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Sample records for melospiza melodia hypothalamus

  1. Seasonal differences of gene expression profiles in song sparrow (Melospiza melodia hypothalamus in relation to territorial aggression.

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    Motoko Mukai

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia are territorial year-round; however, neuroendocrine responses to simulated territorial intrusion (STI differ between breeding (spring and non-breeding seasons (autumn. In spring, exposure to STI leads to increases in luteinizing hormone and testosterone, but not in autumn. These observations suggest that there are fundamental differences in the mechanisms driving neuroendocrine responses to STI between seasons. Microarrays, spotted with EST cDNA clones of zebra finch, were used to explore gene expression profiles in the hypothalamus after territorial aggression in two different seasons.Free-living territorial male song sparrows were exposed to either conspecific or heterospecific (control males in an STI in spring and autumn. Behavioral data were recorded, whole hypothalami were collected, and microarray hybridizations were performed. Quantitative PCR was performed for validation. Our results show 262 cDNAs were differentially expressed between spring and autumn in the control birds. There were 173 cDNAs significantly affected by STI in autumn; however, only 67 were significantly affected by STI in spring. There were 88 cDNAs that showed significant interactions in both season and STI.Results suggest that STI drives differential genomic responses in the hypothalamus in the spring vs. autumn. The number of cDNAs differentially expressed in relation to season was greater than in relation to social interactions, suggesting major underlying seasonal effects in the hypothalamus which may determine the differential response upon social interaction. Functional pathway analyses implicated genes that regulate thyroid hormone action and neuroplasticity as targets of this neuroendocrine regulation.

  2. Distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), upper Santa Cruz River watershed, southern Arizona, 2011-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems in arid environments provide critical habitat for breeding, migratory, and wintering birds, yet are often at risk of contamination by heavy metals. Birds and other animals living in contaminated areas are susceptible to adverse health effects as a result of long-term exposure and bioaccumulation of heavy metals. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia) in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade, and (3) assess sparrow condition among sites with differing potential sources of contamination exposure. We examined six study sites that reflected different potential sources of contamination. Hematocrit values, body mass residuals, and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium exceeded background concentrations at some sites, but generally were lower than or similar to concentrations found in earlier studies performed prior to the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade. Concentrations were higher in recaptured birds in 2012 than in 2011 for 7 metals in feathers and 14 metals in blood, suggesting possible bioaccumulation. We found no cascading effects as a result of heavy metal exposure, but did find that heavy metal concentrations were reduced following the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade.

  3. Hypothalamus

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    The hypothalamus is an area of the brain that produces hormones that control: Body temperature Hunger Mood Release of ... or inflammation SYMPTOMS OF HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASE Because the hypothalamus controls so many different functions, hypothalamic disease can ...

  4. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii.

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    Kendra B Sewall

    Full Text Available Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM, because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA, because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  5. Popular and Classical Female Singers: Acoustic Comparison of Voice Use in the Song Melodia Sentimental (Sentimental Melody) by Heitor Villa-Lobos.

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    Sanchez Escamez, Natalia Eugenia; Guimarães Silva, Ana Paula; Assumpção de Andrada E Silva, Marta

    2017-12-29

    This study aims to compare acoustic characteristics of classical and popular female singers' vocal performances in Heitor Villa-Lobos' Melodia Sentimental (Sentimental Melody). Long-term average spectrum acoustic analysis and long-term voice onset time (VOT) were performed for two consonants /d/ in the first six verses of Melodia Sentimental sang by 10 professional singers: five classical (GC) and five popular (GP). Classical singers presented prominence in the region of the frequencies between 2.5 and 3.5 kHz, not observed in the majority of the popular singers' group. The GC group showed lighter spectral decline curves and the numerical value of decline was also lower. Classical singers presented lower long-term voice onset time values, which indicates a longer period of glottic closure. Acoustic analysis revealed that classical singers have more energy in glottic closure associated with a shorter duration of glottic coaptation. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of the Neuroendocrine Hypothalamus.

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    Burbridge, Sarah; Stewart, Iain; Placzek, Marysia

    2016-03-15

    The neuroendocrine hypothalamus is composed of the tuberal and anterodorsal hypothalamus, together with the median eminence/neurohypophysis. It centrally governs wide-ranging physiological processes, including homeostasis of energy balance, circadian rhythms and stress responses, as well as growth and reproductive behaviours. Homeostasis is maintained by integrating sensory inputs and effecting responses via autonomic, endocrine and behavioural outputs, over diverse time-scales and throughout the lifecourse of an individual. Here, we summarize studies that begin to reveal how different territories and cell types within the neuroendocrine hypothalamus are assembled in an integrated manner to enable function, thus supporting the organism's ability to survive and thrive. We discuss how signaling pathways and transcription factors dictate the appearance and regionalization of the hypothalamic primordium, the maintenance of progenitor cells, and their specification and differentiation into neurons. We comment on recent studies that harness such programmes for the directed differentiation of human ES/iPS cells. We summarize how developmental plasticity is maintained even into adulthood and how integration between the hypothalamus and peripheral body is established in the median eminence and neurohypophysis. Analysis of model organisms, including mouse, chick and zebrafish, provides a picture of how complex, yet elegantly coordinated, developmental programmes build glial and neuronal cells around the third ventricle of the brain. Such conserved processes enable the hypothalamus to mediate its function as a central integrating and response-control mediator for the homeostatic processes that are critical to life. Early indications suggest that deregulation of these events may underlie multifaceted pathological conditions and dysfunctional physiology in humans, such as obesity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. [The hypothalamus in Huntington's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellosta-Diago, E; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Lopez Del Val, L J

    2017-11-01

    Disorders affecting sleep and the circadian rhythm, autonomic clinical signs and symptoms, and neuroendocrine alterations are frequent characteristics in Huntington's disease, some of which present in early stages of the disease. It is reasonable to think that some of these features could result from a hypothalamic dysfunction affecting the centre regulating sleep, metabolism and the autonomic nervous system. The study presents the evidence available to date that suggests the involvement of a hypothalamic disorder in Huntington's disease. Histopathological, hormonal and neuroimaging research relates this area of the brain to Huntington's disease. The experimental findings and those obtained with animal models or in studies conducted with patients are summarised. Likewise, the clinical repercussions (sleep and circadian rhythm disorders, psychiatric and cognitive pathologies, and the clinical signs and symptoms linked to autonomic dysfunction) secondary to possible involvement of the hypothalamus in this disease are also described. The hypothalamus acts as a centre that integrates the neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, and plays a significant role in cognitive and behavioural signs and symptoms. Disorders of this type have been highlighted in Huntington's disease. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role and scope of this region of the brain in this disease.

  8. South Fork of the Santa Clara River, Santa Clarita Valley, California. Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Regalus calendulal, Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata), Lesser Goldfinch ( Carduelis psaltria), Common Snipe (Gallinago Rallinago), and Bushtit...Junco hyemalis Lincoln’s Sparrow Melospiza lincolnii Song Sparrow Melospiza melodia Western Meadowlark Sturnella neglecta Lesser Goldfinch Carduelis ...Dendroica coronata), Lesser Goldfinch ( Carduelis psaltria), Common Snipe (Gallinago al-i-a.o), and Bushtit (Paltriparus minimus). Mammals detected in

  9. Adrenergic innervation of the rat hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palkovits, M.; Mezey, E.; Záborszky, L.; Feminger, A.; Versteeg, D.H.G.; Wijnen, H.J.L.M.; Jong, Wybren de; Fekete, M.I.K.; Herman, J.P.; Kanyicska, B.

    The adrenergic innervation of the hypothalamus was studied by measuring hypothalamic adrenaline levels following surgical transection of the lower brain stem or electrolytic lesion of the medullary adrenaline-containing cell groups. The adrenaline levels in some hypothalamic nuclei and in the median

  10. Sexual differentiation of the human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, Dick F.; Chung, Wilson C. J.; Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Hofman, Michael A.; Ishunina, Tatjana A.

    2002-01-01

    Functional sex differences in reproduction, gender and sexual orientation and in the incidence of neurological and psychiatric diseases are presumed to be based on structural and functional differences in the hypothalamus and other limbic structures. Factors influencing gender, i.e., the feeling to

  11. MicroRNAs in the Hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meister, Björn; Herzer, Silke; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (∼22 nucleotides) non-coding ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules that negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Posttranscriptional silencing of target genes by miRNA is initiated by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, resulting...... of the hypothalamus and miRNAs have recently been shown to be important regulators of hypothalamic control functions. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the current knowledge regarding the expression and role of miRNAs in the hypothalamus.......RNA molecules are abundantly expressed in tissue-specific and regional patterns and have been suggested as potential biomarkers, disease modulators and drug targets. The central nervous system is a prominent site of miRNA expression. Within the brain, several miRNAs are expressed and/or enriched in the region...

  12. Proteomic profiling of the rat hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedroso Amanda P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus plays a pivotal role in numerous mechanisms highly relevant to the maintenance of body homeostasis, such as the control of food intake and energy expenditure. Impairment of these mechanisms has been associated with the metabolic disturbances involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Since rodent species constitute important models for metabolism studies and the rat hypothalamus is poorly characterized by proteomic strategies, we performed experiments aimed at constructing a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE profile of rat hypothalamus proteins. Results As a first step, we established the best conditions for tissue collection and protein extraction, quantification and separation. The extraction buffer composition selected for proteome characterization of rat hypothalamus was urea 7 M, thiourea 2 M, CHAPS 4%, Triton X-100 0.5%, followed by a precipitation step with chloroform/methanol. Two-dimensional (2-D gels of hypothalamic extracts from four-month-old rats were analyzed; the protein spots were digested and identified by using tandem mass spectrometry and database query using the protein search engine MASCOT. Eighty-six hypothalamic proteins were identified, the majority of which were classified as participating in metabolic processes, consistent with the finding of a large number of proteins with catalytic activity. Genes encoding proteins identified in this study have been related to obesity development. Conclusion The present results indicate that the 2-DE technique will be useful for nutritional studies focusing on hypothalamic proteins. The data presented herein will serve as a reference database for studies testing the effects of dietary manipulations on hypothalamic proteome. We trust that these experiments will lead to important knowledge on protein targets of nutritional variables potentially able to affect the complex central nervous system control of energy homeostasis.

  13. The anterior hypothalamus in cluster headache.

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    Arkink, Enrico B; Schmitz, Nicole; Schoonman, Guus G; van Vliet, Jorine A; Haan, Joost; van Buchem, Mark A; Ferrari, Michel D; Kruit, Mark C

    2017-10-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence, localization, and specificity of structural hypothalamic and whole brain changes in cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH). Methods We compared T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of subjects with cluster headache (episodic n = 24; chronic n = 23; probable n = 14), CPH ( n = 9), migraine (with aura n = 14; without aura n = 19), and no headache ( n = 48). We applied whole brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using two complementary methods to analyze structural changes in the hypothalamus: region-of-interest analyses in whole brain VBM, and manual segmentation of the hypothalamus to calculate volumes. We used both conservative VBM thresholds, correcting for multiple comparisons, and less conservative thresholds for exploratory purposes. Results Using region-of-interest VBM analyses mirrored to the headache side, we found enlargement ( p cluster headache compared to controls, and in all participants with episodic or chronic cluster headache taken together compared to migraineurs. After manual segmentation, hypothalamic volume (mean±SD) was larger ( p cluster headache compared to controls (1.72 ± 0.15 ml) and migraineurs (1.68 ± 0.19 ml). Similar but non-significant trends were observed for participants with probable cluster headache (1.82 ± 0.19 ml; p = 0.07) and CPH (1.79 ± 0.20 ml; p = 0.15). Increased hypothalamic volume was primarily explained by bilateral enlargement of the anterior hypothalamus. Exploratory whole brain VBM analyses showed widespread changes in pain-modulating areas in all subjects with headache. Interpretation The anterior hypothalamus is enlarged in episodic and chronic cluster headache and possibly also in probable cluster headache or CPH, but not in migraine.

  14. Range of control of cardiovascular variables by the hypothalamus

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    Smith, O. A.; Stephenson, R. B.; Randall, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    New methodologies were utilized to study the influence of the hypothalamus on the cardiovascular system. The regulation of myocardial activity was investigated in monkeys with hypothalamic lesions that eliminate cardiovascular responses. Observations showed that a specific part of the hypothalamus regulates changes in myocardial contractility that accompanies emotion. Studies of the hypothalamus control of renal blood flow showed the powerful potential control of this organ over renal circulation.

  15. Changes in hypothalamus in continuously irradiated sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendarcik, J.; Stanikova, A.; Rajtova, V.; Molnarova, M.

    1983-01-01

    Neurosecretion, PAS-positive mucopolysaccharides and the Nissl substance were studied in the neurons of the rostral, medial and caudal hypothalamus of continuously irradiated ewes. The study was performed on 21 ewes of the Slovak Merino breed of a live weight of 34 kg. The animals were in the period of physiological anoestrus and their age was two to three years. The first group of six ewes was the control. The second group included 15 sheep irradiated with a total dose of 6.7 Gy (700 R) for seven days. Co 60 was used as the source of irradiation. The animals of this group were killed seven days following treatment. The ewes in the third group were left for the study of mortality. The brains were perfused with 2% buffered paraformaldehyde immediately after the bleeding of the sheep; then the brains were removed from the skulls and fixed in buffered picroformol. Paraffin slices were stained with haematoxylin-eosine, aldehyde-fuchsine and alcian blue for neurosecretion, by the PAS reaction for mucopolysaccharides and with cresyl violet for the Nissl substance. It was found that irradiation of the whole body inhibited the activity of neurosecretory cells in the rostral and medial hypothalamus, thus reducing neurosecretion. These regions also showed a reduced activity of the PAS reaction used for the demonstration of mucopolysaccharides. The observed changes also included damage of the endothelium of blood vessels with the occurrence of erythrocyte extravasates and with haemorrhages. In this way, the trophism of neurosecretory cells was affected, which is ascribed to the decrease in the amount of neurosecretory material. In the caudal hypothalamus, neurosecretion and PAS-positivity were slightly stimulated by irradiation. The Nissl substance disappeared as a result of irradiation. (author)

  16. Imaging of serotonin transporters with [123I]FP-CIT SPECT in the human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.; Alkemade, A.; Van de Giessen, E.M.; Drent, M.L.; Booij, J.; Bisschop, P.H.; Fliers, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Serotonergic neurons in the rodent hypothalamus are implicated in key neuroendocrine and metabolic functions, including circadian rhythmicity. However, the assessment of the serotonergic system in the human hypothalamus in vivo is difficult as delineation of the hypothalamus is

  17. Reduced metabolism in the hypothalamus of the anorecticanx/anxmouse.

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    Bergström, Ulrika; Lindfors, Charlotte; Svedberg, Marie; Johansen, Jeanette E; Häggkvist, Jenny; Schalling, Martin; Wibom, Rolf; Katz, Abram; Nilsson, Ida A K

    2017-04-01

    The anorectic anx/anx mouse exhibits a mitochondrial complex I dysfunction that is related to aberrant expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides and transmitters regulating food intake. Hypothalamic activity, i.e. neuronal firing and transmitter release, is dependent on glucose utilization and energy metabolism. To better understand the role of hypothalamic activity in anorexia, we assessed carbohydrate and high-energy phosphate metabolism, in vivo and in vitro , in the anx/anx hypothalamus. In the fasted state, hypothalamic glucose uptake in the anx/anx mouse was reduced by ~50% of that seen in wild-type (wt) mice ( P  hypothalamus ATP and glucose 6-P contents were similar to those in wt hypothalamus, whereas phosphocreatine was elevated (~2-fold; P  hypothalamus had elevated total AMPK (~25%; P  hypothalamus. Interestingly, the activation state of AMPK (ratio of phosphorylated AMPK/total AMPK) was significantly decreased in hypothalamus of the anx/anx mouse (~60% of that in wt; P  hypothalamus. These data demonstrate that carbohydrate and high-energy phosphate utilization in the anx/anx hypothalamus are diminished under basal and stress conditions. The decrease in hypothalamic metabolism may contribute to the anorectic behavior of the anx/anx mouse, i.e. its inability to regulate food intake in accordance with energy status. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Lateral–Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex–Hypothalamus Connectivity

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    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC–hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  19. Sweet taste receptor in the hypothalamus: a potential new player in glucose sensing in the hypothalamus.

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    Kohno, Daisuke

    2017-07-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. The feeding center senses the systemic energy status by detecting hormone and nutrient levels for homeostatic regulation, resulting in the control of food intake, heat production, and glucose production and uptake. The concentration of glucose is sensed by two types of glucose-sensing neurons in the feeding center: glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. Previous studies have mainly focused on glucose metabolism as the mechanism underlying glucose sensing. Recent studies have indicated that receptor-mediated pathways also play a role in glucose sensing. This review describes sweet taste receptors in the hypothalamus and explores the role of sweet taste receptors in energy homeostasis.

  20. Differential developmental strategies by Sonic hedgehog in thalamus and hypothalamus.

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    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The traditional concept of diencephalon (thalamus plus hypothalamus) and with it the entire traditional subdivision of the developing neural tube are being challenged by novel insights obtained by mapping the expression of key developmental genes. A model in which the hypothalamus is placed in the most rostral portion of the neural tube, followed caudally by a diencephalon formed by prethalamus, thalamus and pretectum has been proposed. The adult thalamus and hypothalamus are quite unlike each other in connectivity and functions. Here we review work on the role of the secreted morphogen protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the developing diencephalon and hypothalamic region to show how different these two regions are also from this point of view. Shh from the prechordal plate (PCP) induces and patterns the hypothalamus but there is no evidence that this role is fulfilled by a morphogen gradient. Later, the hypothalamic primordium itself expresses Shh and a large part of the hypothalamus belongs to the Shh lineage, including the ventral domains. Neural Shh is necessary to complete the specification (lateral hypothalamus), differentiation and growth of the hypothalamus. Although Gli2A is the major effector of Shh in this region, hypothalamic specification also depends on the suppression of Gli3R by Shh secreted by the PCP as well as the neuroepithelium. The thalamus is patterned by an Shh morphogen gradient originated in the ZLI following similar mechanisms to those in the spinal cord. The thalamus itself does not belong to the Shh lineage. Gli2A is necessary for appropriate growth and specification of the thalamic nuclei, to the exception of the medial and intralaminar groups (limbic-related), whose development depends on Gli3R. Beyond specification and patterning, the scarce data available about cell sorting and aggregation in these two regions shows key differences between them as well. In summary, not only expression patterns but also developmental mechanisms support

  1. Development of the hypothalamus: conservation, modification and innovation.

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    Xie, Yuanyuan; Dorsky, Richard I

    2017-05-01

    The hypothalamus, which regulates fundamental aspects of physiological homeostasis and behavior, is a brain region that exhibits highly conserved anatomy across vertebrate species. Its development involves conserved basic mechanisms of induction and patterning, combined with a more plastic process of neuronal fate specification, to produce brain circuits that mediate physiology and behavior according to the needs of each species. Here, we review the factors involved in the induction, patterning and neuronal differentiation of the hypothalamus, highlighting recent evidence that illustrates how changes in Wnt/β-catenin signaling during development may lead to species-specific form and function of this important brain structure. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. DNA Methylation Patterns in the Hypothalamus of Female Pubertal Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Ye, Jing; Li, Xiumei; Gao, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Kaifa; Luo, Lei; Ding, Jianping; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Hongguo; Ling, Yinghui; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Ya; Fang, Fugui

    2016-01-01

    Female pubertal development is tightly controlled by complex mechanisms, including neuroendocrine and epigenetic regulatory pathways. Specific gene expression patterns can be influenced by DNA methylation changes in the hypothalamus, which can in turn regulate timing of puberty onset. In order to understand the relationship between DNA methylation changes and gene expression patterns in the hypothalamus of pubertal goats, whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and RNA-sequencing analyses were carried out. There was a decline in DNA methylation levels in the hypothalamus during puberty and 268 differentially methylated regions (DMR) in the genome, with differential patterns in different gene regions. There were 1049 genes identified with distinct expression patterns. High levels of DNA methylation were detected in promoters, introns and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Levels of methylation decreased gradually from promoters to 5'-UTRs and increased from 5'-UTRs to introns. Methylation density analysis demonstrated that methylation level variation was consistent with the density in the promoter, exon, intron, 5'-UTRs and 3'-UTRs. Analyses of CpG island (CGI) sites showed that the enriched gene contents were gene bodies, intergenic regions and introns, and these CGI sites were hypermethylated. Our study demonstrated that DNA methylation changes may influence gene expression profiles in the hypothalamus of goats during the onset of puberty, which may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in pubertal onset.

  3. Activity changes of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus during stressor exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, David M; Poe, Gina R

    2004-01-01

    Dorso-medial paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) activity was assessed by light scattering procedures in freely behaving cats during auditory stressor exposure. Acoustic noise (> 95dB) raised plasma ACTH concentrations, somatic muscle tonus, respiratory frequency and cardiac rates; PVH activity...

  4. Building a Habitat Conversion Model for San Francisco Bay Wetlands: A Multi-species Approach for Integrating GIS and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana Stralberg; Nils Warnock; Nadav Nur; Hildie Spautz; Gary W. Page

    2005-01-01

    More than 80 percent of San Francisco Bay's original tidal wetlands have been altered or displaced, reducing available habitat for a range of tidal marsh-dependent species, including the Federally listed California Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) and three endemic Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) subspecies. In...

  5. Biological Survey, Buffalo River and Outer Harbor of Buffalo, New York. Volume II. Data Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    phoeniceus Red-winged blackbird 26 Passer domsticus House sparrow I Sturnus vulgaris Starling 7 Larus delawarensis Ring-billed gull 90 Carduelis tristis...teal 10 Agelaius phoeniceus Red-winged blackbird 15 Melospiza melodia Song sparrow 4 Larus arqentatus Herring gull 6 Carduelis tristis American

  6. Napa River Salt Marsh Restoration Project. Volume 1: Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Chapter 6. Biological Resources-Wildlife The HSMEW also provides sightings of American and lesser goldfinches ( Carduelis tristis, C. psaltria); barn...Lawrence’s goldfinch, Carduelis lawrencei (SC) San Pablo song sparrow, Melospiza melodia samuelis (SC) Snowy Egret, Egretta thula (MB) Suisun song sparrow

  7. Social Control of Hypothalamus-Mediated Male Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taehong; Yang, Cindy F; Chizari, M Delara; Maheswaranathan, Niru; Burke, Kenneth J; Borius, Maxim; Inoue, Sayaka; Chiang, Michael C; Bender, Kevin J; Ganguli, Surya; Shah, Nirao M

    2017-08-16

    How environmental and physiological signals interact to influence neural circuits underlying developmentally programmed social interactions such as male territorial aggression is poorly understood. We have tested the influence of sensory cues, social context, and sex hormones on progesterone receptor (PR)-expressing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) that are critical for male territorial aggression. We find that these neurons can drive aggressive displays in solitary males independent of pheromonal input, gonadal hormones, opponents, or social context. By contrast, these neurons cannot elicit aggression in socially housed males that intrude in another male's territory unless their pheromone-sensing is disabled. This modulation of aggression cannot be accounted for by linear integration of environmental and physiological signals. Together, our studies suggest that fundamentally non-linear computations enable social context to exert a dominant influence on developmentally hard-wired hypothalamus-mediated male territorial aggression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Constitutive expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in mouse hypothalamus.

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    Severi, Ilenia; Carradori, Maria Rita; Lorenzi, Teresa; Amici, Adolfo; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent survival molecule for a large number of neuronal and glial cells in culture; its expression in glial cells is strongly upregulated after a variety of nerve tissue injuries. Exogenously administered CNTF produces an anorectic effect via activation of hypothalamic neurons and stimulates neurogenesis in mouse hypothalamus. To determine whether CNTF is produced endogenously in the hypothalamus, we sought cellular sources and examined their distribution in adult mouse hypothalamus by immunohistochemistry. CNTF immunoreactivity (IR) was predominantly detected in the ependymal layer throughout the rostrocaudal extension of the third ventricle, where numerous ependymocytes and tanycytes exhibited specific staining. Some astrocytes in the grey matter of the anterior hypothalamus and in the median eminence of the hypothalamic tuberal region were also positive. Stimulation of cells bearing CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) induces specific activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling system. Treatment with recombinant CNTF and detection of the nuclear expression of phospho-STAT3 (P-STAT3) showed that CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes were intermingled with, or very close to, P-STAT3-positive, CNTFRα-bearing cells. A fraction of CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes and some median eminence astrocytes also exhibited P-STAT3 IR. Thus, in normal adult mice the ependyma of the third ventricle is both a source of and a target for CNTF, which may play hitherto unknown roles in hypothalamic function in physiological conditions. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  9. Activity changes of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus during stressor exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, David M; Poe, Gina R

    2004-01-01

    Dorso-medial paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) activity was assessed by light scattering procedures in freely behaving cats during auditory stressor exposure. Acoustic noise (> 95dB) raised plasma ACTH concentrations, somatic muscle tonus, respiratory frequency and cardiac rates; PVH activity...... and nadir. Isolated pixels appeared opposite in activity pattern to overall changes. We suggest that transient activity increases represent initial PVH neural stress responses, and that subsequent profound declines result from neural inhibitory feedback....

  10. Tanycytes and a differential fatty acid metabolism in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Kristina; Lamberz, Christian; Piotrowitz, Kira; Offermann, Nina; But, Diana; Scheller, Anja; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Kuerschner, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Although the brain controls all main metabolic pathways in the whole organism, its lipid metabolism is partially separated from the rest of the body. Circulating lipids and other metabolites are taken up into brain areas like the hypothalamus and are locally metabolized and sensed involving several hypothalamic cell types. In this study we show that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids are differentially processed in the murine hypothalamus. The observed differences involve both lipid distribution and metabolism. Key findings were: (i) hypothalamic astrocytes are targeted by unsaturated, but not saturated lipids in lean mice; (ii) in obese mice labeling of these astrocytes by unsaturated oleic acid cannot be detected unless β-oxidation or ketogenesis is inhibited; (iii) the hypothalamus of obese animals increases ketone body and neutral lipid synthesis while tanycytes, hypothalamic cells facing the ventricle, increase their lipid droplet content; and (iv) tanycytes show different labeling for saturated or unsaturated lipids. Our data support a metabolic connection between tanycytes and astrocytes likely to impact hypothalamic lipid sensing. GLIA 2017;65:231-249. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Short-term fasting promotes insulin expression in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakic, Tamara B; Jevdjovic, Tanja V; Peric, Mina I; Bjelobaba, Ivana M; Markelic, Milica B; Milutinovic, Bojana S; Lakic, Iva V; Jasnic, Nebojsa I; Djordjevic, Jelena D; Vujovic, Predrag Z

    2017-07-01

    In the hypothalamus, insulin takes on many roles involved in energy homoeostasis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine hypothalamic insulin expression during the initial phase of the metabolic response to fasting. Hypothalamic insulin content was assessed by both radioimmunoassay and Western blot. The relative expression of insulin mRNA was examined by qPCR. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the distribution of insulin immunopositivity in the hypothalamus. After 6-h fasting, both glucose and insulin levels were decreased in serum but not in the cerebrospinal fluid. Our study showed for the first time that, while the concentration of circulating glucose and insulin decreased, both insulin mRNA expression and insulin content in the hypothalamic parenchyma were increased after short-term fasting. Increased insulin immunopositivity was detected specifically in the neurons of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus and in the ependymal cells of fasting animals. These novel findings point to the complexity of mechanisms regulating insulin expression in the CNS in general and in the hypothalamus in particular. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Shark Basal Hypothalamus: Molecular Prosomeric Subdivisions and Evolutionary Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Durán, Gabriel N.; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Menuet, Arnaud; Mazan, Sylvie; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva

    2018-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key integrative center of the vertebrate brain. To better understand its ancestral morphological organization and evolution, we previously analyzed the segmental organization of alar subdivisions in the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula, a cartilaginous fish and thus a basal representative of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). With the same aim, we deepen here in the segmental organization of the catshark basal hypothalamus by revisiting previous data on ScOtp, ScDlx2/5, ScNkx2.1, ScShh expression and Shh immunoreactivity jointly with new data on ScLhx5, ScEmx2, ScLmx1b, ScPitx2, ScPitx3a, ScFoxa1, ScFoxa2 and ScNeurog2 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunoreactivity. Our study reveals a complex genoarchitecture for chondrichthyan basal hypothalamus on which a total of 21 microdomains were identified. Six belong to the basal acroterminal region, the rostral-most point of the basal neural tube; seven are described in the tuberal region (Tu/RTu); four in the perimamillar region (PM/PRM) and four in the mamillar one (MM/RM). Interestingly, the same set of genes does not necessarily describe the same microdomains in mice, which in part contributes to explain how forebrain diversity is achieved. This study stresses the importance of analyzing data from basal vertebrates to better understand forebrain diversity and hypothalamic evolution. PMID:29593505

  13. Exploring the brain through posterior hypothalamus surgery for aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Michele; Trezza, Andrea; Messina, Giuseppe; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Franzini, Angelo; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2017-09-01

    Neurological surgery offers an opportunity to study brain functions, through either resection or implanted neuromodulation devices. Pathological aggressive behavior in patients with intellectual disability is a frequent condition that is difficult to treat using either supportive care or pharmacological therapy. The bulk of the laboratory studies performed throughout the 19th century enabled the formulation of hypotheses on brain circuits involved in the generation of emotions. Aggressive behavior was also studied extensively. Lesional radiofrequency surgery of the posterior hypothalamus, which peaked in the 1970s, was shown to be an effective therapy in many reported series. As with other surgical procedures for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, however, this therapy was abandoned for many reasons, including the risk of its misuse. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) offers the possibility of treating neurological and psychoaffective disorders through relatively reversible and adaptable therapy. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus was proposed and performed successfully in 2005 as a treatment for aggressive behavior. Other groups reported positive outcomes using target and parameter settings similar to those of the original study. Both the lesional and DBS approaches enabled researchers to explore the role of the posterior hypothalamus (or posterior hypothalamic area) in the autonomic and emotional systems.

  14. [Participation of the posterior hypothalamus in the activity of the ascending activating system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noselidze, A G; Naneĭshvili, T L; Bakuradze, A N; Machavariani, G I

    1975-08-01

    In chronic experiments on cats with premezencaphalic section of the brain stem electrica stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus caused desynchronization of the electrical activity of the neocortex. After the isolated injury of the posterior hypothalamus a moderate electrical stimulation of the medical part of the midbrain reticular formation failed to cause any pronounced activation of the neocortex. The results obtained indicated an important role of the posterior hypothalamus in the function of the ascending activating system.

  15. Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus.

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    Cecilia Berg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac® is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  16. The hypothalamus at the crossroads of psychopathology and neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Daniel A N; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Monte Santo, Felipe; de Oliveira Faria, Ana Carolina; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2017-09-01

    The neurosurgical endeavor to treat psychiatric patients may have been part of human history since its beginning. The modern era of psychosurgery can be traced to the heroic attempts of Gottlieb Burckhardt and Egas Moniz to alleviate mental symptoms through the ablation of restricted areas of the frontal lobes in patients with disabling psychiatric illnesses. Thanks to the adaptation of the stereotactic frame to human patients, the ablation of large volumes of brain tissue has been practically abandoned in favor of controlled interventions with discrete targets. Consonant with the role of the hypothalamus in the mediation of the most fundamental approach-avoidance behaviors, some hypothalamic nuclei and regions, in particular, have been selected as targets for the treatment of aggressiveness (posterior hypothalamus), pathological obesity (lateral or ventromedial nuclei), sexual deviations (ventromedial nucleus), and drug dependence (ventromedial nucleus). Some recent improvements in outcomes may have been due to the use of stereotactically guided deep brain stimulation and the change of therapeutic focus from categorical diagnoses (such as schizophrenia) to dimensional symptoms (such as aggressiveness), which are nonspecific in terms of formal diagnosis. However, agreement has never been reached on 2 related issues: 1) the choice of target, based on individual diagnoses; and 2) reliable prediction of outcomes related to individual targets. Despite the lingering controversies on such critical aspects, the experience of the past decades should pave the way for advances in the field. The current failure of pharmacological treatments in a considerable proportion of patients with chronic disabling mental disorders is reminiscent of the state of affairs that prevailed in the years before the early psychosurgical attempts. This article reviews the functional organization of the hypothalamus, the effects of ablation and stimulation of discrete hypothalamic regions, and the

  17. Transcriptional profile of the male and female rate hypothalamus during sexual differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual differentiation, specifically masculinization, of the hypothalamus is proposed to involve a seriesofeventsthat includethearomatization oftestosteronetoestradiol inthebrainattheend ofgestationandtheday ofbirth. Thishormonethenactivatesthetranscription ofestrogen¬responsive ...

  18. Hypovolemic hemorrhage induces Fos expression in the rat hypothalamus: Evidence for involvement of the lateral hypothalamus in the decompensatory phase of hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktalay, G; Millington, W R

    2016-05-13

    This study tested the hypothesis that the hypothalamus participates in the decompensatory phase of hemorrhage by measuring Fos immunoreactivity and by inhibiting neuronal activity in selected hypothalamic nuclei with lidocaine or cobalt chloride. Previously, we reported that inactivation of the arcuate nucleus inhibited, but did not fully prevent, the fall in arterial pressure evoked by hypotensive hemorrhage. Here, we report that hemorrhage (2.2 ml/100g body weight over 20 min) induced Fos expression in a high percentage of cells in the paraventricular, supraoptic and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus as shown previously. Lower densities of Fos immunoreactive cells were also found in the medial preoptic area (mPOA), anterior hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), dorsomedial hypothalamus, ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and posterior hypothalamus. Bilateral injection of lidocaine (2%; 0.1 μl or 0.3 μl) or cobalt chloride (5mM; 0.3 μl) into the tuberal portion of the LH immediately before hemorrhage was initiated reduced the magnitude of hemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia significantly. Lidocaine injection into the VMH also attenuated the fall in arterial pressure and heart rate evoked by hemorrhage although inactivation of the mPOA or rostral LH was ineffective. These findings indicate that hemorrhage activates neurons throughout much of the hypothalamus and that a relatively broad area of the hypothalamus, extending from the arcuate nucleus laterally through the caudal VMH and tuberal LH, plays an important role in the decompensatory phase of hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Distinct types of feeding related neurons in mouse hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eTang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades of research provided evidence for a substantial heterogeneity among feeding-related neurons (FRNs in the hypothalamus. However, it remains unclear how FRNs differ in their firing patterns during food intake. Here, we investigated the relationship between the activity of neurons in mouse hypothalamus and their feeding behavior. Using tetrode-based in vivo recording technique, we identified various firing patterns of hypothalamic FRNs, which, after the initiation of food intake, can be sorted into four types: sharp increase (type I, slow increase (type II, sharp decrease (type III and sustained decrease (type IV of firing rates. The feeding-related firing response of FRNs was rigidly related to the duration of food intake and, to a less extent, associated with the type of food. The majority of these FRNs responded to glucose and leptin and exhibited electrophysiological characteristics of putative GABAergic neurons. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the diversity of neurons in the complex hypothalamic network coordinating food intake.

  20. Distribution of histaminergic neuronal cluster in the rat and mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Chinatsu; Chiba, Seiichi; Wei, Huixing; Aosa, Taishi; Kitamura, Hirokazu; Ina, Keisuke; Shibata, Hirotaka; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) catalyzes the biosynthesis of histamine from L-histidine and is expressed throughout the mammalian nervous system by histaminergic neurons. Histaminergic neurons arise in the posterior mesencephalon during the early embryonic period and gradually develop into two histaminergic substreams around the lateral area of the posterior hypothalamus and the more anterior peri-cerebral aqueduct area before finally forming an adult-like pattern comprising five neuronal clusters, E1, E2, E3, E4, and E5, at the postnatal stage. This distribution of histaminergic neuronal clusters in the rat hypothalamus appears to be a consequence of neuronal development and reflects the functional differentiation within each neuronal cluster. However, the close linkage between the locations of histaminergic neuronal clusters and their physiological functions has yet to be fully elucidated because of the sparse information regarding the location and orientation of each histaminergic neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and mice. To clarify the distribution of the five-histaminergic neuronal clusters more clearly, we performed an immunohistochemical study using the anti-HDC antibody on serial sections of the rat hypothalamus according to the brain maps of rat and mouse. Our results confirmed that the HDC-immunoreactive (HDCi) neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and mice are observed in the ventrolateral part of the most posterior hypothalamus (E1), ventrolateral part of the posterior hypothalamus (E2), ventromedial part from the medial to the posterior hypothalamus (E3), periventricular part from the anterior to the medial hypothalamus (E4), and diffusely extended part of the more dorsal and almost entire hypothalamus (E5). The stereological estimation of the total number of HDCi neurons of each clusters revealed the larger amount of the rat than the mouse. The characterization of histaminergic neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and

  1. Synaptic proteome changes in the hypothalamus of mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvari, Edina Brigitta; Völgyi, Katalin; Gulyássy, Péter; Dimén, Diána; Kis, Viktor; Barna, János; Szabó, Éva Rebeka; Lubec, Gert; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-04-21

    To establish synaptic proteome changes associated with motherhood, we isolated synaptosome fractions from the hypothalamus of mother rats and non-maternal control females at the 11th postpartum day. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric protein identification established 26 significant proteins, 7 increasing and 19 decreasing protein levels in the dams. The altered proteins are mainly involved in energy homeostasis, protein folding, and metabolic processes suggesting the involvement of these cellular processes in maternal adaptations. The decrease in a significantly altered protein, complement component 1q subcomponent-binding protein (C1qbp) was validated with Western blotting. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed its presence in hypothalamic fibers and terminals in agreement with its presence in synaptosomes. We also found the expression of C1qbp in different hypothalamic nuclei including the preoptic area and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus at the protein and at the mRNA level using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry, respectively. Bioinformatical network analysis revealed that cytokines, growth factors, and protein kinases are common regulators, which indicates a complex regulation of the proteome change in mothers. The results suggest that maternal responsiveness is associated with synaptic proteins level changes in the hypothalamus, and that growth factors and cytokines may govern these alterations. The period of motherhood is accompanied with several behavioral, neuroendocrine, emotional and metabolic adaptations in the brain. Although it is established that various hypothalamic networks participate in the maternal adaptations of the rodent brain, our knowledge on the molecular background of these alterations remains seriously limited. In the present study, we first determined that the functional alterations of the maternal brain can be detected at the

  2. The accessory magnocellular neurosecretory system of the rostral human hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Busch, Johannes R.; Jacobsen, Christina

    2018-01-01

    and supraoptic nuclei as well as the hypothalamo-hypophysial tracts exhibited strong immunoreactivity for the neurophysin antibodies. In addition, large collections of immunoreactive accessory magnocellular nuclei and single scattered neurophysin-positive neurons were located in the preoptic region between...... the paraventricular and supraoptic nucleus among the hypothalamo-hypophysial nerve fibers. In addition, smaller collections of neurophysin-immunoreactive neurons were located in the basal part of this region. Among the accessory magnocellular nuclei, the classical circular nucleus was identified. Accessory......The morphology and neurophysin expression of the magnocellular accessory neuroendocrine system located in the rostral human hypothalamus is investigated in a series of brains obtained at autopsy. The hypothalami were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin, or after cryoprotection, frozen...

  3. Esr1+cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus control female aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Koichi; Hashikawa, Yoshiko; Tremblay, Robin; Zhang, Jiaxing; Feng, James E; Sabol, Alexander; Piper, Walter T; Lee, Hyosang; Rudy, Bernardo; Lin, Dayu

    2017-11-01

    As an essential means of resolving conflicts, aggression is expressed by both sexes but often at a higher level in males than in females. Recent studies suggest that cells in the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl) that express estrogen receptor-α (Esr1) and progesterone receptor are essential for male but not female mouse aggression. In contrast, here we show that VMHvl Esr1+ cells are indispensable for female aggression. This population was active when females attacked naturally. Inactivation of these cells reduced female aggression whereas their activation elicited attack. Additionally, we found that female VMHvl contains two anatomically distinguishable subdivisions that showed differential gene expression, projection and activation patterns after mating and fighting. These results support an essential role of the VMHvl in both male and female aggression and reveal the existence of two previously unappreciated subdivisions in the female VMHvl that are involved in distinct social behaviors.

  4. Kumbhakarna : Did he suffer from the disorder of the hypothalamus?

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    Om J Lakhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kumbhakarna was brother of the evil Raavana in the mythological tale of Ramayana. According the legend, Kumbhakarna had an insatiable appetite and thirst and used to sleep for great lengths of time. He also had an uncontrollable temper, which was feared by many. It is our assessment that Kumbhakarna possibly suffered from hypothalamic obesity. Hypothalamic obesity can be defined as significant polyphagia and weight gain that occurs because of structural or function involvement of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus bilaterally. The characteristic features are obesity associated with polyphagia. Somnolence is present in 40% of cases. Sham rage is a characteristic behavioral abnormality seen in these patients. All these symptoms are described in the mythological text while describing Kumbhakarna. The episodic nature of Kumbhakarna′s symptoms can also be explained by another hypothalamic syndrome called Klein-Levine syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by with periodic episodes of somnolence, hyperphagia and hypersexuality along with other behavioral and cognitive difficulties.

  5. Immunohistochemical and cytochemical localization of the somatostatin receptor subtype sst1 in the somatostatinergic parvocellular neuronal system of the rat hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helboe, Lone; Stidsen, Cartsen E.; Møller, Morten

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor, sst1, immunohistochemistry, ultrastructure, autoreceptor, hypothalamus, median eminence, synapse......Somatostatin receptor, sst1, immunohistochemistry, ultrastructure, autoreceptor, hypothalamus, median eminence, synapse...

  6. Fine morphological evaluation of hypothalamus in patients with hyperphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-05-01

    Various metabolic diseases induced by eating disorders are some of the most serious and difficult problems for modern public healthcare. However, little is known about hyperphagia, partly because of the lack of a clear definition. Several basic studies have analyzed eating habits using endocrinological or neurophysiological approaches, which have suggested a controlled balance between the hunger and satiety centers in the central nervous system. However, more detailed neuro-radiologic evaluations have not been achieved for the hypothalamus, and evaluations were limited only to the floor of the third ventricles. Fine structures of hypothalamic morphology were investigated using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in seven patients with hypothalamo-pituitary tumors, who suffered from preoperative hyperphagia-induced severe obesity and metabolic disorders. Body mass index (BMI) varied from 22.4 to 40.5 kg/m 2 (mean 32.8 kg/m 2 ). Clinical data were compared with the data of nine patients without hyperphagia and seven healthy volunteers. Morphological evaluation was possible in all patients and control subjects, and patients with hyperphagia had significantly shortened maximum distances between the ependymal layers of the lateral wall of the third ventricle and fornixes (hyperphagia group right side 0.30 mm, left side 0.23 mm vs. patients without hyperphagia group right side 1.60, left side 1.53 vs. healthy group right side 1.73 mm, left side 1.85 mm) (p hypothalamus in patients with hypothalamo-pituitary tumors. We report the first case of dynamic improvement from hyperphagia, with both symptomatic and neuro-radiological findings.

  7. Anorexic action of deoxynivalenol in hypothalamus and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Misa; Momonaka, Yuka; Yokose, Chihiro; Tadaishi, Miki; Shimizu, Makoto; Yamane, Takumi; Oishi, Yuichi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    Although deoxynivalenol (DON) suppresses food intake and subsequent weight gain, its contribution to anorexia mechanisms has not been fully clarified. Thus, we investigated the anorexic actions of DON in the hypothalamus and intestine, both organs related to appetite. When female B6C3F1 mice were orally exposed to different doses of DON, a drastic anorexic action was observed at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) from 0 to 3 h after administration. Exposure to DON (12.5 mg/kg bw) for 3 h significantly increased the hypothalamic mRNA levels of anorexic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and its downstream targets, including melanocortin 4 receptor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and tyrosine kinase receptor B; at the same time, orexigenic hormones were not affected. In addition, exposure to DON significantly elevated the hypothalamic mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) and activated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream factor of POMC. These results suggest that DON-induced proinflammatory cytokines increased the POMC level via NF-κB activation. Moreover, exposure to DON significantly enhanced the gastrointestinal mRNA levels of anorexic cholecystokinin (CCK) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel (TRPA1), a possible target of DON; these findings suggest that DON induced anorexic action by increasing CCK production via TRPA1. Taken together, these results suggest that DON induces anorexic POMC, perhaps via NF-κB activation, by increasing proinflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and brings about CCK production, possibly through increasing intestinal TRPA1 expression, leading to anorexic actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Letra, melodia, arranjo: componentes em tensão em O morro não tem vez de Antonio Carlos Jobim e Vinícius de Moraes Lyrics, melody, arrangement: elements in tension in Favela by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vinícius de Moraes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Augusto Merhy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O registro fonográfico tornou mais fácil pensar uma produção musical como documento, não apenas como objeto de apreciação estética. A gravação de canções populares permite prontamente decompor, recompor, analisar, destacar partes e pensá-las como objeto pertencente a uma rede social de amplitudes quase infinitas. Ocasionalmente, o modo como se combinam letra, melodia e arranjo faz brotar questões sobre a classificação dos gêneros. O arranjo musical, suporte sonoro da canção, pode colocar em tensão a combinação letra e música e até mesmo deslocar o sentido do conjunto. Algumas das gravações de O morro não tem vez de Tom Jobim e Vinícius de Moraes revelam contrastes e tensões que tornam uma questão permanente o que se classificou como Bossa Nova.Records have made easier to think over a musical issue as a document, not exclusively as an aesthetic object. Through song recordings it is possible to decompose, recompose, analyze, extract components, etc., and most of all consider them as belonging to a vast social net. Putting together lyrics, melody and arrangement poses the question of classifying genres. Musical arrangements, as a kind of song frame, can break apart the former sense of the combination lyrics/melody. Some recordings of O morro não tem vez by Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes disclose contradictions and tensions in what is called Bossa Nova and make it a permanent question.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypothalamus hypophysis axis lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Takeki; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru; Yoshida, Sho; Yamada, Kenichi.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 0.5T superconductive machine was performed to the thirty three cases with a variety of the sellar and parasellar tumors and with dysfunction of the hypothalamus-hypophysis axis. Posterior pituitary bright spot (PBS) on T1 weighted image was evaluated with the pituitary hormonal function. These cases were 12 cases of post-treated tumors including pituitary adenoma (9 patients), suprasellar germinoma (2 patients) and craniopharyngioma (one patient), and non-tumorous conditions including 15 cases of central diabetes insipidus (DI), Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) (one patient), Sheehan's syndrome (3 patients) and anorexia nervosa (2 patients). Pituitary bright spot was not seen in all 19 cases with overt DI. On the other hand, PBS was not seen in 9 cases without overt DI. Three cases of these 9 cases showing Sheehan's syndrome with insufficient antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion was considered as the state of subclinical DI. Posterior bright spot was not seen in all 13 cases of empty sella including partial empty sella. The results suggested that disappearance of PBS represents abnormality or loss of posterior pituitary function and also it was considered to be closely related to the empty sella. (author)

  10. Activity changes of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus during phasic respiratory events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Poe, G R; Rector, D M

    1997-01-01

    We monitored the spatiotemporal organization of cellular activity in the medial paraventricular hypothalamus during spontaneously-occurring periods of increased inspiratory effort followed by prolonged respiratory pauses (sigh/apnea) in the freely-behaving cat. Paraventricular hypothalamic activity...

  11. Decreased number of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in AIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purba, J. S.; Hofman, M. A.; Portegies, P.; Troost, D.; Swaab, D. F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of immunocytochemically identified vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) neurons was determined morphometrically in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of 20 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and 10 controls. The AIDS group consisted of 14 homosexual males (age

  12. Ganglioneuroblastoma of the Hypothalamus: Radiologic and Pathological Findings of a Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Jun; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Ganglion cell tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are uncommon. There have been few reports in the literature about ganglion cell tumors that arise from the spinal cord, pineal gland, cerebral hemisphere or cerebellum. We recently experienced a case of ganglioneuroblastoma that developed from the hypothalamus in 4-year-old boy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ganglioneuroblastoma in the hypothalamus. We report on this case and we present the neuroimaging and pathologic findings

  13. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of the Porcine Developing Hypothalamus and Pituitary Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifan; Cai, Zhaowei; Wei, Shengjuan; Zhou, Huiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Jiang, Xiaoling; Xu, Ningying

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNA molecules, play important roles in gene expressions at transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages in mammalian brain. So far, a growing number of porcine miRNAs and their function have been identified, but little is known regarding the porcine developing hypothalamus and pituitary. In the present study, Solexa sequencing analysis showed 14,129,397 yielded reads, 6,680,678 of which were related to 674 unique miRNAs. After a microarray assay, we detected 175 unique miRNAs in the hypothalamus, including 136 previously known miRNAs and 39 novel candidates, while a total of 140 miRNAs, including 104 known and 36 new candidate miRNAs, were discovered in pituitary. More importantly, 37 and 30 differentially expressed miRNAs from several developmental stages of hypothalamus and pituitary were revealed, respectively. The 37 differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus represented 6 different expression patterns, while the 30 differentially expressed miRNAs in pituitary represented 7 different expression patterns. To clarify potential target genes and specific functions of these differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary, TargetScan and Gorilla prediction tools were then applied. The current functional analysis showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary shared many biological processes, with the main differences being found in tissue-specific processes including: CDP-diacylglycerol biosynthetic/metabolic process; phosphatidic acid biosynthetic/metabolic process; energy reserve metabolic process for hypothalamus; adult behavior; sterol transport/homeostasis; and cholesterol/reverse cholesterol transport for pituitary. Overall, this study identified miRNA profiles and differentially expressed miRNAs among various developmental stages in hypothalamus and pituitary and indicated miRNA profiles change with age and brain location, enhancing our knowledge about spatial

  14. Localization of 125I-insulin binding sites in the rat hypothalamus by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corp, E.S.; Woods, S.C.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Porte, D. Jr.; Baskin, D.G.; Dorsa, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography and computer video densitometry were used to localize and quantify binding of 125 I-insulin in the hypothalamus of the rat brain. Highest specific binding was found in the arculate, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and periventricular regions. Significantly lower binding was present in the ventromedial nucleus and median eminence. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin modulates the neural regulation of feeding by acting at sites in the hypothalamus. (author)

  15. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of the Porcine Developing Hypothalamus and Pituitary Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNA molecules, play important roles in gene expressions at transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages in mammalian brain. So far, a growing number of porcine miRNAs and their function have been identified, but little is known regarding the porcine developing hypothalamus and pituitary. In the present study, Solexa sequencing analysis showed 14,129,397 yielded reads, 6,680,678 of which were related to 674 unique miRNAs. After a microarray assay, we detected 175 unique miRNAs in the hypothalamus, including 136 previously known miRNAs and 39 novel candidates, while a total of 140 miRNAs, including 104 known and 36 new candidate miRNAs, were discovered in pituitary. More importantly, 37 and 30 differentially expressed miRNAs from several developmental stages of hypothalamus and pituitary were revealed, respectively. The 37 differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus represented 6 different expression patterns, while the 30 differentially expressed miRNAs in pituitary represented 7 different expression patterns. To clarify potential target genes and specific functions of these differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary, TargetScan and Gorilla prediction tools were then applied. The current functional analysis showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary shared many biological processes, with the main differences being found in tissue-specific processes including: CDP-diacylglycerol biosynthetic/metabolic process; phosphatidic acid biosynthetic/metabolic process; energy reserve metabolic process for hypothalamus; adult behavior; sterol transport/homeostasis; and cholesterol/reverse cholesterol transport for pituitary. Overall, this study identified miRNA profiles and differentially expressed miRNAs among various developmental stages in hypothalamus and pituitary and indicated miRNA profiles change with age and brain location, enhancing our

  16. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in a mouse model of cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Ihnatko, Robert; Post, Claes; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anorexia-cachexia is a common and severe cancer-related complication but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, using a mouse model for tumour-induced anorexia-cachexia, we screened for proteins that are differentially expressed in the hypothalamus, the brain’s metabolic control centre. Methods: The hypothalamus of tumour-bearing mice with implanted methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MCG 101) displaying anorexia and their sham-implanted pair-fed or free-fed litterma...

  17. Essential function of the transcription factor Rax in the early patterning of the mammalian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orquera, Daniela P; Nasif, Sofia; Low, Malcolm J; Rubinstein, Marcelo; de Souza, Flávio S J

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamus is a region of the anterior forebrain that controls basic aspects of vertebrate physiology, but the genes involved in its development are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate the function of the homeobox gene Rax/Rx in early hypothalamic development using a conditional targeted inactivation strategy in the mouse. We found that lack of Rax expression prior to embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) caused a general underdevelopment of the hypothalamic neuroepithelium, while inactivation at later timepoints had little effect. The early absence of Rax impaired neurogenesis and prevented the expression of molecular markers of the dorsomedial hypothalamus, including neuropeptides Proopiomelanocortin and Somatostatin. Interestingly, the expression domains of genes expressed in the ventromedial hypothalamus and infundibulum invaded dorsal hypothalamic territory, showing that Rax is needed for the proper dorsoventral patterning of the developing medial hypothalamus. The phenotypes caused by the early loss of Rax are similar to those of eliminating the expression of the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (Shh) specifically from the hypothalamus. Consistent with this similarity in phenotypes, we observed that Shh and Rax are coexpressed in the rostral forebrain at late head fold stages and that loss of Rax caused a downregulation of Shh expression in the dorsomedial portion of the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. REM sleep deprivation increases the expression of interleukin genes in mice hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Won Sub; Park, Hae Jeong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Kim, Jong Woo

    2013-11-27

    Recently, evidence has suggested the possible involvement of inflammatory cytokines in sleep deprivation (SD). In this study, we assessed the patterns of inflammatory gene regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to two groups, SD (n=15) and control groups (n=15). Mice in the SD group were sleep-deprived for 72h using modified multiple platforms. Microarray analysis on inflammatory genes was performed in mice hypothalamus. In addition, interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) protein expression was analyzed by the immunochemistry method. Through microarray analysis, we found that expressions of IL subfamily genes, such as IL1β (2.55-fold), IL18 (1.92-fold), IL11 receptor alpha chain 1 (1.48-fold), IL5 (1.41-fold), and IL17E genes (1.31-fold), were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control. The increase in the expression of these genes was also confirmed by RT-PCR. Among these genes, the expression of IL1β was particularly increased in the hypothalamus of SD mice. Interestingly, we found that the protein expression of endogenous IL1β was also elevated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control mice. These results implicate that IL subfamily genes, and in particular, IL1β, may play a role in sleep regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulating Hypothalamus Gene Expression in Food Intake: Dietary Composition or Calorie Density?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proportion of saturated fatty acids/unsaturated fatty acids in the diet seems to act as a physiological regulation on obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Differently composed fatty acid diets may induce satiety of the hypothalamus in different ways. However, the direct effect of the different fatty acid diets on satiety in the hypothalamus is not clear.MethodsThree experiments in mice were conducted to determine whether: different compositions of fatty acids affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus over time; different types of fatty acids administered into the stomach directly affect gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus; and fat composition changes in the diet affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus.ResultsThe type of fat in cases of purified fatty acid administration directly into the stomach may cause changes of gene expressions in the hypothalamus. Gene expression by dietary fat may be regulated by calorie amount ingested rather than weight amount or type of fat.ConclusionTherefore, the calorie density factor of the diet in regulating hypothalamic gene in food intake may be detrimental, although the possibility of type of fat cannot be ruled out.

  20. Effect of low dose radiation on POMC transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To disclose the changes in mRNA transcription level of POMC in the hypothalamus and immune organs after low dose radiation. Method: In situ hybridization was used to examine the changes of POMC mRNA transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs following whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays. Results: There was a basal expression of POMC mRNA in both the hypothalamus and immune organs. POMC mRNA-positive neutron were located in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays could significantly down-regulate the POMC transcription level that was remarkable within 1h and remained low in the observation period of 12h. POMC transcription level in mouse immune organs increased with time within 8h after irradiation and then began to decrease but still remained at a higher than normal level. The changes of POMC transcription level were more marked in the spleen than in other immune organs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the immediate decrease of POMC transcription level in the hypothalamus might be the direct cause of the down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis after WBI with 75 mGy X-rays, accompanied with an increase in POMC transcription in immune organs

  1. The ventromedial hypothalamus oxytocin induces locomotor behavior regulated by estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Kazumi; Murata, Takuya; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that excitation of neurons in the rat ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) induced locomotor activity. An oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) exists in the VMH and plays a role in regulating sexual behavior. However, the role of Oxtr in the VMH in locomotor activity is not clear. In this study we examined the roles of oxytocin in the VMH in running behavior, and also investigated the involvement of estrogen in this behavioral change. Microinjection of oxytocin into the VMH induced a dose-dependent increase in the running behavior in male rats. The oxytocin-induced running activity was inhibited by simultaneous injection of Oxtr-antagonist, (d(CH2)5(1), Try(Me)(2), Orn(8))-oxytocin. Oxytocin injection also induced running behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. Pretreatment of the OVX rats with estrogen augmented the oxytocin-induced running activity twofold, and increased the Oxtr mRNA in the VMH threefold. During the estrus cycle locomotor activity spontaneously increased in the dark period of proestrus. The Oxtr mRNA was up-regulated in the proestrus afternoon. Blockade of oxytocin neurotransmission by its antagonist before the onset of the dark period of proestrus decreased the following nocturnal locomotor activity. These findings demonstrate that Oxtr in the VMH is involved in the induction of running behavior and that estrogen facilitates this effect by means of Oxtr up-regulation, suggesting the involvement of oxytocin in the locomotor activity of proestrus female rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Energy Expenditure and Bone Formation Share a Common Sensitivity to AP-1 Transcription in the Hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Glenn C.; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa; Saito, Hiroaki; Yin, Min; Green, Thomas A.; Lotinun, Sutada; Kveiborg, Marie; Horne, William C.; Nestler, Eric J.; Baron, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of bone and fat homeostasis and its relationship to energy expenditure has recently been the focus of increased attention due to its potential relevance to osteoporosis, obesity and diabetes. Although central effectors within the hypothalamus have been shown to contribute to the regulation of both energy balance and bone homeostasis, little is known of the underlying mechanisms, including the possible involvement of transcriptional factors within the hypothalamus. Transgenic mice overexpressing ΔFosB, a splice variant of the AP1 transcription factor FosB with mixed agonist-antagonistic properties, have increased energy expenditure and bone mass. Since these mice express ΔFosB in bone, fat and hypothalamus, we sought to determine 1) whether overexpression of ΔFosB within the hypothalamus was sufficient to regulate energy expenditure and whether it would also regulate bone mass, and 2) whether these effects were due to antagonism to AP1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ΔFosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wildtype mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass. This effect was phenocopied, at an even stronger level, by overexpressiong of a dominant-negative DNJunD, a pure AP1 antagonist. Taken together these results suggest that downregulation of AP1 activity in the hypothalamus profoundly increases energy expenditure and bone formation, leading to both a decrease in adipose mass and an increase in bone mass. These findings may have physiological implications since ΔFosB is expressed and regulated in the hypothalamus. PMID:22461201

  3. Hypothalamus-Anchored Resting Brain Network Changes before and after Sertraline Treatment in Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sertraline, one of the oldest antidepressants, remains to be the most efficacious treatment for depression. However, major depression disorder (MDD is characterized by altered emotion processing and deficits in cognitive control. In cognitive interference tasks, patients with MDD have shown excessive hypothalamus activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of antidepressant treatment (sertraline on hypothalamus-anchored resting brain circuitry. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on depressed patients (n=12 both before and after antidepressant treatment. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, patients with depression showed significantly increased connectivity between the hypothalamus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, putamen, caudate, and claustrum. By contrast, decreased connectivity of the hypothalamus-related areas was primarily located in the inferior frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, cingulated gyrus, precuneus, thalamus, and cerebellum. After eight weeks of antidepressant therapy, 8 out of the 12 depressed subjects achieved 70% reduction or better in depressive symptoms, as measured on the Hamilton depression rating scale. Our findings may infer that antidepressant treatment can alter the functional connectivity of the hypothalamus resting brain to achieve its therapeutic effect.

  4. Transcriptome-wide identification of preferentially expressed genes in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny eSt-Amand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify preferentially expressed genes in the central endocrine organs of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, we generated transcriptome-wide mRNA profiles of the mouse hypothalamus, pituitary gland and parietal cortex using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. Total counts of SAGE tags for the hypothalamus, pituitary gland and parietal cortex were 165824, 126688 and 161045 tags, respectively. This represented 59244, 45151 and 55131 distinct tags, respectively. Comparison of these mRNA profiles revealed that 22 mRNA species, including three potential novel transcripts, were preferentially expressed in the hypothalamus. In addition to well-known hypothalamic transcripts, such as hypocretin, several genes involved in hormone function, intracellular transduction, metabolism, protein transport, steroidogenesis, extracellular matrix and brain disease were identified as preferentially expressed hypothalamic transcripts. In the pituitary gland, 106 mRNA species, including 60 potential novel transcripts, were preferentially expressed. In addition to well-known pituitary genes, such as growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone beta, a number of genes classified to function in transport, amino acid metabolism, intracellular transduction, cell adhesion, disulfide bond formation, stress response, transcription, protein synthesis and turnover, cell differentiation, the cell cycle and in the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix were also preferentially expressed. In conclusion, the current study identified not only well-known hypothalamic and pituitary transcripts but also a number of new candidates likely to be involved in endocrine homeostatic systems regulated by the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  5. [Functional asymmetry of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats during food instrumental conditioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanetsiian, G L; Pavlova, I V

    2003-01-01

    The synchronism and latency of auditory evoked potentials (EP) recorded in symmetric points of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats were measured at different stages of instrumental food conditioning and after the urgent transition to 30% reinforcement. Correlation coefficients between EPs in the cortex and hypothalamus were high (with left-side dominance) at the beginning of the experiments, when food motivation was high, and during the whole experiments in cases of high-probability of conditioned performance. Analysis of early positive P55-80 EP component showed that at all conditioning stages the peak latency of this component was shorter in the left cortical areas than in symmetrical points, whereas in the hypothalamus the shorter latency at the left side was observed at the stage of unstable conditioned reflex, and at the stage of stable reflex the latency of the studied component was shorter at the right side. During transition to 30% reinforcement, the latency was also shorter in the right hypothalamus. It is suggested that the high left-side correlation between the hypothalamus and cortex was associated with motivational and motor component of behavior rather than reflected the emotional stress induced by transition to another stereotype of food reinforcement (30%).

  6. Estradiol receptors in the pituitary and anterior hypothalamus of the rat: measurement by agar gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, I J; Naftolin, F; Ryan, K J; Siu, J

    1975-05-01

    The reliability of agar gel electrophoresis in the measurement of high-affinity saturable estrogen-binding component in the cytosol of the rat pituitary gland and anterior hypothalamus was assessed. The available binding sites were determined in small samples with good precision and accuracy. Incubation with 100-fold competitor was more satisfactory than heat-treatment for measuring nonspecific binding. There was substantial, but incomplete, dissociation of albumin-estradiol complexes. The total number of estrogen binding sites in the anterior hypothalamus was approximately 15% greater in 28-day-old females than males (p .02). However, differences in the number of binding sites in the pituitary was not significant (p .02). The pituitary was found to contain twice as many binding sites as the anterior hypothalamus in both sexes. The latter finding is consistent with the importance of the direct action of estrogen on the pituitary in mediating pituitary function.

  7. Detailed volumetric analysis of the hypothalamus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchetta, Martina; Gordon, Elizabeth; Manning, Emily; Barnes, Josephine; Cash, David M; Espak, Miklos; Thomas, David L; Modat, Marc; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D; Ourselin, Sebastien; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Rohrer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal eating behaviors are frequently reported in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). The hypothalamus is the regulatory center for feeding and satiety but its involvement in bvFTD has not been fully clarified, partly due to its difficult identification on MR images. We measured hypothalamic volume in 18 patients with bvFTD (including 9 MAPT and 6 C9orf72 mutation carriers) and 18 cognitively normal controls using a novel optimized multimodal segmentation protocol, combining 3D T1 and T2-weighted 3T MRIs (intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.93). The whole hypothalamus was subsequently segmented into five subunits: the anterior (superior and inferior), tuberal (superior and inferior), and posterior regions. The presence of abnormal eating behavior was assessed with the revised version of the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI-R). The bvFTD group showed a 17% lower hypothalamic volume compared with controls (p hypothalamus.

  8. Gamma oscillations organize top-down signalling to hypothalamus and enable food seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carus-Cadavieco, Marta; Gorbati, Maria; Ye, Li; Bender, Franziska; van der Veldt, Suzanne; Kosse, Christin; Börgers, Christoph; Lee, Soo Yeun; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Hu, Yubin; Denisova, Natalia; Ramm, Franziska; Volitaki, Emmanouela; Burdakov, Denis; Deisseroth, Karl; Ponomarenko, Alexey; Korotkova, Tatiana

    2017-02-09

    Both humans and animals seek primary rewards in the environment, even when such rewards do not correspond to current physiological needs. An example of this is a dissociation between food-seeking behaviour and metabolic needs, a notoriously difficult-to-treat symptom of eating disorders. Feeding relies on distinct cell groups in the hypothalamus, the activity of which also changes in anticipation of feeding onset. The hypothalamus receives strong descending inputs from the lateral septum, which is connected, in turn, with cortical networks, but cognitive regulation of feeding-related behaviours is not yet understood. Cortical cognitive processing involves gamma oscillations, which support memory, attention, cognitive flexibility and sensory responses. These functions contribute crucially to feeding behaviour by unknown neural mechanisms. Here we show that coordinated gamma (30-90 Hz) oscillations in the lateral hypothalamus and upstream brain regions organize food-seeking behaviour in mice. Gamma-rhythmic input to the lateral hypothalamus from somatostatin-positive lateral septum cells evokes food approach without affecting food intake. Inhibitory inputs from the lateral septum enable separate signalling by lateral hypothalamus neurons according to their feeding-related activity, making them fire at distinct phases of the gamma oscillation. Upstream, medial prefrontal cortical projections provide gamma-rhythmic inputs to the lateral septum; these inputs are causally associated with improved performance in a food-rewarded learning task. Overall, our work identifies a top-down pathway that uses gamma synchronization to guide the activity of subcortical networks and to regulate feeding behaviour by dynamic reorganization of functional cell groups in the hypothalamus.

  9. Leptin in the hindbrain facilitates phosphorylation of STAT3 in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bhavna N; Harris, Ruth B S

    2015-03-01

    Leptin receptors (ObRs) in the forebrain and hindbrain have been independently recognized as important mediators of leptin responses. We recently used low-dose leptin infusions to show that chronic activation of both hypothalamic and hindbrain ObRs is required to reduce body fat. The objective of the present study was to identify the brain nuclei that are selectively activated in rats that received chronic infusion of leptin in both the forebrain and hindbrain. Either saline or leptin was infused into third and fourth ventricles (0.1 μg/24 h in the third ventricle and 0.6 μg/24 h in the fourth ventricle) of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 6 days using Alzet pumps. Rats infused with leptin into both ventricles (LL rats) showed a significant increase in phosphorylated (p)STAT3 immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, and posterior hypothalamus compared with other groups. No differences in pSTAT3 immunoreactivity were observed in midbrain or hindbrain nuclei despite a sixfold higher infusion of leptin into the fourth ventricle than the third ventricle. ΔFosB immunoreactivity, a marker of chronic neuronal activation, showed that multiple brain nuclei were chronically activated due to the process of infusion, but only the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, and ventral tuberomamillary nucleus showed a significant increase in LL rats compared with other groups. These data demonstrate that low-dose leptin in the hindbrain increases pSTAT3 in areas of the hypothalamus known to respond to leptin, supporting the hypothesis that leptin-induced weight loss requires an integrated response from both the hindbrain and forebrain. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Catecholamine levels in sheep hypothalamus, hypophysis and adrenals following whole-body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorova, B.; Arendarcik, J.; Molnarova, M.

    1985-01-01

    Changes were studied in the levels of catecholamines and L-DOPA in the control system of the reproduction cycle (hypothalamus, hypophysis) and in the adrenal glands of sheep after whole-body irradiation with 60 Co at a total dose of 6.7 Gy for seven days. The output of the radiation source was 0.039 Gy/h. The catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and adrenaline) and L-DOPA were determined after separation from the tissues by the method of spectral fluorometry. After whole-body exposure to gamma radiation, noradrenaline dropped in the hypothalamus in comparison with the control group, most significantly in the rostral (by 74.2%) and caudal (by 40%) parts. A similar drop was also observed in dopamine, the concentrations of which decreased in the rostral hypothalamus by 60%. Adrenaline showed a drop in the hypothalamus, most significant in the caudal region (by 62%). Consequently, the level of the precursor of the synthesis of catecholamines and L-DOPA changed and showed in the studied regions of the hypothalamus significantly lower levels than in the control group. As regards the hypophysis, after irradiation no significant changes in the levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline were recorded, however, dopamine and L-DOPA dropped significantly (P<0.01). The exposure to gamma radiation also causes a decrease in the concentrations of catecholamines and L-DOPA in the adrenal glands of sheep, most significantly in noradrenaline (by 61%). It was thus found that whole-body irradiation of sheep with a dose of 6.7 Gy results in a significant decrease in the level of catecholamines in the hypothalamus, hypophysis and adrenal glands, which is probably in relation to the failure of synthesis and degradation of catecholamines and to the total organism injury

  11. Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes of rats with mammary gland cancer induced by N-methyl nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Valenzuela, M T; García, M J; Mayas, M D; Arias de Saavedra, J M; Sánchez, R; Pérez, M C; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2005-02-01

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase is an omega-peptidase that hydrolyses N-terminal pyroglutamyl residues from biologically active peptides such as gonadotropin-releasing and thyrotrophin-releasing hormones. We previously described a decrease in both rat and human pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity with breast cancer, suggesting that gonadotropin-releasing hormone may be an important local intracrine, autocrine and/or paracrine hormonal factor in the pathogenesis of breast cancer while playing a role in the tumoral process. However, the other susceptible substrate of pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, may also be modified with breast cancer, supporting an association between breast cancer and thyroid disorders. The present work analyses soluble and membrane-bound pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes in N-methyl nitrosourea-induced breast cancer in rats. Our aim was to determine the possible relationship between gonadotropin-releasing hormone and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone regulation through pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity. We propose that pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity dysregulation at various local and systemic levels may participate in the initiation, promotion and progression of breast cancer induced in rat by N-methyl nitrosourea through the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Since pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity also acts on thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, the dysregulation of this enzyme's activity could indirectly affect hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis function, and thus potentially represent a link between the diseases of thyroid and breast cancer.

  12. Persistent expression of activated notch in the developing hypothalamus affects survival of pituitary progenitors and alters pituitary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Paven K; Bogdanovic, Vedran; Naratadam, George T; Raetzman, Lori T

    2015-08-01

    As the pituitary gland develops, signals from the hypothalamus are necessary for pituitary induction and expansion. Little is known about the control of cues that regulate early signaling between the two structures. Ligands and receptors of the Notch signaling pathway are found in both the hypothalamus and Rathke's pouch. The downstream Notch effector gene Hes1 is required for proper pituitary formation; however, these effects could be due to the action of Hes1 in the hypothalamus, Rathke's pouch, or both. To determine the contribution of hypothalamic Notch signaling to pituitary organogenesis, we used mice with loss and gain of Notch function within the developing hypothalamus. We demonstrate that loss of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the hypothalamus does not affect expression of Hes1 within the posterior hypothalamus or expression of Hes5. In contrast, expression of activated Notch within the hypothalamus results in ectopic Hes5 expression and increased Hes1 expression, which is sufficient to disrupt pituitary development and postnatal expansion. Taken together, our results indicate that Rbpj-dependent Notch signaling within the developing hypothalamus is not necessary for pituitary development, but persistent Notch signaling and ectopic Hes5 expression in hypothalamic progenitors affects pituitary induction and expansion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Neurochemical profile of the mouse hypothalamus using in vivo 1H MRS at 14.1T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongxia; Poitry-Yamate, Carol; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The hypothalamus plays an essential role in the central nervous system of mammals by among others regulating glucose homeostasis, food intake, temperature, and to some extent blood pressure. Assessments of hypothalamic metabolism using, e.g. (1)H MRS in mouse models can provide important insights into its function. To date, direct in vivo (1)H MRS measurements of hypothalamus have not been reported. Here, we report that in vivo single voxel measurements of mouse hypothalamus are feasible using (1)H MRS at 14.1T. Localized (1)H MR spectra from hypothalamus were obtained unilaterally (2-2.2 microL, VOI) and bilaterally (4-4.4 microL) with a quality comparable to that of hippocampus (3-3.5 microL). Using LCModel, a neurochemical profile consisting of 21 metabolites was quantified for both hypothalamus and hippocampus with most of the Cramér-Rao lower bounds within 20%. Relative to the hippocampus, the hypothalamus was characterized by high gamma-aminobutryric acid and myo-inositol, and low taurine concentrations. When studying transgenic mice with no glucose transporter isoform 8 expressed, small metabolic changes were observed, yet glucose homeostasis was well maintained. We conclude that a specific neurochemical profile of mouse hypothalamus can be measured by (1)H MRS which will allow identifying and following metabolic alterations longitudinally in the hypothalamus of genetic modified models.

  14. Estrogen receptor-alpha distribution in the human hypothalamus in relation to sex and endocrine status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Balesar, Rawien; Espila, Ana M.; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    The present study reports the first systematic rostrocaudal distribution of estrogen receptor-a immunoreactivity (ERalpha-ir) in the human hypothalamus and its adjacent areas in young adults. Postmortem material taken from 10 subjects (five male and five female), between 20 and 39 years of age, was

  15. NPY/neuropeptide Y enhances autophagy in the hypothalamus: a mechanism to delay aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Aging was recently described as a life event programmed by the hypothalamus, a key brain region that is crucial for the neuroendocrine interaction between the central nervous system and the periphery. Autophagy impairment is a hallmark of aging, contributing to the aging phenotype and to the aggravation of age-related diseases. Since hypothalamic autophagy decreases with age, strategies to promote autophagy in the hypothalamus may be relevant for control of the aging process. NPY (neuropeptide Y) is an endogenous neuropeptide mainly produced by the hypothalamus. We recently reported, for the first time, that NPY stimulates autophagy in rodent hypothalamus and mediates caloric restriction-induced autophagy in hypothalamic neurons. Moreover, we observed that NPY acts through NPY1R (neuropeptide Y receptor Y1) or NPY5R activation involving a concerted action of different signaling pathways. Since both hypothalamic autophagy and NPY levels decrease with age, modulation of NPY levels could provide new putative therapeutic tools to ameliorate age-related deteriorations and extend longevity.

  16. GPR30 mediates anorectic estrogen-induced STAT3 signaling in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Insook; Shin, Sora; Kim, Mijung; Kwon, Somin; Oh, So Ra; Ahn, Young Soo; Kim, Chul Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the control of energy balance in the hypothalamus. Leptin-independent STAT3 activation (i.e., tyrosine(705)-phosphorylation of STAT3, pSTAT3) in the hypothalamus is hypothesized as the primary mechanism of the estrogen-induced anorexic response. However, the type of estrogen receptor that mediates this regulation is unknown. We investigated the role of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in estradiol (E2)-induced STAT3 activation in the hypothalamus. Regulation of STAT3 activation by E2, G-1, a specific agonist of GPR30 and G-15, a specific antagonist of GPR30 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Effect of GPR30 activation on eating behavior was analyzed in vivo. E2 stimulated pSTAT3 in cells expressing GPR30, but not expressing estrogen receptor ERα and ERβ. G-1 induced pSTAT3, and G-15 inhibited E2-induced pSTAT3 in primary cultures of hypothalamic neurons. A cerebroventricular injection of G-1 increased pSTAT3 in the arcuate nucleus of mice, which was associated with a decrease in food intake and body weight gain. These results suggest that GPR30 is the estrogen receptor that mediates the anorectic effect of estrogen through the STAT3 pathway in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothalamus as a mediator of chronic migraine: Evidence from high-resolution fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Laura H; Allers, Angie; May, Arne

    2017-05-23

    To identify pathophysiologic mechanisms of migraine chronification using a recently standardized protocol for high-resolution brainstem imaging of trigeminal nociceptive stimulation. Eighteen episodic migraineurs (EMs), 17 chronic migraineurs (CMs), and 19 healthy controls (HCs) underwent painful ammonia stimulation of the left nostril in a 3T MRI scanner. Functional images were acquired with a brainstem-optimized protocol for high-resolution echo-planar imaging. We detected a significantly stronger activation of the anterior right hypothalamus in CMs compared to HCs. To exclude the headache as a prime mediator of the hypothalamic activations, we compared all migraineurs with headaches (EMs and CMs) with all migraineurs without headaches (EMs and CMs) and HCs in a second analysis and found a more posterior region of the hypothalamus to be more activated bilaterally during headaches. Our data corroborate the fact that the hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of migraine chronification and acute pain stage of migraineurs. While the more posterior part of the hypothalamus seems to be important for the acute pain stage, the more anterior part seems to play an important role in attack generation and migraine chronification. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. The Structure of the Neuroendocrine Hypothalamus: The Neuroanatomical Legacy of Geoffrey Harris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    In November 1955 Geoffrey Harris published a paper based on the Christian A. Herter Lecture he had given earlier that year at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. The paper reviewed the contemporary research that was starting to explain how the hypothalamus controlled the pituitary gland. In the process of doing this Harris introduced a set of properties that would help define the neuroendocrine hypothalamus. They included: a) three criteria that putative releasing factors for adenohypophysial hormones would have to fulfill; b) an analogy between the representation of body parts in sensory and motor cortices and the spatial localization of neuroendocrine function in the hypothalamus; and c) the idea that neuroendocrine neurons were motor neurons, with the pituitary stalk functioning as a Sherringtonian final common pathway through which the impact of sensory and emotional events on neuroendocrine neurons had to pass to control pituitary hormone release. Were these properties a sign that the major neuroscientific discoveries being made in the early 1950s were beginning to influence neuroendocrinology? The present article discusses two main points: the context and significance of Harris's Herter Lecture for how our understanding of neuroendocrine anatomy (particularly as it relates to the control of the adenohypophysis) has developed since 1955; and within this framework, how novel and powerful techniques are taking our understanding of the structure of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus to new levels. PMID:25994006

  19. GABAergic projections from lateral hypothalamus to paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus promote feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesions of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) cause hypophagia. However, activation of glutamatergic neurons in LH inhibits feeding. These results suggest a potential importance for other LH neurons in stimulating feeding. Our current study in mice showed that disruption of GABA release from adult LH GAB...

  20. Role of the Hypothalamus in the Regulation of Food and Water Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sebastian P.

    1975-01-01

    Article considered the thesis that the fiber systems that course throught the hypothalamus may play a more important role in the etiology of the dysfunctions in food and water intake that are seen after hypothalamic lessions and stimulation than the widely accepted model of hypothalamic regulation implies. (Author/RK)

  1. Sex differences in the hypothalamus in the different stages of human life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, Dick F.; Chung, Wilson C. J.; Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Hofman, Michel A.; Hestiantoro, Andon

    2003-01-01

    Quite a number of structural and functional sex differences have been reported in the human hypothalamus and adjacent structures that may be related to not only reproduction, sexual orientation and gender identity, but also to the often pronounced sex differences in prevalence of psychiatric and

  2. Different electroclinical manifestations of the epilepsy associated with hamartomas connecting to the middle or posterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Alberto J R; Moreira, Ana; Robalo, Conceição; Ribeiro, Constança

    2003-09-01

    The epilepsy associated with hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) has typical clinical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral manifestations refractory to drug therapy and with unfavorable evolution. It is well known that only sessile lesions produce epilepsy, but no correlation has been established between the different types of sessile hamartomas and the diverse manifestations of the epilepsy. We correlate anatomic details of the hamartoma and the clinical and neurophysiologic manifestations of the associated epilepsy. HHs of seven patients with epilepsy (ages 2- 25 years) were classified as to lateralization and connection to the anteroposterior axis of the hypothalamus by using high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging. We correlated the anatomic classification with the clinical and neurophysiologic manifestations of the epilepsy as evaluated in long-term (24 h) video-EEG recordings. HHs ranged in size from 0.4 to 2.6 cc, with complete lateralization in six of seven patients. Ictal manifestations showed good correlation with the lobar involvement of ictal/interictal EEGs. These manifestations suggest the existence of two types of cortical involvement, one associated with the temporal lobe, produced by hamartomas connected to the posterior hypothalamus (mamillary bodies), and the other associated with the frontal lobe, seen in lesions connecting to the middle hypothalamus. A consistent clinical and neurophysiologic pattern of either temporal or frontal lobe cortical secondary involvement was found in the patients of our series. It depends on whether the hamartoma connects to the mamillary bodies (temporal lobe cases) or whether it connects to the medial hypothalamus (frontal lobe cases).

  3. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: The structure of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus: the neuroanatomical legacy of Geoffrey Harris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alan G

    2015-08-01

    In November 1955, Geoffrey Harris published a paper based on the Christian A Herter Lecture he had given earlier that year at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, USA. The paper reviewed the contemporary research that was starting to explain how the hypothalamus controlled the pituitary gland. In the process of doing so, Harris introduced a set of properties that helped define the neuroendocrine hypothalamus. They included: i) three criteria that putative releasing factors for adenohypophysial hormones would have to fulfill; ii) an analogy between the representation of body parts in the sensory and motor cortices and the spatial localization of neuroendocrine function in the hypothalamus; and iii) the idea that neuroendocrine neurons are motor neurons and the pituitary stalk functions as a Sherringtonian final common pathway through which the impact of sensory and emotional events on neuroendocrine neurons must pass in order to control pituitary hormone release. Were these properties a sign that the major neuroscientific discoveries that were being made in the early 1950s were beginning to influence neuroendocrinology? This Thematic Review discusses two main points: the context and significance of Harris's Herter Lecture for how our understanding of neuroendocrine anatomy (particularly as it relates to the control of the adenohypophysis) has developed since 1955; and, within this framework, how novel and powerful techniques are currently taking our understanding of the structure of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus to new levels. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Activation and degeneration during aging: a morphometric study of the human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J. N.; Swaab, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    During the course of aging both activation and degenerative changes are found in the human hypothalamus. Degeneration may start around middle-age in some neurotransmitter- or neuromodulator-containing neurons. For instance, a decreased number of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) neurons was

  5. Effects of HPM irradiation on expression of GR in hypothalamus and pituitary gland of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Li; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Ma Junjie; Wang Shuiming; Hu Wenhua; Wang Dewen; Su Zhentao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression and significance of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in hypothalamus and pituitary gland of rats after high power microwave (HPM) exposure. Methods: A total of 130 male Wistar rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 14 d, 28 d and 3 m after whole body irradiation by 2-90 mW/cm 2 HPM and their hypothalamus and pituitary gland were collected. The changes of GR in the two tissues after HPM exposure were investigated by means of immunohistochemical staining and image analysis. Results: The expression of GR in hypothalamus was decreased after HPM exposure. The level of GR in the group of 10 mW/cm 2 was significantly lower (P 2 group was significantly lower (P 2 group was significantly higher (P 2 group was significantly higher (P<0.01) on 1 d and 3 d after HPM exposure. Conclusion: The expression of GR in hypothalamus was decreased while that in the anterior pituitary was increased after HPM exposure. The refore, the negative feedback of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was upset and the changes of GR is involved in the pathophysiological course of HPA. (authors)

  6. Cocaine place conditioning increases pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Kruyer, A; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    2012-11-14

    Recent research suggests an involvement of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene products in modulating cocaine reward and addiction-like behaviors in rodents. In this study, we investigated whether cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) alters POMC gene expression in the brain or pituitary of rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were conditioned with 4 injections of 0, 10 or 30 mg/kg cocaine (i.p.) over 8 days and tested 4 days after the last conditioning session. Another group received the same pattern of cocaine injections without conditioning. POMC mRNA levels in the hypothalamus (including arcuate nucleus), amygdala and anterior pituitary, as well as plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were measured. Cocaine place conditioning at 10 and 30 mg/kg doses increased POMC mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner in the hypothalamus, with no effect in the amygdala. Cocaine CPP had no effect on POMC mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary or on plasma ACTH or corticosterone levels. In rats that received cocaine at 30 mg/kg without conditioning, there was no such effect on hypothalamic POMC mRNA levels. Alteration of POMC gene expression in the hypothalamus is region-specific after cocaine place conditioning, and dose-dependent. The increased POMC gene expression in the hypothalamus suggests that it is involved in the reward/learning process of cocaine-induced conditioning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy expenditure and bone formation share a common sensitivity to AP-1 transcription in the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, Glenn C; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa

    2012-01-01

    ) whether these effects were due to antagonism to AP1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ¿FosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wildtype mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass...

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of the porcine hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Xiao Long; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that DNA methylation in both CpG and CpH (where H = C, T or A) contexts plays a critical role in biological functions of different tissues. However, the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns of porcine hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary (HPO) tissues remain virtually unex...

  9. The role of gut hormones and the hypothalamus in appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Simpson, Katherine A; Minnion, James S; Shillito, Joyceline C; Bloom, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organisation has estimated that by 2015 approximately 2.3 billion adults will be overweight and more than 700 million obese. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular events, stroke and cancer. The hypothalamus is a crucial region for integrating signals from central and peripheral pathways and plays a major role in appetite regulation. In addition, there are reciprocal connections with the brainstem and higher cortical centres. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, there are two major neuronal populations which stimulate or inhibit food intake and influence energy homeostasis. Within the brainstem, the dorsal vagal complex plays a role in the interpretation and relaying of peripheral signals. Gut hormones act peripherally to modulate digestion and absorption of nutrients. However, they also act as neurotransmitters within the central nervous system to control food intake. Peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and oxyntomodulin suppress appetite, whilst ghrelin increases appetite through afferent vagal fibres to the caudal brainstem or directly to the hypothalamus. A better understanding of the role of these gut hormones may offer the opportunity to develop successful treatments for obesity. Here we review the current understanding of the role of gut hormones and the hypothalamus on food intake and body weight control.

  10. [Evoked activity of the cat hypothalamus and amygdala under food motivation and in emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, I V; Vanetsian, G L

    2004-12-01

    Amplitude-latency characteristics of auditory evoked potentials (EPs) recorded in bilateral points of the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala were studied under food motivation, in emotional stress (presentation of dogs) and tentative reactions. In the state of hunger, as compared with safety, the latencies of P1, N2 components of EP in hypothalamus, and P1, N2, N3 in amygdala were decreased and their amplitudes were changed. Changes in the left side of both structures were more pronounced. During presentation of dogs, decreases of latencies of all EP components including N1 occurred in hypothalamus and amygdala, changes in hypothalamic potentials were more pronounced on the right side, whereas in the amygdala--on the left side. During tentative responses to emotional-neutral stimuli, the latency of EP increased. It was concluded that sensory reactivity of hypothalamus and amygdala increased in motivational-emotional states. It was supposed that the side of dominance of structure may be related both to the factors of active or passive behavior during fear and the genesis of emotion (motivational or informational).

  11. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...

  12. Changes in orexin (hypocretin) neuronal expression with normal aging in the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Rodriguez, Michael L; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that decreased orexin expression changes sleep regulation with normal aging. This study examined orexin A and B expression in the tuberal hypothalamus in infants (0-1 year; n = 8), children (4-10 years; n = 7), young adults (22-32 years; n = 4), and older (48-60 years; n = 7) adults. Neuronal expression was defined by the percentage positive orexin immunoreactive (Ox-ir) neurons in the whole tuberal hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medial (DMH), perifornical, and lateral hypothalamus. In addition, the number of Ox-ir neurons/mm(2), regional distribution, and co-localization were examined. Within the whole tuberal hypothalamic section, there was a 23% decrease in the percentage of Ox-ir neurons between infants and older adults (p changes were confined to the DMH and/or perifornical hypothalamus. There was a 9%-24% decrease in Ox neurons/mm(2) in adults compared with infants and/or children (p ≤ 0.001). These results demonstrate a decrease in Ox expression with normal human maturation and aging. This may contribute to changes in sleep regulation during development and with aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  14. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Bolado Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E9.5 contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia. Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5 give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly

  15. Role of adenosine and the orexinergic perifornical hypothalamus in sleep-promoting effects of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2014-03-01

    Strong clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that acute ethanol promotes sleep. However, very little is known about how and where ethanol acts to promote sleep. We hypothesized that ethanol may induce sleep by increasing extracellular levels of adenosine and inhibiting orexin neurons in the perifornical hypothalamus. Experiments 1 and 2: Within-Subject Design; Experiment 3: Between-Subject Design. N/A. N/A. N/A. Using adult male Sprague-Dawley rats as our animal model, we performed three experiments to test our hypothesis. Our first experiment examined the effect of A1 receptor blockade in the orexinergic perifornical hypothalamus on sleep- promoting effects of ethanol. Bilateral microinjection of the selective A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine (500 μM; 250 nL/side) into orexinergic perifornical hypothalamus significantly reduced nonrapid eye movement sleep with a concomitant increase in wakefulness, suggesting that blockade of adenosine A1 receptor attenuates ethanol-induced sleep promotion. Our second experiment examined adenosine release in the orexinergic perifornical hypothalamus during local ethanol infusion. Local infusion of pharmacologically relevant doses of ethanol significantly and dose-dependently increased adenosine release. Our final experiment used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to examine the effects of ethanol on the activation of orexin neurons. Acute ethanol exposure significantly reduced the number of orexin neurons containing c-Fos, suggesting an inhibition of orexin neurons after ethanol intake. Based on our results, we believe that ethanol promotes sleep by increasing adenosine in the orexinergic perifornical hypothalamus, resulting in A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of orexin neurons.

  16. Acute Exercise Decreases Tribbles Homolog 3 Protein Levels in the Hypothalamus of Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Barbara De Almeira; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; DE Souza, Claudio Teodoro; DA Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa; Marinho, Rodolfo; DE Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eloize Cristina Chiarreotto; Botezelli, José Diego; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on tribbles homolog 3 (TRB3) protein levels and on the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins in the hypothalamus of obese rats. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TRB3 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and verified whether an acute exercise session influences them. In the first part of the study, the rats were divided into three groups: control (lean), fed standard rodent chow; DIO, fed a high-fat diet; and DIO-EXE, fed a high-fat diet and submitted to a swimming acute exercise protocol. In the second part of the study, we used three other groups: control (lean) group receiving an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of vehicle, lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin, and lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin and performing an acute exercise session. Four hours after the exercise session, food intake was measured, and the hypothalamus was dissected and separated for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The acute exercise session reduced TRB3 protein levels, disrupted the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins, increased the phosphorylation of Foxo1, and restored the anorexigenic effects of insulin on the hypothalamus of DIO rats. Interestingly, the suppressive effects of acute exercise on TRB3 protein levels may be related, at least in part, to decreased ER stress (evaluated though pancreatic ER kinase phosphorylation and C/EBP homologous protein levels) in the hypothalamus. Exercise-mediated reduction of hypothalamic TRB3 protein levels may be associated with reduction of ER stress. These data provide a new mechanism by which an acute exercise session improves insulin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and restores food intake control in obesity.

  17. Effects of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate on the Hypothalamus-Uterus in Pubertal Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Te; Jia, Yiyang; Zhou, Liting; Wang, Qi; Sun, Di; Xu, Jin; Wu, Juan; Chen, Huaiji; Xu, Feng; Ye, Lin

    2016-11-12

    The pollution of endocrine disruptors and its impact on human reproductive system have attracted much attention. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), an environmental endocrine disruptor, is widely used in food packages, containers, medical supplies and children's toys. It can cause diseases such as infertility, sexual precocity and uterine bleeding and thus arouse concerns from the society and scholars. The effect of DEHP on pubertal female reproductive system is still not well-studied. This study was to investigate the effects of DEHP on the hypothalamus-uterus in pubertal female rats, reveal the reproductive toxicity of DEHP on pubertal female rats and its mechanism, and provide scientific evidence for the evaluation of toxicity and toxic mechanism of DEHP on reproductive system. Forty-eight pubertal female rats were randomly divided into four groups and respectively administered via oral gavage 0, 250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/d DEHP in 0.1 mL corn oil/20 g body weight for up to four weeks. Compared with control rats, the DEHP-treated rats showed: (1) higher gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) level in the hypothalamus; (2) higher protein levels of GnRH in the hypothalamus; and (3) higher mRNA and protein levels of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the uterus. Our data reveal that DEHP exposure may lead to a disruption in pubertal female rats and an imbalance of hypothalamus-uterus. Meanwhile, DEHP may, through the GnRH in the hypothalamus and its receptor on the uterus, lead to diseases of the uterus. DEHP may impose a negative influence on the development and functioning of the reproductive system in pubertal female rats.

  18. TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Schulz, Paul E; Appel, Stanley H; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2014-12-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by motor symptoms including limb weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise, and pathologically by inclusions of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also may demonstrate non-motor symptoms and signs of autonomic and energy dysfunction as hypermetabolism and weight loss that suggest the possibility of pathology in the forebrain, including hypothalamus. However, this region has received little investigation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, the frequency, topography, and clinical associations of TDP-43 inclusion pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus were examined in 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: 25 men and 8 women; mean age at death of 62.7 years, median disease duration of 3.1 years (range of 1.3 to 9.8 years). TDP-43 pathology was present in 11 patients (33.3%), including components in both basal forebrain (n=10) and hypothalamus (n=7). This pathology was associated with non-motor system TDP-43 pathology (Χ2=17.5, p=0.00003) and bulbar symptoms at onset (Χ2=4.04, p=0.044), but not age or disease duration. Furthermore, TDP-43 pathology in the lateral hypothalamic area was associated with reduced body mass index (W=11, p=0.023). This is the first systematic demonstration of pathologic involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, the findings suggest that involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus has significant phenotypic associations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including site of symptom onset, as well as deficits in energy metabolism with loss of body mass index.

  19. Chronic antidepressant treatments resulted in altered expression of genes involved in inflammation in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Silvia; Benatti, Cristina; Montanari, Claudia; Tascedda, Fabio; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2013-12-05

    To gain insight into the possible immune targets of antidepressant, we evaluated the expression of several inflammatory mediators in the hypothalamus of rats chronically (28 days) treated with the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p.) or the tricyclic compound imipramine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). We focused our attention on the hypothalamus as it plays a key role in determining many of the somatic symptoms experienced by depressed patients. This brain region, critical also for expression of motivated behaviours, participates in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in stress response as well as coordinates physiological functions such as sleep and food intake that have been found altered in a high percentage of depressed patients. Notably, hypothalamus is a key structure for brain cytokine expression and function as it integrates signals from the neuro, immune, endocrine systems. By means of quantitative Real Time PCR experiments we demonstrated that a chronic treatment with either fluoxetine or imipramine resulted in a reduction of IL-6 and IFN-γ mRNAs and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus. Moreover, we demonstrated that hypothalamic expression of members of IL-18 system was differentially affected by chronic antidepressant treatments. Chronically administered fluoxetine decreased IL-8 and CX3CL1 hypothalamic expression, while a chronic treatment with imipramine decreased p11 mRNA. Our data suggest that a shift in the balance of the inflammation toward an anti-inflammatory state in the hypothalamus may represent a common mechanism of action of both the chronic treatments with fluoxetine and imipramine. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effects of systemic carbidopa on dopamine synthesis in rat hypothalamus and striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakkola, S.; Tuomainen, P.; Wurtman, R. J.; Mannisto, P. T.

    1992-01-01

    Significant concentrations of carbidopa (CD) were found in rat hypothalamus, striatum, and in striatal microdialysis efflux after intraperitoneal administration of the drug. Efflux levels peaked one hour after administration of 100 mg/kg at 0.37 micrograms/ml, or about 2% of serum levels. Concurrent CD levels in hypothalamus and striatum were about 2.5% and 1.5%, respectively, of corresponding serum levels. Levels of dopamine and its principal metabolites in striatal efflux were unaffected. The removal of the brain blood by saline perfusion decreased the striatal and hypothalamic CD concentrations only by 33% and 16%, respectively. In other rats receiving both CD and levodopa (LD), brain L-dopa, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels after one hour tended to be proportionate to LD dose. When the LD dose remained constant, increasing the CD dose dose-dependently enhanced L-dopa levels in the hypothalamus and striatum. However dopamine levels did not increase but, in contrast, decreased dose-dependently (although significantly only in the hypothalamus). CD also caused dose-dependent decrease in striatal 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and in striatal and hypothalamic homovanillic acid (HVA), when the LD dose was 50 mg/kg. We conclude that, at doses exceeding 50 mg/kg, sufficient quantities of CD enter the brain to inhibit dopamine formation, especially in the hypothalamus. Moreover, high doses of LD/CD, both of which are themselves catechols, can inhibit the O-methylation of brain catecholamines formed from the LD.

  1. One-day high-fat diet induces inflammation in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waise, T M Zaved; Toshinai, Koji; Naznin, Farhana; NamKoong, Cherl; Md Moin, Abu Saleh; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-09-04

    A high-fat diet (HFD) induces inflammation in systemic organs including the hypothalamus, resulting in obesity and diabetes. The vagus nerve connects the visceral organs and central nervous system, and the gastric-derived orexigenic peptide ghrelin transmits its starvation signals to the hypothalamus via the vagal afferent nerve. Here we investigated the inflammatory response in vagal afferent neurons and the hypothalamus in mice following one day of HFD feeding. This treatment increased the number of macrophages/microglia in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Furthermore, one-day HFD induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in the goblet cells of the colon and upregulated mRNA expressions of the proinflammatory biomarkers Emr1, Iba1, Il6, and Tnfα in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Both subcutaneous administration of ghrelin and celiac vagotomy reduced HFD-induced inflammation in these tissues. HFD intake triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, nodose ganglion, and subsequently in the hypothalamus within 24 h. These findings suggest that the vagal afferent nerve may transfer gut-derived inflammatory signals to the hypothalamus via the nodose ganglion, and that ghrelin may protect against HFD-induced inflammation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced food intake by progesterone-treated female rats is related to changes in neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmańska, Ewa; Sucajtys-Szulc, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone-treated females eat more food, but the mechanism underlying this effect is not well understood. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of progesterone on neuropeptide genes expression in rat hypothalamus. Experiments were carried out on female and male Wistar rats. Animals were treated with progesterone (100 mg per rat) for 28 days. NPY and CART mRNA levels in hypothalamus were quantified by real-time PCR. The serum progesterone concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Progesterone administration to females caused an increase in food intake, body mass, and white adipose tissue mass. Elevated circulating progesterone concentration up-regulated NPY and down-regulated CART genes expression in hypothalamus of females. In males, elevated blood progesterone concentration had no effect on food intake, body and fat mass and on the neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus. Moreover, administration of progesterone in females resulted in decrease of PR mRNA level in hypothalamus. No effect of progesterone administration on PR mRNA level in hypothalamus of males was found. The changes in neuropeptide genes expression in hypothalamus may lead to stimulation of appetite and might explain the observed increase in food intake, body and adipose tissue mass in progesterone-treated females.

  3. Notch signaling and proneural genes work together to control the neural building blocks for the initial scaffold in the hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Michelle; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Dupé, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate embryonic prosencephalon gives rise to the hypothalamus, which plays essential roles in sensory information processing as well as control of physiological homeostasis and behavior. While patterning of the hypothalamus has received much attention, initial neurogenesis in the developing hypothalamus has mostly been neglected. The first differentiating progenitor cells of the hypothalamus will give rise to neurons that form the nucleus of the tract of the postoptic commissure (nTPOC) and the nucleus of the mammillotegmental tract (nMTT). The formation of these neuronal populations has to be highly controlled both spatially and temporally as these tracts will form part of the ventral longitudinal tract (VLT) and act as a scaffold for later, follower axons. This review will cumulate and summarize the existing data available describing initial neurogenesis in the vertebrate hypothalamus. It is well-known that the Notch signaling pathway through the inhibition of proneural genes is a key regulator of neurogenesis in the vertebrate central nervous system. It has only recently been proposed that loss of Notch signaling in the developing chick embryo causes an increase in the number of neurons in the hypothalamus, highlighting an early function of the Notch pathway during hypothalamus formation. Further analysis in the chick and mouse hypothalamus confirms the expression of Notch components and Ascl1 before the appearance of the first differentiated neurons. Many newly identified proneural target genes were also found to be expressed during neuronal differentiation in the hypothalamus. Given the critical role that hypothalamic neural circuitry plays in maintaining homeostasis, it is particularly important to establish the targets downstream of this Notch/proneural network. PMID:25520625

  4. Spontaneously hypertensive rats have more orexin neurons in their medial hypothalamus than normotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Liam; Dampney, Bruno W; Carrive, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? Blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, suggesting that upregulation of orexin signalling underlies the hypertensive phenotype of the SHR. However, it is not known what causes this upregulation. What is the main finding and its importance? Using orexin immunolabelling, we show that SHRs have 20% more orexin neurons than normotensive WKY and Wistar rats in the medial hypothalamus, which is a good match to their blood pressure phenotype. In contrast, there is no such match for the orexin neurons of the lateral hypothalamus. Essential hypertension may be linked to an increase in orexin neurons in the medial hypothalamus. The neuropeptide orexin contributes to the regulation of blood pressure as part of its role in the control of arousal during wakefulness and motivated behaviour (including responses to psychological stress). Recent work shows that pharmacological blockade of orexin receptors reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. It is not clear why orexin signalling is upregulated in the SHR, but one possibility is that these animals have more orexin neurons than their normotensive WKY and Wistar relatives. To test this possibility, SHRs, WKY and Wistar male rats (6-16 weeks old) were killed, perfused and their brains sectioned and immunolabelled for orexin A. Labelled neurons were plotted and counted in the six best labelled hemisections (120 μm apart) of each brain. There were significantly more orexin neurons (+20%) in the medial hypothalamus (medial to fornix) of SHRs compared with WKY and Wistar rats (126 ± 4 versus 106 ± 5 and 104 ± 5 per hemisection, respectively, P hypothalamus did not match the blood pressure phenotypes (69 ± 2 versus 50 ± 3 and 76 ± 4, respectively). The results support the idea that orexin signalling is upregulated

  5. Reaction by the rat hypothalamus-hypophyseal system to stress from immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajkowska, B.; Luciani, A.; Borowicz, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cytophysical changes in the ultrastructure of the neurosecretory hypothalamus under conditions of total short term immobility and partial long term immobility are investigated. Electron microscope morphological studies revealed a stimulatory response of the hypothalamus hypophyseal system of the rat brain to stress produced by immobilization. Total immobilization for two days resulted in changes in the neurons of the supraoptical and paraventricular nuclei and in the fibers of the neurohypophysis indicating an increased production of neurosecretory granules, their rapid flow and enhanced secretion to the blood. Partial immobilization of the animals for 3 weeks produced changes of a somewhat different character and of weaker intensity, which may be considered as a manifestation of the adaptation of the system and of the whole organism to the changed condition.

  6. Traveling from the hypothalamus to the adipose tissue: The thermogenic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cristina; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; López, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a specialized tissue critical for non-shivering thermogenesis producing heat through mitochondrial uncoupling; whereas white adipose tissue (WAT) is responsible of energy storage in the form of triglycerides. Another type of fat has been described, the beige adipose tissue; this tissue emerges in existing WAT depots but with thermogenic ability, a phenomenon known as browning. Several peripheral signals relaying information about energy status act in the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, to regulate thermogenesis in BAT and browning of WAT. Different hypothalamic areas have the capacity to regulate the thermogenic process in brown and beige adipocytes through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This review discusses important concepts and discoveries about the central control of thermogenesis as a trip that starts in the hypothalamus, and taking the sympathetic roads to reach brown and beige fat to modulate thermogenic functions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  8. Transcriptional profiling of rat hypothalamus response to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-ρ-dioxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlahan, Kathleen E; Prokopec, Stephenie D; Moffat, Ivy D; Lindén, Jere; Lensu, Sanna; Okey, Allan B; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2015-02-03

    In some mammals, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (HAH) exposure causes wasting syndrome, defined as significant weight loss associated with lethal outcomes. The most potent HAH in causing wasting is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-ρ-dioxin (TCDD), which exerts its toxic effects through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Since TCDD toxicity is thought to predominantly arise from dysregulation of AHR-transcribed genes, it was hypothesized that wasting syndrome is a result of to TCDD-induced dysregulation of genes involved in regulation of food-intake. As the hypothalamus is the central nervous systems' regulatory center for food-intake and energy balance. Therefore, mRNA abundances in hypothalamic tissue from two rat strains with widely differing sensitivities to TCDD-induced wasting syndrome: TCDD-sensitive Long-Evans rats and TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar rats, 23h after exposure to TCDD (100μg/kg) or corn oil vehicle. TCDD exposure caused minimal transcriptional dysregulation in the hypothalamus, with only 6 genes significantly altered in Long-Evans rats and 15 genes in Han/Wistar rats. Two of the most dysregulated genes were Cyp1a1 and Nqo1, which are induced by TCDD across a wide range of tissues and are considered sensitive markers of TCDD exposure. The minimal response of the hypothalamic transcriptome to a lethal dose of TCDD at an early time-point suggests that the hypothalamus is not the predominant site of initial events leading to hypophagia and associated wasting. TCDD may affect feeding behaviour via events upstream or downstream of the hypothalamus, and further work is required to evaluate this at the level of individual hypothalamic nuclei and subregions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular structure of purinergic P2X receptors and their expression in hypothalamus and pituitary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Balík, Aleš; Jindřichová, Marie; Vávra, Vojtěch

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S23-S38 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011408; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : purinergic P2X receptors * hypothalamus * pituitary Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  10. The Shark Alar Hypothalamus: Molecular Characterization of Prosomeric Subdivisions and Evolutionary Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Durán, Gabriel N.; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Menuet, Arnaud; Quintana-Urzainqui, Idoia; Mazan, Sylvie; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an important physiologic center of the vertebrate brain involved in the elaboration of individual and species survival responses. To better understand the ancestral organization of the alar hypothalamus we revisit previous data on ScOtp, ScDlx2/5, ScTbr1, ScNkx2.1 expression and Pax6 immunoreactivity jointly with new data on ScNeurog2, ScLhx9, ScLhx5, and ScNkx2.8 expression, in addition to immunoreactivity to serotonin (5-HT) and doublecortin (DCX) in the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula, a key species for this purpose since cartilaginous fishes are basal representatives of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Our study revealed a complex genoarchitecture for the chondrichthyan alar hypothalamus. We identified terminal (rostral) and peduncular (caudal) subdivisions in the prosomeric paraventricular and subparaventricular areas (TPa/PPa and TSPa/PSPa, respectively) evidenced by the expression pattern of developmental genes like ScLhx5 (TPa) and immunoreactivity against Pax6 (PSPa) and 5-HT (PPa and PSPa). Dorso-ventral subdivisions were only evidenced in the SPa (SPaD, SPaV; respectively) by means of Pax6 and ScNkx2.8 (respectively). Interestingly, ScNkx2.8 expression overlaps over the alar-basal boundary, as Nkx2.2 does in other vertebrates. Our results reveal evidences for the existence of different groups of tangentially migrated cells expressing ScOtp, Pax6, and ScDlx2. The genoarchitectonic comparative analysis suggests alternative interpretations of the rostral-most alar plate in prosomeric terms and reveals a conserved molecular background for the vertebrate alar hypothalamus likely acquired before/during the agnathan-gnathostome transition, on which Otp, Pax6, Lhx5, and Neurog2 are expressed in the Pa while Dlx and Nkx2.2/Nkx2.8 are expressed in the SPa. PMID:27932958

  11. Tissue-type plasminogen activator in somatostatin cells of rat pancreas and hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P; Larsson, L I; Danø, K

    1987-01-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs) proteolytically convert plasminogen to plasmin, which, in turn, can degrade most proteins. This system has been implicated in a variety of biological processes. Using immunocytochemical methods, we here describe the localization of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in rat somatos...... of the hypothalamus. No t-PA immunoreactivity could be detected in somatostatin cells of the gastric and intestinal mucosa....

  12. Volumetric Parcellation Methodology of the Human Hypothalamus in Neuroimaging: Normative Data and Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Nikos; Swaab, Dick F.; van der Kouwe, Andre; Abbs, Brandon; Boriel, Denise; Handa, Robert; Tobet, Stuart; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence regarding the importance of the hypothalamus for understanding sex differences in relation to neurological, psychiatric, endocrine and sleep disorders. Although different in histology, physiology, connections and function, multiple hypothalamic nuclei subserve non-voluntary functions and are nodal points for the purpose of maintaining homeostasis of the organism. Thus, given the critical importance of hypothalamic nuclei and their key multiple roles in regulating basic functions, it is important to develop the ability to conduct in vivo human studies of anatomic structure, volume, connectivity, and function of hypothalamic regions represented at the level of its nuclei. The goals of the present study were to develop a novel method of semi-automated volumetric parcellation for the human hypothalamus that could be used to investigate clinical conditions using MRI and to demonstrate its applicability. The proposed new method subdivides the hypothalamus into five parcels based on visible anatomic landmarks associated with specific nuclear groupings and was confirmed using two ex vivo hypothalami that were imaged in a 7 Tesla (7T) scanner and processed histologically. Imaging results were compared with histology from the same brain. Further, the method was applied to 44 healthy adults (26 men; 18 women, comparable on age, handedness, ethnicity, SES) to derive normative volumes and assess sex differences in hypothalamic regions using 1.5 Tesla MRI. Men compared to women had a significantly larger total hypothalamus, relative to cerebrum size, similar for both hemispheres, a difference that was primarily driven by the tuberal region, with the sex effect size being largest in the superior tuberal region and, to a lesser extent, inferior tuberal region. Given the critical role of hypothalamic nuclei in multiple chronic diseases and the importance of sex differences, we argue that the use of the novel methodology presented here will allow for

  13. Cdc2-like kinase 2 in the hypothalamus is necessary to maintain energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, P G F; Weissmann, L; Zanotto, T M; Santos, A C; de Matos, A H B; Furigo, I C; Simabuco, F M; Donato, J; Bittencourt, J C; Lopes-Cendes, I; Prada, P O

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether the Cdc2-like kinase 2 (CLK2) is expressed in hypothalamic neurons and if it is, whether the hypothalamic CLK2 has a role in the regulation of energy balance. Swiss mice on chow or high-fat diet (HFD) and db/db mice on chow diet were used to address the role of CLK2 in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic CLK2 Thr343 phosphorylation, which induces CLK2 activity, is regulated in vivo by refeeding, insulin and leptin, in a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-dependent manner. The reduction of CLK2 expression in the hypothalamus, by chronic pharmacological inhibition with TG003 or by chronic knockdown with small interfering RNA was sufficient to abolish the anorexigenic effect of insulin and leptin, to increase body weight, fat mass, food intake and to decrease energy expenditure in mice on chow. In contrast, CLK2 Thr343 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus in response to insulin, leptin or refeeding was impaired in mice on HFD or in db/db mice. Chronic CLK2 inhibition in the hypothalamus was associated with a slight increase in the fasting blood glucose levels, reduction in PEPCK (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) expression in the liver and enhanced glucose production from pyruvate, suggesting a regulation of hepatic glucose production. Further, overexpressing CLK2 in the mediobasal hypothalami of mice on HFD or in db/db mice by adenovirus partially reversed the obese phenotype. Thus, our results suggest that protein CLK2 integrates some important hypothalamic pathways, and may be a promising molecule for new therapeutic approaches for obesity and diabetes.

  14. Characterization of the hypothalamus of Xenopus laevis during development. II. The basal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2014-04-01

    The expression patterns of conserved developmental regulatory transcription factors and neuronal markers were analyzed in the basal hypothalamus of Xenopus laevis throughout development by means of combined immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. The connectivity of the main subdivisions was investigated by in vitro tracing techniques with dextran amines. The basal hypothalamic region is topologically rostral to the basal diencephalon and is composed of the tuberal (rostral) and mammillary (caudal) subdivisions, according to the prosomeric model. It is dorsally bounded by the optic chiasm and the alar hypothalamus, and caudally by the diencephalic prosomere p3. The tuberal hypothalamus is defined by the expression of Nkx2.1, xShh, and Isl1, and rostral and caudal portions can be distinguished by the distinct expression of Otp rostrally and Nkx2.2 caudally. In the mammillary region the xShh/Nkx2.1 combination defined the rostral mammillary area, expressing Nkx2.1, and the caudal retromammillary area, expressing xShh. The expression of xLhx1, xDll4, and Otp in the mammillary area and Isl1 in the tuberal region highlights the boundary between the two basal hypothalamic territories. Both regions are strongly connected with subpallial regions, especially those conveying olfactory/vomeronasal information, and also possess abundant intrahypothalamic connections. They show reciprocal connections with the diencephalon (mainly the thalamus), project to the midbrain tectum, and are bidirectionally related to the rhombencephalon. These results illustrate that the basal hypothalamus of anurans shares many features of specification, regionalization, and hodology with amniotes, reinforcing the idea of a basic bauplan in the organization of this prosencephalic region in all tetrapods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Excessive training is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress but not apoptosis in the hypothalamus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Paula; da Rocha, Alisson Luiz; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Oliveira, Luciana da Costa; Morais, Gustavo Paroschi; Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2017-04-01

    Downhill running-based overtraining model increases the hypothalamic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, SOCS3, and pSAPK-JNK. The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of 3 overtraining protocols on the levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), pPERK (Thr981), pelF2α (Ser52), ATF-6, GRP-94, caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) proteins in the mouse hypothalamus. The mice were randomized into the control, overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up), and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR) groups. After the overtraining protocols (i.e., at the end of week 8), hypothalamus was removed and used for immunoblotting. The OTR/down group exhibited increased levels of all of the analyzed endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. The OTR/up and OTR groups exhibited increased levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), and pPERK (Thr981) in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. There were no significant differences in the levels of caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) between the experimental groups at the end of week 8. In conclusion, the 3 overtraining protocols increased the endoplasmic reticulum stress at the end of week 8.

  16. Obesity Increases Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-3 Levels in the Hypothalamus of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara de A. Rodrigues

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 3 (MKP-3 has been involved in the negative regulation of insulin signaling. The absence of MKP-3 is also associated with reduced adiposity, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. The MKP-3 is known as the main Erk1/2 phosphatase and FoxO1 activator, which has repercussions on the gluconeogenesis pathway and hyperglycemia in obese mice. Recently, we showed that MKP-3 overexpression decreases FoxO1 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus of lean mice. However, the hypothalamic interaction between MKP-3 and FoxO1 during obesity was not investigated yet. Here, the MKP-3 expression and the effects on food intake and energy expenditure, were investigated in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. The results indicate that obesity in mice increased the MKP-3 protein content in the hypothalamus. This hypothalamic upregulation led to an increase of food intake, adiposity, and body weight. Furthermore, the obese mice with increased MKP-3 showed an insulin signaling impairment with reduction of insulin-induced FoxO1 and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus. Moreover, a bioinformatics analysis of data demonstrated that hypothalamic MKP-3 mRNA levels were positively correlated with body weight and negatively correlated to oxygen consumption (VO2 in BXD mice. Taken together, our study reports that obesity is associated with increased protein levels of hypothalamic MKP-3, which is related to the reduction of FoxO1 and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus as well as to an increase in body weight and a reduction in energy expenditure.

  17. Stability Analysis for an Extended Model of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Jackowska-Zduniak

    2016-01-01

    We formulate and analyze a mathematical model describing dynamics of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid homoeostatic mechanism in endocrine system. We introduce to this system two types of couplings and delay. In our model, feedback controls the secretion of thyroid hormones and delay reflects time lags required for transportation of the hormones. The influence of delayed feedback on the stability behaviour of the system is discussed. Analytical results are illustrated by...

  18. Progesterone metabolism by the hypothalamus, pituitary, and uterus of the rat during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrone, B.L.; Karavolas, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Metabolites of [ 3 H]progesterone were quantitated from incubations of hypothalamus, pituitary, and uterus of rats during different stages of pregnancy. The hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and a section of uterus from five rats on Days 1, 8, 15, and 21 of pregnancy were incubated individually with [3H]progesterone and analyzed for metabolite formation by reverse isotopic dilution analysis. The radioactive metabolites present were 5 alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione (5 alpha-DHP), 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one, 20 alpha-hydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one, 20 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-3-one, and 5 alpha-pregnane-3 alpha, 20 alpha-diol. The major metabolite formed by the hypothalamus and pituitary was 5 alpha-DHP. In the pituitary samples, formation of 5 alpha-DHP was decreased on Days 15 and 21 of pregnancy compared to Day 1, and formation of 20 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-3-one was decreased on Day 21 compared to Day 1. In the uterine samples, 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one was the major metabolite formed at all stages of pregnancy. The formation of all metabolic products of progesterone by the uterus was increased on Day 21 compared to Days 1, 8, and 15 of pregnancy. No changes in the formation of progesterone metabolites were observed in the hypothalamic samples during pregnancy. It is concluded that there are different profiles in the in vitro metabolism of [3H]progesterone by the hypothalamus, pituitary, and uterus of the rat during the course of pregnancy

  19. A Role for Glucocorticoids in Stress-Impaired Reproduction: Beyond the Hypothalamus and Pituitary

    OpenAIRE

    Whirledge, Shannon; Cidlowski, John A.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-characterized role of the sex steroid receptors in regulating fertility and reproduction, reproductive events are also mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to an individual's environment. Glucocorticoid secretion in response to stress contributes to the well-characterized suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through central actions in the hypothalamus and pituitary. However, both animal and in vitro studies indicate that oth...

  20. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal.

  1. Modulatory effect of endothelin-1 and -3 on neuronal norepinephrine release in the rat posterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nunzio, Andrea S; Legaz, Guillermina; Rodano, Valeria; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2004-04-15

    Based upon the existence of high density of ET-receptors on catecholaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus, we studied the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin-3 (ET-3) on neuronal norepinephrine (NE) release in the rat posterior hypothalamus. The intracellular pathways and receptors involved were also investigated. Neuronal NE release was enhanced by ET-1 and ET-3 (10 etaM). The selective antagonists of subtype A and B ET receptors (ETA, ETB) (100 etaM BQ-610 and 100 etaM BQ-788, respectively) abolished the increase induced by ET-1 but not by ET-3. The PLC inhibitor, U73122 (10 microM), abolished ET-1 and ET-3 response. GF-109203X (100 etaM) (PKC inhibitor) blocked the increase in NE release produced by ET-3 and partially blocked ET-1 response. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release inhibitor, 42 microM 2-APB, inhibited the stimulatory effect induced by ET-3 but not by ET-1. The PKA inhibitor, 500 etaM H-89, blocked the increase in neuronal NE release evoked by ET-1 but not by ET-3. Our results showed that ET-1 as well as ET-3 displayed an excitatory neuromodulatory effect on neuronal NE release in the rat posterior hypothalamus. ET-1 through an atypical ETA or ETB receptor activated the PLC/PKC signalling pathway as well as the cAMP pathway, whereas ET-3 through a non-ETA/non-ETB receptor activated the phosphoinositide pathway. Both ETs would enhance the sympathoexcitatory response elicited by the posterior hypothalamus and thus participate in cardiovascular regulation.

  2. Prosomeric organization of the hypothalamus in an elasmobranch, the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel-Nicolás eSantos-Durán

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus has been a central topic in neuroanatomy because of its important physiological functions, but its mature organization remains elusive. Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain. Here we studied the molecular organization of the hypothalamus and neighboring telencephalic domains in a cartilaginous fish, the catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula, focusing on ScFoxg1a, ScShh, ScNkx2.1, ScDlx2/5, ScOtp and ScTbr1 expression profiles and on the identification α-acetylated-tubulin-immunoreactive (ir, TH-ir, 5-HT-ir and GFAP-ir structures by means of immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates. These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

  3. Prosomeric organization of the hypothalamus in an elasmobranch, the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Durán, Gabriel N; Menuet, Arnaud; Lagadec, Ronan; Mayeur, Hélène; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Mazan, Sylvie; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus has been a central topic in neuroanatomy because of its important physiological functions, but its mature organization remains elusive. Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain. Here we studied the molecular organization of the hypothalamus and neighboring telencephalic domains in a cartilaginous fish, the catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula, focusing on ScFoxg1a, ScShh, ScNkx2.1, ScDlx2/5, ScOtp, and ScTbr1 expression profiles and on the identification α-acetylated-tubulin-immunoreactive (ir), TH-ir, 5-HT-ir, and GFAP-ir structures by means of immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates. These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

  4. Melatonin modulates monochromatic light-induced GHRH expression in the hypothalamus and GH secretion in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-04-01

    To study the mechanism by which monochromatic lights affect the growth of broilers, a total of 192 newly hatched broilers, including the intact, sham-operated and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) using a light-emitting diode (LED) system for 2 weeks. The results showed that the GHRH-ir neurons were distributed in the infundibular nucleus (IN) of the chick hypothalamus. The mRNA and protein levels of GHRH in the hypothalamus and the plasma GH concentrations in the chicks exposed to GL were increased by 6.83-31.36%, 8.71-34.52% and 6.76-9.19% compared to those in the chicks exposed to WL (P=0.022-0.001), RL (P=0.002-0.000) and BL (P=0.290-0.017) in the intact group, respectively. The plasma melatonin concentrations showed a positive correlation with the expression of GHRH (r=0.960) and the plasma GH concentrations (r=0.993) after the various monochromatic light treatments. After pinealectomy, however, these parameters decreased and there were no significant differences between GL and the other monochromatic light treatments. These findings suggest that melatonin plays a critical role in GL illumination-enhanced GHRH expression in the hypothalamus and plasma GH concentrations in young broilers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hypothalamus and ovary of Capra hircus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, Stefano; Capra, Emanuele; Lazzari, Barbara; McKay, Stephanie D; Coizet, Beatrice; Talenti, Andrea; Groppetti, Debora; Riccaboni, Pietro; Pecile, Alessandro; Chessa, Stefania; Castiglioni, Bianca; Williams, John L; Pagnacco, Giulio; Stella, Alessandra; Crepaldi, Paola

    2017-06-23

    DNA methylation is a frequently studied epigenetic modification due to its role in regulating gene expression and hence in biological processes and in determining phenotypic plasticity in organisms. Rudimentary DNA methylation patterns for some livestock species are publically available: among these, goat methylome deserves to be further explored. Genome-wide DNA methylation maps of the hypothalamus and ovary from Saanen goats were generated using Methyl-CpG binding domain protein sequencing (MBD-seq). Analysis of DNA methylation patterns indicate that the majority of methylation peaks found within genes are located gene body regions, for both organs. Analysis of the distribution of methylated sites per chromosome showed that chromosome X had the lowest number of methylation peaks. The X chromosome has one of the highest percentages of methylated CpG islands in both organs, and approximately 50% of the CpG islands in the goat epigenome are methylated in hypothalamus and ovary. Organ-specific Differentially Methylated Genes (DMGs) were correlated with the expression levels. The comparison between transcriptome and methylome in hypothalamus and ovary showed that a higher level of methylation is not accompanied by a higher gene suppression. The genome-wide DNA methylation map for two goat organs produced here is a valuable starting point for studying the involvement of epigenetic modifications in regulating goat reproduction performance.

  6. [Effects of lipopolysaccharide and dexamethasone on the expression of Kisspeptin/GPR54 in mouse hypothalamus].

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    Mao, Jiangfeng; Huang, Bingkun; Sun, Zhao; Han, Qin; Nie, Min; Wu, Xueyan

    2016-03-22

    To evaluate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dexamethasone on function of hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. LPS (100 μg/kg), dexamethasone (DEX, 1 mg/kg) and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) were injected subcutaneously into castrated mice (n=5 in each group) for 4 weeks. The expression of Kisspeptin and its receptor GPR54 in hypothalamus were measured by immunohistochemistry, and plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay. After LPS and DEX were administered for 4 weeks, the LH level in LPS group and DEX group was (1.79±0.74) U/L and (2.19±0.60) U/L, respectively, which were lower than PBS group (4.87±1.25) U/L (all Phypothalamus was 4.2±1.1, which was lower than the control group (10.2±1.6, Phypothalamus was 3.6±0.5, which was lower than PBS group (6.2±1.8, Phypothalamus did not change after treatment. LPS may downregulate function of hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis through Kisspeptin/GPR54 system. Dexamethasone could suppress function of gonadal axis as well, while the underlying mechanism is still unclear.

  7. Genetic programs of the developing tuberal hypothalamus and potential mechanisms of their disruption by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesan, Dinushan; Kurrasch, Deborah M

    2016-12-15

    The hypothalamus is a critical regulator of body homeostasis, influencing the autonomic nervous system and releasing trophic hormones to modulate the endocrine system. The developmental mechanisms that govern formation of the mature hypothalamus are becoming increasingly understood as research in this area grows, leading us to gain appreciation for how these developmental programs are susceptible to disruption by maternal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals or other environmental factors in utero. These vulnerabilities, combined with the prominent roles of the various hypothalamic nuclei in regulating appetite, reproductive behaviour, mood, and other physiologies, create a window whereby early developmental disruption can have potent long-term effects. Here we broadly outline our current understanding of hypothalamic development, with a particular focus on the tuberal hypothalamus, including what is know about nuclear coalescing and maturation. We finish by discussing how exposure to environmental or maternally-derived factors can perhaps disrupt these hypothalamic developmental programs, and potentially lead to neuroendocrine disease states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypothalamus-Related Resting Brain Network Underlying Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Primary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempted to explore modulated hypothalamus-seeded resting brain network underlying the cardiovascular system in primary hypertensive patients after short-term acupuncture treatment. Thirty right-handed patients (14 male were divided randomly into acupuncture and control groups. The acupuncture group received a continuous five-day acupuncture treatment and undertook three resting-state fMRI scans and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM as well as SF-36 questionnaires before, after, and one month after acupuncture treatment. The control group undertook fMRI scans and 24-hour ABPM. For verum acupuncture, average blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR decreased after treatment but showed no statistical differences. There were no significant differences in BP and HR between the acupuncture and control groups. Notably, SF-36 indicated that bodily pain (P = 0.005 decreased and vitality (P = 0.036 increased after acupuncture compared to the baseline. The hypothalamus-related brain network showed increased functional connectivity with the medulla, brainstem, cerebellum, limbic system, thalamus, and frontal lobes. In conclusion, short-term acupuncture did not decrease BP significantly but appeared to improve body pain and vitality. Acupuncture may regulate the cardiovascular system through a complicated brain network from the cortical level, the hypothalamus, and the brainstem.

  9. One night of partial sleep deprivation affects habituation of hypothalamus and skin conductance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anja C; Blechert, Jens; Sämann, Philipp G; Eidner, Ines; Czisch, Michael; Spoormaker, Victor I

    2014-09-15

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in clinical anxiety, but it remains unclear whether they are cause and/or consequence of this condition. Fear conditioning constitutes a valid laboratory model for the acquisition of normal and pathological anxiety. To explore the relationship between disturbed sleep and anxiety in more detail, the present study evaluated the effect of partial sleep deprivation (SD) on fear conditioning in healthy individuals. The neural correlates of 1) nonassociative learning and physiological processing and 2) associative learning (differential fear conditioning) were addressed. Measurements entailed simultaneous functional MRI, EEG, skin conductance response (SCR), and pulse recordings. Regarding nonassociative learning, partial SD resulted in a generalized failure to habituate during fear conditioning, as evidenced by reduced habituation of SCR and hypothalamus responses to all stimuli. Furthermore, SCR and hypothalamus activity were correlated, supporting their functional relationship. Regarding associative learning, effects of partial SD on the acquisition of conditioned fear were weaker and did not reach statistical significance. The hypothalamus plays an integral role in the regulation of sleep and autonomic arousal. Thus sleep disturbances may play a causal role in the development of normal and possibly pathological fear by increasing the susceptibility of the sympathetic nervous system to stressful experiences. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Oleic Acid and Octanoic Acid Sensing Capacity in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Is Direct in Hypothalamus and Brockmann Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librán-Pérez, Marta; López-Patiño, Marcos A.; Míguez, Jesús M.; Soengas, José L.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we provided evidence for the presence in hypothalamus and Brockmann bodies (BB) of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss of sensing systems responding to changes in levels of oleic acid (long-chain fatty acid, LCFA) or octanoic acid (medium-chain fatty acid, MCFA). Since those effects could be attributed to an indirect effect, in the present study, we evaluated in vitro if hypothalamus and BB respond to changes in FA in a way similar to that observed in vivo. In a first set of experiments, we evaluated in hypothalamus and BB exposed to increased oleic acic or octanoic acid concentrations changes in parameters related to FA metabolism, FA transport, nuclear receptors and transcription factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS) effectors, components of the KATP channel, and (in hypothalamus) neuropeptides related to food intake. In a second set of experiments, we evaluated in hypothalamus the response of those parameters to oleic acid or octanoic acid in the presence of inhibitors of fatty acid sensing components. The responses observed in vitro in hypothalamus are comparable to those previously observed in vivo and specific inhibitors counteracted in many cases the effects of FA. These results support the capacity of rainbow trout hypothalamus to directly sense changes in MCFA or LCFA levels. In BB increased concentrations of oleic acid or octanoic acid induced changes that in general were comparable to those observed in hypothalamus supporting direct FA sensing in this tissue. However, those changes were not coincident with those observed in vivo allowing us to suggest that the FA sensing capacity of BB previously characterized in vivo is influenced by other neuroendocrine systems. PMID:23533628

  11. Dynamic of bioelectric activity back hypothalamus changes in conditions of pyroxan application on the background of stress-reaction developmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Chaus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of changes of capacity of electroencephalogram’s rhythms back hypothalamus at animals of control group and group in stress conditions in parallel with rats who on a background of stress development accepted pyroxan is analyzed. The submitted results have shown influence of a pharmacological preparation pyroxan on bioelectric activity of back hypothalamus in stress conditions that restoration of electric activity under action of this preparation was more shown at 3 weeks of its application.

  12. Increase in oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rat: Antioxidative effect of Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, P; Shetty, R; Ghafourifar, P; Parihar, M S

    2016-01-22

    Hypothalamus, the primary brain region for glucose sensing, is severely affected by oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress in this region of brain may cause severe impairment in neuronal metabolic functions. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative stress and the combination of increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions may further decline hypothalamic neuronal functions. In the present study we examined the oxidative damage response, antioxidative responses and mitochondrial membrane permeability transition in hypothalamus of streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Our results show that streptozotocin significantly increases hypothalamic lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content while glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione were declined. Mitochondrial impairment marked by an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization was seen following streptozotocin treatment in the hypothalamus. The oral administration of Withania somnifera root extract stabilized mitochondrial functions and prevented oxidative damage in the hypothalamus of diabetic rat. These findings suggest an increase in the oxidative stress and decline in antioxidative responses in the hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rats. Withania somnifera root extract was found useful in reducing oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of diabetic rat.

  13. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  14. The Different Roles of Glucocorticoids in the Hippocampus and Hypothalamus in Chronic Stress-Induced HPA Axis Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression. PMID:24831808

  15. Heat stress attenuates new cell generation in the hypothalamus: a role for miR-138.

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    Kisliouk, T; Cramer, T; Meiri, N

    2014-09-26

    The anterior hypothalamus (Ant Hyp) of the brain serves as the main regulator of numerous homeostatic functions, among them body temperature. Fine-tuning of the thermal-response set point during the critical postnatal sensory-developmental period involves neuronal network remodeling which might also be accompanied by alterations in hypothalamic cell populations. Here we demonstrate that heat stress during the critical period of thermal-control establishment interferes with generation of new cells in the chick hypothalamus. Whereas conditioning of the 3-day-old chicks under high ambient temperatures for 24h diminished the number of newborn cells in anterior hypothalamic structures 1 week after the treatment, mild heat stress did not influence the amount of new cells. Phenotypic analysis of these newborn cells indicated a predominant decrease in non-neuronal cell precursors, i.e. cells that do not express doublecortin (DCX). Furthermore, heat challenge of 10-day-old previously high-temperature-conditioned chicks abolished hypothalamic neurogenesis and significantly decreased the number of cells of non-neural origin. As a potential regulatory mechanism for the underlying generation of new cells in the hypothalamus, we investigated the role of the microRNA (miRNA) miR-138, previously reported by us to promote hypothalamic cell migration in vitro and whose levels are reduced during heat stress. Intracranial injection into the third ventricle of miR-138 led to an increase in the number of newborn cells in the Ant Hyp, an effect which might be partially mediated by inhibition of its direct target reelin. These data demonstrate the role of ambient temperature on the generation of new cells in the hypothalamus during the critical period of thermal-control establishment and highlight the long-term effect of severe heat stress on hypothalamic cell population. Moreover, miRNAs, miR-138 in particular, can regulate new cell generation in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2014 IBRO

  16. The central anorexigenic mechanism of adrenocorticotropic hormone involves the caudal hypothalamus in chicks.

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    Shipp, Steven L; Yi, Jiaqing; Dridi, Sami; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), consisting of 39 amino acids, is most well-known for its involvement in an organism's response to stress. It also participates in satiety, as exogenous ACTH causes decreased food intake in rats. However, its anorexigenic mechanism is not well understood in any species and its effect on appetite is not reported in the avian class. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate central ACTH's effect on food intake and to elucidate the mechanism mediating this response using broiler chicks. Chicks that received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 1, 2, or 4 nmol of ACTH reduced food intake, under both ad libitum and 180 min fasted conditions. Water intake was also reduced in ACTH-injected chicks under both feeding conditions, but when measured without access to feed it was not affected. Blood glucose was not affected in either feeding condition. Following ACTH injection, c-Fos immunoreactivity was quantified in key appetite-associated hypothalamic nuclei including the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the parvo- and magno-cellular portions of the paraventricular nucleus. ACTH-injected chicks had increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the VMH, LH, and ARC. Hypothalamus was collected at 1h post-injection, and real-time PCR performed to measure mRNA abundance of some appetite-associated factors. Neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, glutamate decarboxylase 1, melanocortin receptors 2-5, and urocortin 3 mRNA abundance was not affected by ACTH treatment. However, expression of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), urotensin 2 (UT), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), and orexin (ORX), and melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) mRNA decreased in the hypothalamus of ACTH-injected chicks. In conclusion, ICV ACTH causes decreased food intake in chicks, and is associated with VMH, LH, and ARC activation, and a decrease in hypothalamic mRNA abundance of CRF, UT, AgRP, ORX

  17. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-induced anorexia in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) likely involves the ventromedial hypothalamus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Taylor; Liu, Lingbin; O'Donnell, Madison; McConn, Betty R; Denbow, D Michael; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) reduces food intake in birds and mammals. The objective of this experiment was to determine effects of α-MSH on food and water intake, and hypothalamic c-Fos immunoreactivity and appetite-associated factor mRNA in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), a species that has not undergone the same artificial selection for growth-related traits as the chicken. At 7days post-hatch, 3-h-fasted quail were intracerebroventricularly (ICV) injected into the lateral ventricle with 0 (vehicle), 0.5, 5, or 50pmol of α-MSH and food and water intake were recorded at 30min intervals for 180min. In the second and third experiment, quail were injected with 50pmol α-MSH and hypothalami were collected at 1h to determine c-Fos immunoreactivity and mRNA abundance, respectively. At 30min, quail injected with 5 or 50pmol of α-MSH ate and drank less than vehicle-injected quail. Quail injected with 50pmol ate less for the entire duration of the experiment and drank less than vehicle-injected quail for 120min post-injection. Hypothalamic expression of agouti-related peptide and DOPA decarboxylase were greater in vehicle- than α-MSH-injected quail, whereas melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) mRNA was greater in α-MSH- than vehicle-injected birds. Alpha-MSH injection was associated with more c-Fos immunoreactive cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Results suggest that the anorexigenic effect of α-MSH is conserved among avians and that effects in quail are associated with the VMH and PVN and involve MC4R. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of monochromatic light on circadian rhythmic expression of clock genes in the hypothalamus of chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the effect of monochromatic light on circadian clock gene expression in chick hypothalamus, a total 240 newly hatched chickens were reared under blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL) and white light (WL), respectively. On the post-hatched day 14, 24-h profiles of seven core clock genes (cClock, cBmal1, cBmal2, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) were measured at six time points (CT 0, CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, circadian time). We found all these clock genes expressed with a significant rhythmicity in different light wavelength groups. Meanwhile, cClock and cBmal1 showed a high level under GL, and followed a corresponding high expression of cCry1. However, RL decreased the expression levels of these genes. Be consistent with the mRNA level, CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins also showed a high level under GL. The CLOCK-like immunoreactive neurons were observed not only in the SCN, but also in the non-SCN brain region such as the nucleus anterior medialis hypothalami, the periventricularis nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus and the median eminence. All these results are consistent with the auto-regulatory circadian feedback loop, and indicate that GL may play an important role on the circadian time generation and development in the chick hypothalamus. Our results also suggest that the circadian clock in the chick hypothalamus such as non-SCN brain region were involved in the regulation of photo information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of neuroleptics administration on adult neurogenesis in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojczyk, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    Among many factors influencing adult neurogenesis, pharmacological modulation has been broadly studied. It is proven that neuroleptics positively affect new neuron formation in canonical neurogenic sites - subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Latest findings suggest that adult neurogenesis also occurs in several additional regions like the hypothalamus, amygdala, neocortex and striatum. As the hypothalamus is considered an important target of neuroleptics, a hypothesis can be made that these substances are able to modulate local neural proliferation. Experiments were performed on adult male rats injected for 28 days or 1 day by three neuroleptics: olanzapine, chlorpromazine and haloperidol. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine expression of proliferation marker (Ki-67) and the marker of neuroblasts - doublecortin (DCX) - which may inform about drug influence on adult neurogenesis at the level of the hypothalamus. It was shown that a single injection of antipsychotics causes significant decrease in hypothalamic DCX expression, but after chronic treatment with chlorpromazine, but not olanzapine, there is an increase in the number of newly formed neuroblasts. Haloperidol has the opposite effect - its long-term administration decreases the number of DCX-positive cells. Cell proliferation levels (Ki-67 expression) increase after long-term drug administration, whereas their single doses do not have any modulatory effect on proliferation potential. Our results throw a new light on the neuroleptics mechanism of action. They also support the potential role of antipsychotics as a factor that can modulate hypothalamic neurogenesis with putative clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Melatonin modulates monochromatic light-induced melatonin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Chen, Funing; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-09-01

    To study the mechanism of the effect of monochromatic light on physiological function in chicken, a total of 192 newly hatched chicks were randomly divided into intact, sham-operated and pinealectomy groups then exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) using a light-emitting diode (LED) system for two weeks. At P14, the hypothalami were immediately collected for immunohistochemical staining of melatonin receptor subtypes (Mel1a and Mel1b) and detection of Mel1a and Mel1b expressions using RT-PCR and western blot. Immunohistochemical staining of the hypothalamus showed that the Mel1a-ir cells were distributed in the preoptic area (POA), nucleus preopticus periventricularis (POP) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), and the Mel1b-ir cells were presented in the POA and SCN. Analysis of RT-PCR and western blot showed that the mRNA and protein levels of Mel1a and Mel1b in the hypothalamus of chick exposed to GL were increased by 10.7-29.3%, 9.18-35.9% and 8.97-27.3% compared to those in the chicks exposed to WL (P=0.029-0.002), RL (P=0.027-0.001) and BL (P=0.038-0.007) in the intact group, respectively. After pinealectomy, however, these parameters decreased and there were no significant differences among the WL, RL, GL and BL groups. These findings suggested that melatonin plays a critical role in GL illumination-enhanced Mel1a and Mel1b expressions in the hypothalamus of chicks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothalamus-pituitary axis: an obligatory target for endocannabinoids to inhibit steroidogenesis in frog testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianese, Rosanna; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Meccariello, Rosaria

    2014-09-01

    Endocannabinoids - primarily anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) - are lipophilic molecules that bind to cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). They affect neuroendocrine activity inhibiting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and testosterone production in rodents, through a molecular mechanism supposed to be hypothalamus dependent. In order to investigate such a role, we choose the seasonal breeder, the anuran amphibian Rana esculenta, an experimental model in which components of the endocannabinoid system have been characterized. In February, at the onset of a new spermatogenetic wave, we carried out in vitro incubations of frog testis with AEA, at 10(-9)M dose. Such a treatment had no effect on the expression of cytochrome P450 17alpha hydroxylase/17,20 lyase (cyp17) nor 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ-5-4 isomerase (3β-HSD), key enzymes of steroidogenesis. To understand whether or not the functionality of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis could be essential to support the role of endocannabinoids in steroidogenesis, frogs were injected with AEA, at 10(-8)M dose. Differently from in vitro experiment, the in vivo administration of AEA reduced the expression of cyp17 and 3β-HSD. Whereas the effect on 3β-HSD was counteracted by SR141716A (Rimonabant) - a selective antagonist of CB1, thus indicating a CB1 dependent modulation - the effect on cyp17 was not, suggesting a possible involvement of receptors other than CB1, probably the type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), since AEA works as an endocannabinoid and an endovanilloid as well. In conclusion our results indicate that endocannabinoids, via CB1, inhibit the expression of 3β-HSD in frog testis travelling along the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubuiro, Ashley; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Walsh, Susan A.; Sunderland, John; McCormick, Laurie; Singh, Minati

    2013-01-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wheel and food. Metabolic activity of brain and peripheral tissue were assessed with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and RNA expression of feeding related genes, ADAR2, dopamine and opiate receptors from the hypothalamus and striatum were examined. The results indicate that ADAR2 transgenic mice exhibit, (1) a food preference for diets with higher fat content, (2) significantly increased food intake that is non-distractible in a competing reward environment, (3) significantly increased mRNA expressions of ADAR2, serotonin 2C receptor (5HT2CR), D1, D2, and mu opioid receptors and no change in CRH mRNAs and significantly reduced ADAR2 protein expression in the hypothalamus, (4) significantly increased D1 receptor and altered bioamines with no change in ADAR2, mu opioid and D2 receptor mRNA expression in the striatum, and (5) significantly greater glucose metabolism in the hypothalamus, brain stem, right hippocampus, left and right mid brain regions and suprascapular peripheral tissue than controls. These results suggest that highly motivated and goal-oriented overeating behaviors of ADAR2 transgenic mice are associated with altered feeding, reward-related mRNAs, and hyperactive brain mesolimbic region. PMID:23323881

  3. The role of hypothalamus tuberomammillary nucleus on the regulation of respiratory movement of rats with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the role of central histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN of posterior hypothalamus on asthma. Methods  Seventy-two healthy male SD rats were served as study objects. Sixty-four rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA solution intraperitoneally and challenged with OA aerosol inhalation to prepare asthma model. Asthma attack was evoked in asthmatic rats by OA solution injected intravenously, the electrical activities of TMN in posterior hypothalamus were recorded with biological signal collecting system and the power spectra were analyzed. TMN was lesioned or stimulated electrically by central stereo positioning technology. Histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(α-methylhistamine (RMHA or antagonist thioperamide (THIO was microinjected into TMN by central nuclear group microinjection technology, and the pulmonary function indexes were detected including diaphragm electromyography (EMGdi frequency, EMGdi integral, minute ventilation volume (MVV, expiratory time/inspiratory time (TE/TI, airway resistance (Raw and dynamic pulmonary compliance (Cdyn. Results  Compared with control group, the percentage of α, β1 and β2 wave in the electrical activities of TMN of asthmatic rats increased significantly, while the percentage of δ and θ wave decreased and the total discharge power increased. Compared with the corresponding control group, electric lesion of TMN or TMN microinjected with histamine H3 receptor antagonist increased EMGdi frequency, TE/TI, Raw, and decreased EMGdi integral, MVV and Cdyn. Compared with the corresponding control group, electric stimulation of TMN or TMN microinjected with histamine H3 receptor agonist decreased EMGdi frequency, TE/TI, Raw, and increased EMGdi integral, MVV and Cdyn. Conclusion  Central histaminergic neurons in tuberomammillary nucleus of posterior hypothalamus are activated in asthmatic rats. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.12.09

  4. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubuiro, A; Bridget Zimmerman, M; Boles Ponto, L L; Walsh, S A; Sunderland, J; McCormick, L; Singh, M

    2013-04-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wheel and food. Metabolic activity of brain and peripheral tissue were assessed with [(18) F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and RNA expression of feeding related genes, ADAR2, dopamine and opiate receptors from the hypothalamus and striatum were examined. The results indicate that ADAR2 transgenic mice exhibit, (1) a food preference for diets with higher fat content, (2) significantly increased food intake that is non-distractible in a competing reward environment, (3) significantly increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of ADAR2, serotonin 2C receptor (5HT2C R), D1, D2 and mu opioid receptors and no change in corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNAs and significantly reduced ADAR2 protein expression in the hypothalamus, (4) significantly increased D1 receptor and altered bioamines with no change in ADAR2, mu opioid and D2 receptor mRNA expression in the striatum and (5) significantly greater glucose metabolism in the hypothalamus, brain stem, right hippocampus, left and right mid brain regions and suprascapular peripheral tissue than controls. These results suggest that highly motivated and goal-oriented overeating behaviors of ADAR2 transgenic mice are associated with altered feeding, reward-related mRNAs and hyperactive brain mesolimbic region. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

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    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  6. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...... to a charge-coupled device camera, and positioned over the PVH in five cats. Electrodes for assessing state variables, including electroencephalographic activity, eye movement, and somatic muscle tone were also placed. After surgical recovery, reflected light intensity was measured continuously at 2.5 Hz...

  7. Hypothalamus proteomics from mouse models with obesity and anorexia reveals therapeutic targets of appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousopoulou, A; Koutmani, Y; Karaliota, S; Woelk, C H; Manolakos, E S; Karalis, K; Garbis, S D

    2016-04-25

    This study examined the proteomic profile of the hypothalamus in mice exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD) or with the anorexia of acute illness. This comparison could provide insight on the effects of these two opposite states of energy balance on appetite regulation. Four to six-week-old male C56BL/6J mice were fed a normal (control 1 group; n=7) or a HFD (HFD group; n=10) for 8 weeks. The control 2 (n=7) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) groups (n=10) were fed a normal diet for 8 weeks before receiving an injection of saline and LPS, respectively. Hypothalamic regions were analysed using a quantitative proteomics method based on a combination of techniques including iTRAQ stable isotope labeling, orthogonal two-dimensional liquid chromatography hyphenated with nanospray ionization and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Key proteins were validated with quantitative PCR. Quantitative proteomics of the hypothalamous regions profiled a total of 9249 protein groups (q<0.05). Of these, 7718 protein groups were profiled with a minimum of two unique peptides for each. Hierachical clustering of the differentiated proteome revealed distinct proteomic signatures for the hypothalamus under the HFD and LPS nutritional conditions. Literature research with in silico bioinformatics interpretation of the differentiated proteome identified key biological relevant proteins and implicated pathways. Furthermore, the study identified potential pharmacologic targets. In the LPS groups, the anorexigen pro-opiomelanocortin was downregulated. In mice with obesity, nuclear factor-κB, glycine receptor subunit alpha-4 (GlyR) and neuropeptide Y levels were elevated, whereas serotonin receptor 1B levels decreased. High-precision quantitative proteomics revealed that under acute systemic inflammation in the hypothalamus as a response to LPS, homeostatic mechanisms mediating loss of appetite take effect. Conversely, under chronic inflammation in the hypothalamus as a response to HFD, mechanisms

  8. Coinjection of CCK and leptin reduces food intake via increased CART/TRH and reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akieda-Asai, Sayaka; Poleni, Paul-Emile; Date, Yukari

    2014-06-01

    CCK and leptin are anorectic hormones produced in the small intestine and white adipose tissue, respectively. Investigating how these hormones act together as an integrated anorectic signal is important for elucidating the mechanisms by which energy balance is maintained. We found here that coadministration of subthreshold CCK and leptin, which individually have no effect on feeding, dramatically reduced food intake in rats. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus significantly decreased after coinjection of CCK and leptin. In addition, coadministration of these hormones significantly increased mRNA levels of anorectic cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the hypothalamus. The interactive effect of CCK and leptin on food intake was abolished by intracerebroventricular preadministration of the AMPK activator AICAR or anti-CART/anti-TRH antibodies. These findings indicate that coinjection of CCK and leptin reduces food intake via reduced AMPK phosphorylation and increased CART/TRH in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, by using midbrain-transected rats, we investigated the role of the neural pathway from the hindbrain to the hypothalamus in the interaction of CCK and leptin to reduce food intake. Food intake reduction induced by coinjection of CCK and leptin was blocked in midbrain-transected rats. Therefore, the neural pathway from hindbrain to hypothalamus plays an important role in transmitting the anorectic signals provided by coinjection of CCK and leptin. Our findings give further insight into the mechanisms of feeding and energy balance. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Effect of Zinc on Appetite Regulatory Peptides in the Hypothalamus of Salmonella-Challenged Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiyi; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Li, Xianlei; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Bingkun; Song, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    The effects of dietary Zinc (Zn) supplementation on the gene expression of appetite regulatory peptides were investigated in Salmonella-infected broiler chickens. Broiler chickens (Arbor Acres, 1 day old) were allocated randomly into 24 pens of 10 birds. The chickens from 12 pens were fed with basal diet and the other with basal diet supplemented with Zn (ZnSO4·H2O, 120 mg/kg). At 5 days of age, the chickens were divided into 4 treatments with 6 pens: basal diet; basal diet and Salmonella challenge; Zn-supplemented diet; Zn-supplemented diet and Salmonella challenge. At 42 days of age, the hypothalamus from 6 chickens per treatment (1 chicken per pen) was individually collected for gene expression determination. Results showed that dietary supplementation of Zn reduced the gene expression of hypothalamic ghrelin and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (P hypothalamus of Salmonella-challenged broilers.

  10. Unilateral neuromodulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus of the rat through deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkuhle, M. J.; Mayes, S. M.; Kipke, D. R.

    2010-06-01

    This study offers evidence that long-term deep brain stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter weight gain in mammals without affecting feeding behavior. Animals stimulated unilaterally at high frequencies of 150 or 500 Hz demonstrated increased CO2 production that decreased from prestimulation levels after the stimulation was removed. Animals stimulated for up to 6 weeks gained weight at a lower rate than normal animals or animals implanted with an electrode but not stimulated. Stimulated animals exhibited normal food and water consumption. A significant decrease in efficiency was observed during stimulation that coincided with an increase in the amount of feces produced. Whereas the weight of control animals was significantly different from week to week, the weight of stimulated animals did not change accordingly. These data suggest that the VMH may be a viable target for long-term deep brain stimulation for modulation of the neural mechanisms of metabolism. The potential therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus are discussed.

  11. Induction of Autophagy in the Striatum and Hypothalamus of Mice after 835 MHz Radiofrequency Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Rim

    2016-01-01

    The extensive use of wireless mobile phones and associated communication devices has led to increasing public concern about potential biological health-related effects of the exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). EMFs emitted by a mobile phone have been suggested to influence neuronal functions in the brain and affect behavior. However, the affects and phenotype of EMFs exposure are unclear. We applied radiofrequency (RF) of 835 MHz at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 5 hours/day for 4 and 12 weeks to clarify the biological effects on mouse brain. Interestingly, microarray data indicated that a variety of autophagic related genes showed fold-change within small range after 835 MHz RF exposure. qRT-PCR revealed significant up-regulation of the autophagic genes Atg5, LC3A and LC3B in the striatum and hypothalamus after a 12-week RF. In parallel, protein expression of LC3B-II was also increased in both brain regions. Autophagosomes were observed in the striatum and hypothalamus of RF-exposed mice, based on neuronal transmission electron microscopy. Taken together, the results indicate that RF exposure of the brain can induce autophagy in neuronal tissues, providing insight into the protective mechanism or adaptation to RF stress. PMID:27073885

  12. Reactive oxygen species in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus alter sympathetic activity during metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSIANE CAMPOS CRUZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II, which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs, mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO. Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS: dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS.

  13. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wu, Jibiao

    2017-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability) commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies. PMID:28255462

  14. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqi Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies.

  15. Characterization of taurine binding, uptake, and release in the rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanretta, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neurotransmitter criteria of specific receptors, inactivation, and release were experimentally examined for taurine in the hypothalamus. Specific membrane binding and synaptosomal uptake of taurine both displayed high affinity and low affinity systems. The neurotransmitter criterion of release was studied in superfused synaptosomes. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the high affinity uptake range (1.5 μM) to either 56 mM K + or 100 μM veratridine evoked a Ca 2+ -independent release. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the low affinity uptake range (2 mM) to 56 mM K + induced a Ca 2+ -independent release, whereas 100 + M veratridine did not, either in the presence or absence of Ca 2+ . Based on these results, as well as other observations, a model is proposed in which the high affinity uptake system is located on neuronal membranes and the low affinity uptake system is located on glial membranes. The mechanisms of binding, uptake, and release in relation to the cellular location of each are discussed. We conclude that the neurotransmitter criterion of activation by re-uptake is satisfied for taurine in the hypothalamus. However, the failure to demonstrate both a specific taurine receptor site and a Ca 2+ -dependent evoked release, necessitates that we conclude that taurine appears not to function as a hypothalamic neurotransmitter, at least not in the classical sense

  16. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in two mouse models of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Sausan; Schlatzer, Daniela; Nethery, David; Saleh, Dania; Li, Xiaolin; Akladious, Afaf; Chance, Mark R; Strohl, Kingman P

    2017-07-01

    Narcolepsy is a disabling neurological disorder of sleepiness linked to the loss of neurons producing orexin neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. Two well-characterized phenotypic mouse models of narcolepsy, loss-of-function (orexin-knockout), and progressive loss of orexin (orexin/ataxin-3) exist. The open question is whether the proteomics signatures of the hypothalamus would be different between the two models. To address this gap, we utilized a label-free proteomics approach and conducted a hypothalamic proteome analysis by comparing each disease model to that of wild type. Following data processing and statistical analysis, 14 484 peptides mapping to 2282 nonredundant proteins were identified, of which 39 proteins showed significant differences in protein expression across groups. Altered proteins in both models showed commonalties in pathways for mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal degeneration, as well as altered proteins related to inflammatory demyelination, insulin resistance, metabolic responses, and the dopaminergic and monoaminergic systems. Model-specific alterations in insulin degraded enzyme (IDE) and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 were unique to orexin-KO and orexin/ataxin-3, respectively. For both models, proteomics not only identified clinically suspected consequences of orexin loss on energy homeostasis and neurotransmitter systems, but also identified commonalities in inflammation and degeneration despite the entirely different genetic basis of the two mouse models. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in a mouse model of cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnatko, R; Post, C; Blomqvist, A

    2013-10-01

    Anorexia-cachexia is a common and severe cancer-related complication but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, using a mouse model for tumour-induced anorexia-cachexia, we screened for proteins that are differentially expressed in the hypothalamus, the brain's metabolic control centre. The hypothalamus of tumour-bearing mice with implanted methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MCG 101) displaying anorexia and their sham-implanted pair-fed or free-fed littermates was examined using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE)-based comparative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The 2-DE data showed an increased expression of dynamin 1, hexokinase, pyruvate carboxylase, oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor in tumour-bearing mice, whereas heat-shock 70 kDa cognate protein, selenium-binding protein 1, and guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gα0 were downregulated. The expression of several of the identified proteins was similarly altered also in the caloric-restricted pair-fed mice, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in brain metabolic adaptation to restricted nutrient availability. However, the expression of dynamin 1, which is required for receptor internalisation, and of hexokinase, and pyruvate carboxylase were specifically changed in tumour-bearing mice with anorexia. The identified differentially expressed proteins may be new candidate molecules involved in the pathophysiology of tumour-induced anorexia-cachexia.

  18. Serotonergic effects on feeding, but not hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal secretion, are altered in ovine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingis, Melissa; Richards, Elaine; Perrone, Dana; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2012-05-01

    In ovine pregnancy, as in human pregnancy, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal activity is chronically increased. These studies were designed to test the hypotheses that expression of serotonergic genes and responsiveness to serotonin are increased in pregnancy. We tested the stimulatory effect of an acute, intracerebroventricular injection of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine on plasma ACTH and cortisol in ewes during late pregnancy or postpartum. We also tested the effect of lower-dose, longer-term stimulation by intracerebroventricular infusion of fluoxetine in pregnant and nonpregnant ewes over 6 days. Overall, we found that the stimulatory effect of fluoxetine on ACTH and cortisol was not significantly different between late-gestation and nonpregnant ewes, although the effect of acute fluoxetine administration was inversely related to plasma progesterone concentrations. Also, there were no differences in hypothalamic expression of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, corticotropin-releasing hormone, AVP, the serotonin reuptake transporter, or the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptors 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) with pregnancy or fluoxetine treatment. However, chronic fluoxetine infusion reduced food intake in the nonpregnant, but not pregnant, ewes. Expression of proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the hypothalamus was reduced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant ewes. Our results indicate that pregnancy does not increase responsiveness of ACTH and cortisol to serotonergic stimulation but, rather, that progesterone reduces the ACTH response. In addition, we found a reduced ability of serotonin to inhibit feeding in the pregnant ewes, consistent with a reduction in anorexic mechanisms in the pregnant state.

  19. Sex differences in feeding behavior in rats: the relationship with neuronal activation in the hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eFukushima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is general agreement that the central nervous system in rodents differs between sexes due to the presence of gonadal steroid hormone during differentiation. Sex differences in feeding seem to occur among species, and responses to fasting (i.e., starvation, gonadal steroids (i.e., testosterone and estradiol, and diet (i.e., western-style diet vary significantly between sexes. The hypothalamus is the center for controlling feeding behavior. We examined the activation of feeding-related peptides in neurons in the hypothalamus. Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB is a good marker for neural activation, as is the Fos antigen. Therefore, we predicted that sex differences in the activity of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons would be associated with feeding behavior. We determined the response of MCH neurons to glucose in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA and our results suggested MCH neurons play an important role in sex differences in feeding behavior. In addition, fasting increased the number of orexin neurons harboring phosphorylated CREB in female rats (regardless of the estrous day, but not male rats. Glucose injection decreased the number of these neurons with phosphorylated CREB in fasted female rats. Finally, under normal spontaneous food intake, MCH neurons, but not orexin neurons, expressed phosphorylated CREB. These sex differences in response to fasting and glucose, as well as under normal conditions, suggest a vulnerability to metabolic challenges in females.

  20. Astrocytes modulate distribution and neuronal signaling of leptin in the hypothalamus of obese A vy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; Xu, Changlei; Wu, Xiaojun; Bouret, Sebastien G; Kastin, Abba J

    2011-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that astrocytic activity modulates neuronal uptake and signaling of leptin in the adult-onset obese agouti viable yellow (A vy) mouse. In the immunohistochemical study, A vy mice were pretreated with the astrocyte metabolic inhibitor fluorocitrate or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle intracerebroventricularly (icv) followed 1 h later by Alexa568-leptin. Confocal microscopy showed that fluorocitrate pretreatment reduced astrocytic uptake of Alexa568-leptin 30 min after icv while increasing neuronal uptake in the arcuate nucleus and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Fluorocitrate also induced mild astrogliosis and moderately increased pSTAT3 immunopositive neurons in response to Alexa568-leptin in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. In the Western blotting study, A vy mice were pretreated with either PBS or fluorocitrate, and received PBS or leptin 1 h later followed by determination of pSTAT3 and GFAP expression an additional 30 min afterward. The results show that fluorocitrate induced a mild pSTAT3 activation but attenuated leptin-induced pSTAT3 activation and decreased GFAP expression independently of leptin treatment. We conclude that inhibition of astrocytic activity resulted in enhanced neuronal leptin uptake and signaling. This suggests opposite roles of astrocytes and neurons in leptin's actions in the A vy mouse with adult-onset obesity.

  1. THE ROLE OF THE HYPOTHALAMUS LESIONS IN WOMEN'S STERILITY - AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladmila Bojanic

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The anovulatory cycles and amenorrhea in the female patients with Cushing'ssyndrome, coupled with sterility, the Cushingoid type of obesity in our experiment as well as contradictory data about sterility of rats and mice in the identical experimentrepresent the reasons for studyng the function and morphology of the ovaries in theanimals treated by monosodium glutamate (MSG.The experimental group of the black mice C57BL/6.T of the female gender hasbeen treated by an intraperitoneal solution of MSG in the dose of 4,4 mg/g of the bodyweightfrom the first to the ninth day after birth. The coupling of the treated femaleswith the untreated males was done after 90 days of age; these females were sacrificed120 days after birth. The ovaries were removed and fixed in the solution of 10%fonnaldehyde, manually treated and cut on the microtone. The paraffin sections werecolored by HE, PAS and Van Giesen methods. The identical procedure was alsoappliced to the control group of animals of both sexes.All the treated animals were sterile. The ovaries were enlarged, cystic, withoutyellow or albinic bodies. In the control females, there were Graf follicles found invarious phases of maturation as well as luteinized stroma.The paper discusses the disturbance of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-gonadaxis caused by the damage of the hypothalamus regions secreting various "releasing"hormones.

  2. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Eva; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; González-Rodríguez, Agueda; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente; Valverde, Angela M; Frago, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Morphological changes in the neurons of hypothalamus and ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle of sheep after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanikova, A.; Pastorova, B.; Maracek, I.; Sopkova, D.; Halagan, J.

    2004-01-01

    We focused on changes in the hypothalamic neuro-secretion, morphology of brain ventricle ependyma of sheep after irradiation and hormonal stimulation. We observed sheep in anoestrus. Synchronization was ensured with Agelin for 10 days. On day 5 after the instillation of sponges, we started with irradiation lasting for 5 days (2.5 Gy) and on day 10 we stimulated the sheep with SG and FSH. The samples from hypothalamus intended for REM, were processed according to Murakami et al. (1977). Hormonal treatment in combination with irradiation produced qualitative changes, more marked in the ependyma than in the hypothalamus. (authors)

  4. Histological changes in the hypothalamus and ependyne in the third ventricle of the brain in sheep after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanikova, A.; Pastorova, B.

    2008-01-01

    We focused on changes in the hypothalamic neuro-secretion, morphology of brain ventricle ependyma of sheep after irradiation and hormonal stimulation. We observed sheep in anoestrous. Synchronization was ensured with Agelin for 10 days. On day 5 after instilation of sponges, we started with irradiation lasting for 5 days (2.5 Gy) and on day 10 we stimulated the sheep with SG and FSH. The samples from hypothalamus intended for REM, were processed according to Murakami et al. (1977). Hormonal treatment in combination with irradiation produced qualitative changes, more marked in the ependyma than in the hypothalamus. (authors)

  5. Locked Nucleic Acid-Based In Situ Hybridization Reveals miR-7a as a Hypothalamus-Enriched MicroRNA with a Distinct Expression Pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzer, S; Silahtaroglu, A; Meister, B

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (22 nucleotides) non-coding ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules that post-transcriptionally repress expression of protein-coding genes by binding to 3'-untranslated regions of the target mRNAs. In order to identify miRNAs selectively expressed within the hypothalamus...... present in the hypothalamus, miR-7a, was the only miRNA found to be enriched in the hypothalamus, with low or no expression in other parts of the central nervous system (CNS). Within the hypothalamus, strong miR-7a expression was distinct and restricted to some hypothalamic nuclei and adjacent areas. mi......R-7a expression was particularly prominent in the subfornical organ, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular, periventricular, supraoptic, dorsomedial and arcuate nuclei. Identical expression patterns for miR-7a was seen in mouse and rat hypothalamus. By combining LNA-FISH with immunohistochemistry...

  6. Diet-induced cellular neuroinflammation in the hypothalamus: Mechanistic insights from investigation of neurons and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dean Q; Tse, Erika K; Kim, Mun Heui; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-12-15

    Diet-induced obesity can lead to detrimental chronic disorders. The severity of this global epidemic has encouraged ongoing research to characterize the mechanisms underlying obesity and its comorbidities. Recent evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) in high-fat diets rapidly generate inflammation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), which centrally regulates whole-body energy homeostasis. Herein, we will review the roles of hypothalamic neurons and resident microglia in the initiation of SFA-induced hypothalamic inflammation. Particularly, we focus on neuronal and microglial free fatty acid-sensing and capacity to produce inflammatory signaling. We also outline a potential role of peripherally-derived monocytes in this inflammation. And finally, we explore synaptic plasticity as a mechanism through which hypothalamic inflammation can modulate ARC circuitry, and thus disrupt energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural and Ultrastructural Analysis of Cerebral Cortex, Cerebellum, and Hypothalamus from Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Hernández-Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic and peripheral neuropathies are well-described complications in diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is also associated to central nervous system damage. This little-known complication is characterized by impairment of brain functions and electrophysiological changes associated with neurochemical and structural abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate brain structural and ultrastructural changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum were obtained from controls and 8 weeks diabetic rats. Light and electron microscope studies showed degenerative changes of neurons and glia, perivascular and mitochondrial swelling, disarrangement of myelin sheath, increased area of myelinated axons, presynaptic vesicle dispersion in swollen axonal boutoms, fragmentation of neurofilaments, and oligodendrocyte abnormalities. In addition, depressive mood was observed in diabetic animals. The brain morphological alterations observed in diabetic animals could be related to brain pathologic process leading to abnormal function, cellular death, and depressive behavioral.

  8. Hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and function of cardiac muscle in energy deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lachowicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Frequently repeated statement that energy restriction is a factor that improves cardiovascular system function seems to be not fully truth. Low energy intake modifies the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism. Thyroid hormones, as modulators of the expression and activity of many cardiomyocyte proteins, control heart function. Decreased thyroid hormone levels and their disturbanced conversion and action result in alternation of cardiac remodeling, disorder of calcium homeostasis and diminish myocardial contractility. This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of energy restriction effects on thyroidal axis activity, thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism and action in target tissues, especially in cardiac myocytes. We also showed the existence of energy restriction-thyroid-heart pathway.

  9. Macronutrients and the FTO gene expression in hypothalamus; a systematic review of experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Doaei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The various studies have examined the relationship between FTO gene expression and macronutrients levels. In order to obtain better viewpoint from this interactions, all of existing studies were reviewed systematically. All published papers have been obtained and reviewed using standard and sensitive keywords from databases such as CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane, from 1990 to 2016. The results indicated that all of 6 studies that met the inclusion criteria (from a total of 428 published article found FTO gene expression changes at short-term follow-ups. Four of six studies found an increased FTO gene expression after calorie restriction, while two of them indicated decreased FTO gene expression. The effect of protein, carbohydrate and fat were separately assessed and suggested by all of six studies. In Conclusion, The level of FTO gene expression in hypothalamus is related to macronutrients levels. Future research should evaluate the long-term impact of dietary interventions.

  10. Pedophilia is linked to reduced activation in hypothalamus and lateral prefrontal cortex during visual erotic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Martin; Witzel, Joachim; Wiebking, Christine; Gubka, Udo; Rotte, Michael; Schiltz, Kolja; Bermpohl, Felix; Tempelmann, Claus; Bogerts, Bernhard; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Northoff, Georg

    2007-09-15

    Although pedophilia is of high public concern, little is known about underlying neural mechanisms. Although pedophilic patients are sexually attracted to prepubescent children, they show no sexual interest toward adults. This study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of deficits of sexual and emotional arousal in pedophiles. Thirteen pedophilic patients and 14 healthy control subjects were tested for differential neural activity during visual stimulation with emotional and erotic pictures with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Regions showing differential activations during the erotic condition comprised the hypothalamus, the periaqueductal gray, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the latter correlating with a clinical measure. Alterations of emotional processing concerned the amygdala-hippocampus and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Hypothesized regions relevant for processing of erotic stimuli in healthy individuals showed reduced activations during visual erotic stimulation in pedophilic patients. This suggests an impaired recruitment of key structures that might contribute to an altered sexual interest of these patients toward adults.

  11. The novel neuropeptide phoenixin is highly co-expressed with nesfatin-1 in the rat hypothalamus, an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa; Bogus, Katarzyna; Worthington, John J; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-04-10

    The hypothalamus regulates a number of autonomic functions essential for homeostasis; therefore, investigations concerning hypothalamic neuropeptides and their functions and distribution are of great importance in contemporary neuroscience. Recently, novel regulatory factors expressed in the hypothalamus have been discovered, of which nesfatin-1 and phoenixin (PNX), show intriguing similarities in their brain distributions. There are currently few studies characterizing PNX expression, so it is imperative to accurately trace its localization, with particular attention to the hypothalamic nuclei and nesfatin-1 co-expression. Using fluorescence and classical immunohistochemical stainings on adult rat brain, we visualized the potential co-expression of nesfatin-1 and PNX immunoreactive cells. We have demonstrated a distinct PNX-immunoreactivity in 21-32% of cells in the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial and lateral hypothalamus. Nesfatin-1 expression reached 45-68% of all neurons in the same sites, while co-expression was strikingly seen in the vast majority (70-86%) of PNX-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic nuclei. Our results demonstrate for the first time, a wide distribution of PNX in the hypothalamus which could implicate a potential functional relationship with nesfatin-1, possibly in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or other autonomic functions, which require further study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Hypothalamus metabolomic profiling to elucidate the tissue-targeted biochemical basis of febrile response in yeast-induced pyrexia rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyu; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Baosheng; Zhang, Zhixin; Qin, Lingling; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Qing; Lu, Zhiwei; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-25

    In the previous reports regarding thermoregulation, the hypothalamus is thought to be the primary centre in the central nervous system for controlling the body temperature. However, to date, there has not been sufficient evidence to reveal its thermoregulatory mechanism. In the current study, we utilised a tissue-targeted metabolomics strategy to elucidate the underlying biochemical mechanisms of thermoregulation in the fever process by analysing the global metabolic profile of the hypothalamus in yeast-induced pyrexia rats. Data acquisition was completed using the HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap/MS in both positive and negative ion mode. Principal component analysis was used to observe the cluster characteristics between the control group and the pyrexia group. Potential biomarkers were screened using orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis. Seventeen potential biomarkers were identified in the hypothalamus samples to discriminate the control and pyrexia groups, including amino acids, nucleic acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. As a result, purine metabolism was enhanced pronouncedly, and perturbation of lipid metabolism was also observed. Meanwhile, amino acid metabolism and energy metabolism were also activated significantly. In conclusion, the study indicated that hypothalamus-targeted metabolomics could provide a powerful tool to further understand the pathogenesis of febrile response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atrazine alters expression of reproductive and stress genes in the developing hypothalamus of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russart, Kathryn L G; Rhen, Turk

    2016-07-29

    Atrazine is an herbicide used to control broadleaf grasses and a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical. Snapping turtles lay eggs between late May and early June, which could lead to atrazine exposure via field runoff. Our goal was to determine whether a single exposure to 2ppb or 40ppb atrazine during embryogenesis could induce short- and long-term changes in gene expression within the hypothalamus of snapping turtles. We treated eggs with atrazine following sex determination and measured gene expression within the hypothalamus. We selected genes a priori for their role in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad or the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axes of the endocrine system. We did not identify any changes in gene expression 24-h after treatment. However, at hatching AR, Kiss1R, and POMC expression was upregulated in both sexes, while expression of CYP19A1 and PDYN was increased in females. Six months after hatching, CYP19A1 and PRLH expression was increased in animals treated with 2ppb atrazine. Our study shows persistent changes in hypothalamic gene expression due to low-dose embryonic exposure to the herbicide atrazine with significant effects in both the HPG and HPA axes. Effects reported here appear to be conserved among vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Association of gastric emptying with ghrelin, obestatin and receptor (GHSR, GPR-39) in hypothalamus of diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-yan; Wang, Li-hua; Wei, Liang-zhou; Wu, Jun; Wei, Ning; Kong, Xin-juan; Tian, Zi-bin

    2010-04-27

    To investigate the association of gastric emptying with ghrelin, obestatin and GHSR, GPR-39 in hypothalamus of diabetic rats. Sixty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: a normal control group (NC, n = 20), a diabetes mellitus group (DM, n = 20) induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and an insulin treated group (INS, n = 20). After two and six weeks of STZ injection, gastric emptying was measured by intragastric administration of phenol red, ghrelin and obestatin in hypothalamus measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and GHSR and GPR-39 by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). After two weeks of STZ injection, gastric emptying (%) (74 +/- 8, 40 +/- 5), ghrelin level(ng/g) (52 +/- 9, 51 +/- 7) and ratio of ghrelin/obestatin (3.8 +/- 1.0, 2.8 +/- 1.0) increased significantly in DM and INS groups compared to those in NC group [32% +/- 7%, (39 +/- 11) ng/g, 2.1 +/- 0.8, all P GPR-39 in hypothalamus. The rapid gastric emptying may be due to the rising levels of ghrelin and GHSR in hypothalamus during early hyperglycemia. And the duration of hyperglycemia is affected by the rising ratio of ghrelin/obestatin.

  15. Energy balance affects luteinizing hormone pulses and expression of neurokinin B in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pubertal transition of gonadotropin secretion in pigs is metabolically gated, but the mechanisms that underpin this regulation are unknown. Kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB) are coexpressed in neurons within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) and are thought to play an important role ...

  16. Defective functional connectivity between posterior hypothalamus and regions of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction in chronic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Stefania; Nigri, Anna; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Brivio, Luca; Proietti Cecchini, Alberto; Verri, Mattia; Chiapparini, Luisa; Leone, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis of a defective functional connectivity between the posterior hypothalamus and diencephalic-mesencephalic regions in chronic cluster headache based on: a) clinical and neuro-endocrinological findings in cluster headache patients; b) neuroimaging findings during cluster headache attacks; c) neuroimaging findings in drug-refractory chronic cluster headache patients improved after successful deep brain stimulation. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, associated with a seed-based approach, was employed to investigate the functional connectivity of the posterior hypothalamus in chronic cluster headache patients (n = 17) compared to age and sex-matched healthy subjects (n = 16). Random-effect analyses were performed to study differences between patients and controls in ipsilateral and contralateral-to-the-pain posterior hypothalamus functional connectivity. Results Cluster headache patients showed an increased functional connectivity between the ipsilateral posterior hypothalamus and a number of diencephalic-mesencephalic structures, comprising ventral tegmental area, dorsal nuclei of raphe, and bilateral substantia nigra, sub-thalamic nucleus, and red nucleus ( p cluster headache patients mainly involves structures that are part of (i.e. ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra) or modulate (dorsal nuclei of raphe, sub-thalamic nucleus) the midbrain dopaminergic systems. The midbrain dopaminergic systems could play a role in cluster headache pathophysiology and in particular in the chronicization process. Future studies are needed to better clarify if this finding is specific to cluster headache or if it represents an unspecific response to chronic pain.

  17. The Abnormal Functional Connectivity between the Hypothalamus and the Temporal Gyrus Underlying Depression in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozheng; Chen, Wei; Tu, Yunhai; Hou, Hongtao; Huang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xingli; Guo, Zhongwei; Bai, Guanghui; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Hypothalamic communication with the rest of the brain is critical for accomplishing a wide variety of physiological and psychological functions, including the maintenance of neuroendocrine circadian rhythms and the management of affective processes. Evidence has shown that major depressive disorder (MDD) patients exhibit increased functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Neurofibrillary tangles are also found in the hypothalamus of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and AD patients exhibit abnormal changes in the HPA. However, little is known of how the hypothalamus interacts with other brain regions in AD patients with depression (D-AD). Functional connectivity (FC) analysis explores the connectivity between brain regions that share functional properties. Here, we used resting-state (rs) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology and the FC method to measure hypothalamic connectivity across the whole brain in 22 D-AD patients and 21 non-depressed AD patients (nD-AD). Our results showed that D-AD patients had reduced FC among the hypothalamus, the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) compared with the FC of nD-AD patients, suggesting that the abnormal FC between the hypothalamus and the temporal lobe may play a key role in the pathophysiology of depression in AD patients.

  18. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vreugdenhil Erno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP, with a lentiviral (LV vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed, to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 × 108 or 1 × 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 × 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Results Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. Conclusions This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest.

  19. Specific expression of an oxytocin-enhanced cyan fluorescent protein fusion transgene in the rat hypothalamus and posterior pituitary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katoh, A.; Fujihara, H.; Ohbuchi, T.; Onaka, T.; Scott, W. S. III.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Yamasaki, Y.; Kawata, M.; Suzuki, H.; Otsubo, H.; Suzuki, Hi.; Murphy, D.; Ueta, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 204, č. 3 (2010), s. 275-285 ISSN 0022-0795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnocellular neurons * neurosecretory-cells * hypothalamus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.099, year: 2010

  20. Time-dependent effects of neuropeptide Y infusion in the paraventricular hypothalamus on ingestive and associated behaviors in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G; Strubbe, JH

    In this study the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the daily regulation of feeding, drinking, locomotor activity, and nestbox occupation was investigated. These behaviors were recorded during and after bilateral infusion of NPY into the PVN of

  1. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  2. Sensitivity to the photoperiod and potential migratory features of neuroblasts in the adult sheep hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batailler, Martine; Derouet, Laura; Butruille, Lucile; Migaud, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Adult neurogenesis, a process that consists in the generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, represents a remarkable illustration of the brain structural plasticity abilities. The hypothalamus, a brain region that plays a key role in the neuroendocrine regulations including reproduction, metabolism or food intake, houses neural stem cells located within a hypothalamic neurogenic niche. In adult sheep, a seasonal mammalian species, previous recent studies have revealed photoperiod-dependent changes in the hypothalamic cell proliferation rate. In addition, doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in immature migrating neurons, is highly present in the vicinity of the hypothalamic neurogenic niche. With the aim to further explore the mechanism underlying adult sheep hypothalamic neurogenesis, we first show that new neuron production is also seasonally regulated since the density of DCX-positive cells changes according to the photoperiodic conditions at various time points of the year. We then demonstrate that cyclin-dependant kinase-5 (Cdk5) and p35, two proteins involved in DCX phosphorylation and known to be critically involved in migration processes, are co-expressed with DCX in young hypothalamic neurons and are capable of in vivo interaction. Finally, to examine the migratory potential of these adult-born neurons, we reveal the rostro-caudal extent of DCX labeling on hypothalamic sagittal planes. DCX-positive cells are found in the most rostral nuclei of the hypothalamus, including the preoptic area many of which co-expressed estrogen receptor-α. Thus, beyond the confirmation of the high level of neuron production during short photoperiod in sheep, our results bring new and compelling elements in support of the existence of a hypothalamic migratory path that is responsive to seasonal stimuli.

  3. Alterations in opioid parameters in the hypothalamus of rats with estradiol-induced polycystic ovarian disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, G.C.; Beaudet, A.; Brawer, J.R. (McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    The distribution and density of selectively labeled mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid binding sites were examined by in vitro radioautography in the hypothalamus of normal, estradiol valerate (EV)-injected, and estradiol (E2)-implanted female rats. Hypothalamic beta-endorphin concentration was also examined by RIA in these three groups of animals. Quantitative analysis of film radioautographs demonstrated a selective increase in mu-opioid binding in the medial preoptic area of EV-treated, but not of E2-implanted rats. However, both these estrogenized groups exhibited a reduction in the density of delta-opioid binding in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Statistically significant changes between either estrogenized groups were not observed for kappa-opioid binding. Results on the hypothalamic concentration of beta-endorphin indicated a marked reduction in EV-injected animals with respect to controls. In contrast, the E2-implanted animals exhibited beta-endorphin concentrations similar to controls. The present results confirm the increase in opioid receptor binding previously reported in the hypothalamus of EV-treated rats and further demonstrate that this increase is confined to the medial preoptic area and exclusively concerns mu-opioid receptors. The concomitant reduction in beta-endorphin levels observed in the same group of animals suggests that the observed increase in mu-opioid binding could reflect a chronic up-regulation of the receptor in response to compromised beta-endorphin input. Given the restriction of this effect to the site of origin of LHRH neurons and the demonstrated inhibitory role of opioids on LHRH release, it is tempting to postulate that such up-regulation could lead to the suppression of the plasma LH pattern that characterizes polycystic ovarian disease in the EV-treated rat.

  4. Alterations in opioid parameters in the hypothalamus of rats with estradiol-induced polycystic ovarian disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjardins, G.C.; Beaudet, A.; Brawer, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and density of selectively labeled mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid binding sites were examined by in vitro radioautography in the hypothalamus of normal, estradiol valerate (EV)-injected, and estradiol (E2)-implanted female rats. Hypothalamic beta-endorphin concentration was also examined by RIA in these three groups of animals. Quantitative analysis of film radioautographs demonstrated a selective increase in mu-opioid binding in the medial preoptic area of EV-treated, but not of E2-implanted rats. However, both these estrogenized groups exhibited a reduction in the density of delta-opioid binding in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Statistically significant changes between either estrogenized groups were not observed for kappa-opioid binding. Results on the hypothalamic concentration of beta-endorphin indicated a marked reduction in EV-injected animals with respect to controls. In contrast, the E2-implanted animals exhibited beta-endorphin concentrations similar to controls. The present results confirm the increase in opioid receptor binding previously reported in the hypothalamus of EV-treated rats and further demonstrate that this increase is confined to the medial preoptic area and exclusively concerns mu-opioid receptors. The concomitant reduction in beta-endorphin levels observed in the same group of animals suggests that the observed increase in mu-opioid binding could reflect a chronic up-regulation of the receptor in response to compromised beta-endorphin input. Given the restriction of this effect to the site of origin of LHRH neurons and the demonstrated inhibitory role of opioids on LHRH release, it is tempting to postulate that such up-regulation could lead to the suppression of the plasma LH pattern that characterizes polycystic ovarian disease in the EV-treated rat

  5. Metabolic activity in the insular cortex and hypothalamus predicts hot flashes: an FDG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Hadine; Deckersbach, Thilo; Lin, Nancy U; Makris, Nikos; Skaar, Todd C; Rauch, Scott L; Dougherty, Darin D; Hall, Janet E

    2012-09-01

    Hot flashes are a common side effect of adjuvant endocrine therapies (AET; leuprolide, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors) that reduce quality of life and treatment adherence in breast cancer patients. Because hot flashes affect only some women, preexisting neurobiological traits might predispose to their development. Previous studies have implicated the insula during the perception of hot flashes and the hypothalamus in thermoregulatory dysfunction. The aim of the study was to understand whether neurobiological factors predict hot flashes. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans coregistered with structural magnetic resonance imaging were used to determine whether metabolic activity in the insula and hypothalamic thermoregulatory and estrogen-feedback regions measured before and in response to AET predict hot flashes. Findings were correlated with CYP2D6 genotype because of CYP2D6 polymorphism associations with tamoxifen-induced hot flashes. We measured regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose uptake (rCMRglu) in the insula and hypothalamus on FDG-PET. Of 18 women without hot flashes who began AET, new-onset hot flashes were reported by 10 (55.6%) and were detected objectively in nine (50%) participants. Prior to the use of all AET, rCMRglu in the insula (P ≤ 0.01) and hypothalamic thermoregulatory (P = 0.045) and estrogen-feedback (P = 0.007) regions was lower in women who reported developing hot flashes. In response to AET, rCMRglu was further reduced in the insula in women developing hot flashes (P ≤ 0.02). Insular and hypothalamic rCMRglu levels were lower in intermediate than extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers. Trait neurobiological characteristics predict hot flashes. Genetic variability in CYP2D6 may underlie the neurobiological predisposition to hot flashes induced by AET.

  6. Changes in orexinergic immunoreactivity of the piglet hypothalamus and pons after exposure to chronic postnatal nicotine and intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Russell, Benjamin; Du, Man K; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2016-06-01

    We recently showed that orexin expression in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants was reduced by 21% in the hypothalamus and by 40-50% in the pons as compared with controls. Orexin maintains wakefulness/sleeping states, arousal, and rapid eye movement sleep, abnormalities of which have been reported in SIDS. This study examined the effects of two prominent risk factors for SIDS, intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (IHH) (prone-sleeping) and chronic nicotine exposure (cigarette-smoking), on orexin A (OxA) and orexin B (OxB) expression in piglets. Piglets were randomly assigned to five groups: saline control (n = 7), air control (n = 7), nicotine [2 mg/kg per day (14 days)] (n = 7), IHH (6 min of 7% O2 /8% CO2 alternating with 6-min periods of breathing air, for four cycles) (n = 7), and the combination of nicotine and IHH (N + IHH) (n = 7). OxA/OxB expression was quantified in the central tuberal hypothalamus [dorsal medial hypothalamus (DMH), perifornical area (PeF), and lateral hypothalamus], and the dorsal raphe, locus coeruleus of the pons. Nicotine and N + IHH exposures significantly increased: (i) orexin expression in the hypothalamus and pons; and (ii) the total number of neurons in the DMH and PeF. IHH decreased orexin expression in the hypothalamus and pons without changing neuronal numbers. Linear relationships existed between the percentage of orexin-positive neurons and the area of pontine orexin immunoreactivity of control and exposure piglets. These results demonstrate that postnatal nicotine exposure increases the proportion of orexin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus and fibre expression in the pons, and that IHH exposure does not prevent the nicotine-induced increase. Thus, although both nicotine and IHH are risk factors for SIDS, it appears they have opposing effects on OxA and OxB expression, with the IHH exposure closely mimicking what we recently found in SIDS. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John

  7. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody attenuates subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced apoptosis in the hypothalamus by inhibiting the activation of Erk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma L

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ling Ma,1 Yong Jiang,2 Yanan Dong,2 Jun Gao,2 Bin Du,2 Dianwei Liu2 1Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH can induce apoptosis in many regions of the brain including the cortex and hippocampus. However, few studies have focused on apoptosis in the hypothalamus after SAH. Although some antiapoptotic strategies have been developed for SAH, such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α antibody, the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition have yet to be elucidated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether SAH could induce apoptosis in the hypothalamus and identify the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of anti-TNF-α antibody, as a therapeutic regimen, upon apoptosis. Materials and methods: SAH was induced in a rat model. Thirty minutes prior to SAH, anti-TNF-α antibody or U0126, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk inhibitor, was microinjected into the left lateral cerebral ventricle. In addition, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate was injected intraperitoneally immediately after the anti-TNF-α antibody microinjection. Then, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, phosphorylated Erk (p-Erk and Erk. Finally, anxiety-like behavior was identified by using open field. Results: Levels of caspase-3, bax and bcl-2, all showed a temporary rise after SAH in the hypothalamus, indicating the induction of apoptosis in this brain region. Interestingly, we found that the microinjection of anti-TNF-α antibody could selectively block the elevated levels of bax, suggesting the potential role of anti-TNF-α antibody in the inhibition of SAH

  8. Inhibition of opioid systems in the hypothalamus as well as the mesolimbic area suppresses feeding behavior of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H; Ardianto, C; Yonemochi, N; Yang, L; Ohashi, T; Ikegami, M; Nagase, H; Kamei, J

    2015-12-17

    Opioid receptors, especially μ-opioid receptors, in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) are reported to regulate food motivation. However, the roles of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are not fully understood. Moreover, since μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are reported to distribute in the hypothalamus, these receptors in the hypothalamus might regulate feeding behavior. Thus, the present study investigated the role of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the VTA, the NAcc and the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding behavior. Male ICR mice were subjected to a feeding test after food deprivation for 16h. The mRNA levels of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), preproenkephalin (PENK) and prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursors of endogenous opioid peptides, were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The systemic injection of non-selective (naloxone) and selective μ (β-funaltrexamine; β-FNA), δ (naltrindole) and κ (norbinaltorphimine; norBNI) opioid receptor antagonists markedly reduced food intake. In contrast, the systemic injection of preferential μ (morphine), selective δ (KNT-127) and κ (U-50,488) opioid receptor agonists did not change food intake. The mRNA levels of POMC, PENK and PDYN were decreased in the hypothalamus and the midbrain after food deprivation, whereas the mRNA levels of PENK and PDYN, but not POMC, were decreased in the ventral striatum. The injection of naloxone into the NAcc, VTA and lateral hypothalamus (LH), but not the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, significantly decreased food intake. The injection of β-FNA and naltrindole into the LH, but not the VTA or NAcc, decreased food intake. The injection of norBNI into the LH and VTA, but not the NAcc, decreased food intake. These results indicate that μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the LH play a more important role in the regulation of feeding behavior than those receptors in the VTA and the NAcc. Copyright © 2015

  9. Galanin-Expressing GABA Neurons in the Lateral Hypothalamus Modulate Food Reward and Noncompulsive Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls-Creekmore, Emily; Yu, Sangho; Francois, Marie; Hoang, John; Huesing, Clara; Bruce-Keller, Annadora; Burk, David; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Morrison, Christopher D; Münzberg, Heike

    2017-06-21

    The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) integrates reward and appetitive behavior and is composed of many overlapping neuronal populations. Recent studies associated LHA GABAergic neurons (LHA GABA ), which densely innervate the ventral tegmental area (VTA), with modulation of food reward and consumption; yet, LHA GABA projections to the VTA exclusively modulated food consumption, not reward. We identified a subpopulation of LHA GABA neurons that coexpress the neuropeptide galanin (LHA Gal ). These LHA Gal neurons also modulate food reward, but lack direct VTA innervation. We hypothesized that LHA Gal neurons may represent a subpopulation of LHA GABA neurons that mediates food reward independent of direct VTA innervation. We used chemogenetic activation of LHA Gal or LHA GABA neurons in mice to compare their role in feeding behavior. We further analyzed locomotor behavior to understand how differential VTA connectivity and transmitter release in these LHA neurons influences this behavior. LHA Gal or LHA GABA neuronal activation both increased operant food-seeking behavior, but only activation of LHA GABA neurons increased overall chow consumption. Additionally, LHA Gal or LHA GABA neuronal activation similarly induced locomotor activity, but with striking differences in modality. Activation of LHA GABA neurons induced compulsive-like locomotor behavior; while LHA Gal neurons induced locomotor activity without compulsivity. Thus, LHA Gal neurons define a subpopulation of LHA GABA neurons without direct VTA innervation that mediate noncompulsive food-seeking behavior. We speculate that the striking difference in compulsive-like locomotor behavior is also based on differential VTA innervation. The downstream neural network responsible for this behavior and a potential role for galanin as neuromodulator remains to be identified. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) regulates motivated feeding behavior via GABAergic LHA neurons. The molecular identity of LHA

  10. Photoperiodic Co-Regulation of Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B and Dynorphin in the Hypothalamus of a Seasonal Rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartzen-Sprauer, J; Klosen, P; Ciofi, P

    2014-01-01

    -dependent in a seasonal rodent, the Syrian hamster, which exhibits robust seasonal rhythms in reproductive activity. The majority of Kp neurones in the arcuate nucleus co-express NKB and DYN and the expression of all three peptides is decreased under a short (compared to long) photoperiod, leading to a 60% decrease...... in the number of KNDy neurones under photo-inhibitory conditions. In seasonal rodents, RFamide-related peptide (RFRP) neurones of the dorsomedial hypothalamus are also critical for seasonal reproduction. Interestingly, NKB and DYN are also expressed in the dorsomedial hypothalamus but do not co......-localise with RFRP-immunoreactive neurones, and the expression of both NKB and DYN is higher under a short photoperiod, which is opposite to the short-day inhibition of RFRP expression. In conclusion, the present study shows that NKB and DYN display different photoperiodic variations in the Syrian hamster...

  11. ESTs and putative line-specific (broiler and layer SNPs identified in genes expressed in Gallus gallus pituitary and hypothalamus

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    Clarissa Sanches da Silva Cassoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian poultry industry has reached a high level of development in both meat and egg production as a result of constant technological modernization. Further improvements can be achieved through genomics, but before this can be accomplished, a better understanding of gene expression profiles and nucleotide polymorphisms is necessary. Since animal physiology is directly or indirectly controlled by the pituitary and hypothalamus, the aim of the present work was to identify and analyze genes expressed in these tissues in chicken lines with different growth potential. Two pituitary and hypothalamus cDNA libraries from 21 day broiler (TT and layer (CC chickens lines were constructed and allowed identification of 3,074 unique sequences and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and SNPs identified in this study represents an important resource for future studies aimed at identifying genes responsible for growth in chicken.

  12. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Voluntary exercise induces neurogenesis in the hypothalamus and ependymal lining of the third ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Atsuko; Nishibori, Masahiro; Hamasaki, Shinichi; Kobori, Takuro; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    In the adult hypothalamus and ependymal lining of the third ventricle, tanycytes function as multipotential progenitor cells that enable continuous neurogenesis, suggesting that tanycytes may be able to mediate the restoration of homeostatic function after stroke. Voluntary wheel running has been shown to alter neurochemistry and neuronal function and to increase neurogenesis in rodents. In the present study, we found that voluntary exercise improved the survival rate and energy balance of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP/Kpo). We also investigated the effect of exercise on the proliferation and differentiation of hypothalamic cells using immunoreactivity for tanycytes and neural markers. The proliferation of elongated cells, which may be the tanycytes, was enhanced in exercising SHRSP compared to sedentary rats before and after stroke. In addition, the proliferation of cells was correlated with the induction of fibroblast growth factor-2 in the subependymal cells of the third ventricle and in the cerebrospinal fluid. Some of the newborn cells of exercising SHRSP showed differentiation into mature neurons after stroke. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise correlates with hypothalamic neurogenesis, leading to recovery of homeostatic functions in the adult brain after stroke.

  14. Inhibitory role of the serotonergic system on estrogen receptor α expression in the female rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Shimogawa, Yuji; Kohagura, Daisuke; Moriizumi, Tetsuji; Yamanouchi, Korehito

    2014-11-07

    The role of the serotonergic system in regulating the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) α in the hypothalamus was investigated in ovariectomized rats by injecting a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA), or by destroying the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). The number of ERα-immunoreactive (ir) cells was counted in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus in the preoptic area (AVPV), ventrolateral ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (vlVMN), and arcuate nucleus (ARCN). Seven days after ovariectomy, 100mg/kg PCPA or saline was injected daily for 4 days. Alternatively, radiofrequency lesioning of the DR (DRL) or sham lesions were made on the same time of ovariectomy. One-day after the last injection of PCPA or 7 days after brain surgery, the brain was fixed for immunostaining of ERα and the number of ERα-ir cell were counted in the nuclei of interest. The mean number of ERα-ir cells/mm(3) (density) in the AVPV of the PCPA or DRL groups was statistically higher than that in the saline or sham group. In the vlVMN and ARCN of the PCPA or DRL groups, the mean density of ERα-ir cells was comparable to the saline or sham groups. These results suggest that the serotonergic system of the DR plays an inhibitory role on the expression of ERα in the AVPV, but not in the vlVMN and ARCN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Posterior hypothalamus glutamate infusion decreases pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures of male rats through hippocampal histamine increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhang, Atieh; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Goudarzi, Iran

    2017-07-01

    Seizures are epileptic manifestations that are intrinsically modulated through different neurotransmitters and receptor systems. Although glutamate increases excitation and hence seizures, it activates other systems which could potentially terminate seizures. Histamine originates from neurons of the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and can mediate anticonvulsant properties, but the effect of local PH glutamate on hippocampal histamine content is unknown. Therefore, in this study, the effect of PH glutamate and the involvement of hippocampal histamine in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced seizure activity was studied. OX2R antagonist (TCS OX2 29, 40nmol/1μl, intra-PH), AMPA/Kainate receptor antagonist (CNQX, 3mM, intra-PH) and glutamate (1mM) were injected bilaterally into PH using stereotaxic surgery. The intravenous PTZ infusion model was used to generate behavioral convulsions and the amount of hippocampal histamine content was then measured using a biochemical method. Administration of glutamate into PH decreased both seizure stage and the duration of tonic-clonic convulsion (TCC) with increasing TCC latency and hippocampal histamine content. Blocking OX2Rs alone or coinhibition of OX2Rs and AMPA/kainate receptors reversed these effects by increasing both seizure stage and TCC duration, and by decreasing both latency and consequent histamine content. Our findings suggest that glutamate administration into PH may control seizures (stages and duration) through increasing the hippocampal histamine content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rx3 and Shh direct anisotropic growth and specification in the zebrafish tuberal/anterior hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Victor; Eachus, Helen; Ellis, Pam; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In the developing brain, growth and differentiation are intimately linked. Here, we show that in the zebrafish embryo, the homeodomain transcription factor Rx3 coordinates these processes to build the tuberal/anterior hypothalamus. Analysis of rx3 chk mutant/rx3 morphant fish and EdU pulse-chase studies reveal that rx3 is required to select tuberal/anterior hypothalamic progenitors and to orchestrate their anisotropic growth. In the absence of Rx3 function, progenitors accumulate in the third ventricular wall, die or are inappropriately specified, the shh+ anterior recess does not form, and its resident pomc+, ff1b+ and otpb+ Th1+ cells fail to differentiate. Manipulation of Shh signalling shows that Shh coordinates progenitor cell selection and behaviour by acting as an on-off switch for rx3. Together, our studies show that Shh and Rx3 govern formation of a distinct progenitor domain that elaborates patterning through its anisotropic growth and differentiation. PMID:27317806

  17. α/β-Hydrolase Domain 6 in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Controls Energy Metabolism Flexibility

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    Alexandre Fisette

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available α/β-Hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6 is a monoacylglycerol hydrolase that degrades the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG. Although complete or peripheral ABHD6 loss of function is protective against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, the role of ABHD6 in the central control of energy balance is unknown. Using a viral-mediated knockout approach, targeted endocannabinoid measures, and pharmacology, we discovered that mice lacking ABHD6 from neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHKO have higher VMH 2-AG levels in conditions of endocannabinoid recruitment and fail to physiologically adapt to key metabolic challenges. VMHKO mice exhibited blunted fasting-induced feeding and reduced food intake, energy expenditure, and adaptive thermogenesis in response to cold exposure, high-fat feeding, and dieting (transition to a low-fat diet. Our findings identify ABHD6 as a regulator of the counter-regulatory responses to major metabolic shifts, including fasting, nutrient excess, cold, and dieting, thereby highlighting the importance of ABHD6 in the VMH in mediating energy metabolism flexibility.

  18. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.

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    Jae Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat.

  19. A Role for Glucocorticoids in Stress-Impaired Reproduction: Beyond the Hypothalamus and Pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirledge, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-characterized role of the sex steroid receptors in regulating fertility and reproduction, reproductive events are also mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to an individual's environment. Glucocorticoid secretion in response to stress contributes to the well-characterized suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through central actions in the hypothalamus and pituitary. However, both animal and in vitro studies indicate that other components of the reproductive system are also regulated by glucocorticoids. Furthermore, in the absence of stress, it appears that homeostatic glucocorticoid signaling plays a significant role in reproduction and fertility in all tissues comprising the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Indeed, as central regulators of the immune response, glucocorticoids are uniquely poised to integrate an individual's infectious, inflammatory, stress, nutritional, and metabolic status through glucocorticoid receptor signaling in target tissues. Endocrine signaling between tissues regulating the immune and stress response and those determining reproductive status provides an evolutionary advantage, facilitating the trade-off between reproductive investment and offspring fitness. This review focuses on the actions of glucocorticoids in tissues important for fertility and reproduction, highlighting recent studies that show glucocorticoid signaling plays a significant role throughout the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and characterizing these effects as permissive or inhibitory in terms of facilitating reproductive success. PMID:24064362

  20. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

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    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  1. Activation of lateral hypothalamus-projecting parabrachial neurons by intraorally delivered gustatory stimuli

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    Kenichi eTokita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated a subpopulation of neurons in the mouse parabrachial nucleus (PbN, a gustatory and visceral relay area in the brainstem, that project to the lateral hypothalamus (LH. We made injections of the retrograde tracer Fluorogold (FG into LH, resulting in fluorescent labeling of neurons located in different regions of the PbN. Mice were stimulated through an intraoral cannula with one of seven different taste stimuli, and PbN sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of the immediate early gene c-Fos, which labels activated neurons. LH projection neurons were found in all PbN subnuclei, but in greater concentration in lateral subnuclei, including the dorsal lateral subnucleus (dl. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI was observed in the PbN in a stimulus-dependent pattern, with the greatest differentiation between intraoral stimulation with sweet (0.5 M sucrose and bitter (0.003 M quinine compounds. In particular, sweet and umami-tasting stimuli evoked robust FLI in cells in the dl, whereas quinine evoked almost no FLI in cells in this subnucleus. Double-labeled cells were also found in the greatest quantity in the dl. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that the dl contains direct a projection to the LH that is activated preferentially by appetitive compounds; this projection may be mediated by taste and/or postingestive mechanisms.

  2. Effects of estradiol on norepinephrine and prostaglandin efflux in medial basal hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, D.P.; Fernandez Pardal, J.; Gimeno, M.F.; Gimeno, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous and K + -stimulated efflux of norepinephrine (NE) and the release of PGE 2 and PGF 2 α were examined in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) of ovariectomized rats killed before and during the LH release that follows estradiol treatment. As compared to vehicle-treated, ovariectomized rats, estradiol-primed rats exhibited a 60% more increase in K + -stimulated 3 H-overflow of MBH slices preloaded with 3 H-NE at morning hours (1000 hours). Estradiol treatment did not result in further increase of K + -induced 3 H release from MBH slices at the time of LH release (1700 hours), nor affected labelled NE release in occipital cortex slices. A significant difference between K + -stimulated NE release of vehicle-treated spayed rats killed at 1000 and 1700 hours was observed, the latter showing 54% more release upon stimulus. PGE 2 efflux was time-dependent being highest at the evening in both vehicle- and estradiol-treated animals. The MBH of estrogenized rats released significantly more PGE 2 at the evening as compared to the controls. The release of PGF 2 α remained essentially unchanged regardless of estradiol treatment or time of day. The present results offer additional support to the involvement of MBH catecholamines and prostaglandins in the mechanism of LH secretion in the rat. (author)

  3. Sub-cellular organization of the melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancsik, Veronika; Bene, Roland; Sótonyi, Péter; Zachar, Gergely

    2018-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a potent orexigenic and sleep-promoting neuropeptide in mammals produced predominately by hypothalamic neurons which project to a wide variety of brain areas. Several MCH producing neurons contain MCH as the only neuropeptide, while others comprise cocaine- and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) as well. The intrahypothalamic localization and the projection pattern of these two subpopulations are distinct. To provide structural grounding to understand the mechanism of action of MCH neurons we show here the subcellular localization of the neuropeptides in the two subpopulations within the hypothalamus of healthy young male mice by applying single and double immunofluorescence labelling.; Thick, prominent MCH immunopositive reticulation and fine discrete granules are detected within the perikarya of both CART positive and CART-free MCH neurons. Typically, one or more immunoreactive processes emanate from the perikarya. The bulk of CART immunoreactivity is also centrally positioned, surrounded by sparse immunoreactive granules within the perikarya and in the processes. In double immunopositive neurons, the two neuropeptides seem to colocalize in the heavily labelled central area, while the immunopositive granules in the cell body periphery and in the processes apparently contain either MCH or CART. This spatial arrangement suggests that MCH and CART, after being synthetized and processed in the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi complex, are sorted into separate dense core vesicles, which then enter into the cell processes. This mechanism allows for both concerted and independent regulation of the transport and release of MCH and CART. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothalamus transcriptome profile suggests an anorexia-cachexia syndrome in the anx/anx mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Josep Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Sumoy, Lauro; Dierssen, Mara; Visa, Joana; Gratacòs, Mònica; Estivill, Xavier

    2008-11-12

    The anx/anx mouse displays poor appetite and lean appearance and is considered a good model for the study of anorexia nervosa. To identify new genes involved in feeding behavior and body weight regulation we performed an expression profiling in the hypothalamus of the anx/anx mice. Using commercial microarrays we detected 156 differentially expressed genes and validated 92 of those using TaqMan low-density arrays. The expression of a set of 87 candidate genes selected based on literature evidences was also quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. Our results showed enrichment in deregulated genes involved in cell death, cell morphology, and cancer, as well as an alteration of several signaling circuits involved in energy balance including neuropeptide Y and melanocortin signaling. The expression profile along with the phenotype led us to conclude that anx/anx mice resemble the anorexia-cachexia syndrome typically observed in cancer, infection with human immunodeficiency virus or chronic diseases, rather than starvation, and that anx/anx mice could be considered a good model for the treatment and investigation of this condition.

  5. Fasting induced cytoplasmic Fto expression in some neurons of rat hypothalamus.

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    Predrag Vujovic

    Full Text Available Fat mass and obesity associated protein (Fto is a nucleic acid demethylase, with a preference for thymine or uracil, according to the recent structural data. This fact suggests that methylated single-stranded RNA, rather than DNA, may be the primary Fto substrate. Fto is abundantly expressed in all hypothalamic sites governing feeding behavior. Considering that selective modulation of Fto levels in the hypothalamus can influence food intake, we set out to investigate the effect of 48 h fasting on the Fto expression in lateral hypothalamic area, paraventricular, ventromedial and arcuate nucleus, the regulatory centres of energy homeostasis. We have demonstrated that 48 h fasting causes not only an increase in the overall hypothalamic levels of both Fto mRNA and protein, but also alters Fto intracellular distribution. This switch happens in some neurons of paraventricular and ventromedial nucleus, as well as lateral hypothalamic area, resulting in the majority of the enzyme being localized outside the cell nuclei. Interestingly, the change in the Fto intracellular localization was not observed in neurons of arcuate nucleus, suggesting that fasting did not universally affect Fto in all of the hypothalmic sites involved in energy homeostasis regulation. Both Fto mRNA and catechol-O-methyltransferaze mRNA were upregulated in the identical time-dependent manner in fasting animals. This fact, combined with the knowledge of the Fto substrate preference, may provide further insight into monoamine metabolism in the state of disturbed energy homeostasis.

  6. Effect of parenteral glutamate treatment on the localization of neurotransmitters in the mediobasal hypothalamus

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    Walaas, I.; Fonnum, F.

    1978-01-01

    The localization of cholinergic, aminergic and amino acid-ergic neurones in the mediobasal hypothalamus has been studied in normal rat brain and in brains where neurones in nucleus arcuatus were destroyed by repeated administration of 2 mg/g body weight monosodium glutamate to newborn animals. In normal animals acetylcholinesterase staining, choline acetyltransferase and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase were concentrated in the median eminence and the arcuate nucleus. Glutamate decarboxylase was concentrated at the boundary between the ventromedial and the arcuate nuclei, with lower activity in the arcuate nucleus and very low activity in the median eminence. Nucleus arcuatus contained an intermediate level of high affinity glutamate uptake. In the lesioned animals, there were significant decreases in choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase staining and glutamate decarboxylase in the median eminence, whereas choline acetyltransferase activity and acetylcholinesterase staining, but not glutamate decarboxylase activity, were decreased in nucleus arcuatus. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase was unchanged in all regions studied. The high affinity uptakes of glutamate, dopamine and noradrenaline, and the endogenous amino acid levels were also unchanged in the treated animals. The results indicate the existence of acetylcholine- and GABA-containing elements in the tuberoinfundibular tract. They further indicate that the dopamine cells in the arcuate nucleus are less sensitive to the toxic effect of glutamate than other cell types, possibly because they contain less glutamate receptors.

  7. In vitro evidence supports the presence of glucokinase-independent glucosensing mechanisms in hypothalamus and hindbrain of rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Velasco, Cristina; Álvarez-Otero, Rosa; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2016-06-01

    We previously obtained evidence in rainbow trout for the presence and response to changes in circulating levels of glucose (induced by intraperitoneal hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic treatments) of glucosensing mechanisms based on liver X receptor (LXR), mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to increased expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and sweet taste receptor in the hypothalamus, and on sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1) in hindbrain. However, these effects of glucose might be indirect. Therefore, we evaluated the response of parameters related to these glucosensing mechanisms in a first experiment using pooled sections of hypothalamus and hindbrain incubated for 6 h at 15°C in modified Hanks' medium containing 2, 4 or 8 mmol l(-1) d-glucose. The responses observed in some cases were consistent with glucosensing capacity. In a second experiment, pooled sections of hypothalamus and hindbrain were incubated for 6 h at 15°C in modified Hanks' medium with 8 mmol l(-1) d-glucose alone (control) or containing 1 mmol l(-1) phloridzin (SGLT-1 antagonist), 20 µmol l(-1) genipin (UCP2 inhibitor), 1 µmol l(-1) trolox (ROS scavenger), 100 µmol l(-1) bezafibrate (T1R3 inhibitor) and 50 µmol l(-1) geranyl-geranyl pyrophosphate (LXR inhibitor). The response observed in the presence of these specific inhibitors/antagonists further supports the proposal that critical components of the different glucosensing mechanisms are functioning in rainbow trout hypothalamus and hindbrain. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. A very large number of GABAergic neurons are activated in the tuberal hypothalamus during paradoxical (REM) sleep hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapin, Emilie; Bérod, Anne; Léger, Lucienne; Herman, Paul A; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Peyron, Christelle

    2010-07-26

    We recently discovered, using Fos immunostaining, that the tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus contain a massive population of neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep (PS) hypersomnia. We further showed that some of the activated neurons of the tuberal hypothalamus express the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neuropeptide and that icv injection of MCH induces a strong increase in PS quantity. However, the chemical nature of the majority of the neurons activated during PS had not been characterized. To determine whether these neurons are GABAergic, we combined in situ hybridization of GAD(67) mRNA with immunohistochemical detection of Fos in control, PS deprived and PS hypersomniac rats. We found that 74% of the very large population of Fos-labeled neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia were GAD-positive. We further demonstrated combining MCH immunohistochemistry and GAD(67)in situ hybridization that 85% of the MCH neurons were also GAD-positive. Finally, based on the number of Fos-ir/GAD(+), Fos-ir/MCH(+), and GAD(+)/MCH(+) double-labeled neurons counted from three sets of double-staining, we uncovered that around 80% of the large number of the Fos-ir/GAD(+) neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia do not contain MCH. Based on these and previous results, we propose that the non-MCH Fos/GABAergic neuronal population could be involved in PS induction and maintenance while the Fos/MCH/GABAergic neurons could be involved in the homeostatic regulation of PS. Further investigations will be needed to corroborate this original hypothesis.

  9. A very large number of GABAergic neurons are activated in the tuberal hypothalamus during paradoxical (REM sleep hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available We recently discovered, using Fos immunostaining, that the tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus contain a massive population of neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep (PS hypersomnia. We further showed that some of the activated neurons of the tuberal hypothalamus express the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH neuropeptide and that icv injection of MCH induces a strong increase in PS quantity. However, the chemical nature of the majority of the neurons activated during PS had not been characterized. To determine whether these neurons are GABAergic, we combined in situ hybridization of GAD(67 mRNA with immunohistochemical detection of Fos in control, PS deprived and PS hypersomniac rats. We found that 74% of the very large population of Fos-labeled neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia were GAD-positive. We further demonstrated combining MCH immunohistochemistry and GAD(67in situ hybridization that 85% of the MCH neurons were also GAD-positive. Finally, based on the number of Fos-ir/GAD(+, Fos-ir/MCH(+, and GAD(+/MCH(+ double-labeled neurons counted from three sets of double-staining, we uncovered that around 80% of the large number of the Fos-ir/GAD(+ neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia do not contain MCH. Based on these and previous results, we propose that the non-MCH Fos/GABAergic neuronal population could be involved in PS induction and maintenance while the Fos/MCH/GABAergic neurons could be involved in the homeostatic regulation of PS. Further investigations will be needed to corroborate this original hypothesis.

  10. PI3K is an upstream regulator of the PDE3B pathway of leptin signaling that may not involve activation of Akt in the rat hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Abhiram; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Sahu, Maitrayee

    2012-01-01

    Leptin, the product of the obese gene, regulates energy homeostasis by acting primarily at the level of the hypothalamus. Leptin action through its receptor involves various pathways including the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B)-cAMP signaling in the CNS and peripheral tissues. In the hypothalamus, leptin stimulates STAT3 activation, and induces PI3K and PDE3B activities, among others. We have previously demonstrated that PDE3B activation in the hypothalamus is critical for transducing anorectic and body weight reducing effects of leptin. Similarly, PI3K has been implicated toplay a critical role in leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. Whereas in insulin signaling pathway, PI3K is known to be an upstream regulator of PDE3B in non-neuronal tissues, it is still unknown whether this is also the case for leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. To address this possibility, the effect of wortmannin, a specific PI3K inhibitor, was examined on the leptin-induced PDE3B activity in the hypothalamus of male rats. Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of leptin (4 μg) significantly increased PDE3B activity by 2-fold in the hypothalamus as expected. However, prior administration of wortmannin completely reversed the stimulatory effect of leptin on PDE3B activity in the hypothalamus. To demonstrate whether leptin stimulates p-Akt levels and there by a possible upstream regulator of PDE3B, we examined the effects of icv leptin on p-Akt levels in the hypothalamus and compared that with the known stimulatory effect of insulin on p-Akt. We observed that insulin increased p-Akt levels but leptin failed to do so although it increased p-STAT3 levels in the rat hypothalamus. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the biochemical finding in that leptin failed but insulin increased the number of p-Akt positive cells in various hypothalamic nuclei. Altogether these results implicate PI3K but not Akt

  11. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for qPCR in kidney and hypothalamus of rats under testosterone influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Khadijeh; Loh, Su Yi; Salleh, Naguib; Lam, Sau Kuen; Hoe, See Ziau

    2017-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is the most reliable and accurate technique for analyses of gene expression. Endogenous reference genes are being used to normalize qPCR data even though their expression may vary under different conditions and in different tissues. Nonetheless, verification of expression of reference genes in selected studied tissue is essential in order to accurately assess the level of expression of target genes of interest. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to examine six commonly used reference genes in order to identify the gene being expressed most constantly under the influence of testosterone in the kidneys and hypothalamus. The reference genes include glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin beta (ACTB), beta-2 microglobulin (B2m), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT), peptidylprolylisomerase A (Ppia) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (Hmbs). The cycle threshold (Ct) value for each gene was determined and data obtained were analyzed using the software programs NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper, and rank aggregation. Results showed that Hmbs and Ppia genes were the most stably expressed in the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, in kidneys, Hmbs and GAPDH appeared to be the most constant genes. In conclusion, variations in expression levels of reference genes occur in kidneys and hypothalamus under similar conditions; thus, it is important to verify reference gene levels in these tissues prior to commencing any studies.

  12. Both Ox1R and Ox2R orexin receptors contribute to the cardiorespiratory response evoked from the perifornical hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Mirza I; Horiuchi, Jouji; Dampney, Roger A L; Carrive, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Orexin/hypocretin neurons are located in and around the perifornical hypothalamus. Disinhibition of this area in the anaesthetized preparation evokes cardiorespiratory changes that can be reduced to nearly half or more by systemic Almorexant, a dual receptor antagonist of the two known orexin receptors, Ox1R and Ox2R. It is not clear if these reductions result from the blockade of one receptor or both. To determine the contribution of the two receptors, we compared the effects of Almorexant to those of the selective Ox1R antagonist ACT335827 and the selective Ox2R antagonists EMPA and TCS-OX2-29. Bicuculline (20 pmol) was injected in the perifornical hypothalamus of urethane-anaesthetized rats before and after administration of the drugs (all 15 mg/kg, intravenously). The pressor, tachycardic and tachypneic responses to bicuculline were attenuated/reduced by ACT335827 (by 19%, ns; 10%, ns and 24%, P hypothalamus under anaesthesia. They are consistent with our previous study in the conscious animal. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Exercise training and high-fat diet elicit endocannabinoid system modifications in the rat hypothalamus and hippocampus.

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    Gamelin, François-Xavier; Aucouturier, Julien; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Mazzarella, Enrico; Aveta, Teresa; Leriche, Melissa; Dupont, Erwan; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Leclair, Erwan; Bastide, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Heyman, Elsa

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic exercise on the hypothalamus and hippocampus levels of the endocannabinoids (eCBs) anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and of two AEA congeners and on the expression of genes coding for CB1, CB2 receptors (Cnr1 and Cnr2, respectively), and the enzymes responsible for eCB biosynthesis and degradation, in rats fed with a standard or high-fat diet. Male Wistar rats (n = 28) were placed on a 12-week high-fat (HFD) or standard diet period, followed by 12 weeks of exercise training for half of each group. Tissue levels of eCBs and related lipids were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and expression of genes coding for CB1 and CB2 receptors and eCB metabolic enzymes was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). HFD induced a significant increase in 2-AG (p hypothalamus. High-fat diet paired with exercise training had no effect on AEA, 2-AG, and AEA congener levels in the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Cnr1 expression levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus in response to HFD, exercise, and the combination of both (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that eCB signaling in the CNS is sensitive to diet and/or exercise.

  14. [Substance P in the central mechanism of the rabbit feeding response evoked by stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus].

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    Zilov, V G; Rogacheva, S K; Ivanova, L I; Patyshakuliev, A P

    1984-01-01

    The effects of substance P on the central mechanisms of food motivation elicited by electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus were studied in chronic experiments on rabbits. Intravenous injection of substance P (30 micrograms/kg) brought about a dramatic reduction in the excitability of the "food center" in the hypothalamus, which returned to normal 45-60 minutes after injection. Higher concentrations of substance P provoked food behavior inversion up to the replacement of food motivation by avoidance behavior. Intravenous injections of substance P disturbed the relationships between the hippocamp, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus seen in health. This manifested in complete cessation of the inhibitory effects of the dorsal hippocamp and facilitating influences of the midbrain reticular formation on the excitability of the hypothalamic "food center". It is assumed that disorders of the central mechanisms of food motivation may arise from the effects produced by substance P directly on the central nervous system or on the brain via changes in the hormonal balance and responses of the autonomous nervous system.

  15. Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Hypothalamus Is Involved in the Central Regulation of Thermogenesis and the Response to Cold Exposure

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    Elise Laperrousaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (LPL is expressed in different areas of the brain, including the hypothalamus and plays an important role in neural control of the energy balance, including feeding behavior and metabolic fluxes. This study tested the hypothesis that hypothalamic LPL participates in the control of body temperature. We first showed that cold exposure induces decreased activity and expression of LPL in the mouse hypothalamus. We then selectively deleted LPL in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH through an adeno-associated virus approach in LPL-floxed mice and generated MBHΔLpl mice with 30–35% decrease in hypothalamic LPL activity. Results showed a decrease in body temperature in MBHΔLpl mice when compared with controls at 22°C. Exposure to cold (4°C for 4 h decreased the body temperature of the control mice while that of the MBHΔLpl mice remained similar to that observed at 22°C. MBHΔLpl mice also showed increased energy expenditure during cold exposure, when compared to controls. Finally, the selective MBH deletion of LPL also increased the expression of the thermogenic PRMD16 and Dio2 in subcutaneous and perigonadal adipose tissues. Thus, the MBH LPL deletion seems to favor thermogenesis. These data demonstrate that for the first time hypothalamic LPL appears to function as a regulator of body temperature and cold-induced thermogenesis.

  16. mGluR1/5 activation in the lateral hypothalamus increases food intake via the endocannabinoid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fuentes, Asai; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Becerril-Meléndez, Alline L; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-Garcia, Oscar

    2016-09-19

    Mounting evidence has shown that glutamatergic and endocannabinoid systems in the hypothalamus regulate mammalian food intake. Stimulation of hypothalamic mGluR1/5 and CB1 receptors induces hyperphagia suggesting a possible interaction between these systems to control food intake. In addition, synthesis of endocannabinoids has been reported after mGluR1/5 stimulation in the brain. The aim of this study was to examine the potential cannabinergic activity in the food intake induction by lateral hypothalamic stimulation of mGluR1/5. Wistar albino male rats received bilateral infusions in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of: (i) vehicle; (ii) (RS)-2-Chloro-5-hidroxyphenylglycine (CHPG; mGluR1/5 agonist); (iii) 2-AG (CB1 endogenous agonist); (iv) AM251 (CB1 antagonist); (v) tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, 1.2μg; diacyl-glycerol lipase inhibitor); and (vi) combinations of CHPG + with the other aforementioned drugs. Food intake was evaluated the first two hours after drug administration. CHPG significantly increased food intake; whereas CHPG in combination with a dose of 2-AG (with no effects on food intake) greatly increased food ingestion compared to CHPG alone. The increase induced by CHPG in food intake was prevented with AM251 or THL. These results suggest that activation of mGluR1/5 in the lateral hypothalamus induces an orexigenic effect via activation of the endocannabinoid system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neonatal handling and the expression of immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase in the hypothalamus of adult male rats

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    E.E.S. Hermel

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal handling has long-lasting effects on behavior and stress reactivity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of neonatal handling on the number of dopaminergic neurons in the hypothalamic nuclei of adult male rats as part of a series of studies that could explain the long-lasting effects of neonatal stimulation. Two groups of Wistar rats were studied: nonhandled (pups were left undisturbed, control and handled (pups were handled for 1 min once a day during the first 10 days of life. At 75-80 days, the males were anesthetized and the brains were processed for immunohistochemistry. An anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibody and the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method were used. Tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR neurons were counted bilaterally in the arcuate, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus in 30-µm sections at 120-µm intervals. Neonatal handling did not change the number of TH-IR neurons in the arcuate (1021 ± 206, N = 6; 1020 ± 150, N = 6; nonhandled and handled, respectively, paraventricular (584 ± 85, N = 8; 682 ± 62, N = 9 or periventricular (743 ± 118, N = 7; 990 ± 158, N = 7 nuclei of the hypothalamus. The absence of an effect on the number of dopaminergic cells in the hypothalamus indicates that the reduction in the amount of neurons induced by neonatal handling, as shown by other studies, is not a general phenomenon in the brain.

  18. Transcriptome analyses identify five transcription factors differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of post- versus prepubertal Brahman heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, M R S; Nguyen, L T; Weller, M M D C A; Cánovas, A; Islas-Trejo, A; Porto-Neto, L R; Reverter, A; Lehnert, S A; Boe-Hansen, G B; Thomas, M G; Medrano, J F; Moore, S S

    2016-09-01

    Puberty onset is a developmental process influenced by genetic determinants, environment, and nutrition. Mutations and regulatory gene networks constitute the molecular basis for the genetic determinants of puberty onset. The emerging knowledge of these genetic determinants presents opportunities for innovation in the breeding of early pubertal cattle. This paper presents new data on hypothalamic gene expression related to puberty in (Brahman) in age- and weight-matched heifers. Six postpubertal heifers were compared with 6 prepubertal heifers using whole-genome RNA sequencing methodology for quantification of global gene expression in the hypothalamus. Five transcription factors (TF) with potential regulatory roles in the hypothalamus were identified in this experiment: , , , , and . These TF genes were significantly differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of postpubertal versus prepubertal heifers and were also identified as significant according to the applied regulatory impact factor metric ( cancer and developmental processes. Mutations in were associated with puberty in humans. Mutations in these TF, together with other genetic determinants previously discovered, could be used in genomic selection to predict the genetic merit of cattle (i.e., the likelihood of the offspring presenting earlier than average puberty for Brahman). Knowledge of key mutations involved in genetic traits is an advantage for genomic prediction because it can increase its accuracy.

  19. Maternal obesity leads to increased proliferation and numbers of astrocytes in the developing fetal and neonatal mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Won; Glendining, Kelly A; Grattan, David R; Jasoni, Christine L

    2016-10-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy is associated with chronic maternal, placental, and fetal inflammation; and it elevates the risk for offspring obesity. Changes in the development of the hypothalamus, a brain region that regulates body weight and energy balance, are emerging as important determinants of offspring risk, but such changes are only beginning to be defined. Here we focused on the hypothesis that the pathological exposure of developing hypothalamic astrocytes to cytokines would alter their development. A maternal high-fat diet (mHFD) mouse model was used to investigate changes in hypothalamic astrocytes in the fetus during late gestation and in early neonates by using immunochemistry, confocal microscopy, and qPCR. The number of astrocytes and the proportion of proliferating astrocytes was significantly higher in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus at both ages compared to control offspring from normal weight pregnancies. Supplemental to this we found that cultured fetal hypothalamic astrocytes proliferated significantly in response to IL6 (10ng/ml), one of the cytokines significantly elevated in fetuses of obese dams, via the JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway. Thus, maternal obesity during pregnancy stimulated the proliferation and thereby increased numbers of astrocytes in the fetal as well as early neonatal hypothalamus, which may be driven, during fetal life, by IL6. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical evidence for glutamate as a transmitter in hippocampal efferents to the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in the rat brain

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    Walaas, I.; Fonnum, F.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bilateral transection of the fornix bundle on the high affinity uptake of glutamate and on the amino acid content in several nuclei of rat forebrain and hypothalamus were studied in order to investigate the possible role of glutamate as a transmitter of these fibres. This lesion decreased the high affinity uptake of L-glutamate by 60 to 70% in the mammillary body and lateral septum, and by 40 to 50% in the anterior diagonal band nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens. The content of endogenous glutamate in samples dissected from freeze-dried tissue also decreased significantly in these regions. Endogenous aspartate was slightly decreased in the anterior diagonal band nucleus and the mammillary body, but unchanged in the other regions. No significant changes were seen in the levels of serine, ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, glutamine and taurine, except for an increase in glutamine and taurine in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The high affinity uptake of ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, tested in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the mammillary body, was unchanged after the lesion. The results indicate that allocortical efferents innervating subcortial nuclei through the fornix might use glutamate as a transmitter. The study further supports the concept that glutamate plays an important role as transmitter of several different corticofugal fibre systems in mammalian brain.

  1. Polyunsaturated fatty acid receptors, GPR40 and GPR120, are expressed in the hypothalamus and control energy homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragano, Nathalia R V; Solon, Carina; Ramalho, Albina F; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Razolli, Daniela S; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Azevedo, Carlos; Ulven, Trond; Velloso, Licio A

    2017-04-26

    The consumption of large amounts of dietary fats is one of the most important environmental factors contributing to the development of obesity and metabolic disorders. GPR120 and GPR40 are polyunsaturated fatty acid receptors that exert a number of systemic effects that are beneficial for metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Here, we evaluate the expression and potential role of hypothalamic GPR120 and GPR40 as targets for the treatment of obesity. Male Swiss (6-weeks old), were fed with a high fat diet (HFD, 60% of kcal from fat) for 4 weeks. Next, mice underwent stereotaxic surgery to place an indwelling cannula into the right lateral ventricle. intracerebroventricular (icv)-cannulated mice were treated twice a day for 6 days with 2.0 μL saline or GPR40 and GPR120 agonists: GW9508, TUG1197, or TUG905 (2.0 μL, 1.0 mM). Food intake and body mass were measured during the treatment period. At the end of the experiment, the hypothalamus was collected for real-time PCR analysis. We show that both receptors are expressed in the hypothalamus; GPR120 is primarily present in microglia, whereas GPR40 is expressed in neurons. Upon intracerebroventricular treatment, GW9508, a non-specific agonist for both receptors, reduced energy efficiency and the expression of inflammatory genes in the hypothalamus. Reducing GPR120 hypothalamic expression using a lentivirus-based approach resulted in the loss of the anti-inflammatory effect of GW9508 and increased energy efficiency. Intracerebroventricular treatment with the GPR120- and GPR40-specific agonists TUG1197 and TUG905, respectively, resulted in milder effects than those produced by GW9508. GPR120 and GPR40 act in concert in the hypothalamus to reduce energy efficiency and regulate the inflammation associated with obesity. The combined activation of both receptors in the hypothalamus results in better metabolic outcomes than the isolated activation of either receptor alone.

  2. Differential pre-mRNA splicing regulates Nnat isoforms in the hypothalamus after gastric bypass surgery in mice.

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    William R Scott

    Full Text Available Neuronatin (NNAT is an endoplasmic reticulum proteolipid implicated in intracellular signalling. Nnat is highly-expressed in the hypothalamus, where it is acutely regulated by nutrients and leptin. Nnat pre-mRNA is differentially spliced to create Nnat-α and -β isoforms. Genetic variation of NNAT is associated with severe obesity. Currently, little is known about the long-term regulation of Nnat.Expression of Nnat isoforms were examined in the hypothalamus of mice in response to acute fast/feed, chronic caloric restriction, diet-induced obesity and modified gastric bypass surgery. Nnat expression was assessed in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tissues. RTqPCR was used to determine isoform-specific expression of Nnat mRNA.Hypothalamic expression of both Nnat isoforms was comparably decreased by overnight and 24-h fasting. Nnat expression was unaltered in diet-induced obesity, or subsequent switch to a calorie restricted diet. Nnat isoforms showed differential expression in the hypothalamus but not brainstem after bypass surgery. Hypothalamic Nnat-β expression was significantly reduced after bypass compared with sham surgery (P = 0.003, and was positively correlated with post-operative weight-loss (R(2 = 0.38, P = 0.01. In contrast, Nnat-α expression was not suppressed after bypass surgery (P = 0.19, and expression did not correlate with reduction in weight after surgery (R(2 = 0.06, P = 0.34. Hypothalamic expression of Nnat-β correlated weakly with circulating leptin, but neither isoform correlated with fasting gut hormone levels post- surgery. Nnat expression was detected in brainstem, brown-adipose tissue, stomach and small intestine.Nnat expression in hypothalamus is regulated by short-term nutrient availability, but unaltered by diet-induced obesity or calorie restriction. While Nnat isoforms in the hypothalamus are co-ordinately regulated by acute nutrient supply, after modified gastric bypass

  3. Maternal high-fat diet induces metabolic stress response disorders in offspring hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long The; Saad, Sonia; Tan, Yi; Pollock, Carol; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Maternal obesity has been shown to increase the risk of obesity and related disorders in the offspring, which has been partially attributed to changes of appetite regulators in the offspring hypothalamus. On the other hand, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy have been implicated in hypothalamic neuropeptide dysregulation, thus may also play important roles in such transgenerational effect. In this study, we show that offspring born to high-fat diet-fed dams showed significantly increased body weight and glucose intolerance, adiposity and plasma triglyceride level at weaning. Hypothalamic mRNA level of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) was increased, while the levels of the anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), NPY1 receptor (NPY1R) and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) were significantly downregulated. In association, the expression of unfolded protein response (UPR) markers including glucose-regulated protein (GRP)94 and endoplasmic reticulum DNA J domain-containing protein (Erdj)4 was reduced. By contrast, protein levels of autophagy-related genes Atg5 and Atg7, as well as mitophagy marker Parkin, were slightly increased. The administration of 4-phenyl butyrate (PBA), a chemical chaperone of protein folding and UPR activator, in the offspring from postnatal day 4 significantly reduced their body weight, fat deposition, which were in association with increased activating transcription factor (ATF)4, immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) and Erdj4 mRNA as well as reduced Parkin, PTEN-induced putative kinase (PINK)1 and dynamin-related protein (Drp)1 protein expression levels. These results suggest that hypothalamic ER stress and mitophagy are among the regulatory factors of offspring metabolic changes due to maternal obesity. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Transient expression of neuropeptide W in postnatal mouse hypothalamus--a putative regulator of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoike, T; Skach, A G; Godwin, J K; Sinton, C M; Yamazaki, M; Abe, M; Natsume, R; Sakimura, K; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-08-20

    Neuropeptide B and W (NPB and NPW) are cognate peptide ligands for NPBWR1 (GPR7), a G protein-coupled receptor. In rodents, they have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine/autonomic responses, and social interactions. Although localization of these peptides and their receptors in adult rodent brain has been well documented, their expression in mouse brain during development is unknown. Here we demonstrate the transient expression of NPW mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of postnatal mouse brain and its co-localization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA. Neurons expressing both NPW and NPY mRNAs begin to emerge in the DMH at about postnatal day 0 (P-0) through P-3. Their expression is highest around P-14, declines after P-21, and by P-28 only a faint expression of NPW and NPY mRNA remains. In P-18 brains, we detected NPW neurons in the region spanning the subincertal nucleus (SubI), the lateral hypothalamic (LH) perifornical (PF) areas, and the DMH, where the highest expression of NPW mRNA was observed. The majority of these postnatal hypothalamic NPW neurons co-express NPY mRNA. A cross of NPW-iCre knock-in mice with a Cre-dependent tdTomato reporter line revealed that more than half of the reporter-positive neurons in the adult DMH, which mature from the transiently NPW-expressing neurons, are sensitive to peripherally administrated leptin. These data suggest that the DMH neurons that transiently co-express NPW and NPY in the peri-weaning period might play a role in regulating energy homeostasis during postnatal development. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Connectivity from OR37 expressing olfactory sensory neurons to distinct cell types in the hypothalamus

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    Andrea eBader

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons which express a member from the OR37 subfamily of odorant receptor genes are wired to the main olfactory bulb in a unique monoglomerular fashion; from these glomeruli an untypical connectivity into higher brain centers exists. In the present study we have investigated by DiI and transsynaptic tracing approaches how the connection pattern from these glomeruli into distinct hypothalamic nuclei is organized. The application of DiI onto the ventral domain of the bulb which harbors the OR37 glomeruli resulted in the labeling of fibers within the paraventricular and supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus; some of these fibers were covered with varicose-like structures. No DiI-labeled cell somata were detectable in these nuclei. The data indicate that projection neurons which originate in the OR37 region of the main olfactory bulb form direct connections into these nuclei. The cells that were labeled by the transsynaptic tracer WGA in these nuclei were further characterized. Their distribution pattern in the paraventricular nucleus was reminiscent of cells which produce distinct neuropeptides. Double labeling experiments confirmed that they contained vasopressin, but not the related neuropeptide oxytocin. Morphological analysis revealed that they comprise of magno- and parvocellular cells. A comparative investigation of the WGA-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus demonstrated that these were vasopressin-positive, as well, whereas oxytocin-producing cells of this nucleus also contained no transsynaptic tracer. Together, the data demonstrate a connectivity from OR37 expressing sensory neurons to distinct hypothalamic neurons with the same neuropeptide content.

  6. Differential Sensitivity of Specific Neuronal Populations of the Rat Hypothalamus to Prolactin Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, Tony J.; Kokay, Ilona C.; Östberg, Lovisa; Bridges, Robert S.; Grattan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin stimulates dopamine release from neuroendocrine dopaminergic (NEDA) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to maintain low levels of serum prolactin. Elevated prolactin levels during pregnancy and lactation may mediate actions in other hypothalamic regions such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral preoptic area (rPOA). We predicted that NEDA neurons would be more sensitive prolactin targets than neurons in other regions because they are required to regulate basal prolactin secretion. Moreover, differences in the accessibility of the ARC to prolactin in blood may influence the responsiveness of this population. Therefore, we compared prolactin-induced signaling in different hypothalamic neuronal populations following either systemic or intracerebroventricular (icv) prolactin administration. Phosphorylation of the signal transduction factor, STAT5 (pSTAT5), was used to identify prolactin-responsive neurons. In response to systemic prolactin, pSTAT5-labeled cells were widely observed in the ARC but absent from the rPOA and PVN. Many of these responsive cells in the ARC were identified as NEDA neurons. The lowest icv prolactin dose (10 ng) induced pSTAT5 in the ARC, but with higher doses (>500 ng) pSTAT5 was detected in numerous regions, including the rPOA and PVN. NEDA neurons were maximally labeled with nuclear pSTAT5 in response to 500 ng prolactin and appeared to be more sensitive than dopaminergic neurons in the rPOA. Subpopulations of oxytocin neurons in the hypothalamus were also found to be differentially sensitive to prolactin. These data suggest that differences in the accessibility of the arcuate nucleus to prolactin, together with intrinsic differences in the NEDA neurons, may facilitate homeostatic feedback regulation of prolactin release. PMID:21953590

  7. Deep brain stimulation of the posteromedial hypothalamus: indications, long-term results, and neurophysiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Angelo; Messina, Giuseppe; Cordella, Roberto; Marras, Carlo; Broggi, Giovanni

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the indications for and results of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamus (pHyp) in the treatment of drug-refractory and severe painful syndromes of the face, disruptive and aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy, and below-average intelligence. The preoperative clinical picture, functional imaging studies, and overall clinical results in the literature are discussed. All patients underwent stereotactic implantation of deep-brain electrodes within the pHyp. Data from several authors have been collected and reported for each clinical entity, as have clinical results, adverse events, and neurophysiological characteristics of the pHyp. The percentage of patients with chronic cluster headache who responded to DBS was 50% in the overall reported series. The response rate was 100% for short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing and for chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, although only 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively, have been described as having these conditions. None of the 4 patients suffering from refractory neuropathic trigeminal pain benefited from the procedure (0% response rate), whereas all 5 patients (100%) affected with refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) due to multiple sclerosis (MS) and undergoing pHyp DBS experienced a significant decrease in pain attacks within the first branch of cranial nerve V. Six (75%) of 8 patients presenting with aggressive behavior and mental retardation benefited from pHyp stimulation; 6 patients were part of the authors' series and 2 were reported in the literature. In carefully selected patients, DBS of the pHyp can be considered an effective procedure for the treatment of refractory trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, aggressive behavior, and MS-related TN in the first trigeminal branch. Only larger and prospective studies along with multidisciplinary approaches (including, by necessity, neuroimaging studies) can

  8. Neurotensin releases norepinephrine differentially from perfused hypothalamus of sated and fasted rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.F.; Rezvani, A.H.; Hepler, J.R.; Myers, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The central injection of neurotensin (NT) has been reported to attenuate the intake of food in the fasted animal. To determine whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) is involved in the satiating effect of NT, the in vivo activity of NE in circumscribed sites in the hypothalamus of the unanesthetized rat was examined. Bilateral guide tubes for push-pull perfusion were implanted stereotaxically to rest permanently above one of several intended sites of perfusion, which included the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area. After endogenous stores of NE at a specific hypothalamic locus were radiolabeled by microinjection of 0.02-0.5 μCi of [ 3 H]NE, an artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused at the site at a rate of 20 μl/min over successive intervals of 5.0 min. When 0.05 or 0.1 μg/μl NT was added to the perfusate, the peptide served either to enhance or educe the local release of NE at 50% of the sites of perfusion. In these experiments, the circumscribed effect of NT on the characteristics of catecholamine efflux depended entirely on the state of hunger or satiety of the rat. That is, when NT was perfused in the fully satiated rat, NE release was augmented within the PVn or VMN; conversely, NE release was inhibited in the LH. in the animal fasted for 18-22 h, NT exerted an opposite effect on the activity of NE within the same anatomical loci in that the efflux of NE was enhanced in the LH but attenuated or unaffected in the PVN or VMN. Taken together, these observations provide experimental support for the view-point that NT could act as a neuromodulator of the activity of hypothalamic noradrenergic neurons that are thought to play a functional role in the regulation of food intake

  9. ANABOLIC STEROIDS ALTER THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF AGGRESSION CIRCUITS IN THE LATERAL ANTERIOR HYPOTHALAMUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R.; Sikes, Robert W.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure. PMID:26691962

  10. A riot of rhythms: neuronal and glial circadian oscillators in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilding, Clare; Hughes, Alun T L; Brown, Timothy M; Namvar, Sara; Piggins, Hugh D

    2009-08-27

    In mammals, the synchronized activity of cell autonomous clocks in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) enables this structure to function as the master circadian clock, coordinating daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, the dominance of this clock has been challenged by the observations that metabolic duress can over-ride SCN controlled rhythms, and that clock genes are expressed in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of appetite and feeding. The recent development of mice in which clock gene/protein activity is reported by bioluminescent constructs (luciferase or luc) now enables us to track molecular oscillations in numerous tissues ex vivo. Consequently we determined both clock activities and responsiveness to metabolic perturbations of cells and tissues within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a site pivotal for optimal internal homeostatic regulation. Here we demonstrate endogenous circadian rhythms of PER2::LUC expression in discrete subdivisions of the arcuate (Arc) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH). Rhythms resolved to single cells did not maintain long-term synchrony with one-another, leading to a damping of oscillations at both cell and tissue levels. Complementary electrophysiology recordings revealed rhythms in neuronal activity in the Arc and DMH. Further, PER2::LUC rhythms were detected in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle and in the median eminence/pars tuberalis (ME/PT). A high-fat diet had no effect on the molecular oscillations in the MBH, whereas food deprivation resulted in an altered phase in the ME/PT. Our results provide the first single cell resolution of endogenous circadian rhythms in clock gene expression in any intact tissue outside the SCN, reveal the cellular basis for tissue level damping in extra-SCN oscillators and demonstrate that an oscillator in the ME/PT is responsive to changes in metabolism.

  11. A riot of rhythms: neuronal and glial circadian oscillators in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilding Clare

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, the synchronized activity of cell autonomous clocks in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN enables this structure to function as the master circadian clock, coordinating daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, the dominance of this clock has been challenged by the observations that metabolic duress can over-ride SCN controlled rhythms, and that clock genes are expressed in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of appetite and feeding. The recent development of mice in which clock gene/protein activity is reported by bioluminescent constructs (luciferase or luc now enables us to track molecular oscillations in numerous tissues ex vivo. Consequently we determined both clock activities and responsiveness to metabolic perturbations of cells and tissues within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH, a site pivotal for optimal internal homeostatic regulation. Results Here we demonstrate endogenous circadian rhythms of PER2::LUC expression in discrete subdivisions of the arcuate (Arc and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH. Rhythms resolved to single cells did not maintain long-term synchrony with one-another, leading to a damping of oscillations at both cell and tissue levels. Complementary electrophysiology recordings revealed rhythms in neuronal activity in the Arc and DMH. Further, PER2::LUC rhythms were detected in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle and in the median eminence/pars tuberalis (ME/PT. A high-fat diet had no effect on the molecular oscillations in the MBH, whereas food deprivation resulted in an altered phase in the ME/PT. Conclusion Our results provide the first single cell resolution of endogenous circadian rhythms in clock gene expression in any intact tissue outside the SCN, reveal the cellular basis for tissue level damping in extra-SCN oscillators and demonstrate that an oscillator in the ME/PT is responsive to changes in metabolism.

  12. Hubs and spokes of the lateral hypothalamus: cell types, circuits and behaviour

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    Bonnavion, Patricia; Mickelsen, Laura E.; Fujita, Akie; de Lecea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hypothalamus is among the most phylogenetically conserved regions in the vertebrate brain, reflecting its critical role in maintaining physiological and behavioural homeostasis. By integrating signals arising from both the brain and periphery, it governs a litany of behaviourally important functions essential for survival. In particular, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is central to the orchestration of sleep–wake states, feeding, energy balance and motivated behaviour. Underlying these diverse functions is a heterogeneous assembly of cell populations typically defined by neurochemical markers, such as the well‐described neuropeptides hypocretin/orexin and melanin‐concentrating hormone. However, anatomical and functional evidence suggests a rich diversity of other cell populations with complex neurochemical profiles that include neuropeptides, receptors and components of fast neurotransmission. Collectively, the LHA acts as a hub for the integration of diverse central and peripheral signals and, through complex local and long‐range output circuits, coordinates adaptive behavioural responses to the environment. Despite tremendous progress in our understanding of the LHA, defining the identity of functionally discrete LHA cell types, and their roles in driving complex behaviour, remain significant challenges in the field. In this review, we discuss advances in our understanding of the neurochemical and cellular heterogeneity of LHA neurons and the recent application of powerful new techniques, such as opto‐ and chemogenetics, in defining the role of LHA circuits in feeding, reward, arousal and stress. From pioneering work to recent developments, we review how the interrogation of LHA cells and circuits is contributing to a mechanistic understanding of how the LHA coordinates complex behaviour. PMID:27302606

  13. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CB1 receptor mediates the effects of glucocorticoids on AMPK activity in the hypothalamus.

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    Scerif, Miski; Füzesi, Tamás; Thomas, Julia D; Kola, Blerina; Grossman, Ashley B; Fekete, Csaba; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of cellular and systemic energy homeostasis, can be influenced by several hormones. Tissue-specific alteration of AMPK activity by glucocorticoids may explain the increase in appetite, the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissues, and the detrimental cardiac effects of Cushing's syndrome. Endocannabinoids are known to mediate the effects of various hormones and to influence AMPK activity. Cannabinoids have central orexigenic and direct peripheral metabolic effects via the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). In our preliminary experiments, WT mice received implants of a corticosterone-containing pellet to establish a mouse model of Cushing's syndrome. Subsequently, WT and Cb1 (Cnr1)-knockout (CB1-KO) littermates were treated with corticosterone and AMPK activity in the hypothalamus, various adipose tissues, liver and cardiac tissue was measured. Corticosterone-treated CB1-KO mice showed a lack of weight gain and of increase in hypothalamic and hepatic AMPK activity. In adipose tissues, baseline AMPK activity was higher in CB1-KO mice, but a glucocorticoid-induced drop was observed, similar to that observed in WT mice. Cardiac AMPK levels were reduced in CB1-KO mice, but while WT mice showed significantly reduced AMPK activity following glucocorticoid treatment, CB1-KO mice showed a paradoxical increase. Our findings indicate the importance of the CB1 receptor in the central orexigenic effect of glucocorticoid-induced activation of hypothalamic AMPK activity. In the periphery adipose tissues, changes may occur independently of the CB1 receptor, but the receptor appears to alter the responsiveness of the liver and myocardial tissues to glucocorticoids. In conclusion, our data suggest that an intact cannabinoid pathway is required for the full metabolic effects of chronic glucocorticoid excess.

  15. Melatonin promotes sleep in mice by inhibiting orexin neurons in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2018-04-14

    Melatonin promotes sleep. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Orexin neurons in the perifornical lateral-hypothalamus (PFH) are pivotal for wake-promotion. Does melatonin promote sleep by inhibiting orexin neurons? We used C57BL/6J mice and designed four experiments to address this question. Experiment 1 used double-labeled immunofluorescence and examined the presence of melatonin receptors on orexin neurons. Second, mice, implanted with bilateral guides targeted toward PFH, and sleep-recording electrodes, were infused with melatonin (500 pmole/50 nl/side) at dark onset (onset of active period) and spontaneous bouts of sleep-wakefulness were examined. Third, mice, implanted with bilateral guides into the PFH, were infused with melatonin (500 pmole/50 nl/side) at dark onset and euthanized two hours later, to examine activation of orexin neurons using c-Fos expression in orexin neurons. Fourth, mice, implanted with PFH bilateral guides and sleep- recording electrodes, were infused with melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, (10pmol/50 nL/side) at lights-onset (onset of sleep period) and spontaneous bouts of sleep-wakefulness were examined. Our results suggests that orexin neurons express MT1, but not MT2 receptors. Melatonin infusion into the PFH, at dark onset, site-specifically and significantly increased NREM sleep (43.7%, p=0.003) and reduced wakefulness (12.3%, p=0.013). Local melatonin infusion at dark-onset inhibited orexin neurons as evident by a significant reduction (66%, p=0.0004) in the number of orexin neurons expressing c-Fos. Finally, luzindole infusion induced blockade of melatonin receptors in PFH, at sleep onset significantly increased wakefulness (44.1%, p=0.015). Based on these results we suggest that melatonin may act via the MT1 receptors to inhibit orexin neurons and promote sleep. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Sexual Dimorphism of Growth Hormone in the Hypothalamus: Regulation by Estradiol

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    Addison, Melisande L.

    2012-01-01

    GH is best known as an anterior pituitary hormone fundamental in regulating growth, differentiation, and metabolism. GH peptide and mRNA are also present in brain, in which their functions are less well known. Here we describe the distribution of GH neurons and fibers and sex differences in Gh mRNA in adult mouse brain. Cell bodies exhibiting GH immunoreactivity are distributed in many brain regions, particularly in the hypothalamus in which retrograde labeling suggests that some of these cells project to the median eminence. To determine whether Gh mRNA is sexual dimorphic, we carried out quantitative RT-PCR on microdissected brain nuclei. Ovary-intact mice had elevated Gh mRNA in the arcuate nucleus and medial preoptic area (MPOA) compared with gonad-intact males. In males, castration increased Gh mRNA in the MPOA, whereas ovariectomy decreased Gh mRNA in both regions. When gonadectomized adults of both sexes were treated with estradiol Gh mRNA increased in females but had no effect in castrated males. Tamoxifen was able to blunt the rise in Gh mRNA in response to estradiol in females. In addition, we found that estrogen receptor-α is coexpressed in GH neurons in the MPOA and arcuate nucleus. In summary, the findings reveal sexual dimorphisms in Gh gene expression in areas of the brain associated with reproduction and behavior. Interestingly, estradiol enhances Gh mRNA in females only, suggesting that multiple factors orchestrate this sexual dimorphism. PMID:22315455

  17. A Computational Model of the Rainbow Trout Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovary-Liver Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Kendall; Krone, Stephen M; Nagler, James J; Schultz, Irvin R

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction in fishes and other vertebrates represents the timely coordination of many endocrine factors that culminate in the production of mature, viable gametes. In recent years there has been rapid growth in understanding fish reproductive biology, which has been motivated in part by recognition of the potential effects that climate change, habitat destruction and contaminant exposure can have on natural and cultured fish populations. New approaches to understanding the impacts of these stressors are being developed that require a systems biology approach with more biologically accurate and detailed mathematical models. We have developed a multi-scale mathematical model of the female rainbow trout hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-liver axis to use as a tool to help understand the functioning of the system and for extrapolation of laboratory findings of stressor impacts on specific components of the axis. The model describes the essential endocrine components of the female rainbow trout reproductive axis. The model also describes the stage specific growth of maturing oocytes within the ovary and permits the presence of sub-populations of oocytes at different stages of development. Model formulation and parametrization was largely based on previously published in vivo and in vitro data in rainbow trout and new data on the synthesis of gonadotropins in the pituitary. Model predictions were validated against several previously published data sets for annual changes in gonadotropins and estradiol in rainbow trout. Estimates of select model parameters can be obtained from in vitro assays using either quantitative (direct estimation of rate constants) or qualitative (relative change from control values) approaches. This is an important aspect of mathematical models as in vitro, cell-based assays are expected to provide the bulk of experimental data for future risk assessments and will require quantitative physiological models to extrapolate across biological scales.

  18. Contributions of HIV infection in the hypothalamus and substance abuse/use to HPT dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Dianne; Baron, David; Joy, Javed; Valle, Luis Del; Shack, Jonathon

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, consequences of HIV infection of the CNS on disease severity and clinical neuropsychiatric manifestations have changed. These changes are due, in part, to improved control of peripheral infection by new anti-retroviral medications and more efficient CNS penetration of combination anti-retroviral therapies (cART). While the life spans of HIV-infected patients have been prolonged with successful cART, the spectrum of cognitive alterations observed in these patients has broadened. Recent studies report that there does not appear to be a single prototypical pattern of neuropsychological impairment associated with HIV, but rather it includes diverse manifestations. Some co-morbidities such as substance abuse or depression, likely play significant roles in the neuropsychiatric profiles of some HIV-infected patients. Newly recognized factors contributing to neurocognitive impairments include ageing and unanticipated side effects from cART. Likewise, disturbances in neuroendocrine functioning are emerging as potentially important contributors to HIV-associated neurocognitive alterations. A retrospective review of clinical data from a small cohort of HIV-infected patients admitted to the psychiatric unit of an inner city hospital indicates that thyroid stimulating hormone levels were abnormal in 27% of the patients. Our data from analyses of post-mortem tissues from HIV patients show for the first time HIV infection of the hypothalamus and altered levels of thyroid hormone processing enzymes. Decreased vasopressin and oxytocin immunoreactivity in hypothalamic neurons was also observed. Thus, HIV infection of the CNS may contribute to changes in hypothalamic hormone signaling, thereby resulting in abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis feedback and neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:21115295

  19. Acid sensing ion channel 1 in lateral hypothalamus contributes to breathing control.

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    Nana Song

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are present in neurons and may contribute to chemoreception. Among six subunits of ASICs, ASIC1 is mainly expressed in the central nervous system. Recently, multiple sites in the brain including the lateral hypothalamus (LH have been found to be sensitive to extracellular acidification. Since LH contains orexin neurons and innervates the medulla respiratory center, we hypothesize that ASIC1 is expressed on the orexin neuron and contributes to acid-induced increase in respiratory drive. To test this hypothesis, we used double immunofluorescence to determine whether ASIC1 is expressed on orexin neurons in the LH, and assessed integrated phrenic nerve discharge (iPND in intact rats in response to acidification of the LH. We found that ASIC1 was co-localized with orexinA in the LH. Microinjection of acidified artificial cerebrospinal fluid increased the amplitude of iPND by 70% (pH 7.4 v.s. pH 6.5:1.05±0.12 v.s. 1.70±0.10, n = 6, P<0.001 and increased the respiratory drive (peak amplitude of iPND/inspiratory time, PA/Ti by 40% (1.10±0.23 v.s. 1.50±0.38, P<0.05. This stimulatory effect was abolished by blocking ASIC1 with a nonselective inhibitor (amiloride 10 mM, a selective inhibitor (PcTX1, 10 nM or by damaging orexin neurons in the LH. Current results support our hypothesis that the orexin neuron in the LH can exert an excitation on respiration via ASIC1 during local acidosis. Since central acidification is involved in breathing dysfunction in a variety of pulmonary diseases, understanding its underlying mechanism may improve patient management.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced neuronal activation in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamus depends on ambient temperature.

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    Samuel P Wanner

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is associated with either fever or hypothermia, but the mechanisms responsible for switching from one to the other are unknown. In experimental animals, systemic inflammation is often induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. To identify the diencephalic and brainstem structures involved in the fever-hypothermia switch, we studied the expression of c-Fos protein, a marker of neuronal activation, in rats treated with the same high dose of LPS (0.5 mg/kg, intravenously either in a thermoneutral (30 °C or cool (24 °C environment. At 30 °C, LPS caused fever; at 24 °C, the same dose caused profound hypothermia. Both fever and hypothermia were associated with the induction of c-Fos in many brain areas, including several structures of the anterior preoptic, paraventricular, lateral, and dorsal hypothalamus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the posterior pretectal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, lateral parabrachial nucleus, area postrema, and nucleus of the solitary tract. Every brain area studied showed a comparable response to LPS at the two different ambient temperatures used, with the exception of two areas: the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH, which we studied together with the adjacent dorsal hypothalamic area (DA, and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH. Both structures had much stronger c-Fos expression during LPS hypothermia than during fever. We propose that PVH and DMH/DA neurons are involved in a circuit, which - depending on the ambient temperature - determines whether the thermoregulatory response to bacterial LPS will be fever or hypothermia.

  1. Apolipoprotein A-IV exerts its anorectic action through a PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Lo, Chunmin C; Woollett, Laura A; Liu, Min

    2017-12-09

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is a satiation factor that acts in the hypothalamus, however, the intracellular mechanisms responsible for this action are still largely unknown. Here we report that apoA-IV treatment elicited a rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway in cultured primary hypothalamic neurons, and this effect was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of the PI3K pathway. To determine if the activation of PI3K is required for apoA-IV's inhibitory effect on food intake, apoA-IV was administered intracerebroventricularly. We found that apoA-IV significantly reduced food intake and activated PI3K signaling in the hypothalamus, and these effects were abolished by icv pre-treatment with LY294002. To identify the distinct brain sites where apoA-IV exerts its anorectic action, apoA-IV was administered into the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) through implanted bilateral cannula. At a low dose (0.5 μg), apoA-IV significantly inhibited food intake and activated PI3K signaling pathway in the VMH of lean rats, but not in high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. These results collectively demonstrate a critical role of the PI3K/Akt pathway in apoA-IV's anorectic action in lean rats and suggest a defective PI3K pathway in the VMH is responsible for the impaired apoA-IV's anorectic action in the DIO animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene expression of pro-opiomelanocortin and melanocortin receptors is regulated in the hypothalamus and mesocorticolimbic system following nicotine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapinc, Damla E; Ilgin, Rabia; Kaya, Egemen; Gozen, Oguz; Ugur, Muzeyyen; Koylu, Ersin O; Kanit, Lutfiye; Keser, Aysegul; Balkan, Burcu

    2017-01-10

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides and their receptors have been shown to play important roles in natural and drug-induced reward and reinforcement. Reward process may involve the regulation of POMC gene expression and the gene expression of POMC-derived peptide receptors. The present study investigated the alterations observed in the transcript levels of POMC, melanocortin 3 (MC3R), melanocortin 4 (MC4R) and mu-opioid receptors (MOR) in the hypothalamus and mesocorticolimbic system during nicotine exposure. Rats were injected subcutaneously for 5days with one of the three doses (0.2, 0.4 or 0.6mg/kg/day, free base) of nicotine and were decapitated one hour after a challenge dose on the sixth day. mRNA levels of POMC in the hypothalamus, MC3R in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), MC4R and MOR in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum, amygdala, lateral hypothalamic area and VTA were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed that treatment with 0.6mg/kg/day nicotine upregulated POMC mRNA in the hypothalamus and MC4R mRNA in the mPFC. Additionally, all three nicotine doses increased MC3R mRNA expression in the VTA. On the other hand, none of the nicotine doses altered MOR mRNA levels in the mesocorticolimbic system and associated limbic structures. These results suggest that nicotine may enhance melanocortin signaling in the mesocorticolimbic system and this alteration may be an important mechanism mediating nicotine reward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of the hypothalamus and pituitary in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2012-01-01

    The living monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are distinguished by the development of their young in a leathery-shelled egg, a low and variable body temperature and a primitive teat-less mammary gland. Their young are hatched in an immature state and must deal with the external environment, with all its challenges of hypothermia and stress, as well as sourcing nutrients from the maternal mammary gland. The Hill and Hubrecht embryological collections have been used to follow the structural development of the monotreme hypothalamus and its connections with the pituitary gland both in the period leading up to hatching and during the lactational phase of development, and to relate this structural maturation to behavioural development. In the incubation phase, development of the hypothalamus proceeds from closure of the anterior neuropore to formation of the lateral hypothalamic zone and putative medial forebrain bundle. Some medial zone hypothalamic nuclei are emerging at the time of hatching, but these are poorly differentiated and periventricular zone nuclei do not appear until the first week of post-hatching life. Differentiation of the pituitary is also incomplete at hatching, epithelial cords do not develop in the pars anterior until the first week, and the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract does not appear until the second week of post-hatching life. In many respects, the structure of the hypothalamus and pituitary of the newly hatched monotreme is similar to that seen in newborn marsupials, suggesting that both groups rely solely on lateral hypothalamic zone nuclei for whatever homeostatic mechanisms they are capable of at birth/hatching. PMID:22512474

  4. Effects of glucose, propionate and splanchnic hormones on neuropeptide mRNA concentrations in the ovine hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relling, A E; Lee, K; Loerch, S C; Reynolds, C K

    2012-08-01

    The capacity for glucose, propionate or hormones of splanchnic origin to influence appetite by directly regulating the expression of neuropeptides in the feeding centres of the hypothalamus of the ruminant is not described. Therefore, our objective was to measure the direct effect of metabolites (glucose and propionate) or hormones [insulin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and polypeptide YY (PYY)] on hypothalamic mRNA concentrations for neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) following in vitro incubation. Hypothalamic tissue from 4- to 5-month-old lambs was obtained at slaughter and immediately incubated in culture media for 2 h at 36 °C. Treatments included a control Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) containing 1 mm glucose or DMEM with the following additions: 10 mm glucose, 1 mm propionate, 1 nm insulin, 120 pm GLP-1, 100 pm PYY, 80 pm CCK or 10 mm glucose plus 1 nm insulin. The abundance of mRNA for NPY, AgRP and POMC was measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Fisher's protected LSD test was used to compare changes in relative mRNA concentrations for the hypothalamus incubated in the control media vs. the rest of the treatments. The media containing glucose plus insulin increased POMC mRNA concentration (p 0.20). Results of the present study are consistent with the concept that effects of propionate on feed intake in ruminants is not mediated through direct effects on the hypothalamus, and that insulin is required for an effect of glucose on hypothalamic POMC expression. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Development of the hypothalamus and pituitary in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2012-07-01

    The living monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are distinguished by the development of their young in a leathery-shelled egg, a low and variable body temperature and a primitive teat-less mammary gland. Their young are hatched in an immature state and must deal with the external environment, with all its challenges of hypothermia and stress, as well as sourcing nutrients from the maternal mammary gland. The Hill and Hubrecht embryological collections have been used to follow the structural development of the monotreme hypothalamus and its connections with the pituitary gland both in the period leading up to hatching and during the lactational phase of development, and to relate this structural maturation to behavioural development. In the incubation phase, development of the hypothalamus proceeds from closure of the anterior neuropore to formation of the lateral hypothalamic zone and putative medial forebrain bundle. Some medial zone hypothalamic nuclei are emerging at the time of hatching, but these are poorly differentiated and periventricular zone nuclei do not appear until the first week of post-hatching life. Differentiation of the pituitary is also incomplete at hatching, epithelial cords do not develop in the pars anterior until the first week, and the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract does not appear until the second week of post-hatching life. In many respects, the structure of the hypothalamus and pituitary of the newly hatched monotreme is similar to that seen in newborn marsupials, suggesting that both groups rely solely on lateral hypothalamic zone nuclei for whatever homeostatic mechanisms they are capable of at birth/hatching. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  6. Nutrient restriction induces failure of reproductive function and molecular changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in postpubertal gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dongsheng; Zhuo, Yong; Che, Lianqiang; Lin, Yan; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2014-07-01

    People on a diet to lose weight may be at risk of reproductive failure. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanism, changes of reproductive traits, hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined in postpubertal gilts at anestrus induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts having experienced two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86 kg/d) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1 kg/d) food regimens to expect anestrus. NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated fourth estrus. Blood samples were collected at 5 days' interval for consecutive three times for measurement of hormone concentrations at the 23th day of the fourth estrus cycle. Individual progesterone concentrations of NR gilts from three consecutive blood samples were below 1.0 ng/mL versus 2.0 ng/mL in CON gilts, which was considered anestrus. NR gilts had impaired development of reproductive tract characterized by absence of large follicles (diameter ≥ 6 mm), decreased number of corepus lutea and atrophy of uterus and ovary tissues. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I, kisspeptin, estradiol, progesterone and leptin were significantly lower in NR gilts than that in CON gilts. Nutrient restriction down-regulated gene expressions of kiss-1, G-protein coupled protein 54, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor, leptin receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and insulin-like growth factor I in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis of gilts. Collectively, nutrient restriction resulted in impairment of reproductive function and changes of hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, which shed light on the underlying mechanism by which nutrient restriction influenced reproductive function.

  7. In a rat model of night work, activity during the normal resting phase produces desynchrony in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Nadia, Saderi; Angeles-Castellanos, M; Buijs, Ruud M; Escobar, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    Internal synchrony among external cycles and internal oscillators allows adaptation of physiology to cyclic demands for homeostasis. Night work and shift work lead to a disrupted phase relationship between external time cues and internal rhythms, also losing internal coherence among oscillations. This process results in internal desynchrony (ID) in which behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic variables cycle out of phase. It is still not clear whether ID originates at a peripheral or at a central level. In order to determine the possible role of hypothalamic oscillators in ID, we explored with a rat model of "night work" daily rhythms of activity and clock gene expression in the hypothalamus. This study provides evidence that wakefulness and activity during the normal resting phase lead to a shift in the diurnal rhythms of c-Fos and induce a rhythm of PER1 in the arcuate and dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, both associated with metabolism and regulation of the sleep/wake cycle. Moreover, the number of orexin (ORX)-positive neurons and c-Fos in the perifornical area increased during the working period, suggesting a relevant switch of activity in this brain region induced by the scheduled activity; however, the colocalization of c-Fos in ORX-positive cells was not increased. In contrast, the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the paraventricular nucleus remained locked to the light/dark cycle, resulting in ID in the hypothalamus. Present data suggest that ID occurs already at the level of the first output projections from the SCN, relaying nuclei that transmit temporal signals to other brain areas and to the periphery.

  8. Modulation of orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides gene expression in the rat DVC and hypothalamus by acute immobilization stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatiha eChigr

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the long term effects of a single exposure to immobilization stress (IS (1 hour on the expression of anorexigenic (Pro-opiomelanocortin: POMC and cocaine amphetamine related transcript: CART and orexigenic (neuropeptide Y:NPY, Agouti related peptide: AgRP factors in hypothalamus and dorso vagal complex (DVC. We showed, by using RT-PCR that in the hypothalamus, that the mRNAs of POMC and CART were up-regulated at the end of IS and up to 24 hours. This up regulation persists until 48-72h after IS for CART only. In the DVC, their expressions peak significantly at 24h post stress and decline afterwards; CART mRNA is down regulated after 48h post stress. NPY and AgRP mRNAs show a gradual increase just after the end of IS. The up regulation is significant only at 24 hours after stress for AgRP but remains significantly higher for NPY compared to controls. In DVC, the mRNAs of the two factors show generally a similar post stress pattern. A significant increase jut after the end of IS of rats which persists up to 24 hours after is firstly noticed. The levels tend then to reach the basal levels although, they were slightly but significantly higher up to 72 hours after stress for mRNA NPY. The comparison between the expression profiles of anorexigenic and the two orexigenic peptides investigated shows the presence of a parallelism between that of POMC and AgRP and that of CART and NPY when each brain region (hypothalamus and DVC is considered separately. It seems that any surge in the expression of each anorexigenic factor stimulates the expression of those of corresponding and appropriated orexigenic one. These last reactions from orexigenic peptides tend to attenuate the anorexigenic effects of CART and POMC and by consequent to abolish the anorexia state generated by stress.

  9. Long-Term Effect of Cranial Radiotherapy on Pituitary-Hypothalamus Area in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Cecilia; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2016-09-01

    Survival rates of childhood cancer have improved markedly, and today more than 80 % of those diagnosed with a pediatric malignancy will become 5-year survivors. Nevertheless, survivors exposed to cranial radiotherapy (CRT) are at particularly high risk for long-term morbidity, such as endocrine insufficiencies, metabolic complications, and cardiovascular morbidity. Deficiencies of one or more anterior pituitary hormones have been described following therapeutic CRT for primary brain tumors, nasopharyngeal tumors, and following prophylactic CRT for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Studies have consistently shown a strong correlation between the total radiation dose and the development of pituitary deficits. Further, age at treatment and also time since treatment has strong implications on pituitary hormone deficiencies. There is evidence that the hypothalamus is more radiosensitive than the pituitary and is damaged by lower doses of CRT. With doses of CRT hypothalamus and this usually causes isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Higher doses (>50 Gy) may produce direct anterior pituitary damage, which contributes to multiple pituitary deficiencies. The large group of ALL survivors treated with CRT in the 70-80-ties has now reached adulthood, and these survivors were treated mainly with 24 Gy, and the vast majority of these patients suffer from GHD. Further, after long-term follow-up, insufficiencies in prolactin (PRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been reported and a proportion of these patients were also adrenocoticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficient. CRT to the hypothalamus causes neuroendocrine dysfunction, which means that the choice of GH test is crucial for the diagnosis of GHD.

  10. Evidence for a luteinizing hormone surge center in the hypothalamus of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeling, R R; Johnson, B; Barb, C R; Rampacek, G B

    1998-05-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether there is an LH surge generator in the hypothalamus of the pig. In experiment 1, 157-day-old ovariectomized (OVX) gilts received 1.5 microg estradiol benzoate (EB)/kg BW i.m. every 12 h from 0 through 24, 48, 72, or 96 h. Blood was sampled every 6 h from 3 to 36 h and every 3 h from 36 through 144 h. One of 3, 4 of 4, 4 of 4, and 2 of 3 gilts displayed an LH surge after treatment for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, respectively. With the exception that time to maximum LH concentration was greater in gilts treated for 96 h than in those treated for 72 h (p gilts. In experiment 2a, an Alzet osmotic pump containing EB or vehicle was inserted s.c. behind an ear of 124-day-old OVX gilts, resulting in the following daily doses of EB: 0, 0.75, 1.50, or 3.00 microg/kg BW. Blood was sampled at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h and every 8 h thereafter through 168 h to evaluate surge secretion of LH, and every 15 min for 8 h starting at 168 h to evaluate pulsatile LH secretion. Zero of 3, 0 of 2, 3 of 3, and 3 of 3 gilts displayed an LH surge after 0, 0.75, 1.50, and 3.00 microg EB/kg BW, respectively. Parameters of the surge were similar among gilts. Pulsatile LH secretion, evaluated 7 days after pump insertion, was significantly suppressed for estradiol-treated gilts compared to controls. In experiment 2b, at 182 days of age, 10 gilts used in experiment 2a plus 2 additional gilts in the original group prepared but not used for experiment 2a, were randomly assigned in groups (n=3) to the following daily doses of EB: 0, 0.19, 0.38, or 0.75 microg/kg BW, administered again by osmotic pump. Treatment and blood-sampling schedules were the same as in experiment 2a. Zero, 0, 1, and 2 gilts displayed an LH surge after treatment with 0, 0.19, 0.38, and 0.75 microg EB/kg BW, respectively. Parameters of the surge were similar among gilts that displayed an LH surge. Pulsatile LH secretion was significantly suppressed for estradiol-treated gilts compared to controls

  11. Estradiol Valerate and Remifemin ameliorate ovariectomy-induced decrease in a serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Guangxia; Jin, Biao; Wang, Ke; Chen, Xing; Sun, Yu; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2016-11-01

    Perimenopausal syndromes begin as ovarian function ceases and the most common symptoms are hot flushes. Data indicate that the projections of serotonin to hypothalamus may be involved in the mechanism of hot flushes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of the serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway for hot flushes in an animal model of menopause. We determined the changes in serotonin expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and preoptic anterior hypothalamus (POAH) in ovariectomized rats. We also explored the therapeutical effects of estradiol valerate and Remifemin in this model. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated (SHAM) group, ovariectomy (OVX) group with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate treatment (OVX+E) group and ovariectomy with Remifemin (OVX+ICR) group. Serotonin expression was evaluated in the DR and POAH using immunofluorescence and quantified in the DR using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Apoptosis was analyzed in the DR by TUNEL assay. The number of serotonin immunoreactive neurons and the level of serotonin expression in the DR decreased significantly following OVX compared to the SHAM group. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the DR in any group. In addition, following OVX, the number of serotonin-positive fibers decreased significantly in the ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), especially in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). Treatment with either estradiol or Remifemin for 4 weeks countered the OVX-induced decreases in serotonin levels in both the DR and the hypothalamus, with levels in the treated rats similar to those in the SHAM group. A fluorescently labeled retrograde tracer was injected into the VLPO at the 4-week time point. A significantly lower percentage of serotonin with CTB double-labeled neurons in CTB-labeled neurons was demonstrated after ovariectomy, and both estradiol and Remifemin countered this OVX

  12. Metabolic and non-cognitive manifestations of Alzheimer’s disease: the hypothalamus as both culprit and target of pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Makoto; Iadecola, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is increasingly recognized as a complex neurodegenerative disease beginning decades prior to the cognitive decline. While cognitive deficits remain the cardinal manifestation of AD, metabolic and non-cognitive abnormalities, such as alterations in body weight and neuroendocrine functions are also present, often preceding the cognitive decline. Furthermore, hypothalamic dysfunction can also be a driver of AD pathology. Here we offer a brief appraisal of hypothalamic dysfunction in AD, and provide insight into an underappreciated dual role of the hypothalamus as both a culprit and target of AD pathology, as well as into new opportunities for therapeutic interventions and biomarker development. PMID:26365177

  13. Expression of ODC1, SPD, SPM and AZIN1 in the hypothalamus, ovary and uterus during rat estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joseph R D; Jain, Sammit; Banerjee, Arnab

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate variation in the expression pattern of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC1), spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and antizyme inhibitor (AZIN1) in hypothalamus, ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle of rats. Further, to understand any correlation between polyamines and GnRH I expression in hypothalamus; effect of putrescine treatment on GnRH I expression in hypothalamus and progesterone and estradiol levels in serum were investigated. The study also aims in quantifying all the immunohistochemistry images obtained based on pixel counting algorithm to yield the relative pixel count. This algorithm uses a red green blue (RGB) colour thresholding approach to quantify the intensity of the chromogen present. The result of the present study demonstrates almost similar expression pattern of polyamine and polyamine related factors, ODC1, SPD, SPM and AZIN1, with that of hypothalamic GnRH I, all of which mainly localized in the medial preoptic area (MPA) of the hypothalamus, during the proestrus, estrus and diestrus. This suggest that hypothalamic GnRH I expression is under regulation of polyamines. The study showed significant increase in hypothalamic GnRH I expression for both the doses of putrescine treatment to adult female rats. Further, it was shown that in ovary expression pattern of ODC1, SPM, SPD and AZIN1 were similar with that of steroidogenic factor, StAR during the estrous cycle, and putrescine supplementation increased significantly estradiol and progesterone levels in serum, all suggesting ovarian polyamines are involved in regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis. Localization of these factors in the theca and granulosa cells suggest involvement of polyamines in the process of folliculogenesis and luteinization; and ODC1, SPD, SPM and AZIN1 in oocyte further suggests polyamine role in maintenance of oocyte physiology. Finally, in uterus SPM and AZIN1 were localized throughout the estrous cycle, being comparatively more

  14. Increased a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/Ob receptor-mediated signals in hypothalamus of GD3 synthase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shuting; Tokizane, Kyohei; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Okajima, Tetsuya; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko

    2016-10-21

    Gangliosides are widely involved in the regulation of cells and organs. However, little is known about their roles in adipose tissues and hypothalamus. In GD3 synthase-knockout (GD3S KO) mice, deletion of b-series gangliosides resulted in the reduction of serum leptin due to disturbed secretion from adipocytes. To examine whether leptin signals altered, leptin/leptin receptor (ObR)-mediated signaling in hypothalamus was analyzed. Hypothalamus of GD3S KO mouse showed increased expression of GM1 and GD1a, and increased activation of ObR-mediated signals such as pSTAT3 and c-Fos. Leptin stimulation of hypothalamus-derived N-41 cells and their transfectants with GD3S cDNA showed that a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/ObR-mediated signals. Co-precipitation analysis revealed that ObR interacts with a-series gangliosides with increased association by leptin stimulation. In brown adipose tissues (BAT) of GD3S KO mice, their weights and adipocyte numbers were increased, and BAT markers such as PGC1α and UCP-1 were also up-regulated. These results suggested that leptin/ObRb-mediated signals were enhanced in hypothalamus of GD3S KO mice due to increased a-series gangliosides, leading to the apparently similar features of energy expenditure between the KO and wild type mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (phypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Computer-Assisted Segmentation of the Human Hypothalamus on 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E.; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures. PMID:23935821

  17. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquifino, A.I. [Dept. de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular III, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A. [Lab. de Toxicologia, Universidad de Vigo, Orense (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  18. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquifino, A.I.; Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  19. Serotonin transporter binding in the hypothalamus correlates negatively with tonic heat pain ratings in healthy subjects: A [11C]DASB PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    ) tonic noxious heat stimulus. PET data were analyzed using both volume-of-interest (VOI) and voxel-based approaches. VOI analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = −0.59; p = 0.008), a finding confirmed by the parametric...... analysis revealed a positive correlation between pain tolerance and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = 0.53; p = 0.02) although this was not seen in the parametric analysis. These data extend our earlier observation that cortical 5-HT receptors co-determine responses to tonic but not to phasic pain....... The negative correlation between SERT binding in the hypothalamus and insula with tonic pain ratings suggests a possible serotonergic control of the role of these areas in the modulation or in the affective appreciation of pain....

  20. Bisphenol A exposure induces increased microglia and microglial related factors in the murine embryonic dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mifumi; Komada, Munekazu; Miyazawa, Ken; Goto, Shigemi; Ikeda, Yayoi

    2018-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used compound in the food packaging industry. Prenatal exposure to BPA induces histological abnormalities in the neocortex and hypothalamus in association with abnormal behaviors. Yet, the molecular and cellular neurodevelopmental toxicological mechanisms of BPA are incompletely characterized on neuroinflammatory-related endopoints. To evaluate the neurodevelopmental effects of BPA exposure in mouse embryos, we examined microglial numbers as well as the expression of microglial-related factors in the E15.5 embryonic brain. BPA-exposed embryos exhibited significant increases in Iba1-immunoreactive microglial numbers in the dorsal telencephalon and the hypothalamus compared to control embryos. Further, the expression levels of microglial markers (Iba1, CD16, iNOS, and CD206), inflammatory factors (TNFα and IL4), signal transducing molecules (Cx3Cr1 and Cx3Cl1), and neurotrophic factor (IGF1) were altered in BPA-exposed embryos. These findings suggest that BPA exposure increases microglial numbers in the brain and alters the neuroinflammatory status at a transcriptional level. Together, these changes may represent a novel target for neurodevelopmental toxicity assessment after BPA exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for the Presence of Glucosensor Mechanisms Not Dependent on Glucokinase in Hypothalamus and Hindbrain of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Velasco, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A.; Míguez, Jesús M.; Soengas, José L.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that glucosensor mechanisms other than that mediated by glucokinase (GK) operate in hypothalamus and hindbrain of the carnivorous fish species rainbow trout and stress affected them. Therefore, we evaluated in these areas changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor mechanisms based on liver X receptor (LXR), mitochondrial activity, sweet taste receptor, and sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1) 6h after intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL.Kg-1 of saline solution alone (normoglycaemic treatment) or containing insulin (hypoglycaemic treatment, 4 mg bovine insulin.Kg-1 body mass), or D-glucose (hyperglycaemic treatment, 500 mg.Kg-1 body mass). Half of tanks were kept at a 10 Kg fish mass.m-3 and denoted as fish under normal stocking density (NSD) whereas the remaining tanks were kept at a stressful high stocking density (70 kg fish mass.m-3) denoted as HSD. The results obtained in non-stressed rainbow trout provide evidence, for the first time in fish, that manipulation of glucose levels induce changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor systems based on LXR, mitochondrial activity and sweet taste receptor in hypothalamus, and a system based on SGLT-1 in hindbrain. Stress altered the response of parameters related to these systems to changes in glycaemia. PMID:25996158

  2. Glucostatic regulation of (+)-[3H]amphetamine binding in the hypothalamus: correlation with Na+, K+-ATPase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, I.; Hauger, R.L.; Luu, M.D.; Giblin, B.; Skolnick, P.; Paul, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of rat hypothalamic slices in glucose-free Krebs-Ringer buffer (37 0 C) resulted in a time-dependent decrease in specific (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding in the crude synaptosomal fraction prepared from these slices. The addition of D-glucose resulted in a dose- and time-dependent stimulation of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding, whereas incubations with L-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, or 3-O-methyl-D-glucose failed to increase the number of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding sites. Ouabain potently inhibited the glucose-induced stimulation of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding, suggesting the involvement of Na + , K + -ATPase. Preincubation of hypothalamic slices with glucose also resulted in an increase in Na + ,K + -ATPase activity and the number of specific high-affinity binding sites for [ 3 H]ouabain, and a good correlation was observed between the glucose-stimulated increase in (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine and [ 3 H]ouabain binding. These data suggest that the (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding site in hypothalamus, previously linked to the anorectic actions of various phenylethylamines, is regulated both in vitro and in vivo by physiological concentrations of glucose. Glucose and amphetamine appear to interact at common sites in the hypothalamus to stimulate Na + ,K + -ATPase activity, and the latter may be involved in the glucostatic regulation of appetite

  3. Activity of etv5a and etv5b genes in the hypothalamus of fasted zebrafish is influenced by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechaly, Alejandro S; Richardson, Ebony; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2017-05-15

    Serotonin has been implicated in the inhibition of food intake in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms through which serotonin acts has yet to be elucidated. Recently, ETV5 (ets variant gene 5) has been associated with obesity and food intake control mechanisms in mammals. We have analyzed a putative physiological function of the two etv5 paralogous genes (etv5a and etv5b) in neuronal food intake control in adult zebrafish that have been exposed to different nutritional conditions. A feeding assay was established and fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), was applied. Gene expression changes in the hypothalamus were determined using real-time PCR. Fasting induced an up-regulation of etv5a and etv5b in the hypothalamus, whereas increased serotonin levels in the fasted fish counteracted the increase in expression. To investigate potential mechanisms the expression of further food intake control genes was determined. The results show that an increase of serotonin in fasting fish causes a reduction in the activity of genes stimulating food intake. This is in line with a previously demonstrated anorexigenic function of serotonin. Our results suggest that obesity-associated ETV5 has a food intake stimulating function and that this function is modulated through serotonin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α Expression in the Hypothalamus by Sex Steroids: Implication in the Regulation of Energy Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian; Shi, Haifei

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences exist in the complex regulation of energy homeostasis that utilizes central and peripheral systems. It is widely accepted that sex steroids, especially estrogens, are important physiological and pathological components in this sex-specific regulation. Estrogens exert their biological functions via estrogen receptors (ERs). ERα, a classic nuclear receptor, contributes to metabolic regulation and sexual behavior more than other ER subtypes. Physiological and molecular studies have identified multiple ERα-rich nuclei in the hypothalamus of the central nervous system (CNS) as sites of actions that mediate effects of estrogens. Much of our understanding of ERα regulation has been obtained using transgenic models such as ERα global or nuclei-specific knockout mice. A fundamental question concerning how ERα is regulated in wild-type animals, including humans, in response to alterations in steroid hormone levels, due to experimental manipulation (i.e., castration and hormone replacement) or physiological stages (i.e., puberty, pregnancy, and menopause), lacks consistent answers. This review discusses how different sex hormones affect ERα expression in the hypothalamus. This information will contribute to the knowledge of estrogen action in the CNS, further our understanding of discrepancies in correlation of altered sex hormone levels with metabolic disturbances when comparing both sexes, and improve health issues in postmenopausal women.

  5. Evidence for the Presence of Glucosensor Mechanisms Not Dependent on Glucokinase in Hypothalamus and Hindbrain of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Otero-Rodiño

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that glucosensor mechanisms other than that mediated by glucokinase (GK operate in hypothalamus and hindbrain of the carnivorous fish species rainbow trout and stress affected them. Therefore, we evaluated in these areas changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor mechanisms based on liver X receptor (LXR, mitochondrial activity, sweet taste receptor, and sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1 6 h after intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL x Kg(-1 of saline solution alone (normoglycaemic treatment or containing insulin (hypoglycaemic treatment, 4 mg bovine insulin x Kg(-1 body mass, or D-glucose (hyperglycaemic treatment, 500 mg x Kg(-1 body mass. Half of tanks were kept at a 10 Kg fish mass x m(-3 and denoted as fish under normal stocking density (NSD whereas the remaining tanks were kept at a stressful high stocking density (70 kg fish mass x m(-3 denoted as HSD. The results obtained in non-stressed rainbow trout provide evidence, for the first time in fish, that manipulation of glucose levels induce changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor systems based on LXR, mitochondrial activity and sweet taste receptor in hypothalamus, and a system based on SGLT-1 in hindbrain. Stress altered the response of parameters related to these systems to changes in glycaemia.

  6. [The resting-state functional connectivity of the hypothalamus and its relationships with gonadal steroid hormones and depression symptoms in perimenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianglan; Tao, Jiong; Zhong, Zhiyong; Liu, Sha; Han, Zili; Zhang, Jinbei; Li, Lingjiang

    2015-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the resting-state functional connectivity of the hypothalamus and its relationships with gonadal steroid hormones and depression symptoms in perimenopausal women. Total 66 perimenopausal women voluntarily participated in this study from October 2012 to June 2013. Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (ZSDS) was used to assess depression symptoms. Plasma gonadal steroid hormones including estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were determined by the chemiluminescence immunoassay. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was utilized to acquire resting-state functional MRI data. The z-value functional connectivity map of each participant was calculated voxel-wisely based on the seed region of the hypothalamus. One sample t test of Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) were used to determine the brain areas with statistically significant functional connectivity to the hypothalamus, then multiple regression of SPM was used to calculate the correlated areas with 3 gonadal steroid hormones, respectively. Finally, Pearson correlation was performed to analyze bivariate correlations between mean z-values and ZSDS scores. Significant functional connectivity to the hypothalamus were found in brain areas as follows:the lateral inferior frontal gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, subgenual cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, cuneus and precuneus, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and angular gyrus (False Discovery Rate qdepression symptoms (r=0.278, P=0.024) and somatic symptoms (r=0.357, P=0.003). In perimenopausal women, the hypothalamus has resting-state functional connectivity with widespread areas involved in the brain depression-related network and default mode network, and the plasma androgen level may modulate the functional connectivity strengths of the hypothalamus and decrease the susceptibility of perimenopausal women to depression.

  7. Leptin receptor expressing neurons express phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) and leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Maitrayee; Sahu, Abhiram

    2015-11-01

    Leptin signaling in the hypothalamus is critical for normal food intake and body weight regulation. Cumulative evidence suggests that besides the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway, several non-STAT3 pathways including the phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) pathway mediate leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. We have shown that PDE3B is localized in various hypothalamic sites implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis and that the anorectic and body weight reducing effects of leptin are mediated by the activation of PDE3B. It is still unknown if PDE3B is expressed in the long form of the leptin-receptor (ObRb)-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus and whether leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B-expressing neurons. In this study, we examined co-localization of PDE3B with ObRb neurons in various hypothalamic nuclei in ObRb-GFP mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 2h. Results showed that most of the ObRb neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, 93%), ventromedial nucleus (VMN, 94%), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN, 95%), ventral premammillary nucleus (PMv, 97%) and lateral hypothalamus (LH, 97%) co-expressed PDE3B. We next examined co-localization of p-STAT3 and PDE3B in the hypothalamus in C57BL6 mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 1h. The results showed that almost all p-STAT3 positive neurons in different hypothalamic nuclei including ARC, VMN, DMN, LH and PMv areas expressed PDE3B. These results suggest the possibility for a direct role for the PDE3B pathway in mediating leptin action in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of chronic exposure to gamma radiation and of hormonal stimulation with serum gonadotropin on catecholamine levels in hypothalamus, epiphysis and adrenals of ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorova, B.; Arendarcik, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects were studied of exposure to whole body continuous irradiation and of the administration of serum gonadotropin (SG) on the concentration of catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) in the hypothalamus, epiphysis and adrenal glands of ewes during the anestric period with synchronized estrus. The first group (young barren ewes) and second group (older ewes) were exposed to continuous radiation of 60 Co for five days. The radiation was applied at a rate of 0.020 Gy per hour. After the termination of irradiation the ewes were subjected to hormonal stimulation by fractionated administration of 1500 I.U. SG. The third and fourth experimental groups of ewes were stimulated with 1500 I.U. SG without irradiation. Catecholamines were separated from the tissue supernatants by adsorption chromatography and the catecholamine contents in the eluates were determined spectrofluorometrically. Chronic exposure to gamma radiation and hormonal stimulation with SG reduced the concentration of norepinephrine in the whole hypothalamus of the sheep. A statistically significant decrease (P<0.001) was recorded in the medial and caudal hypothalamus of the adult ewes and in the rostral and caudal hypothalamus regions of the young ewes. A decrease in norepinephrine concentration, statistically significant in the caudal (P<0.01) and medial hypothalamus was recorded in the group of adult ewes after hormonal stimulation with SG without irradiation. The experimental group of young ewes responded to hormonal stimulation by a greater reduction of norepinephrine contents as compared with combined exposure to radiation and hormonal stimulation. It is assumed that the decrease in catecholamine concentration after hormonal stimulation with SG is associated with the increase in the contents of estrogens which act on the adrenergic receptors of the hypothalamus. (author). 4 figs., 21 refs

  9. [Age-related changes in biogenic amine content and oxidative stress profile in the rat hypothalamus in hyperhomocysteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Yu P; Pustygina, A V; Zaloznyaya, I V; Arutjunyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a detailed analysis of correlations between the content of a variety of biogenic amines in the hypothalamic structures responsible for the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone synthesis and secretion (the medial preoptic area and median eminence) and such independent factors as total L-homocysteine plasma level elevation induced by L-methionine loading and aging. Both a nature and a pattern of changes in oxidative stress profile were evaluated. It was shown that ageing, when compared to hyperhomocysteinemia, is a determining factor influencing biogenic amine content in the studied hypothalamic structures. Unlike antioxidant defense system profile, considerable changes in macromolecule oxidative modification were not found, which evidences a balanced activity of pro- and antioxidant systems in the hypothalamus.

  10. Differential effects of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated neuropeptide Y overexpression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and lateral hypothalamus on feeding behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiesjema, Birgitte; Adan, Roger A. H.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases food intake. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are both involved in the acute, hyperphagic effects of NPY. Although it is obvious that increased energy intake may lead to obesity, it is less

  11. Changes in estrogen receptor-alpha and -beta in the infundibular nucleus of the human hypothalamus are related to the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestiantoro, Andon; Swaab, Dick F.

    2004-01-01

    The expression of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and -beta in the infundibular nucleus of the hypothalamus was studied immunocytochemically in 28 control subjects and 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A shift was found from more nuclear staining of ERalpha in young female controls to more

  12. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Galanin neurons in the intermediate nucleus (InM) of the human hypothalamus in relation to sex, age, and gender identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Ligtenberg, Lisette; Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2011-01-01

    The intermediate nucleus (InM) in the preoptic area of the human brain, also known as the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the interstitial nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus-1 (INAH-1) is explored here. We investigated its population of galanin-immunoreactive (Gal-Ir)

  14. Effect of inhibitory avoidance trainning, ACTH, beta-endorphin and adrenaline on the incorporation of 14C-leucine into synaptosomal proteins of rat hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmaz, C.; Maia, H.M.M.; Izquierdo, I.

    1986-01-01

    'In vitro' incorporation of leucine to protein was studied in synaptosomes isolated from the hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus of rats submitted to inhibitory avoidance training or to the i.p. injection of ACTH, beta-endorphin or adrenaline; or in synaptosomes incubated with these substances. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Hypothyroidism reduces ObRb-STAT3 leptin signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary of rats associated with resistance to leptin acute anorectic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Camila; Souza, Luana L; Costa-e-Sousa, Ricardo H; Almeida, Norma A S; Trevenzoli, Isis H; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C

    2012-10-01

    Leptin has been shown to regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, acting primarily through the STAT3 pathway triggered through the binding of leptin to the long-chain isoform of the leptin receptor, ObRb. We previously demonstrated that although hyperthyroid rats presented leptin effects on TSH secretion, those effects were abolished in hypothyroid rats. We addressed the hypothesis that changes in the STAT3 pathway might explain the lack of TSH response to leptin in hypothyroidism by evaluating the protein content of components of leptin signalling via the STAT3 pathway in the hypothalamus and pituitary of hypothyroid (0·03% methimazole in the drinking water/21 days) and hyperthyroid (thyroxine 5 μg/100 g body weight /5 days) rats. Hypothyroid rats exhibited decreased ObRb and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) protein in the hypothalamus, and in the pituitary gland they exhibited decreased ObRb, total STAT3, pSTAT3 and SOCS3 (P<0·05). Except for a modest decrease in pituitary STAT3, no other alterations were observed in hyperthyroid rats. Moreover, unlike euthyroid rats, the hypothyroid rats did not exhibit a reduction in food ingestion after a single injection of leptin (0·5 mg/kg body weight). Therefore, hypothyroidism decreased ObRb-STAT3 signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, which likely contributes to the loss of leptin action on food intake and TSH secretion, as previously observed in hypothyroid rats.

  16. The effects of serotonergic and dopaminergic lesions on sodium-sensitive [3H]mazindol binding in rat hypothalamus and corpus striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, I; Janowsky, A; Paul, S M

    1989-12-04

    The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) on sodium-sensitive [3H]mazindol binding were investigated in the rat hypothalamus and corpus striatum. In the hypothalamus, specific [3H]mazindol binding was inhibited by low concentrations of sodium and stimulated by high-sodium concentrations, whereas in the corpus striatum, only a sodium-dependent stimulation of [3H]mazindol binding was observed. Lesions with 6-OHDA significantly reduced sodium-dependent [3H]mazindol binding in the corpus striatum, but had no effect on the binding of [3H]mazindol in the absence of sodium. Lesions of serotonergic neurons with 5,7-DHT, however, had no effect on [3H]mazindol binding in the striatum, but resulted in a significant increase in the number of [3H]mazindol binding sites in the hypothalamus. These data suggest that [3H]mazindol may bind to two anatomically distinct binding sites, one that is stimulated and the other inhibited by sodium. The sodium-stimulated binding sites appear to be located on dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, and in the hypothalamus, the sodium-inhibited sites appear to be regulated by serotonergic neuronal activity.

  17. Prenatal stress induces long-term effects in cell turnover in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis in adult male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Baquedano

    Full Text Available Subchronic gestational stress leads to permanent modifications in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of offspring probably due to the increase in circulating glucocorticoids known to affect prenatal programming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cell turnover is affected in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis by subchronic prenatal stress and the intracellular mechanisms involved. Restraint stress was performed in pregnant rats during the last week of gestation (45 minutes; 3 times/day. Only male offspring were used for this study and were sacrificed at 6 months of age. In prenatally stressed adults a decrease in markers of cell death and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary. This was associated with an increase in insulin-like growth factor-I mRNA levels, phosphorylation of CREB and calpastatin levels and inhibition of calpain -2 and caspase -8 activation. Levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were increased and levels of the pro-apoptotic factor p53 were reduced. In conclusion, prenatal restraint stress induces a long-term decrease in cell turnover in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis that might be at least partly mediated by an autocrine-paracrine IGF-I effect. These changes could condition the response of this axis to future physiological and pathophysiological situations.

  18. Reflection of induced and amplified food motivation in impulse activity of the masticatory muscles during electrostimulation of the "hunger center" in the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, J P; Kromin, A A

    2012-04-01

    We studied reflection of artificially induced and amplified food motivation in impulse activity of the masticatory muscles during electrostimulation of "hunger center" of the lateral hypothalamus in the absence and presence of food. The threshold stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in hungry and satiated animals in the absence of food induced incessant food-procuring behavior paralleled by regular generation of spike bursts in masticatory muscles with biomodal distributions of intervals between pulses. This reaction of masticatory muscles during stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in the absence of food was an example of the anticipatory reaction reflecting characteristics of the action result acceptor. Higher level of hunger motivation during threshold stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in hungry and satiated rabbits in the course of effective food-procuring behavior increased the incidence of spike burst generation during the food capture phase, but did not modify this parameter during the chewing phase. Impulse activity of the masticatory muscles reflected convergent interactions of food motivation and support excitation on neurons of the central generator of chewing pattern.

  19. Changes of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin neurons in the rat hypothalamus induced by genistein: a stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunović, Svetlana; Manojlović-Stojanoski, Milica; Ristić, Nataša; Nestorović, Nataša; Medigović, Ivana; Živanović, Jasmina; Milošević, Verica

    2016-12-01

    Genistein is a plant-derived estrogenic isoflavone commonly found in dietary and therapeutic supplements, due to its potential health benefits. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS) are neurosecretory peptides synthesized in neurons of the hypothalamus and regulate the growth hormone secretion. Early reports indicate that estrogens have highly involved in the regulation of GHRH and SS secretions. Since little is known about the potential effects of genistein on GHRH and SS neurons, we exposed rats to genistein. Genistein were administered to adult rats in dose of 30 mg/kg, for 3 weeks. The estradiol-dipropionate treatment was used as the adequate controls to genistein. Using applied stereology on histological sections of hypothalamus, we obtained the quantitative information on arcuate (Arc) and periventricular (Pe) nucleus volume and volume density of GHRH neurons and SS neurons. Image analyses were used to obtain GHRH and SS contents in the median eminence (ME). Administration of estradiol-dipropionate caused the increase of Arc and Pe nucleus volume, SS neuron volume density, GHRH and SS staining intensity in the ME, when compared with control. Genistein treatment increased: Arc nucleus volume and the volume density of GHRH neurons (by 26%) and SS neurons (1.5 fold), accompanied by higher GHRH and SS staining intensity in the ME, when compared to the orhidectomized group. These results suggest that genistein has a significant effect on hypothalamic region, involved in the regulation of somatotropic system function, and could contribute to the understanding of genistein as substance that alter the hormonal balance.

  20. Repeated manganese administration produced abnormal expression of circadian clock genes in the hypothalamus and liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Fan, Ximin; Luo, Ying; Song, Sheng; Liu, Jie; Fan, Qiyuan

    2017-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) neurotoxicity displays non-motor dysfunction and motor impairment like Parkinson's disease (PD), and is called as Manganism. Circadian disruption is a non-motor symptom found in PD and Manganism. Clock genes are essential to drive and maintain circadian rhythm, but little is known about Mn exposure on circadian clock genes expression. Both the brain and liver are targets of Mn, we hypothesize that repeated Mn administration could affect clock gene expression in the hypothalamus and livers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected Mn 2+ 1mg and 5mg/kg as MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O, every other day for 30 days. Mn neurotoxicity was evaluated by behavioral changes and loss of dopaminergic neurons via immunohistochemistry. The expression of circadian clock genes was determined via RT-qPCR. Repeated Mn administration dose-dependently retarded the body weight gain, impaired the rotarod activity, decreased the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, and activated microglia in the brain. Expressions of circadian core genes brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1), locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) and neuronal PAS domain protein2 (Npas2), and clock feedback gene cryptochrome1 (Cry1), period genes (Per1 and Per2) in the hypothalamus and liver were decreased after exposure to Mn in a dose-dependent manner, while expressions of clock-targeted genes nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) and D-box-binding protein (Dbp) were increased. Peripheral clock in the liver appears to be more susceptible to Mn-induced abnormal clock gene expression. In summary, repeated Mn administration produced dysregulation of circadian clock gene expressions in both the brain and liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signalling in the mouse hypothalamus

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    Ilenia eSeveri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD, of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction (CR regimen. RT-PCR showed that CNTF mRNA increased significantly in HFD mice and decreased significantly in CR animals. Western blotting confirmed that CNTF expression was higher in HFD mice and reduced in CR mice, but high interindividual variability blunted the significance of these differences. By immunohistochemistry, hypothalamic tuberal and mammillary region tanycytes stained strongly for CNTF in HFD mice, whereas CR mice exhibited markedly reduced staining. RT-PCR and Western blotting disclosed that changes in CNTF expression were paralleled by changes in the expression of its specific receptor, CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα. Injection of recombinant CNTF and detection of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (P-STAT3 showed that CNTF responsiveness by the ependymal layer, mainly by tanycytes, was higher in HFD than CR mice. In addition, in HFD mice CNTF administration induced distinctive STAT3 signalling in a large neuron population located in the dorsomedial and ventromedial nuclei, perifornical area and mammillary body. The hypothalamic expression of CNTF and CNTFRα did not change in the hyperphagic, leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice; accordingly, P-STAT3 immunoreactivity in CNTF-treated ob/ob mice was confined to ependymal layer and arcuate neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that hypothalamic CNTF is involved in controlling the energy balance and that CNTF signalling plays a role in HFD obese mice at specific sites.

  2. Exposure to chronic isolation modulates receptors mRNAs for oxytocin and vasopressin in the hypothalamus and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Hossein; Kenkel, William; Mohsenpour, Seyed Ramezan; Sanzenbacher, Lisa; Saadat, Habibollah; Partoo, Leila; Yee, Jason; Azizi, Fereidoun; Carter, C Sue

    2013-05-01

    The goal of our study was to explore the effect of social isolation stress of varying durations on the plasma oxytocin (OT), messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for oxytocin receptor (OTR), plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) and mRNA for V1a receptor of AVP (V1aR) expression in the hypothalamus and heart of socially monogamous female and male prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Continuous isolation for 4 weeks (chronic isolation) increased plasma OT level in females, but not in males. One hour of isolation every day for 4 weeks (repeated isolation) was followed by a significant increase in plasma AVP level. Chronic isolation, but not repeated isolation, significantly decreased OTR mRNA in the hypothalamus and heart in both sexes. Chronic isolation significantly decreased cardiac V1aR mRNA, but no effect on hypothalamic V1aR mRNA expression. We did not find a gender difference within repeated social isolation groups. The results of the present study reveal that although chronic social isolation can down-regulate gene expression for the OTR in both sexes, the release of the OT peptide was increased after chronic isolation only in females, possibly somewhat protecting females from the negative consequences of isolation. In both sexes repeated, but not chronic, isolation increased plasma AVP, which could be permissive for mobilization and thus adaptive in response to a repeated stressor. The differential effects of isolation on OT and AVP systems may help in understanding mechanisms through social interactions can be protective against emotional and cardiovascular disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Features of the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of hypothalamus in different models of arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Kolesnyk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of the paraventricular (PVN and supraoptic (SON nuclei’s activity is carried out with a great amount of different neurotransmitters, in particular, with nitric oxide. In order to get clear understanding of the local NO effects in hypothalamus in normal condition and different models of hypertension it is necessary to study all isoforms of NOS in PVN and SON. Our purpose was to find out the features of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in magnocellular SON and PVN in SHR and endocrine-saline model of hypertension in rats. Materials and methods. For all rats the mean blood pressure (mBP was measured. In Wistar rats mBP was stable during the experiment. In SHR mBP was higher than normal. In animals of the 3rd group with ESM the first measurement (before the modelling demonstrated normal rates of mBP. Since the 7th day of modelling mBP started increase and became steadily increased from the 21st day. We obtained the frontal slices of hypothalamus and performed the assessment of iNOS expression using immunofluorescence assay. The results showed the presence of the constitutive expression of iNOS in the magnocellular neurons of hypothalamus in Wistar rats as well as in both groups of experimental hypertension. The level of iNOS expression in magnocellular nuclei was dependent both on type of hypertension and topography of magnocellular neurons in hypothalamus. In SHR there was high expression of iNOS in PVN and low one in SON, whereas in endocrine-saline model there was high expression in SON and there were no substantial changes of the iNOS expression in PVN. Conclusions. We believe the alteration of iNOS expression in magnocellular nuclei of hypothalamus could participate in development and/or adaptation to hypertension.

  4. Neutralizing IL-6 reduces heart injury by decreasing nerve growth factor precursor in the heart and hypothalamus during rat cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi; Xu, Jun-Mei; Yu, Tian

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether the expression of nerve growth factor precursor (proNGF) changes during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and whether neutralizing interleukin-6 (IL-6) during CPB has cardiac benefits. Thirty patients undergoing CPB were recruited and their serum proNGF and troponin-I (TNI) were detected. In addition, rats were divided into three groups: CPB group, CPB with cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group, and a control group. The pre-CPB standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN) and post-CPB SDNN were compared. At the end of CPB, nerve peptide Y (NPY), acetylcholinesterase, cell apoptosis, and proNGF protein expression were measured in the heart and hypothalamus. Another rat cohort undergoing CPB was divided into two groups: an anti-IL-6 group with IL-6 antibody and a control group with phosphate buffer solution. At the end of CPB, serum hs-troponin-T and cardiac caspases 3 and 9 were detected. NPY and proNGF in the heart and hypothalamus were detected. In patients, serum proNGF increased during CPB, and the concentration was positively correlated with TNI. In rats, cardiac autonomic nervous function was disturbed during CPB. More apoptotic cells and higher levels of proNGF were found in the heart and hypothalamus in the CPB groups than in the control groups. Neutralizing IL-6 was beneficial to lower cardiac injury by decreasing proNGF and apoptosis. CPB induced changes in proNGF in the heart and hypothalamus. Suppressing inflammation attenuated myocardial apoptosis and autonomic nerve function disturbance in CPB rats, likely due in part to regulation of proNGF in the heart and hypothalamus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Transcription factor CREB3L1 mediates cAMP and glucocorticoid regulation of arginine vasopressin gene transcription in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Mingkwan; Greenwood, Michael P; Mecawi, Andre S; Loh, Su Yi; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2015-10-26

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide hormone that functions in the regulation of water homeostasis by controlling water re-absorption at kidneys, is synthesised in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. An increase in plasma osmolality stimulates secretion of AVP to blood circulation and induces AVP synthesis in these nuclei. Although studies on mechanism of AVP transcriptional regulation in hypothalamus proposed that cAMP and glucocorticoids positively and negatively regulate Avp expression, respectively, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Recently, we identified CREB3L1 (cAMP-responsive element binding protein 3 like 1) as a putative transcription factor of Avp transcription in the rat hypothalamus. However the mechanism of how CREB3L1 is regulated in response of hyperosmotic stress in the neurons of hypothalamus has never been reported. This study aims to investigate effect of previously reported regulators (cAMP and glucocorticoid) of Avp transcription on transcription factor CREB3L1 in order to establish a molecular explanation for cAMP and glucocorticoids effect on AVP expression. The effect of cAMP and glucocorticoid treatment on Creb3l1 was investigated in both AtT20 cells and hypothalamic organotypic cultures. The expression of Creb3l1 was increased in both mRNA and protein level by treatment with forskolin, which raises intracellular cAMP levels. Activation of cAMP by forskolin also increased Avp promoter activity in AtT20 cells and this effect was blunted by shRNA mediated silencing of Creb3l1. The forskolin induced increase in Creb3l1 expression was diminished by combined treatment with dexamethasone, and, in vivo, intraperitoneal dexamethasone injection blunted the increase in Creb3l1 and Avp expression induced by hyperosmotic stress. Here we shows that cAMP and glucocorticoid positively and negatively regulate Creb3l1 expression in the rat hypothalamus, respectively, and regulation of cAMP on AVP

  6. The testosterone-dependent and independent transcriptional networks in the hypothalamus of Gpr54 and Kiss1 knockout male mice are not fully equivalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutcliffe Margaret

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humans and mice with loss of function mutations in GPR54 (KISS1R or kisspeptin do not progress through puberty, caused by a failure to release GnRH. The transcriptional networks regulated by these proteins in the hypothalamus have yet to be explored by genome-wide methods. Results We show here, using 1 million exon mouse arrays (Exon 1.0 Affymetrix and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR validation to analyse microdissected hypothalamic tissue from Gpr54 and Kiss1 knockout mice, the extent of transcriptional regulation in the hypothalamus. The sensitivity to detect important transcript differences in microdissected RNA was confirmed by the observation of counter-regulation of Kiss1 expression in Gpr54 knockouts and confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Since Gpr54 and Kiss1 knockout animals are effectively pre-pubertal with low testosterone (T levels, we also determined which of the validated transcripts were T-responsive and which varied according to genotype alone. We observed four types of transcriptional regulation (i genotype only dependent regulation, (ii T only dependent regulation, (iii genotype and T-dependent regulation with interaction between these variables, (iv genotype and T-dependent regulation with no interaction between these variables. The results implicate for the first time several transcription factors (e.g. Npas4, Esr2, proteases (Klk1b22, and the orphan 10-transmembrane transporter TMEM144 in the biology of GPR54/kisspeptin function in the hypothalamus. We show for the neuronal activity regulated transcription factor NPAS4, that distinct protein over-expression is seen in the hypothalamus and hippocampus in Gpr54 knockout mice. This links for the first time the hypothalamic-gonadal axis with this important regulator of inhibitory synapse formation. Similarly we confirm TMEM144 up-regulation in the hypothalamus by RNA in situ hybridization and western blot. Conclusions Taken together, global

  7. Genome-wide analysis of DHEA- and DHT-induced gene expression in mouse hypothalamus and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qianxing; Lu, Shifang; Garippa, Carrie; Brownstein, Michael J; Simon, Neal G

    2009-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is the most abundant steroid in humans and a multi-functional neuroactive steroid that has been implicated in a variety of biological effects in both the periphery and central nervous system. Mechanistic studies of DHEA in the periphery have emphasized its role as a prohormone and those in the brain have focused on effects exerted at cell surface receptors. Recent results demonstrated that DHEA is intrinsically androgenic. It competes with DHT for binding to androgen receptor (AR), induces AR-regulated reporter gene expression in vitro, and exogenous DHEA administration regulates gene expression in peripheral androgen-dependent tissues and LnCAP prostate cancer cells, indicating genomic effects and adding a level of complexity to functional models. The absence of information about the effect of DHEA on gene expression in the CNS is a significant gap in light of continuing clinical interest in the compound as a hormone replacement therapy in older individuals, patients with adrenal insufficiency, and as a treatment that improves sense of well-being, increases libido, relieves depressive symptoms, and serves as a neuroprotective agent. In the present study, ovariectomized CF-1 female mice, an established model for assessing CNS effects of androgens, were treated with DHEA (1mg/day), dihydrotestosterone (DHT, a potent androgen used as a positive control; 0.1mg/day) or vehicle (negative control) for 7 days. The effects of DHEA on gene expression were assessed in two regions of the CNS that are enriched in AR, hypothalamus and hippocampus, using DNA microarray, real-time RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. RIA of serum samples assessed treatment effects on circulating levels of major steroids. In hypothalamus, DHEA and DHT significantly up-regulated the gene expression of hypocretin (Hcrt; also called orexin), pro-melanin-concentrating hormone (Pmch), and protein kinase C delta (Prkcd), and down-regulated the expression of deleted in bladder

  8. Tracking the fear memory engram: discrete populations of neurons within amygdala, hypothalamus, and lateral septum are specifically activated by auditory fear conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Yvette M.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.; Murphy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Memory formation is thought to occur via enhanced synaptic connectivity between populations of neurons in the brain. However, it has been difficult to localize and identify the neurons that are directly involved in the formation of any specific memory. We have previously used fos-tau-lacZ (FTL) transgenic mice to identify discrete populations of neurons in amygdala and hypothalamus, which were specifically activated by fear conditioning to a context. Here we have examined neuronal activation due to fear conditioning to a more specific auditory cue. Discrete populations of learning-specific neurons were identified in only a small number of locations in the brain, including those previously found to be activated in amygdala and hypothalamus by context fear conditioning. These populations, each containing only a relatively small number of neurons, may be directly involved in fear learning and memory. PMID:26179231

  9. A Proteomic Evaluation of Sympathetic Activity Biomarkers of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis by Western Blotting Technique Following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Sakarya, Yasemin; Tümer, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disorders and autonomic dysfunction are common paradigms following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis following TBI may result in impaired vasopressor response, energy imbalance, fatigue, depression, or neurological disorders. Autonomic dysfunction is a common disorder following TBI. The sympathetic activity markers on HPA axis can be measured by Western blot protein analysis. Tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta hydroxylase are the key enzymes for the synthesis of norepinephrine; and neuropeptide Y (NPY) is the peptide that is co-stored and co-released with norepinephrine. Thus, the present chapter reviews the experimental protocols for Western blot protein analysis for the measurement of biomarkers that indicate sympathetic activity in brain regions (hypothalamus, pituitary, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum) following TBI.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypothalamus hypophysis axis lesions; Relationship between posterior pituitary function and posterior bright spot

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    Shiina, Takeki; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru; Yoshida, Sho (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Yamada, Kenichi

    1990-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 0.5T superconductive machine was performed to the thirty three cases with a variety of the sellar and parasellar tumors and with dysfunction of the hypothalamus-hypophysis axis. Posterior pituitary bright spot (PBS) on T1 weighted image was evaluated with the pituitary hormonal function. These cases were 12 cases of post-treated tumors including pituitary adenoma (9 patients), suprasellar germinoma (2 patients) and craniopharyngioma (one patient), and non-tumorous conditions including 15 cases of central diabetes insipidus (DI), Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) (one patient), Sheehan's syndrome (3 patients) and anorexia nervosa (2 patients). Pituitary bright spot was not seen in all 19 cases with overt DI. On the other hand, PBS was not seen in 9 cases without overt DI. Three cases of these 9 cases showing Sheehan's syndrome with insufficient antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion was considered as the state of subclinical DI. Posterior bright spot was not seen in all 13 cases of empty sella including partial empty sella. The results suggested that disappearance of PBS represents abnormality or loss of posterior pituitary function and also it was considered to be closely related to the empty sella. (author).

  11. Volumetric Analysis of the Hypothalamus in Huntington Disease Using 3T MRI: The IMAGE-HD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabery, Sanaz; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Lundh, Sofia Hult; Cheong, Rachel Y.; Churchyard, Andrew; Chua, Phyllis; Stout, Julie C.; Egan, Gary F.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Non-motor symptoms and signs such as psychiatric disturbances, sleep problems and metabolic dysfunction are part of the disease manifestation. These aspects may relate to changes in the hypothalamus, an area of the brain involved in the regulation of emotion, sleep and metabolism. Neuropathological and imaging studies using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) have demonstrated pathological changes in the hypothalamic region during early stages in symptomatic HD. In this investigation, we aimed to establish a robust method for measurements of the hypothalamic volume in MRI in order to determine whether the hypothalamic dysfunction in HD is associated with the volume of this region. Using T1-weighted imaging, we describe a reproducible delineation procedure to estimate the hypothalamic volume which was based on the same landmarks used in histologically processed postmortem hypothalamic tissue. Participants included 36 prodromal HD (pre-HD), 33 symptomatic HD (symp-HD) and 33 control participants who underwent MRI scanning at baseline and 18 months follow-up as part of the IMAGE-HD study. We found no evidence of cross-sectional or longitudinal changes between groups in hypothalamic volume. Our results suggest that hypothalamic pathology in HD is not associated with volume changes. PMID:25659157

  12. PCB disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis involves brain glucocorticoid receptor downregulation in anadromous Arctic charr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluru, N.; Jorgensen, E.H.; Maule, A.G.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether brain glucocorticoid receptor (GR) modulation by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was involved in the abnormal cortisol response to stress seen in anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). Fish treated with Aroclor 1254 (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg/kg body mass) were maintained for 5 mo without feeding in the winter to mimic their seasonal fasting cycle, whereas a fed group with 0 and 100 mg/kg Aroclor was maintained for comparison. Fasting elevated plasma cortisol levels and brain GR content but depressed heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and interrenal cortisol production capacity. Exposure of fasted fish to Aroclor 1254 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in brain total PCB content. This accumulation in fish with high PCB dose was threefold higher in fasted fish compared with fed fish. PCBs depressed plasma cortisol levels but did not affect in vitro interrenal cortisol production capacity in fasted charr. At high PCB dose, the brain GR content was significantly lower in the fasted fish and this corresponded with a lower brain hsp70 and hsp90 content. The elevation of plasma cortisol levels and upregulation of brain GR content may be an important adaptation to extended fasting in anadromous Arctic charr, and this response was disrupted by PCBs. Taken together, the hypothalamus-pituitary- interrenal axis is a target for PCB impact during winter emaciation in anadromous Arctic charr.

  13. The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in teleosts and amphibians: Endocrine disruption and its consequences to natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J.A.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teleosts and pond-breeding amphibians may be exposed to a wide variety of anthropogenic, waterborne contaminants that affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Because thyroid hormone is required for their normal development and reproduction, the potential impact of HPT-disrupting contaminants on natural teleost and amphibian populations raises special concern. There is laboratory evidence indicating that persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, pharmaceutical and personal care products, agricultural chemicals, and aerospace products may alter HPT activity, development, and reproduction in teleosts and amphibians. However, at present there is no evidence to clearly link contaminant-induced HPT alterations to impairments in teleost or amphibian population health in the field. Also, with the exception of perchlorate for which laboratory studies have shown a direct link between HPT disruption and adverse impacts on development and reproductive physiology, little is known about if or how other HPT-disrupting contaminants affect organismal performance. Future field studies should focus on establishing temporal associations between the presence of HPT-disrupting chemicals, the occurrence of HPT alterations, and adverse effects on development and reproduction in natural populations; as well as determining how complex mixtures of HPT contaminants affect organismal and population health. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Na+ pump in renal tubular cells is regulated by endogenous Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor from hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantiello, H.F.; Chen, E.; Ray, S.; Haupert, G.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Bovine hypothalamus contains a high affinity, specific, reversible inhibitor of mammalian Na + -K + -ATPase. Kinetic analysis using isolated membrane fractions showed binding and dissociation rates of the hypothalamic factor (HF) to be (like ouabain) relatively long (off rate = 60 min). To determine whether the kinetics of inhibition in intact cells might be more consistent with regulation of physiological processes in vivo, binding and dissociation reactions of HF in intact renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK 1 ) were studied using 86 Rb + uptake and [ 3 H]ouabain binding. As with membranes, a 60-min incubation with HF inhibited Na + -K + -ATPase in LLC-PK 1 cells. In contrast to membrane studies, no prolonged incubation with LLC-PK 1 was needed to observe inhibition of Na + -K + -ATPase. HF caused a 33% inhibition of ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb + influx within 10 min. Incubation of cells with HF followed by washout showed rapid reversal of pump inhibition and a doubling of pump activity. The dose-response curve for HF inhibition of LLC-PK 1 86 Rb + uptake showed a sigmoidal shape consistent with an allosteric binding reaction. Thus HF is a potent regulator of Na + -K + -ATPase activity in intact renal cells, with binding and dissociation reactions consistent with relevant physiological processes

  15. Differential regulation of proopiomelanocortin (POMC mRNA expression in hypothalamus and anterior pituitary following repeated cyanamide with ethanol administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinoshita Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. We have investigated proopiomelanocortin (POMC mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC and the anterior lobe of the pituitary (AL following repeated cyanamide-ethanol reaction (CER. Methods. Adult male Sprague -Dawley rats (250 −290 gr were housed in a temperature and humidity controlled environment with free access to food and water. Four experimental groups were used as follows: saline (as control, cyanamide alone, ethanol alone and ethanol with cyanamide. The animals received daily intraperitoneal injections (i.p. of cyanamide (10mg/kg, 60 min before ethanol dosing with or without ethanol (1g/kg for 5 consecutive days, and were sacrificed 60 min after the last dosing of ethanol. The results were presented as the mean ± SEM for each group. All groups within each data set were compared by one-way ANOVA followed by Fisher PLSD test for multiple comparisons. A value of p<0.05 was considered significant. Results. The POMC mRNA levels in ARC were significantly decreased with cyanamide compared to the control and ethanol alone (p<0.05 and p<0.05 respectively, but increased in AL following repeated CER. Conclusion. We speculate that this differential regulation of POMC mRNA expression may be partially involved in the preventive effects on alcohol intake in response to CER.

  16. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects on sleep and dopamine levels of microdialysis perfusion of cannabidiol into the lateral hypothalamus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Mechoulam, Raphael; Drucker-Colín, René

    2011-03-14

    The major non-psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa, cannabidiol (CBD), displays a plethora of actions including wakefulness. In the present study, we addressed whether perfusing CBD via microdialysis into lateral hypothalamus (LH) during the lights-on period would modify the sleep-wake cycle of rats as well as the contents of dopamine (DA) collected from nucleus accumbens (AcbC). Additionally, we tested whether perfusion of CBD into LH would block the sleep rebound after a sleep deprivation period. Electroencephalogram and electromyogram electrodes were implanted in rats as well as a guide-cannula aimed to LH or AcbC. CBD perfusion was carried out via cannulae placed into LH whereas contents of DA were collected from AcbC and analyzed using HPLC means. We found that microdialysis perfusion of CBD (30, 60, or 90 nM) into LH of rat enhances alertness and suppresses sleep. This effect was accompanied with an increase in DA extracellular levels collected from the AcbC. Furthermore, perfusion of CBD into LH after total sleep deprivation prevented the sleep rebound. These findings enhance the investigation about the neurobiological properties of CBD on sleep modulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Volumetric analysis of the hypothalamus in Huntington Disease using 3T MRI: the IMAGE-HD Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Gabery

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Non-motor symptoms and signs such as psychiatric disturbances, sleep problems and metabolic dysfunction are part of the disease manifestation. These aspects may relate to changes in the hypothalamus, an area of the brain involved in the regulation of emotion, sleep and metabolism. Neuropathological and imaging studies using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as well as positron emission tomography (PET have demonstrated pathological changes in the hypothalamic region during early stages in symptomatic HD. In this investigation, we aimed to establish a robust method for measurements of the hypothalamic volume in MRI in order to determine whether the hypothalamic dysfunction in HD is associated with the volume of this region. Using T1-weighted imaging, we describe a reproducible delineation procedure to estimate the hypothalamic volume which was based on the same landmarks used in histologically processed postmortem hypothalamic tissue. Participants included 36 prodromal HD (pre-HD, 33 symptomatic HD (symp-HD and 33 control participants who underwent MRI scanning at baseline and 18 months follow-up as part of the IMAGE-HD study. We found no evidence of cross-sectional or longitudinal changes between groups in hypothalamic volume. Our results suggest that hypothalamic pathology in HD is not associated with volume changes.

  19. Glutamate AMPA/kainate receptors, not GABA(A) receptors, mediate estradiol-induced sex differences in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brigitte J; Schwarz, Jaclyn M; Mong, Jessica A; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2007-02-15

    Sex differences in brain morphology underlie physiological and behavioral differences between males and females. During the critical perinatal period for sexual differentiation in the rat, gonadal steroids act in a regionally specific manner to alter neuronal morphology. Using Golgi-Cox impregnation, we examined several parameters of neuronal morphology in postnatal day 2 (PN2) rats. We found that in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) and in areas just dorsal and just lateral to the VMN that there was a sex difference in total dendritic spine number (males greater) that was abolished by treating female neonates with exogenous testosterone. Dendritic branching was similarly sexually differentiated and hormonally modulated in the VMN and dorsal to the VMN. We then used spinophilin, a protein that positively correlates with the amount of dendritic spines, to investigate the mechanisms underlying these sex differences. Estradiol, which mediates most aspects of masculinization and is the aromatized product of testosterone, increased spinophilin levels in female PN2 rats to that of males. Muscimol, an agonist at GABA(A) receptors, did not affect spinophilin protein levels in either male or female neonates. Kainic acid, an agonist at glutamatergic AMPA/kainate receptors, mimicked the effect of estradiol in females. Antagonizing AMPA/kainate receptors with NBQX prevented the estradiol-induced increase in spinophilin in females but did not affect spinophilin level in males. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Melanin concentrating hormone and estrogen receptor-α are coexstensive but not coexpressed in cells of male rat hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschamp, John W.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2009-01-01

    In male rats, estradiol (E2) exerts marked anorectic effects. One mechanism proposed for this effect is an E2-mediated down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone (MCH). Previous anatomical work has shown that both MCH and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are found in quantity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a structure long associated with appetite and ingestive behavior. It has been hypothesized that the most direct manner by which E2 could affect MCH expression and feeding would be via classical nuclear ERα located in MCH neurons. To evaluate this notion, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry for MCH and ERα in male rat hypothalamus. We report here that MCH neurons do not contain ERα, suggesting that the primary locus for estrogenic control of feeding is not the MCH neurons themselves. Rather, we show substantial overlap in the anatomical distribution of both cell types, raising the possibility that E2 influences MCH signaling indirectly via adjacent ERα-containing cells. PMID:17933463

  1. Na sup + pump in renal tubular cells is regulated by endogenous Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase inhibitor from hypothalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantiello, H.F.; Chen, E.; Ray, S.; Haupert, G.T. Jr. (Harvard medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    Bovine hypothalamus contains a high affinity, specific, reversible inhibitor of mammalian Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. Kinetic analysis using isolated membrane fractions showed binding and dissociation rates of the hypothalamic factor (HF) to be (like ouabain) relatively long (off rate = 60 min). To determine whether the kinetics of inhibition in intact cells might be more consistent with regulation of physiological processes in vivo, binding and dissociation reactions of HF in intact renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK{sup 1}) were studied using {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake and ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding. As with membranes, a 60-min incubation with HF inhibited Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. In contrast to membrane studies, no prolonged incubation with LLC-PK{sub 1} was needed to observe inhibition of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. HF caused a 33% inhibition of ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb{sup +} influx within 10 min. Incubation of cells with HF followed by washout showed rapid reversal of pump inhibition and a doubling of pump activity. The dose-response curve for HF inhibition of LLC-PK{sub 1} {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake showed a sigmoidal shape consistent with an allosteric binding reaction. Thus HF is a potent regulator of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in intact renal cells, with binding and dissociation reactions consistent with relevant physiological processes.

  2. Estradiol suppresses ingestive response evoked by activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the lateral hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschetto, Ana P D; Levone, Brunno R; Kochenborger, Larissa; da Silva, Eduardo S; Flores, Rafael A; Faria, Moacir S; Paschoalini, Marta A

    2018-03-08

    The present study investigated the effects of estradiol (E2) on ingestive behavior after activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of female rats habituated to eat a wet mash diet. Ovariectomized rats treated with corn oil (OVX) or estradiol cypionate (OVX+E) received local injections into the LH of vehicle or an agonist of 5-HT1A receptors, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; at a dose of 6 nmol). To determine the involvement of these receptors in food intake, some animals were pretreated with N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclohexane carboxamide maleate (WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor full antagonist, at a dose of 0.37 nmol), followed by the injection of the agonist 8-OH-DPAT or its vehicle. The results showed that the injection of 8-OH-DPAT into the LH of OVX rats significantly increased food intake, and the duration and frequency of this behavior. The pretreatment with E2 suppressed the hyperphagic response induced by 8-OH-DPAT in OVX animals. The inhibition of 5-HT1A receptors after pretreatment with WAY-100635 blocked the hyperphagic effects evoked by 8-OH-DPAT in OVX. These results indicate that the activity of LH 5-HT1A receptors could be affected by blood E2 levels.

  3. A model for evaluating steroids acting at the hypothalamus-pituitary axis using radioimmunoassay and related procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spona, J.; Bieglmayer, C.; Schroeder, R.; Poeckl, E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative affinity constants for binding of estrone (E 1 ), estriol (E 3 ), 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) and 17α-ethinyl-17β-estradiol (EE 2 ) to cytosol estrogen-receptor of rat hypothalamus and pituitary were estimated by radioligand-receptor assays. Relative affinity constants in the hypothalamic system were 6.5 x 10 -1 M for E 2 , 1 x 10 -9 M for EE 2 and 2 x 10 -8 M for E 1 and E 3 , respectively. The affinity constants were 1 x 10 -9 M for E 2 and E 3 and 7 x 10 -9 M for E 1 and E 3 , resp., when pituitary cytosol samples were used. Some discrepancies between biological activity and affinity for the estrogen-receptor was noted, which may be due to differences in the metabolisms and cellular uptake of the estrogens. The present system may be also a useful procedure to help to provide a good definition of estrogen and anti-estroegn acting at the hypothalamic and pituitary level. Sedimentation patterns of cytosol samples labeled with estrogens used in this study revealed protein moieties sedimenting upon ultracentrifugation in the 8 S region. (orig.) [de

  4. An Estrogen-Responsive Module in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Selectively Drives Sex-Specific Activity in Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen-receptor alpha (ERα neurons in the ventrolateral region of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHVL control an array of sex-specific responses to maximize reproductive success. In females, these VMHVL neurons are believed to coordinate metabolism and reproduction. However, it remains unknown whether specific neuronal populations control distinct components of this physiological repertoire. Here, we identify a subset of ERα VMHVL neurons that promotes hormone-dependent female locomotion. Activating Nkx2-1-expressing VMHVL neurons via pharmacogenetics elicits a female-specific burst of spontaneous movement, which requires ERα and Tac1 signaling. Disrupting the development of Nkx2-1+ VMHVL neurons results in female-specific obesity, inactivity, and loss of VMHVL neurons coexpressing ERα and Tac1. Unexpectedly, two responses controlled by ERα+ neurons, fertility and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, are unaffected. We conclude that a dedicated subset of VMHVL neurons marked by ERα, NKX2-1, and Tac1 regulates estrogen-dependent fluctuations in physical activity and constitutes one of several neuroendocrine modules that drive sex-specific responses.

  5. Lateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral pallidum roles in eating and hunger: interactions between homeostatic and reward circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Charles Castro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the neural bases of eating behavior, hunger, and reward has consistently implicated the lateral hypothalamus (LH and its interactions with mesocorticolimbic circuitry, such as mesolimbic dopamine projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc and ventral pallidum (VP, in controlling motivation to eat. The NAc and VP play special roles in mediating the hedonic impact (‘liking’ and motivational incentive salience (‘wanting’ of food rewards, and their interactions with LH help permit regulatory hunger/satiety modulation of food motivation and reward. Here, we review some progress that has been made regarding this circuitry and its functions: the identification of localized anatomical hedonic hotspots within NAc and VP for enhancing hedonic impact; interactions of NAc/VP hedonic hotspots with specific LH signals such as orexin; an anterior-posterior gradient of sites in NAc shell for producing intense appetitive eating versus intense fearful reactions; and anatomically distributed appetitive functions of dopamine and mu opioid signals in NAc shell and related structures. Such findings help improve our understanding of NAc, VP, and LH interactions in mediating affective and motivation functions, including ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ for food rewards.

  6. Profiling of differential gene expression in the hypothalamus of broiler-type Taiwan country chickens in response to acute heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Wang, Shih-Han; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Acute heat stress severely impacts poultry production. The hypothalamus acts as a crucial center to regulate body temperature, detect temperature changes, and modulate the autonomic nervous system and endocrine loop for heat retention and dissipation. The purpose of this study was to investigate global gene expression in the hypothalamus of broiler-type B strain Taiwan country chickens after acute heat stress. Twelve 30-week-old hens were allocated to four groups. Three heat-stressed groups were subjected to acute heat stress at 38 °C for 2 hours without recovery (H2R0), with 2 hours of recovery (H2R2), and with 6 hours of recovery (H2R6). The control hens were maintained at 25 °C. At the end, hypothalamus samples were collected for gene expression analysis. The results showed that 24, 11, and 25 genes were upregulated and 41, 15, and 42 genes were downregulated in H2R0, H2R2, and H2R6 treatments, respectively. The expressions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GNRH1), heat shock 27-kDa protein 1 (HSPB1), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) were upregulated at all recovery times after heat exposure. Conversely, the expression of TPH2 was downregulated at all recovery times. A gene ontology analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in biological processes including cellular processes, metabolic processes, localization, multicellular organismal processes, developmental processes, and biological regulation. A functional annotation analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were related to the gene networks of responses to stress and reproductive functions. These differentially expressed genes might be essential and unique key factors in the heat stress response of the hypothalamus in chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The central anorexigenic mechanism of amylin in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) involves pro-opiomelanocortin, calcitonin receptor, and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingwei; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2017-08-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide hormone that exerts anorexigenic effects in humans and animals. We demonstrated that central injection of amylin into chicks affected feeding and related behaviors via the hypothalamus and brainstem, although the molecular mechanisms remained elusive. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying anorexigenic effects of amylin in 7 day-old Japanese quail. Food but not water intake was reduced after intracerebroventricular amylin injection, and the behavior analysis indicated that this was associated with decreased food pecks and preening. Whole hypothalamus and hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and lateral hypothalamic area (LH) were extracted from quail at 1h post-injection for total RNA isolation. Real time PCR was performed to quantify mRNA abundance of amylin receptors, appetite-associated neuropeptides and monoamine-synthesis-related enzymes. Central amylin injection increased the mRNA abundance of calcitonin receptor (CALCR), receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the hypothalamus and individual hypothalamic nuclei. Relative quantities of CALCR and POMC mRNA were greater in the ARC of the amylin- than vehicle-treated group. Thus, amylin-mediated effects on food intake may involve POMC, monoamine synthesis, and amylin receptor 1 (a complex of CALCR and RAMP1) in the ARC. Together, these data provide novel insights on the hypothalamic-specific molecular mechanisms of amylin-induced food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promote neuroprotection, reduced cell apoptosis and glial cell activation in the hypothalamus of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marlon R; Cechella, José L; Pinton, Simone; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a process characterized by deterioration of the homeostasis of various physiological systems; although being a process under influence of multiple factors, the mechanisms involved in aging are not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet (1ppm, 4weeks) and swimming exercise (1% of body weight, 20min per day, 4weeks) on proteins related to glial cells activation, apoptosis and neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old male Wistar rats (27month-old). Old rats had activation of astrocytes and microglia which was demonstrated by the increase in the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) in hypothalamus. A decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and procaspase-3 levels as well as an increase of the cleaved PARP/full length PARP ratio (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP) and the pJNK/JNK ratio (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, JNK) were observed. The levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF), the pAkt/Akt ratio (also known as protein kinase B) and NeuN (neuronal nuclei), a neuron marker, were decreased in the hypothalamus of old rats. Old rats that received a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and performed swimming exercise had the hypothalamic levels of Iba-1 and GFAP decreased. The combined treatment also increased the levels of Bcl-2 and procaspase-3 and decreased the ratios of cleaved PARP/full length PARP and pJNK/JNK in old rats. The levels of mBDNF and NeuN, but not the pAkt/Akt ratio, were increased by combined treatment. In conclusion, a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promoted neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old rats, reducing apoptosis and glial cell activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre Mutant Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; F?zesi, Tam?s; Watts, Alan G.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-...

  10. Wnt3a upregulates brain-derived insulin by increasing NeuroD1 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaemeun; Kim, Kyungchan; Yu, Seong-Woon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2016-03-08

    Insulin plays diverse roles in the brain. Although insulin produced by pancreatic β-cells that crosses the blood-brain barrier is a major source of brain insulin, recent studies suggest that insulin is also produced locally within the brain. However, the mechanisms underlying the production of brain-derived insulin (BDI) are not yet known. Here, we examined the effect of Wnt3a on BDI production in a hypothalamic cell line and hypothalamic tissue. In N39 hypothalamic cells, Wnt3a treatment significantly increased the expression of the Ins2 gene, which encodes the insulin isoform predominant in the mouse brain, by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The concentration of insulin was higher in culture medium of Wnt3a-treated cells than in that of untreated cells. Interestingly, neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1), a target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and one of transcription factors for insulin, was also induced by Wnt3a treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the treatment of BIO, a GSK3 inhibitor, also increased the expression of Ins2 and NeuroD1. Knockdown of NeuroD1 by lentiviral shRNAs reduced the basal expression of Ins2 and suppressed Wnt3a-induced Ins2 expression. To confirm the Wnt3a-induced increase in Ins2 expression in vivo, Wnt3a was injected into the hypothalamus of mice. Wnt3a increased the expression of NeuroD1 and Ins2 in the hypothalamus in a manner similar to that observed in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that BDI production is regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin/NeuroD1 pathway in the hypothalamus. Our findings will help to unravel the regulation of BDI production in the hypothalamus.

  11. Effects of Qiangji Jianli Yin on the hypothalamus CRH contents and plasma ACTH, cortisol levels in rat models of kidney-yang deficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hui; Chen Zhixi; Chen Jinyan; Li Zhiqiang; He Zanhou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of qiangji jianli yin on hypothalamus CRH contents and plasma ACTH, Cortisol levels in rat models with kidney-yang deficiency syndrome. Methods: Rat models of kidney-yang deficiency syndrome were prepared with intramuscular injuection of hydroeortisone and divided into 5 groups: (1) no further treatment, n=13 (2) treated with high dosage d qiangji jiandi yin, n=12 (3) treated with medium dosage of qiangji jianli yin, n=12 (4) treated with low dosage of qiangji jianli yin n=12, (5) treated with yougui wan, n=12. Ten rats injuected with intramuscular distilled water only served as controls. The animals were sacrificied 14 days later and the hypothalamus CRH contents as well as plasma AOM and cortisol levels were measured with RIA. The thymus gland weight index and the adrenal gland index were calculated. Results: (1) The hypothalamus CRH contents and plasma ACTH, cortisol levels were significantly lower (P<0.01) in the rat models of kidney-yang deficiency syndrome without any treatment thas those in controls rats; the thymus and adrenal gland weight index were significantly decreased too (P <0.01). The CRH conteats and ACTH, cortisol levels in all the three group of rat model treated with different dosage of qiangji jianli yin were significantly higher than those in the models without any treatment (P<0.05-0.01). Conclusion: In rat models of kidney-yang deficiency syndrome, dysfunction of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) led to decreased secretion of related hormones. The HPAA function might be partially restored with administation of qiangji jianli yin. (authors)

  12. A contribution to the study of spontaneous and evoked electrical activities of the adult rabbit hypothalamus and application of digital analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasmoles, Francoise

    1974-01-01

    The spontaneous and evoked electrical activities of the hypothalamus were studied in 18 adult rabbits chronically implanted with electrodes. The graphic study of the EEG was completed by digital analyses of the signal considered as a random process and processed both by statistical analysis in order to know the distribution function of the signal amplitude and harmonic analysis allowing classification of power density spectra by the calculation of the autocorrelation function and its Fourier transform. Absolute values and percentage of energy distribution were obtained from 0 to 40 Hz for each frequency rate (0.25 Hz) and in various frequency bands (0-3, 3-6, 7-9, 9-15, 15-20, 20-30 and 30-40 Hz). The experimental methods (electrode implantation, data acquisition and processing) are described: 240 sequences corresponding to stable physiological states were analyzed after analogical-digital conversion (sampling rate: 10 ms, period of integration: 20 s). Whatever the state of vigilance, the hypothalamus had a fairly homogeneous function different from the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex. The signal characteristics both in amplitude and frequency allowed to distinguish the hypothalamic areas studied (supra-optic area, mammillary body, postero-lateral hypothalamus). The results were reproducible and verified the information supplied by visual examination of the EEG. Following light stimulus, the evoked potentials were collected in the hypothalamus; there should therefore be convergence, yet since the answers are unstable and long latent, the neuronal paths followed by the impulse must not be direct. (author) [fr

  13. Organization and number of orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus of two species of Cetartiodactyla: A comparison of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    OpenAIRE

    Dell, Leigh-Anne; Patzke, Nina; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Bux, Faiza; Fuxe, Kjell; Barber, Grace; Siegel, Jerome M.; Manger, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the organization of the orexinergic (hypocretinergic) neurons in the hypothalamus of the giraffe and harbour porpoise – two members of the mammalian Order Cetartiodactyla which is comprised of the even-toed ungulates and the cetaceans as they share a monophyletic ancestry. Diencephalons from two sub-adult male giraffes and two adult male harbour porpoises were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained for orexin-A. The staining revealed that the orexine...

  14. Decreased serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus and midbrain in patients with multiple systemic atrophy: a study with [{sup 123}I]-FP-CITA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jon Min; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We investigated quantification of dopaminergic transporter (DAT) and serotonergic transporter (SERT) for differentiating between multiple systemic atrophy (MSA) and idiopathic Parkinsons disease (IPD). Nfluoropropyl- 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-4-[{sup 123}I]-iodophenylnortropane SPECT ([123I]-FP-CIT SPECT) was performed in 6 patients with MSA, 18 with early IPD, and 6 healthy controls. Standard ROIs (region of interests) of striatal regions to evaluate DAT, and hypothalamus and midbrain for SERT were drawn on standard template images and applied to each image taken 4 hours after radiotracer injection. Striatal V3? for DAT and hypothalamic and midbrain V3? for SERT were calculated using region/reference ration based on the transient equilibrium method. Group differences were tested using ANOVA with the postHoc analysis. DAT in the putamen was significantly decreased in both patients groups with MSA and early IPD, compared with healthy control (p=0.03, p=0.05, respectively). A reduction of DAT in the caudate was significant in MSA patients (p=0.05) and showed a trend in early IPD patient. This implied least involvement of caudate in early IPD. Regarding SERT, MSA patients showed significant reduction of SERT in hypothalamus compared with controls as well as early IPD patients (p=0.05, 0.01, respectively), and also showed a tendency of decrease in SERT of the midbrain (p=0.058 vs, control). In patients with IPD, there was no significant reduction of SERT in the hypothalamus or midbrain when compared with controls. In this study, the decreased SERT in the hypothalamus and midbrain could be demonstrated in MSA patients using [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT. We suggest that the quantification of SERT as well as DAT in [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT is helpful to differentiate Parkinsonian disorders.

  15. Inhalation of a racemic mixture (R,S)-linalool by rats experiencing restraint stress alters neuropeptide and MHC class I gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazushi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Kamei, Asuka; Abe, Keiko; Nakamura, Akio

    2017-07-13

    Some odorants have physiological and psychological effects on organisms. However, little is known about the effects of inhaling them, particularly on the central nervous system. Using DNA microarray analysis, we obtained gene expression profiles of the hypothalamus from restraint stressed rats exposed to racemic (R,S)-linalool. Hierarchical clustering across all probe sets showed that this inhalation of (R,S)-linalool influenced the expression levels of a wide range of genes in the hypothalamus. A comparison of transcription levels revealed that the inhalation of (R,S)-linalool restored the expression of 560 stress-induced probe sets to a normal status. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that these genes were associated with synaptic transmission via neurotransmitters including anxiolytic neuropeptides such as oxytocin and neuropeptide Y. These genes also included several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules necessary for neural development and plasticity. Moreover, Upstream Regulator Analysis predicted that the hormone prolactin would be activated by the inhalation of (R,S)-linalool under stress. Our results reveal some of the molecular mechanisms associated with odor inhalation in the hypothalamus in organisms under stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha activates signal transduction in hypothalamus and modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory proteins and orexigenic/anorexigenic neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria E; Barbuio, Raquel; Milanski, Marciane; Romanatto, Talita; Barbosa, Helena C; Nadruz, Wilson; Bertolo, Manoel B; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mario J A; Franchini, Kleber G; Velloso, Licio A

    2006-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to participate in the wastage syndrome that accompanies cancer and severe infectious diseases. More recently, a role for TNF-alpha in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been shown. Much of the regulatory action exerted by TNF-alpha upon the control of energy stores depends on its action on the hypothalamus. In this study, we show that TNF-alpha activates canonical pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus of rats. These signaling events lead to the transcriptional activation of an early responsive gene and to the induction of expression of cytokines and a cytokine responsive protein such as interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, interleukin-10 and suppressor of cytokine signalling-3, respectively. In addition, TNF-alpha induces the expression of neurotransmitters involved in the control of feeding and thermogenesis. Thus, TNF-alpha may act directly in the hypothalamus inducing a pro-inflammatory response and the modulation of expression of neurotransmitters involved in energy homeostasis.

  17. Serotonin and dopamine in the hypothalamus of control and malnourished mother rats during pregnancy and lactation and body composition of their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; González-Ramírez, Misael; Boyzo-Montes de Oca, Alfonso; Herrera-Márquez, Rocío; Hernández-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    To determine concentrations of serotonin and dopamine in the hypothalamus of undernourished rats and controls during pregnancy and lactation and body composition of their offspring. Malnourished rats along with control rats were used during pregnancy and lactation. At birth of their offspring, control mothers nursed their young and malnourished rats and the undernourished mothers nursed their offspring and control pups. On days 5, 10, 15, and 21 of lactation (at the beginning and end of a feeding), L-tryptophan (L-Trp)-free, bound and total, plasma prolactin (PRL) and milk composition were determined. Serotonin and dopamine were measured in the hypothalamus. Body composition of offspring was determined. Increase of free L-Trp was confirmed in undernourished mothers. Furthermore, hypothalamic serotonin was elevated at the start of suckling and decreased at termination. There was also a decrease in dopamine in the hypothalamus at the beginning and end of suckling followed by an increase of plasma PRL that was greater in control mothers who breastfed malnourished offspring. Interestingly, undernourished offspring consumed more milk and showed a clear recovery of body composition with accumulation of body fat. Changes observed in hypothalamic neurotransmitters appear to be closely related to nutritional status and to the response and control of PRL production, possibly to adapt the offspring to the metabolic changes. It was also confirmed that on-demand feeding of undernourished offspring is the main factor involved in nutritional recovery and a predisposition to overweight in the recovered undernourished animals.

  18. LPS-induced inflammation in the chicken is associated with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta-mediated fat mass and obesity associated gene down-regulation in the liver but not hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Guo, Feng; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2013-12-17

    The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) is widely investigated in humans regarding its important roles in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Studies in mammals demonstrate that FTO is also associated with inflammation markers. However, the association of FTO with inflammation in chickens remains unclear. In this study, male chickens on day 28 posthatching were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline to investigate whether the FTO gene is involved in LPS-induced inflammation. We detected significant down-regulation of FTO mRNA in the liver (P hypothalamus, 2 and 24 h after LPS challenge. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 (P hypothalamus. IL-1β was dramatically up-regulated (P hypothalamus 2 h after LPS challenge, while activation of IL-6 was observed in the liver (P hypothalamus. The 5'-flanking sequence of the chicken FTO gene contains nine predicted binding sites for CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP beta) and one for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Significant elevation of C/EBP beta was detected in the liver (P hypothalamus, 2 h after LPS challenge. Lipopolysaccharide challenge increased the C/EBP beta binding to FTO promoter in the liver (P hypothalamus, is affected by the i.p. injection of LPS, which may be mediated through tissue-specific FTO transcriptional regulation by C/EBP beta and STAT3 interaction.

  19. An acute injection of corticosterone increases thyrotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus but interferes with the rapid hypothalamus pituitary thyroid axis response to cold in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Rivera, I; Jaimes-Hoy, L; Cote-Vélez, A; Espinoza-Ayala, C; Charli, J-L; Joseph-Bravo, P

    2014-12-01

    The activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is rapidly adjusted by energy balance alterations. Glucocorticoids can interfere with this activity, although the timing of this interaction is unknown. In vitro studies indicate that, albeit incubation with either glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists or protein kinase A (PKA) activators enhances pro-thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (pro-TRH) transcription, co-incubation with both stimuli reduces this enhancement. In the present study, we used primary cultures of hypothalamic cells to test whether the order of these stimuli alters the cross-talk. We observed that a simultaneous or 1-h prior (but not later) activation of GR is necessary to inhibit the stimulatory effect of PKA activation on pro-TRH expression. We tested these in vitro results in the context of a physiological stimulus on the HPT axis in adult male rats. Cold exposure for 1 h enhanced pro-TRH mRNA expression in neurones of the hypophysiotrophic and rostral subdivisions of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, thyrotrophin (TSH) serum levels and deiodinase 2 (D2) activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT). An i.p. injection of corticosterone stimulated pro-TRH expression in the PVN of rats kept at ambient temperature, more pronouncedly in hypophysiotrophic neurones that no longer responded to cold exposure. In corticosterone-pretreated rats, the cold-induced increase in pro-TRH expression was detected only in the rostral PVN. Corticosterone blunted the increase in serum TSH levels and D2 activity in BAT produced by cold in vehicle-injected animals. Thus, increased serum corticosterone levels rapidly restrain cold stress-induced activation of TRH hypophysiotrophic neurones, which may contribute to changing energy expenditure. Interestingly, TRH neurones of the rostral PVN responded to both corticosterone and cold exposure with an amplified expression of pro-TRH mRNA, suggesting that these neurones integrate stress and temperature

  20. Phosphodiesterase-3B-cAMP pathway of leptin signalling in the hypothalamus is impaired during the development of diet-induced obesity in FVB/N mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, M; Anamthathmakula, P; Sahu, A

    2015-04-01

    The phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B)-cAMP pathway plays an important role in transducing the action of leptin in the hypothalamus. Obesity is usually associated with hyperleptinaemia and resistance to anorectic and body weight-reducing effects of leptin. To determine whether the hypothalamic PDE3B-cAMP pathway of leptin signalling is impaired during the development of diet-induced obesity (DIO), we fed male FVB/N mice a high-fat diet (HFD: 58% kcal as fat) or low-fat diet (LFD: 6% kcal as fat) for 4 weeks. HFD fed mice developed DIO in association with hyperphagia, hyperleptinaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. Leptin (i.p.) significantly increased hypothalamic PDE3B activity and phosphorylated (p)-Akt levels in LFD-fed but not in HFD-fed mice. However, basal p-Akt levels in hypothalamus were increased in DIO mice. Additionally, amongst six-microdissected brain nuclei examined, leptin selectively decreased cAMP levels in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of LFD-fed mice but failed to do so in HFD-fed mice. We next tested whether both the PBE3B and Akt pathways of leptin signalling remained impaired in DIO mice on the HFD for 12 weeks (long-term). DIO mice were hyperinsulinaemic and hyperleptinaemic in association with impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. Although, in LFD-fed mice, leptin significantly increased PDE3B activity and p-Akt levels in the hypothalamus, it failed to do so in HFD-fed mice. Also, basal p-Akt levels in the hypothalamus were increased in DIO mice and leptin had no further effect. Similarly, immunocytochemistry showed that leptin increased the number of p-Akt-positive cells in the ARC of LFD-fed but not in HFD-fed mice, and there was an increased basal number of p-Akt positive cells in the ARC of DIO mice. These results suggest that the PDE3B-cAMP- and Akt-pathways of leptin signalling in the hypothalamus are impaired during the development of DIO. Thus, a defect in the regulation by leptin of the hypothalamic PDE3B-cAMP pathway and Akt signalling may be one

  1. The preoptic area in the hypothalamus is the source of the additional respiratory drive at raised body temperature in anaesthetised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, A G; Harris, M C; Parkes, M J

    2000-09-01

    In mammals that use the ventilatory system as the principal means of increasing heat loss, raising body temperature causes the adoption of a specialised breathing pattern known as panting and this is mediated by the thermoregulatory system in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. In these species an additional respiratory drive is also present at raised body temperature, since breathing can reappear at low Pa,CO2 levels, when stimulation of chemoreceptors is minimal. It is not known whether the preoptic area is also the source of this additional drive. Rats do not pant but do possess this additional respiratory drive at raised body temperatures. We have therefore tested whether the preoptic area of the hypothalamus is the source of this additional respiratory drive in rats. Urethane anaesthesia and hyperoxia were used in eleven rats to minimise behavioural and chemical drives to breathe. The presence of the additional respiratory drive was indicated if rhythmic diaphragmatic EMG activity reappeared during hypocapnia (a mean Pa,CO2 level of 21+/-2 mm Hg, n = 11), induced by mechanical ventilation. The additional respiratory drive was absent at normal body temperature (37¿C). When the temperature of the whole body was raised using an external source of radiant heat, the additional respiratory drive appeared at 40.6+/-0.5 degrees C (n = 3). In two further rats this drive was induced at normal body temperature by localised warming in the preoptic area of the intact hypothalamus. The additional respiratory drive appeared at similar temperatures to those in control rats in three rats following isolation of the hypothalamus from more rostral areas of the brain. In contrast, the additional respiratory drive failed to appear at these temperatures in three rats after isolating the hypothalamus from the caudal brainstem, by sectioning pathways medial to the medial forebrain bundle. Since the preoptic area is known to contain thermoreceptors and to receive afferents from

  2. In ovo leptin administration modulates glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression specifically in the hypothalamus of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Wang, Yufeng; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Ruqian

    2017-01-18

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is well documented to play a crucial role in the central control of energy homeostasis in mammals. However, the distribution and function of the GR in the chicken brain are less clear. Leptin is a key hormone regulating energy homeostasis in mammals, yet its action in the chicken is still under debate. In this study, the distribution of GR mRNA in the chicken brain and the effects of in ovo administration of leptin and its antagonist on early post-hatch growth and GR mRNA expression in different hypothalamic nuclei were investigated via in situ hybridization (ISH) and quantitative PCR. GR mRNA was widely expressed in the chicken brain, mainly in the corpus striatum, nucleus rotundus, dorsolateral nucleus, nucleus ovoidalis, nucleus reticularis superior and the hippocampus (Hp) and in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. High doses of leptin (5.0μg) significantly promoted post-hatch growth, resulting in a significant high body weight increased by 24.64% at day (D) 21 of life. Meanwhile, hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in the LL and HL groups was down-regulated significantly by 7.02% and 13.65% respectively (Phypothalamus of D21 broiler chickens. The leptin antagonist was able to reverse the effect of leptin on the growth rate and hypothalamic GR mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that in ovo administration of leptin influences early post-hatch growth and the hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in broiler chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lateral hypothalamus orexinergic system modulates the stress effect on pentylenetetrazol induced seizures through corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpour, Maryam; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Abrari, Kataneh; Goudarzi, Iran

    2016-11-01

    Stress is a trigger factor for seizure initiation which activates hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as well other brain areas. In this respect, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) orexinergic system are involved in seizure occurrence. In this study, we investigated the role of LH area and orexin expression in (mediation of) stress effect on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) -induced seizures with hippocampal involvement. Two mild foot shock stresses were applied to intact and adrenalectomized animals; with or without CRHr1 blocking (NBI 27914) in the LH area. Then, changes in orexin production were evaluated by RT-PCR. Intravenous PTZ infusion (25 mg/ml) -induced convulsions were scored upon modified Racine scale. Finally, hippocampal glutamate and GABA were evaluated to study excitability changes. We demonstrated that the duration and severity of convulsions in stress-induced as well as adrenalectomized group were increased. Plasma corticosterone (CRT) level and orexin mRNA expression were built up in the stress and/or seizure groups. Furthermore, glutamate and GABA content was increased and decreased respectively due to stress and seizures. In contrast, rats receiving CRHr1 inhibitor showed reduced severity and duration of seizures, increased GABA, decreased glutamate and corticosterone and also orexin mRNA compared to the inhibitor free rats. Stress and adrenalectomy induced augmenting effect on seizure severity and duration and the subsequent reduction due to CRHr1 blocking with parallel orexin mRNA changes, indicated the likely involvement of CRH1r induced orexin expression of the LH in gating stress effect on convulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute and long-term suppression of feeding behavior by POMC neurons in the brainstem and hypothalamus, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Cheng; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Zhang, Ju-En; Lin, Shuailiang; Bao, Junhong; Wu, Ping; Luo, Minmin

    2013-02-20

    POMC-derived melanocortins inhibit food intake. In the adult rodent brain, POMC-expressing neurons are located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), but it remains unclear how POMC neurons in these two brain nuclei regulate feeding behavior and metabolism differentially. Using pharmacogenetic methods to activate or deplete neuron groups in separate brain areas, in the present study, we show that POMC neurons in the ARC and NTS suppress feeding behavior at different time scales. Neurons were activated using the DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) method. The evolved human M3-muscarinic receptor was expressed in a selective population of POMC neurons by stereotaxic infusion of Cre-recombinase-dependent, adeno-associated virus vectors into the ARC or NTS of POMC-Cre mice. After injection of the human M3-muscarinic receptor ligand clozapine-N-oxide (1 mg/kg, i.p.), acute activation of NTS POMC neurons produced an immediate inhibition of feeding behavior. In contrast, chronic stimulation was required for ARC POMC neurons to suppress food intake. Using adeno-associated virus delivery of the diphtheria toxin receptor gene, we found that diphtheria toxin-induced ablation of POMC neurons in the ARC but not the NTS, increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and ultimately resulted in obesity and metabolic and endocrine disorders. Our results reveal different behavioral functions of POMC neurons in the ARC and NTS, suggesting that POMC neurons regulate feeding and energy homeostasis by integrating long-term adiposity signals from the hypothalamus and short-term satiety signals from the brainstem.

  5. A critical role of lateral hypothalamus in context-induced relapse to alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Nathan J; Rabei, Rana; Kaganovsky, Konstantin; Caprioli, Daniele; Bossert, Jennifer M; Bonci, Antonello; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-05-28

    In human alcoholics, abstinence is often self-imposed, despite alcohol availability, because of the negative consequences of excessive use. During abstinence, relapse is often triggered by exposure to contexts associated with alcohol use. We recently developed a rat model that captures some features of this human condition: exposure to the alcohol self-administration environment (context A), after punishment-imposed suppression of alcohol self-administration in a different environment (context B), provoked renewal of alcohol seeking in alcohol-preferring P rats. The mechanisms underlying context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence are unknown. Here, we studied the role of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its forebrain projections in this effect. We first determined the effect of context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking on Fos (a neuronal activity marker) expression in LH. We next determined the effect of LH reversible inactivation by GABAA + GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol + baclofen) on this effect. Finally, we determined neuronal activation in brain areas projecting to LH during context-induced renewal tests by measuring double labeling of the retrograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B (CTb; injected in LH) with Fos. Context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence was associated with increased Fos expression in LH. Additionally, renewal was blocked by muscimol + baclofen injections into LH. Finally, double-labeling analysis of CTb + Fos showed that context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence was associated with selective activation of accumbens shell neurons projecting to LH. The results demonstrate an important role of LH in renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence and suggest a role of accumbens shell projections to LH in this form of relapse. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347447-11$15.00/0.

  6. Differential effect of adrenocorticosteroids on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase bioactivity at the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, R B; Mohamad, N B; Morat, P B; Saim, A; Abdul Kadir, K B

    1996-08-01

    11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) is a microsomal enzyme that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of cortisol (F) to cortisone (E) in man and corticosterone (B) to 11-dehydrocorticosterone (A) in rats. 11 beta-OHSD has been identified in a wide variety of tissues. The differential distribution of 11 beta-OHSD suggests that this enzyme has locally defined functions that vary from region to region. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the glucocorticoids B and dexamethasone (DM), the mineralocorticoid deoxycorticosterone (DOC), and the inhibitors of 11 beta-OHSD glycyrrhizic acid (Gl) and glycyrrhetinic acid (GE) on 11 beta-OHSD bioactivity at the hypothalamus (HT) and anterior pituitary (AP). Male Wistar rats were treated with GI or were adrenalectomized (ADX) and treated with either B, DM, or DOC for 7 days. All treatments were in vivo except GE, which was used in vitro. At the end of treatment, homogenates of HT and AP were assayed for 11 beta-OHSD bioactivity, expressed as the percentage conversion of B to A in the presence of NADP, 11 beta-OHSD bioactivity is significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in the AP compared with the HT. Adrenalectomy significantly increased the enzyme activity in the AP (P < 0.05), an effect reversed by B or DM. ADX rats treated with DOC showed decreased enzyme activity in the AP (P < 0.001) but increased the activity in the HT (P < 0.0001). Gl increased activity in both HT and AP, whereas GE decreased activity significantly. We conclude that the modulation of 11 beta-OHSD is both steroid specific and tissue specific.

  7. Hypothalamus integrity and appetite regulation in low birth weight rats reared artificially on a high-protein milk formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, Bérengère; Delamaire, Eloïse; Hoebler, Christine; Grit, Isabelle; Even, Patrick; Fromentin, Gilles; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    High-protein (HP) milk formulas are routinely used in infants born with a low birth weight (LBW) to enhance growth and ensure a better verbal IQ development. Indirect evidence points to a link between an HP intake during early life and the prevalence of obesity in later life. We hypothesized that HP milk supplementation to LBW pups during early postnatal life would impact hypothalamic appetite neuronal pathways development with consequences, at adulthood, on energy homeostasis regulation. Rat pups born with a LBW were equipped with gastrostomy tubes on the fifth day of life. They received a milk formula with either normal protein (NP, 8.7 g protein/dl) or high protein content (HP; 13.0 g protein/dl) and were subsequently weaned to a standard, solid diet at postnatal day 21. Rats that had been fed HP content milk gained more weight at adulthood associated with an increase of plasma insulin, leptin and triglycerides concentrations compared to NP rats. Screening performed on hypothalamus in development from the two groups of rats identified higher gene expression for cell proliferation and neurotrophin markers in HP rats. Despite these molecular differences, appetite neuronal projections emanating from the arcuate nucleus did not differ between the groups. Concerning feeding behavior at adulthood, rats that had been fed HP or NP milk exhibited differences in the satiety period, resting postprandial duration and nocturnal meal pattern. The consequences of HP milk supplementation after LBW will be discussed in regard to neural development and metabolic anomalies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of Disturbance on Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid (HPT Axis in Zebrafish Larvae after Exposure to DEHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Pan Jia

    Full Text Available Di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP has the potential to disrupt the thyroid endocrine system, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos were exposed to different concentrations of DEHP (0, 40, 100, 200, 400 μg/L from 2 to 168 hours post fertilization (hpf. Thyroid hormones (THs levels and transcriptional profiling of key genes related to hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis were examined. The result of whole-body thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 indicated that the thyroid hormone homeostasis was disrupted by DEHP in the zebrafish larvae. After exposure to DEHP, the mRNA expressions of thyroid stimulating hormone (tshβ and corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh genes were increased in a concentration dependent manner, respectively. The expression level of genes involved in thyroid development (nkx2.1 and pax8 and thyroid synthesis (sodium/iodide symporter, nis, thyroglobulin, tg were also measured. The transcripts of nkx2.1 and tg were significantly increased after DEHP exposure, while those of nis and pax8 had no significant change. Down-regulation of uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase (ugt1ab and up-regulation of thyronine deiodinase (dio2 might change the THs levels. In addition, the transcript of transthyretin (ttr was up-regulated, while the mRNA levels of thyroid hormone receptors (trα and trβ remained unchanged. All the results demonstrated that exposure to DEHP altered the whole-body thyroid hormones in the zebrafish larvae and changed the expression profiling of key genes related to HPT axis, proving that DEHP induced the thyroid endocrine toxicity and potentially affected the synthesis, regulation and action of thyroid hormones.

  9. Ontogeny of clock and KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) gene expression in the prepubertal mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Cassandra C; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2017-09-01

    Kisspeptin is crucial for the generation of the circadian-gated preovulatory gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-LH surge in female rodents, with expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) peaking in the late afternoon of pro-oestrus. Given kisspeptin expression is established before puberty, the aim of the present study was to investigate kisspeptin and clock gene rhythms during the neonatal period. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice on Postnatal Days (P) 5, 15 and 25, at six time points across 24h, for analysis of gene expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like gene (Bmal1) and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 2 (Rev-erbα) in the anterior hypothalamus (containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus) was not rhythmic at P5 or P15, but Bmal1 expression exhibited rhythmicity in P25 females, whereas Rev-erbα expression was rhythmic in P25 males. KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) expression did not exhibit time-of-day variation in the anterior (containing the AVPV) or posterior (containing the arcuate nucleus) hypothalami in female and male mice at P5, P15 or P25. The data indicate that the kisspeptin circadian peak in expression observed in the AVPV of pro-oestrous females does not manifest at P5, P15 or P25, likely due to inadequate oestrogenic stimuli, as well as incomplete development of clock gene rhythmicity before puberty.

  10. Alteration of NPY and Y1 receptor in dorsomedial and ventromedial areas of hypothalamus in anorectic tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, William T; Xiao, Chun; Dayal, Ramesh; Sheriff, Sulaiman

    2007-02-01

    Although previous studies have implicated NPY in the etiology of experimental cancer anorexia, the results have been difficult to interpret. Studies have suggested that although NPY level and message were decreased in the dorsomedial hypothalamic area (DMA), they were elevated in the ventromedial hypothalamic area (VMA). To better assess specific intra-area alterations of NPY, Y(1) receptor (Y(1) R), and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in TB rats, we used radioimmunoassay, quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We found that NPY and AgRP mRNA were elevated significantly in whole hypothalamus of anorectic TB rats, while Y(1) R mRNA was decreased. Based on two replicates of four pooled samples each, both NPY and AgRP mRNA appeared to be elevated in the VMA of anorectic TB rats, while only AgRP exhibited a similar increase in the DMA. Levels of NPY were elevated in the VMA of both TB and pair-fed (PF) rats, but in the DMA only PF rats exhibited a significant NPY increase. NPY and Y(1) R immunohistochemistry revealed reduced NPY staining in PVN and ARC nucleus of TB and PF rats. Y(1) R immunostaining was also reduced in the ARC and PVN of TB rats, while PF rats exhibited elevated immunostaining in the PVN. These results continue to implicate dysfunction of NPY feeding systems in experimental cancer anorexia and suggest down-regulation of Y(1) R receptors as well as possible problems in NPY translation.

  11. MYT1L mutations cause intellectual disability and variable obesity by dysregulating gene expression and development of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Blanchet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deletions at chromosome 2p25.3 are associated with a syndrome consisting of intellectual disability and obesity. The smallest region of overlap for deletions at 2p25.3 contains PXDN and MYT1L. MYT1L is expressed only within the brain in humans. We hypothesized that single nucleotide variants (SNVs in MYT1L would cause a phenotype resembling deletion at 2p25.3. To examine this we sought MYT1L SNVs in exome sequencing data from 4, 296 parent-child trios. Further variants were identified through a genematcher-facilitated collaboration. We report 9 patients with MYT1L SNVs (4 loss of function and 5 missense. The phenotype of SNV carriers overlapped with that of 2p25.3 deletion carriers. To identify the transcriptomic consequences of MYT1L loss of function we used CRISPR-Cas9 to create a knockout cell line. Gene Ontology analysis in knockout cells demonstrated altered expression of genes that regulate gene expression and that are localized to the nucleus. These differentially expressed genes were enriched for OMIM disease ontology terms "mental retardation". To study the developmental effects of MYT1L loss of function we created a zebrafish knockdown using morpholinos. Knockdown zebrafish manifested loss of oxytocin expression in the preoptic neuroendocrine area. This study demonstrates that MYT1L variants are associated with syndromic obesity in humans. The mechanism is related to dysregulated expression of neurodevelopmental genes and altered development of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus.

  12. Enhanced slow-wave EEG activity and thermoregulatory impairment following the inhibition of the lateral hypothalamus in the rat.

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    Matteo Cerri

    Full Text Available Neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH are thought to be able to evoke behavioural responses that are coordinated with an adequate level of autonomic activity. Recently, the acute pharmacological inhibition of LH has been shown to depress wakefulness and promote NREM sleep, while suppressing REM sleep. These effects have been suggested to be the consequence of the inhibition of specific neuronal populations within the LH, i.e. the orexin and the MCH neurons, respectively. However, the interpretation of these results is limited by the lack of quantitative analysis of the electroencephalographic (EEG activity that is critical for the assessment of NREM sleep quality and the presence of aborted NREM-to-REM sleep transitions. Furthermore, the lack of evaluation of the autonomic and thermoregulatory effects of the treatment does not exclude the possibility that the wake-sleep changes are merely the consequence of the autonomic, in particular thermoregulatory, changes that may follow the inhibition of LH neurons. In the present study, the EEG and autonomic/thermoregulatory effects of a prolonged LH inhibition provoked by the repeated local delivery of the GABAA agonist muscimol were studied in rats kept at thermoneutral (24°C and at a low (10°C ambient temperature (Ta, a condition which is known to depress sleep occurrence. Here we show that: 1 at both Tas, LH inhibition promoted a peculiar and sustained bout of NREM sleep characterized by an enhancement of slow-wave activity with no NREM-to-REM sleep transitions; 2 LH inhibition caused a marked transitory decrease in brain temperature at Ta 10°C, but not at Ta 24°C, suggesting that sleep changes induced by LH inhibition at thermoneutrality are not caused by a thermoregulatory impairment. These changes are far different from those observed after the short-term selective inhibition of either orexin or MCH neurons, suggesting that other LH neurons are involved in sleep-wake modulation.

  13. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus protect against diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D.; Pati, Dipanwita; Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Sumners, Colin; Frazier, Charles J.; Seeley, Randy J.; Herman, James P.; Woods, Stephen C.; Krause, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased levels of angiotensin-II (Ang-II), which activates angiotensin type-1a receptors (AT1a) to influence cardiovascular function and energy homeostasis. To test the hypothesis that specific AT1a within the brain control these processes, we utilized the Cre/lox system to delete AT1a from the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of mice. PVN AT1a deletion did not affect body mass or adiposity when mice were maintained on standard chow. However, maintenance on a high-fat diet revealed a gene by environment interaction whereby mice lacking AT1a in the PVN had increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure that augmented body mass and adiposity relative to controls. Despite this increased adiposity, PVN AT1a deletion reduced systolic blood pressure, suggesting that this receptor population mediates the positive correlation between adiposity and blood pressure. Gene expression studies revealed that PVN AT1a deletion decreased hypothalamic expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and oxytocin, neuropeptides known to control food intake and sympathetic nervous system activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings confirmed that PVN AT1a deletion eliminates responsiveness of PVN parvocellular neurons to Ang-II, and suggest that Ang-II responsiveness is increased in obese wild-type mice. Central inflammation is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders and PVN AT1a deletion reduced indices of hypothalamic inflammation. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that PVN AT1a regulate energy balance during environmental challenges that promote metabolic and cardiovascular pathologies. The implication is that the elevated Ang-II that accompanies obesity serves as a negative feedback signal that activates PVN neurons to alleviate weight gain. PMID:23486953

  14. Angiotensin Type-2 Receptors Influence the Activity of Vasopressin Neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Male Mice.

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    de Kloet, Annette D; Pitra, Soledad; Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Pioquinto, David J; Smith, Justin A; Sumners, Colin; Stern, Javier E; Krause, Eric G

    2016-08-01

    It is known that angiotensin-II acts at its type-1 receptor to stimulate vasopressin (AVP) secretion, which may contribute to angiotensin-II-induced hypertension. Less well known is the impact of angiotensin type-2 receptor (AT2R) activation on these processes. Studies conducted in a transgenic AT2R enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter mouse revealed that although AT2R are not themselves localized to AVP neurons within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), they are localized to neurons that extend processes into the PVN. In the present set of studies, we set out to characterize the origin, phenotype, and function of nerve terminals within the PVN that arise from AT2R-enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive neurons and synapse onto AVP neurons. Initial experiments combined genetic and neuroanatomical techniques to determine that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons derived from the peri-PVN area containing AT2R make appositions onto AVP neurons within the PVN, thereby positioning AT2R to negatively regulate neuroendocrine secretion. Subsequent patch-clamp electrophysiological experiments revealed that selective activation of AT2R in the peri-PVN area using compound 21 facilitates inhibitory (ie, GABAergic) neurotransmission and leads to reduced activity of AVP neurons within the PVN. Final experiments determined the functional impact of AT2R activation by testing the effects of compound 21 on plasma AVP levels. Collectively, these experiments revealed that AT2R expressing neurons make GABAergic synapses onto AVP neurons that inhibit AVP neuronal activity and suppress baseline systemic AVP levels. These findings have direct implications in the targeting of AT2R for disorders of AVP secretion and also for the alleviation of high blood pressure.

  15. Heat loss may explain bill size differences between birds occupying different habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Greenberg

    Full Text Available Research on variation in bill morphology has focused on the role of diet. Bills have other functions, however, including a role in heat and water balance. The role of the bill in heat loss may be particularly important in birds where water is limiting. Song sparrows localized in coastal dunes and salt marsh edge (Melospiza melodia atlantica are similar in size to, but have bills with a 17% greater surface area than, those that live in mesic habitats (M. m. melodia, a pattern shared with other coastal sparrows. We tested the hypotheses that sparrows can use their bills to dissipate "dry" heat, and that heat loss from the bill is higher in M. m. atlantica than M. m. melodia, which would indicate a role of heat loss and water conservation in selection for bill size.Bill, tarsus, and body surface temperatures were measured using thermal imaging of sparrows exposed to temperatures from 15-37°C and combined with surface area and physical modeling to estimate the contribution of each body part to total heat loss. Song sparrow bills averaged 5-10°C hotter than ambient. The bill of M. m atlantica dissipated up to 33% more heat and 38% greater proportion of total heat than that of M. m. melodia. This could potentially reduce water loss requirements by approximately 7.7%.This >30% higher heat loss in the bill of M. m. atlantica is independent of evaporative water loss and thus could play an important role in the water balance of sparrows occupying the hot and exposed dune/salt marsh environments during the summer. Heat loss capacity and water conservation could play an important role in the selection for bill size differences between bird populations and should be considered along with trophic adaptations when studying variation in bill size.

  16. Adolescent binge-pattern alcohol exposure alters genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in the hypothalamus of alcohol-naïve male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimes, AnnaDorothea; Torcaso, Audrey; Pinceti, Elena; Kim, Chun K; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J; Pak, Toni R

    2017-05-01

    Teenage binge drinking is a major health concern in the United States, with 21% of teenagers reporting binge-pattern drinking behavior in the previous 30 days. Recently, our lab showed that alcohol-naïve offspring of rats exposed to alcohol during adolescence exhibited altered gene expression profiles in the hypothalamus, a brain region involved in stress regulation. We employed Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing as an unbiased approach to test the hypothesis that parental exposure to binge-pattern alcohol during adolescence alters DNA methylation profiles in their alcohol-naïve offspring. Wistar rats were administered a repeated binge-ethanol exposure paradigm during early (postnatal day (PND) 37-44) and late (PND 67-74) adolescent development. Animals were mated 24 h after the last ethanol dose and subsequent offspring were produced. Analysis of male PND7 offspring revealed that offspring of alcohol-exposed parents exhibited differential DNA methylation patterns in the hypothalamus. The differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) were distinct between offspring depending on which parent was exposed to ethanol. Moreover, novel DMCs were observed when both parents were exposed to ethanol and many DMCs from single parent ethanol exposure were not recapitulated with dual parent exposure. We also measured mRNA expression of several differentially methylated genes and some, but not all, showed correlative changes in expression. Importantly, methylation was not a direct predictor of expression levels, underscoring the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Overall, we demonstrate that adolescent binge ethanol exposure causes altered genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in the hypothalamus of alcohol-naïve offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic delivery of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in rat hypothalamus using albumin-alginate microparticles: effects on food intake and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, N; Legrand, R; Breton, J; Déchelotte, P; Edwards-Lévy, F; Fetissov, S O

    2015-04-02

    Chronic delivery of neuropeptides in the brain is a useful experimental approach to study their long-term effects on various biological parameters. In this work, we tested albumin-alginate microparticles, as a potential delivery system, to study if continuous release in the hypothalamus of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an anorexigenic neuropeptide, may result in a long-term decrease in food intake and body weight. The 2-week release of α-MSH from peptide-loaded particles was confirmed by an in vitro assay. Then, daily food intake and body weight were studied for 18 days in rats injected bilaterally into the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus with particles loaded or not with α-MSH. A decrease in body weight gain, persisting throughout the study, was found in rats injected with α-MSH-charged particles as compared with rats receiving non-charged particles and with rats injected with the same dose of α-MSH in solution. Food intake was significantly decreased for 3 days in rats receiving α-MSH-loaded particles and it was not followed by the feeding rebound effect which appears after food restriction. The presence of α-MSH-loaded particles in the hypothalamus was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, our study validates albumin-alginate microparticles as a new carrier system for long-term delivery of neuropeptides in the brain and demonstrates that chronic delivery of α-MSH in the hypothalamus results in a prolonged suppression of food intake and a decrease of body weight gain in rats. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia associations with gene expression changes in liver and hypothalamus of chickens from lines selected for low or high body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Brittany B; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Shiping; Siegel, Paul B; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    Chickens selected for low (LWS) or high (HWS) body weight for more than 56 generations now have a 10-fold difference in body weight at 56 days of age and correlated responses in appetite and glucose regulation. The LWS chickens are lean and some are anorexic, while the HWS are compulsive feeders and have a different threshold sensitivity of food intake and blood glucose to both central and peripheral insulin, respectively. We previously demonstrated that at 90-days of age, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was associated with reduced glucose transporter expression in the liver of both lines, and differences in expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptor sub-type genes between LWS and HWS in the hypothalamus. The objective of this study was to determine effects of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on gene expression in the hypothalamus and liver of early post-hatch LWS and HWS chicks. On day 5 post-hatch chicks from each line were fasted for 3h and injected intraperitoneally with insulin or vehicle. At 1h post-injection, chicks were euthanized, blood glucose was measured, and hypothalamus and liver were removed. Total RNA was isolated and real time PCR performed. Insulin injection was associated with a more pronounced reduction in blood glucose in HWS compared with LWS chicks (two-way interaction; Phypothalamus (Phypothalamus of HWS than LWS (Phypothalamus of both lines (P=0.02). In the liver of both lines, insulin treatment was associated with decreased (P=0.01) GLUT2 mRNA and increased (P=0.01) GLUT1 mRNA, compared to vehicle-treated chicks. Results suggest that NPY-associated factors and glucose transporters are differentially-expressed between LWS and HWS chickens and that HWS chicks display greater sensitivity to exogenous insulin during the early post-hatch period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy show reduced cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity in hypothalamus correlating with circadian rhythms alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipo, Vicente; Piedrafita, Blanca; Barios, Juan A; Agustí, Ana; Ahabrach, Hanan; Romero-Vives, María; Barrio, Luis C; Rey, Beatriz; Gaztelu, Jose M; Llansola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis show disturbances in sleep and in its circadian rhythms which are an early sign of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). The mechanisms of these disturbances are poorly understood. Rats with porta-caval shunt (PCS), a model of MHE, show sleep disturbances reproducing those of cirrhotic patients. The aims of this work were to characterize the alterations in circadian rhythms in PCS rats and analyze the underlying mechanisms. To reach these aims, we analyzed in control and PCS rats: (a) daily rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activity and of temperature, (b) timing of the onset of activity following turning-off the light, (c) synchronization to light after a phase advance and (d) the molecular mechanisms contributing to these alterations in circadian rhythms. PCS rats show altered circadian rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activities (wheel running). PCS rats show more rest bouts during the active phase, more errors in the onset of motor activity and need less time to re-synchronize after a phase advance than control rats. Circadian rhythm of body temperature is also slightly altered in PCS rats. The internal period length (tau) of circadian rhythm of motor activity is longer in PCS rats. We analyzed some mechanisms by which hypothalamus modulate circadian rhythms. PCS rats show increased content of cGMP in hypothalamus while the activity of cGMP-dependent protein kinase was reduced by 41% compared to control rats. Altered cGMP-PKG pathway in hypothalamus would contribute to altered circadian rhythms and synchronization to light.

  20. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase immunoreactivity is abundantly present in human hypothalamus and posterior pituitary gland, with reduced expression in paraventricular and suprachiasmatic neurons in chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Müller, Susan; Dobrowolny, Hendrik; Wolke, Carmen; Lendeckel, Uwe; Bukowska, Alicja; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Becker, Axel; Trübner, Kurt; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    The vasopressin- and oxytocin-degrading enzyme insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) is expressed in various organs including the brain. However, knowledge about its presence in human hypothalamus is fragmentary. Functionally, for a number of reasons (genetic linkage, hydrolysis of oxytocin and vasopressin, its role as angiotensin IV receptor in learning and memory and others) IRAP might play a role in schizophrenia. We studied the regional and cellular localization of IRAP in normal human brain with special emphasis on the hypothalamus and determined numerical densities of IRAP-expressing cells in the paraventricular, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei in schizophrenia patients and controls. By using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, IRAP was immunolocalized in postmortem human brains. Cell countings were performed to estimate numbers and numerical densities of IRAP immunoreactive hypothalamic neurons in schizophrenia patients and control cases. Shape, size and regional distribution of IRAP-expressing cells, as well the lack of co-localization with the glia marker glutamine synthetase, show that IRAP is expressed in neurons. IRAP immunoreactive cells were observed in the hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, thalamus, amygdala and, abundantly, hypothalamus. Double labeling experiments (IRAP and oxytocin/neurophysin 1, IRAP with vasopressin/neurophysin 2) revealed that IRAP is present in oxytocinergic and in vasopressinergic neurons. In schizophrenia patients, the numerical density of IRAP-expressing neurons in the paraventricular and the suprachiasmatic nuclei is significantly reduced, which might be associated with the reduction in neurophysin-containing neurons in these nuclei in schizophrenia. The pathophysiological role of lowered hypothalamic IRAP expression in schizophrenia remains to be established.

  1. Organization and number of orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus of two species of Cetartiodactyla: a comparison of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Leigh-Anne; Patzke, Nina; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Bux, Faiza; Fuxe, Kjell; Barber, Grace; Siegel, Jerome M; Manger, Paul R

    2012-07-01

    The present study describes the organization of the orexinergic (hypocretinergic) neurons in the hypothalamus of the giraffe and harbour porpoise--two members of the mammalian Order Cetartiodactyla which is comprised of the even-toed ungulates and the cetaceans as they share a monophyletic ancestry. Diencephalons from two sub-adult male giraffes and two adult male harbour porpoises were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained for orexin-A. The staining revealed that the orexinergic neurons could be readily divided into two distinct neuronal types based on somal volume, area and length, these being the parvocellular and magnocellular orexin-A immunopositive (OxA+) groups. The magnocellular group could be further subdivided, on topological grounds, into three distinct clusters--a main cluster in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus, a cluster associated with the zona incerta and a cluster associated with the optic tract. The parvocellular neurons were found in the medial hypothalamus, but could not be subdivided, rather they form a topologically amorphous cluster. The parvocellular cluster appears to be unique to the Cetartiodactyla as these neurons have not been described in other mammals to date, while the magnocellular nuclei appear to be homologous to similar nuclei described in other mammals. The overall size of both the parvocellular and magnocellular neurons (based on somal volume, area and length) were larger in the giraffe than the harbour porpoise, but the harbour porpoise had a higher number of both parvocellular and magnocellular orexinergic neurons than the giraffe despite both having a similar brain mass. The higher number of both parvocellular and magnocellular orexinergic neurons in the harbour porpoise may relate to the unusual sleep mechanisms in the cetaceans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Organization and number of orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus of two species of Cetartiodactyla: A comparison of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Leigh-Anne; Patzke, Nina; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Bux, Faiza; Fuxe, Kjell; Barber, Grace; Siegel, Jerome M.; Manger, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the organization of the orexinergic (hypocretinergic) neurons in the hypothalamus of the giraffe and harbour porpoise – two members of the mammalian Order Cetartiodactyla which is comprised of the even-toed ungulates and the cetaceans as they share a monophyletic ancestry. Diencephalons from two sub-adult male giraffes and two adult male harbour porpoises were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained for orexin-A. The staining revealed that the orexinergic neurons could be readily divided into two distinct neuronal types based on somal volume, area and length, these being the parvocellular and magnocellular orexin-A immunopositive (OxA+) groups. The magnocellular group could be further subdivided, on topological grounds, into three distinct clusters – a main cluster in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus, a cluster associated with the zona incerta and a cluster associated with the optic tract. The parvocellular neurons were found in the medial hypothalamus, but could not be subdivided, rather they form a topologically amorphous cluster. The parvocellular cluster appears to be unique to the Cetartiodactyla as these neurons have not been described in other mammals to date, while the magnocellular nuclei appear to be homologous to similar nuclei described in other mammals. The overall size of both the parvocellular and magnocellular neurons (based on somal volume, area and length) were larger in the giraffe than the harbour porpoise, but the harbour porpoise had a higher number of both parvocellular and magnocellular orexinergic neurons than the giraffe despite both having a similar brain mass. The higher number of both parvocellular and magnocellular orexinergic neurons in the harbour porpoise may relate to the unusual sleep mechanisms in the cetaceans. PMID:22683547

  3. The role of the lateral hypothalamus and orexin in ingestive behavior: A model for the translation of past experience and sensed deficits into motivated behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth William Hurley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus has been recognized for its involvement in both maintaining homeostasis and mediating motivated behavior. The present article discusses a region of the hypothalamus known as the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA. It is proposed that brain nuclei within the LHA including the dorsal region of the lateral hypothalamus (LHAd and perifornical area (PeF provide a link between neural systems that regulates homeostasis and those that mediate appetitive motivated behaviors. Functional and immunohistochemical data indicate that the LHA promotes many motivated behaviors including food intake, water intake, salt intake, and sexual behavior. Anatomical tracing experiments demonstrate that the LHA is positioned to receive inputs from brain areas involved in regulating body fluid and energy homeostasis. Regions within the LHA send dense projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA, providing a pathway for the LHA to influence dopaminergic systems generally recognized to be involved in motivated behaviors and their reinforcement. Furthermore, the LHA contains neurons that synthesize orexin/hypocretin, a neuropeptide that promotes many appetitive motivated behaviors. The LHA also receives inputs from brain areas involved in reward-related learning and orexin neuron activation can become conditioned to environmental stimuli that are associated with rewards. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the LHA integrates signaling from areas that regulate body fluid and energy balance and reward-related learning. In turn, this information is fed into mesolimbic circuitry to influence the performance of motivated behaviors. This hypothesis may foster experiments that will result in an improved understanding of LHA function. An improved understanding of LHA function may aid in treating disorders that are associated with an excess or impairment in the expression of ingestive behavior including obesity, anorexia, impairments in thirst, salt gluttony and salt

  4. The role of the lateral hypothalamus and orexin in ingestive behavior: a model for the translation of past experience and sensed deficits into motivated behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Seth W; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus has been recognized for its involvement in both maintaining homeostasis and mediating motivated behaviors. The present article discusses a region of the hypothalamus known as the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). It is proposed that brain nuclei within the LHA including the dorsal region of the lateral hypothalamus (LHAd) and perifornical area (PeF) provide a link between neural systems that regulate homeostasis and those that mediate appetitive motivated behaviors. Functional and immunohistochemical data indicate that the LHA promotes many motivated behaviors including food intake, water intake, salt intake, and sexual behavior. Anatomical tracing experiments demonstrate that the LHA is positioned to receive inputs from brain areas involved in regulating body fluid and energy homeostasis. Regions within the LHA send dense projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), providing a pathway for the LHA to influence dopaminergic systems generally recognized to be involved in motivated behaviors and their reinforcement. Furthermore, the LHA contains neurons that synthesize orexin/hypocretin, a neuropeptide that promotes many appetitive motivated behaviors. The LHA also receives inputs from brain areas involved in reward-related learning and orexin neuron activation can become conditioned to environmental stimuli that are associated with rewards. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the LHA integrates signaling from areas that regulate body fluid and energy balance and reward-related learning. In turn, this information is "fed into" mesolimbic circuitry to influence the performance of motivated behaviors. This hypothesis may foster experiments that will result in an improved understanding of LHA function. An improved understanding of LHA function may aid in treating disorders that are associated with an excess or impairment in the expression of ingestive behavior including obesity, anorexia, impairments in thirst, salt gluttony, and salt deficiency.

  5. Overactivity of Liver-Related Neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus: Electrophysiological Findings indb/dbMice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Molinas, Adrien J R; Miyata, Kayoko; Qiao, Xin; Zsombok, Andrea

    2017-11-15

    Preautonomic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus play a large role in the regulation of hepatic functions via the autonomic nervous system. Activation of hepatic sympathetic nerves increases glucose and lipid metabolism and contributes to the elevated hepatic glucose production observed in the type 2 diabetic condition. This augmented sympathetic output could originate from altered activity of liver-related PVN neurons. Remarkably, despite the importance of the brain-liver pathway, the cellular properties of liver-related neurons are not known. In this study, we provide the first evidence of overall activity of liver-related PVN neurons. Liver-related PVN neurons were identified with a retrograde, trans-synaptic, viral tracer in male lean and db/db mice and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted. In db/db mice, the majority of liver-related PVN neurons fired spontaneously; whereas, in lean mice the majority of liver-related PVN neurons were silent, indicating that liver-related PVN neurons are more active in db/db mice. Persistent, tonic inhibition was identified in liver-related PVN neurons; although, the magnitude of tonic inhibitory control was not different between lean and db/db mice. In addition, our study revealed that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1-dependent increase of excitatory neurotransmission was reduced in liver-related PVN neurons of db/db mice. These findings demonstrate plasticity of liver-related PVN neurons and a shift toward excitation in a diabetic mouse model. Our study suggests altered autonomic circuits at the level of the PVN, which can contribute to autonomic dysfunction and dysregulation of neural control of hepatic functions including glucose metabolism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A growing body of evidence suggests the importance of the autonomic control in the regulation of hepatic metabolism, which plays a major role in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus

  6. The effect of consumption temperature on the homeostatic and hedonic responses to glucose ingestion in the hypothalamus and the reward system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opstal, Anna M; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; Hoeksma, Marco; Blonk, Cor; Pijl, Hanno; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has been associated with obesity and related diseases. SSBs are often consumed cold, and both the energy content and temperature might influence the consumption behavior for SSBs. The main aim of this study was to elucidate whether consumption temperature and energy (i.e., glucose) content modulate homeostatic (hypothalamus) and reward [ventral tegmental area (VTA)] responses. Sixteen healthy men participated in our study [aged 18-25 y; body mass index (kg/m2): 20-23]. High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected after ingestion of 4 different study stimuli: plain tap water at room temperature (22°C), plain tap water at 0°C, a glucose-containing beverage (75 g glucose dissolved in 300 mL water) at 22°C, and a similar glucose drink at 0°C. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) changes from baseline (7 min preingestion) were analyzed over time in the hypothalamus and VTA for individual stimulus effects and for effects between stimuli. In the hypothalamus, water at 22°C led to a significantly increased BOLD response; all other stimuli resulted in a direct, significant decrease in BOLD response compared with baseline. In the VTA, a significantly decreased BOLD response compared with baseline was found after the ingestion of stimuli containing glucose at 0°C and 22°C. These responses were not significantly modulated by consumption temperature. The consumption of plain water did not have a significant VTA BOLD effect. Our data show that glucose at 22°C, glucose at 0°C, and water at 0°C lowered hypothalamic activity, which is associated with increased satiation. On the contrary, the consumption of water at room temperature increased activity. All stimuli led to a similar VTA response, which suggests that all drinks elicited a similar hedonic response. Our results indicate that, in addition to glucose, the low temperature at which SSBs are often consumed also leads to a response

  7. 350-μm side-view optical probe for imaging the murine brain in vivo from the cortex to the hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ki; Choi, Jin Woo; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Miniature endoscopic probes offer a solution for deep brain imaging by overcoming the limited depth of intravital microscopy. We describe a small-diameter (350 μm) graded-index optical probe with a side-view design for in vivo cellular imaging of the mammalian brain. The side-view probe provides a unique view of the vertical network of neurons and penetrating blood vessels. At a given insertion site, the translational and rotational scanning of the probe provides access to a large tissue area (>) across the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and hypothalamus.

  8. Ferrum nano particles and multiwall carbon nano tubes based electrode as FIA detector for determination of amino acids in hypothalamus microdialysis fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, Y. T.; Yu, L.; Peng, H.; Zhu, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    An amperometric electrode based on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe nanoparticles (NPs) has been successfully fabricated. Combined with Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) and chromatography separation column, the electrode exhibits linear response in the concentration range of 0.1 -12 μM and the sensitivity of 30.0 nA μM-1 for most of amino acids. The determination of 17 amino acids in the hypothalamus microdialysis fluids of guinea pigs, illustrates that the electrode is a powerful tool to investigate physiology and pathology mechanisms

  9. Fetal alcohol exposure alters proopiomelanocortin gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function via increasing MeCP2 expression in the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkaram Gangisetty

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC is a precursor gene of the neuropeptide β-endorphin in the hypothalamus and is known to regulate various physiological functions including stress response. Several recent reports showed that fetal alcohol exposure programs the hypothalamus to produce lower levels of POMC gene transcripts and to elevate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis response to stressful stimuli. We investigated the role of methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2 in the effects of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis function. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed between GD 7 and 21 with a liquid diet containing 6.7% alcohol, pair-fed with isocaloric liquid diet, or fed ad libitum with rat chow, and their male offsprings were used at 60 days after birth in this study. Fetal alcohol exposure reduced the level of POMC mRNA, but increased the level of DNA methylation of this gene in the arcuate nucleus (ARC of the hypothalamus where the POMC neuronal cell bodies are located. Fetal alcohol exposed rats showed a significant increase in MeCP2 protein levels in POMC cells, MeCP2 gene transcript levels as well as increased MeCP2 protein binding on the POMC promoter in the arcuate nucleus. Lentiviral delivery of MeCP2 shRNA into the third ventricle efficiently reduced MeCP2 expression and prevented the effect of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression in the arcuate nucleus. MeCP2-shRNA treatment also normalized the prenatal ethanol-induced increase in corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH gene expression in the hypothalamus and elevated plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone hormone responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge. These results suggest that fetal alcohol programming of POMC gene may involve recruitment of MeCP2 on to the methylated promoter of the POMC gene to suppress POMC transcript levels and contribute to HPA axis dysregulation.

  10. Effects of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on slow electric activity and spike activity of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits under conditions of hunger and satiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2013-09-01

    In chronic experiments on rabbits, the effect of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on myoelectric activity of the fundal and antral parts of the stomach was studied under conditions of hunger and satiation in the absence of food. Stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation and in previously fed rabbits produced incessant seeking behavior, which was followed by reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of muscles of the stomach body and antrum specific for hungry and satiated animals. Increased hunger motivation during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the replacement of bimodal distribution of slow wave periods to a trimodal type typical of 2-day deprivation, while transition from satiation to hunger caused by electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was associated with a shift from monomodal distributions of slow wave periods to a bimodal type typical of 24-h deprivation. Reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was determined by descending inhibitory influences of food motivational excitation on activity of the myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature of the stomach.

  11. Some morphometric and radio-isotopic studies of the early post-natal development of the hypothalamus of the normal and androgenized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyn, C.N.

    1979-01-01

    Female rats given a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) in the first few days of post-natal life exhibit post-pubertally, persistent vaginal oestrous, sterility, disordered secretion of gonadotrophins and modified patterns of sexual behaviour. The effects of TP on the incorporation of 14 C-uridine in the CNS of 5 and 61/2 day old litter mate triads consisting of male, female and TP treated female rats were investigated. Low resolution autoradiographs of serial sections of brain were prepared and analysed. A sexual dimorphism in cell nuclear size was found in the suprachiasmatic, arcuate and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. TP treatment resulted in an increase in nuclear size towards the male pattern in the latter two areas. A decrease in cell nuclear size was found in the ventromedial and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Neither sex differences nor changes following TP injection were detected in rate of incorporation of 14 C-uridine in any areas of the brain, although a significant (p<0.02) reduction in uridine incorporation in the adrenal of the female animal 24 hours after TP injection was demonstrated. The results suggested an immediate direct action of TP on the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues of the neonatal rat. (author)

  12. Loss of Maged1 results in obesity, deficits of social interactions, impaired sexual behavior and severe alteration of mature oxytocin production in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombret, Carlos; Nguyen, Tuan; Schakman, Olivier; Michaud, Jacques L; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; De Backer, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    MAGED1, NECDIN and MAGEL2 are members of the MAGE gene family. The latter two of these genes have been involved in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), which includes hyperphagia, repetitive and compulsive behaviors, and cognitive impairment. Here, we show that Maged1-deficient mice develop progressive obesity associated with hyperphagia and reduced motor activity. Loss of Maged1 also results in a complex behavioral syndrome that includes reduced social interactions and memory, deficient sexual behavior, as well as increased anxiety and self-grooming. Oxytocin (OT), which is produced in the hypothalamus, can act as a neurotransmitter that reduces anxiety, promotes social behaviors and regulates food intake. Growing evidences indicate that OT is involved in autism. We found that Maged1 mutants showed a severe reduction in the levels of mature OT, but not of its precursors, in the hypothalamus. Moreover, the administration of OT rescued the deficit in social memory of these mice. We conclude that Maged1 is required for OT processing or stability. A decrease in mature OT levels in Maged1 mutants affects social interactions and possibly other behavioral processes. Our observations suggest that, in human, MAGED1 could play a role in autism or cause a neurodevelopmental condition that is reminiscent of the PWS.

  13. Membrane-initiated non-genomic signaling by estrogens in the hypothalamus: cross-talk with glucocorticoids with implications for behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eRainville

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor (ER and glucocorticoid receptor (GR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can signal using both non-genomic and genomic transcriptional modes. Though genomic modes of signaling have been well characterized and several behaviors attributed to this signaling mechanism, the physiological significance of non-genomic modes of signaling has not been well understood. This has partly been due to the controversy regarding the identity of the membrane ER (mER or membrane GR (mGR that may mediate rapid, non-genomic signaling and the downstream signaling cascades that may result as a consequence of steroid ligands binding the mER or the mGR. Both estrogens and glucocorticoids exert a number of actions on the hypothalamus, including feedback. This review focuses on the various candidates for the mER or mGR in the hypothalamus and the contribution of non-genomic signaling to classical hypothalamically-driven behaviors and changes in neuronal morphology. It also attempts to categorize some of the possible functions of non-genomic signaling at both the cellular level and at the organismal level that are relevant for behavior, including some behaviors that are regulated by both estrogens and glucocorticoids in a potentially synergistic manner. Lastly, it attempts to show that steroid signaling via non-genomic modes may provide the organism with rapid behavioral responses to stimuli.

  14. The over-expression of miR-200a in the hypothalamus of ob/ob mice is linked to leptin and insulin signaling impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Delphine; Benomar, Yacir; Riffault, Laure; Amine, Hamza; Gertler, Arieh; Taouis, Mohammed

    2014-03-25

    Early in life, leptin plays a crucial role in hypothalamic neural organization. Leptin, most likely, controls neural gene expression conferring then specific phenotype regarding energy homeostasis. MicroRNAs are new regulators for several physiological functions, including the regulation of metabolism. However, the impact of leptin on hypothalamic microRNA patterns remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-429 are up-regulated in the hypothalamus of genetically obese and leptin deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin treatment down-regulates these miRNAs in ob/ob hypothalamus. The hypothalamic silencing of miR-200a increased the expression level of leptin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 2, reduced body weight gain, and restored liver insulin responsiveness. In addition, the overexpression of pre-miR-200a in a human neuroblastoma cell line impaired insulin and leptin signaling. These findings link the alteration of leptin and insulin signaling to the up-regulation of hypothalamic miR-200a which could be a new target for treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship of angiotensin ase and vasopressin ase enzymatic activities between hypothalamus and plasma in an obese rat model by high-fat diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domínguez-Vías, G.; Segarra Robles, A.B.; Ramirez-Sánchez, M.; Jiménez Serrano, S.

    2016-07-01

    High-fat diets are associated with the development of hypertension. However, a high intake of monounsaturated fat has been proposed to be a dietary factor that can decrease the incidence of hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and vasopressin interact to regulate blood pressure at central and peripheral level. In this study, we investigated the effect of different degrees of dietary fatty acid saturation in the control of RAS and vasopressin on brain-blood. To improve our understanding of their interaction and their relationship, we analyzed angiotensin- and vasopressin-metabolizing activities in hypothalamus and plasma, collected from Wistar rats fed during 24 weeks with diets enriched with extra virgin olive oil (monounsaturated fat) or butter plus cholesterol (saturated fat) compared with a standard diet. As results no angiotensinase and vasopressinase activities were found in hypothalamus and plasma, however significant correlations between enzymatic activities in both regions were noticed. They indicated that our results do not support the beneficial influence of extra virgin olive oil on central and systemic level to regulate blood pressure. Therefore, the substrates hydrolyzed by these activities as well as their functions may be similarly affected and suggest that these studies should be continued because of beneficial of Mediterranean diet, found previously in different works, which may also be an effective tool in the treatment of hypertension.

  16. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 in rat hypothalamus - a mechanism for desensitization of AngII signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsoni, Márcio A; Carvalheira, José B; Calegari, Vivian C; Bezerra, Rosangela M N; Saad, Mário J A; Gontijo, José A; Velloso, Lício A

    2004-04-01

    Angiotensin II exerts a potent dypsogenic stimulus on the hypothalamus, which contributes to its centrally mediated participation in the control of water balance and blood pressure. Repetitive intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of angiotensin II lead to a loss of effect characterized as physiological desensitization to the peptide's action. In the present study, we demonstrate that angiotensin II induces the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 via angiotensin receptor 1 (AT1) and JAK-2, mostly located at the median preoptic lateral and anterodorsal preoptic nuclei. SOCS-3 produces an inhibitory effect upon the signal transduction pathways of several cytokines and hormones that employ members of the JAK/STAT families as intermediaries. The partial inhibition of SOCS-3 translation by antisense oligonucleotide was sufficient to significantly reduce the refractoriness of repetitive i.c.v. angiotensin II injections, as evaluated by water ingestion. Thus, by acting through AT1 on the hypothalamus, angiotensin II induces the expression of SOCS-3 which, in turn, blocks further activation of the pathway and consequently leads to desensitization to angiotensin II stimuli concerning its dypsogenic effect.

  17. Upregulation of Mineralocorticoid Receptor in the Hypothalamus Associated with a High Anxiety-like Level in Apolipoprotein E4 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-Tao; Zhao, Jun; Fang, Hui; Zhang, Li-Feng; Wu, Hui-Mei; Liu, Ya-Jing

    2017-07-01

    Anxiety symptoms occur in a large portion of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. ApolipoproteinE-4 (ApoE ε4 allele), a risk factor for AD, has been recognized as an important contributor to psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the corticosterone level in relation to anxiety-like behavior changes in transgenic male mice with different glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-ApoE isoforms. GFAP-ApoE4 transgenic mice aged 3 months showed higher anxiety-like behavior in open field, light-dark box and elevated plus maze tasks compared with that of age-matched GFAP-ApoE3 mice. However, corticotropin releasing factor levels in the hypothalamus and plasma corticosterone secretion were similar in GFAP-ApoE3 and GFAP-ApoE4 transgenic male mice. Additionally, increased expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and unchanged expression of the glucocorticoid receptor were observed in the hypothalamus of GFAP-ApoE4 mice. However, no significant differences were found in the expression levels of the MR in GFAP-ApoE3 and GFAP-ApoE4 mice at postnatal day 2. In conclusion, we found that MR upregulation rather than corticosterone level changes in the early stage of adulthood was associated with the higher anxiety-like level measured in GFAP-ApoE4 mice.

  18. A Study on Effect of Electroacupuncture on Gene Expression in Hypothalamus of Rats with Stress-Induced Prehypertension Based on Gene Chip Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojia Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the effect of electroacupuncture (EA on gene expression in the hypothalamus of rats with stress-induced prehypertension and try to reveal its biological mechanism with gene chip technology. Methods. The stress-induced hypertensive rat model was prepared by combining electric foot-shocks with generated noise. Molding cycle lasted for 14 days and EA intervention was applied on model + EA group during model preparation. Rat Gene 2.0 Array technology was used for the determination of gene expression profiles and the screened key genes were verified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR method. Results. Compared with the blank group, 234 genes were upregulated and 73 were downregulated in the model group. Compared with the model group, 110 genes were upregulated and 273 genes were downregulated in model + EA group. The PCR results of the key genes including HSPB1, P2RX4, PPP1R14A, and TH are consistent with that of gene chip test. Conclusion. EA could significantly lower blood pressure of stress-induced prehypertension rats and affect its gene expression profile in hypothalamus. Genes and their signal transduction pathway that related to the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, concentration of Ca2+, and excitability of sympathetic nerve may be involved in EA’s antihypertensive mechanism.

  19. Relationship of angiotensinase and vasopressinase enzymatic activities between hypothalamus and plasma in an obese rat model by high-fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Domínguez-Vías

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High-fat diets are associated with the development of hypertension. However, a high intake of monounsaturated fat has been proposed to be a dietary factor that can decrease the incidence of hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS and vasopressin interact to regulate blood pressure at central and peripheral level. In this study, we investigated the effect of different degrees of dietary fatty acid saturation in the control of RAS and vasopressin on brain-blood. To improve our understanding of their interaction and their relationship, we analyzed angiotensin- and vasopressin-metabolizing activities in hypothalamus and plasma, collected from Wistar rats fed during 24 weeks with diets enriched with extra virgin olive oil (monounsaturated fat or butter plus cholesterol (saturated fat compared with a standard diet. As results no angiotensinase and vasopressinase activities were found in hypothalamus and plasma, however significant correlations between enzymatic activities in both regions were noticed. They indicated that our results do not support the beneficial influence of extra virgin olive oil on central and systemic level to regulate blood pressure. Therefore, the substrates hydrolyzed by these activities as well as their functions may be similarly affected and suggest that these studies should be continued because of beneficial of Mediterranean diet, found previously in different works, which may also be an effective tool in the treatment of hypertension.

  20. An optimized method for measuring hypocretin-1 peptide in the mouse brain reveals differential circadian regulation of hypocretin-1 levels rostral and caudal to the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinussen, J L; Holm, A; Kornum, B R

    2015-12-03

    The hypocretin/orexin system regulates, among other things, sleep and energy homeostasis. The system is likely regulated by both homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Little is known about local differences in the regulation of hypocretin activity. The aim of this study was to establish an optimized peptide quantification method for hypocretin-1 extracted from different mouse brain areas and use this method for investigating circadian fluctuations of hypocretin-1 levels in these areas. The results show that hypocretin-1 peptide can be extracted from small pieces of intact tissue, with sufficient yield for measurements in a standard radioimmunoassay. Utilizing the optimized method, it was found that prepro-hypocretin mRNA and peptide show circadian fluctuations in the mouse brain. This study further demonstrates that the hypocretin-1 peptide level in the frontal brain peaks during dark as does prepro-hypocretin mRNA in the hypothalamus. However, in midbrain and brainstem tissue caudal to the hypothalamus, there was less circadian fluctuation and a tendency for higher levels during the light phase. These data suggest that regulation of the hypocretin system differs between brain areas. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Examining the role of endogenous orexins in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis endocrine function using transient dual orexin receptor antagonism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Michel A; Sciarretta, Carla; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Strasser, Daniel S; Studer, Rolf; Jenck, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The orexin neuropeptide system regulates wakefulness and contributes to physiological and behavioral stress responses. Moreover, a role for orexins in modulating hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity has been proposed. Brain penetrating dual orexin receptor (OXR) antagonists such as almorexant decrease vigilance and have emerged as a novel therapeutic class for the treatment of insomnia. Almorexant was used here as a pharmacological tool to examine the role of endogenous orexin signaling in HPA axis endocrine function under natural conditions. After confirming the expression of prepro-orexin and OXR-1 and OXR-2 mRNA in hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands, the effects of systemic almorexant were investigated on peripheral HPA axis hormone release in the rat under baseline, stress and pharmacological challenge conditions. Almorexant did not alter basal or stress-induced corticosterone release despite affecting wake and sleep stages (detected by radiotelemetric electroencephalography/electromyography) during the stress exposure. Moreover, almorexant did not affect the release of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone at different time points along the diurnal rhythm, nor corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)- and ACTH-stimulated neuroendocrine responses, measured in vivo under stress-free conditions. These results illustrate that dual OXR antagonists, despite modulating stress-induced wakefulness, do not interfere with endocrine HPA axis function in the rat. They converge to suggest that endogenous orexin signaling plays a minor role in stress hormone release under basal conditions and under challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional centrality of amygdala, striatum and hypothalamus in a "small-world" network underlying joy: an fMRI study with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros

    2014-07-01

    Current knowledge about small-world networks underlying emotions is sparse, and confined to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using resting-state paradigms. This fMRI study applied Eigenvector Centrality Mapping (ECM) and functional connectivity analysis to reveal neural small-world networks underlying joy and fear. Joy and fear were evoked using music, presented in 4-min blocks. Results show that the superficial amygdala (SF), laterobasal amygdala (LB), striatum, and hypothalamus function as computational hubs during joy. Out of these computational hubs, the amygdala nuclei showed the highest centrality values. The SF showed functional connectivity during joy with the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) and nucleus accumbens (Nac), suggesting that SF, MD, and Nac modulate approach behavior in response to positive social signals such as joyful music. The striatum was functionally connected during joy with the LB, as well as with premotor cortex, areas 1 and 7a, hippocampus, insula and cingulate cortex, showing that sensorimotor, attentional, and emotional processes converge in the striatum during music perception. The hypothalamus showed functional connectivity during joy with hippocampus and MD, suggesting that hypothalamic endocrine activity is modulated by hippocampal and thalamic activity during sustained periods of music-evoked emotion. Our study indicates high centrality of the amygdala nuclei groups within a functional network underlying joy, suggesting that these nuclei play a central role for the modulation of emotion-specific activity within this network.

  3. Effects of Chronic Estrogen Administration in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus (VMH) on Fat and Bone Metabolism in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Liu, J; Veldhuis-Vlug, A G; Su, Y; Foppen, E; van der Eerden, B C J; Koedam, M; Bravenboer, N; Kalsbeek, A; Boelen, A; Fliers, E; Bisschop, P H

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen deficiency after ovariectomy (OVX) results in increased adiposity and bone loss, which can be prevented by systemic 17-β estradiol (E2) replacement. Studies in transgenic mice suggested that in addition to direct actions of estrogen in peripheral tissues, also estrogen signaling in the hypothalamus regulates fat distribution and bone metabolism. We hypothesized that the protective effect of systemic E2 on fat and bone metabolism in the OVX model is partly mediated through the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of systemic, central, and targeted VMH administration of E2 on fat and bone metabolism in OVX rats. Subcutaneous administration of E2 for 4 weeks decreased body weight, gonadal and perirenal fat, and bone formation rate in OVX rats. This effect was completely mimicked by intracerebroventricular injections of E2, once every 4 days for 4 weeks. Administration of E2 locally in the VMH by retromicrodialysis (3 h) acutely increased expression of the lipolytic gene hormone-sensitive lipase in gonadal and perirenal fat. Finally, chronic administration of E2 in the VMH for 8 weeks decreased perirenal fat but did not affect body weight, trabecular bone volume, or cortical thickness. In conclusion, we demonstrated that intracerebroventricular E2 replacement reduces body weight gain, ameliorates intraabdominal fat accumulation, and reduces bone formation in the OVX rats. E2 administration selectively in the VMH also reduced intraabdominal fat but did not affect bone metabolism.

  4. Altered sexual partner preference in male ferrets given excitotoxic lesions of the preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, R G; Baum, M J

    1995-10-01

    Numerous experiments suggest that perinatal exposure of male vertebrates to testosterone (T), or its estrogenic metabolites, masculinizes aspects of coital function, including males' characteristic preference to seek out and mate with a female as opposed to another male conspecific. Other research has shown that this perinatal action of sex steroids also masculinizes aspects of neuronal morphology in the medial preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus (mPOA/AH). We asked whether neurons of the mPOA/AH contribute to males' preference to mate with a female. The ferret is an ideal species in which to ask this question. When tested in a T-maze after gonadectomy and treatment with estradiol benzoate (EB), female ferrets prefer to approach and receive neck grips from a stimulus male whereas males prefer to approach and neck grip an estrous female. In the minority of trials when EB-treated males approach a stimulus male, they occasionally receive a neck grip to which they display receptive postures as opposed to agonistic behaviors. In Experiment 1 castrated, EB-treated male ferrets which received bilateral infusions of the NMDA excitotoxin, quinolinic acid aimed at the dorsomedial POA/AH, preferred to approach a stimulus male significantly more often than groups of control males which either received a sham lesion, received a unilateral mPOA/AH lesion or in which bilateral infusions of quinolinic aci produced no histologically detectible excitotoxic damage to the mPOA/AH. Males with bilateral mPOA/AH lesions also displayed neck gripping on a significantly lower percentage of trials than control males when they approached the stimulus female. Ovariectomized, EB-treated female ferrets with bilateral mPOA/AH lesions, like control females, preferred to approach and receive neck grips from a stimulus male. The males used in Experiment 1 had never experienced circulating levels of T characteristic of the breeding season. Therefore, in Experiment 2 prepubertally gonadectomized males

  5. Expression of regulatory neuropeptides in the hypothalamus of red deer (Cervus elaphus) reveals anomalous relationships in the seasonal control of appetite and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrell, G K; Ridgway, M J; Wellby, M; Pereira, A; Henry, B A; Clarke, I J

    2016-04-01

    Red deer are seasonal with respect to reproduction and food intake, so we tested the hypothesis that their brains would show seasonal changes in numbers of cells containing hypothalamic neuropeptides that regulate these functions. We examined the brains of male and female deer in non-breeding and breeding seasons to quantify the production of kisspeptin, gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH - an index of pro-opiomelanocortin production), using immunohistochemistry. These neuropeptides are likely to be involved in the regulation of reproductive function and appetite. During the annual breeding season there were more cells producing kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus than during the non-breeding season in males and females whereas there was no seasonal difference in the expression of GnIH. There were more cells producing the appetite stimulating peptide, NPY, in the arcuate/median eminence regions of the hypothalamus of females during the non-breeding season whereas the levels of an appetite suppressing peptide, γ-MSH, were highest in the breeding season. Male deer brains exhibited the converse, with NPY cell numbers highest in the breeding season and γ-MSH levels highest in the non-breeding season. These results support a role for kisspeptin as an important stimulatory regulator of seasonal breeding in deer, as in other species, but suggest a lack of involvement of GnIH in the seasonality of reproduction in deer. In the case of appetite regulation, the pattern exhibited by females for NPY and γ-MSH was as expected for the breeding and non-breeding seasons, based on previous studies of these peptides in sheep and the seasonal cycle of appetite reported for various species of deer. An inverse result in male deer most probably reflects the response of appetite regulating cells to negative energy balance during the mating season. Differences between the sexes in the seasonal

  6. Oral delivery of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, synthetic peptide leptin mimetics: Immunofluorescent localization in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian M; Jacobson, Lauren; Novakovic, Zachary M; Grasso, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    This study describes the localization of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, in the hypothalamus of Swiss Webster and C57BL/6J wild-type mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and leptin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The mice were given [D-Leu-4]-OB3 or MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 in 0.3% dodecyl maltoside by oral gavage. Once peak serum concentrations were reached, the mice received a lethal dose of pentobarbital and were subjected to intracardiac perfusion fixation. The brains were excised, post-fixed in paraformaldehyde, and cryo-protected in sucrose. Free-floating frozen coronal sections were cut at 25-µm and processed for imaging by immunofluorescence microscopy. In all four strains of mice, dense staining was concentrated in the area of the median eminence, at the base and/or along the inner wall of the third ventricle, and in the brain parenchyma at the level of the arcuate nucleus. These results indicate that [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 cross the blood-brain barrier and concentrate in an area of the hypothalamus known to regulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Most noteworthy is the localization of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 immunoreactivity within the hypothalamus of DIO mice via a conduit that is closed to leptin in this rodent model, and in most cases of human obesity. Together with our previous studies describing the effects of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 on energy balance, glucose regulation, and signal transduction pathway activation, these findings are consistent with a central mechanism of action for these synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, and suggest their potential usefulness in the management of leptin-resistant obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of 5-HT1Areceptors in the rat dorsomedial hypothalamus inhibits stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, Christopher E; Hassell, James E; Kapitz, Adam J; Renner, Kenneth J; Orchinik, Miles; Lowry, Christopher A

    2017-03-01

    Acute activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, leading to the release of corticosteroid hormones into the circulation, is an adaptive response to perceived threats. Persistent activation of the HPA axis can lead to impaired physiological or behavioral function with maladaptive consequences. Thus, efficient control and termination of stress responses is essential for well-being. However, inhibitory control mechanisms governing the HPA axis are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that serotonergic systems, acting within the medial hypothalamus, play an important role in inhibitory control of stress-induced HPA axis activity. To test this hypothesis, we surgically implanted chronic jugular cannulae in adult male rats and conducted bilateral microinjection of vehicle or the 5-HT 1A receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; 8 nmol, 0.2 μL, 0.1 μL/min, per side) into the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) immediately prior to a 40 min period of restraint stress. Repeated blood sampling was conducted using an automated blood sampling system and plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Bilateral intra-DMH microinjections of 8-OH-DPAT suppressed stress-induced increases in plasma corticosterone within 10 min of the onset of handling prior to restraint and, as measured by area-under-the-curve analysis of plasma corticosterone concentrations, during the 40 min period of restraint. These data support an inhibitory role for serotonergic systems, acting within the DMH, on stress-induced activation of the HPA axis. Lay summary: Inhibitory control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress hormone response is important for well-being. One neurochemical implicated in inhibitory control of the HPA axis is serotonin. In this study we show that activation of serotonin receptors, specifically inhibitory 5-HT 1A receptors in the dorsomedial

  8. Mu-opioid receptor and delta-opioid receptor differentially regulate microglial inflammatory response to control proopiomelanocortin neuronal apoptosis in the hypothalamus: effects of neonatal alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Pallavi; Cabrera, Miguel A; Chastain, Lucy G; Boyadjieva, Nadka I; Jabbar, Shaima; Franklin, Tina; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2017-04-14

    Opioid receptors are known to control neurotransmission of various peptidergic neurons, but their potential role in regulation of microglia and neuronal cell communications is unknown. We investigated the role of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and delta-opioid receptors (DOR) on microglia in the regulation of apoptosis in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons induced by neonatal ethanol in the hypothalamus. Neonatal rat pups were fed a milk formula containing ethanol or control diets between postnatal days 2-6. Some of the alcohol-fed rats additionally received pretreatment of a microglia activation blocker minocycline. Two hours after the last feeding, some of the pups were sacrificed and processed for histochemical detection of microglial cell functions or confocal microscopy for detection of cellular physical interaction or used for gene and protein expression analysis. The rest of the pups were dissected for microglia separation by differential gradient centrifugation and characterization by measuring production of various activation markers and cytokines. In addition, primary cultures of microglial cells were prepared using hypothalamic tissues of neonatal rats and used for determination of cytokine production/secretion and apoptotic activity of neurons. In the hypothalamus, neonatal alcohol feeding elevated cytokine receptor levels, increased the number of microglial cells with amoeboid-type circularity, enhanced POMC and microglial cell physical interaction, and decreased POMC cell numbers. Minocycline reversed these cellular effects of alcohol. Alcohol feeding also increased levels of microglia MOR protein and pro-inflammatory signaling molecules in the hypothalamus, and MOR receptor antagonist naltrexone prevented these effects of alcohol. In primary cultures of hypothalamic microglia, both MOR agonist [D-Ala 2, N-MePhe 4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and ethanol increased microglial cellular levels and secretion of pro-inflammatory cell signaling proteins. However

  9. Dysfunction in Ribosomal Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus following Chronic Social Defeat Stress in Male Mice as Revealed by RNA-Seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Smagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic social defeat stress leads to the development of anxiety- and depression-like states in male mice and is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in brain. The influence of 21-day period of social stress on ribosomal gene expression in five brain regions was studied using the RNA-Seq database. Most Rps, Rpl, Mprs, and Mprl genes were upregulated in the hypothalamus and downregulated in the hippocampus, which may indicate ribosomal dysfunction following chronic social defeat stress. There were no differentially expressed ribosomal genes in the ventral tegmental area, midbrain raphe nuclei, or striatum. This approach may be used to identify a pharmacological treatment of ribosome biogenesis abnormalities in the brain of patients with “ribosomopathies.”

  10. Effects of the action of microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation on the spike activity of neurons in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasyan, S M; Grigoryan, G Yu; Saakyan, S G; Akhumyan, A A; Kalantaryan, V P

    2007-02-01

    Acute experiments on white rats anesthetized with Nembutal (40 mg/kg, i.p.) were performed with extracellular recording and analysis of background spike activity from neurons in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus after exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter range. The distribution of neurons was determined in terms of the degree of regularity, the nature of the dynamics of neural streams, and the modalities of histograms of interspike intervals; the mean neuron spike frequency was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation of interspike intervals. These studies demonstrated changes in the background spike activity, predominantly affecting the internal structure of the spike streams recorded. The major changes were in the duration of interspike intervals and the degree of regularity of spike activity. Statistically significant changes in the mean spike frequencies of neuron populations in individual frequency ranges were also seen.

  11. Panhypopituitarism due to metastases to the hypothalamus and the pituitary resulting from primary breast cancer: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Melpomeni; Papaxoinis, Georgios; Xiros, Nikolaos; Raptis, Sotirios A; Economopoulos, Theofanis; Hadjidakis, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    Pituitary metastasis occurs rarely in cancer patients and often remains undiagnosed. However, early detection and appropriate treatment can improve the patient's quality of life and possibly prolong survival. Herein, we describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with panhypopituitarism caused by metastases to the hypothalamus and pituitary from primary breast cancer. She had a 5-year history of breast cancer with metastases to the bones 1.5 years after initial diagnosis and mastectomy. She presented with severe headaches, generalized fatigue, dizziness, hypotension, difficulties with balance and coordination, polyuria, and polydipsia. Laboratory work-up revealed panhypopituitarism (central diabetes insipidus; hypothyroidism; and low prolactin, gonadotrophin, and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels), and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the pituitary and hypothalamic involvement. She received hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy of the sella turcica and suprasellar lesion, and chemotherapy, with significant improvement of her clinical status, but she died 15 months later.

  12. Study on changes of hypothalamus-pituitary-target axis hormones in patients with insomnia of fire-symdrome due to the stagnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianfei; Yan Songqin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hypothalamus-pituitary-target axis hormones in patients with insomnia of fire-symdrom due to the stagnation of liver-qi. Methods: Serum thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), growth hormone (GH), free thyroxine (FT 4 ), cortisol levels were measured with immunoradioassay (IMRA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 30 patients with this type of insomnia and 30 controls. Results: The serum TSH levels were significantly lower and serum TRH, GH, cortisol FT 4 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: This insomnia syndrome was closely related to the dysfunction of mpothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and adrenal axis. (authors)

  13. Radiographical investigations of organic lesions of the hypothalamus in patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema due to serious intracranial diseases. Relationship between radiographical findings and outcome of patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Kunihide

    2003-01-01

    Radiographical investigations of the hypothalamus by computerized tomography (CT) have rarely been performed despite the fact that the damage to the hypothalamus owing to serious intracranial organic diseases may cause neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). We presented 22 consecutive cases of patients suffering from NPE caused by serious intracranial organic diseases and investigated the relationship between NPE and abnormal radiographical findings of the hypothalamus. In 11 cases, organic lesions were noted in the hypothalami and 10 of these patients died of NPE (91.0%). In contrast, of the remaining 11 cases without significant radiographical findings of organic lesions in the hypothalami, only 2 patients were lost (18.2%). In general, various factors including systemic ones are considered to contribute to the prognosis of the patients suffering NPEs caused by serious intracranial diseases. It was concluded that hypothalamic damage was not always found by radiograph in patients with NPE due to critical intracranial diseases, but once abnormal findings in their hypothalamus of these patients were noted, their prognosis would become significantly poor (p<0.05). (author)

  14. 5-HT has contrasting effects in the frontal cortex, but not the hypothalamus, on changes in noradrenaline efflux induced by the monoamine releasing-agent, d-amphetamine, and the reuptake inhibitor, BTS 54 354.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géranton, Sandrine M; Heal, David J; Stanford, S Clare

    2004-03-01

    There is extensive evidence for functional interactions between central noradrenergic and serotonergic neurones. Here, dual-probe microdialysis was used in freely-moving rats to compare the effects of 5-HT on noradrenergic transmission in the rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus. We studied the effects of the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA; which depleted 5-HT stores in both the frontal cortex and the hypothalamus), on spontaneous efflux of noradrenaline and on the noradrenergic responses to d-amphetamine, and the monoamine reuptake inhibitor, BTS 54 354. pCPA pretreatment alone did not affect spontaneous noradrenaline efflux in either brain region, whether or not alpha2-autoreceptors were inactivated by administration of the alpha2-antagonist, atipamezole (1 mg/kg i.p). However, in the frontal cortex, pCPA pretreatment augmented the amplitude of, and prolonged, the noradrenergic response to local infusion of d-amphetamine (10 microM). In contrast, pCPA abolished the increase in cortical noradrenaline efflux induced by local infusion of BTS 54 354 (50 microM). In the hypothalamus, pCPA did not affect the amplitude of the response to either of these agents but did prolong the effects of d-amphetamine on noradrenaline efflux. These findings suggest that serotonergic transmission has complex effects on the noradrenergic response to drugs that increase noradrenergic transmission in the frontal cortex, but has less influence in the hypothalamus.

  15. Effect of serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus on the formation of hemopoietic colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice after bone marrow cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, N.A.; Likhovetskaya, Z.M.; Kurbanova, G.N.; Prigozhina, T.A.; L'vovich, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Colony formation capability of serum from animals with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was studied in lethally irradiated mice. Male-rats of Wistar line and hybrid mice (CBA x C57 BL) were used in the experiments. The serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was injected simultaneously with bone marrow transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. The number of macrocolonies in the spleen was counted on the 9th day. It was ascertained that the serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus caused an increase of the number of macroscopically visible colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice. The determination of hemopoetic types of colonies showed that the effect of the serum from those animals caused an increase of the number of granulocytic-type colonies. The initiation of colony stimulating and leukopoetic activity in the blood of animals after the destruction of mammillary body nuclei and posterior hypothalamic nucleus attested, according to the authors point of view, that humoral mediators (humoral mediator) could participated in the mechanism of hypothalamus effect on leulopoiesis

  16. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, attenuates obesity-induced inflammation in the nodose ganglion, hypothalamus, and skeletal muscle of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Farhana; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Okada, Tadashi; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Waise, T M Zaved; Arakawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-01-05

    Chronic inflammation in systemic organs, such as adipose tissue, nodose ganglion, hypothalamus, and skeletal muscles, is closely associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus. Because sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors exert both anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects by promoting urinary excretion of glucose and subsequent caloric loss, we investigated the effect of canagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, on obesity-induced inflammation in neural tissues and skeletal muscles of mice. High-fat diet (HFD)-fed male C57BL/6J mice were treated with canagliflozin for 8 weeks. Canagliflozin attenuated the HFD-mediated increases in body weight, liver weight, and visceral and subcutaneous fat weight. Additionally, canagliflozin decreased blood glucose as well as the fat, triglyceride, and glycogen contents of the liver. Along with these metabolic corrections, canagliflozin attenuated the increases in the mRNA levels of the proinflammatory biomarkers Iba1 and Il6 and the number of macrophages/microglia in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. In the skeletal muscle of HFD-fed obese mice, canagliflozin decreased inflammatory cytokine levels, macrophage accumulation, and the mRNA level of the specific atrophic factor atrogin-1. Canagliflozin also increased the mRNA level of insulin-like growth factor 1, protected against muscle mass loss, and restored the contractile force of muscle. These findings suggested that SGLT2 inhibition disrupts the vicious cycle of obesity and inflammation, not only by promoting caloric loss, but also by suppression of obesity-related inflammation in both the nervous system and skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural progenitor cell proliferation in the hypothalamus is involved in acquired heat tolerance in long-term heat-acclimated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Constant exposure to moderate heat facilitates progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the hypothalamus of heat-acclimated (HA) rats. In this study, we investigated neural phenotype and responsiveness to heat in HA rats' hypothalamic newborn cells. Additionally, the effect of hypothalamic neurogenesis on heat acclimation in rats was evaluated. Male Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were housed at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 32°C for 6 days (STHA) or 40 days (LTHA), while control (CN) rats were kept at a Ta of 24°C for 6 days (STCN) or 40 days (LTCN). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was intraperitoneally injected daily for five consecutive days (50 mg/kg/day) after commencing heat exposure. The number of hypothalamic BrdU-immunopositive (BrdU+) cells in STHA and LTHA rats was determined immunohistochemically in brain samples and found to be significantly greater than those in respective CN groups. In LTHA rats, approximately 32.6% of BrdU+ cells in the preoptic area (POA) of the anterior hypothalamus were stained by GAD67, a GABAergic neuron marker, and 15.2% of BrdU+ cells were stained by the glutamate transporter, a glutamatergic neuron marker. In addition, 63.2% of BrdU+ cells in the POA were immunolabeled with c-Fos. Intracerebral administration of the mitosis inhibitor, cytosine arabinoside (AraC), interfered with the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and acquired heat tolerance in LTHA rats, whereas the selected ambient temperature was not changed. These results demonstrate that heat exposure generates heat responsive neurons in the POA, suggesting a pivotal role in autonomic thermoregulation in long-term heat-acclimated rats.

  18. Stress-induced suppression of neuropeptide Y-induced hunger in anorexic chicks involves corticotrophin-releasing factor signalling and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Yi, J; Siegel, P B; Cline, M A; Gilbert, E R

    2017-12-01

    The Virginia lines of chickens have been selected for low (LWS) or high (HWS) juvenile body weight and have different severities of anorexia and obesity, respectively. The LWS that are exposed to stressors at hatch are refractory to neuropeptide Y (NPY)-induced food intake and the objective of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms. Chicks were exposed to a stressor (-20°C for 6 minutes and 22°C and delayed access to food for 24 hours) after hatching and the hypothalamic nuclei, including the lateral hypothalamus (LH), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and arcuate nucleus (ARC), were collected 5 days later. In LWS but not HWS, stress exposure up-regulated corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), CRF receptor subtypes 1 and 2 (CRFR1 and CRFR2, respectively), melanocortin receptor 4 and urocortin 3 in the PVN, as well as CRFR2 mRNA in the VMH and ARC. In LWS, stress exposure was also associated with greater NPY and NPY receptor subtype 5 mRNA in the ARC and PVN, respectively, as well as decreased agouti-related peptide mRNA in the ARC. In HWS, stress exposure was associated with increased CRFR1 and decreased cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the ARC and PVN, respectively. Refractoriness of the food intake response to NPY in LWS may thus result from the over-riding anorexigenic tone in the PVN associated with CRF signalling. Indeed, the orexigenic effect of NPY was restored when LWS were injected with a CRF receptor antagonist, astressin, before stress exposure. The results of the present study provide insights into the molecular basis of eating disorders and suggest that CRF signalling in the PVN may exacerbate the anorexic phenotype in the presence of environmental stressors. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. The effects of subchronic acrylamide exposure on gene expression, neurochemistry, hormones, and histopathology in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of male Fischer 344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, J.F.; Latendresse, J.R.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Muskhelishvili, L.; Warbritton, A.R.; Thomas, M.; Tareke, E.; McDaniel, L.P.; Doerge, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines possible evidence for disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis from 14 days of repeated exposure of male Fischer 344 rats to doses of AA that range from one that is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure (2.5 mg/kg/d), an intermediate dose (10 mg/kg/d), and a high dose (50 mg/kg/d) that is neurotoxic for this exposure time. The endpoints selected include: serum levels of thyroid and pituitary hormones; target tissue expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis, release, and receptors; neurotransmitters in the CNS that affect hormone homeostasis; and histopathological evaluation of target tissues. These studies showed virtually no evidence for systematic alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and do not support hormone dysregulation as a plausible mechanism for AA-induced thyroid cancer in the Fischer 344 rat. Specifically, there were no significant changes in: 1) mRNA levels in hypothalamus or pituitary for TRH, TSH, thyroid hormone receptor α and β, as well 10 other hormones or releasing factors; 2) mRNA levels in thyroid for thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodide symporter, or type I deiodinases; 3) serum TSH or T3 levels (T4 was decreased at high dose only); 4) dopaminergic tone in the hypothalamus and pituitary or importantly 5) increased cell proliferation (Mki67 mRNA and Ki-67 protein levels were not increased) in thyroid or pituitary. These negative findings are consistent with a genotoxic mechanism of AA carcinogenicity based on metabolism to glycidamide and DNA adduct formation. Clarification of this mechanistic dichotomy may be useful in human cancer risk

  20. Oral leucine supplementation is sensed by the brain but neither reduces food intake nor induces an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais T Zampieri

    Full Text Available Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity.

  1. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  2. Prenatal exposure to dietary fat induces changes in the transcriptional factors, TEF and YAP, which may stimulate differentiation of peptide neurons in rat hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinning Poon

    Full Text Available Gestational exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD stimulates the differentiation of orexigenic peptide-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus of offspring. To examine possible mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon, this study investigated the transcriptional factor, transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF, and co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP, which when inactivated stimulate neuronal differentiation. In rat embryos and postnatal offspring prenatally exposed to a HFD compared to chow, changes in hypothalamic TEF and YAP and their relationship to the orexigenic peptide, enkephalin (ENK, were measured. The HFD offspring at postnatal day 15 (P15 exhibited in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus a significant reduction in YAP mRNA and protein, and increased levels of inactive and total TEF protein, with no change in mRNA. Similarly, HFD-exposed embryos at embryonic day 19 (E19 showed in whole hypothalamus significantly decreased levels of YAP mRNA and protein and TEF mRNA, and increased levels of inactive TEF protein, suggesting that HFD inactivates TEF and YAP. This was accompanied by increased density and fluorescence intensity of ENK neurons. A close relationship between TEF and ENK was suggested by the finding that TEF co-localizes with this peptide in hypothalamic neurons and HFD reduced the density of TEF/ENK co-labeled neurons, even while the number and fluorescence intensity of single-labeled TEF neurons were increased. Increased YAP inactivity by HFD was further evidenced by a decrease in number and fluorescence intensity of YAP-containing neurons, although the density of YAP/ENK co-labeled neurons was unaltered. Genetic knockdown of TEF or YAP stimulated ENK expression in hypothalamic neurons, supporting a close relationship between these transcription factors and neuropeptide. These findings suggest that prenatal HFD exposure inactivates both hypothalamic TEF and YAP, by either decreasing their levels or increasing their inactive

  3. A useful PET probe [11C]BU99008 with ultra-high specific radioactivity for small animal PET imaging of I2-imidazoline receptors in the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Shimoda, Yoko; Yui, Joji; Zhang, Yiding; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A positron emission tomography (PET) probe with ultra-high specific radioactivity (SA) enables measuring high receptor specific binding in brain regions by avoiding mass effect of the PET probe itself. It has been reported that PET probe with ultra-high SA can detect small change caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand. Recently, Kealey et al. developed [ 11 C]BU99008, a more potent PET probe for I 2 -imidazoline receptors (I 2 Rs) imaging, with a conventional SA (mean 76 GBq/μmol) showed higher specific binding in the brain. Here, to detect small change of specific binding for I 2 Rs caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand in an extremely small region, such as hypothalamus in the brain, we synthesized and evaluated [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA as a useful PET probe for small-animal PET imaging of I 2 Rs. Methods: [ 11 C]BU99008 was prepared by [ 11 C]methylation of N-desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. Biodistribution, metabolite analysis, and brain PET studies were conducted in rats. Results: [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA in the range of 5400–16,600 GBq/μmol were successfully synthesized (n = 7), and had appropriate radioactivity for in vivo study. In the biodistribution study, the mean radioactivity levels in all investigated tissues except for the kidney did not show significant difference between [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA and that with conventional SA. In the metabolite analysis, the percentage of unchanged [ 11 C]BU99008 at 30 min after the injection of probes with ultra-high and conventional SA was similar in rat brain and plasma. In the PET study of rats' brain, radioactivity level (AUC 30–60 min ) in the hypothalamus of rats injected with [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (64 [SUV ∙ min]) was significantly higher than that observed for that with conventional SA (50 [SUV ∙ min]). The specific binding of [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (86% of total binding) for I 2 R was higher than that of

  4. Feeding prepubescent gilts a high-fat diet induces molecular changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis and predicts early timing of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yong; Zhou, Dongsheng; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Wu, De

    2014-01-01

    The onset of puberty in females has been occurring earlier over the past decades, presumably as a result of improved nutrition in developed countries. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the early attainment of puberty as a result of nutrition fortification remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hormone and gene expression changes in prepubescent gilts fed a high-fat diet to investigate whether these changes could predict the early timing of puberty. Forty gilts were fed a daily basal diet (LE) or a basal diet with an additional 270 g/d or 340 g/d of fat (HE) during the prepubescent phase. Blood samples were collected during the prepubescent phase to detect hormone secretion changes in insulin-like growth factor-1, kisspeptin, estradiol, progesterone, and leptin. The gene expressions at the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined on day 73 of the experiment (average age on day 177) during the prepubescent phase. An HE diet resulted in accelerated body weight gain and back-fat thickness at the P2 point compared with LE gilts during the prepubescent phase. Gilts that were fed HE diets attained puberty 12 d earlier than LE gilts, and a larger proportion of HE gilts reached puberty at day 180 or 190 of age. A postmortem analysis revealed a promoted development of the uterus and ovary tissue that was characterized by a 53.7% and 29.5% increase in the uterine and ovary weight, respectively, and an increased length of the uterine horn and oviduct tissue in HE gilts. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that HE gilts had higher Kiss-1, G protein-coupled receptor 54, gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor α mRNA expression levels in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus; the leptin receptor mRNA expression level was higher in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and ovary tissue; the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression was higher in the pituitary and

  5. Chronic methamphetamine treatment induces oxytocin receptor up-regulation in the amygdala and hypothalamus via an adenosine A2A receptor-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Panos; Wright, Sherie R; Georgiou, Polymnia; Yoo, Ji Hoon; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna M; Kitchen, Ian; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; Bailey, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    There is mounting evidence that the neuropeptide oxytocin is a possible candidate for the treatment of drug addiction. Oxytocin was shown to reduce methamphetamine self-administration, conditioned place-preference, hyperactivity and reinstatement in rodents, highlighting its potential for the management of methamphetamine addiction. Thus, we hypothesised that the central endogenous oxytocinergic system is dysregulated following chronic methamphetamine administration. We tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of chronic methamphetamine administration on oxytocin receptor density in mice brains with the use of quantitative receptor autoradiographic binding. Saline (4ml/kg/day, i.p.) or methamphetamine (1mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered daily for 10 days to male, CD1 mice. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of oxytocin receptors was carried out with the use of [(125)I]-vasotocin in brain sections of these animals. Chronic methamphetamine administration induced a region specific upregulation of oxytocin receptor density in the amygdala and hypothalamus, but not in the nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen. As there is evidence suggesting an involvement of central adenosine A2A receptors on central endogenous oxytocinergic function, we investigated whether these methamphetamine-induced oxytocinergic neuroadaptations are mediated via an A2A receptor-dependent mechanism. To test this hypothesis, autoradiographic oxytocin receptor binding was carried out in brain sections of male CD1 mice lacking A2A receptors which were chronically treated with methamphetamine (1mg/kg/day, i.p. for 10 days) or saline. Similar to wild-type animals, chronic methamphetamine administration induced a region-specific upregulation of oxytocin receptor binding in the amygdala and hypothalamus of A2A receptor knockout mice and no genotype effect was observed. These results indicate that chronic methamphetamine use can induce profound neuroadaptations of the oxytocinergic receptor

  6. The orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 decreases anxiety-like behavior and c-Fos expression in the hypothalamus of rats exposed to cat odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhaven, M W; Cornish, J L; Staples, L G

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the orexin system is involved in modulating anxiety, and we have recently shown that cat odor-induced anxiety in rats is attenuated by the orexin receptor antagonist SB-334867. In the current experiment, c-Fos expression was used to map changes in neuronal activation following SB-334867 administration in the cat odor anxiety model. Male Wistar rats were exposed to cat odor with or without SB-334867 pre-treatment (10 mg/kg, i.p.). A naïve control group not exposed to cat odor was also used. Following cat odor exposure, brains were processed for c-Fos expression. Vehicle-treated rats showed an increase in anxiety-like behaviors (increased hiding and decreased approach toward the cat odor), and increased c-Fos expression in the posteroventral medial amygdala (MePV), paraventricular hypothalamus (PVN) and dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd). In rats pretreated with SB-334867, approach scores increased and c-Fos expression decreased in the PVN and PMd. These results provide both behavioral and neuroanatomical evidence for the attenuation of cat odor-induced anxiety in rats via the orexin system. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. μ-Opioid and 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus interact for the regulation of panic-related defensive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Yamashita, Paula Shimene de Melo; Frias, Alana Tercino; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne; Zangrossi, Helio

    2017-06-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) have been implicated in the genesis and regulation of panic-related defensive behaviors, such as escape. Previous results point to an interaction between serotonergic and opioidergic systems within the DPAG to inhibit escape, involving µ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1AR). In the present study we explore this interaction in the DMH, using escape elicited by electrical stimulation of this area as a panic attack index. The obtained results show that intra-DMH administration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.5 nmol) prevented the panicolytic-like effect of a local injection of serotonin (20 nmol). Pretreatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTOP (1 nmol) blocked the panicolytic-like effect of the 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OHDPAT (8 nmol). Intra-DMH injection of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (0.3 nmol) also inhibited escape behavior, and a previous injection of the 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY-100635 (0.37 nmol) counteracted this panicolytic-like effect. These results offer the first evidence that serotonergic and opioidergic systems work together within the DMH to inhibit panic-like behavior through an interaction between µ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors, as previously described in the DPAG.

  8. Investigation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in hypothalamus of obese rats: Modulation by omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maksoud, Sahar M; Hassanein, Sally I; Gohar, Neveen A; Attia, Saad M M; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was investigating the effect of omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 FAs) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression, using in vivo and in vitro models, to unravel the potential mechanisms of polyunsaturated fatty acids use in obesity. Twenty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; lean controls fed normal chow diet for 14 weeks, obese controls fed 60% of their diet as saturated fats for 14 weeks, and ω-3 FAs-treated rats fed 60% saturated fat diet for 14 weeks with concomitant oral administration of 400 mg/kg/day ω-3 FAs, mainly docosahexaenoic acid and EPA, from week 12 to week 14. For the in vitro experiment, hypothalamic cells from six obese rats were cultured in the presence of different concentrations of ω-3 FAs to determine its direct effect on BDNF expression. In vivo results showed that obesity has negative effect on BDNF gene expression in rat hypothalamus that was reversed by administration of ω-3 FAs. Obese rats showed hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, normoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperleptinemia. Treatment with ω-3 FAs showed significant decrease in serum total cholesterol and TAG. Also serum glucose level and HOMA index were decreased significantly. In vitro results demonstrated the increase in BDNF expression by ω-3 FAs in a dose-dependent manner. Obesity causes down-regulation of BDNF gene expression that can be reversed by ω-3 FAs treatment, making them an interesting treatment approach for obesity and metabolic disease.

  9. Characterization of corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I; Füzesi, Tamás; Watts, Alan G; Bains, Jaideep S

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-Cre driver and Ai14 Cre-reporter mouse strains. tdTomato containing PVN neurons in Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 mice are readily visualized without secondary-detection methods. These neurons are predominantly neuroendocrine and abundantly express CRH protein, but not other PVN phenotypic neuropeptides. After an acute stress, a large majority of tdTomato cells express neuronal activation marker c-Fos. Finally, tdTomato PVN neurons exhibit homogenous intrinsic biophysical and synaptic properties, and can be optogenetically manipulated by viral Cre-driven expression of channelrhodopsin. These observations highlight basic cell-type characteristics of CRH neurons in a mutant mouse, providing validation for its future use in probing neurophysiology of endocrine stress responses.

  10. Characterization of corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn I Wamsteeker Cusulin

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-Cre driver and Ai14 Cre-reporter mouse strains. tdTomato containing PVN neurons in Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 mice are readily visualized without secondary-detection methods. These neurons are predominantly neuroendocrine and abundantly express CRH protein, but not other PVN phenotypic neuropeptides. After an acute stress, a large majority of tdTomato cells express neuronal activation marker c-Fos. Finally, tdTomato PVN neurons exhibit homogenous intrinsic biophysical and synaptic properties, and can be optogenetically manipulated by viral Cre-driven expression of channelrhodopsin. These observations highlight basic cell-type characteristics of CRH neurons in a mutant mouse, providing validation for its future use in probing neurophysiology of endocrine stress responses.

  11. Effect of Testosterone on Neuronal Morphology and Neuritic Growth of Fetal Lamb Hypothalamus-Preoptic Area and Cerebral Cortex in Primary Culture.

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    Radhika C Reddy

    Full Text Available Testosterone plays an essential role in sexual differentiation of the male sheep brain. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN, is 2 to 3 times larger in males than in females, and this sex difference is under the control of testosterone. The effect of testosterone on oSDN volume may result from enhanced expansion of soma areas and/or dendritic fields. To test this hypothesis, cells derived from the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA and cerebral cortex (CTX of lamb fetuses were grown in primary culture to examine the direct morphological effects of testosterone on these cellular components. We found that within two days of plating, neurons derived from both the HPOA and CTX extend neuritic processes and express androgen receptors and aromatase immunoreactivity. Both treated and control neurites continue to grow and branch with increasing time in culture. Treatment with testosterone (10 nM for 3 days significantly (P < 0.05 increased both total neurite outgrowth (35% and soma size (8% in the HPOA and outgrowth (21% and number of branch points (33% in the CTX. These findings indicate that testosterone-induced somal enlargement and neurite outgrowth in fetal lamb neurons may contribute to the development of a fully masculine sheep brain.

  12. GABA Neural Signaling in the Latero-Anterior Hypothalamus Modulates Aggressive Behavior in Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroid-Treated Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated and mature forms of offensive aggression correlated with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) afferent development as well as decreased GABAA receptors in the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) – an area of convergence for developmental and neuroplastic changes that underlie offensive aggressive behaviors in hamsters. This study investigated whether microinfusion of a GABAA receptor agonist (muscimol; 0.01 – 1.0 pM) or antagonist (bicuculline; 0.04 – 4.0 pM) directly into the LAH modulate adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Activation of LAH GABAA receptors enhanced adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression, beginning at the 0.1pM dose, when compared with AAS-treated animals injected with saline into the LAH. Importantly, GABAA receptor agonism within the LAH significantly increased the frequency of belly/rear attacks, while simultaneously decreasing the frequency of frontal attacks. These data identify a neuroanatomical locus where GABAA receptor activation functions to enhance aggression in adolescent AAS-treated animals, while also promoting the display of mature forms of aggression and suppressing juvenile play behaviors. PMID:25171080

  13. Dopamine D2 Receptors Act Upstream of AVP in the Latero-Anterior Hypothalamus to Modulate Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroid-Induced Aggression in Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    In pubertal male Syrian hamsters, exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence facilitates a high level of offensive aggression modulated by the enhanced development and activity of the vasopressin (AVP) and dopamine (DA) neural systems within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH), i.e., a brain region implicated in the control of aggression. The present studies provide a detailed report of the pharmacologic interactions between AVP and DA D2 receptor signaling within the LAH in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Male Syrian hamsters were treated with AAS throughout adolescence and tested for aggression after local infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) alone, or in combination with AVP in the LAH in an effort to determine the influence of DA D2 receptors relative to AVP-receptor mediated aggression mechanisms. As previously shown, ETIC infusion into the LAH suppressed adolescent AAS-induced aggressive responding; however, the AAS-induced aggressive phenotype was rescued by the co-infusion of AVP into the LAH. These behavioral data indicate that interactions between AVP and DA neural systems within the LAH modulate the control of aggression following adolescent exposure to AAS and that DA D2 receptor signaling functions upstream of AVP in the LAH to control this behavioral response. PMID:25798632

  14. Dopamine D2 receptors act upstream of AVP in the latero-anterior hypothalamus to modulate adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2015-04-01

    In pubertal male Syrian hamsters, exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence facilitates a high level of offensive aggression modulated by the enhanced development and activity of the vasopressin (AVP) and dopamine (DA) neural systems within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH), that is, a brain region implicated in the control of aggression. The present studies provide a detailed report of the pharmacologic interactions between AVP and DA D2 receptor signaling within the LAH in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Male Syrian hamsters were treated with AAS throughout adolescence and tested for aggression after local infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) alone, or in combination with AVP in the LAH in an effort to determine the influence of DA D2 receptors relative to AVP-receptor mediated aggression mechanisms. As previously shown, ETIC infusion into the LAH suppressed adolescent AAS-induced aggressive responding; however, the AAS-induced aggressive phenotype was rescued by the coinfusion of AVP into the LAH. These behavioral data indicate that interactions between AVP and DA neural systems within the LAH modulate the control of aggression following adolescent exposure to AAS and that DA D2 receptor signaling functions upstream of AVP in the LAH to control this behavioral response. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Aggression frequency and intensity, independent of testosterone levels, relate to neural activation within the dorsolateral subdivision of the ventromedial hypothalamus in the tree lizard Urosaurus ornatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabelik, David; Crombie, Tim; Moore, Michael C

    2008-06-01

    The mechanisms by which testosterone regulates aggression are unclear and may involve changes that alter the activity levels of one or more brain nuclei. We estimate neural activity by counting immunopositive cells against phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB). We demonstrate increased pCREB immunoreactivity within the dorsolateral subdivision of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHdl) following an aggressive encounter in male tree lizards Urosaurus ornatus. This immunoreactivity is induced both by exposure to and performance of aggressive behaviors. This dual activation of the VMHdl suggests its possible role as an integration center for assessment and expression of aggressive behavior. Furthermore, pCREB induction was greater in encounters involving higher frequency and intensity of aggressive display, demonstrating a direct relationship between neural activation and behavior. The VMHdl is also rich in steroid receptors. In a second experiment involving hormone manipulations, testosterone treatment increased aggression levels, though it did not increase the number of pCREB positive cells within the VMHdl. This lack of an effect of testosterone on pCREB induction within the VMHdl may be due to induction arising from the behaviors of conspecifics (especially in low-testosterone, low-aggression individuals), variation in aggression mediated by other variables, or regulation of aggression by circuits outside of the VMHdl. Together, these findings support a notion of the VMHdl as a nucleus involved in integrating afferent and efferent information within the neural aggression-control circuit.

  16. The thermogenic effect of leptin is dependent on a distinct population of prolactin-releasing peptide neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Garron T; Worth, Amy A; Nunn, Nicolas; Korpal, Aaron K; Bechtold, David A; Allison, Margaret B; Myers, Martin G; Statnick, Michael A; Luckman, Simon M

    2014-10-07

    Leptin is a critical regulator of metabolism, which acts on brain receptors (Lepr) to reduce energy intake and increase energy expenditure. Some of the cellular pathways mediating leptin's anorectic actions are identified, but those mediating the thermogenic effects have proven more difficult to decipher. We define a population of neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) containing the RFamide PrRP, which is activated by leptin. Disruption of Lepr selectively in these cells blocks thermogenic responses to leptin and causes obesity. A separate population of leptin-insensitive PrRP neurons in the brainstem is required, instead, for the satiating actions of the gut-derived hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Global deletion of PrRP (in a loxSTOPlox-PrRP mouse) results in obesity and attenuated responses to leptin and CCK. Cre-recombinase-mediated reactivation of PrRP in brainstem rescues the anorectic actions of CCK, but reactivation in the hypothalamus is required to re-establish the thermogenic effect of leptin. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Serotonin delivery into the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus affects differently feeding pattern and body weight in obese and lean Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetissov, Sergueï O; Meguid, Michael M

    2010-04-01

    To determine if central serotonin (5-HT)-induced satiety is altered in obesity. Obese and lean Zucker rats received infusion of 5-HT (5 microg/0.5 microl/h) or saline into the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) for 2 weeks. In lean rats, 5-HT decreased body weight (7%) and total food intake (15%) which was due to a decreased meal size during the dark phase. In obese rats, a decrease of food intake was also observed in the dark phase, but it was compensated by an increased food intake during the light phase, resulting in no significant changes of total food intake and body weight. In obese rats, meal number but not meal size was affected by 5-HT delivery. Body fat content was not affected by 5-HT in obese rats, while cessation of 5-HT delivery in lean rats resulted in 13% increase. Intra-VMN 5-HT in obese rats did not increase meal-associated satiety as it did in lean rats, but modulated hunger. These results show that the Zucker obese phenotype is characterized by VMN resistance to 5-HT, which may contribute to neurobiological mechanisms of increased meal size and food intake and may diminish anti-obesity effects of serotonergic anorexiants. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Proenkephalin Gene Regulation: CREB Interacts with the Proenkephalin Gene in the Mouse Hypothalamus and Is Phosphorylated in Response to Hyperosmolar Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, David; Konradi, Christine; Falkowski, Olga; Comb, Michael; Hyman, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    We have established a transgenic model to facilitate the study of stress-induced gene regulation in the hypothalamus. This model, which uses a human proenkephalin-β-galactosidase fusion gene, readily permits anatomic and cellular colocalization of stress-regulated immediate early gene products (e.g. Fos) and other transcription factors [e.g. cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)] with the product of a potential target gene. Moreover, Fos provides a marker of cellular activation that is independent of the transgene. Hypertonic saline stress induced Fos in almost all cells in the PVN that exhibited basal expression of the proenkephalin transgene; however, all cells in which the transgene was activated by stress also expressed Fos. CREB was found in essentially all neurons. Gel shift analysis with and without antisera to Fos and CREB showed that AP-1 binding activity, containing Fos protein, was induced by hyperosmotic stress. However, Fos was not detected binding to the proenkephalin second messenger-inducible enhancer even in hypothalamic cell extracts from stressed animals. In contrast, CREB formed specific complexes with both the proenkephalin enhancer and a cAMP- and calcium-regulated element (CaRE) within the c-fos gene. Moreover, we found that hypertonic saline induced CREB phosphorylation in cells that express the transgene within the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus. These results suggest a model in which proenkephalin gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus is regulated by CREB in response to hypertonic stress. PMID:8170480

  19. Acupuncture Decreases Blood Pressure Related to Hypothalamus Functional Connectivity with Frontal Lobe, Cerebellum, and Insula: A Study of Instantaneous and Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effects of acupuncture in decreasing blood pressure are ambiguous and underlying acupuncture in hypertension treatment has not been investigated. Our objective was to observe the change of quality of life and compare the differences in brain functional connectivity by investigating instantaneous and short-term acupuncture treatment in essential hypertension patients. A total of 30 patients were randomly divided into the LR3 group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting-state fMRI among preacupuncture, postinstantaneous, and short-term acupuncture treatment in two groups. Hypothalamus was selected as the seed point to analyze the changes in connectivity. We found three kinds of results: (1 There was statistical difference in systolic blood pressure in LR3 group after the short-term treatment and before acupuncture. (2 Compared with sham acupoint, acupuncture at LR3 instantaneous effects in the functional connectivity with seed points was more concentrated in the frontal lobe. (3 Compared with instantaneous effects, acupuncture LR3 short-term effects in the functional connectivity with seed points had more regions in frontal lobe, cerebellum, and insula. These brain areas constituted a neural network structure with specific functions that could explain the mechanism of therapy in hypertension patients by LR3 acupoint.

  20. The Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Neurodegeneration, TNF-α Concentration in Hypothalamus, and CSF-to-Plasma Ratio of Insulin in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nameni, Ghazaleh; Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Shahabi, Parviz; Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Mesgari-Abbasi, Mehran; Hemmati, Mohammad-Reza; Vatandoust, Seyed Mahdi

    2017-02-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity can lead to neurodegeneration induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). Moreover, obesity is associated with reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Insulin deficiency in the brain especially in the hypothalamus region has neurodegenerative and obesity-promoting effects. Because of the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of vitamin D, in the current experimental study, we aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on neurodegeneration, TNF-α concentration in the hypothalamus, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to serum ratio of insulin in high-fat-diet-induced obese rats. At the first phase of the study, the rats were divided into two groups: (1) normal diet (ND, 10% fat) and (2) high-fat diet (HFD, 59% fat) and were fed for 16 weeks. In the second phase, each group was subdivided into four groups including the following: ND, normal diet + vitamin D, HFD, and HFD + vitamin D. Weight was measured and recorded weekly. Vitamin D supplementation for 5 weeks at 500 IU/kg dosage was used. One week after vitamin D supplementation, daily food intake was recorded. At week 22, blood was collected to determine fasting serum glucose, vitamin D, and insulin concentrations, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. CSF samples were also collected to measure insulin concentrations, and the hypothalamus was dissected to determine TNF-α concentration. HFD significantly increased TNF-α concentrations and degenerated neurons in the hypothalamus (P = 0.02). We also observed a significant reduction of CSF-to-serum ratio of insulin in HFD group (P = 0.03). The HOMA-IR test indicated significant increment of insulin resistance in HFD-fed rats (P = 0.006). Vitamin D supplementation in HFD group significantly reduced weight (P = 0.001) and food intake (P = 0.008) and increased CSF-to-serum ratio of insulin

  1. Combined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and maternal restraint stress on hypothalamus adrenal axis (HPA) function in the offspring of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, Diana; Fuentes, Silvia; Torrente, Margarita; Colomina, M. Teresa; Domingo, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is known that prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) can cause developmental adverse effects in mammals, the disruptive effects of this compound on hormonal systems are still controversial. Information concerning the effects of PFOS on hypothalamus adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress and corticosterone levels is not currently available. On the other hand, it is well established that stress can enhance the developmental toxicity of some chemicals. In the present study, we assessed the combined effects of maternal restraint stress and PFOS on HPA axis function in the offspring of mice. Twenty plug-positive female mice were divided in two groups. Animals were given by gavage 0 and 6 mg PFOS/kg/day on gestation days 12-18. One half of the animals in each group were also subjected to restraint stress (30 min/session, 3 sessions/day) during the same period. Five plug-positive females were also included as non-manipulated controls. At 3 months of age, activity in an open-field and the stress response were evaluated in male and female mice by exposing them to 30 min of restraint stress. Male and female offspring were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected to measure changes in corticosterone levels at four different moments related to stress exposure conditions: before stress exposure, immediately after 30 min of stress exposure, and recuperation levels at 60 and 90 min after stress exposure. Results indicate corticosterone levels were lower in mice prenatally exposed to restraint. In general terms, PFOS exposure decreased corticosterone levels, although this effect was only significant in females. The recuperation pattern of corticosterone was mainly affected by prenatal stress. Interactive effects between PFOS and maternal stress were sex dependent. The current results suggest that prenatal PFOS exposure induced long-lasting effects in mice.

  2. Presence of TSH receptors in discrete areas of the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem with relevance for feeding controls-Support for functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wärnåker, Sara; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that brain-derived thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and its receptor (TSHr) are present in hypothalamic extracts. No studies investigating both the anatomical location and functional significance of putative TSHr proteins in specific central nervous system (CNS) nuclei involved in feeding controls have yet been conducted. The aim was thus to determine whether TSHr are present in nuclei associated with feeding behavior, and if such receptors may be functional. Brain tissue from adult rats was analyzed for gene expression and receptor protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry and western blotting. To investigate whether putative TSHr may be functional, we evaluated food intake of rats given intraparenchymal nanoinjections of TSH into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). RT-qPCR confirmed previous reports that TSHr mRNA is expressed in CNS tissues of the adult rat. Immunohistochemistry showed TSHr-immunoreactivity in the arcuate, the ventromedial, the dorsomedial, and the paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. We also found TSHr-ir in the dorsal hindbrain to be localized to the area postrema, NTS, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and the hypoglossal motor nucleus. Further protein analysis with western blotting showed 120kDa TSHr-ir proteins present in the hypothalamus and brainstem. Injections of TSH into the NTS reduced food intake similar to the positive control, urocortin. These data suggest that functional TSHr are present in the caudal brainstem and hypothalamic nuclei of relevance for feeding control as a possibly uncleaved holoreceptor, and highlights a hindbrain component to central TSH inhibition of food intake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cue-induced food seeking after punishment is associated with increased Fos expression in the lateral hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Erin J; Barker, David J; Nasser, Helen M; Kaganovsky, Konstantin; Dayas, Christopher V; Marchant, Nathan J

    2017-04-01

    In humans, relapse to unhealthy eating habits following dieting is a significant impediment to obesity treatment. Food-associated cues are one of the main triggers of relapse to unhealthy eating during self-imposed abstinence. Here we report a behavioral method examining cue-induced relapse to food seeking following punishment-induced suppression of food taking. We trained male rats to lever press for food pellets that were delivered after a 10-s conditional stimulus (CS) (appetitive). Following training, 25% of reinforced lever presses resulted in the presentation of a compound stimulus consisting of a novel CS (aversive) and the appetitive CS followed by a pellet and footshock. After punishment-imposed abstinence, we tested the rats in an extinction test where lever pressing resulted in the presentation of either the appetitive or aversive CS. We then compared activity of lateral hypothalamus (LH) and associated extrahypothalamic regions following this test. We also assessed Fos expression in LH orexin and GABA neurons. We found that cue-induced relapse of food seeking on test was higher in rats tested with the appetitive CS compared to the aversive CS. Relapse induced by the appetitive CS was associated with increased Fos expression in LH, caudal basolateral amygdala (BLA), and medial amygdala (MeA). This relapse was also associated with increased Fos expression in LH orexin and VGAT-expressing neurons. These data show that relapse to food seeking can be induced by food-associated cues after punishment-imposed abstinence, and this relapse is associated with increased activity in LH, caudal BLA, and MeA. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Profiles of mRNA expression of related genes in the duck hypothalamus-pituitary growth axis during embryonic and early post-hatch development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Liu, Hongxiang; Song, Chi; Xu, Wenjuan; Ji, Gaige; Zhu, Chunhong; Shu, Jingting; Li, Huifang

    2015-03-15

    In this study, the ontogeny of body and liver weight and the pattern of related gene mRNA expression in the hypothalamus-pituitary growth axis (HPGA) of two different duck breeds (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) were compared during embryonic and post-hatch development. Duck hypothalamic growth hormone release hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SS), pituitary growth hormone (GH), liver growth hormone receptor (GHR) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) mRNA were first detected on the 13th embryonic day. During early duck development, SS maintained a lower expression status, whereas the other four genes exhibited highly significant variations in an age-specific manner. Highly significant breed specificity was observed with respect to hepatic IGF-1 mRNA expression, which showed a significant breed-age interaction effect. Compared with previous studies on chickens, significant species differences were observed regarding the mRNA expression of bird embryonic HPGA-related genes. During early development, highly significant breed and age specificity were observed with respect to developmental changes in body and liver weight, and varying degrees of significant linear correlation were found between these performances and the mRNA expression of HPGA-related genes in the duck HPGA. These results suggest that different genetic backgrounds may lead to differences in duck growth and HPGA-related gene mRNA expression, and the differential mRNA expression of related genes in the duck HPGA may be particularly important in the early growth of ducks. Furthermore, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA expression presented highly significant breed specificity, and evidence suggests the involvement of hepatic IGF-1 in mediating genetic effects on embryo and offspring growth in ducks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Organization of connections between the amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral hypothalamus: a single and double retrograde tracing study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Christina J; Petrovich, Gorica D

    2016-07-01

    The amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are highly interconnected telencephalic areas critical for cognitive processes, including associative learning and decision making. Both structures strongly innervate the lateral hypothalamus (LHA), an important component of the networks underlying the control of feeding and other motivated behaviors. The amygdala-prefrontal-lateral hypothalamic system is therefore well positioned to exert cognitive control over behavior. However, the organization of this system is not well defined, particularly the topography of specific circuitries between distinct cell groups within these complex, heterogeneous regions. This study used two retrograde tracers to map the connections from the amygdala (central and basolateral area nuclei) and mPFC to the LHA in detail, and to determine whether amygdalar pathways to the mPFC and to LHA originate from the same or different neurons. One tracer was placed into a distinct mPFC area (dorsal anterior cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, or rostromedial orbital), and the other into dorsal or ventral LHA. We report that the central nucleus and basolateral area of the amygdala send projections to distinct LHA regions, dorsal and ventral, respectively. The basolateral area, but not central nucleus, also sends substantial projections to the mPFC, topographically organized rostrocaudal to dorsoventral. The entire mPFC, in turn, projects to the LHA, providing a separate route for potential amygdalar influence following mPFC processing. Nearly all amygdalar projections to the mPFC and to the LHA originated from different neurons suggesting amygdala and amygdala-mPFC processing influence the LHA independently, and the balance of these parallel pathways ultimately controls motivated behaviors.

  6. Inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in the hypothalamus, pons and cerebellum of the offspring rat due to experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Tsela, Smaragda; Zissis, Konstantinos M; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Skandali, Nikolina; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Carageorgiou, Haris; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2015-08-01

    Neurodevelopment is known to be particularly susceptible to thyroid hormone insufficiency and can result in extensive structural and functional deficits within the central nervous system (CNS), subsequently leading to the establishment of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The current study evaluated the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism (as a suggestive multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes that has been developed and characterized by the authors) on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a CNS region-specific manner. The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase in the offspring hypothalamus, cerebellum and pons were assessed. The study demonstrated that maternal exposure to PTU (0.05% w/v in the drinking water) during the critical periods of neurodevelopment can result in an inhibition of hypothalamic, pontine and cerebellar Na(+),K(+)-ATPase; a major marker of neuronal excitability and metabolic energy production as well as an important regulator of important systems of neurotransmission. On the other hand, no significant changes in the activities of the herein offspring CNS regions' AChE and Mg(2+)-ATPase were recorded. The observed Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibition: (i) is region-specific (and non-detectable in whole brain homogenetes), (ii) could constitute a central event in the pathophysiology of clinically-relevant hypothyroidism-associated developmental neurotoxicity, (iii) occurs under all examined experimental schemes, and (iv) certainly deserves further clarification at a molecular and histopathological level. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they also underline the need for the adoption and further study of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity as a consistent neurochemical marker within the context of a systematic

  7. Neuroregulation of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA Axis in Humans: Effects of GABA-, Mineralocorticoid-, and GH-Secretagogue-Receptor Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Giordano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis exerts a variety of effects at both the central and peripheral level. Its activity is mainly regulated by CRH, AVP, and the glucocorticoid-mediated feedback action. Moreover, many neurotransmitters and neuropeptides influence HPA axis activity by acting at the hypothalamic and/or suprahypothalamic level. Among them, GABA and Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHS/GHS-receptor systems have been shown to exert a clear inhibitory and stimulatory effect, respectively, on corticotroph secretion. Alprazolam (ALP, a GABA-A receptor agonist, shows the most marked inhibitory effect on both spontaneous and stimulated HPA axis activity, in agreement with its peculiar efficacy in panic disorders and depression where an HPA axis hyperactivation is generally present. Ghrelin and synthetic GHS possess a marked ACTH/cortisol-releasing effect in humans and the ghrelin/GHS-R system is probably involved in the modulation of the HPA response to stress and nutritional/metabolic variations. The glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback action is mediated by both glucocorticoid (GR and mineralocorticoid (MR receptors activation at the central level, mainly in the hippocampus. In agreement with animal studies, MRs seem to play a crucial role in the maintenance of the circadian ACTH and cortisol rhythm, through the modulation of CRH and AVP release. GABA agonists (mainly ALP, ghrelin, as well as MR agonists/antagonists, may represent good tools to explore the activity of the HPA axis in both physiological conditions and pathological states characterized by an impaired control of the corticotroph function.

  8. A patient-specific model of the negative-feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Balamurugan; Merrill, Stephen J; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of modelling the negative-feedback control mechanism of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis is to describe the clinical course of euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and overt hypothyroidism for patients. Thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels are controlled by negative-feedback control through thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). T4, like other hormones, can be bound or unbound; the unbound T4 (FT4) is used as a marker for hypothyroidism. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a disease in which the thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes attack autoantigens in follicle cells, destroying them over a long time. To describe the operation of the feedback control, we developed a mathematical model involving four clinical variables: TSH, FT4, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and the thyroid gland's functional size. The first three variables are regularly measured while the last variable is determined through relationships between the other three variables. The problem of two different time scales for circulating hormones and thyroid damage is addressed using singular perturbation theory. Analysis of the mathematical model establishes stability and conditions under which the diseased state can maintain the slow movement toward diseased state equilibrium. Although we have used four variables in modelling the feedback control through the HPT axis, the predicted clinical course given any set of parameters is shown to depend on the steady-state levels of TSH and FT4. This observation makes possible the development of the clinical charts based only on the levels of TSH, time and potential steady-state values. To validate the model predictions, a dataset obtained from a Sicilian adult population has been employed. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  9. Interplay of hippocampal volume and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis function as markers of stress vulnerability in men at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

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    Pruessner, M; Bechard-Evans, L; Pira, S; Joober, R; Collins, D L; Pruessner, J C; Malla, A K

    2017-02-01

    Altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and reduced hippocampal volume (HV) are established correlates of stress vulnerability. We have previously shown an attenuated cortisol awakening response (CAR) and associations with HV specifically in male first-episode psychosis patients. Findings in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis regarding these neurobiological markers are inconsistent, and assessment of their interplay, accounting for sex differences, could explain incongruent results. Study participants were 42 antipsychotic-naive UHR subjects (24 men) and 46 healthy community controls (23 men). Saliva samples for the assessment of CAR were collected at 0, 30 and 60 min after awakening. HV was determined from high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scans using a semi-automatic segmentation protocol. Cortisol measures and HV were not significantly different between UHR subjects and controls in total, but repeated-measures multivariate regression analyses revealed reduced cortisol levels 60 min after awakening and smaller left HV in male UHR individuals. In UHR participants only, smaller left and right HV was significantly correlated with a smaller total CAR (ρ = 0.42, p = 0.036 and ρ = 0.44, p = 0.029, respectively), corresponding to 18% and 19% of shared variance (medium effect size). Our findings suggest that HV reduction in individuals at UHR for psychosis is specific to men and linked to reduced post-awakening cortisol concentrations. Abnormalities in the neuroendocrine circuitry modulating stress vulnerability specifically in male UHR subjects might explain increased psychosis risk and disadvantageous illness outcomes in men compared to women.

  10. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on the electrical properties of thermally classified neurons in the ventromedial preoptic area of the rat hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin John D

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiological and morphological evidence suggests that activation of the ventromedial preoptic area of the hypothalamus (VMPO is an essential component of an intravenous LPS-dependent fever. In response to the endogenous pyrogen prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, the majority of temperature insensitive neurons in the VMPO show an increase in firing rate, while warm sensitive neurons are inhibited. We have hypothesized that these PGE2 dependent effects on firing rate are due to changes in the inherent electrical properties of VMPO neurons, which are regulated by the activity of specific ionic currents. Results To characterize the electrical properties of VMPO neurons, whole-cell recordings were made in tissue slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results indicate that PGE2 dependent firing rate responses were not the result of changes in resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude and duration, or local synaptic input. However, PGE2 reduced the input resistance of all VMPO neurons, while increasing the excitability of temperature insensitive neurons and decreasing the excitability of warm sensitive neurons. In addition, the majority of temperature insensitive neurons responded to PGE2 with an increase in the rate of rise of the depolarizing prepotential that precedes each action potential. This response to PGE2 was reversed for warm sensitive neurons, in which the prepotential rate of rise decreased. Conclusion We would therefore suggest that PGE2 is having an effect on the ionic currents that regulate firing rate by controlling how fast membrane potential rises to threshold during the prepotential phase of the action potential.

  11. Hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis disruption in rats with breast cancer is related to an altered endogenous oxytocin/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) system.

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    Carrera-González, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; de Saavedra, Jose Manuel Arias; Sánchez-Agesta, Rafael; Mayas, María Dolores; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2011-06-01

    Associations of breast cancer with diseases of the thyroid have been repeatedly reported, but the mechanism underlying this association remains to be elucidated. It has been reported that oxytocin (OXT) attenuates the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) release in response to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) and decreased plasma levels of TSH as well as the thyroid hormones by an effect mediated by the central nervous system. Oxytocinase (IRAP) is the regulatory proteolytic enzyme reported to hydrolyze OXT. Changes in IRAP activity have been reported in both human breast cancer and N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU)-induced rat mammary tumours. Here, we measure IRAP activity fluorometrically using cystyl-β-naphthylamide as the substrate, in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis together with the circulating levels of OXT, and its relationship with circulating levels of TSH and free thyroxine (fT4), as markers of thyroid function in control rats and rats with breast cancer induced by NMU. We found decreased thyroid function in rats with breast cancer induced by NMU, supported by the existence of lower serum circulating levels of both TSH and fT4 than their corresponding controls. Concomitantly, we found a decrease of hypothalamic IRAP activity and an increase in circulating levels of OXT. We propose that breast cancer increases OXT pituitary release by decreasing its hypothalamic catabolism through IRAP activity, probably due to the alteration of the estrogenic endocrine status. Thus, high circulating levels of OXT decreased TSH release from the pituitary, and therefore, of thyroid hormones from the thyroid, supporting the association between breast cancer and thyroid function disruption.

  12. Galanin neurons in the intermediate nucleus (InM) of the human hypothalamus in relation to sex, age, and gender identity.

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    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Ligtenberg, Lisette; Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-10-15

    The intermediate nucleus (InM) in the preoptic area of the human brain, also known as the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the interstitial nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus-1 (INAH-1) is explored here. We investigated its population of galanin-immunoreactive (Gal-Ir) neurons in relation to sex, age, and gender identity in the postmortem brain of 77 subjects. First we compared the InM volume and number of Gal-Ir neurons of 22 males and 22 females in the course of aging. In a second experiment, we compared for the first time the InM volume and the total and Gal-Ir neuron number in 43 subjects with different gender identities: 14 control males (M), 11 control females (F), 10 male-to-female (MtF) transsexual people, and 5 men who were castrated because of prostate cancer (CAS). In the first experiment we found a sex difference in the younger age group ( 45 years. In the second experiment the MtF transsexual group presented an intermediate value for the total InM neuron number and volume that did not seem different in males and females. Because the CAS group did not have total neuron numbers that were different from the intact males, the change in adult circulating testosterone levels does not seem to explain the intermediate values in the MtF group. Organizational and activational hormone effects on the InM are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Ghrelin fibers from lateral hypothalamus project to nucleus tractus solitaries and are involved in gastric motility regulation in cisplatin-treated rats.

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    Gong, Yanling; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shasha; Jin, Hong; Guo, Feifei; Xu, Luo

    2017-03-15

    Ghrelin can alleviate cancer chemotherapy-induced dyspepsia in rodents, though the neural mechanisms involved are not known. Therefore, ghrelin projections from the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its involvement in the regulation of gastric motility in cisplatin-treated rats were investigated with a multi-disciplined approach. Retrograde tracing combined with fluoro-immunohistochemical staining were used to investigate ghrelin fiber projections arising from LH and projecting to nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS). Results revealed that ghrelin fibers originating in LH project to NTS. Expression of ghrelin and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) in LH and NTS were detected by Western Blot. 2days after cisplatin dosing, expression of ghrelin in LH decreased while GHS-R1a in both LH and NTS increased. In electrophysiological experiments, the effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) microinjection in LH on neuronal discharge of gastric distension-responsive neurons in NTS and gastric motility were assessed. NMDA in LH excited most of ghrelin-responsive gastric distension (GD)-sensitive neurons in NTS and promoted gastric motility. This effect was partially blocked by ghrelin antibody in NTS. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of NMDA in cisplatin-treated rats were weaker than those in saline-treated rats. Behaviorally, cisplatin induced a significant increase of kaolin consumption and decrease of food intake. These studies reveal a decreased expression of ghrelin in LH and up-regulation of GHS-R1a in LH and NTS, which are involved in the regulation of GD neuronal discharge in NTS and gastric motility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Repeated in vivo exposure of cocaine induces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in hypocretin/orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus in mice

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    Rao, Yan; Mineur, Yann S; Gan, Geliang; Wang, Alex Hanxiang; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Wu, Xinyuan; Suyama, Shigetomo; de Lecea, Luis; Horvath, Tamas L; Picciotto, Marina R; Gao, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Hypocretin (orexin), a neuropeptide synthesized exclusively in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus, is critical for drug seeking and relapse, but it is not clear how the circuitry centred on hypocretin-producing neurons (hypocretin neurons) is modified by drugs of abuse and how changes in this circuit might alter behaviours related to drug addiction. In this study, we show that repeated, but not single, in vivo cocaine administration leads to a long-lasting, experience-dependent potentiation of glutamatergic synapses on hypocretin neurons in mice following a cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP) protocol. The synaptic potentiation occurs postsynaptically and probably involves up-regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors on hypocretin neurons. Phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is also significantly increased in hypocretin neurons in cocaine-treated animals, suggesting that CREB-mediated pathways may contribute to synaptic potentiation in these cells. Furthermore, the potentiation of synaptic efficacy in hypocretin neurons persists during cocaine withdrawal, but reverses to baseline levels after prolonged abstinence. Finally, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered by a high-frequency stimulation is facilitated in hypocretin neurons in cocaine-treated mice, suggesting that long-lasting changes in synapses onto hypocretin neurons would probably be further potentiated by other stimuli (such as concurrent environmental cues) paired with the drug. In summary, we show here that hypocretin neurons undergo experience-dependent synaptic potentiation that is distinct from that reported in other reward systems, such as the ventral tegmental area, following exposure to cocaine. These findings support the idea that the hypocretin system is important for behavioural changes associated with cocaine administration in animals and humans. PMID:23318871

  15. Repeated in vivo exposure of cocaine induces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in hypocretin/orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yan; Mineur, Yann S; Gan, Geliang; Wang, Alex Hanxiang; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Wu, Xinyuan; Suyama, Shigetomo; de Lecea, Luis; Horvath, Tamas L; Picciotto, Marina R; Gao, Xiao-Bing

    2013-04-01

    Hypocretin (orexin), a neuropeptide synthesized exclusively in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamus, is critical for drug seeking and relapse, but it is not clear how the circuitry centred on hypocretin-producing neurons (hypocretin neurons) is modified by drugs of abuse and how changes in this circuit might alter behaviours related to drug addiction. In this study, we show that repeated, but not single, in vivo cocaine administration leads to a long-lasting, experience-dependent potentiation of glutamatergic synapses on hypocretin neurons in mice following a cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP) protocol. The synaptic potentiation occurs postsynaptically and probably involves up-regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors on hypocretin neurons. Phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is also significantly increased in hypocretin neurons in cocaine-treated animals, suggesting that CREB-mediated pathways may contribute to synaptic potentiation in these cells. Furthermore, the potentiation of synaptic efficacy in hypocretin neurons persists during cocaine withdrawal, but reverses to baseline levels after prolonged abstinence. Finally, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered by a high-frequency stimulation is facilitated in hypocretin neurons in cocaine-treated mice, suggesting that long-lasting changes in synapses onto hypocretin neurons would probably be further potentiated by other stimuli (such as concurrent environmental cues) paired with the drug. In summary, we show here that hypocretin neurons undergo experience-dependent synaptic potentiation that is distinct from that reported in other reward systems, such as the ventral tegmental area, following exposure to cocaine. These findings support the idea that the hypocretin system is important for behavioural changes associated with cocaine administration in animals and humans.

  16. Orexin signaling in rostral lateral hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens shell in the control of spontaneous physical activity in high- and low-activity rats.

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    Perez-Leighton, Claudio; Little, Morgan R; Grace, Martha; Billington, Charles; Kotz, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    Spontaneous physical activity (SPA) describes activity outside of formal exercise and shows large interindividual variability. The hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin peptides are key regulators of SPA. Orexins drive SPA within multiple brain sites, including rostral lateral hypothalamus (LH) and nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh). Rats with high basal SPA (high activity, HA) show higher orexin mRNA expression and SPA after injection of orexin-A in rostral LH compared with low-activity (LA) rats. Here, we explored the contribution of orexin signaling in rostral LH and NAcSh to the HA/LA phenotype. We found that HA rats have higher sensitivity to SPA after injection of orexin-A in rostral LH, but not in NAcSh. HA and LA rats showed similar levels of orexin receptor expression in rostral LH, and activation of orexin-producing neurons after orexin-A injection in rostral LH. Also, in HA and LA rats, the coinjection of orexin-A in rostral LH and NAcSh failed to further increase SPA beyond the effects of orexin-A in rostral LH. Pretreatment with muscimol, a GABA A receptor agonist, in NAcSh potentiated SPA produced by orexin-A injection in rostral LH in HA but not in LA rats. Our results suggest that a feedback loop from orexin-responsive neurons in rostral LH to orexin neurons and a the NAcSh-orexin neuron-rostral LH circuit regulate SPA. Overall, our data suggest that differences in orexin sensitivity in rostral LH and its modulation by GABA afferents from NAcSh contribute to individual SPA differences. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Role of orexin-2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens in antinociception induced by carbachol stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in formalin test.

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    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Ezzatpanah, Somayeh; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    Orexins, which are mainly produced by orexin-expressing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), play an important role in pain modulation. Previously, it has been established that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is involved in the modulation of formalin-induced nociceptive responses, a model of tonic pain. In this study, the role of intra-accumbal orexin-2 receptors (OX2rs) in the mediation of formalin-induced pain was investigated. A volume of 0.5 μl of 10, 20, and 40 nmol/l solutions of TCS OX2 29, an OX2r antagonist, were unilaterally microinjected into the NAc 5 min before an intra-LH carbachol microinjection (0.5 μl of 250 nmol/l solution). After 5 min, animals received a subcutaneous injection of formalin 2.5% (50 μl) into the hind paw. Pain-related behaviors were assessed at 5 min intervals during a 60-min test period. The findings showed that TCS OX2 29 administration dose dependently blocked carbachol-induced antinociception during both phases of formalin-induced pain. The antianalgesic effect of TCS OX2 29 was greater during the late phase compared with the early phase. These observations suggest that the NAc, as a part of a descending pain-modulatory circuitry, partially mediates LH-induced analgesia in the formalin test through recruitment of OX2rs. This makes the orexinergic system a good potential therapeutic target in the control of persistent inflammatory pain.

  18. Central mechanism of the cardiovascular responses caused by L-proline microinjected into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Azevedo, Silvana; Busnardo, Cristiane; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar

    2016-12-01

    Previously, we reported that microinjection of L-proline (L-Pro) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) caused vasopressin-mediated pressor responses in unanesthetized rats. In the present study, we report on the central mechanisms involved in the mediation of the cardiovascular effects caused by the microinjection of L-Pro into the PVN. Microinjection of increasing doses of L-Pro (3-100nmol/100nL) into the PVN caused dose-related pressor and bradycardic responses. No cardiovascular responses were observed after the microinjection of equimolar doses (33nmol/100nL) of its isomer D-Proline (D-Pro) or Mannitol. The PVN pretreatment with either a selective non-NMDA (NBQX) or selective NMDA (LY235959 or DL-AP7) glutamate receptor antagonists blocked the cardiovascular response to L-Pro (33nmol/100nL). The dose-effect curve for the pretreatment with increasing doses of LY235959 was located at the left in relation to the curves for NBQX and DL-AP7, showing that LY235959 is more potent than NBQX, which is more potent than DL-AP7 in inhibiting the cardiovascular response to L-Pro. The cardiovascular response to the microinjection of L-Pro into the PVN was not affected by local pretreatment with N ω -Propyl-l-arginine (N-Propyl), a selective inhibitor of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), suggesting that NO does not mediate the responses to L-Pro in the PVN. In conclusion, the results suggest that ionotropic receptors in the PVN, blocked by both NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists, mediate the pressor response to L-Pro that results from activation of PVN vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons and vasopressin release into the systemic circulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus control cardiovascular reactivity and anxiety-like behavior in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2016-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that deletion of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1a) from the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) attenuates anxiety-like behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and cardiovascular reactivity. We used the Cre/LoxP system to generate male mice with AT1a specifically deleted from the PVN. Deletion of the AT1a from the PVN reduced anxiety-like behavior as indicated by increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. In contrast, PVN AT1a deletion had no effect on HPA axis activation subsequent to an acute restraint challenge but did reduce hypothalamic mRNA expression for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). To determine whether PVN AT1a deletion inhibits cardiovascular reactivity, we measured systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) using telemetry and found that PVN AT1a deletion attenuated restraint-induced elevations in systolic blood pressure and elicited changes in HRV indicative of reduced sympathetic nervous activity. Consistent with the decreased HRV, PVN AT1a deletion also decreased adrenal weight, suggestive of decreased adrenal sympathetic outflow. Interestingly, the altered stress responsivity of mice with AT1a deleted from the PVN was associated with decreased hypothalamic microglia and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Collectively, these results suggest that deletion of AT1a from the PVN attenuates anxiety, CRH gene transcription, and cardiovascular reactivity and reduced brain inflammation may contribute to these effects. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. A moderate diet restriction during pregnancy alters the levels of endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-related lipids in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and olfactory bulb of rat offspring in a sex-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosario Noemi; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Arco, Rocío; Orio, Laura; Suárez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Bindila, Laura; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy has been associated to increased vulnerability to develop metabolic and behavior alterations later in life. The endocannabinoid system might play an important role in these processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a moderate maternal calorie-restricted diet on the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid (AA) and the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) anandamide (AEA), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in the brain of newborn rat offspring. We focused on brain structures involved in metabolism, feeding behavior, as well as emotional and cognitive responses. Female Wistar rats were assigned during the entire pregnancy to either control diet (C) or restriction diet (R), consisting of a 20% calorie-restricted diet. Weight gain and caloric intake of rat dams were monitored and birth outcomes were assessed. 2-AG, AA and NAE levels were measured in hypothalamus, hippocampus and olfactory bulb of the offspring. R dams displayed lower gain weight from the middle pregnancy and consumed less calories during the entire pregnancy. Offspring from R dams were underweight at birth, but litter size was unaffected. In hypothalamus, R male offspring displayed decreased levels of AA and OEA, with no change in the levels of the endocannabinoids 2-AG and AEA. R female exhibited decreased 2-AG and PEA levels. The opposite was found in the hippocampus, where R male displayed increased 2-AG and AA levels, and R female exhibited elevated levels of AEA, AA and PEA. In the olfactory bulb, only R female presented decreased levels of AEA, AA and PEA. Therefore, a moderate diet restriction during the entire pregnancy alters differentially the endocannabinoids and/or endocannabinoid-related lipids in hypothalamus and hippocampus of the underweight offspring, similarly in both sexes, whereas sex-specific alterations occur in the olfactory bulb. Consequently, endocannabinoid and endocannabinoid

  1. Changes in the 5-HT2A receptor system in the pre-mammillary hypothalamus of the ewe are related to regulation of LH pulsatile secretion by an endogenous circannual rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsch Fred J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We wanted to determine if changes in the expression of serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2A receptor gene in the premammillary hypothalamus are associated with changes in reproductive neuroendocrine status. Thus, we compared 2 groups of ovariectomized-estradiol-treated ewes that expressed high vs low LH pulsatility in two different paradigms (2 groups per paradigm: (a refractoriness (low LH secretion or not (high LH secretion to short days in pineal-intact Ile-de-France ewes (RSD and (b endogenous circannual rhythm (ECR in free-running pinealectomized Suffolk ewes in the active or inactive stage of their reproductive rhythm. Results In RSD ewes, density of 5HT2A receptor mRNA (by in situ hybridization was significantly higher in the high LH group (25.3 ± 1.4 vs 21.4 ± 1.5 grains/neuron, P 3H-Ketanserin binding (a specific radioligand of the median part of the premammillary hypothalamus tended to be higher in the high group (29.1 ± 4.0 vs 24.6 ± 4.2 fmol/mg tissu-equivalent; P A receptor mRNA and 3H-Ketanserin binding were both significantly higher in the high LH group (20.8 ± 1.6 vs 17.0 ± 1.5 grains/neuron, P Conclusions We conclude that these higher 5HT2A receptor gene expression and binding activity of 5HT2A receptor in the premammillary hypothalamus are associated with stimulation of LH pulsatility expressed before the development of refractoriness to short days and prior to the decline of reproductive neuroendocrine activity during expression of the endogenous circannual rhythm.

  2. Effects of electrical stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus and food reinforcement on impulse activity of the stomach in rabbits under conditions of hunger and satiation.

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    Zenina, O Yu; Kromin, A A

    2012-10-01

    Stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in preliminary fed animals in the presence of the food is associated with successful food-procuring behavior, accompanied by regular generation of high-amplitude slow electrical waves by muscles of the lesser curvature, body, and antrum of the stomach, which was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of slow electrical activity in the form of unimodal distribution of slow wave periods typical of satiation state. Despite increased level of food motivation caused by stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus, the additional food intake completely abolished the inhibitory effects of hunger motivation excitement on slow electrical muscle activity in the lesser curvature, body, and antrum of the stomach of satiated rabbits. Changes in slow electrical activity of the stomach muscles in rabbits deprived of food over 24 h and offered food and associated food-procuring behavior during electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus have a two-phase pattern. Despite food intake during phase I of electrical stimulation, the downstream inhibitory effect of hunger motivation excitement on myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature of stomach abolishes the stimulating effect of food reinforcement on slow electrical muscle activity in the lesser curvature, body, and antrum of the stomach. During phase II of electrical stimulation, the food reinforcement decreases inhibitory effect of hunger motivation excitement on myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature that paces maximal rhythm of slow electrical waves for muscles activity in the lesser curvature, body, and antrum of the stomach, which is reflected by unimodal distribution of slow electrical wave periods. Our results indicated that the structure of temporal organization of slow electrical activity of the stomach muscles reflects convergent interactions of food motivation and reinforcement excitations on the dorsal vagal complex neurons in medulla oblongata.

  3. Inhalation of air polluted with gasoline vapours alters the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinawy, Amal A; Ezzat, Ahmed R; Al-Suwaigh, Badryah R

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of exposure to the vapours of two kinds of gasoline, a widely used fuel for the internal combustion engines on the levels of the amino acid neurotransmitters of the rat brain. Recent studies provide strong evidence for a causative role for traffic-related air pollution on morbidity outcomes as well as premature death (Health Effects Institute, 2009; Levy et al., 2010; von Stackelberg et al., 2013). Exposure to the vapours of gasoline or its constituents may be accidental, occupational by workers at fuel stations and factories, or through abuse as a mean of mood alteration (Fortenberry, 1985; Mc Garvey et al., 1999). Two kinds of gasoline that are common in Egypt have been used in this study. The first contains octane enhancers in the form of lead derivatives (leaded gasoline; G1) and the other contains methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the octane enhancer (unleaded gasoline; G2). The levels of the major excitatory (aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and the inhibitory (GABA and glycine) amino acid neurotransmitters were determined in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The current study revealed that the acute inhalation of air polluted with the two types of gasoline vapours (1/2 LC50 for 30 min) induced elevation in the levels of aspartic and glutamic acids along with a decrease in glycine and GABA in most studied brain areas. Chronic inhalation of both types of gasoline (a single daily 30-min session of 1/5 LC50 for 60 days) caused a significant increase in the aspartic and glutamic acid concentrations of the hippocampus without affecting the levels of GABA or glycine. Acute and chronic inhalation of either one of G1 and G2 vapours induced a disturbance and fluctuation in the levels of the free amino acids that act as excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the brain areas under investigation. These neurotransmitters are fundamental for the communicative functioning of the neurons and such

  4. Vitamin A Deficiency Induces Autistic-Like Behaviors in Rats by Regulating the RARβ-CD38-Oxytocin Axis in the Hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xi; Wu, Xiaofeng; Hou, Nali; Liu, Shu; Li, Qing; Yang, Ting; Miao, Jingkun; Dong, Zhifang; Chen, Jie; Li, Tingyu

    2018-03-01

    Vitamin A (VA) is an essential nutrient for the development of the brain. We previously found that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a significant rate of VA deficiency (VAD). In the current study, we aim to determine whether VAD is a risk factor for the generation of autistic-like behaviors via the transcription factor retinoic acid receptor beta (RARβ)-regulated cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38)-oxytocin (OXT) axis. Gestational VAD or VA supplementation (VAS) rat models are established, and the autistic-like behaviors in the offspring rats are investigated. The different expression levels of RARβ and CD38 in hypothalamic tissue and serum retinol and OXT concentration are tested. Primary cultured rat hypothalamic neurons are treated with all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), and recombinant adenoviruses carrying the rat RARβ (AdRARβ) or RNA interference virus RARβ-siRNA (siRARβ) are used to infect neurons to change RARβ signal. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and intracellular Ca 2+ detections are used to investigate the primary regulatory mechanism of RARβ in the CD38-OXT signaling pathway. We found that gestational VAD increases autistic-like behaviors and decreases the expression levels of hypothalamic RARβ and CD38 and serum OXT levels in the offspring. VAS ameliorates these autistic-like behaviors and increases the expression levels of RARβ, CD38, and OXT in the gestational VAD pups. In vitro, atRA increases the Ca 2+ excitability of neurons, which might further promote the release of OXT. Different CD38 levels are induced in the neurons by infection with different RARβ adenoviruses. Furthermore, atRA enhances the binding of RARβ to the proximal promoter of CD38, indicating a potential upregulation of CD38 transcriptional activity by RARβ. Gestational VAD might be a risk factor for autistic-like behaviors due to the RARβ signal suppression of CD38 expression in the hypothalamus of the offspring, which

  5. Estrogen enhances expression of the complement C5a receptor and the C5a-agonist evoked calcium influx in hormone secreting neurons of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Imre; Varju, Patricia; Szabo, Emese; Hrabovszky, Erik; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; Liposits, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we examined presence of the complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons of the rodent brain and effect of estrogen on C5aR expression. Whole cell patch clamp measurements revealed that magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamic slices of the rats responded to the C5aR-agonist PL37-MAP peptide with calcium ion current pulses. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) producing neurons in slices of the preoptic area of the mice also reacted to the peptide treatment with inward calcium current. PL37-MAP was able to evoke the inward ion current of GnRH neurons in slices from ovariectomized animals. The amplitude of the inward pulses became higher in slices obtained from 17beta-estradiol (E2) substituted mice. Calcium imaging experiments demonstrated that PL37-MAP increased the intracellular calcium content in the culture of the GnRH-producing GT1-7 cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Calcium imaging also showed that E2 pretreatment elevated the PL37-MAP evoked increase of the intracellular calcium content in the GT1-7 cells. The estrogen receptor blocker Faslodex in the medium prevented the E2-evoked increase of the PL37-MAP-triggered elevation of the intracellular calcium content in the GT1-7 cells demonstrating that the effect of E2 might be related to the presence of estrogen receptor. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that E2 increased the expression of C5aR mRNA in GT1-7 neurons, suggesting that an increased C5aR synthesis could be involved in the estrogenic modulation of calcium response. These data indicate that hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurons can integrate immune and neuroendocrine functions. Our results may serve a better understanding of the inflammatory and neurodegeneratory diseases of the hypothalamus and the related neuroendocrine and autonomic compensatory responses.

  6. Functional interaction between orexin-1 and CB1 receptors in the periaqueductal gray matter during antinociception induced by chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, M H; Reisi, Z; Ezzatpanah, S; Haghparast, A

    2016-11-01

    Chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) with carbachol induces antinociception which is antagonized by blockade of orexin receptors in some pain modulatory sites in the tail-flick test. In this study, we evaluated the role of orexin-1 and CB1 receptors in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), a critical pain modulatory site, in mediation of antinociceptive responses induced by LH stimulation in rats. One hundred thirty-two adult male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-250 g were unilaterally implanted with two separate cannulae into the LH and ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG). Intra-vlPAG administration of SB334867, as a selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist (0.5, 1.5, 5, 15 and 50 nM), or AM251, as a selective CB1 receptor antagonist (1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 nM), was performed just 5 min before carbachol (125 nM) microinjection into the LH. Our findings showed that SB334867 or AM251 administration dose dependently prevented the development of LH-induced antinociception in rats. Treatment with two antagonists at the same time could not intensify their effects in comparison with separate administration of antagonists. It seems that antinociceptive effect of intra-LH administration of carbachol is mediated, at least partially, through the activation of orexin-1 and CB1 receptors in the vlPAG. This work demonstrates a pain modulatory role of the orexinergic system via the PAG in hypothalamic-mediated analgesia suggesting that orexins can be advantageously targeted to achieve analgesia. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: OX1 receptor antagonist (SB334867) administration into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG) dose dependently blocked the carbachol-induced antinociception. CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251) microinjection in the vlPAG prevented carbachol-induced antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrent administration of SB334867 and AM251 into the vlPAG did not reinforce the antinociceptive responses. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  7. Perinatal Western Diet Consumption Leads to Profound Plasticity and GABAergic Phenotype Changes within Hypothalamus and Reward Pathway from Birth to Sexual Maturity in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Paradis

    2017-08-01

    hypothalamus. Altogether, these data reveal that maternal WD, restricted to the perinatal period, has no sustained impact on energy homeostasis and fat preference later in life even though a strong remodeling of the hypothalamic homeostatic and reward pathway involved in eating behavior occurred. Further functional experiments would be needed to understand the relevance of these circuits remodeling.

  8. Cyclic ADP-ribose and heat regulate oxytocin release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the hypothalamus during social or psychological stress in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by -NAD+, cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these -NAD+ metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF OT level increased transiently at 5 minutes after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8

  9. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. (Univ. of Kanazawa School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  10. Distribution of serotonin 5-HT1A-binding sites in the brainstem and the hypothalamus, and their roles in 5-HT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors in rock pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Krüger, Jéssica; Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Herold, Christina; Zilles, Karl; Poli, Anicleto; Güntürkün, Onur; Marino-Neto, José

    2015-12-15

    Serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1ARs), which are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, participate in cognitive and emotional functions. In birds, 5-HT1ARs are expressed in prosencephalic areas involved in visual and cognitive functions. Diverse evidence supports 5-HT1AR-mediated 5-HT-induced ingestive and sleep behaviors in birds. Here, we describe the distribution of 5-HT1ARs in the hypothalamus and brainstem of birds, analyze their potential roles in sleep and ingestive behaviors, and attempt to determine the involvement of auto-/hetero-5-HT1ARs in these behaviors. In 6 pigeons, the anatomical distribution of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding in the rostral brainstem and hypothalamus was examined. Ingestive/sleep behaviors were recorded (1h) in 16 pigeons pretreated with MM77 (a heterosynaptic 5-HT1AR antagonist; 23 or 69 nmol) for 20 min, followed by intracerebroventricular ICV injection of 5-HT (N:8; 150 nmol), 8-OH-DPAT (DPAT, a 5-HT1A,7R agonist, 30 nmol N:8) or vehicle. 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors, brainstem 5-HT neuronal density and brain 5-HT content were examined in 12 pigeons, pretreated by ICV with the 5-HT neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or vehicle (N:6/group). The distribution of brainstem and diencephalic c-Fos immunoreactivity after ICV injection of 5-HT, DPAT or vehicle (N:5/group) into birds provided with or denied access to water is also described. 5-HT1ARs are concentrated in the brainstem 5-HTergic areas and throughout the periventricular hypothalamus, preoptic nuclei and circumventricular organs. 5-HT and DPAT produced a complex c-Fos expression pattern in the 5-HT1AR-enriched preoptic hypothalamus and the circumventricular organs, which are related to drinking and sleep regulation, but modestly affected c-Fos expression in 5-HTergic neurons. The 5-HT-induced ingestivebehaviors and the 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep behaviors were reduced by MM77 pretreatment. 5,7-DHT increased sleep per se, decreased tryptophan

  11. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J.

    1990-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography

  12. Long-day suppressed expression of type 2 deiodinase gene in the mediobasal hypothalamus of the Saanen goat, a short-day breeder: implication for seasonal window of thyroid hormone action on reproductive neuroendocrine axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Nakao, Nobuhiro; Ohkura, Satoshi; Iigo, Masayuki; Hagiwara, Satoko; Goto, Akemitsu; Ando, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Takashi; Watanabe, Miwa; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Oda, Sen-ichi; Maeda, Kei-ichiro; Lincoln, Gerald A; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In most animals that live in temperate regions, reproduction is under photoperiodic control. In long-day breeders such as Japanese quail and Djungarian hamsters, type 2 deiodinase (Dio2) plays an important role in the mediobasal hypothalamus, catalyzing the conversion of prohormone T4 to bioactive T3 to regulate the photoperiodic response of the gonads. However, the molecular basis for seasonal reproduction in short-day breeders remains unclear. Because thyroid hormones are also known to be involved in short-day breeders, we examined the effect of an artificial long-day stimulus on Dio2 expression in the male Saanen goat (Capra hircus), a short-day breeder. Dio2 expression was observed in the caudal continuation of the arcuate nucleus, known as the target site for both melatonin and T4 action. In addition, expression of Dio2 and T3 content in the mediobasal hypothalamus was suppressed by artificial long-day conditions, which is the opposite of the results of long-day breeders. Thyroid hormone action on the development of neuroendocrine anestrus is known to be limited to a specific seasonal window. This long-day suppression of Dio2 may provide a mechanism that accounts for the lack of responsiveness to thyroxine during the mid to late anestrus.

  13. Molecular characterization of Kiss2 receptor and in vitro effects of Kiss2 on reproduction-related gene expression in the hypothalamus of half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Quan; Liu, Xuezhou; Xu, Yongjiang; Shi, Bao

    2017-08-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss) and its receptor, KissR (previously known as GPR54), play a critical role in the control of reproduction and puberty onset in mammals. Additionally, a number of studies have provided evidence of the existence of multiple Kiss/KissR systems in teleosts, but the physiological relevance and functions of these kisspeptin forms (Kiss1 and Kiss2) still remain to be investigated. To this end, we examined the direct actions of Kiss2 on hypothalamic functions in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), a representative species of the order Pleuronectiformes. As a first step, the full-length cDNA for kiss2r was identified and kiss2r transcripts were shown to be widely expressed in various tissues, notably in the brain of tongue sole. Then, the effects of Kiss2 decapeptide on reproduction-related gene expression were evaluated using a primary hypothalamus culture system. Our results showed that neither gnrh2 nor gnrh3 mRNA levels were altered by Kiss2. However, Kiss2 significantly increased the amounts of gnih and kiss2 mRNAs. In contrast, Kiss2 elicited an evident inhibitory effect on both gnihr and kiss2r mRNA levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a direct and differential regulation of reproduction-related gene expression by Kiss2 at the hypothalamus level of a teleost fish. Overall, this study provides novel information on the role of Kiss2/Kiss2R system in the reproductive function of teleosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adverse effects of BDE-47 on in vivo developmental parameters, thyroid hormones, and expression of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis genes in larvae of the self-fertilizing fish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Il-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-06-01

    2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenylether (BDE-47) is known to have the potential to disrupt the thyroid endocrine system in fishes due to its structural similarity to the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). However, the effects of BDE-47 on thyroid function in fishes remain unclear. In this study, abnormal development (e.g. deformity, hemorrhaging) and an imbalance in thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis was shown in the early developmental stages of the mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus in response to BDE-47 exposure. To examine the thyroid endocrinal effect of BDE-47 exposure in mangrove killifish K. marmoratus larvae, transcript levels of genes involved in TH homeostasis and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis-related genes were measured. The expression of thyroid hormone metabolism-related genes (e.g. deiodinases, UGT1ab) and HPT axis-related genes was up-regulated and there were significant changes in TH levels (P thyroid endocrine system of fishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Infusion of modafinil into anterior hypothalamus or pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus at different time-points enhances waking and blocks the expression of recovery sleep in rats after sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Haro, Reyes; Drucker-Colín, René; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that the primary pharmacological activity of modafinil (MOD) is inducing wakefulness; however, the brain targets that underlie its wake-promoting activity have not been described. In the present study, we show that MOD injected into sleep-wake related brain areas promoted alertness. If administered (10, 20, or 30 μg/1 μL) into either anterior hypothalamus (AH) or pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) at 08:00, 12:00 or 16:00 h, MOD enhanced wakefulness whereas diminished slow wave sleep as well as rapid eye movement sleep. In addition, microinjection of MOD (10, 20, or 30 μg/1 μL) either into AH or PPTg after total sleep deprivation prevented the sleep rebound. Taken together, these observations suggest that AH and PPTg play a key role in the wake-inducing effects of MOD and encourage further experimentation to draw a possible mechanism of action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The V1a and V1b, but not V2, vasopressin receptor genes are expressed in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus, and the transcripts are essentially colocalized in the vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbin, A; Boissin-Agasse, L; Orcel, H; Rabié, A; Joux, N; Desarménien, M G; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-11-01

    We have identified and visualized the vasopressin (VP) receptors expressed by hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. To do this, we used RT-PCR on total RNA extracts from supraoptic nuclei or on single freshly dissociated supraoptic neurons, and in situ hybridization on frontal sections of hypothalamus of Wistar rats. The RT-PCR on supraoptic RNA extracts revealed that mainly V1a, but also V1b, subtypes of VP receptors are expressed from birth to adulthood. No V2 receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected. Furthermore, the single-cell RT-nested PCR indicated that the V1a receptor mRNA is present in vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons. In light of these results, in situ hybridization was performed to visualize the V1a and V1b receptor mRNAs in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Simultaneously, we coupled this approach to: 1) in situ hybridization detection of oxytocin or VP mRNAs; or 2) immunocytochemistry to detect the neuropeptides. This provided a way of identifying the neurons expressing perceptible amounts of V1a or V1b receptor mRNAs as vasopressinergic neurons. Here, we suggest that the autocontrol exerted specifically by VP on vasopressinergic neurons is mediated through, at least, V1a and V1b subtype receptors.

  17. An optimized method for neurotransmitters and their metabolites analysis in mouse hypothalamus by high performance liquid chromatography-Q Exactive hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zong-Lin; Li, Hui; Wang, Bing; Liu, Shu-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) and their metabolites are known to play an essential role in maintaining various physiological functions in nervous system. However, there are many difficulties in the detection of NTs together with their metabolites in biological samples. A new method for NTs and their metabolites detection by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q Exactive hybrid quadruple-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) was established in this paper. This method was a great development of the applying of Q Exactive MS in the quantitative analysis. This method enabled a rapid quantification of ten compounds within 18min. Good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient above 0.99. The concentration range of the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) level were 0.0008-0.05nmol/mL and 0.002-25.0nmol/mL respectively. Precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) of this method were at 0.36-12.70%. Recovery ranges were between 81.83% and 118.04%. Concentrations of these compounds in mouse hypothalamus were detected by Q Exactive LC-MS technology with this method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of short-term and prolonged stress on the biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamus and GnRHR in the pituitary of ewes during various physiological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechanowska, M; Łapot, M; Antkowiak, B; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Paluch, M; Przekop, F

    2016-11-01

    Using an ELISA assay, the levels of GnRH and GnRHR were analysed in the preoptic area (POA), anterior (AH) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VM), stalk/median eminence (SME); and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) of non-breeding and breeding sheep subjected to short-term or prolonged stress. The ELISA study was supplemented with an analysis of plasma LH concentration. Short-term footshock stimulation significantly increased GnRH levels in hypothalamus in both seasons. Prolonged stress elevated or decreased GnRH concentrations in the POA and the VM, respectively during anoestrus, and lowered GnRH amount in the POA-hypothalamus of follicular-phase sheep. An up-regulation of GnRHR levels was noted in both, anoestrous and follicular-phase animals. In the non-breeding period, a prolonged stress procedure increased GnRHR biosynthesis in the VM and decreased it in the SME and AP, while in the breeding time the quantities of GnRHR were significantly lower in the whole hypothalamus. In follicular-phase ewes the fluctuations of GnRH and GnRHR levels under short-term and prolonged stress were reflected in the changes of LH secretion, suggesting the existence of a direct relationship between GnRH and GnRH-R biosynthesis and GnRH/LH release in this period. The study showed that stress was capable of modulating the biosynthesis of GnRH and GnRHR; the pattern of changes was dependent upon the animal's physiological state and on the time course of stressor application. The obtained results indicate that the disturbances of gonadotropin secretion under stress conditions in sheep may be due to a dysfunction of GnRH and GnRHR biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females' alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females' within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Variation in parent–offspring kinship in socially monogamous systems with extra‐pair reproduction and inbreeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jane M.; Bocedi, Greta; Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Duthie, A. Bradley; Wolak, Matthew E.; Gow, Elizabeth A.; Arcese, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Female extra‐pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems is predicted to cause cuckolded socially‐paired males to conditionally reduce paternal care, causing selection against extra‐pair reproduction and underlying polyandry. However, existing models and empirical studies have not explicitly considered that cuckolded males might be related to their socially‐paired female and/or to her extra‐pair mate, and therefore be related to extra‐pair offspring that they did not sire but could rear. Selection against paternal care, and hence against extra‐pair reproduction, might then be weakened. We derive metrics that quantify allele‐sharing between within‐pair and extra‐pair offspring and their mother and her socially‐paired male in terms of coefficients of kinship and inbreeding. We use song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) paternity and pedigree data to quantify these metrics, and thereby quantify the joint effects of extra‐pair reproduction and inbreeding on a brood's total allelic value to its socially‐paired parents. Cuckolded male song sparrows were almost always detectably related to extra‐pair offspring they reared. Consequently, although brood allelic value decreased substantially following female extra‐pair reproduction, this decrease was reduced by within‐pair and extra‐pair reproduction among relatives. Such complex variation in kinship within nuclear families should be incorporated into models considering coevolutionary dynamics of extra‐pair reproduction, parental care, and inbreeding. PMID:27174154

  1. Developmental timing of signals affects information content: song complexity but not consistency reflects innate immune strategy in male song sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubli, Shawn P; MacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A

    2014-05-01

    In short-lived animals, innate immunity is an important component of fitness and quality. Although receivers cannot generally assess a signaler's immune function directly, sexually selected displays such as birdsong may reflect past or current condition. We investigated the degree to which song complexity and consistency, thought to reflect condition over different developmental timescales, predict multiple aspects of innate immunity in male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). We also investigated correlations among immune measures. Noncellular components of innate immunity (soluble blood proteins including natural antibody and other protective proteins) were negatively related to cellular (phagocytosis-based) components, suggesting trade-offs within innate immune protection. This pattern underscores the risk of inferring "immunocompetence" from a single metric. Song complexity, a permanent trait in this species, was positively related to noncellular relative to cellular immune components and may thus provide information as to the singer's innate immune strategy (investment in noncellular vs. cellular activity). Such a relationship could arise through shared timing of song learning and antibody repertoire development in early life. Singing consistency, thought to track variation in current condition and measured at both whole-song and syllable scales, did not predict any immune measures. Developmental timing of signals thus appears to influence their information content.

  2. No evidence of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits in wild song sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losdat, Sylvain; Germain, Ryan R; Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Arcese, Peter; Reid, Jane M

    2018-02-01

    Inbreeding is widely hypothesized to shape mating systems and population persistence, but such effects will depend on which traits show inbreeding depression. Population and evolutionary consequences could be substantial if inbreeding decreases sperm performance and hence decreases male fertilization success and female fertility. However, the magnitude of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits has rarely been estimated in wild populations experiencing natural variation in inbreeding. Further, the hypothesis that inbreeding could increase within-ejaculate variation in sperm traits and thereby further affect male fertilization success has not been explicitly tested. We used a wild pedigreed song sparrow ( Melospiza melodia ) population, where frequent extrapair copulations likely create strong postcopulatory competition for fertilization success, to quantify effects of male coefficient of inbreeding ( f ) on key sperm performance traits. We found no evidence of inbreeding depression in sperm motility, longevity, or velocity, and the within-ejaculate variance in sperm velocity did not increase with male f . Contrary to inferences from highly inbred captive and experimental populations, our results imply that moderate inbreeding will not necessarily constrain sperm performance in wild populations. Consequently, the widely observed individual-level and population-level inbreeding depression in male and female fitness may not stem from reduced sperm performance in inbred males.

  3. Testosterone and aggression: Berthold, birds and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, K K

    2006-07-01

    Berthold's classic study of domesticated roosters in 1849 demonstrated that testicular secretions are necessary for the normal expression of aggressive behaviour. Although this conclusion is undoubtedly correct, field studies of wild songbirds have yielded important modifications and limitations of Berthold's original hypothesis. For example, studies of the North American song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) during the breeding season reveal that not only does testosterone increase aggression, but aggressive interactions also increase plasma testosterone levels. Furthermore, in winter, nonbreeding song sparrows have low plasma testosterone levels but are very aggressive, and castration of nonbreeding song sparrows does not decrease aggression. Interestingly, an aromatase inhibitor (fadrozole) does decrease male aggression in the nonbreeding season, and the effects of fadrozole can be rescued with oestradiol. In winter, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) from the periphery can be metabolised within the brain to supply oestradiol to specific neural circuits. Additionally, oestradiol might be synthesised de novo from cholesterol entirely within the brain. These mechanisms may have evolved to avoid the 'costs' of circulating testosterone in the nonbreeding season. Recent studies in tropical birds, hamsters, and humans suggest that these neuroendocrine mechanisms are important for the control of aggression in many vertebrate species.

  4. Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Aggression in Birds and Mice: The Fast and the Furious

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimovics, Sarah A.; Trainor, Brian C.; Soma, Kiran K.

    2015-01-01

    Across invertebrates and vertebrates, steroids are potent signaling molecules that affect nearly every cell in the organism, including cells of the nervous system. Historically, researchers have focused on the genomic (or “nuclear-initiated”) effects of steroids. However, all classes of steroids also have rapid non-genomic (or “membrane-initiated”) effects, although there is far less basic knowledge of these non-genomic effects. In particular, steroids synthesized in the brain (“neurosteroids”) have genomic and non-genomic effects on behavior. Here, we review evidence that estradiol has rapid effects on aggression, an important social behavior, and on intracellular signaling cascades in relevant regions of the brain. In particular, we focus on studies of song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) and Peromyscus mice, in which estradiol has rapid behavioral effects under short photoperiods only. Furthermore, in captive Peromyscus, estrogenic compounds (THF-diols) in corncob bedding profoundly alter the rapid effects of estradiol. Environmental factors in the laboratory, such as photoperiod, diet, and bedding, are critical variables to consider in experimental design. These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that locally-produced steroids are more likely than systemic steroids to act via non-genomic mechanisms. Furthermore, these studies illustrate the dynamic balance between genomic and non-genomic signaling for estradiol, which is likely to be relevant for other steroids, behaviors, and species. PMID:25980562

  5. Male song sparrows have elevated testosterone in response to neighbors versus strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser-Purdy, Christopher; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A; Bonier, Frances; Graham, Brendan A; Boyer, Andrea C; Mennill, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    Upon hearing a conspecific signal, animals must assess their relationship with the signaller and respond appropriately. Territorial animals usually respond more aggressively to strangers than neighbors in a phenomenon known as the "dear enemy effect". This phenomenon likely evolved because strangers represent a threat to an animal's territory tenure and parentage, whereas neighbors only represent a threat to an animal's parentage because they already possess a territory (providing territory boundaries are established and stable). Although the dear enemy effect has been widely documented using behavioral response variables, little research has been conducted on the physiological responses of animals to neighbors versus strangers. We sought to investigate whether the dear enemy effect is observed physiologically by exposing territorial male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to playback simulating a neighbor or a stranger, and then collecting blood samples to measure plasma testosterone levels. We predicted that song sparrows would exhibit increased testosterone levels after exposure to stranger playback compared to neighbor playback, due to the role testosterone plays in regulating aggression. Contrary to our prediction, we found that song sparrows had higher testosterone levels after exposure to neighbor playback compared to stranger playback. We discuss several explanations for our result, notably that corticosterone may regulate the dear enemy effect in male song sparrows and this may inhibit plasma testosterone. Future studies will benefit from examining corticosterone in addition to testosterone, to better understand the hormonal underpinnings of the dear enemy effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Wintering bird response to fall mowing of herbaceous buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, P.J.; Parks, J.R.; Dively, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Herbaceous buffers are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted between working agricultural land and streams or wetlands. Mowing is a common maintenance practice to control woody plants and noxious weeds in herbaceous buffers. Buffers enrolled in Maryland's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) cannot be mowed during the primary bird nesting season between 15 April and 15 August. Most mowing of buffers in Maryland occurs in late summer or fall, leaving the vegetation short until the following spring. We studied the response of wintering birds to fall mowing of buffers. We mowed one section to 10-15 cm in 13 buffers and kept another section unmowed. Ninety-two percent of birds detected in buffers were grassland or scrub-shrub species, and 98% of all birds detected were in unmowed buffers. Total bird abundance, species richness, and total avian conservation value were significantly greater in unmowed buffers, and Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis), Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), and White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) were significantly more abundant in unmowed buffers. Wintering bird use of mowed buffers was less than in unmowed buffers. Leaving herbaceous buffers unmowed through winter will likely provide better habitat for wintering birds. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  7. To flock or fight: neurochemical signatures of divergent life histories in sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, James L; Wilson, Leah C; Schrock, Sara E

    2012-06-26

    Many bird species exhibit dramatic seasonal switches between territoriality and flocking, but whereas neuroendocrine mechanisms of territorial aggression have been extensively studied, those of seasonal flocking are unknown. We collected brains in spring and winter from male field sparrows (Spizella pusilla), which seasonally flock, and male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), which are territorial year-round in much of their range. Spring collections were preceded by field-based assessments of aggression. Tissue series were immunofluorescently multilabeled for vasotocin, mesotocin (MT), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, tyrosine hydroxylase, and aromatase, and labeling densities were measured in many socially relevant brain areas. Extensive seasonal differences are shared by both species. Many measures correlate significantly with both individual and species differences in aggression, likely reflecting evolved mechanisms that differentiate the less aggressive field sparrow from the more aggressive song sparrow. Winter-specific species differences include a substantial increase of MT and CRH immunoreactivity in the dorsal lateral septum (LS) and medial amygdala of field sparrows but not song sparrows. These species differences likely relate to flocking rather than the suppression of winter aggression in field sparrows, because similar winter differences were found for two other emberizids that are not territorial in winter--dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), which seasonally flock, and eastern towhees (Pipilo erythropthalmus), which do not flock. MT signaling in the dorsal LS is also associated with year-round species differences in grouping in estrildid finches, suggesting that common mechanisms are targeted during the evolution of different life histories.

  8. The distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in song sparrows along Arizona's upper Santa Cruz River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are persistent environmental contaminants, and transport of metals into the environment poses a threat to ecosystems, as plants and wildlife are susceptible to long-term exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential toxicity. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in southwestern song sparrows (Melospiza melodia fallax), a resident riparian bird species that occurs along the US/Mexico border in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to a 2009 international wastewater facility upgrade, and (3) assess the condition of song sparrows among sites with differing potential levels of exposure. We examined five study sites along with a reference site that reflect different potential sources of contamination. Body mass residuals and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Birds at our study sites typically had higher metal concentrations than birds at the reference site. Copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium in song sparrows did exceed background levels, although most metals were below background concentrations determined from previous studies. Song sparrows generally showed lower heavy metal concentrations compared to studies conducted prior to the 2009 wastewater facility upgrade. We found no cascading effects as a result of metal exposure.

  9. Individual differences affect honest signalling in a songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Çağlar; Campbell, S. Elizabeth; Beecher, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Research in the past decade has established the existence of consistent individual differences or ‘personality’ in animals and their important role in many aspects of animal behaviour. At the same time, research on honest signalling of aggression has revealed that while some of the putative aggression signals are reliable, they are only imperfectly so. This study asks whether a significant portion of the variance in the aggression-signal regression may be explained by individual differences in signalling strategies. Using the well-studied aggressive signalling system of song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), we carried out repeated assays to measure both aggressive behaviours and aggressive signalling of territorial males. Through these assays, we found that aggressive behaviours and aggressive signalling were both highly repeatable, and moreover that aggressive behaviours in 2009–2010 predicted whether the birds would attack a taxidermic mount over a year later. Most significantly, we found that residual variation in signalling behaviours, after controlling for aggressive behaviour, was individually consistent, suggesting there may be a second personality trait determining the level of aggressive signalling. We term this potential personality trait ‘communicativeness’ and discuss these results in the context of honest signalling theories and recent findings reporting prevalence of ‘under-signalling’. PMID:24307671

  10. Birdsong signals individual diversity at the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J W G; Watson, M J; MacDougall-Shackleton, E A

    2017-11-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a key role in vertebrate immunity, and pathogen-mediated selection often favours certain allelic combinations. Assessing potential mates' MHC profiles may provide receivers with genetic benefits (identifying MHC-compatible mates and producing optimally diverse offspring) and/or material benefits (identifying optimally diverse mates capable of high parental investment). Oscine songbirds learn songs during early life, such that song repertoire content can reflect population of origin while song complexity can reflect early life condition. Thus birdsong may advertise the singer's genetic dissimilarity to others in the population (and, presumably, compatibility with potential mates), or individual genetic diversity (and thus condition-dependent material benefits). We tested whether song repertoire content and/or complexity signal MHC class IIβ dissimilarity and/or diversity in male song sparrows ( Melospiza melodia ). Pairwise dissimilarity in repertoire content did not predict MHC dissimilarity between males, suggesting that locally rare songs do not signal rare MHC profiles. Thus, geographical variation in song may not facilitate MHC-mediated inbreeding or outbreeding. Larger repertoires were associated with intermediate MHC diversity, suggesting intermediate rather than maximal MHC diversity is optimal. This could reflect trade-offs between resisting infection and autoimmune disorders. Song complexity may advertise optimal MHC diversity, a trait affecting disease resistance and capacity for parental care. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Chemical composition of preen wax reflects major histocompatibility complex similarity in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J W G; Watson, M J; Kelly, T R; Gloor, G B; Bernards, M A; MacDougall-Shackleton, E A

    2016-11-16

    In jawed vertebrates, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a key role in immunity by encoding cell-surface proteins that recognize and bind non-self antigens. High variability at MHC suggests that these loci may also function in social signalling such as mate choice and kin recognition. This requires that MHC genotype covaries with some perceptible phenotypic trait. In mammals and fish, MHC is signalled chemically through volatile and non-volatile peptide odour cues, facilitating MHC-dependent mate choice and other behaviours. In birds, despite evidence for MHC-dependent mating, candidate mechanisms for MHC signalling remain largely unexplored. However, feather preen wax has recently been implicated as a potential source of odour cues. We examined whether the chemical composition of preen wax correlates with MHC class IIβ genotypes of wild song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Pairwise chemical distance reflected amino acid distance at MHC for male-female dyads, although not for same-sex dyads. Chemical diversity did not reflect MHC diversity. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to characterize preen wax compounds, and identified four wax esters that best reflect MHC similarity. Provided songbirds can detect variation in preen wax composition, this cue may allow individuals to assess MHC compatibility of potential mates. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Emotional exhaustion and overcommitment to work are differentially associated with hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to a low-dose ACTH1-24 (Synacthen) and dexamethasone-CRH test in healthy school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Maren; Bellingrath, Silja; Feuerhahn, Nicolas; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for a detrimental impact of chronic work stress on health has accumulated in epidemiological research. Recent studies indicate altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation as a possible biological pathway underlying the link between stress and disease. However, the direction of dysregulation remains unclear, with reported HPA hyper- or hyporeactivity. To disentangle potential effects on different functional levels in the HPA axis, we examined responses using two pharmacological stimulation tests in 53 healthy teachers (31 females, 22 males; mean age: 49.3 years; age range: 30-64 years): a low-dose adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH(1-24), Synacthen) test was used to assess adrenal cortex sensitivity and the combined dexamethasone-corticotropin relea