WorldWideScience

Sample records for mellitus clinical utility

  1. Utility of DN4 questionnaire in assessment of neuropathic pain and its clinical correlations in Turkish patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, S; Yenidunya, G; Temel, E; Purisa, S; Uzum, A Kubat; Gul, N; Cinkil, G; Dinccag, N; Satman, I

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the utility of DN4 questionnaire (Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questions) to define the frequency and severity of neuropathic pain (NP) and also its clinical correlation to daily clinical practice. We included 1357 patients with diabetes (56.5% women, 90.4% type 2 diabetes) who were followed up in our diabetes outpatient clinic. Presence of NP was evaluated by performing simultaneous DN4 questionnaires and physical examination. Those who had a DN4 score ≥4 were considered to have NP. The mean age was 58.2±12.1 years, mean duration was 12.5±7.5; (min-max: 1-45) years, mean HbA1c level was 7.8±1.6% (min-max: 5-16.2%), (61.7±6.0mmol/mol; min-max: 31.1-153.6mmol/mol). Three hundred thirteen patients (23%) were diagnosed with NP using the DN4 tool. Male gender (p=0.01), receiving antihypertensive treatment (p=0.01), presence of retinopathy (pdiabetes duration (pdiabetes duration (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00-1.04, p=0.007), elevated HbA1c levels (1.11, 1.02-1.21, 0.015), presence of retinopathy (1.41, 1.20-1.64, diet only-regimens) were significantly associated with NP. Utilization of DN4 questionnaire in daily clinical practice is an effective tool in the identification of pain related with peripheral diabetic polyneuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the clinical utility of optical quality and fundus autofluorescence metrics for monitoring and screening for diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Maroto, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    La Diabetes Mellitus (DM) es una enfermedad sistémica que se caracteriza por una hiperglucemia crónica asociada a daños a largo plazo de diferentes órganos, como son los ojos, riñones, corazón y vasos sanguíneos, entre otros. Normalmente, la DM se clasifica en DM tipo 1 y DM tipo 2, a los que también hay que añadir la diabetes gestacional y otros tipos de diabetes causados por factores genéticos y otras enfermedades o infecciones. La DM es una enfermedad que constituye un gran impacto soci...

  3. Debating Clinical Utility

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, W.; Laberge, A.-M.; Press, N.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical utility of genetic tests is determined by the outcomes following test use. Like other measures of value, it is often contested. Stakeholders may have different views about benefits and risks and about the importance of social versus health outcomes. They also commonly disagree about the evidence needed to determine whether a test is effective in achieving a specific outcome. Questions may be presented as factual disagreements, when they are actually debates about what information...

  4. Debating clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Wylie; Laberge, A-M; Press, N

    2010-01-01

    The clinical utility of genetic tests is determined by the outcomes following test use. Like other measures of value, it is often contested. Stakeholders may have different views about benefits and risks and about the importance of social versus health outcomes. They also commonly disagree about the evidence needed to determine whether a test is effective in achieving a specific outcome. Questions may be presented as factual disagreements, when they are actually debates about what information matters or how facts should be interpreted and used in clinical decision-making. Defining the different issues at stake is therefore an important element of policy-making. Key issues include evidence standards for test use, and in particular, the circumstances under which prospective controlled data should be required, as well as evidence on feasibility, cost and equitable delivery of testing; the goals of population-based screening programs, and in particular, the role of social outcomes in evaluating test value; and the appropriate uses and funding of tests that inform non-medical actions. Addressing each of these issues requires attention to stakeholder values and methods for effective deliberation that incorporate consumer as well as health professional perspectives. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Megan J.; Vite, Charles H.; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  6. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Megan J; Vite, Charles H; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S

    2008-06-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  7. Factors associated with clinical remission in cats with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsin Lien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease in cats. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that are associated with clinical remission in diabetic cats, and those that might influence survival time. Medical records of 29 cats with diabetes mellitus were evaluated retrospectively. Data collected from each record included breed, age, and sex, types of diet before and after admission, degree of weight loss, duration of clinical signs before admission, elevation of alanine aminotransferase activity and ketonuria at the time of admission, concurrent pancreatitis or renal failure, glipizide administration, insulin supplement, and survival time. The diet after establishing diagnosis (restriction to non-carbohydrate canned food was the only factor that was significantly associated with achieving clinical remission (P P = 0.004 with clinical remission status and the type of diet after admission (P = 0.04 and negatively associated with the presence of chronic renal failure (P = 0.04. This was the first report of feline diabetes mellitus from Taiwan.

  8. Clinical survey to detect diabetes mellitus, Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnick, P.A.; Anderson, P.S. Jr.

    1961-07-19

    Data from this study are in agreement with the general observations that diabetes is not uncommon in Japan. In an adult study population in Hiroshima 108 patients with diabetes were detected, yielding the prevalence rate of 3.02 percent. Nearly one-half of the patients were diagnosed initially as a result of the routine detection program. Although in females a trend with exposure is suggested by the raw data no statistically significant differences could be demonstrated. However, the size of the sample involved does not permit confident negative conclusions. Additional clinical and laboratory observations were completed in order to characterize the manifestation of diabetes in these subjects. Late manifestations of diabetes frequently were found, but atherosclerotic complications were nonexistent. This is considered to be related to the low fat, high carbohydrate diet of the Japanese. The lack of ketosis, apparently low prevalence rate for juveniles, and male preponderance suggest that diabetes in Japan differs from the disease found in many Western countries. 69 references, 1 figure, 9 tables.

  9. Clinical Utility and "DSM-V"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The construction of the American Psychiatric Association's diagnostic manual has been guided primarily by concerns of construct validity rather than of clinical utility, despite claims by its authors that the highest priority has in fact been clinical utility. The purpose of this article was to further articulate the concept and importance of…

  10. Clinical presentation and management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Azemi N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasser Al-Azemi,1 Michael F Diejomaoh,1,2 Elisavet Angelaki,1 Asiya T Mohammed2 1Maternity Hospital, Shuwaikh, Kuwait; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait Objective: To evaluate the clinical presentation, management, and the outcome of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy. Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with diabetes mellitus admitted between September 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008, to the labor room at Maternity Hospital in Kuwait for induction of labor made up the study population; while an equivalent number of patients without medical complications who also were admitted for induction of labor made up the control group. The patients were assessed at admission, and their medical data were extracted. The study and control patients were monitored through labor/puerperium, and the outcome was documented. Results: Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 71.9% of the study patients, a past history of diabetes mellitus was recorded in 81.34% of the study patients, and 49.2% of the patients were admitted at 8–12 weeks of gestation for diabetic control. The mean weight gained in pregnancy was significantly higher for control patients (11.52±5.643 versus [vs] 9.90±5.757 kg/m2; P<0.009, and the body mass index of study patients was higher (32.00±6.160 vs 28.20±5.885 kg/m2; P<0.0001. Of the study population, 64.3% of the patients were managed with diet and increased physical activity and 35.7% with insulin, diet, and increased physical activity. The incidences of maternal morbidity in both study and control groups were comparable, and the incidence of preeclampsia was low, at 2.3%. The gestational age at delivery was higher in the control group (39.02±1.834 weeks vs 38.62±1.773 weeks; P<0.0001, and the percentage of cesarean deliveries was higher in the study population (44.4% vs 33.3%; P=0.046. The Apgar scores of the both groups were comparable and in the normal range, and the

  11. Clinical periodontal status and inflammatory cytokines in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçaka, Özgün; Ceyhan-Öztürk, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Akcalı, Aliye; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare clinical periodontal findings as well as gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and IL-33 between women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Serum and GCF samples were collected, full-mouth recordings comprising plaque index, bleeding on probing and probing depth were performed in 96 females with GDM (cases) and 65 non-diabetic pregnant females (controls). Age, smoking status, pre-pregnancy body mass index, pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Serum and GCF IL-10, IL-33, TNF-α levels were determined. The GDM group was significantly older than the control group with an age difference of 3.27 years (mean ages were 32.05 and 28.78 years, respectively) (pperiodontal health during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rajhans, Neelima S.; Kohad, Ramesh M.; Chaudhari, Viren G.; Mhaske, Nilkanth H.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non-diabetics. Aim: The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Materials and Methods: Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral ...

  13. [The changes in vestibular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Tianyu; Shen, Jianzhong; Gong, Jingrong; Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Jimin; Pang, Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    To study the changes of vestibular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and its clinical significance. Electronystagmography (ENG) was used to examine 76 patients with diabetes mellitus and 60 healthy adults subjects. After clinical detection of vestibular function including spontaneous nystagmus, positional test, head shaking nystagmus, neck torsion test, caloric test, and sensory organization tests which consist of gaze, saccade and smooth pursuit test, the results of these two groups were recorded for qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis. The rate of vestibular dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus were 68.4%. and that of the controls were 8.3%. There was significant difference between these two groups (chi2 = 15.472, P Vertigo or dizziness occurred in patients with diabetes mellitus might be related to vestibular dysfunction. ENG test could be used as one of the objective clinical examinations in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  14. Clinical features of diabetes mellitus in Japan as observed in a hospital outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Sunao; Toda, Shintaro; Omori, Yoshiaki; Yamakido, Michio; Blackard, W.G.

    1963-04-18

    A university diabetes clinic in Japan was characterized by age at examination, age at onset, sex ratio, microangiopathies, atherosclerotic complications, weight, heredity, and diet. The findings in this clinic, along with those from other diabetes clinics in Japan, were compared with studies on Western diabetics. The similarities between the 2 diabetic populations far outnumbered the dissimilarities. However, diabetes mellitus in Japan is distinguished by infrequent occurrence of juvenile diabetes and ketosis, relative lack of atherosclerotic complications, and reversal of the sex ratio. 39 references, 7 tables.

  15. Clinical utility of measures of breathlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah L; Rodak, Bernadette

    2002-09-01

    The clinical utility of measures of dyspnea has been debated in the health care community. Although breathlessness can be evaluated with various instruments, the most effective dyspnea measurement tool for patients with chronic lung disease or for measuring treatment effectiveness remains uncertain. Understanding the evidence for the validity and reliability of these instruments may provide a basis for appropriate clinical application. Evaluate instruments designed to measure breathlessness, either as single-symptom or multidimensional instruments, based on psychometrics foundations such as validity, reliability, and discriminative and evaluative properties. Classification of each dyspnea measurement instrument will recommend clinical application in terms of exercise, benchmarking patients, activities of daily living, patient outcomes, clinical trials, and responsiveness to treatment. Eleven dyspnea measurement instruments were selected. Each instrument was assessed as discriminative or evaluative and then analyzed as to its psychometric properties and purpose of design. Descriptive data from all studies were described according to their primary patient application (ie, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or other patient populations). The Borg Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale are applicable to exertion and thus can be applied to any cardiopulmonary patient to determine dyspnea. All other measures were determined appropriate for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, whereas the Shortness of Breath Questionnaire can be applied to cystic fibrosis and lung transplant patients. The most appropriate utility for all instruments was measuring the effects on activities of daily living and for benchmarking patient progress. Instruments that quantify function and health-related quality of life have great utility for documenting outcomes but may be limited as to documenting treatment responsiveness in terms of clinically important changes. The dyspnea

  16. Hypoglycaemia in diabetes mellitus: epidemiology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frier, Brian M

    2014-12-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a frequent adverse effect of treatment of diabetes mellitus with insulin and sulphonylureas. Fear of hypoglycaemia alters self-management of diabetes mellitus and prevents optimal glycaemic control. Mild (self-treated) and severe (requiring help) hypoglycaemia episodes are more common in type 1 diabetes mellitus but people with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus are also exposed to frequent hypoglycaemic events, many of which occur during sleep. Hypoglycaemia can disrupt many everyday activities such as driving, work performance and leisure pursuits. In addition to accidents and physical injury, the morbidity of hypoglycaemia involves the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Whereas coma and seizures are well-recognized neurological sequelae of hypoglycaemia, much interest is currently focused on the potential for hypoglycaemia to cause dangerous and life-threatening cardiac complications, such as arrhythmias and myocardial ischaemia, and whether recurrent severe hypoglycaemia can cause permanent cognitive impairment or promote cognitive decline and accelerate the onset of dementia in middle-aged and elderly people with diabetes mellitus. Prevention of hypoglycaemia is an important part of diabetes mellitus management and strategies include patient education, glucose monitoring, appropriate adjustment of diet and medications in relation to everyday circumstances including physical exercise, and the application of new technologies such as real-time continuous glucose monitoring, modified insulin pumps and the artificial pancreas.

  17. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cirrhosis: clinical implications and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkrief, Laure; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sarin, Shiv; Valla, Dominique; Paradis, Valérie; Moreau, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Disorders of glucose metabolism, namely glucose intolerance and diabetes, are frequent in patients with chronic liver diseases. In patients with cirrhosis, diabetes can be either a classical type 2 diabetes mellitus or the so-called hepatogenous diabetes, i.e. a consequence of liver insufficiency and portal hypertension. This review article provides an overview of the possible pathophysiological mechanisms explaining diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is associated with portosystemic shunts as well as reduced hepatic mass, which can both impair insulin clearance by the liver, contributing to peripheral insulin resistance through insulin receptors down-regulation. Moreover, cirrhosis is associated with increased levels of advanced-glycation-end products and hypoxia-inducible-factors, which may play a role in the development of diabetes. This review also focuses on the clinical implications of diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. First, diabetes is an independent factor for poor prognosis in patients with cirrhosis. Specifically, diabetes is associated with the occurrence of major complications of cirrhosis, including ascites and renal dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy and bacterial infections. Diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver diseases. Last, the management of patients with concurrent diabetes and liver disease is also addressed. Recent findings suggest a beneficial impact of metformin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Insulin is often required in patients with advanced cirrhosis. However, the favourable impact of controlling diabetes in patients with cirrhosis has not been demonstrated yet. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a review of the diagnosis, clinical implications and management

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Vincent Wing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition that affects the wellbeing of mother and fetus. Women with GDM are at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the future, while fetal exposure to hyperglycaemia in-utero may affect their glycometabolic profile later in life. Appropriate screening and management of this problem is important in ensuring good pregnancy outcomes. In this review, the clinical implications, the various ways to screen and diagnose GDM, and management strategies d...

  19. Antidiabetic Effects of Resveratrol: The Way Forward in Its Clinical Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola R. Oyenihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the understanding and management of diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of the disease is increasing unabatedly with resulting disabling and life-reducing consequences to the global human population. The limitations and side effects associated with current antidiabetic therapies have necessitated the search for novel therapeutic agents. Due to the multipathogenicity of diabetes mellitus, plant-derived compounds with proven multiple pharmacological actions have been postulated to “hold the key” in the search for an affordable, efficacious, and safer therapeutic agent in the treatment of the disease and associated complications. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in few plant species, has demonstrated beneficial antidiabetic effects in animals and humans through diverse mechanisms and multiple molecular targets. However, despite the enthusiasm and widespread successes achieved with the use of resveratrol in animal models of diabetes mellitus, there are extremely limited clinical data to confirm the antidiabetic qualities of resveratrol. This review presents an update on the mechanisms of action and protection of resveratrol in diabetes mellitus, highlights challenges in its clinical utility, and suggests the way forward in translating the promising preclinical data to a possible antidiabetic drug in the near future.

  20. Clinical Trial Designs to Support Clinical Utility of Pharmacogenomic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Pacanowski, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Advancing the use of biomarkers and pharmacogenomics has been a key priority area for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA offers prescribing recommendations to manage ~100 gene-drug interactions, and multiple institutions around the United States and abroad have incorporated genomic testing into patient care. However, the penetration of pharmacogenomic testing remains incomplete. In this perspective, we summarize the evidence streams to support the clinical utility of pharmacogenomic testing and its transition into clinical practice. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Negative pressure wound therapy: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heidi Sandoz Accelerate CIC, Mile End Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT, also known as topical negative pressure therapy, has been increasingly used in health care for the management of a wide variety of wounds over the last 2–3 decades. It is an advanced therapy that can be helpful to accelerate wound healing in both acute and chronic wounds by delivering negative pressure (suction to the wound bed. More recent advancements in the application of NPWT have provided clinicians with wider choices of utilization. There are now devices available that can deliver irrigation to the wound bed, be used for closed surgical incisions, or are disposable and highly portable. Systematic reviews considering NPWT have been published previously. These usually focus on one wound group or device and fail to offer practical clinical guidance due to the scrutiny offered to the evidence via a systematic review process. Here, an overview of the history of NPWT, the varieties of device available, their wide clinical application, and the evidence to support its use are explored in a pragmatic way. Keywords: negative pressure, wound, incision, healing, pain 

  2. Zinc Transporters, Mechanisms of Action and Therapeutic Utility: Implications for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Myers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element that plays a vital role in maintaining many biological processes and cellular homeostasis. Dysfunctional zinc signaling is associated with a number of chronic disease states including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes. Cellular homeostasis requires mechanisms that tightly control the uptake, storage, and distribution of zinc. This is achieved through the coordinated actions of zinc transporters and metallothioneins. Evidence on the role of these proteins in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is now emerging. Zinc plays a key role in the synthesis, secretion and action of insulin in both physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, recent studies highlight zinc’s dynamic role as a “cellular second messenger” in the control of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. This suggests that zinc plays an unidentified role as a novel second messenger that augments insulin activity. This previously unexplored concept would raise a whole new area of research into the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and introduce a new class of drug target with utility for diabetes pharmacotherapy.

  3. Pediatric Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Epidemiology, Comorbidities, and Medication Utilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli Farsani, S.

    2015-01-01

    The numbers of patients with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) are increasing globally, both in adults and children. Pediatric diabetes mellitus is an important health concern, since this disease has significant effects on health and quality of life, social function, use of medical services and

  4. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus: Aptitud clínica del médico de atención primaria Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical aptitude of the doctor of primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Gómez-López

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar la aptitud clínica del médico de las Unidades de Medicina Familiar, en la atención de la diabetes mellitus. Material y métodos: Diseño transversal y comparativo. Se aplicó un instrumento de evaluación validado previamente por un grupo de expertos, a 78 médicos familiares que se desempeñan en el primer nivel de atención. Dentro de los indicadores explorados con el instrumento de evaluación se incluyen: I Reconocimiento de factores de riesgo, II Reconocimiento de signos y síntomas, III Utilización e interpretación de recursos de laboratorio y gabinete, IV Integración diagnóstica, V Utilización de medidas terapéuticas y VI Medidas de seguimiento. Para el análisis estadístico, se utilizó la prueba de Kruskall-Wallis y la Ji cuadrada con un nivel de significancia de 0.05 Resultados: El puntaje que correspondió a lo explicable por efectos del azar fue Objective: to compare the clinic aptitude of the doctor in the unities of familiar medicine in the care of the diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods: Transversal and comparative pattern. A evaluation previously validated by a group of experts was apply to 78 specialist in familiar medicine who redeem in the first level of attention. The indicators explored in the evaluation are. I recognition of cause of risk. II recognition of signs and symptoms. III utilization and interpretation of laboratory studies and consultation studies. IV diagnostic integration. V utilization of terapeutic measures and VI following measures. For the statistical analysis, it was used the Kruskall-Wallis and chi-square with a level of important of 0.05 Results: the points to the explainable for effects of chance were of < 24 in global grade. According to the scale used, the 64 % (IC 95 % de 53 a 70 % of the results in the grades was situated in the low scale (49-73. In general it didn´t appear significative differences in the results of clinic aptitude by indicator and academic degree

  6. External validation of a clinical scoring system for the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    Aim: A prediction rule for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could be helpful in early detection and increased efficiency of screening. A prediction rule by means of a clinical scoring system is available, but has never been validated externally. The aim of this study was to validate the scoring

  7. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of retinopathy in assessing the risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular morbidity or death among patients in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). Design TREAT enrolled 4038 patients with T2DM, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and moderate anemia. Patients were grouped by baseline history of retinopathy. Proportional hazards regression models were utilized to assess the association between retinopathy and subsequent ESRD, cardiovascular morbidity or death over an average of 2.4 years. Results Although younger, the 1895 (47%) patients with retinopathy had longer duration of diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, more proteinuria, and more microvascular complications. In univariate analysis, retinopathy was associated with a higher rate of ESRD, but not with cardiovascular events or mortality. After adjustment, retinopathy was no longer statistically significant for the prediction of ESRD or any clinical endpoint. Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with T2DM, CKD, and anemia, retinopathy was common but not independently associated with a higher risk of renal or cardiovascular morbidity or death. Trial registration number NCT00093015 PMID:25452859

  8. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Neelima S; Kohad, Ramesh M; Chaudhari, Viren G; Mhaske, Nilkanth H

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non.diabetics. The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral examination was carried out and relevant history was recorded for all the patients. Results indicated that the prevalence of periodontal disease in diabetic patients was 86.8%. It can be concluded that poorer the glycemic control, and longer the duration of diabetes, the greater will be the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease.

  9. Molecular diagnostics clinical utility strategy: a six-part framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Felix W; Quinn, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    The clinical utility of a molecular test rises proportional to a favorable regulatory risk/benefit assessment, and clinical utility is the driver of payer coverage decisions. Although a great deal has been written about clinical utility, debates still center on its 'definition.' We argue that the definition (an impact on clinical outcomes) is self-evident, and improved communications should focus on sequential steps in building and proving an adequate level of confidence for the diagnostic test's clinical value proposition. We propose a six-part framework to facilitate communications between test developers and health technology evaluators, relevant to both regulatory and payer decisions.

  10. Orthokeratology: clinical utility and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charm J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jessie Charm Sight Enhancement Center, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Abstract: Orthokeratology (ortho-k is a special rigid contact lens worn at night to achieve myopic reduction and control. This review provides an overview on prescribing ortho-k, including clinical consideration on patient aspect and lens design; its clinical outcomes; and clinical efficacy and safety. Patient satisfaction was summarized. In order to achieve long-term healthy ortho-k treatment, it requires both patient and practitioners’ care and rapport to maintain good ocular health and lens conditions. Keywords: orthokeratology, efficacy, patient satisfaction, myopic reduction, myopic control

  11. Prevalence of eating disorders and psychiatric comorbidity in a clinical sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Papelbaum,Marcelo; Appolinário,José Carlos; Moreira,Rodrigo de Oliveira; Ellinger,Vivian Carola Moema; Kupfer,Rosane; Coutinho,Walmir Ferreira

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have shown high rates of eating disorders and psychiatric morbidity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVE: disturbed eating behavior and psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of T2DM patients. METHODS: Seventy type 2 diabetes mellitus patients between 40 and 65 years of age (mean, 52.9 ± 6.8) from a diabetes outpatient clinic were sequentially evaluated. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Binge Eating Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were u...

  12. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Omani Children - Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Al-Yaarubi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics and clinical presentation of Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all children with type 1 diabetes mellitus attending the Pediatric Endocrine Unit at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2006 to May 2013. Results: One hundred and forty-four patients were included in the study. The mean±SD of age at diagnosis was 6.7 ± 3.7 years. The median duration of symptoms was 10 days (IQR; 5-14. The most commonly reported presenting symptoms were polyuria (94%, polydipsia (82%, and weight loss (59%. Diabetic ketoacidosis at initial presentation was diagnosed in 31% of the patients. Different insulin regimens were prescribed: multiple daily injections in 109 (76% patients, twice daily insulin regimen in 23 (16% patients, and insulin pump therapy in 12 (8% patients. Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus was present in 31 (22% patients. There were no significant differences in presenting complaints (polyuria, p=0.182; polydipsia, p=0.848, duration of symptoms (p=0.331, reported weight loss (p=0.753, or diabetic ketoacidosis at presentation (p=0.608 between patients with and without family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss are the most common presenting symptoms. Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent among the studied patients. Diabetic ketoacidosis was found to be less common in Oman compared to other diabetes centers in the Middle East.

  13. Clinical utility of the KAMRA corneal inlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroo, Shehzad Anjam; Bilkhu, Paramdeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of presbyopia has been the focus of much scientific and clinical research over recent years, not least due to an increasingly aging population but also the desire for spectacle independence. Many lens and nonlens-based approaches have been investigated, and with advances in biomaterials and improved surgical methods, removable corneal inlays have been developed. One such development is the KAMRA™ inlay where a small entrance pupil is exploited to create a pinhole-type effect that increases the depth of focus and enables improvement in near visual acuity. Short- and long-term clinical studies have all reported significant improvement in near and intermediate vision compared to preoperative measures following monocular implantation (nondominant eye), with a large proportion of patients achieving Jaeger (J) 2 to J1 (~0.00 logMAR to ~0.10 logMAR) at the final follow-up. Although distance acuity is reduced slightly in the treated eye, binocular visual acuity and function remain very good (mean 0.10 logMAR or better). The safety of the inlay is well established and easily removable, and although some patients have developed corneal changes, these are clinically insignificant and the incidence appears to reduce markedly with advancements in KAMRA design, implantation technique, and femtosecond laser technology. This review aims to summarize the currently published peer-reviewed studies on the safety and efficacy of the KAMRA inlay and discusses the surgical and clinical outcomes with respect to the patient’s visual function. PMID:27274194

  14. Clinical utility of the KAMRA corneal inlay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naroo SA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shehzad Anjam Naroo, Paramdeep Singh Bilkhu Ophthalmic Research Group, School of Life & Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK Abstract: The treatment of presbyopia has been the focus of much scientific and clinical research over recent years, not least due to an increasingly aging population but also the desire for spectacle independence. Many lens and nonlens-based approaches have been investigated, and with advances in biomaterials and improved surgical methods, removable corneal inlays have been developed. One such development is the KAMRA™ inlay where a small entrance pupil is exploited to create a pinhole-type effect that increases the depth of focus and enables improvement in near visual acuity. Short- and long-term clinical studies have all reported significant improvement in near and intermediate vision compared to preoperative measures following monocular implantation (nondominant eye, with a large proportion of patients achieving Jaeger (J 2 to J1 (~0.00 logMAR to ~0.10 logMAR at the final follow-up. Although distance acuity is reduced slightly in the treated eye, binocular visual acuity and function remain very good (mean 0.10 logMAR or better. The safety of the inlay is well established and easily removable, and although some patients have developed corneal changes, these are clinically insignificant and the incidence appears to reduce markedly with advancements in KAMRA design, implantation technique, and femtosecond laser technology. This review aims to summarize the currently published peer-reviewed studies on the safety and efficacy of the KAMRA inlay and discusses the surgical and clinical outcomes with respect to the patient’s visual function. Keywords: presbyopia, refractive surgery, implants, cornea

  15. Clinical utility of positron emission mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Shannon B.; Shah, Zeeshan A.

    2013-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been introduced over recent years to better screen for and stage breast cancer. Positron emission mammography (PEM) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and introduced into clinical use as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography and breast ultrasonography. PEM has higher resolution and a more localized field of view than positron emission tomography–computed tomography and can be performed on patients to stage a newly diagnosed malignancy. Revie...

  16. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a review of the diagnosis, clinical implications and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Wing-Ming Wong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a condition that affects the wellbeing of mother and fetus. Women with GDM are at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the future, while fetal exposure to hyperglycaemia in-utero may affect their glycometabolic profile later in life. Appropriate screening and management of this problem is important in ensuring good pregnancy outcomes. In this review, the clinical implications, the various ways to screen and diagnose GDM, and management strategies during pregnancy will be discussed. For years, insulin is the mainstay of treatment if medical nutrition therapy fails to maintain adequate glycaemic control, but use of other oral pharmacotherapy may gain greater acceptance in the future. Following delivery, ongoing follow-up of these women is worthwhile as early intervention through lifestyle or pharmacotherapy may prevent the development of diabetes.

  17. Clinical utility of positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Shannon B; Shah, Zeeshan A

    2013-07-01

    Several imaging modalities have been introduced over recent years to better screen for and stage breast cancer. Positron emission mammography (PEM) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and introduced into clinical use as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography and breast ultrasonography. PEM has higher resolution and a more localized field of view than positron emission tomography-computed tomography and can be performed on patients to stage a newly diagnosed malignancy. Review of mammograms together with magnetic resonance or PEM images improves detection of disease.

  18. Clinical utility of nuchal translucency screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanovic V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vedran Stefanovic,1 Outi Äyräs,1 Marianne Eronen,2 Jorma Paavonen,1 Minna Tikkanen1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, 2Health Department, The Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Helsinki, Finland Abstract: The term nuchal translucency (NT is used to describe the accumulation of fluid behind the fetal neck visible on ultrasound in the first trimester of pregnancy. In singleton and dichorionic twin pregnancies, increased NT thickness is associated with trisomy 21 and other aneuploidies, major fetal anomalies (especially congenital heart disease, and genetic syndromes. The pathophysiology and significance of increased or discordant NT in monochorionic twin pregnancies is more complex and is associated with twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome and other pregnancy complications due to monochorionicity. The long-term neurological outcome of euploid children without structural anomalies after increased fetal NT seems to be favorable. Proper counseling is essential in the screening process. Special attention should be paid to the assessment of NT screening quality control. Even in the era of arising possibilities for non-invasive fetal karyotype determination from maternal blood, the role of NT screening is far from over. The association of this phenomenon with aneuploidies is only one of its utilities in modern obstetrics. Keywords: nuchal translucency, screening, aneuploidy, congenital anomaly, counseling, obstetrics

  19. Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective management of the T1DM athlete is a constant challenge due to various concerns such as the increased risk of hypoglycemia. This review seeks to summarize the available literature and aid clinicians in clinical decision-making for this patient population. PubMed searches were conducted for "type 1 diabetes mellitus AND athlete" along with "type 1 diabetes mellitus AND exercise" from database inception through November 2015. All articles identified by this search were reviewed if the article text was available in English and related to management of athletes with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles yielded additional literature included in this review. The majority of current literature available exists as recommendations, review articles, or proposed societal guidelines, with less prospective or higher-order treatment studies available. The available literature is presented objectively with an attempt to describe clinically relevant trends and findings in the management of athletes living with T1DM. Managing T1DM in the context of exercise or athletic competition is a challenging but important skill for athletes living with this disease. A proper understanding of the hormonal milieu during exercise, special nutritional needs, glycemic control, necessary insulin dosing adjustments, and prevention/management strategies for exercise-related complications can lead to successful care plans for these patients. Individualized management strategies should be created with close cooperation

  20. The utility of an electronic adherence assessment device in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study of single medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Kheir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nadir Kheir1, William Greer2, Adil Yousif3, Hajer Al-Geed1, Randa Al Okkah1, Mahmoud Zirie4, Amy Sandridge5, Manal Zaidan61College of Pharmacy, 2Sidra Medical and Research Centre, 3Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, 4Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 5Private Research Consultant, 6Al Amal Cancer Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, QatarObjectives: The primary objective of this pilot study was to determine if the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS is capable of providing meaningful estimates of compliance within the indigenous Qatari population. The secondary objective was to highlight any specific problems which might be associated with the use of MEMS within this population.Method: A sample of adult diabetic Qatari patients attending an outpatient diabetic clinic were administered a Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices (KAP questionnaire and then dispensed one of their regular medications in a MEMS®-fitted bottle. Data contained in the MEMS® were downloaded after the patients returned for a refill and adherence was estimated using 2 methods: pill count and MEMS® data.Results: A total of 54 patients agreed to participate in this pilot study. Adherence to daily doses was 67.7% and with regimen 13.7%. No correlation was found between adherence assessed by pill count and MEMS®. The association between KAP and adherence was generally poor. A number of other issues and challenges in the use of MEMS® that could affect its utility were noted and will be discussed.Conclusions: Our results revealed problems associated with the use of MEMS® that could affect its usefulness in assessing adherence in this part of the world. Some issues identified in this pilot study included retrieving the MEMS®, registering extra opening of MEMS®, desire to hoard medicine by taking doses at different frequency than recorded in MEMS®. All these issues could be closely associated with the

  1. Pharmacist management of patients with diabetes mellitus enrolled in a rural free clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, Julie M; Franklin, Meg A; Gerrald, Katherine R

    2013-01-01

    The impact of pharmacist management of patients with diabetes mellitus enrolled in a rural free clinic was evaluated. Data from 95 patients continuously enrolled in a new pharmacist service were analyzed over 24 months. Patients were at least 18 years old, qualified for free care on the basis of income or insurance status, and had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus upon clinic entry. Under a collaborative agreement, pharmacists educated patients on diabetes, counseled patients on lifestyle modifications, assessed appropriateness of drug therapy, and managed drug therapy for diabetes and associated comorbid conditions. Clinical impact was measured by changes from baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels, blood pressure, and lipid levels over a 24-month period. Using published cost estimates, the economic impact of the clinic was calculated based on expected savings for each patient who had a decrease of ≥1% in HbA(1c) value. Significant reductions from baseline in HbA1c values (p 1% in HbA(1c) value (n = 67), the pharmacist service was estimated to provide a savings of $74,906 per year. Pharmacist management of patients with type 2 diabetes significantly influenced clinical and economic outcomes in an uninsured population living in a rural area with few health care resources.

  2. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  3. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  4. Healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Hatzigeorgiou, Christos; Anglin, Judith; Xie, Ding; Besenyi, Gina M; De Leo, Gianluca; Stewart, Jessica; Wilkins, Thad

    2017-01-01

    Diet and exercise therapy have been reported to be effective in improving blood glucose control and are an important part of treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, as measured by Hgb-A1c, cardiovascular indicators, physical activity, weight, and BMI. Also of interest are optimal strategies for subject recruitment, the number of intervention sessions attended, and participant use of the Fitbit watch to monitor their physical activity and track food and beverage consumption. A pre/post-test design will be used in this pilot study. Non-institutionalized adult patients (n=50) aged 18-65 years who have been seen at the Augusta Health outpatient clinics (General Internal Medicine or Family Medicine) for type 2 diabetes in the past 12 months, and who are interested in reducing their risk of disease recurrence through healthy lifestyle behaviors, will be eligible to participate. At orientation visit, eligible individuals will be asked to provide written informed consent. Consenting volunteers (n=50) will be asked to complete the baseline and 6-month follow-up questionnaire and to participate in 12 weekly group sessions of 90 min duration, involving physical activity and to meet with a dietitian (baseline, one month, 90 days) to receive individualized advice on diet and nutrition. The technology-based intervention will use wrist-worn Fitbit Blaze physical activity monitoring devices. This pilot study will provide important information about the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of consumer-facing devices such as the Fitbit watch has the potential advantage over the use of research accelerometers, pedometers, or actigraphs in increasing the likelihood that the intervention will be sustainable after the study ends.

  5. Central macular thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without clinical retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mehmet; Oba, Ersin; Dirim, Burcu; Ozdal, Erhan; Can, Efe

    2013-04-09

    An increase in macular thickness due to fluid accumulation in the macula in patients with diabetes mellitus. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been shown to be highly reproducible in measuring macular thickness in normal individuals and diabetic patients. OCT can detect subtle changes of macular thickness. The aim of this study is to compare central macular thickness (CMT) of diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy and normal controls, in order to assess possible increased macular thickness associated with diabetes mellitus. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements were performed in 124 eyes of 62 subjects with diabetes mellitus without clinically retinopathy (study group: 39 female, 23 male, mean age: 55.06 ± 9.77 years) and in 120 eyes of 60 healthy subjects (control group: 35 female, 25 male, mean age: 55.78 ± 10.34 years). Blood biochemistry parameters were analyzed in all cases. The data for central macular thickness (at 1 mm) and the levels of the fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were compared in both groups. The mean central macular thickness was 232.12 ±24.41 μm in the study group and 227.19 ± 29.94 μm in the control group.The mean HbA1c level was 8.92 ± 2.58% in the study group and 5.07 ± 0.70% in the control group (p=0.001). No statistically significant relationship was found between CMT, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose level in either group (p=0.05). Central macular thickness was not significantly thicker in patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy than in healthy subjects.

  6. Clinical Utility of the CCAPS, CAS, and OQ-45

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Ian M.; Henry, Courtney L.; Nash, Trisha; Kissel, Susan; Bush, David

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study evaluating the clinical utility of three clinical assessment measures commonly used in university counseling centers: the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45), the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms, and the College Adjustment Scales. Results found subscales assessing depression and anxiety were…

  7. Utility of glycated albumin for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in a Japanese population study: results from the Kyushu and Okinawa Populaiton Study (KOPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glycated albumin is a measure of the mean plasma glucose concentration over approximately 2-3 weeks. We determined reference values for glycated albumin, and assessed its utility for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the general population. We studied 1,575 men and women (mean age, 49.9 y...

  8. Socio-demographic determinants of antenatal clinic utilization in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-demographic determinants of antenatal clinic utilization in a Nigerian university teaching hospital. ... CONCLUSION:Among other social factors female education improved women's ability to take decisions on reproductive matters. Poor education and low socioeconomic status not only increase women's vulnerability ...

  9. RESEARCH NOTE Clinical Utility of a 377 gene custom NGS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-11

    Nov 11, 2016 ... reduces the ambiguity of reporting VUSs, particularly in light of the non-seizure related association of ~70% of the genes. Furthermore, our data suggests that rarer genes may play a more significant role in the manifestation of epileptic phenotypes. The clinical utility of a test is primarily determined by its ...

  10. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  11. Clinical significance of detection of GAD-Ab, ICA and IAA in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jinhong; Liu Zhenzong; Wang Huimin

    2006-01-01

    To explore value of combined detection of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody(GAD-Ab), islet cell antibody (ICA) and insulin autoantibody (IAA) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Serum GAD-Ab, ICA and IAA were detected by chemiluminescent immunoassay and RIA in 46 of type 1 diabetes mellitus (1 DM), 78 of 2 DM respectively, and in 50 nondiabetic subjects as control group, and analysed according to the positive rates of different groups. Results showed that the positive rate of GAD-Ab was 67.39%, ICA 39.73%, IAA 23.91% in 1 DM,and that of GAD-Ab was 8.97%, ICA 15.39%, IAA 10.26% in 2 DM respectively. The positive rate of combined detection of GAD-Ab, ICA and IAA was 91.30% in patients with 1 DM, and 29.49% which was higher than that in control group (P<0.01). The detection of serum GAD-Ab,ICA and IAA might be regarded as clinical significance for classification, treatment and predict prognosis of DM. (authors)

  12. Metformin versus Insulin in the Management of Pre-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyuo, Titus; Obed, Samuel Amenyi; Adjepong-Yamoah, Kenneth Kweku; Bugyei, Kwasi Agyei; Oppong, Samuel Antwi; Marfoh, Kissinger

    2015-01-01

    To determine if metformin monotherapy or metformin in combination with insulin is equally effective as insulin monotherapy at glycemic control in diabetes mellitus in pregnancy among Ghanaians. This was a study involving 104 pregnant women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) at 20-30 weeks gestation. Participants were randomized into metformin and insulin treatment groups. Starting dose of metformin was 500 mg once a day and increased gradually over two (2) weeks, to meet glycemic targets. Insulin was added if targets could not be reached on metformin alone at maximum doses. Total daily dose of premixed insulin at initiation was calculated as 0.3 IU/kg body weight and titrated upwards to achieve glycemic control. Glycemic profile monitoring was done every two weeks. The two hour post prandial blood glucose (2HPG) levels were significantly lower in the metformin group than the insulin group (p= 0.004). The findings of this study suggest that metformin monotherapy is effective in achieving glycemic targets in the management of diabetes in pregnancy. It is more effective than insulin in lowering the 2HPG level. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12614000942651.

  13. Metformin versus Insulin in the Management of Pre-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Beyuo

    Full Text Available To determine if metformin monotherapy or metformin in combination with insulin is equally effective as insulin monotherapy at glycemic control in diabetes mellitus in pregnancy among Ghanaians.This was a study involving 104 pregnant women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM at 20-30 weeks gestation. Participants were randomized into metformin and insulin treatment groups. Starting dose of metformin was 500 mg once a day and increased gradually over two (2 weeks, to meet glycemic targets. Insulin was added if targets could not be reached on metformin alone at maximum doses. Total daily dose of premixed insulin at initiation was calculated as 0.3 IU/kg body weight and titrated upwards to achieve glycemic control. Glycemic profile monitoring was done every two weeks.The two hour post prandial blood glucose (2HPG levels were significantly lower in the metformin group than the insulin group (p= 0.004.The findings of this study suggest that metformin monotherapy is effective in achieving glycemic targets in the management of diabetes in pregnancy. It is more effective than insulin in lowering the 2HPG level.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR ACTRN12614000942651.

  14. [Epidemiologic and clinical features of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care facilities (Sousse, Tunisie)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Drissi, Leila; Tlili, Henda; Gaha, Khaled; Soltane, Ibtissem; Amrani, Raja; Ghannemr, Hassen

    2006-07-01

    As a result of epidemiologic transition, diabetes mellitus became a major public health problem in Tunisia. We tried to determine the epidemiological and clinical features of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary health care units in Sousse (Tunisia). It was a cross sectional study about a stratified sample of 404 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients followed in primary care offices in Sousse in 2003. Average age was 60 + 10.9 years and sex-ratio was 0.5. Hypertension and obesity were found in respectively 71.3% and 37.6%. Diabetic neuropathy was the most frequent degenerative complication (41.1%) followed by diabetic retinopathy (18.3%). Thus, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, followed in primary care units show a high cardiovascular risk with serious and frequent complications. That's why, the national care program of type diabetes mellitus, in primary health care should take in consideration, in its guidelines, the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of these patients.

  15. Diabetes mellitus in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in an aging population in Shanghai, China: Prevalence, clinical characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheyuan; Guo, Juntao; Huang, Ying; Cai, Enmao; Zhang, Xia; Pan, Qichao; Yuan, Zheng'an; Shen, Xin

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients and the difference of clinical characteristics and outcomes between pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without diabetes mellitus in an aging population in Shanghai, China. This is a retrospective population-based study. 201 newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Changning District, Shanghai during 2007-2008 were included. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were collected. Determination of diabetes mellitus was based on the medical records before pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients was 19.9% (40/201). Pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus were more likely to be old (≥50, OR=5.23, 95% CI=2.07-13.25), to have pulmonary cavities (OR=3.02, 95% CI=1.31-6.98), to be sputum smear positive (OR=2.90, 95% CI=1.12-7.51), and to have extension of anti-tuberculosis treatment duration (OR=2.68, 95% CI 1.17-6.14). Besides, they had a higher 2nd month sputum smear positive proportion (OR=2.97, 95% CI 1.22-7.22) and a higher 5-year recurrence rate (OR=5.87, 95% CI 1.26-27.40). High prevalence, severe clinical characteristics and poor outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus highlight the necessity of early bi-directional screening and co-management of these two diseases in Shanghai, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethnic differences in the timely diagnosis of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands: clinical presentation at onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, J. J. N.; Grishchenko, M.; van Wouwe, J. P.; Stronks, K.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Little is known about ethnic differences in the timely diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM). This study aimed to assess ethnic inequalities in the timely diagnosis of Type 1 DM, as indicated by a more adverse clinical condition at onset. In addition, we assessed whether these

  17. Estimating the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus : a clinical prediction model based on patient characteristics and medical history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    Objective To develop a clinical prediction rule that can help the clinician to identify women at high and low risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) early in pregnancy in order to improve the efficiency of GDM screening. Design We used data from a prospective cohort study to develop the

  18. Effect of pharmaceutical care on clinical outcomes of outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao H

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hua Shao,1 Guoming Chen,1 Chao Zhu,2 Yongfei Chen,1 Yamin Liu,1 Yuxing He,2 Hui Jin3 1Department of Pharmacy, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 3Department of Endocrinology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: In the People’s Republic of China, outpatients have limited time with their physicians. Thus, compared to inpatients, outpatients have lower medication adherence and are less knowledgeable about their disease.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pharmaceutical care on clinical outcomes of outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Patients and methods: A randomized, controlled, prospective clinical trial was conducted recruiting a total of 240 T2DM outpatients from Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University. ­The control group (CG received only common care from medical staff, whereas the inter­vention group (IG received extra pharmaceutical care from clinical pharmacists. Biochemical data such as blood pressure (BP, fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin A1 (HbA1c, and blood lipid were collected before and after 6-month intervention. The primary end points in this study were FBG and HbA1c.Results: After the intervention, most of the baseline clinical outcomes of the patients in IG significantly improved, while only body mass index, diastolic BP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol (TC improved significantly in patients in the CG. Compared to CG, in IG, there were significant improvements in FBG, HbA1c, TC, the target attainment rates of HbA1c, and BP.Conclusion: Pharmaceutical care provided by clinical pharmacists could improve the control of diabetes of outpatients, and clinical pharmacists could play an important role in diabetes management. Keywords: clinical pharmacist, pharmaceutical care, type 2

  19. Use of a web portal among adult clinic patients seen for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Heboyan, Vahé; Williams, Lovoria B; Hatzigeorgiou, Christos

    2018-01-01

    To determine the number of adult clinic patients seen for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at an academic medical center and to examine characteristics of those who had or had not registered for a web portal. Electronic records were reviewed to identify web portal registration by patients treated for T2DM by age, sex, race and Hispanic ethnicity, and service (General Internal Medicine, Endocrinology). A total of 1,401 patients with T2DM were seen in General Internal Medicine and Endocrinology outpatient clinics. Less than one third (32%) had registered for the web portal. Women were more likely to have registered for the web portal than men [odds ratio (OR) =1.25; 95% CI, 0.99-1.57; Pweb portal, along with those who were 56 to 60 and >66 years of age. In multivariate analysis, a statistically significant association was observed between web portal registration and General Internal Medicine clinic vs . Endocrinology clinic (OR =2.96, P18-25 years, male sex (adjusted OR =0.71, P=0.006), and Black race (OR =0.33, P<0.001). Additional research is needed to identify portal design features that improve glycemic control and interventions that will increase use of patient portals, especially among Black patients with T2DM and those with low health literacy or computer literacy.

  20. Prevalence and clinical profile of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM in follow-up in a Tertiary Care Referral Centre in Western India and to describe the clinical features indicative of CD in screened patients of TIDM. Study Design: In this single center observational cross-sectional study, 71 children who were diagnosed with TIDM were subjected to screening for CD with tissue transglutaminase antibody testing. Those who tested positive were offered intestinal biopsy for the confirmation of diagnosis. Clinical profiles of both groups of patients were compared and manifestations of CD were delineated. Results: The study revealed the prevalence of CD (based on serology in children with Type 1 diabetes as 15.49%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed CD was 7.04%. Of the diagnosed CD patients, one-third were symptomatic at the time of screening while the majority was asymptomatic. The major clinical features indicative of CD were intestinal symptoms, anemia, rickets, and short stature. Autoimmune thyroid disease was prevalent in 29.6% of the patients with TIDM followed by CD. Conclusions: The high prevalence of CD in children with Type 1 diabetes emphasizes the need for routine screening programs to be in place for these high-risk populations. The clinical profile of patients with CD further elaborates the indicators of CD and the need to screen for them.

  1. Clinical utility of metabolic syndrome severity scores: considerations for practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBoer MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark D DeBoer,1,2 Matthew J Gurka2 11Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, 2Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: The metabolic syndrome (MetS is marked by abnormalities in central obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high fasting glucose and appears to be produced by underlying processes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and adipocyte dysfunction. MetS has traditionally been classified based on dichotomous criteria that deny that MetS-related risk likely exists as a spectrum. Continuous MetS scores provide a way to track MetS-related risk over time. We generated MetS severity scores that are sex- and race/ethnicity-specific, acknowledging that the way MetS is manifested may be different by sex and racial/ethnic subgroup. These scores are correlated with long-term risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Clinical use of scores like these provide a potential opportunity to identify patients at highest risk, motivate patients toward lifestyle change, and follow treatment progress over time. Keywords: metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, risk prediction

  2. The utility of fractal analysis in clinical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ann M; Elfanagely, Omar; Ayala, Carlos A; Cohen, Michael; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and scientists can use fractal analysis as a tool to objectively quantify complex patterns found in neuroscience and neurology. Fractal analysis has the potential to allow physicians to make predictions about clinical outcomes, categorize pathological states, and eventually generate diagnoses. In this review, we categorize and analyze the applications of fractal theory in neuroscience found in the literature. We discuss how fractals are applied and what evidence exists for fractal analysis in neurodegeneration, neoplasm, neurodevelopment, neurophysiology, epilepsy, neuropharmacology, and cell morphology. The goal of this review is to introduce the medical community to the utility of applying fractal theory in clinical neuroscience.

  3. Semiology and clinical development of cystopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Kuz'min

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate clinical peculiarities of cystopathy in correlation with duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Materials and Methods. 70 patients with T2DM (26 male and 44 female; mean age 63.3±4.2 were monitored under this study. Pres- ence, form and severity of diabetic dysfunction of lower urinary tract were evaluated based on natural history, complains, physical examination, urination records and urodynamic testing.Results. Clinical and urodynamic evidence for cystopathy was obtained in 61 participant (87.1%. 32 patients (45.7% demonstrated signs of overactive bladder, while 29 (41.4% had underactive bladder syndrome (UBS. We observed three stages in the development of diabetic cytopathy: latent stage followed by overactive bladder (in 5 years from first signs of T2DM and finally by UBS (in 10 years, respectively. Conclusion. Our data shows association between clinical picture of diabetic cystopathy and duration of T2DM.

  4. The frequency of gestational diyabetes mellitus in a maternity hospital antepartum clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Turgut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM frequency and age related frequency with GDM screening tests in patients whom referred to our hospital’s antepartum clinic for routine follow-up.Materials and methods: Totally, 2617 pregnant women who did not have any risk factors for GDM and attended to our antepartum clinic for routine follow-up between August 2009 and March 2011 enrolled in this study. A 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT applied at 24-28 weeks’ gestation. The patients who had a value of blood glucose ≥ 140 mg/dl undergone 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Patients who had a value of ≥200 mg/dl blood glucose in GCT or one value of ≥200 mg/dl in OGTT or had two values exceeded normal ranges in OGTT were accepted as GDM. Age related GDM frequency was also determined.Results: Of the 2617 pregnant women 110 patients diagnosed as GDM (4.2%. For the age related frequency, there was a tendency towards GDM after the age of 33. The age 44 was the most risky with a 33% ratio of GDM occurrence rate.Conclusion: In this study the GDM frequency in our hospital’s routine follow-up clinic was found as compatible with the 1% to 6% frequency reported in the literature. The higher frequency of GDM was found in advanced age pregnancies.

  5. Clinical- and Cost-effectiveness of Telemedicine in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Yun-kai; Zhu, Wei-jun; Cai, Yan-ling; Sun, Dong-xu; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging telemedicine programs offer potential low-cost solutions to the management of chronic disease. We sought to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of telemedicine approaches on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using terms related to type 2 diabetes and telemedicine, MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, and CINAHL Plus were searched to identify relevant studies published through February 28, 2014. Data from identified clinical trials were ...

  6. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  7. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2012-02-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  8. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  9. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATTERN OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA AND ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Vijayrao Rajkondawar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research was undertaken to study the pattern of dyslipidaemia and varied clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease, its risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Diabetes Mellitus (DM has become major public health problem in India. It is not only increasing in morbidity and mortality, but also decreases the quality of life. Also, disease and its complications are causing heavy economic burden for patients suffering from it.1,2 Diabetes is endemic globally with increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. Diabetes is a major cause of mortality, but several studies indicate that it is likely underreported as a cause of death. A recent estimate suggested that diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and was responsible for almost 3 million deaths annually (1.7-5.2% of all deaths. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients attending the outpatient department or admitted to medical wards, ICU of tertiary care centre and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were evaluated clinically. A baseline Electrocardiogram (ECG was taken in all cases irrespective of clinical evidence of cardiac involvement. Patients with normal ECG pattern were further evaluated by Treadmill Testing (TMT or stress test for subclinical cardiac involvement. Risk factor evaluation was done in all cases. RESULTS Prevalence of IHD was found to be 41% with a male predominance (1.067:1. Evaluation of risk factors has shown its strong association with IHD. Incidence of IHD was high when low HDL (P 25 had negatively significant association with IHD in type 2 diabetics (P=0.072. Smoking was not statistically associated (P=0.577 and in male alcoholics, IHD had positive association with alcohol (P=0.193. CONCLUSION The current study points out that there exists an increased incidence of ischaemic heart disease in diabetics with few, but not all risk factors contributing to it. Early detection, optimal glycaemic

  10. Prevalence of eating disorders and psychiatric comorbidity in a clinical sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papelbaum, Marcelo; Appolinário, José Carlos; Moreira, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Ellinger, Vivian Carola Moema; Kupfer, Rosane; Coutinho, Walmir Ferreira

    2005-06-01

    A few studies have shown high rates of eating disorders and psychiatric morbidity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Disturbed eating behavior and psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of T2DM patients. Seventy type 2 diabetes mellitus patients between 40 and 65 years of age (mean, 52.9 +/- 6.8) from a diabetes outpatient clinic were sequentially evaluated. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Binge Eating Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess eating disorders and other psychiatric comorbidity. In addition to the descriptive analysis of the data, we compared groups divided based on the presence of obesity (evaluated by the body mass index) or an eating disorder. Twenty percent of the sample displayed an eating disorder. Binge eating disorder was the predominant eating disorder diagnosis (10%). Overall, the group of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented rates of psychiatric comorbidity comparable to those seen in their nonobese counterparts. However, the presence of an eating disorder was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of anxiety disorders (57.1% x 28.6%; p = 0.044). In our study sample, the occurrence of eating disorders was increased compared to rates observed in the general population, with the predominance of binge eating disorder. The presence of an eating disorder in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients was associated with higher rates of anxiety disorders.

  11. Clinical Profile and Etiology of Diabetes Mellitus With Onset at Less Than 6 Months of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Valamparampil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical profile and etiology of diabetes mellitus (DM with onset at < 6 months of age. All children aged < 6 months diagnosed with DM at a tertiary referral center between 2005 and 2008 were included in the study. Three cases of DM with onset at < 6 months of age were identified. All patients were female and of the same ethnic origin, with nonconsanguineous parents. Intrauterine growth retardation was noted in all three patients, and diabetic ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridemia in two of the three. Blood samples from all three patients and their parents were analyzed for mutations in the KCNJ11 gene (inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, subfamily J, member 11 gene; OMIM 600937. A heterozygous de novo mutation in the KCNJ11 gene was detected in one patient, which confirmed the diagnosis of permanent neonatal DM. Neither C-peptide secretion nor circulating islet cell antibodies were detected in any patient during diagnosis, but C-peptide elevation was detected in the patient with permanent neonatal DM after treatment with sulfonylurea. One infant had clinical and immunological evidence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection while the diabetes in another case was postulated to be syndromic. DM within the first 6 months of life is a rare condition with various etiologies. The high prevalence of Kir6.2 mutations in neonatal diabetes means that all children < 6 months of age diagnosed with diabetes should be tested for Kir6.2 mutations at diagnosis.

  12. Sleep Respiratory Disorders and Clinical Profile in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sleep respiratory disorders (SRDs are often found in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Objective The aim was to establish the prevalence of risk to develop an SRD using the Clinical Berlin Questionnaire (CBQ and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS in patients with T2DM and verifying the correlation of anthropometric measurements and life quality (LQ with ESS. Methods A descriptive and analytical study of a case series evaluating 208 patients with T2DM, submitted to clinical and biochemical evaluation and implementation of CBQ, ESS, and WHOQOL-bref to evaluate LQ. Results Mean age was 60.8 ± 8.8 years, and 65.4% were women. Most diabetics were overweight (36.1%, and 29.8% were class I obese. One-third had positive risk signals for a SRD, with 87.0 and 34.1% having high risk in CBQ and sleep disorders in ESS, respectively. There was a significant difference in the general LQ between the low- and high-risk groups in the CBQ. Conclusion In this scenario, it is noteworthy that the active search for sleep disorders must start from simple methods, such as application of protocols.

  13. Clinical relevance of epigenetics in the onset and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommese, Linda; Zullo, Alberto; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Fabbricini, Rossella; Soricelli, Andrea; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epigenetics is involved in the altered expression of gene networks that underlie insulin resistance and insufficiency. Major genes controlling β-cell differentiation and function, such as PAX4, PDX1, and GLP1 receptor, are epigenetically controlled. Epigenetics can cause insulin resistance through immunomediated pro-inflammatory actions related to several factors, such as NF-kB, osteopontin, and Toll-like receptors. Hereafter, we provide a critical and comprehensive summary on this topic with a particular emphasis on translational and clinical aspects. We discuss the effect of epigenetics on β-cell regeneration for cell replacement therapy, the emerging bioinformatics approaches for analyzing the epigenetic contribution to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the epigenetic core of the transgenerational inheritance hypothesis in T2DM, and the epigenetic clinical trials on T2DM. Therefore, prevention or reversion of the epigenetic changes occurring during T2DM development may reduce the individual and societal burden of the disease. PMID:28059593

  14. The validity and clinical utility of binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Stephen A; Gordon, Kathryn H; Mitchell, James E; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G

    2009-12-01

    This review attempted to examine the validity and clinical utility of the DSM-IV binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis across a wide range of validating strategies. Various electronic databases (Pub Med, Psych Info) were searched for terms relevant to the diagnosis of BED (e.g., binge eating disorder, binge eating) in order to identify papers. Additionally, published papers were reviewed in order to locate additional manuscripts and papers that were presented at meetings. The validity and utility of BED varied substantially according to the validator chosen. There is reasonable evidence that BED can be differentiated from other existing eating disorders and is associated with significant impairment and clinical levels of eating disorder psychopathology. The relationship of BED to obesity is complex, and in spite of some positive findings, further research examining the predictive power of BED, beyond the simple presence of obesity and associated psychopathology, in relationship to clinically relevant outcomes is needed. Binge eating disorder is being considered for inclusion in the DSM-V and various options regarding this decision are reviewed based upon the empirical findings in the paper.

  15. Gingival crevicular blood: As a non-invasive screening tool for diabetes mellitus in dental clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Shetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high number of patients with periodontitis may have undiagnosed diabetes. Self-monitoring devices provide a simple method for rapid monitoring of the glucose level in the blood by utilizing a blood sample from the finger, but this method requires a needle puncture to obtain blood. It is possible that gingival crevicular blood (GCB from routine periodontal probing may be a source of blood for glucose measurements. Aim: To establish whether GCB can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic aid in screening for diabetes mellitus during routine periodontal examination. Materials and Methods: The study involved 50 diabetics and 50 non-diabetics, with an age range of 26-66 years. Both diabetic and non-diabetic patients had moderate to severe gingivitis with at least one tooth in the maxillary anterior region showing bleeding upon probing. The Gingival Index and Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified were recorded. Blood oozing from the gingival sulcus/pocket following periodontal pocket probing was collected using a capillary tube and transferred to the test stick of a glucose self-monitoring device (Accu-Chek, Roche Diagnostic, Germany in patients with comparable gingival and oral hygiene status. This value was compared with the peripheral fingerstick blood glucose (PFBG value, which was obtained by pricking the finger tip at the same visit. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson′s correlation coefficient. Result: There was no statistically significant difference between the gingival crevicular blood glucose (GCBG values and the PFBG values in both the diabetic (P = 0.129, NS and the non-diabetic (P = 0.503, NS groups. Karl Pearson′s product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated, which showed a positive correlation between the two measurements in the diabetic (r = 0.943 as well as the non-diabetic (r = 0.926 groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that GCB can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic aid in screening for diabetes

  16. Optimizing value utilizing Toyota Kata methodology in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merguerian, Paul A; Grady, Richard; Waldhausen, John; Libby, Arlene; Murphy, Whitney; Melzer, Lilah; Avansino, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Value in healthcare is measured in terms of patient outcomes achieved per dollar expended. Outcomes and cost must be measured at the patient level to optimize value. Multidisciplinary clinics have been shown to be effective in providing coordinated and comprehensive care with improved outcomes, yet tend to have higher cost than typical clinics. We sought to lower individual patient cost and optimize value in a pediatric multidisciplinary reconstructive pelvic medicine (RPM) clinic. The RPM clinic is a multidisciplinary clinic that takes care of patients with anomalies of the pelvic organs. The specialties involved include Urology, General Surgery, Gynecology, and Gastroenterology/Motility. From May 2012 to November 2014 we performed time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) analysis by measuring provider time for each step in the patient flow. Using observed time and the estimated hourly cost of each of the providers we calculated the final cost at the individual patient level, targeting clinic preparation. We utilized Toyota Kata methodology to enhance operational efficiency in an effort to optimize value. Variables measured included cost, time to perform a task, number of patients seen in clinic, percent value-added time (VAT) to patients (face to face time) and family experience scores (FES). At the beginning of the study period, clinic costs were $619 per patient. We reduced conference time from 6 min/patient to 1 min per patient, physician preparation time from 8 min to 6 min and increased Medical Assistant (MA) preparation time from 9.5 min to 20 min, achieving a cost reduction of 41% to $366 per patient. Continued improvements further reduced the MA preparation time to 14 min and the MD preparation time to 5 min with a further cost reduction to $194 (69%) (Figure). During this study period, we increased the number of appointments per clinic. We demonstrated sustained improvement in FES with regards to the families overall experience with their providers

  17. Clinical Efficacy of Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for advanced diabetes mellitus (DM). This study presents a meta-analysis of relevant clinical trials to determine the efficacy of stem cell therapy in DM. We aim to critically evaluate and synthesize clinical evidence on the safety and efficiency of different types of stem cell therapy for both T1DM and T2DM. We pooled participant-level data from twenty-two eligible clinical trials that satisfied our inclusion criteria, with a total of 524 patients. There were significant differences in the outcome based on the type and source of the infused cells. Out of all T1DM patients who received CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) infusion, 58.9% became insulin independent for a mean period of 16 months, whereas the results were uniformly negative in patients who received umbilical cord blood (UCB). Infusion of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) provided significantly beneficial outcome in T1DM, when compared to bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) (Pstem cell therapy early after DM diagnosis was more effective than intervention at later stages (relative risk = 2.0, P = 0.0008). Adverse effects were observed in only 21.72% of both T1DM and T2DM stem cell recipients with no reported mortality. Out of all poor responders, 79.5% were diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Stem cell transplantation can represent a safe and effective treatment for selected patients with DM. In this cohort of trials, the best therapeutic outcome was achieved with CD34+ HSC therapy for T1DM, while the poorest outcome was observed with HUCB for T1DM. Diabetic ketoacidosis impedes therapeutic efficacy.

  18. [Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cui-Xia; Gao, Yun; Wang, Chun; Li, Yan; Feng, Xiao-Bing; Cheng, Yang-Fan; Zhang, Yang; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2017-05-01

    To compare the clinical characteristics and prevalence of chronic complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with various degrees of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). A total of 170 patients with T2DM and OSAS were enrolled in this study. These participants were divided into three groups with low, medium and high apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), respectively. The demographic characteristics, biochemical indicators and chronic complications of the patients in the three groups were compared. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the associations between chronic complications and OSAS. The patients with severe OSAS had higher waist circumference ( P =0.045), higher BMI ( P =0.069), higher prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and higher prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) than the patients with mild-moderate OSAS. Similar levels of macrovascular complications were found in the three groups ( P >0.05). The logistic regression analyses showed that DPN ( OR =1.024, 95% CI 1.002-1.046) and chronic kidney disease ( OR =1.026, 95% CI 1.004-1.049) were independent predictors of AHI, adjusting for the lowest oxygen saturation, gender, age, diabetic duration, family history of diabetes, BMI, and HbA1c. Other microvascular and macrovascular complications were not predictors of AHI. Patients with T2DM and severe OSAS have a higher risk of DPN and DR. Particular attention should be paid to T2DM patients with severe OSAS to prevent complications.

  19. [Clinical study of glycated albumin measurement by enzymatic method in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Jian-Ming; Dou, Jing-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Qun; Ma, Fang-Ling; Zhai, Huai-Wei; Zou, Xiao-Man; Mu, Yi-Ming; Lu, Ju-Ming

    2009-06-09

    To evaluate the clinical significance of glycated albumin (GA) measured by enzymatic method and to compare its effect with glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). 128 type 2 DM patients and 84 normal subjects from the Chinese PLA General Hospital were enrolled for the study. The levels of GA, HbA1c, FBG, PBG in DM patient were detected at baseline and followed visit at 2, 4, 8 weeks after blood glucose management. The levels of GA, HbA1c, FBG, PBG and 75 g OGTT were also detected in above normal subjects. Intra CV and inter CV of enzymatic were (0.74-0.9)% and (0.94-1.49)% respectively. In normal subjects GA was in the range of (9-14)%. At baseline, the GA level was significantly correlated with HbA1c (r = 0.8326, P PBG. After 2, 4, 8 weeks treatment, GA level in DM patients was concomitantly decreased with the improvement of FBG, PBG and HbA1c. At early 2 weeks visit, GA, but not HbA1c, showed significant decrease from its baseline (P PBG during the 8 weeks treatment. GA was more sensitive than HbA1c for short-term variations of glycemic control during treatment of diabetic patients. GA can be used as a better index of short term mean level of blood glucose in diabetic patients.

  20. Stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a review of recent clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couri Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising treatments for the near future. It is expected that this kind of therapy can ameliorate or even reverse some diseases. With regard to type 1 diabetes, studies analyzing the therapeutic effects of stem cells in humans began in 2003 in the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto - SP USP, Brazil, and since then other centers in different countries started to randomize patients in their clinical trials. Herein we summarize recent data about beta cell regeneration, different ways of immune intervention and what is being employed in type 1 diabetic patients with regard to stem cell repertoire to promote regeneration and/or preservation of beta cell mass. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT was a 7-year longitudinal study that demonstrated the importance of the intensive insulin therapy when compared to conventional treatment in the development of chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This study also demonstrated another important issue: there is a reverse relationship between C-peptide levels (endogenous indicator of insulin secretion chronic complications - that is, the higher the C-peptide levels, the lower the incidence of nephropathy, retinopathy and hypoglycemia. From such data, beta cell preservation has become an additional target in the management of T1DM 1.

  1. Clinical utility of antinuclear antibody tests in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kickingbird Lauren M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antinuclear antibody (ANA tests are frequently used to screen children for chronic inflammatory diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. However, the diagnostic utility of this test is limited because of the large number of healthy children who have low-titer positive tests. We sought to determine the clinical utility of ANA tests in screening children for rheumatic disease and to determine whether there are specific signs or symptoms that enhance the clinical utility of ANA tests in children. Methods We undertook a retrospective analysis of 509 new patient referrals. Charts of patients referred because of results of ANA testing were selected for further analysis. Children with JRA, SLE, and other conditions were compared using demographic data, chief complaints at the time of presentation, and ANA titers. Results One hundred ten patients were referred because of an ANA test interpreted as positive. Ten patients were subsequently diagnosed with SLE. In addition, we identified one patient with mixed connective tissue disease, and an additional child with idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon. Eighteen children of the children referred for a positive ANA test had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Another 80 children with positive ANA tests were identified, the majority of whom (n = 39, 49% had musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Neither the presence nor the titer of ANA served to distinguish children with JRA from children with other musculoskeletal conditions. Children with JRA were readily identified on the basis of the history and physical examination. Children with SLE were therefore compared with children with positive ANA tests who did not have JRA, designated the "comparison group." Non-urticarial rash was more common in children with SLE than in children without chronic inflammatory disease (p = 0.007. Children with SLE were also older (mean ± sd = 14.2 ± 2.5 years than the comparison group (11.0 ± 3.6 years; p

  2. Staging in bipolar disorder: from theoretical framework to clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michael; Post, Robert; Ratheesh, Aswin; Gliddon, Emma; Singh, Ajeet; Vieta, Eduard; Carvalho, Andre F; Ashton, Melanie M; Berk, Lesley; Cotton, Susan M; McGorry, Patrick D; Fernandes, Brisa S; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Dodd, Seetal

    2017-10-01

    Illness staging is widely utilized in several medical disciplines to help predict course or prognosis, and optimize treatment. Staging models in psychiatry in general, and bipolar disorder in particular, depend on the premise that psychopathology moves along a predictable path: an at-risk or latency stage, a prodrome progressing to a first clinical threshold episode, and one or more recurrences with the potential to revert or progress to late or end-stage manifestations. The utility and validity of a staging model for bipolar disorder depend on its linking to clinical outcome, treatment response and neurobiological measures. These include progressive biochemical, neuroimaging and cognitive changes, and potentially stage-specific differences in response to pharmacological and psychosocial treatments. Mechanistically, staging models imply the presence of an active disease process that, if not remediated, can lead to neuroprogression, a more malignant disease course and functional deterioration. Biological elements thought to be operative in bipolar disorder include a genetic diathesis, physical and psychic trauma, epigenetic changes, altered neurogenesis and apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Many available agents, such as lithium, have effects on these targets. Staging models also suggest the utility of stage-specific treatment approaches that may not only target symptom reduction, but also impede illness neuroprogression. These treatment approaches range from prevention for at-risk individuals, to early intervention strategies for prodromal and newly diagnosed individuals, complex combination therapy for rapidly recurrent illness, and palliative-type approaches for those at chronic, late stages of illness. There is hope that prompt initiation of potentially disease modifying therapies may preclude or attenuate the cognitive and structural changes seen in the later stages of bipolar disorder. The aims of this paper are to: a

  3. Terapêutica clínica: Insulina inalada para a diabetes mellitus Clinical therapeutics: Inhaled insulin for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham T McMahon

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A propósito de um doente com diabetes mellitus (DM tipo 2, com controlo glicémico insuficiente com agentes orais, é feita uma recomendação terapêutica baseada na discussão clínica e no mecanismo de benefício de uma nova forma terapêutica. Problema clínico A DM é uma das causas principais de morbilidade e mortalidade no mundo, e existe uma preocupação crescente com o aumento da sua prevalência. Embora apenas uma minoria tome insulina, mais de 5 milhões de americanos usam insulina injectável diariamente. Existe uma resistência ao uso da insulina tanto por parte dos doentes mal controlados com DM2 (receio de dor, inconveniência, medo da hipoglicemia ou de aumento de peso, como pelos médicos. Se a educação tem sido utilizada para ultrapassar esta dificuldade, têm sido tentadas formas orais, nasais ou inaladas para evitar a injecção. Fisiopatologia e efeito do tratamento A insulina é crucial para DM1. Para a DM2, o suplemento de insulina poderá ser necessário nos casos de deficiente controlo glicémico com agentes orais. A maior parte das proteínas, como a insulina, têm peso molecular elevado e são hidrossolúveis, pelo que a administração tem sido injectável. No entanto, novos dispositivos inalatórios podem facilitar a administração por via pulmonar, uma vez que o largo território vascular pulmonar permite o acesso à circulação sistémica. As partículas deverão ter entre 1 e 5 micra. A maior parte dos fármacos administrados por via inalatória não necessita de uma alta precisão na dose, mas no caso da insulina é fundamental essa alta precisão. A primeira formulação inalatória aprovada é o Exubera. Permite administrar uma forma de insulina (DNA recombinante em pó seco. Cerca de 40% chega ao pulmão profundo e 10% é biodisponível. O início de acção da insulina inalada é mais rápido do que a injectável de acção rápida, o que permite a sua utilização pré-prandial. Evidência clínica Dos

  4. Clinical utility of the Taylor spatial frame for limb deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshet D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Doron Keshet, Mark Eidelman Pediatric Orthopedics Unit, Rambam Health Care Center, Haifa, Israel Abstract: The Taylor spatial frame (TSF is a hexapod external fixator that can correct six-axis deformities. The mathematical base of all hexapod systems is projective geometry, which describes complex repositioning of an object in space. The Taylor brothers developed one of the first six-axis correction systems, which is known today as TSF. Over the years, this system has become the most used six-axis deformity correction device. In this review, we describe the history behind TSF development, and describe the principles and clinical utility for application of the TSF in different settings, such as acute trauma, malunions, and various deformities of the lower and upper limb. Keywords: external fixator, deformity correction, hexapod

  5. Clinical utility of the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Kristina E; McCurdy, Mark D; Chute, Douglas L; Mahone, E Mark; Zabel, T Andrew; Jacobson, Lisa A

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral disorders are highly comorbid with childhood learning disabilities (LDs), and accurate identification of LDs is vital for guiding appropriate interventions. However, it is difficult to conduct comprehensive assessment of academic skills within the context of primary care visits, lending utility to screening of academic skills via informant reports. The current study evaluated the clinical utility of a parent-reported screening measure in identifying children with learning difficulties. Participants included 440 children (66.7% male), ages 5.25 to 17.83 years (mean = 10.32 years, SD = 3.06 years), referred for neuropsychological assessment. Academic difficulties were screened by parent report using the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ). Reading and math skills were assessed via individually administered academic achievement measures. Sensitivity, specificity, classification accuracy, and conditional probabilities were calculated to evaluate the efficacy of the CLDQ in predicting academic impairment. Correlations between the CLDQ reading scale and reading achievement measures ranged from -0.35 to -0.65 and from -0.24 to -0.46 between the CLDQ math scale and math achievement measures (all P difficulties may be adequate to rule out an overt LD, whereas elevated scores likely indicate the need for more comprehensive assessment.

  6. Utility of the Clinical Dementia Rating in Asian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wee Shiong; Chong, Mei Sian; Sahadevan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Consistent with the worldwide demographic trend of population aging, dementia is expected to become a burgeoning public health problem in Asian populations. Thus, there is a pressing need for reliable and valid methods of dementia diagnosis and staging that are applicable in heterogeneous Asian populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) is an informant-based global assessment scale with established reliability and validity that has been widely utilized as a severity-ranking scale in many studies of Asian populations. From a diagnostic standpoint, the CDR is congruent with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders approach of dementia diagnosis. It exhibits excellent discriminatory ability in the very mild stages of dementia, a useful property that is germane to the surging interest in mild cognitive impairment and related concepts. Limitations of the CDR include its length of administration, reliance on clinical judgment and collateral source information, and relative insensitivity as a measure of change in interventional studies. Since the exercise of clinical judgment is inherent in scoring, CDR raters should be mindful of the influence of cultural factors on premorbid lifestyle, informant reliability and performance in certain CDR test items (especially those pertaining to the categories of judgment and problem solving, community, and home and hobbies). Thus, in future studies that involve the nascent use of the CDR in Asian populations, it is recommended that any transcultural adaptation of CDR items be described in detail and appropriate validation studies be carried out before adopting the CDR as a yardstick measure of assessment. The potential of adapted versions of the CDR in chronic care settings and advanced cases should be explored. An integrative approach, combining brief informant interview in conjunction with brief objective cognitive testing, could be a viable strategy for dementia screening in the clinical and research setting

  7. Electroencephalography signatures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guzmán Alba,1 Ernesto Pereda,2 Soledad Mañas,3 Leopoldo D Méndez,3 Almudena González,1 Julián J González1 1Physiology Unit, Health Sciences Faculty (S Medicine, 2Department of Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, University of La Laguna, 3Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, University Hospital La Candelaria, Tenerife, Spain Abstract: The techniques and the most important results on the use of electroencephalography (EEG to extract different measures are reviewed in this work, which can be clinically useful to study subjects with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. First, we discuss briefly and in simple terms the EEG analysis and processing techniques most used in the context of ADHD. We review techniques that both analyze individual EEG channels (univariate measures and study the statistical interdependence between different EEG channels (multivariate measures, the so-called functional brain connectivity. Among the former ones, we review the classical indices of absolute and relative spectral power and estimations of the complexity of the channels, such as the approximate entropy and the Lempel-Ziv complexity. Among the latter ones, we focus on the magnitude square coherence and on different measures based on the concept of generalized synchronization and its estimation in the state space. Second, from a historical point of view, we present the most important results achieved with these techniques and their clinical utility (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to diagnose ADHD. Finally, we propose future research lines based on these results. Keywords: EEG, ADHD, power spectrum, functional connectivity, clinical assessment

  8. Clinical utility of lenalidomide in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Zahr A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdallah Abou Zahr,1 Ehab Saad Aldin,2 Rami S Komrokji,3 Amer M Zeidan4 1Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York City, New York, NY, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital, Baltimore, MD, 3Department of Malignant Hematology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, 4Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS represent a heterogeneous group of acquired clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, paradoxical BM hypercellularity, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of leukemic transformation. Risk stratification, using different prognostic scores and markers, is at the core of MDS management. Deletion 5q [del(5q] MDS is a distinct class of MDS characterized by the haploinsufficiency of specific genes, microRNAs, and proteins, which has been linked to increased sensitivity to the drug lenalidomide. Phase II and III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lenalidomide in improving clinical outcomes of patients with del(5q MDS, including reduction in red blood cell transfusion requirements and improvements in quality of life. Lenalidomide has also demonstrated some activity in non-del(5q lower-risk MDS as well as higher-risk MDS, especially in combination with other agents. In this paper, we review the pathogenesis of del(5q MDS, the proposed mechanisms of action of lenalidomide, the major clinical trials that documented the activity of lenalidomide in different MDS populations, potential predictors of benefit from the drug and suggested mechanisms of resistance, and the use of combination strategies to expand the clinical utility of lenalidomide in MDS. Keywords: deletion 5q, lenalidomide, myelodysplastic syndromes, 5q-syndrome

  9. Does neuronal damage precede vascular damage in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and having no clinical diabetic retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aditya; Raman, Rajiv; Vaitheeswaran, K; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Laxmi, Gella; Gupta, Muneeswar; Shekar, S Chandra; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of neuronal damage, as the earliest change occurring, before the clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy. 70 eyes of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and with no evidence of diabetic retinopathy (cases) and 40 eyes of subjects with no diabetes mellitus (controls) were studied using spectral-domain OCT and microperimetry. The influence of age and gender on the outcome measures was also analyzed. Age- and gender-matched subjects showed a decreased mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in cases when compared to the controls (27 vs. 33 μm; p=0.018). Among the cases, subjects between 40 and 45 years of age showed a reduced mean central foveal thickness (175.1 vs. 198.1 μm; p=0.05), mean retinal thickness in the central 6-mm fundus (260.5 vs. 275.3 μm; p=0.006) and mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (29 vs. 39 μm; p=0.036) when compared to the controls. However, no differences were noted in the microperimetry outcomes in cases when compared to the controls. The duration of diabetes and the glycemic control did not show any significant changes on the outcome measures in cases, except for a significantly lower mean retinal sensitivity in diabetics with glycosylated hemoglobin valuesdamage particularly on spectral-domain OCT, before the clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy, in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Clinical characteristics and survival of patients with diabetes mellitus following non-traumatic lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiessman, Maya Paryente; Liberty, Idit F; Segev, Renana Wilkof; Katz, Tiberiu; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Novack, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus-related lower extremity amputation is a major complication severely affecting patient survival and quality of life. To analyze epidemiological and clinical trends in the incidence and survival of lower extremity amputations among diabetes patients. We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of 565 consecutive diabetes patients who underwent their first non-traumatic lower extremity amputation between January 2002 and December 2009. Major amputations were performed in 316 (55.9%) patients: 142 above the knee (25.1%) and 174 below (30.8%); 249 (44.1%) had a minor amputation. The incidence rates of amputations decreased from 2.9 to 2.1 per 1000 diabetes patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that first year mortality rates were lower among patients with minor amputations (31.7% vs. 39.6%, P = 0.569). First year mortality rates following below-knee amputation were somewhat lower than above-knee amputation (33.1 vs. 45.1%, respectively). Cox regression model of survival at 1 year after the procedure found that age (HR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.07, P amputation (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.01-1.83, P = 0.045) and ischemic heart disease (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.26-2.24, P traumatic amputations in diabetes patients between January 2002 and December 2009 decreased slightly. However, one year mortality rates after the surgery did not decline and remained high, stressing the need for a multidisciplinary effort to prevent amputations in diabetes patients.

  11. Is there a value for probiotic supplements in gestational diabetes mellitus? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatkhah, Neda; Hajifaraji, Majid; Abbasalizadeh, Fatemeh; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Abbasi, Mehran Mesgari

    2015-11-25

    Although several studies have found probiotics encouraging in prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the evidence for the use of probiotics in diagnosed GDM is largely limited. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a probiotic supplement capsule containing four bacterial strains on glucose metabolism indices and weight changes in women with newly diagnosed GDM. Sixty-four pregnant women with GDM were enrolled into a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. They were randomly assigned to receive either a probiotic or placebo capsule along with dietary advice for eight consecutive weeks. The trend of weight gain along with glucose metabolism indices was assayed. During the first 6 weeks of the study, the weight gain trend was similar between the groups. However, in the last 2 weeks of the study, the weight gain in the probiotic group was significantly lower than in the placebo group (p Fasting blood sugar (FBS) decreased in both intervention (from 103.7 to 88.4 mg/dl) and control (from 100.9 to 93.6 mg/dl) groups significantly, and the decrease in the probiotic group was significantly higher than in the placebo group (p probiotic group had 6.74% reduction over the study period (p probiotic group was not significantly different from placebo when adjusted for the baseline levels. The probiotic supplement appeared to affect glucose metabolism and weight gain among pregnant women with GDM. This needs to be confirmed in other settings before a therapeutic value could be approved.

  12. Prevalence and clinical profile of metabolic syndrome among type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Amy; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ngai, Michelle; Amutha, Anandakumar; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Jebarani, Saravanan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Michael, Edwin; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus(T1DM) and to look at prevalence of diabetes complications in T1DM with and without MetS. We studied 451 T1DM patients attending a tertiary diabetes centre in Chennai, South India. T1DM was diagnosed based on absence of beta cell reserve and requirement of insulin from the time of diagnosis. Data on clinical and biochemical characteristics as well as complications details to study the prevalence were also extracted from electronic records. T1DM patients were divided into those with and without MetS[diagnosed according to the harmonizing the metabolic syndrome criteria(IDF/NHLBI/AHA/WHF/IAS/IASO)]. The overall prevalence of MetS among T1DM was 22.2%(100/451). Patients with MetS were older, had longer diabetes duration, acanthosis nigricans, and increased serum cholesterol. In the unadjusted logistic regression analysis, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy were associated with MetS. However after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes duration, HbA1C and BMI significant association was seen only between MetS and retinopathy [odds ratio (OR) 2.82, 95% CI 1.18-6.74, p = 0.020] and nephropathy [OR 4.92, 95% CI 2.59-9.33, p < 0.001]. Prevalence of MetS is high among Asian Indian T1DM patients, and its presence is associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS AND ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Kozlova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study sulodexide clinical efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and ischemic heart disease (IHD in prevention of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN. Material and мethods. Patients with type 2 DM and IHD who undergone X-Ray contrast intervention. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: 56 patients of the main group were i/v administered sulodexide (Vessel Due F , “Alfa Wassermann”, Italy according to standard procedure; 56 patients of the control group were treated with unfractionated heparin. Results. The incidence of CIN in the main and control groups was, respectively , 16% and 42% (p<0.01. Reduction of microalbuminuria (MAU was found in 89.3% of the sulodexide group patients. MAU dynamics in patients of control group was not observed. There were no deteriorations in echocardiography characteristics in patients of both groups. The reduction in  low density cholesterol and triglyceride plasma levels was observed in the main group. Sulodexide induced a lengthening of the activated partial thromboplastin time (from 30±0.6 to 34±0.5 s, without altering fibrinogen level. There were no thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications of endovascular intervention in sulodexide group. No one case of thrombocytopenia was observed. Higher risk of CIN in patients without sulodexide treatment compared with this in sulodexide treated patients was associated with multiple lesions of coronary arteries, diuretic intake in periprocedural period, contrast agent dose, duration of hospitalization, seriousness of intervention. Conclusion. Sulodexide therapy in patients with 2 type DM and IHD undergone X-Ray contrast intervention prevents renal dysfunction, providing antiproteinuric effect and correcting lipid metabolism and coagulation system disturbances.

  14. Empagliflozin for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview of Phase 3 Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have a unique mechanism of action leading to excretion of glucose in the urine and subsequent lowering of plasma glucose. This mechanism is independent of β-cell function; thus, these agents are effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at theoretically any disease stage. This class should not confer an additional risk of hypoglycemia (unless combined with insulin or an insulin secretagogue) and has the potential to be combined with other classes of glucose-lowering agents. Empagliflozin is one of three currently approved SGLT2 inhibitors in the United States, and has shown a favorable benefit-risk ratio in phase 3 clinical trials as monotherapy and as add-on to other glucose-lowering therapy in broad patient populations. In addition to its glucose-lowering effects, empagliflozin has been shown to reduce body weight and blood pressure without a compensatory increase in heart rate. Moreover, on top of standard of care, empagliflozin is the first glucoselowering agent to demonstrate cardiovascular risk reduction in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective outcomes trial: a 14% reduction in risk of the 3-point composite endpoint of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Like other SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin is associated with a higher rate of genital mycotic infections than placebo and has the potential for volume depletion-associated events. This review summarizes the empagliflozin phase 3 clinical trials program and its potential significance in the treatment of patients with T2DM. Evidence from these clinical trials show reductions in glycated hemoglobin (-0.59 to -0.82%) with a low risk of hypoglycemia except when used with insulin or insulin secretagogues, and moderate reductions in body weight (-2.1 to - 2.5 kg) and systolic blood pressure (-2.9 to -5.2 mm Hg), thus supporting the use of empagliflozin as monotherapy or in

  15. Diabetes mellitus and gynecologic cancer: molecular mechanisms, epidemiological, clinical and prognostic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Iavazzo, Christos; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Sifakis, Stavros; Alexandrou, Andreas; Siristatidis, Charalambos; Grigoriadis, Charalambos; Botsis, Dimitrios; Creatsas, George

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of which has increased dramatically worldwide, may put patients at a higher risk of cancer. The aim of our study is the clarification of the possible mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and gynecological cancer and their epidemiological relationship. This is a narrative review of the current literature, following a search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, from their inception until January 2012. Articles investigating gynecologic cancer (endometrial, ovarian, and breast) incidence in diabetic patients were extracted. The strong evidence for a positive association between diabetes mellitus and the risk for cancer indicates that energy intake in excess to energy expenditure, or the sequelae thereof, is involved in gynecological carcinogenesis. This risk may be further heightened by glucose which can directly promote the production of tumor cells by functioning as a source of energy. Insulin resistance accompanied by secondary hyperinsulinemia is hypothezised to have a mitogenic effect. Steroid hormones are in addition potent regulators of the balance between cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inflammatory pathways may also be implicated, as a correlation seems to exist between diabetes mellitus and breast or endometrial carcinoma pathogenesis, although an analogous correlation with ovarian carcinoma is still under investigation. Antidiabetic agents have been correlated with elevated cancer risk, while metformin seems to lower the risk. Diabetes mellitus is associated with an elevation in gynecologic cancer risk. Moreover, there are many studies exploring the prognosis of patients with diabetes and gynecological cancer, the outcome and the overall survival in well-regulated patients.

  16. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs.

  17. Selective estrogen receptor modulators: tissue specificity and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinkovich S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Martinkovich,* Darshan Shah,* Sonia Lobo Planey, John A ArnottDepartment of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs are a diverse group of ­nonsteroidal compounds that function as agonists or antagonists for estrogen receptors (ERs in a target gene-specific and tissue-specific fashion. SERM specificity involves tissue-specific expression of ER subtypes, differential expression of co-regulatory proteins in various tissues, and varying ER conformational changes induced by ligand binding. To date, the major clinical applications of SERMs are their use in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, the prevention of osteoporosis, and the maintenance of beneficial serum lipid profiles in postmenopausal women. However, SERMs have also been found to promote adverse effects, including thromboembolic events and, in some cases, carcinogenesis, that have proven to be obstacles in their clinical utility. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of SERM tissue specificity and highlight the therapeutic application of well-known and emergent SERMs.Keywords: selective estrogen receptor modulators, SERMs, estrogen receptors

  18. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MMK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew MK Chan,1,2 Katrin M Sjoquist,1,3 John R Zalcberg4 1NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW, Australia; 3Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab, inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib, and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs (eg, ramucirumab. Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. Keywords: ramucirumab, IMC-1121B, gastric cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, angiogenesis, targeted therapy

  19. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  20. Clinical utility of celiac disease associated HLA testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallav, Kumar; Kabbani, Toufic; Tariq, Sohaib; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Negative predictive value (NPV) of Celiac Disease (CD) related human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 approaches 100% in individual patients. However, studies evaluating its exclusionary utility in patient groups are lacking. Aim We aim to assess the performance of HLA testing when applied to patient groups with varying characteristics and propose evidence-based recommendations for its clinical use. Methods Demographic and clinical information was recorded in patients undergoing HLA testing. Using predetermined criteria, patients were classified as CD, Non CD or indeterminate. Diagnostic yield of HLA testing was defined as the percentage of patients in whom CD could be excluded based on negative HLA test. Results 256 patients underwent testing for CD related HLA DQ2 and DQ8. 102 (100 Non CD, 2 CD) patients tested HLA negative for a 98% NPV and 39% diagnostic yield. Diagnostic yield was highest (60%) in patients with intraepithelial lymphocytosis plus normal IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and lowest in patients with positive IgA-tTG plus villous atrophy (0%). CD was diagnosed in 2 HLA negative patients, who carried half of DQ2.5 trans genotype. Conclusions Diagnostic yield of CD related HLA testing varies widely depending on clinical indication. HLA testing is a practical and valuable test for most patients in whom initial evaluation for CD is inconclusive. A negative HLA result usually obviates the need for further celiac testing including endoscopy and gluten challenge. Rarely, in patients reported as HLA negative, half of HLA DQ2.5 (cis or trans) is sufficient for development of CD. PMID:24705698

  1. Evaluating the MEDLINE Core Clinical Journals filter: data-driven evidence assessing clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Fedyshin, Michele; Ketchum, Andrea M; Arnold, Robert M; Fedyshin, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    MEDLINE offers the Core Clinical Journals filter to limit to clinically useful journals. To determine its effectiveness for searching and patient-centric decision making, this study compared literature used for Morning Report in Internal Medicine with journals in the filter. An EndNote library with references answering 327 patient-related questions during Morning Report from 2007 to 2012 was exported to a file listing variables including designated Core Clinical Journal, Impact Factor, date used and medical subject. Bradford's law of scattering was applied ranking the journals and reflecting their clinical utility. Recall (sensitivity) and precision of the Core Morning Report journals and non-Core set was calculated. This study applied bibliometrics to compare the 628 articles used against these criteria to determine journals impacting decision making. Analysis shows 30% of clinically used articles are from the Core Clinical Journals filter and 16% of the journals represented are Core titles. When Bradford-ranked, 55% of the top 20 journals are Core. Articles Journals filter indicates less relevance for hospital-based care. The divergence from high-impact medicine titles suggests clinically valuable journals differ from academically important titles. With few subjects demonstrating high recall or precision, the MEDLINE Core Clinical Journals filter may require a review and update to better align with current clinical needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Clinical utility of dabigatran in United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Abdulla; Elnour, Asim A.; Sadik, Adel; Mandil, Mahmoud Abu; AlShamsi, Ali; Suwaidi, Aesha Al; Bhagavathula, AkshayaSrikanth; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hamad, Farah; Nuaimi, Saif K. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide early data regarding clinical utility of dabigatran in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This was an ethics approved retrospective cross sectional study. We retrieved a total of 76 patients who were using dabigatran from September to December 2014 in the Cardiology Clinic at Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE. The primary analysis was designed to test the frequency of bleeding events (rate) with dabigatran 75, 110, and 150 mg. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of cohort was 67.9 ± 1.5 years (range; 29-98 years), composed of males (52.6%) with mean age of 66.3 ± 1.7 years, and females (47.4%) with mean age of 69.6 ± 1.1 years. The highest age group was those between 61-80 years (60.5%). Most comprised the age strata of ≤75 years (73.7%). The main indication for dabigatran use was atrial fibrillation. The rate of bleeding with dabigatran was 18/76 (23.7%), and melena was the leading cause of bleeding 8/76 (10.7%). The hospitalization rate was 67.1%, dabigatran withdrawal rate was 0.01%, and mortality rate was 6.5%. The cohort had exhibited incidences of minor bleeding with one fatal major bleeding, high co-morbidities, admission, and readmission, which was not directly linked to dabigatran. We did not identify any relation of death due to dabigatran. Conclusion: Dabigatran is a suitable alternative to warfarin obviating the need for repetitive international normalized ratio monitoring, however, it may need plasma drug monitoring. PMID:26593161

  3. Clinical utility of dual-energy vertebral assessment (DVA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokes, Tamara J; Dixon, Larry B; Favus, Murray J

    2003-11-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical utility of DVA, a system for imaging the lateral spine on the Lunar Prodigy densitometer. DVA images were obtained and bone density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur measured in 297 subjects (272 women), aged 64+/-13 years. The images were classified as: normal (N) if no fractures were detected and all vertebrae between T6 and L4 were visualized, fracture (F) if any vertebra had a fracture (defined as 25% or more reduction in the vertebral height) even if some of the other vertebrae could not be visualized, and un-interpretable (U) if at least one of the vertebra between T6 and L4 could not be classified and no fractures were detected in the visualized vertebrae. A subset of 66 patients also had standard radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Compared to radiographs, DVA had a 95% sensitivity to detect fractures and 82% specificity (to exclude them). Among all 297 subjects studied, DVAs were interpretable in 87%. They were classified as N in 204 (68%), F in 55 (19%) and U in 38 (13%). The reasons for un-interpretability were: scoliosis, scapular or rib shadow, severe arthritic changes and multiple vertebral compression fracture with severe spinal deformities. Only 11% of F subjects gave a history of a vertebral fracture, and only 56% of F subjects met the BMD criteria for osteoporosis (T score DVA, a low radiation and relatively low cost "point of service" procedure, to BMD measurement provides the clinician with a more comprehensive fracture risk assessment than that afforded by clinical evaluation and BMD measurement alone.

  4. Empagliflozin and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Established Cardiovascular Disease, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Christoph; Lachin, John M; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Fitchett, David; Mattheus, Michaela; George, Jyothis; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Zinman, Bernard

    2018-01-09

    Empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular disease in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients). Urinary glucose excretion with empagliflozin decreases with declining renal function, resulting in less potency for glucose lowering in patients with kidney disease. We investigated the effects of empagliflozin on clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, established cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, established cardiovascular disease, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥30 mL·min -1 ·1.73 m -2 at screening were randomized to receive empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo once daily in addition to standard of care. We analyzed cardiovascular death, hospitalization for heart failure, all-cause hospitalization, and all-cause mortality in patients with prevalent kidney disease (defined as eGFR 300 mg/g) at baseline. Additional analyses were performed in subgroups by baseline eGFR (300, 30-≤300, 10 years, 58% were receiving insulin, and 84% were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. In patients with prevalent kidney disease at baseline, empagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death by 29% compared with placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.98), the risk of all-cause mortality by 24% (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99), the risk of hospitalization for heart failure by 39% (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.42-0.87), and the risk of all-cause hospitalization by 19% (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.72-0.92). Effects of empagliflozin on these outcomes were consistent across categories of eGFR and urine albumin-creatinine ratio at baseline and across the 2 doses studied. The adverse event profile of empagliflozin

  5. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of

  6. Utilization of carbon sources by clinical isolates of Aeromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Karoline C; Surek, Monica; Dallagassa, Cibelle B; Assis, Flávia E A; Piantavini, Mario S; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Farah, Sônia M S S; Alberton, Dayane; Fadel-Picheth, Cyntia M T

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria in the genus Aeromonas are primarily aquatic organisms; however, some species can cause diseases in humans, ranging from wound infections to septicemia, of which diarrhea is the most common condition. The ability to use a variety of carbon substrates is advantageous for pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, we used Biolog GN2 microplates to analyze the ability of 103 clinical, predominantly diarrheal, isolates of Aeromonas to use various carbon sources, and we verified whether, among the substrates metabolized by these strains, there were some endogenous to the human intestine. The results indicate that Aeromonas present great diversity in the utilization of carbon sources, and that they preferentially use carbohydrates and amino acids as carbon sources. Among the carbon sources metabolized by Aeromonas in vitro, some were found to be components of intestinal mucin, including aspartic acid, glutamic acid, l-serine, galactose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and glucose, which were used by all strains tested. Additionally, mannose, d-serine, proline, threonine, and N-acetyl-galactosamine were used by several strains. The potential to metabolize substrates endogenous to the intestine may contribute to Aeromonas' capacity to grow in and colonize the intestine. We speculate that this may help explain the ability of Aeromonas to cause diarrhea.

  7. Identification of unsuspected Wolfram syndrome cases through clinical assessment and WFS1 gene screening in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Aguirre, Maria E; la Parra, David Rivera-De; Tapia-Garcia, Hugo; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Johanna; Welschen, Daniela; Welskin, Daniela; Arroyo-Yllanes, Maria Estela; Escudero, Irineo; Nuñez-Hernandez, Jorge A; Medina-Bravo, Patricia; Zenteno, Juan C

    2015-07-15

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a severe autosomal recessive pleiotropic disease primarily characterized by the association of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Earlier reports have shown that a proportion of WS cases may remain unrecognized due to misdiagnosis as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The objectives of this work were to estimate the prevalence of patients fulfilling clinical criteria for WS in a cohort of subjects diagnosed as T1DM and to identify causal WFS1 gene mutations in those individuals meeting clinical criteria for the disease. A cohort of 131 unrelated Mexican T1DM patients was collected, including 77 females and 54 males. Additional clinical anomalies suggesting WS were identified through review of medical files, detailed physical examination and/or specialized tests. WFS1 gene analysis was performed using exon-by-exon PCR amplification and direct Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from patients reaching WS clinical criteria. Clinical criteria for a WS diagnosis were reached in 6 probands, corresponding to a 4.58% frequency of the disease. WFS1 mutations were identified in 4 out of 5 (80%) individuals fulfilling WS clinical criteria, including two homozygous, one compound heterozygous, and one patient with a single allele mutation. No WFS1 mutations were identified in the remaining subject. In our cohort, approximately 6% of cases diagnosed as T1DM were in fact patients with Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 mutations were identified in 4 out of 5 individuals (80%) fulfilling clinical criteria for WS. Clinical and genetic analyses of large cohorts of T1DM patients from different ethnic origins would help to better estimate the occurrence of WS and will lead to a better management of such patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the clinical diagnosis in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, Javier; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Rivolta, Jasmine; Orini, Stefania; Barthel, Henryk; Agosta, Federica; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-04-27

    We aim to report the quality of accuracy studies investigating the utility of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in supporting the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and the corresponding recommendations made by a panel of experts. Seven panellist, four from the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, and three from the European Academy of Neurology, produced recommendations taking into consideration the incremental value of FDG-PET, as added on clinical-neuropsychological examination, to ascertain the aetiology of MCI (AD, FTLD or DLB). A literature search using harmonized population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) strings was performed, and an evidence assessment consistent with the European Federation of Neurological Societies guidance was provided. The consensual recommendation was achieved based on Delphi rounds. Fifty-four papers reported the comparison of interest. The selected papers allowed the identification of FDG patterns that characterized MCI due to AD, FTLD and DLB. While clinical outcome studies supporting the diagnosis of MCI due to AD showed varying accuracies (ranging from 58 to 100%) and varying areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (0.66 to 0.97), no respective data were identified for MCI due to FTLD or for MCI due to DLB. However, the high negative predictive value of FDG-PET and the existence of different disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism support the consensus recommendations for the clinical use of this imaging technique in MCI subjects. FDG-PET has clinical utility on a fair level of evidence in detecting MCI due to AD. Although promising also in detecting MCI due to FTLD and MCI due to DLB, more research is needed to ultimately judge the clinical utility of FDG-PET in these entities.

  9. Nebivolol: impact on cardiac and endothelial function and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toblli JE

    2012-03-01

    heart failure compared with standard care. Thus, nebivolol is an effective and well tolerated agent with benefits above those of traditional β-blockers due to its influence on nitric oxide release, which give it singular hemodynamic effects, cardioprotective activity, and a good tolerability profile. This paper reviews the pharmacology structure and properties of nebivolol, focusing on endothelial dysfunction, clinical utility, comparative efficacy, side effects, and quality of life in general with respect to the other antihypertensive agents.Keywords: beta-blockers, nebivolol, oxidative stress, endothelial function, cardiovascular protection, nitric oxide

  10. Clinical utility of carotid and transcranial ultrasound in cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Figueiredo, Viviane F Zétola, Marcos C Lange Neurology Division, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil Abstract: Carotid and transcranial (CTU ultrasound is a useful tool in a number of clinical settings, particularly in cerebrovascular diseases. CTU is the only method that provides real-time determination of velocity and the spectral waveform of blood flow in the extracranial and basal intracranial arteries, and is effective in the detection of stenosis and occlusion. When transcranial ultrasound is considered, CTU is the only method that allows visualization of microembolic signals in the intracranial arteries. CTU makes a rapid differential diagnosis possible, improving therapeutic decision-making in acute stroke and determining the risk of recurrence and prognosis based on its findings. It is also the standard of care in children with sickle cell disease, when selecting patients for chronic blood transfusion, and for reducing the risk of ischemic stroke in these patients. CTU has some advantages, ie, relative simplicity in terms of interpretation and performance, and affordability, noninvasiveness, and portability. The main concern with ultrasound is that it is an operator-dependent tool and requires a high level of expertise and knowledge of three-dimensional cerebrovascular anatomy for correct interpretation of sonograms. The most significant limitation of intracranial evaluation by transcranial ultrasound is the absence of a suitable bone window in approximately 10% of patients. This paper gives an overview of the current utility and importance of CTU in the prevention and evaluation of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Keywords: transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, Doppler ultrasonography duplex, cerebrovascular disorders, stroke

  11. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL PROFILE OF DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS WITH OR WITHOUT NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a spectrum of conditions, which is characterised histologically by significant macrovesicular hepatic steatosis that occurs in those who do not consume alcohol in amounts considered to be harmful to liver and in the absence of known toxins, drugs, viral disease, etc. This disease is quite frequently seen in diabetes especially type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is probably related to altered glucose metabolism. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is quite variable from mild alteration of transaminases, which is a benign disease to one with high morbidity and mortality. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for NAFLD and the prevalence of NAFLD in diabetic patients have been shown to be between 30-80%. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, normative survey technique was selected. Duration of the study was one year. The sample comprised of 100 diabetic patients age ranged 31-70 years. The sample was selected on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. The tools such as clinical profile and checklist were administered. RESULTS The study found out that NAFLD is very common in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients with NAFLD has a longer duration of diabetes compared to that of diabetic patients without NAFLD diabetic patients with NAFLD had higher BMI, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure than that of patients without NAFLD. CONCLUSION All the patients within the spectrum of NAFLD should be considered potentially affected not only by a liver disease, but by a multisystem disease. Clinicians should be aware of the importance of a complete clinical evaluation for early diagnosis and treatment of liver disease as well as the different manifestations. All type 2 diabetic patients should be monitored for the development of NAFLD. Early diagnosis of NAFLD can prevent the progression to NASH and its complications.

  12. [Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Bidirectional relationship and clinical implications. A consensus document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschner, J; Haak, T; Jepsen, S; Kocher, T; Mehnert, H; Meyle, J; Schumm-Draeger, P-M; Tschöpe, D

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases with an increasing prevalence in the German population. There is a bi-directional relationship between both diseases. Diabetes promotes the occurrence, the progression and the severity of periodontitis. Periodontitis complicates the glycemic control of diabetes, increases the risk of diabetes-associated complications and possibly even of its onset. In view of the existing evidence, that is still not sufficiently communicated within the medical community, an expert panel consisting of four diabetologists and four periodontists has addressed the following questions: What is the effect of diabetes mellitus on periodontitis and on periodontal therapy? What is the effect of periodontitis on diabetes mellitus? What are the practical consequences, that result for interdisciplinary treatment strategies? The treatment of periodontal infections should become an integral part of the management of diabetes, whereas glycemic control is a prerequisite for successful periodontal therapy.

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY OF RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Vineetha Kolar; Anand Sorikunte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with various rheumatological manifestations that are debilitating and affect the quality of life. The present study is about prevalence of rheumatological manifestations in type 2 diabetics. METHODS The current study is a cross sectional study with 100 patients of type 2 diabetics and 50 patients of age and sex matched non diabetics were examined for rheumatological manifestations during the period July 2008 to July 20...

  14. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in people with pharmacoresistant epilepsy: Prevalence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keezer, Mark R; Novy, Jan; Sander, Josemir W

    2015-09-01

    There have been inconsistent reports on the potential association between diabetes mellitus and epilepsy. We examined a consecutive cohort of 2016 people with pharmacoresistant epilepsy admitted to a tertiary medical centre. We identified 20 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM); a point prevalence of 9.9 (95% CI: 6.4, 15.3) cases per 1000 individuals. This represents a more than two-fold increase relative to published prevalence estimates of T1DM in the general population. The onset of T1DM preceded that of epilepsy in 80% of individuals, by a median of 1.5 years. Individuals with T1DM were significantly more likely to have cryptogenic/unknown epilepsy relative to those with type 2 diabetes mellitus or without diabetes (85% versus 35% and 49%, p=0.045). All individuals with T1DM had focal epilepsy, the majority of which were temporal lobe in origin, although there was no evidence that this proportion was any different from those without T1DM (p>0.999). The prevalence of T1DM appears to be increased in people with pharmacoresistant epilepsy and is associated with cryptogenic/unknown epilepsy. These findings may have pathophysiological implications, especially in the context of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology and clinical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated comorbidities in Spain (e-Management study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch Nadal, Josep; Mata Cases, Manel; Mauricio Puente, Dídac

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is currently the most frequent chronic metabolic disease. In spain, according to the di@bet.es study, its prevalence is 13.8% in the adult population (although it is undiagnosed in 6%). The main risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus is obesity. The severity of type 2 diabetes mellitus is determined not only by the presence of hyperglycaemia, but also by the coexistence of other risk factors such as hypertension or dyslipidaemia, which are often associated with the disease. Its impact on the presence of chronic diabetic complications varies. While hyperglycaemia mainly influences the presence of microvascular complications, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and smoking play a greater role in macrovascular atherosclerotic disease. One of the most powerful ways to study the epidemiology of the disease is through the use of large databases that analyse the situation in the routine clinical management of huge numbers of patients. Recently, the data provided by the e-Management Project, based on the SIDIAP database, have allowed updating of many data on the health care of diabetic persons in Catalonia. This not only allows determination of the epidemiology of the disease but is also a magnificent starting point for the design of future studies that will provide answers to more questions. However, the use of large databases is not free of certain problems, especially those concerning the reliability of registries. This article analyses some of the data obtained by the e-Management study and other spanish epidemiological studies of equal importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF IVABRADINE USE IN PATIENTS WITH UNSTABLE ANGINA AND DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kondratiev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to estimate the clinical and pharmacological effects of ivabradine in complex treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome anddiabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2.Materials and methods. The study included 36 patients with acute coronary insufficiency (unstable angina and acute left ventricular failure(Killip class I–III during concomitant type 2 diabetes.Results. Prescribing ivabradine in treatment of unstable angina pectoris complicated by type 2 diabetes led to decrease in clinical symptoms,heart rate and reduce in number of myocardial ischemia episodes. Patients treated with ivabradine, showed a significant tendency to increase left ventricular ejection fraction (12.3 %. Mo adverse reactions were recorded, including hypotensive complications.Conclusion. Ivabradine therapy was characterized by high ischemic and antianginal efficacy, good tolerability, did not lead to the developmentof tolerance and was not accompanied by the appearance of withdrawal syndrome.

  17. CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF IVABRADINE USE IN PATIENTS WITH UNSTABLE ANGINA AND DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kondratiev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to estimate the clinical and pharmacological effects of ivabradine in complex treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome anddiabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2.Materials and methods. The study included 36 patients with acute coronary insufficiency (unstable angina and acute left ventricular failure(Killip class I–III during concomitant type 2 diabetes.Results. Prescribing ivabradine in treatment of unstable angina pectoris complicated by type 2 diabetes led to decrease in clinical symptoms,heart rate and reduce in number of myocardial ischemia episodes. Patients treated with ivabradine, showed a significant tendency to increase left ventricular ejection fraction (12.3 %. Mo adverse reactions were recorded, including hypotensive complications.Conclusion. Ivabradine therapy was characterized by high ischemic and antianginal efficacy, good tolerability, did not lead to the developmentof tolerance and was not accompanied by the appearance of withdrawal syndrome.

  18. Clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of HLA genotyping in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in screening for coeliac disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, J; Hoorweg-Nijman, J J G; Balemans, W A

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-genotyping in the Netherlands as a screening tool for the development of coeliac disease in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis was performed in 110 children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus diagnosed between January 1996 and January 2013. All children were screened for coeliac disease using coeliac disease-specific antibodies and HLA genotyping was performed in all children. One hundred and ten children were screened for coeliac disease, and coeliac disease could be confirmed in seven. Eighty-six per cent of the children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus had one of the variants of HLA-DQ2.5 and DQ8. HLA genotypes observed in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus children and coeliac disease were heterozygote DQ2.5, homozygote DQ2.5 and heterozygote DQ2.5/DQ8. HLA genotyping in coeliac disease screening in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus is more expensive than screening for coeliac disease with antibodies alone (€326 vs. €182 per child). The risk of coeliac disease development in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased when they are heterozygote DQ2.5/DQ8, homozygote or heterozygote DQ2.5. The implementation of HLA genotyping as a first-line screening tool has to be reconsidered because it is not distinctive or cost-effective. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  19. Pharmaceutical Expenditure for Diabetes Mellitus in a Region of Spain as Clinical Risk Group, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    ALVIS, LUIS; Vivas-Consuelo, David; CABALLER TARAZONA, VICENT; USÓ TALAMANTES, RUTH; SANCHO MESTRE, CARLA; Buigues Pastor, Laia

    2016-01-01

    El contenido de los artículos es de exclusiva responsabilidad de los autores. Los textos pueden reproducirse total o parcialmente citando la fuente. [ES] Se pretende estimar la multimorbilidad asociada con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 y su relación con el gasto farmacéutico, para lo cual se realizó un estudio de corte transversal durante el año 2012. Se identificó a 350 015 individuos diabéticos, a través de códigos clínicos, usando la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades y el ...

  20. Secundary Diabetes Mellitus, the tip of the iceberg: a report of two clinical cases

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, F; Reis, D; Barão, P; Sargento, I; Silva, S; Dutschmann, L

    2006-01-01

    Descrevemos dois casos clínicos raros de Diabetes Mellitus (DM) secundária, cuja avaliação etiológica revelou um macroadenoma hipofisário secretor de GHgh e um tumor secretor de cortisol, localizado unilateralmente na cortical da suprarrenal. Ambos os casos têm a particularidade de terem sido internados pelo Serviço de Urgência com quadros agudos associados à diabetes, antes de serem conhecidas as patologias endócrinas subjacentes. O primeiro (Acromegalia) foi internado por hiperglicemia g...

  1. Quality of Life, Depression, and Healthcare Resource Utilization among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Concomitant Hypertension and Obesity: A Prospective Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study compared quality of life, depression, and healthcare resource utilization among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and comorbid hypertension (HTN and obesity with those of adults reporting T2DM alone. Methods. Respondents to the US SHIELD survey self-reported their height, weight, comorbid conditions, hospitalizations, and outpatient visits and completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12 and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Respondents reporting T2DM and HTN and obesity (body mass index, BMI, ≥30 kg/m2 were compared with a T2DM-alone group. Results. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity (n=1292 had significantly lower SF-12 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (37.3 and 50.9, resp. than T2DM-alone respondents (n=349 (45.8 and 53.5, resp., P<0.0001. Mean PHQ-9 scores were significantly higher among T2DM respondents with comorbid HTN and obesity (5.0 versus 2.5, P<0.0001, indicating greater depression burden. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity had significantly more resource utilization with respect to physician visits and emergency room visits but not hospitalizations than respondents with T2DM alone (P=0.03. Conclusions. SHIELD respondents with comorbid conditions of T2DM, HTN, and obesity reported greater healthcare resource utilization, more depression symptoms, and lower quality of life than the T2DM-alone group.

  2. Intentions of Registered Antenatal Clinic Patients About Utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nigeria bears a sizeable proportion of the global HIV burden; mother to child transmission as a major contributor and prevention of mother to child transmission the hope for a HIV-free generation. Objective: To find evaluate how booked antenatal attendees intend to utilize the labour and delivery services of the ...

  3. The clinical utility and cost effectiveness of routine thyroid screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The use of thyroid tests to assess psychiatric patients remains debatable. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the utility and cost effectiveness of the current protocol used in thyroid testing in adult psychiatric patients presenting at Stikland Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Method: This was a ...

  4. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in People Clinically Diagnosed with Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziukaite, Laura; Slot, Dagmar E; Van der Weijden, Fridus A

    2017-11-10

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are complex chronic diseases with an established bidirectional relationship. This systematic review evaluated in subjects with professionally diagnosed periodontitis the prevalence and odds of having diabetes. The MEDLINE-PubMed, CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with periodontitis were extracted or if possible calculated. From the 803 titles and abstracts that came out of the search, 29papers met the initial criteria. Prevalence of diabetes was 9.4% among subjects with periodontitis and 12.8%among subjects without periodontitis. Based on sub-analysis, for subjects with periodontitis, the prevalence of diabetes was 6.5%when diabetes was self-reported, compared to 17.3%when diabetes was clinically assessed. The highest prevalence of diabetes among subjects with periodontitis was observed in studies originating from Asian countries(17.2%,n=16647) and the lowest in studies describing populations from Europe(4.3%(n=7858). The overall odds ratio for diabetes patients to be among subjects with periodontitis as compared to those without periodontitis was 2.59(95%CI[2.12;3.15]). A substantial variability in the definitions of periodontitis, combination of self-reported and clinically assessed diabetes, lack of confounding for diabetes control in included studies introduces estimation bias. The overall prevalence and odds of having diabetes is higher within periodontitis populations compared to people without periodontitis. Self-reported diabetes underestimates the prevalence when compared to this condition assessed clinically. Geographical differences were observed: the highest diabetes prevalence among subjects with periodontitis was observed in studies conducted in Asia and the lowest in studies originating from Europe. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. The clinical utility of echocardiography as a cardiological diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been a decline in the auscultatory and other clinical skills of physicians especially in developed countries. The advent of echocardiography has revolutionized the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and made up for the decline in clinical skills. Objective: To assess the sensitivity and specificity of ...

  6. Cohort monitoring of persons with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare clinic for Palestine refugees in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Ali; Farajallah, Loai; Shahin, Yousef; Hababeh, Majed; Abu-Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Kochi, Arata; Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Venter, Wendy; Seita, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    To illustrate the method of cohort reporting of persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary healthcare clinic in Amman, Jordan, serving Palestine refugees with the aim of improving quality of DM care services. A descriptive study using quarterly and cumulative case findings, as well as cumulative and 12-month analyses of cohort outcomes collected through E-Health in UNRWA Nuzha Primary Health Care Clinic. There were 55 newly registered patients with DM in quarter 1, 2012, and a total of 2851 patients with DM ever registered on E-Health because this was established in 2009. By 31 March 2012, 70% of 2851 patients were alive in care, 18% had failed to present to a healthcare worker in the last 3 months and the remainder had died, transferred out or were lost to follow-up. Cumulative and 12-month cohort outcome analysis indicated deficiencies in several components of clinical care: measurement of blood pressure, annual assessments for foot care and blood tests for glucose, cholesterol and renal function. 10-20% of patients with DM in the different cohorts had serious late complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular disease and amputations. Cohort analysis provides data about incidence and prevalence of DM at the clinic level, clinical management performance and prevalence of serious morbidity. It needs to be more widely applied for the monitoring and management of non-communicable chronic diseases. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Lifestyle and clinical factors associated with elevated C-reactive protein among newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Mor, Anil; Rungby, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    % male) with newly diagnosed Type 2 DM included in the prospective nationwide Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) project. We assessed the prevalence of elevated CRP and calculated relative risks (RR) examining the association of CRP with lifestyle and clinical factors......BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the prevalence of and modifiable factors associated with elevated C-reactive Protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, in men and women with newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based setting. METHODS: CRP was measured in 1,037 patients (57...... showed consistent results with the full analysis. The linear regression analysis conveyed an association between high CRP and increased fasting blood glucose. CONCLUSIONS: Among newly diagnosed Type 2 DM patients, 40% had elevated CRP levels. Important modifiable risk factors for elevated CRP may vary...

  8. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease: relationship to different clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco-J; Miralles, Lucía; Llambes, Fernando; Bautista, Daniel; Solá-Izquierdo, Eva; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the frequency of periodontal disease in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and how this relates with diabetes metabolic control, duration of diabetes, and presence of diabetic complications. A comparison was made of periodontal parameters (plaque index, bleeding index, pocket depth and attachment loss) in a group of diabetic patients (n=90) versus a group of non-diabetics (n=90). Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease, and the appearance of complications. Diabetics had greater bleeding index (pperiodontal pockets (pperiodontal attachment loss (pdiabetics. Deficient metabolic control and presence of diabetic complication were associated with higher bleeding index and pocket depth (pdiabetes appear to show increased periodontal disease susceptibility, particularly those with poorer metabolic control or with diabetic complications.

  9. Clinical outcomes, not clinical utility, should be the major consideration for saxagliptin with or without metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doggrell SA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sheila A DoggrellDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaA recent review by Panagoulias and Doupis, published in Patient Preference and Adherence, concerned the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination (SAXA/MET FDC, and was titled "Clinical utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes with the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination."1 This review concluded that "The SAXA/MET FDC is a patient-friendly, dosage-flexible, and hypoglycemia-safe regimen with very few adverse events and a neutral or even favorable effect on body weight. It achieves significant glycosylated hemoglobin A1c reduction helping the patient to achieve his/her individual glycemic goals."1View original paper by Panagoulias and Doupis.

  10. Clinical significance of neuregulin 4 (NRG4) in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek Eken, Meryem; Yayla Abide, Cigdem; Sahin Ersoy, Gulcin; Altun Ensari, Tugba; Pekin, Oya; Cevik, Ozge

    2017-12-28

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance detected during pregnancy. GDM is increasing worldwide and is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Neuregulin 4 (NGR4) is epidermal growth factor like signaling molecule. It plays an important role in cell to cell communication furthermore recent studies indicate that NRG4 may work as a novel adipokine with a possible role in maintaining energy and metabolic homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to assess serum NRG4 levels along with several metabolic parameters in patients diagnosed with gestational diabetic mellitus. In this prospective cross-sectional study, the study group was composed of 63 women with GDM and 64 healthy pregnant women matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and gestational age. Blood samples were collected at the 24-28th gestational weeks. Serum NRG4, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, glucose levels during 75-gr OGTT, fasting insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatinine levels were measured. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values were calculated. Serum NRG4 values were significantly elevated in the GDM group compared to the control group (p HOMA-IR (β = 0.222, p < .001) independently and positively predicted NRG4 levels. Serum NRG4 levels were associated with metabolic parameters of GDM. The present study can be considered to be a guide for future studies to clarify the pathophysiology of NGR4 in GDM patients.

  11. Clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of HLA genotyping in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in screening for coeliac disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, J.; Hoorweg-Nijman, J. J. G.; Balemans, W. A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-genotyping in the Netherlands as a screening tool for the development of coeliac disease in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis was performed in 110 children with Type 1

  12. Factors associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowicz, Bryan S; Hyman, Leslie; Hou, Wei; Oates, Thomas W; Reddy, Michael; Paquette, David W; Katancik, James A; Engebretson, Steven P

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. People with T2DM are at risk of experiencing periodontitis and likely require treatment. Using data from the national multicenter Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), the authors assessed patient-based characteristics associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. The DPTT investigators randomly assigned adults with T2DM (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] ≥ 7 percent and periodontitis to receive immediate or delayed therapy (scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, chlorhexidine rinse). The investigators assessed probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and medical conditions at baseline, three months and six months. Six-month changes in mean PD, CAL and BOP defined the treatment response. Complete data were available for 473 of 514 DPTT participants. The authors used multiple regression models to evaluate participant-level factors associated with the response. More severe baseline PD, CAL and BOP were associated with greater improvements in these same measurements (P 30 kilograms per square meter) experienced greater reductions in PD and BOP than did participants who were not obese (P diabetes duration, and smoking were not associated with change in any outcome (P > .1). In patients with T2DM, baseline disease severity was associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Body mass index and Hispanic ethnicity-but not glycemic control, diabetes duration or smoking-also may be useful in predicting clinical changes in this population.

  13. Utilizing Motivational Interviewing to Address Resistant Behaviors in Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahesh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is presented as an approach to address resistant behaviors in clinical supervision. A case example is used to illustrate the process in which the relational and technical elements of motivational interviewing can be applied to supervisee resistance. Implications for supervisors and researchers are discussed.

  14. Clinical utility of RapidArc™ radiotherapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infusino, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    RapidArc™ is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360°) and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords “RapidArc”, “Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy”, and “Intensity-modulated radiotherapy”

  15. Update on the clinical utility and optimal use of cefditoren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barberán J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available José Barberán,1 Lorenzo Aguilar,2 María-José Giménez21Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren. The in vitro activity of cefditoren and its potential pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic adequacy to cover emerging resistance phenotypes in the present decade is reviewed. Cefditoren's in vitro activity against most prevalent bacterial respiratory pathogens in the community and its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile suggests a significant role for cefditoren in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Clinical trials (in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, and sinusitis performed during clinical development outside Japan, mainly in adults, are reviewed, together with new clinical studies in the treatment of pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, and otitis media in children, mainly in Japan, for efficacy and safety assessment. The results of these studies support the adequacy of cefditoren for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections with a safety profile similar to previous oral antibiotics. From the data reviewed, it is concluded that cefditoren is an adequate option for the treatment of mild-to-moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, especially in geographical areas with a reported prevalence of phenotypes exhibiting nonsusceptibility to common oral antibiotics.Keywords: acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis media

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Ranolazine Versus Traditional Therapies in Chronic Stable Angina Pectoris and Concomitant Diabetes Mellitus and Impact on Health Care Resource Utilization and Cardiac Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert L; Ghushchyan, Vahram; Read, Richard A; Hartsfield, Cynthia L; Koch, Bruce R; Nair, Kavita V

    2015-11-01

    Comparative studies evaluating traditional versus newer antianginal (AA) medications in chronic stable angina pectoris (CSA) on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes and utilization are limited, particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Claims data (2008 to 2012) were analyzed using a commercial database. Patients with CSA receiving a β blocker (BB), calcium channel blocker (CCB), long-acting nitrate (LAN), or ranolazine were identified and followed for 12 months after a change in AA therapy. Patients on traditional AA medications were required to have concurrent sublingual nitroglycerin. Therapy change was defined as adding or switching to another traditional AA medication or ranolazine to identify patients whose angina was inadequately controlled with previous therapy. Four groups were identified (BB, CCB, LAN, or ranolazine users) and matched on relevant characteristics. A DM subset was identified. Logistic regression compared revascularization at 30, 60, 90, 180, and 360 days. Negative binomial regression compared all-cause, CV-, and DM-related (in the DM cohort) health care utilization. A total of 8,008 patients were identified with 2,002 patients in each matched group. Majority were men (mean age 66 years). A subset of 3,724 patients with DM (BB, n = 933; CCB, n = 940; LAN, n = 937; and ranolazine, n = 914) resulted from this cohort. Compared to ranolazine in the overall cohort, traditional AA medication exhibited greater odds for revascularization and higher rates in all-cause outpatient, emergency room visits, inpatient length of stay, and CV-related emergency room visits. In the DM cohort, ranolazine demonstrated similar benefits over traditional AA medication. In conclusion, ranolazine use in patients with inadequately controlled chronic angina is associated with less revascularization and all-cause and CV-related health care utilization compared to traditional AA medication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia.

  18. Clinical utility of ustekinumab in Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotze PG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Paulo Gustavo Kotze,1,2 Christopher Ma,1 Abdulelah Almutairdi,1,3 Remo Panaccione1 1Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unit, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatient Clinics, Colorectal Surgery Unit, Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; 3Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapy marked an important milestone in the management of moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease (CD. However, there remains a pressing demand for alternative therapeutic options for patients with primary nonresponse, secondary loss of response, or intolerable side effects to conventional treatment and TNF antagonists. Ustekinumab (UST is a fully human IgG1κ monoclonal antibody that inhibits the p40 subunit shared by the proinflammatory cytokines, the interleukin (IL-12 and -23. This blockade leads to dampening of the inflammatory cascade and differentiation of inflammatory T cells. The clinical development program for UST in CD includes dose finding Phase II (Crohn’s Evaluation of Response to Ustekinumab Anti-Interleukin-12/23 for Induction [CERTIFI] and the pivotal Phase III (UNITI trials that demonstrated both the clinical efficacy and safety in anti-TNF-naive and anti-TNF-exposed patients. Real-world evidence has further defined the role of UST in CD management. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of UST, describe the results of the randomized controlled trials with this agent, and review the real-world efficacy and safety data from observational cohorts. Finally, we identify areas of future research in the IL-12/23 inflammatory pathway and discuss the positioning of this novel therapeutic option in CD treatment algorithms. Keywords: ustekinumab, Crohn’s disease, interleukin

  19. [Long-term clinical course after cataract surgery in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiseliţă, D; Irod, Alexandra; Huţuleac, Alexandra; Juverdeanu, Raluca; Obada, Otilia; Cantemir, Alina

    2012-01-01

    To determine the visual outcome at 5 years postoperatively in patients operated for cataract associated with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective study on a group of 41 eyes in patients with diabetes, who were operated for cataract (the same surgeon) by facoemulsification and IOL implantation in the capsular bag, without intraoperative complications, for 60 months (during 2003-2007). 27 patients with diabetes were included in the study, the average duration of diabetes was 10, 3 years. Average postoperative visual acuity (VA) was 0.5 at six weeks postoperatively. Preoperative VA improvement was observed in 78%. There was a decrease in VA of 85% at more than 5 years after surgery and 15% of eyes had preserved VA. VA decrease was due to the occurrence, progression and worsening of retinopathy (69%) and diabetic maculopathy, posterior capsular opacification (34%), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (12%). Visual acuity was maintained in 15% and decreased in 85% of patients due to diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration.

  20. A Clinical Perspective of Canagliflozin in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardolillo, AnneMarie; Kane, Michael P; Busch, Robert S; Watsky, Jay; Hamilton, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the real-world efficacy and safety of the first sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, canagliflozin, in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This observational study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of canagliflozin in T2DM patients. Primary study outcomes were changes in HbA1C and weight, and percentage of patients reporting adverse effects of therapy. RESULTS The study criteria were met by 111 patient records. Baseline patient characteristics were: average age, 59 ± 9 years; mean duration of T2DM, 11.9 ± 7.3 years; 57.6% of patients were male; 92.8% were Caucasian; baseline BMI, 38.9 ± 11 kg/m2; and mean baseline HbA1C, 7.53 (58.8 mmol/mol) ± 1.08%. HbA1C and weight were significantly reduced by 0.37% and 4.4 kg, respectively. Adverse effects were reported by 21 patients, and 17 (15.3%) discontinued canagliflozin because of adverse reactions. CONCLUSION Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated and significantly reduced HbA1C levels and body weight in patients with T2DM when added to a regimen of other anti-hyperglycemic agents. PMID:25288892

  1. A Clinical Perspective of Canagliflozin in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneMarie Nardolillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the real-world efficacy and safety of the first sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, canagliflozin, in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods This observational study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of canagliflozin in T2DM patients. Primary study outcomes were changes in HbAlC and weight, and percentage of patients reporting adverse effects of therapy. Results The study criteria were met by 111 patient records. Baseline patient characteristics were: average age, 59 ± 9 years; mean duration of T2DM, 11.9 ± 7.3 years; 57.6% of patients were male; 92.8% were Caucasian; baseline BMI, 38.9 ± 11 kg/m 2 ; and mean baseline HbAlC, 7.53 (58.8 mmol/mol ± 1.08%. HbAlC and weight were significantly reduced by 0.37% and 4.4 kg, respectively. Adverse effects were reported by 21 patients, and 17 (15.3% discontinued canagliflozin because of adverse reactions. Conclusion Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated and significantly reduced HbAlC levels and body weight in patients with T2DM when added to a regimen of other anti-hyperglycemic agents.

  2. Metformin compared with insulin in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niromanesh, Shirin; Alavi, Azin; Sharbaf, Fatemeh Rahimi; Amjadi, Nooshin; Moosavi, Sanaz; Akbari, Soheila

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of metformin and insulin in glycemic control and compare pregnancy outcome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This randomized controlled trial was conducted in GDM women with singleton pregnancy and gestational age between 20 and 34 weeks who did not achieve glycemic control on diet were assigned randomly to receive either metformin (n=80) or insulin (n=80). The primary outcomes were maternal glycemic control and birth weight. The secondary outcomes were neonatal and obstetric complications. Two groups were comparable regarding the maternal characteristics. Two groups were similar in mean FBS (P=0.68) and postprandial measurements (P=0.87) throughout GDM treatment. The neonates of metformin group had less rate of birth weight centile >90 than insulin group (RR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9, P=0.012). Maternal weight gain was reduced in the metformin group (P0.05). In metformin group 14% of women needed to supplemental insulin to achieve euglycemia. Metformin is an effective and safe alternative treatment to insulin for women with GDM. This study does not show significant risk of maternal or neonatal adverse outcome with the use of metformin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical utility and limitation of MRI in neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Shigeki (Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)); Machida, Tohru; Shirouzu, Ichirou; Ohkubo, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Yasushi

    1992-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages over computed tomography in the neuroradiological field: it provids biochemical information, images in any plane without bone artifacts, and superior contrast between gray matter and white matter. It is, however, of limited availability because of longer imaging time, poor spatial resolution, and poor visualization of calcification and the bone. In this review, pathophysiology that shows relatively characteristic signal intensity is described, including hemorrhage, fat, protein-rich cyst, calcification, iron, and posterior pituitary gland. The utility and limitation of MRI are discussed in terms of the following diseases and lesion sites: small tumors in the skull base; demyelination of white matter or degenerative disease; cerebral infarction or cerebral ischemic disease; intramedullary lesion; meningeal lesion; and pediatric diseases such as medullary sheath formation and malformation. Finally, recent advance and future perspectives of MRI are presented, focusing on 3-dimensional imaging, MR angiography, fat-suppression MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, imaging time, and spatial resolution. (N.K.) 82 refs.

  4. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro

    1996-01-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  5. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  6. Clinical utility of foam dressings in wound management: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Nielsen, Karsten Fogh Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Background: The management of chronic wounds is a significant medical burden associated with large health care expenditures. Since the establishment of moist wound healing in the 1960s, several types of wound dressings have been developed. However, the evidence for effectiveness when comparing various types of wound dressings is limited. Objectives: The purpose of this review is 1 to provide a general description of the role of foam in wound therapy and 2 to evaluate the evidence for effectiveness of foam dressings compared to other frequently used products. Summary and conclusion: Foam has a significant role in the clinical management of chronic wounds and in moist wound healing. There are only a few randomized controlled trials, which in general, show no significant difference in the healing effect of different dressing types. The choice of wound dressing should therefore be based on clinical evaluation of the wound and the periwound skin. Keywords: foam dressing, chronic wounds, comparative effectiveness, healing, periwound skin, ulcers 

  7. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  8. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maron Martin S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent. High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected, end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance

  9. Biology and clinical utilization of mesenchymal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Minguell

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex cellular arrangement found in the bone marrow stroma there exists a subset of nonhematopoietic cells referred to as mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC. These cells can be expanded ex vivo and induced, either in vitro or in vivo, to terminally differentiate into at least seven types of cells: osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, tenocytes, myotubes, astrocytes and hematopoietic-supporting stroma. This broad multipotentiality, the feasibility to obtain MPC from bone marrow, cord and peripheral blood and their transplantability support the impact that the use of MPC will have in clinical settings. However, a number of fundamental questions about the cellular and molecular biology of MPC still need to be resolved before these cells can be used for safe and effective cell and gene therapies intended to replace, repair or enhance the physiological function of the mesenchymal and/or hematopoietic systems.

  10. Amniotic membrane allografts: development and clinical utility in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzuti A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Allison Rizzuti,1,2 Adam Goldenberg,1 Douglas R Lazzaro1,2 1SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 2Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: Amniotic membrane, the innermost layer of the placenta, is a tissue that promotes epithelialization, while decreasing inflammation, neovascularization, and scarring. It is used in the surgical management of a wide variety of ophthalmic conditions where it functions as a graft or patch in ocular surface reconstruction. The development of new preservation techniques, as well as a sutureless amniotic membrane, has allowed for easier, in-office placement, without the disadvantages of an operating room procedure. The purpose of this review is to describe the historical development of amniotic membrane in ophthalmology and to describe its current clinical applications, particularly focusing on recent advances. Keywords: ocular surface, cornea, stem cells, prokera, allograft, patch, transplantation

  11. Clinical applications of a high quantum utilization scanner. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, P.H.; Cassen, B.

    1973-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tomographic imaging process employing a fast rectilinear scanner consisted of a spherical-cap nest of seven individual detectors (3'' x 1 / 2 '' activated sodium iodide) collimated to a common focal point at 10 cm. Hydraulic drives permitted a fast rectilinear scan to be made and, when raised or lowered, at different planes. Patients with well-defined brain lesions were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate or 203 Hg-chlormerodrin as tracers by measuring three dimensions of their lesions and anatomical location at the time of operation. Brain maps were used to identify this location at operation and also the location of images traced from film density displays of a conventional radioisotopic scan, the tomographic scan, and cerebral angiograms. (U.S.)

  12. Achieving low anastomotic leak rates utilizing clinical perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kream, Jacob; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection increases morbidity, mortality, and in the setting of cancer, increases recurrences rates and reduces survival odds. Recent reports suggest that fluorescence evaluation of perfusion after colorectal anastomosis creation is associated with low anastomotic leak rates (1.4%). The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a similar low anastomotic leak rate after left-sided colorectal resections could be achieved using standard assessment of blood flow to the bowel ends. We performed a retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral center, evaluating 317 consecutive patients who underwent a pelvic anastomosis after sigmoid colectomy, left colectomy, or low anterior resection. All operations were performed by a single surgeon from March 2008 to January 2015 with only standard clinical measures used to assess perfusion to the bowel ends. The primary outcome measure was the anastomotic leak rate as diagnosed by clinical symptoms, exam, or routine imaging. The average patient age was 59.7 years with an average body mass index of 28.8 kg/m(2). Rectal cancer (128, 40.4%) was the most common indication for operation while hypertension (134, 42.3%) was the most common comorbidity. In total, 177 operations were laparoscopic (55.8%), 13 were reoperative resections (4.1%), and 108 were protected with a loop ileostomy (34.1%). Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 25 patients (7.9%) while preoperative chemo/radiation was administered to 64 patients (20.2%). The anastomotic leak rate was 1.6% (5/317). Our data suggests that standard, careful evaluation of adequate blood flow via inspection and confirmation of pulsatile blood flow to the bowel ends and meticulous construction of the colorectal or coloanal anastomoses can result in very low leak rates, similar to the rate reported when intraoperative imaging is used to assess perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diabetes mellitus and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Polychronis, Sotirios; Wilson, Heather; Giordano, Beniamino; Ferrara, Nicola; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2018-04-06

    To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is associated with Parkinson-like pathology in people without Parkinson disease and to evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus on markers of Parkinson pathology and clinical progression in drug-naive patients with early-stage Parkinson disease. We compared 25 patients with Parkinson disease and diabetes mellitus to 25 without diabetes mellitus, and 14 patients with diabetes mellitus and no Parkinson disease to 14 healthy controls (people with no diabetes mellitus or Parkinson disease). The clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was confirmed by 2 consecutive fasting measurements of serum glucose levels >126 mL/dL. Over a 36-month follow-up period, we then investigated in the population with Parkinson disease whether the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression or cognitive decline. The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with higher motor scores ( p Parkinson disease. In patients with diabetes but without Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with lower striatal dopamine transporter binding ( p Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression (hazard ratio = 4.521, 95% confidence interval = 1.468-13.926; p Parkinson-like pathology, and when present in patients with Parkinson disease, can induce a more aggressive phenotype. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus: Cardiovascular and Kidney Effects, Potential Mechanisms, and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Perkins, Bruce A; Fitchett, David H; Husain, Mansoor; Cherney, David Z I

    2016-09-06

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, including empagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and canagliflozin, are now widely approved antihyperglycemic therapies. Because of their unique glycosuric mechanism, SGLT2 inhibitors also reduce weight. Perhaps more important are the osmotic diuretic and natriuretic effects contributing to plasma volume contraction, and decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures by 4 to 6 and 1 to 2 mm Hg, respectively, which may underlie cardiovascular and kidney benefits. SGLT2 inhibition also is associated with an acute, dose-dependent reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate by ≈5 mL·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2) and ≈30% to 40% reduction in albuminuria. These effects mirror preclinical observations suggesting that proximal tubular natriuresis activates renal tubuloglomerular feedback through increased macula densa sodium and chloride delivery, leading to afferent vasoconstriction. On the basis of reduced glomerular filtration, glycosuric and weight loss effects are attenuated in patients with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate kidney disease. With regard to long-term clinical outcomes, the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular disease randomly assigned to empagliflozin versus placebo reported a 14% reduction in the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and >30% reductions in cardiovascular mortality, overall mortality, and heart failure hospitalizations associated with empagliflozin, even though, by design, the hemoglobin A1c difference between the randomized groups was marginal. Aside from an increased risk of mycotic genital infections, empagliflozin-treated patients had fewer serious adverse events, including a lower risk of acute kidney injury. In light of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME results, some diabetes

  15. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Methods Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell’s periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Results Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell’s periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Conclusions

  16. Clinical Significance of Hemostatic Parameters in the Prediction for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianlian Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It would be important to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and diabetic nephropathy (DN. This study was aimed at evaluating the predicting significance of hemostatic parameters for T2DM and DN. Plasma coagulation and hematologic parameters before treatment were measured in 297 T2DM patients. The risk factors and their predicting power were evaluated. T2DM patients without complications exhibited significantly different activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, platelet (PLT, and D-dimer (D-D levels compared with controls (P<0.01. Fibrinogen (FIB, PLT, and D-D increased in DN patients compared with those without complications (P<0.001. Both aPTT and PLT were the independent risk factors for T2DM (OR: 1.320 and 1.211, P<0.01, resp., and FIB and PLT were the independent risk factors for DN (OR: 1.611 and 1.194, P<0.01, resp.. The area under ROC curve (AUC of aPTT and PLT was 0.592 and 0.647, respectively, with low sensitivity in predicting T2DM. AUC of FIB was 0.874 with high sensitivity (85% and specificity (76% for DN, and that of PLT was 0.564, with sensitivity (60% and specificity (89% based on the cutoff values of 3.15 g/L and 245 × 109/L, respectively. This study suggests that hemostatic parameters have a low predicting value for T2DM, whereas fibrinogen is a powerful predictor for DN.

  17. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Choi, Youn-Hee; Won, Kyu-Chang; Moon, Jun Sung; Merchant, Anwar T; Lee, Hee-Kyung

    2013-11-07

    Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell's periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell's periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Diabetes-related factors such as duration of

  18. Topical KINOSTAT™ ameliorates the clinical development and progression of cataracts in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Peter F; Webb, Terah R; Bras, Dineli; Ketring, Kerry; Wyman, Milton

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether topical administration of the aldose reductase inhibitor Kinostat™ can ameliorate the onset or progression of cataracts in dogs with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus (DM). A randomized, prospective, double-masked placebo control pilot study was conducted with 40 dogs newly diagnosed with DM with no or minimal lens changes. Twenty-eight dogs received Kinostat™ and 12 dogs received placebo. Owners administered the agent into both eyes three times daily for 1 year and compliance was monitored with log sheets. Complete ophthalmic examinations were performed on dilated eyes at the time of enrollment and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months into treatment. Cataract severity was assessed on a scale of 0-3. At 12 months, full bloodwork, including HbA1C and blood Kinostat™ levels were performed. After 12 months of treatment, the cataract score in the placebo group significantly increased with seven dogs (14 eyes) developing mature cataracts, two dogs (4 eyes) developing cortical opacities, and one dog (2 eyes) developing equatorial vacuoles with mild punctate cortical opacities. In contrast, the cataract score in the Kinostat™ treated dogs was significantly less with seven developing anterior equatorial vacuoles, two developing incipient anterior cortical cataracts, and four developing mature cataracts. In fact, the cataract scores of the Kinostat™ group at 12 months did not significantly increase from the score at the time of enrollment. The HbA1C values between the two groups after 12 months of treatment were similar, and no blood levels of Kinostat™ were found in any enrolled dog. The onset and/or progression of cataracts in dogs with DM can be significantly delayed by topical administration of Kinostat™. © 2010 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Clinical utility of the Five-Factor Model of personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Lengel, Gregory J

    2012-12-01

    There exists a great deal of research regarding the validity of the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality disorder. One of the most common objections to this model is concern regarding clinical utility. This article discusses clinical utility in terms of three fundamental components (i.e., ease of usage, communication, and treatment). In addition, a considerable number of recent empirical studies have examined whether the FFM compares well to personality disorder diagnostic categories with respect to all three components of clinical utility. The purpose of the current article is to provide a description of the implications of each component of clinical utility as it relates to the FFM and to acknowledge and address the empirical findings. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus upon admission to a dental clinic: considerations for dental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodus, Nelson L; Vibeto, Bryan M; Hamamoto, Darryl T

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of glycemic control in dental patients with diabetes upon admission to a dental school clinic. One hundred patients (mean age: 57.7 years) of the Oral Diagnosis-Admissions Clinic at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, Minnesota, with diabetes mellitus were chosen as subjects. Fasting blood glucose was measured using a portable blood glucose monitoring device as a part of their initial dental examination. Twenty-eight of the 100 patients were found to be hyperglycemic (> or = 126 mg/dl; 174.8 +/- 40.8 mg/dl; mean +/- SEM); 2 patients were found to be hypoglycemic (diabetes in the cohort, 3 (37.5%) were very hyperglycemic, with fasting blood glucose levels > 250 mg/dl. This is important information for dental practitioners because patients with diabetes may not be under good glycemic control, and dentists may have to take special precautions before, during, and after treatment. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of diabetes, the detection of patients with undiagnosed or poorly controlled diabetes, and the management of patients with diabetes during dental treatment.

  1. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus in a North American community: prevalence, serologic screening, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Farid H; Murray, Joseph A; Kudva, Yogish C; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Dierkhising, Ross A; Lahr, Brian D; Dyck, Peter J; Kyle, Robert A; El-Youssef, Mounif; Burgart, Lawrence J; Van Dyke, Carol T; Brogan, Deanna L; Melton, L Joseph

    2005-11-01

    To estimate the prevalence of cellac disease (CD) in pediatric and adult type 1 diabetes melitus in a defined population and to describe clinical features and HLA class II genotypes predictive of CD in screened patients with type 1 diabetes. All residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, with type 1 diabetes mellitus on the prevalence date January 1, 2001, were identified with the use of an established medical records linkage system (Rochester Epidemiology Project) and defined clinical criteria. Consenting patients underwent serologic screening with endomyslal antibody and tissue transglutaminase antibody testing and Intestinal biopsies to confirm the diagnosis of CD. A subset of screened patients also underwent HLA class II genotyping. Quality-of-life screening (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) was completed in a subset of patients at the time of serologic screening. Overall, 392 Olmsted County residents with type 1 diabetes on January 1, 2001, were Identified. A total of 158 patients with type 1 diabetes were tested, representing 40% (158/392) of the enumerated diabetic population, and 11 had biopsy-proven CD for an estimated point prevalence of 7.0% (95% confidence Interval, 3.5%-12.1%). Most CD-positive diabetic patients were asymptomatic and expressed an at-risk CD haplotype with at least one of but not both HLA DQ2 or DQ8. Celiac disease Is not rare In North American patients with type 1 diabetes, and most CD-positive diabetic patients are asymptomatic Irrespective of age at screening.

  2. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  3. The clinical utility of lurasidone in schizophrenia: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey PD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Harvey1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Bruce W Carter VA Medical Center, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Lurasidone is a novel antipsychotic agent approved for the treatment of schizophrenia in a number of countries including the United Kingdom, other European countries, the United States, and Canada. In addition to full antagonist activity at the dopamine D2 (Ki, 1 nM and serotonin 5-HT2A (Ki, 0.5 nM receptors, the pharmacodynamic profile of lurasidone is notable for its high affinity for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors (0.5 nM and its partial agonist activity at 5-HT1A receptors (Ki, 6.4 nM. Long-term treatment of schizophrenia with lurasidone has been shown to reduce the risk of relapse in patients with schizophrenia. Lurasidone appears to be associated with minimal effects on body weight, and low risk for clinically meaningful alterations in glucose, lipids, or electrocardiography parameters. Evidence from two randomized trials also suggests improvement in functional capacity and cognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia. A significant evidence base supports the use of lurasidone as a promising agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. Keywords: long-term treatment, antagonist, pharmacodynamic profile

  4. CLINICAL PROFILE OF NON-ALBUMINURIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sathya Murthy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent metabolic diseases which is characterised by elevated blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes mellitus constitutes about 90 percent of this group. Untreated DM leads to many complications which are traditionally classified as acute and chronic. The microvascular complications include retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause for dialysis and end-stage renal failure across the world. Diabetic nephropathy usually starts with microalbuminuria (UAE 30-300 mg/dL followed by macroalbuminuria (UAE > 300 mg/dL and eventually there is progressive loss of renal function by tissue scarring leading on to end-stage renal disease. However, in type 2 DM, there can be a group of patients who can have impaired renal function without albuminuria (UAE<30 mg/ day. This is being called as “non-albuminuric renal failure”. Reduced GFR in long duration diabetic patients with normal urine albumin excretion have been reported in increasing frequency. There are very few Indian studies which have been done on this group of type 2 diabetic patients. Hence, this study is aimed to evaluate the clinical profile of non-albuminuric renal insufficiency in type 2 diabetes mellitus. AIM To study the clinical profile of non-albuminuric renal insufficiency in type 2 DM. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study population included 97 patients with non-albuminuric (urine microalbumin less than 30 mg/day, renal insufficiency (GFR less than 60 mL/min. as per Cockcroft–Gault formula and are diabetic (type 2 admitted in the Department of General Medicine and Nephrology. Patients with comorbidities other than diabetes which can cause renal insufficiency were excluded from the study. A detailed history was taken and clinical assessment was done for all patients. All patients underwent a panel of tests which included complete blood count, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine

  5. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism: the clinical utility of etelcalcetide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mario; Galassi, Andrea; Conte, Ferruccio; Mangano, Michela; Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a very frequent, severe, and worsening complication of chronic kidney disease, is characterized by high serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), parathyroid gland hyperplasia, and disturbances in mineral metabolism. Clinically, SHPT shows renal osteodystrophy, vascular calcification, cardiovascular damage, and fatal outcome. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is the main physiological regulator of PTH secretion; its activation by calcium rapidly inhibits PTH. Another important player in regulating mineral metabolism is vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is under the influence of vitamin D and influences the intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate, PTH gene expression, and bone calcium mobilization. Serum phosphate levels influence fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) production, a phosphatonin that modulates serum phosphate reabsorption, PTH synthesis, and vitamin D production. Current therapeutic approaches consist of 1) phosphate intake control by diet or phosphate binders, 2) vitamin D by VDR activation, and 3) calcimimetic agents that activate CaSR. Recently, a new long-acting peptide (etelcalcetide) belonging to the calcimimetics class was approved for intravenous use in hemodialysis patients with SHPT. Etelcalcetide binds directly to CaSR, by a sulfide bond, inhibiting the production and secretion of PTH by parathyroid glands. After intravenous administration in rats, etelcalcetide is quickly distributed to the tissues and eliminated by kidneys, while in uremic animals the nonrenal excretion is only 1.2%. In hemodialysis patients, the treatment itself is the main route of elimination. Etelcalcetide in hemodialysis patients with SHPT was more effective than placebo and cinacalcet, with a PTH reduction of >30% in 76% of patients with etelcalcetide versus 10% with placebo. Particular attention was paid to the safety of the drug; the most common adverse event was asymptomatic blood calcium reduction, similar to cinacalcet, while

  6. The Borderline Syndrome Index. Clinical validity and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edell, W S

    1984-05-01

    Recently, a 52-item self-report questionnaire, called the Borderline Syndrome Index (BSI), was developed to provide a rapid clinical assessment of the borderline syndrome (Conte, H. R., Plutchik, R., Karasu, T. B., and Jerrett, I. A self-report borderline scale: Discriminative validity and preliminary norms. J. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 168: 428-435, 1980). The present investigation addresses the question of the applicability of this test instrument over the full range of borderline syndrome psychopathology, as defined by DSM-III diagnostic criteria, as well as the relationship of various demographic, treatment, and personality variables to total scale scores. The final sample consisted of 51 patients meeting DSM-III diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder, 14 patients with DSM-III defined schizotypal personality disorder, 17 patients meeting DSM-III diagnostic criteria for borderline and schizotypal personality disorder, 30 CATEGO-defined early schizophrenics (first psychotic episode within the past 2 years), and 20 normal control subjects. All patient groups scored significantly higher than the normal group on the BSI, and each borderline syndrome group was discriminable from the early schizophrenic group but not from each other. None of the demographic variables correlated significantly with BSI total scores. Treatment variables were somewhat related to total scores, and it is suggested that chronicity rather than severity of disturbance may strongly affect performance on the BSI. Principal component analysis of BSI items, as well as high correlations between scores on the BSI and almost every scale on the MMPI, suggests that the BSI may be tapping a general, rather than specific, dimension of psychopathology. This dimension might best be described as a generalized deficiency in coping with life, with resultant feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness. While the present study provides some support for the discriminative validity of the measure, further

  7. Impact of clinic follow-up visits on body weight control in people with prediabetes or diabetes mellitus: Japanese nonelderly cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Sachiko; Ono, Yosuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    Body weight control is considered essential for the management of diabetes mellitus. Clinicians have an important role in educating and guiding patients with diabetes to control their body weight. The aim of the present study was to clarify if clinic visits influenced body weight control of people with prediabetes or diabetes mellitus. To examine whether individuals with diabetes mellitus who visit clinics show better weight control. We used a large Japanese database (Japan Medical Data Center, Tokyo, Japan) of screening for lifestyle disease linked with administrative claim data to retrospectively identify people with prediabetes or diabetes mellitus based on their fasting plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration. We collected data on their baseline characteristics (including age, sex, body mass index and disease history) and their lifestyles. We used propensity-score inverse probability of treatment weighted generalized estimating equations to examine the association between clinic visits and change in body mass index. Between 2013 and 2014, we identified 11004 individuals with prediabetes or diabetes. The proportions visiting clinics after the first diagnosis made at screening was 27.8%. Clinic visit was significantly associated with lower body mass index after adjustment for baseline patient characteristics a year after first screening (-0.17 kg/m2; 95% confidence interval, -0.22 to -0.12). In Japanese people found to have prediabetes or diabetes during an annual health screen, those who visited clinics after their first diagnosis were likely to have better body weight control. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism: the clinical utility of etelcalcetide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozzolino M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mario Cozzolino,1 Andrea Galassi,1 Ferruccio Conte,1 Michela Mangano,1 Luca Di Lullo,2 Antonio Bellasi1,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Renal Division, University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, 2U.O.C. Nefrologia e Dialisi, Ospedale L. Parodi Delfino, Colleferro, Roma, 3Sant’Anna Hospital, ASST-Lariana, Como, Italy Abstract: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT, a very frequent, severe, and worsening complication of chronic kidney disease, is characterized by high serum parathyroid hormone (PTH, parathyroid gland hyperplasia, and disturbances in mineral metabolism. Clinically, SHPT shows renal osteodystrophy, vascular calcification, cardiovascular damage, and fatal outcome. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is the main physiological regulator of PTH secretion; its activation by calcium rapidly inhibits PTH. Another important player in regulating mineral metabolism is vitamin D receptor (VDR, which is under the influence of vitamin D and influences the intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate, PTH gene expression, and bone calcium mobilization. Serum phosphate levels influence fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23 production, a phosphatonin that modulates serum phosphate reabsorption, PTH synthesis, and vitamin D production. Current therapeutic approaches consist of 1 phosphate intake control by diet or phosphate binders, 2 vitamin D by VDR activation, and 3 calcimimetic agents that activate CaSR. Recently, a new long-acting peptide (etelcalcetide belonging to the calcimimetics class was approved for intravenous use in hemodialysis patients with SHPT. Etelcalcetide binds directly to CaSR, by a sulfide bond, inhibiting the production and secretion of PTH by parathyroid glands. After intravenous administration in rats, etelcalcetide is quickly distributed to the tissues and eliminated by kidneys, while in uremic animals the nonrenal excretion is only 1.2%. In hemodialysis patients, the treatment itself is the

  9. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Juliano Borges,1,2 Mônica Manela-Azulay,1,2 Tullia Cuzzi1,2 1Instituto de Dermatologia Professor Rubem David Azulay, Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro, 2Serviço de Anatomia Patológica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein's theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm. In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement

  10. Metformin versus insulin in gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B; Zhang, L; Fan, Y Y; Wang, L; Li, X G; Liu, T; Cao, Y S; Zhao, Z G

    2016-05-01

    Metformin is widely used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, whether it is safe for use in pregnancy is controversial. A search for relevant studies were performed using PubMed (1948-2014), Embase (1974-2014), the Web of knowledge (1950-2014), and the Cochrane database, included all randomized control trials published in English. Eight RCTs (1712 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus) were retrieved; of those 853 patients were given metformin, and 859 patients were given insulin. Our results showed that metformin does not increase risk of prematurity (RR = 1.26; 95 % CI [0.89, 1.79], P = 0.19). In addition, metformin can either decrease the total weight gain [MD = -1.49, 95 % CI (-2.66, -0.31), P = 0.01] or weight gain after randomization [MD = -1.23, 95 % CI (-1.75, -0.71), P metformin also significantly decreased the risk of neonatal hypoglycemia [RR = 0.58, 95 % CI (0.43, 0.78), P = 0.0003] and admission rates to neonatal intensive care units [RR = 0.74, 95 % CI (0.61, 0.89), P = 0.002]. No other adverse effects were observed, such as hyperbilirubinaemia [RR = 0.83, 95 % CI (0.64, 1.08), P = 0.16], large for gestational age [RR = 0.85, 95 % CI (0.68, 1.05), P = 0.14], small for gestational age [RR = 0.92, 95 % CI (0.61, 1.39), P = 0.69], macrosomia [RR = 0.75, 95 % CI (0.54, 1.03), P = 0.07] or respiratory distress syndrome [RR = 0.88, 95 % CI (0.55, 1.41), P = 0.6]. Metformin may be beneficial in treating gestational diabetes. However, even more studies are needed to provide more evidence for the future use of metformin.

  11. Importance and utility of clinical simulation guides in learning processes in health sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Amaya Afanador, Adalberto; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2011-01-01

    Guides are frequently used in medical education and other health sciences by teachers who focus on constructivism. In health, their utility has been to obtain standardized protocols that can be accepted globally, using best evidence as a gold standard.The utility that we have found and developed with the guides for clinical simulation is different than the utility of clinical guides. Simulation guides are products of an intellectual exercise of educators focused on an educational project and ...

  12. Utilizing Genetic Predisposition Score in Predicting Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence: A Community-based Cohort Study on Middle-aged Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Yin; Choi, Hyung Jin; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    Contribution of genetic predisposition to risk prediction of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was investigated using a prospective study in middle-aged adults in Korea. From a community cohort of 6,257 subjects with 8 yr' follow-up, genetic predisposition score with subsets of 3, 18, 36 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (genetic predisposition score; GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36) in association with T2DM were determined, and their effect was evaluated using risk prediction models. Rs5215, rs10811661, and rs2237892 were in significant association with T2DM, and hazard ratios per risk allele score increase were 1.11 (95% confidence intervals: 1.06-1.17), 1.09 (1.01-1.05), 1.04 (1.02-1.07) with GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36, respectively. Changes in AUC upon addition of GPS were significant in simple and clinical models, but the significance disappeared in full clinical models with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). For net reclassification index (NRI), significant improvement observed in simple (range 5.1%-8.6%) and clinical (3.1%-4.4%) models were no longer significant in the full models. Influence of genetic predisposition in prediction ability of T2DM incidence was no longer significant when HbA1c was added in the models, confirming HbA1c as a strong predictor for T2DM risk. Also, the significant SNPs verified in our subjects warrant further research, e.g. gene-environmental interaction and epigenetic studies.

  13. [Control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain today: identification of the main obstacles in daily clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Irene Vinagre; Donlo, Ignacio Conget

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a highly prevalent chronic disease with major social and healthcare repercussions due to the development of acute and chronic complications. The care of patients with DM2 represents between 6.3% and 7.4% of the budget of the Spanish national health service and is mainly centered on hospital admissions and hypoglycemic agents, leading to an annual expenditure of 1.290 € to 1.476 € per patient. The attainment of glycemic targets remains complex and inadequate, despite new drugs for the treatment of DM2, the available scientific evidence, and national and international guidelines. The main causes proposed for failure to achieve these targets in DM2 are clinical inertia (found in 40% of physicians in Spain treating patients with HbA1c > 7%), poor treatment adherence, the problems inherent to the health system, and the natural history of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin in compare with insulin: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safura Ruholamin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to compare neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM treated with either metformin or insulin. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial carried out on year 2011 on 109 women with GDM who did not adequately control by dietary measures. They received metformin 500 mg once or twice daily or insulin 0.2 IU/kg/day initially. The dose was titrated to achieve target blood glucose values. Neonatal outcomes such as hypoglycemia, birth weight, Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, and hyperbilirubinemia in the 50 women who remained exclusively on metformin were compared with 50 women who treated with insulin. Results: Two groups were similar in mean fasting blood sugar (P = 0.7 and postprandial measurements (P = 0.8 throughout GDM treatment. Pregnancy complications or preterm labor were not different significantly between two groups. Considering neonatal outcomes between insulin and metformin groups, such as hypoglycemia (2 [4%] and 0 [0%], respectively, birth weight (3342 ± 506 mg and 3176 ± 438 mg, respectively, 5 th min Apgar score <7 (no one in either group, umbilical artery pH <7.05 (no one in either group and hyperbilirubinemia (1 [2%] and 0 [0%], respectively, no significant statistical differences were seen. Conclusion: Based on these preliminary data, considering neonatal outcomes, metformin appears to be a safe as insulin in the treatment of GDM.

  15. Comparison of paroxetine and agomelatine in depressed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang RY

    2015-05-01

    acceptability.Conclusion: These results showed that compared to paroxetine, agomelatine might have some advantages in treating symptoms of depression/anxiety and glycemic control in depressed type 2 DM patients. The clinical applicability of agomelatine shows greater promise and should be explored further. Limited by the relatively small samples, future studies are needed to verify and support our findings. Keywords: paroxetine, agomelatine, depression, diabetes mellitus

  16. Clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing in androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Roberts, Janet; McCoy, John; Desai, Nisha; Zarrab, Zoulikha; Pietrzak, Aldona; Lotti, Torello

    2015-01-01

    Clinical response to 5% topical minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is typically observed after 3-6 months. Approximately 40% of patients will regrow hair. Given the prolonged treatment time required to elicit a response, a diagnostic test for ruling out nonresponders would have significant clinical utility. Two studies have previously reported that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts a patient's response to topical minoxidil therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing. In this communication, the present authors conducted an analysis of completed and ongoing studies of minoxidil response testing. The analysis confirmed the clinical utility of a sulfotransferase enzyme test in successfully ruling out 95.9% of nonresponders to topical minoxidil for the treatment of AGA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A mobile and web-based clinical decision support and monitoring system for diabetes mellitus patients in primary care: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kart, Özge; Mevsim, Vildan; Kut, Alp; Yürek, İsmail; Altın, Ayşe Özge; Yılmaz, Oğuz

    2017-01-01

    Background Physicians’ guideline use rates for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of diabetes mellitus (DM) is very low. Time constraints, patient overpopulation, and complex guidelines require alternative solutions for real time patient monitoring. Rapidly evolving e-health technology combined with clinical decision support and monitoring systems (CDSMS) provides an effective solution to these problems. The purpose of the study is to develop a user-friendly, comprehensive, fully integrated ...

  18. New pricing approaches for bundled payments: Leveraging clinical standards and regional variations to target avoidable utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Erik; Chu, Scally; Crump, R Trafford; Yu, Kevin; Sutherland, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Develop pricing models for bundled payments that draw inputs from clinician-defined best practice standards and benchmarks set from regional variations in utilization. Health care utilization and claims data for a cohort of incident Ontario ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke episodes. Episodes of care are created by linking incident stroke hospitalizations with subsequent health service utilization across multiple datasets. Costs are estimated for episodes of care and constituent service components using setting-specific case mix methodologies and provincial fee schedules. Costs are estimated for five areas of potentially avoidable utilization, derived from best practice standards set by an expert panel of stroke clinicians. Alternative approaches for setting normative prices for stroke episodes are developed using measures of potentially avoidable utilization and benchmarks established by the best performing regions. There are wide regional variations in the utilization of different health services within episodes of stroke care. Reconciling the best practice standards with regional utilization identifies significant amounts of potentially avoidable utilization. Normative pricing models for stroke episodes result in increasingly aggressive redistributions of funding. Bundled payment pilots to date have been based on the costs of historical service patterns, which effectively 'bake in' unwarranted and inefficient variations in utilization. This study demonstrates the feasibility of novel clinically informed episode pricing approaches that leverage these variations to target reductions in potentially avoidable utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health-related quality of life and utility values associated to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus treated in the Brazilian Public Health System: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Luciana; Kupfer, Rosane; Momesso, Denise; Cabral, Debora A P; Tschiedel, Balduino; Puñales, Marcia; Lavigne, Suzana; Façanha, Cristina F S; Forti, Adriana C; Mendes, Angela D N; Tura, Bernardo R

    2017-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a critical and limiting factor of a good metabolic control and can adversely affect the quality of life of diabetic patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life and calculate utilities values associated with hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A multicenter, cross-sectional and observational study with T1DM patients from reference centers of the Brazilian public health system was conducted in three cities. Demographic and clinical data were collected, besides details on the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia. Health-related quality of life was assessed using EQ-5D instrument and utility values generated. 221 patients (107 women, 114 men), aged 29.8 ± 11.6 and disease duration of 14.2 ± 9.1 years were included. Most patients (n = 214, 96.8%) reported at least one symptomatic hypoglycemia in the last three months, 68% (n = 150) reported nocturnal episodes and 34.8% (n = 77) reported severe episodes. High frequency (daily or weekly) was observed in 38.6 and 26% of those reporting nocturnal or severe hypoglycemia, respectively. The median visual analog scale was 70 [60-85] for all patients, with differences between those with and without severe hypoglycemia (70 [60-80] vs 80 [61-90]; p = 0.006) and those with high and low frequency (62.5 [50-72.25] vs 70 [60-80]; p = 0.007). The median utility values was 0.801 [0.756-1.000] for all patients, with difference between those with high and low frequency of severe episodes (0.737 [0.628-1.000] vs 0.801 [0.756-1.000]; p = 0.02). This study shows the high frequency of hypoglycemia in a sample of T1DM patients treated in three reference centers of the Brazilian public health system and the impact of severe episodes on health-related quality of life. Utility values were generated and can be used in economic analysis for treatments that could decrease hypoglycemia and consequently improve quality of life.

  20. Relationship of clinical and microbiological variables in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-10-08

    The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens - F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. - and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control.

  1. Clinical outcomes of patients with and without diabetes mellitus after hepatectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Li

    Full Text Available Clinical data regarding the influence of diabetes mellitus (DM on the outcomes of patients undergoing hepatectomy are conflicting. To determine the impact of DM on the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing hepatectomy, we systematically reviewed published studies and carried out a meta-analysis.A systematic literature search of Pubmed, Sciencedirect, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database was conducted from their inception through February 2, 2016. The combined relative risk (RR or hazard ratio (HR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI was calculated.A total of 16 observational studies with 15710 subjects were eligible for meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that DM significantly increased the risk of overall postoperative complications (RR 1.34; 95% CI 1.19-1.51; P<0.001, DM-associated complications (RR 1.8; 95% CI 1.29-2.53; P<0.001, liver failure (RR 2.21; 95% CI 1.3-3.76; P = 0.028 and post-operative infections (RR 1.59; 95% CI 1.01-2.5; P = 0.045. In addition, DM was also found to be significantly associated with unfavorable overall survival and disease free survival after liver resection. The pooled HR was 1.63 (95% CI 1.33-1.99; P<0.001 for overall survival and 1.55 (95% CI 1.07-2.25; P = 0.019 for disease free survival.DM is associated with poor outcomes in patients undergoing hepatectomy. DM should be taken into account cautiously in the management of patients undergoing hepatectomy. Further prospective studies are warranted to explore effective interventions to improve the poor outcomes of diabetic patients undergoing hepatectomy.

  2. Clinical Course and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae Seung; Lim, Tae Seok; Cha, Seon Ah; Ahn, Yu Bae; Song, Ki Ho; Choi, Jin A; Kwon, Jinwoo; Jee, Donghyun; Cho, Yang Kyung; Park, Yong Moon; Ko, Seung Hyun

    2016-12-01

    We investigated clinical course and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 759 patients with T2DM without DR were included from January 2001 to December 2004. Retinopathy evaluation was performed at least annually by ophthalmologists. The severity of the DR was classified into five categories according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scales. Of the 759 patients, 523 patients (68.9%) completed the follow-up evaluation. During the follow-up period, 235 patients (44.9%) developed DR, and 32 patients (13.6%) progressed to severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR) or proliferative DR (PDR). The mean duration of diabetes at the first diagnosis of mild NPDR, moderate NPDR, and severe NPDR or PDR were 14.8, 16.7, and 17.3 years, respectively. After adjusting multiple confounding factors, the significant risk factors for the incidence of DR risk in patients with T2DM were old age, longer duration of diabetes, higher mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and albuminuria. Even in the patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes for longer than 10 years at baseline, a decrease in HbA1c led to a significant reduction in the risk of developing DR (hazard ratio, 0.73 per 1% HbA1c decrement; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.91; P=0.005). This prospective cohort study demonstrates that glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, and albuminuria are important risk factors for the development of DR. More aggressive retinal screening for T2DM patients diagnosed with DR should be required in order to not miss rapid progression of DR.

  3. Clinical Course and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seung Yun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated clinical course and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsA total of 759 patients with T2DM without DR were included from January 2001 to December 2004. Retinopathy evaluation was performed at least annually by ophthalmologists. The severity of the DR was classified into five categories according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scales.ResultsOf the 759 patients, 523 patients (68.9% completed the follow-up evaluation. During the follow-up period, 235 patients (44.9% developed DR, and 32 patients (13.6% progressed to severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR or proliferative DR (PDR. The mean duration of diabetes at the first diagnosis of mild NPDR, moderate NPDR, and severe NPDR or PDR were 14.8, 16.7, and 17.3 years, respectively. After adjusting multiple confounding factors, the significant risk factors for the incidence of DR risk in patients with T2DM were old age, longer duration of diabetes, higher mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and albuminuria. Even in the patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes for longer than 10 years at baseline, a decrease in HbA1c led to a significant reduction in the risk of developing DR (hazard ratio, 0.73 per 1% HbA1c decrement; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.91; P=0.005.ConclusionThis prospective cohort study demonstrates that glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, and albuminuria are important risk factors for the development of DR. More aggressive retinal screening for T2DM patients diagnosed with DR should be required in order to not miss rapid progression of DR.

  4. Effect of Behavioral Intervention on Dilated Fundus Examination Rates in Older African American Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David M; Casten, Robin J; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A; Murchison, Ann P; Johnson, Deiana; Stratford, Shayla; Henderer, Jeffrey; Rovner, Barry W; Haller, Julia A

    2015-09-01

    African American individuals are at high risk of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy but have suboptimal rates of dilated fundus examinations (DFEs). Early intervention is crucial for the prevention of diabetic retinopathy in this high-risk population. To test the efficacy of behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention on rates of DFEs in older African American individuals with diabetes mellitus. Masked randomized clinical trial at 2 urban medical centers from October 1, 2010, to May 31, 2014. Participants included 206 African American individuals 65 years and older with diabetes mellitus who had not obtained a DFE in the preceding 12 months. Participants were randomized to either behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention, a behavioral intervention designed to provide education, facilitate identifying and addressing health care barriers, and promote goal setting to improve rates of DFEs, or supportive therapy, a control condition. The primary outcome was medical documentation of a DFE at 6 months' follow-up. Secondary outcomes included the Risk Perceptions and Risk Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Self-Care Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire 9, and National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire 25 scores and hemoglobin A1c levels. More participants in the behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention group (87.9%) obtained a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (34.1%) by the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < .001). Overall, participants in the behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention group were 2.5 times more likely to obtain a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (risk ratio = 2.58; 95% CI, 1.91-3.48; P < .001). The intervention had no short-term effect on secondary outcomes of hemoglobin A1c levels, depression, or the Risk Perceptions and Risk Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus or National Eye Institute Vision Function

  5. Education as Prescription for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Compliance and Efficacy in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Yeon Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes self-management education has an important role in diabetes management. The efficacy of education has been proven in several randomized trials. However, the status of diabetes education programs in real Korean clinical practice has not yet been evaluated in terms of patient compliance with the education prescription.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data from all patients who were ordered to undergo diabetes education during 2009 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (n=2,291. After excluding ineligible subjects, 588 patients were included in the analysis.ResultsAmong the 588 patients, 433 received education. The overall compliance rate was 73.6%, which was significantly higher in the subjects with a short duration or living in a rural area compared to those with a long duration (85.0% vs. 65.1%, respectively; P<0.001 or living in an urban area (78.2% vs. 70.4%, respectively; P=0.037. The hemoglobin A1c decreased greater in the compliant group (from 7.84±1.54 at baseline to 6.79±1.06 at 3 months and 6.97±1.20 at 12 months after prescription in the compliant group vs. from 7.74±1.25 to 7.14±1.02 and 7.24±1.24 in the non-compliant group; P=0.001. The decrease in hemoglobin A1c was greater in the subjects with a short duration (P=0.032.ConclusionIn our study a large percent of patients refuse to get education despite having a prescription from their physician. This refusal rate was higher in the patients with long-standing diabetes or in urban residence. Furthermore, education was more effective in patients with a short duration of diabetes in clinical practice.

  6. Clinical potential of lixisenatide once daily treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen AB

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Andreas B Petersen,1 Mikkel Christensen1,21Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Diabetes Research Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: The glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide (Lyxumia® was approved for marketing by the European Medicines Agency in February 2013 and has been evaluated in a clinical study program called GetGoal. Lixisenatide activates the GLP-1 receptor and thereby exercises the range of physiological effects generated by GLP-1, which consist of increased insulin secretion, inhibition of glucagon secretion, and decreased gastrointestinal motility alongside the promotion of satiety. In the GetGoal study program, lixisenatide demonstrated significant reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and fasting and postprandial plasma glucose compared with placebo. The effect on glycemia was evident, with both monotherapy and in combination with insulin and various oral antidiabetic agents. Furthermore, a general trend towards reduced bodyweight was reported. In head-to-head trials with the other GLP-1 receptor agonists (exenatide and liraglutide on the market, lixisenatide demonstrated a superior effect with respect to reduction in postprandial plasma glucose and had a tendency towards fewer adverse events. However, lixisenatide seemed to be less efficient or at best, equivalent to exenatide and liraglutide in reducing HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, and bodyweight. The combination of a substantial effect on postprandial plasma glucose and a labeling with once daily administration separates lixisenatide from the other GLP-1 receptor agonists. The combination of basal insulin, having a lowering effect on fasting plasma glucose, and lixisenatide, curtailing the postprandial glucose excursions, makes sense from a clinical point of view. Not surprisingly, lixisenatide is undergoing clinical development as a combination

  7. Clinical potential of lixisenatide once daily treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Brønden; Christensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide (Lyxumia(®)) was approved for marketing by the European Medicines Agency in February 2013 and has been evaluated in a clinical study program called GetGoal. Lixisenatide activates the GLP-1 receptor and thereby exercises the range of...... of lixisenatide seems to be in combination with basal insulin. A large multicenter study will determine the future potential of lixisenatide in preventing cardiovascular events and mortality, in patients with type 2 diabetes and recent acute coronary syndrome....

  8. Clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with diabetes-related distress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Flávia Cristina; Trevisan, Danilo Donizetti; Apolinario, Priscila Peruzzo; Silva, Juliana Bastoni da; Lima, Maria Helena de Melo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between diabetes-related distress and the clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A cross-sectional study based on a secondary analysis of data collected at a specialized care outpatient center in Brazil. Participants completed a questionnaire on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Distress Scale (B-DDS). About 31% of the 130 eligible patients reported diabetes distress, and the mean B-DDS score was 2.6. Multiple regression analysis showed the B-DDS score was positively correlated with marital status (p=0.0230), use of diet and physical activities for diabetes management (p=0.0180), and use of insulin therapy (p=0.0030). The "emotional burden", "regimen-related distress", and "interpersonal distress" domains from B-DDS were associated with the use of insulin therapy (p=0.0010), marital status (p=0.0110), and the presence of three or more comorbidities (p=0.0175). These findings suggest the clinical and sociodemographic variables are relatively weak predictors of diabetes-related distress. The highest scores in the B-DDS were observed in the emotional burden domain, indicating the presence of diabetes distress among the participants of the study. Avaliar a relação entre o estresse relacionado ao diabetes e as características clínicas e sociodemográficas de pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2. Estudo transversal com base na análise secundária de dados coletados em um ambulatório de atendimento terciário no Brasil. Os participantes preencheram um questionário sobre as características sociodemográficas e clínicas, e a versão brasileira da Diabetes Distress Scale (B-DDS). Aproximadamente 31% dos 130 pacientes elegíveis relataram estresse relacionado ao diabetes, e a média do escore da B-DDS foi de 2,6. O modelo de regressão múltipla mostrou que a pontuação B-DDS foi positivamente correlacionada com o estado civil (p=0

  9. Clinical and electrophysiological signs of diabetic polyneuropathy -- effect of glycemia and duration of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Biserka; Kovac, Branislav; Marusić-Emedi, Slavica; Svalina, Sanja; Demarin, Vida

    2011-06-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy occurs in around 50% of diabetic patients. Its pathophysiological mechanism is not completely clarified and major occurrences boil down to the change in neural phenotype and vasa nervorum. As glucose neurotoxicity has been suggested by plenty of evidence, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of glycemia on the severity of diabetic polyneuropathy. Considering that some practical experiences point to serious complications in patients suffering from diabetes of shorter duration, another aim was to assess the effect of diabetes duration on the severity of related neuropathy. Clinical and electromyoneurographic examinations were performed in 100 patients with diabetic polyneuropathy free from any laboratory signs of renal failure. The effect of HbA1c value and duration of disease on clinical symptoms, signs and electrophysiological indicators of polyneuropathy was analyzed. Study results indicated that 78% of patients with diabetic polyneuropathy did not have well-regulated glycemia. Diabetes duration was associated with a growing number of sensory symptoms, among which the sensation of pain similar to electric shock was present in 63% of patients. In addition, it also had negative impact on the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity. HbA1c influenced the whole range of electrophysiological indicators of diabetic polyneuropathy.

  10. Clinical coaching in primary care: Capable of improving control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guajardo, Eduardo Enrique; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Botello-García, Antonio; Mathiew-Quiros, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Few clinical coaching studies are both endorsed by real cases and focused on reducing suboptimal diabetes control. We evaluated the effectiveness of coaching on improving type 2 diabetes goals after 3 years of implementation in primary care. A cross-sectional study with follow up was conducted during 2008-2011. Coaching consisted of guiding family doctors to improve their clinical abilities, and it was conducted by a medical doctor trained in skill building, experiential learning, and goal setting. Effectiveness was assessed by means of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin outcomes. The main analysis consisted of 1×3 and 2×3 repeated measures ANOVAs. A significant coaching×time interaction was observed, indicating that the difference in glucose between primary care units with and without coaching increased over time (Wilks' lambda multivariate test, PCoaching increased 1.4 times (95%CI 1.3, 1.5) the possibility of reaching the fasting glucose goal after controlling for baseline values. There was also a significant improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin (Bonferroni-corrected p-value for pairwise comparisons, Pcoaching was found to be worth the effort to improve type 2 diabetes control in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Associated with Ketosis Events in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalange, Nandu; Aldhouse, Natalie Valerie Jane; Kitchen, Helen; Howard, Daniel; Tutkunkardas, Deniz; Håkan-Bloch, Jonas

    2017-10-01

    Ketosis is a metabolic state associated with insulin deficiency. Untreated, it develops into diabetic ketoacidosis, a significant contributor to mortality and morbidity in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Little is understood about how patients utilize healthcare resources during ketosis events. This study aimed to identify and quantify healthcare resource utilization and provide estimates of associated costs of ketosis events in T1DM, treated unaided or with healthcare professional (HCP) assistance in the UK. Qualitative interviews with adult patients, pediatric carers, and HCPs identified resources used by patients/carers during ketosis events. An online quantitative survey was then used to quantify patients/carers resource use during their/their child's most recent ketosis event, and HCPs estimated patient resource uptake to corroborate the findings. Associated costs estimated from UK data sources were applied to the survey results to calculate the cost of ketosis events in adults and children. Quantitative survey responses from 93 adults, 76 carers, and 52 HCPs were analyzed. Patients and carers monitored ketosis during and following the event with ketone strips and additional glucose strips, and administered treatment comprising insulin and pump set changes where appropriate. Additionally, patients/carers accessed phone services and many received follow-up medical appointments. In total, 70% (n = 65) of adult and 66% (n = 50) of pediatric ketosis events were managed at home, for which resource use costs per event were £23.87 and £38.00 respectively. Remaining events were treated in NHS facilities costing £217.57 per adult and £352.92 per child. Weighted averages identified that ketosis events cost £81.98 per adult and £142.97 per child. Indirect costs from work productivity loss increase these figures to £225.11 per adult and £256.88 per child. Healthcare resource use for ketosis events is high in adults and children with T1DM and

  12. Clinical course of a cohort with type 2 diabetes mellitus after endocrine assessment. A 26-week study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz-Antolín, Sandra; Álvarez-de Frutos, Visitación; Torralba, Miguel

    2018-04-01

    To assess the degree of metabolic control and hypoglycemic treatments in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after evaluation in an endocrinology clinic. A prospective cohort study on 465 patients with T2DM who were not being monitored at an endocrinology clinic. Blood glucose control data and treatments received were recorded at an initial visit and after 26 weeks of follow-up. Baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 8.3±1.8%, as compared to 6.6±0.9% after 26 weeks of follow-up (P<.0001). The proportion of patients with HbA1c levels <7% increased from 33.1% to 71.3% (P<.0001). In 59.9% of patients, a decrease ≥0.8% in HbA1c was seen. In the multivariate analysis, variables predicting for an improvement in the degree of metabolic control were older age (OR 1.038; 95%CI 1-1.07; P=.041), higher baseline HbA1c values (OR 5.51; 95%CI 3.4-9; P<.0001), T2DM duration <5 years (OR 4.63; 95%CI 1.6-13.3; P=.005), and change in hypoglycemic treatment (OR 2.77, 95%CI 1.1-6.9; P=.03). Hypoglycemic therapy was changed in 75.1% of study patients with T2DM. After 26 weeks of follow-up, decreases were seen in both the proportion of patients who receiveding no treatment (from 7% to 0.3%, P<.0001) and the proportions of patients on oral antidiabetic therapy (60.9% vs 55.5%, P=.003) and insulin (10.5% vs 6.2%, P=.021). However, the proportion of patients receiving insulin combined with oral antidiabetic drugs increased from 21.1% to 38% (P<.0001). An improved metabolic control was seen in this cohort of patients with T2DM after their evaluation in an endocrinology clinic. However, HbA1c levels <7% were not achieved in 28.7% of patients, which shows the difficulty to achieve adequate control in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Periodontal abscess as a possible oral clinical sign in the diagnosis of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus of elderly in a dental clinic set up - a 7-year cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagl, Adel S

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the periodontal abscess as a possible oral clinical diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the elderly. In this clinical outpatient department, cross-sectional study of 84 months, 143 212 subjects between the ages of 40 and 84 years were screened for the presence of periodontal abscess. Relevant medical and dental histories were recorded using a questionnaire. The subjects who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, presence of periodontal abscess, and absence of other systemic disease were referred for laboratory diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c). The subjects tested positive for the diabetes were noted, statistical evaluation was undertaken to correlate between undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and periodontal abscess. It was found out that 0.05% undiagnosed diabetes was noted among the 143 212 patients. Among the 143 212 subjects, 1352 met the inclusion criteria having periodontal abscess. Mean age of the participants was 57 ± 14.2 years. Among the 1352 subjects with periodontal abscess: 793 (58.65%) subjects had increased HbA1c (≥6.5% or 47.5 mmol/mol or 7.8 mmol/L); 559 (41.35%) individuals reported to have normal HbA1c (≤6.5% or 47.5 mmol/mol or 7.8 mmol/L). The difference was found to be statistically significant. Periodontal abscess can be considered as possible oral clinical diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Elderly individuals visiting dental clinics need to be given due attention to find out the possibility of having this systemic condition. Medical fraternities are advised to consider oral health parameters in the evaluation of the medical status of elderly individuals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Clinical and laboratory features of children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus of more than two years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose R. L. Batubara

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of IDDM in our clinic during the period from 1989 to 1998 was 0.028%. There were twentyfour IDDM patients with duration of illness of more than 2 years, with a male to female ratio of 1: 1.5. Most of these patients had no diabetic family history and had good nutritional status. The insulin dosage used by these patients ranged between 0.67 - 0.72 IU/kg/day with a mean of 1.06 IU/kg/day. The average frequency of blood glucose home monitoring was less than ideal. Twenty-two out of the 24 patients were fully controlled metabolically; however, these patients still have polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia.

  15. Prevalence and clinical characterization of Japanese diabetes mellitus with an A-to-G mutation at nucleotide 3243 of the mitochondrial tRNA{sup Leu (UUR)} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odawara, Masato; Sasaki, Kayoko; Yamashita, Kamejiro [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    An A-to-G mutation at nucleotide position 3243 of the mitochondrial genome has been associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with deafness. We investigated the prevalence of this mutation in Japanese patients with IDDM, NIDDM, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and in nondiabetic control individuals, and we identified it in 3 of 300 patients with NIDDM or IGT (1.0%). None of these individuals had significant sensorineural hearing loss. None of the 94 IDDM or the 115 nondiabetic control subjects was positive for this mutation. Oral glucose tolerance test revealed that a 57-yr-old male with this mutation was rather hyperinsulinemic in the fasting state. The insulin secretion in this patient decreased with age; he did not complain of any hearing disorder, although audiometry revealed a slight elevation of hearing threshold at high frequencies. In conclusion, we found that a mitochondrial gene mutation at nucleotide position 3243 was present in about 1% of NIDDM patients including those patients with IGT. The subtype of diabetes mellitus with this mutation may have a clinical profile similar to that found in patients with NIDDM commonly seen in outpatient clinics. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Satisfaction Survey on Information Technology-Based Glucose Monitoring System Targeting Diabetes Mellitus in Private Local Clinics in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrivate local clinics in Korea have little experience with information technology (IT-based glucose monitoring (ITGM. Our aim is to examine user satisfaction and the possibility of using ITGM service practically.MethodsPatients sent their blood glucose levels to physicians in local clinics. The physicians reviewed the blood glucose values online and provided personal consultations through text messaging or phone calls. Thereafter, a satisfaction survey on the ITGM service, the modified Morisky scale, and patient assessment of chronic illness care were administered.ResultsOne hundred and seventy patients from seven private local clinics used the ITGM. Overall satisfaction, including that about the ITGM service, the device, and its usefulness, was rated higher than “mostly satisfied” (score 4.2±0.8 out of 5.0 and even higher among the elderly. Satisfaction was positively associated with age, especially in those older than 60 years. The main reason for intent for future use of the service was the time/place flexibility. Highly motivated patients tended to answer positively regarding information satisfaction (P=0.0377.ConclusionOur study is the first to investigate ITGM satisfaction in private local clinics. The feasibility of users utilizing ITGM should be clarified, and future clinical research on the service's clinical effects and cost-benefit analysis is needed.

  17. ENDOCRINOLOGY OF PREGNANCY: Gestational diabetes mellitus: definition, aetiological and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz, Baz; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as a glucose intolerance resulting in hyperglycaemia of variable severity with onset during pregnancy. This review aims to revisit the pathogenesis and aetiology of GDM in order to better understand its clinical presentation and outcomes. During normal pregnancy, insulin sensitivity declines with advancing gestation. These modifications are due to placental factors, progesterone and estrogen. In a physiological situation, a compensatory increase in insulin secretion maintains a normal glucose homeostasis. GDM occurs if pancreatic β-cells are unable to face the increased insulin demand during pregnancy. GDM is most commonly a forerunner of type 2 diabetes (T2D) - the most prevalent form of diabetes. These women share similar characteristics with predisposed subjects to T2D: insulin resistance before and after pregnancy, and carry more T2D risk alleles. Auto-immune and monogenic diabetes are more rare aetiologies of GDM. Adverse pregnancy outcomes of GDM are mainly related to macrosomia caused by fetal hyperinsulinism in response to high glucose levels coming from maternal hyperglycaemia. Screening recommendations and diagnosis criteria of GDM have been recently updated. High risk patients should be screened as early as possible using fasting plasma glucose, and if normal, at 24-28 weeks of gestation using 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The treatment of GDM is based on education with trained nurses and dieticians, and if necessary insulin therapy. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  18. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitusclinical and biochemical differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  19. Assessment of Physical Activity Level among Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at Cheras Health Clinic, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor Shazwani, M N; Suzana, S; Hanis Mastura, Y; Lim, C J; Teh, S C; Mohd Fauzee, M Z; Lim, H C; Dahlia, S; Norliza, M

    2010-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the physical activity levels among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) at Cheras Health Clinic in Kuala Lumpur. A total of 132 subjects (62 men and 70 women) aged 30 years and above participated in this study. Data was collected using an interview based questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and health profile information. Physical activity was assessed using a shortened version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Anthropometric measurements and body fat were also taken. Glycaemic status, that is, HbA1c, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and 2 hours post-prandial (2-HPP) were obtained from medical records. Results showed that the mean age of the patients was 51.9 + 5.8 years. The majority of patients had poor glycaemic control based on HbA1c (70.7%), FBS (71.9%) and 2HPP (85.4%). Patients who were unmarried and aged(60 years and above had a lower physical activity level (p< 0.05). In the older age group, low physical activity was associated with poor glycaemic control (p< 0.05). Patients in the moderate and high physical activity level were motivated to perform physical activity so as to be healthy (68.1%). Low physical activity level among patients was due to lack of time (54.5%) and lack of energy (21.2%). In conclusion, physical activity levels of the patients were unsatisfactory and associated with poor glycaemic control, especially in the elderly. There is a need to encourage diabetic patients to undertake regular physical activity in order to achieve optimal glycaemic control.

  20. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Association with Biochemical and Immunological Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Garibay, S E; Cortez-Espinosa, N; Milán-Segovia, R C; Magaña-Aquino, M; Vargas-Morales, J M; González-Amaro, R; Portales-Pérez, D P; Romano-Moreno, S

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health issue due to the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which exacerbates the clinical course of TB and increases the risk of poor long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of rifampin (RIF) and its relationship with biochemical and immunological parameters in patients with TB and T2DM. The biochemical and immunological parameters were assessed on the same day that the pharmacokinetic evaluation of RIF was performed. Factors related to the metabolic syndrome that is characteristic of T2DM patients were not detected in the TB-T2DM group (where predominant malnutrition was present) or in the TB group. Percentages of CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells were diminished in the TB and TB-T2DM patients, who had high tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and low interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels compared to healthy volunteers. Delayed RIF absorption was observed in the TB and TB-T2DM patients; absorption was poor and slower in the latter group due to poor glycemic control. RIF clearance was also slower in the diabetic patients, thereby prolonging the mean residence time of RIF. There was a significant association between glycemic control, increased TNF-α serum concentrations, and RIF pharmacokinetics in the TB-T2DM patients. These altered metabolic and immune conditions may be factors to be considered in anti-TB therapy management when TB and T2DM are concurrently present. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Conflicts of interest among authors of clinical practice guidelines for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Susan L; Holmer, Haley K; Ogden, Lauren A; Burda, Brittany U; Fu, Rongwei

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) is an important potential source of bias in the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). To examine rates of disclosure of COI, including financial interests in companies that manufacture drugs that are recommended in CPGs on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to explore the relationship between recommendations for specific drugs in a guideline and author COI. We identified a cohort of relevant guidelines from the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and abstracted COI disclosures from all guideline authors for this observational, cross-sectional study. We determined which hypoglycemic drugs were recommended in each guideline, and explored the relationship between specific disclosures and whether a drug was recommended. Among 13 included guidelines, the percentage of authors with one or more financial disclosures varied from 0 to 94% (mean 44.2%), and was particularly high for two US-based guidelines (91% and 94%). Three guidelines disclosed no author financial COI. The percentage of authors with disclosures of financial interests in manufacturers of recommended drugs was also high (mean 30%). On average, 56% of manufacturers of patented drugs recommended in each guideline had one or more authors with a financial interest in their company. We did not find a significant relationship between financial interests and whether a drug was recommended in our sample; US-based guidelines were more likely to make recommendations for a specific drug compared to non-US based guidelines. Authors of this cohort of guidelines have financial interests directly related to the drugs that they are recommending. Although we did not find an association between author COI and drugs recommended in these guidelines and we cannot draw conclusions about the validity of the recommendations, the credibility of many of these guidelines is in doubt.

  2. Attitudes of Palestinian Health-Care Professionals in Gaza to Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Radwan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the huge numbers of the internationally produced and implemented Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs, the compliance with them is still low in health care. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of Palestinian health-care professionals toward the most perceived factors influencing the adherence to the CPG for Diabetes Mellitus in the Primary Health-care centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Health-care centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA using a validated questionnaire.MethodsA cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n = 323. The Cabana theoretical framework was used to develop a study questionnaire. A cross cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version questionnaire. The psychometric properties of Arabic version were finally assessed.ResultsThe Arabic version questionnaire showed a good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal 51.5% (47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA P = 0.000. The most frequently perceived barriers in the PHC-MoH were lack of incentives, lack of resources, and lack of guideline trustworthiness, whereas the lack of time and the lack of guideline trustworthiness were the most prominent barriers in the PHC-UNRWA. In spite of the lack of trustworthiness of the diabetic guideline, most respondents in both settings had a positive attitude toward guidelines in general, but this attitude was not a predictor of guideline adherence.ConclusionThe good validity and reliability of our questionnaire can provide support for the accuracy of our findings. Multifaceted implementation strategies targeting the main barriers elicited from this study are required for addressing the lack of incentives, organizational resources, lack of confidence

  3. Decubitus Ulcers of Soft Tissues in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical Strategies, Insulin Resistance Indicators, Comprehensive Treatment Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Vergun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The causes of decubitus ulcers include ischaemia and neurotrophic tissue changes induced by their chronic compression, continuous pathologic moisture and shift of tissues that determine local ishaemia. The aim of the article: to study clinical options and suppurative complications of decubitus ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in terms of insulin resistance (IR in the context of combined treatment optimization. Materials and methods. Total sample of retro- and prospective analyses involved results of comprehensive treatment of 112 patients. Type 2 DM was diagnosed in 37 patients, I comparison group included 27 patients with decubitus ulcers without complications (I–III stages and DM, with decubitus ulcers stage IV — II comparison group; and the control group included other 75 individuals. Results. The patients with type 2 DM (I comparison group had considerable decrease in HOMA index of β-cell function and increased HOMA index of IR (8.31 ± 0.02, р < 0.01. Patients with type 2 DM with complicated decubitus ulcers (II comparison group had more significant increase of circulating insulin indexes (p2 < 0.01, HOMA index of IR (p2 < 0.05, and considerable decrease on HOMA index of β-cell function (p2 < 0.05. The correlation analysis of HOMA-IR indicators and element concentration in the blood revealed the correlation only in patients with type 2 DM (I and II comparison groups: potent negative correlation (r = –0.72; p < 0.001 was revealed between the HOMA-IR and Mg2+ content in erythrocytes; intermediate negative correlation (r = –0.66; p < 0.01 — between HOMA-IR and Zn2+ concentration in the blood serum; and a negative one (r = –0.69; p < 0.01 — between HOMA-IR and Cr3+ level in the blood serum. Conclusions. The advantage of the proposed classification of decubitus ulcers of soft tissue and a sequence of comprehensive treatment is considering the features of

  4. New-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients receiving HIV care at Newlands Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe: retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimbetete, Cleophas; Mugglin, Catrina; Shamu, Tinei; Kalesan, Bindu; Bertisch, Barbara; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2017-07-01

    To assess the incidence and associated factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Zimbabwe. We analysed data of all HIV-infected patients older than 16 years who attended Newlands Clinic between March 1, 2004 and April 29, 2015. The clinic considers patients whose random blood sugar is higher than 11.1 mmol/l and which is confirmed by a fasting blood sugar higher than 7.0 mmol/l to have T2DM. T2DM is also diagnosed in symptomatic patients who have a RBS >11.0 mmol/l. Risk factors for developing T2DM were identified using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for confounding. Missing baseline BMI data were multiply imputed. Results are presented as adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Data for 4,110 participants were included: 67.2% were women; median age was 37 (IQR: 31-43) years. Median baseline CD4 count was 197 (IQR: 95-337) cells/mm 3 . The proportion of participants with hypertension at baseline was 15.5% (n=638). Over a median follow-up time of 4.7 (IQR: 2.1-7.2) years, 57 patients developed T2DM; the overall incidence rate was 2.8 (95% CI: 2.1-3.6) per 1000 person-years of follow-up. Exposure to PIs was associated with T2DM (HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.04-3.09). In the multivariable analysis, obesity (BMI>30 kg/m 2 ) (aHR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.17-4.36), age >40 years (aHR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.22-3.83) and male gender, (aHR=2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.72) were independently associated with the risk of T2DM. HIV-related factors (baseline CD4 cell count and baseline WHO clinical stage) were not independent risk factors for developing T2DM. Although the incidence of T2DM in this HIV cohort was lower than that has been observed in others, our results show that risk factors for developing T2DM among HIV-infected people are similar to those of the general population. HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa need a comprehensive approach to care that includes better health services for prevention, early

  5. The clinical utility of the Maslach Burnout Inventory in a clinical population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijweg, J.H.M.; Verbraak, M.J.P.M.; Dijk, M.K. van

    2013-01-01

    This replication study examines the use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS), a self-report questionnaire on burnout, as a clinical diagnostic instrument for measuring clinical burnout. The MBI and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a semistructured interview based on

  6. Clinical Validation of the Indicators and Definitions of the Nursing Outcome "Tissue Integrity: Skin and Mucous Membranes" in People With Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantal Magalhães da Silva, Natália; de Souza Oliveira-Kumakura, Ana Railka; Moorhead, Sue; Pace, Ana Emília; Campos de Carvalho, Emília

    2017-10-01

    The study aimed to validate clinically the indicators of the nursing outcome "Tissue Integrity: Skin and Mucous Membranes" and its conceptual and operational definitions in people with diabetes mellitus. A methodological study was conducted with an evaluation of 100 participants for two pairs: one of these pairs used the indicators without the definitions and the other used the indicators with their definitions. The pair who used the definitions presented greater concordance and similarity in the ratings. The indicators and their definitions have been validated clinically. The use of indicators with definitions can contribute to reliable and accurate evaluation of the tissue integrity of the feet in people with diabetes mellitus and, thus, assist in the measurement of the effectiveness of the nursing care provided. Validar clinicamente os indicadores do resultado de enfermagem "Integridade Tissular: pele e mucosas" e suas definições conceituais e operacionais em pessoas com diabetes mellitus. MÉTODOS: Estudo metodológico que consistiu na avaliação de 100 participantes por duas duplas de avaliadores: uma dupla utilizou os indicadores sem as definições e, a outra dupla, os indicadores com suas definições. A dupla que utilizou as definições apresentou maior concordância e similaridade nas avaliações. CONCLUSÃO: Os indicadores e suas definições foram validados clinicamente. IMPLICAÇÕES PARA A PRÁTICA DE ENFERMAGEM: A utilização de indicadores com suas respectivas definições pode contribuir para a avaliação confiável e precisa da integridade tissular dos pés de pessoas com diabetes mellitus e, assim, auxiliar na mensuração da eficácia da assistência de enfermagem. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  7. Prevalence of obesity and systemic hypertension among diabetes mellitus patients attending an out-patient diabetes clinic in a Ghanaian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Abedandi, Robert; Salifu, Zenabankara S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is now a prevalent disease in both developed and developing countries. Overweight/obesity and hypertension are potential modifiable risk factors for diabetes mellitus and persist during the course of the disease. This study was aimed at reporting the prevalence of overweight/obesity and systemic hypertension and their association to blood glucose levels in persons with diabetes mellitus attending a diabetic clinic in Ghanaian Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending a diabetic clinic at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Anthropometric variables of age, weight and height were measured with appropriate instruments, computed into BMI and classified according to WHO classifications. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured by an appropriate instrument and classified by WHO standards. Fasting plasma glucose levels of the study participants were recorded from their personal health folder. All data was analysed by GraphPad prism version 5. In general, 7.0% of the participants were underweight and 32.0% were overweight or obese. The mean±SD weight, height and BMI of the participants were 67.53±13.32, 1.68±0.12 and 24.18±5.32. Twenty-one percent of the studied participants were hypertensive. Mean±SD fasting plasma glucose of 7.94±2.82 was observed among the diabetic patients. As the prevalence of hyperglycaemia was higher among patients aged ≤40 years (88.9% vs. 75.8%), normoglycaemia (11.1% vs. 24.2%) was higher among those over 40 years. The differences were not significant. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia was significantly higher in participants with overweight/obese (0.0% vs. 41.6%, pprevalence of overweight/obesity and systemic hypertension was found. Hyperglycaemia was more prevalent among overweight/obese participants. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiovascular consequences of diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Baan (Caroline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that have one common feature: abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common form is non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NlDDM); about 80-90% of all diabetic patients has

  9. Blink reflex in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkholy, Saly H; Hosny, Hanan M; Shalaby, Nevein M; El-Hadidy, Reem A; Abd El-Rahim, Noha T; Mohamed, Manal M

    2014-12-01

    An evaluation of the extent of damage of the central nervous system in diabetes mellitus is of high value in current research. Electrophysiological abnormalities are frequently present in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic cranial neuropathy is one of the complications of the disease. Blink reflex is used to diagnose subclinical cranial neuropathy. The objective is to test the utility of blink reflex in detecting subclinical cranial nerve involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged from 30 to 60 years examined clinically and neurologically. Blink reflex and nerve conduction studies for the upper and lower limbs were performed and compared with 20 matched normal controls. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy showed significant prolonged distal latency and reduced amplitudes of the R2C response compared with the control, patients without peripheral neuropathy showed insignificant changes. Alteration of R2 correlated with the type of treatment and the duration of the disease. In patients without peripheral neuropathy, ulnar sensory distal latencies showed significant positive correlation with R2I latency, whereas its Conduction Velocity (CV) showed significant positive correlation with R2C amplitudes and negative correlation with R2C latency. R2C is the most sensitive parameter in the blink reflex, which can help in the diagnosis of subclinical diabetic cranial neuropathy.

  10. Resource utilization after introduction of a standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G; Rathod, Rahul H; Farias, Michael; Graham, Dionne; Powell, Andrew J; Fulton, David R; Newburger, Jane W; Colan, Steven D; Jenkins, Kathy J; Lock, James E

    2010-01-01

    A Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) is a novel quality improvement initiative that standardizes the assessment and management of all patients who carry a predefined diagnosis. Based on periodic review of systemically collected data the SCAMP is designed to be modified to improve its own algorithm. One of the objectives of a SCAMP is to identify and reduce resource utilization and patient care costs. We retrospectively reviewed resource utilization in the first 93 arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP patients and 186 age-matched control ASO patients. We compared diagnostic and laboratory testing obtained at the initial SCAMP clinic visit and control patient visits. To evaluate the effect of the SCAMP over time, the number of clinic visits per patient year and echocardiograms per patient year in historical control ASO patients were compared to the projected rates for ASO SCAMP participants. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), stress echocardiogram, and lipid profile utilization were higher in the initial SCAMP clinic visit group than in age-matched control patients. Total echocardiogram and lung scan usage were similar. Chest X-ray and exercise stress testing were obtained less in SCAMP patients. ASO SCAMP patients are projected to have 0.5 clinic visits and 0.5 echocardiograms per year. Historical control patients had more clinic visits (1.2 vs. 0.5 visits/patient year, P<.01) and a higher echocardiogram rate (0.92 vs. 0.5 echocardiograms/patient year, P<.01) Implementation of a SCAMP may initially lead to increased resource utilization, but over time resource utilization is projected to decrease.

  11. A multidisciplinary three-phase approach to improve the clinical utility of patient safety indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Peter; Kachalia, Allen; Sutherland, Tori; Beloff, Jennifer; David-Kasdan, Jo Ann; Bates, David W; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are used for calculation of risk-adjusted postoperative rates for adverse events. The payers and quality consortiums are increasingly requiring public reporting of hospital performance on these metrics. We discuss processes designed to improve the accuracy and clinical utility of PSI reporting in practice. The study was conducted at a 793-bed tertiary care academic medical center where PSI processes have been aggressively implemented to track patient safety events at discharge. A three-phased approach to improving administrative data quality was implemented. The initiative consisted of clinical review of all PSIs, documentation improvement, and provider outreach including active querying for patient safety events. This multidisciplinary effort to develop a streamlined process for PSI calculation reduced the reporting of miscoded PSIs and increased the clinical utility of PSI monitoring. Over 4 quarters, 4 of 41 (10%) PSI-11 and 9 of 138 (7%) PSI-15 errors were identified on review of clinical documentation and appropriate adjustments were made. A multidisciplinary, phased approach leveraging existing billing infrastructure for robust metric coding, ongoing clinical review, and frontline provider outreach is a novel and effective way to reduce the reporting of false-positive outcomes and improve the clinical utility of PSIs.

  12. Music Therapy with Children: A Review of Clinical Utility and Application to Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaw, John David Andrew

    This paper reviews the effectiveness of music therapy in treating children with psychiatric and developmental problems. The clinical utility of music therapy is first evaluated by examining the foundational effects of music on affect and behavior. Next, the two broad approaches to music therapy, active and passive music therapy, are discussed.…

  13. Evidence for the Criterion Validity and Clinical Utility of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katherine M.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Lukowitsky, Mark R.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated aspects of criterion validity and clinical utility of the grandiosity and vulnerability components of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) using two undergraduate samples (N = 299 and 500). Criterion validity was assessed by evaluating the correlations of narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic…

  14. Resource utilization implications of treatment were able to be assessed from appropriately reported clinical trial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole-Wilson, Philip A.; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Voko, Zoltan; de Brouwer, Sophie; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; van Dalen, Frederik J.; Lubsen, Jacobus

    Background and Objective: Published clinical trial data rarely allow assessment of the health care resource utilization implications of treatment. We give an example of how these can be assessed given appropriate tabulation of data. Methods: Data from a trial comparing long-acting nifedipine

  15. Linagliptin versus sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a network meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Khosro; Lotfi, Farhad; Sanati, Ehsan; Salesi, Mahmood; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Jafari, Mojtaba; Mojahedian, Mohammad M; Najafi, Behzad; Nikfar, Shekoufeh

    2017-10-25

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic and costly diseases worldwide and type 2 diabetes is the most common type which accounts for about 90% of cases with diabetes. New medication-therapy regimens such as those containing linagliptin alone or in combination with other medications (within the category of DDP-4 inhibitors) must be evaluated in terms of efficacy and compared with other currently used drugs and then enter the medication list of the country. Hence, this study aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of the two drugs, i.e. linagliptin and sitagliptin, in patients with type 2 diabetes. A systematic review was conducted to identify all clinical trials published by 2015 which compared the two drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Using keywords such as "linagliptin", "type 2 diabetes mellitus", "sitagliptin" and related combinations, we searched databases including Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science. The quality of the selected studies was evaluated using the Jadad score. Considering primary and secondary outcomes extracted from the reviewed studies, a network meta-analysis was used to conduct a systematic comparison between the two studied drugs. This network meta-analysis included 32 studies (Linagliptin vs PLB: n = 8, Sitagliptin vs PLB: n = 13, Linagliptin + MET vs PLB + MET: n = 4, and Sitagliptin + MET vs PLB + MET: n = 7) and a total of 13,747 patients. The results showed no significant difference between linagliptin and sitagliptin in terms of key efficacy and safety outcomes such as HbA1c changes from baseline, body weight change from baseline, percentage of patients achieving HbA1c  0.05). The results showed that the efficacy of the two drug regimens was the same. Based on the results, there was no significant difference between the two drugs, i.e. linagliptin and sitagliptin, in terms of efficacy; in other words, the efficacy of the two drugs was the same. Therefore, the use of these two drugs depends on their availability

  16. Clinical utility of fixed combinations of sitagliptin–metformin in treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Karen Barnard1,2, Mary Elizabeth Cox1, Jennifer B Green1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Adequate glycemic control in type 2 diabetes remains a difficult but achievable goal. The development of new classes of glucose-lowering medications, including in particular the incretin-based therapies, provides an opportunity to utilize combinations of medications which target multiple physiologic abnormalities in type 2 diabetes. Complementary combination therapy with sitagliptin–metformin lowers glucose via enhancement of insulin secretion, suppression of glucagon secretion, and insulin sensitization. Use of this combination in diabetes management will provide a greater degree of glycosylated hemoglobin-lowering than that seen with the use of either drug as monotherapy, is unlikely to cause significant hypoglycemia, and is generally associated with weight loss. The effectiveness, tolerability, and potential cost savings associated with the use of sitagliptin–metformin combination therapy make this an attractive option in diabetes management. The possible beneficial effects of this therapy on beta cell function, as well as its cardiovascular impact, remain inadequately explored but are of significant interest.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, sitagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4, combination therapy

  17. Language interpreter utilization in the emergency department setting: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Dorian; Engel, Kirsten G; Tang, Tricia S

    2008-05-01

    The emergency department (ED) serves as the entry point into the U.S. health care system for many patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). This paper reviews the literature on language interpreter utilization in the ED setting. We focused on three clinical issues related to professional language interpretation: (1) patient satisfaction, (2) health care delivery, and (3) current interpreter utilization practices. Compared with-English speaking patients, LEP patients report less satisfaction with medical encounters, have different rates of diagnostic testing, and receive less explanation and follow-up. Although professional interpretation has been associated with improvements in patient satisfaction, communication, and health care access, these services are largely under-utilized in ED settings. Reliance on untrained ad hoc interpreters, perceived time and labor associated with obtaining and working with an interpreter, and costs of implementing professional interpreter services serve as barriers to implementation and utilization.

  18. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in patients with decompensated cirrhosis being evaluated for liver transplantation: the utility of oral glucose tolerance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Costa Bragança

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and protein calorie malnutrition are important issues in cirrhotic patients because they can increase the progression of liver disease and worsen its prognosis. OBJECTIVE:To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in cirrhotic patients being evaluated for liver transplantation and their impacts on a 3-month follow-up, and to compare fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in consecutively included adult patients. Diabetes mellitus was established through fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test in diagnosing diabetes mellitus in this population. HOMA-IR and HOMA-β indexes were calculated, and nutritional assessment was performed by subjective global assessment, anthropometry and handgrip strength through dynamometry. RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus was found in 40 patients (64.5%, 9 (22.5% of them by fasting glycemia and 31 (77.5% of them by oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin resistance was found in 40 (69% of the patients. There was no relationship between diabetes mellitus and the etiology of cirrhosis. Protein calorie malnutrition was diagnosed in a range from 3.22% to 45.2% by anthropometry, 58.1% by subjective global assessment and 88.7% by handgrip strength. Diabetes mellitus identified by oral glucose tolerance test was related significantly to a higher prevalence of infectious complications and deaths in a 3-month period (P = 0.017. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and protein calorie malnutrition is high in cirrhotic patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. There were more infectious complications and/or deaths in a 3-month follow-up period in patients with diabetes mellitus diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test. Oral glucose tolerance test seems to be

  19. Primary Care in Extreme Environments: Medical Clinic Utilization at Antarctic Stations, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarini, James M; Scarborough, Jullian R; Lee Sombito, V; Parazynski, Scott E

    2016-03-01

    The unique challenges posed by the Antarctic environment include both physiological and psychological stressors to the individual as well as the limited onsite medical capabilities available to address them. This report compares medical clinic utilization among 3 US Antarctic stations to identify differences in diagnostic frequency and utilization of clinic resources under current medical prescreening regimes for summer and winter seasons. Clinic data from 3 Antarctic locations (McMurdo Station, Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, and Palmer Station) for the 2013-2014 Antarctic year were reviewed for patient encounter frequency by season, and provider-assigned visit diagnostic category. Differences between relative diagnosis frequencies among stations were analyzed, and per-capita clinic utilization was compared. The McMurdo clinic recorded 1555 patient encounters, with South Pole Station reporting 744 and Palmer with 128 encounters over the year. The most frequent reasons for clinic visits were orthopedic and dermatologic, with increased visits at McMurdo for respiratory illness and at the more remote locations for neurologic complaints and insomnia. Altitude-related visits were reported only at McMurdo and South Pole stations. The clinic volume predictably correlated with station population. Insomnia and headache complaints, reported only at the South Pole Station, are likely associated with the increased elevation at that site, although they could be attributable to psychological stress from the isolated environment. Although the majority of cases could not be prevented with current screening, we suggest several changes to the current concept of operations that may decrease medical utilization and provide significant improvements to health care delivery on the ice. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved glycemic control in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus taking Urtica dioica leaf extract: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianbakht, Saeed; Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Farahnaz; Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem

    2013-01-01

    Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) needing insulin therapy is common. Most conventional anti-hyperglycemic drugs have limited efficacies and significant side effects, so that better anti-hyperglycemic agents are needed. Urtica dioica L. (nettle) leaves have insulin secretagogue, PPARgamma agonistic, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects. Moreover, nettle leaves are used in traditional medicine as an anti-hyperglycemic agent to treat diabetes mellitus. Thus, efficacy and safety of nettle in the treatment of patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus needing insulin were studied. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of taking nettle leaf extract (one 500 mg capsule every 8 hours for 3 months) combined with the conventional oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs on the blood levels of fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), creatinine and liver enzymes SGOT and SGPT, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures in 46 patients and compared with the placebo group (n = 46). At the endpoint, the extract lowered the blood levels of fasting glucose, 2 hours postprandial glucose, and HbA1c significantly (p 0.05) compared with placebo. Nettle may safely improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients needing insulin therapy.

  1. Preliminary investigation of Brain Network Activation (BNA) and its clinical utility in sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, A; Kutcher, J; Elbin, R J; Or-Ly, H; Sadeh, B; Greer, J; McAllister, D J; Geva, A; Kontos, A P

    2017-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis and management of patients with sport-related concussion is largely dependent on subjectively reported symptoms, clinical examinations, cognitive, balance, vestibular and oculomotor testing. Consequently, there is an unmet need for objective assessment tools that can identify the injury from a physiological perspective and add an important layer of information to the clinician's decision-making process. The goal of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the EEG-based tool named Brain Network Activation (BNA) as a longitudinal assessment method of brain function in the management of young athletes with concussion. Athletes with concussion (n = 86) and age-matched controls (n = 81) were evaluated at four time points with symptom questionnaires and BNA. BNA scores were calculated by comparing functional networks to a previously defined normative reference brain network model to the same cognitive task. Subjects above 16 years of age exhibited a significant decrease in BNA scores immediately following injury, as well as notable changes in functional network activity, relative to the controls. Three representative case studies of the tested population are discussed in detail, to demonstrate the clinical utility of BNA. The data support the utility of BNA to augment clinical examinations, symptoms and additional tests by providing an effective method for evaluating objective electrophysiological changes associated with sport-related concussions.

  2. Clinical characteristics of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years: A single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Chen

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is an important cause of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years. These patients usually have a low insulin reserve and severe ketoacidosis upon diagnosis. A high index of suspicion in the presence of classic symptoms of diabetes in young children is important to prevent complications.

  3. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  4. Informational resources utilized in clinical decision making: common practices in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Marshall, Teresa A; Holmes, David C; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated current trends of Iowa dental practitioners with regard to acquisition and utilization of scientific information resources to support decision making in the clinical practice of dentistry. A survey questionnaire regarding the utilization of various sources of information to support clinical decisions was mailed in September 2009 to all dentists licensed and practicing in the state of Iowa. Dentists appointed full-time within the University of Iowa College of Dentistry were excluded from this study. Continuing education courses were the most frequently utilized and preferred information source by respondents, followed by print journals and consultation with other health care professionals. Practice patterns according to decade of dental school graduation as well as scope of practice were noted. The results of this study demonstrate that dental practitioners utilize a variety of evidence-based and non-evidence-based information resources to support decisions in clinical practice. The habits of newer graduates vary somewhat from those of earlier graduates; the habits of specialists vary from those of general practitioners.

  5. Prenatal Clinical Assessment of NT-proBNP as a Diagnostic Tool for Preeclampsia, Gestational Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sadlecki

    Full Text Available Common complications of pregnancy include preeclampsia (PE, gestational hypertension (GH and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Hypertensive disorders (PE/GH and GDM may result in greater maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Women with PE/GH, one of the most common causes of heart burden in an obstetrical setting, present with elevated serum levels of BNP and NT-proBNP. The aim of this study was to shed more light on the role of NT-proBNP in pathophysiology of PE, GH and GDM. The study included 156 pregnant women with singleton pregnancies. A total of 26 women developed arterial hypertension during pregnancy, 14 were diagnosed with PE, and GDM was detected in 81 patients. The control group included 35 women with uncomplicated pregnancies, normal arterial blood pressure and normal glucose concentrations. Patients with GH presented with significantly higher serum concentrations of NT-proBNPthan normotensive women (65.5 vs. 37.4 pg/ml; p = 0.0136. Serum levels of NT-proBNP in patients with PE were the highest of all the analyzed subsets, being significantly higher than in women without this condition (89.00 vs. 37.4pg/ml,p = 0,0136. However, women with and without GDM did not differ significantly in terms of their serum NT-proBNPconcentrations. Serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml (p = 0.0001 and BMI (p<0.0001 turned out to be independent predictors of GH on multivariate logistic regression analysis.Moreover, serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml was identified as an independent indicator of PE (p = 0.0016. A significant inverse correlation was found between birth weight and maternal serum NT-proBNP concentrations. In our opinion, NT-proBNP can be a useful clinical marker of GH and PE. Determination of NT-proBNP levels may be helpful in identification of patients with PE and GH and in their qualification for intensive treatment; this in turn, may be reflected by better neonatal outcomes.

  6. Gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar Border: a clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Gilder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals in conflict-affected areas rarely get appropriate care for chronic or non-infectious diseases. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is increasing worldwide, and new evidence shows conclusively that the negative effects of hyperglycemia occur even at mild glucose elevations and that these negative effects can be attenuated by treatment. Scientific literature on gestational diabetes in refugee camp settings is critically limited. Methods: A 75 g 2-hour glucose tolerance test was administered to 228 women attending the antenatal care (ANC clinic in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar border. Prevalence of GDM was determined using the HAPO trial cut-offs [≥92 mg/dL (fasting,≥180 (1 hour, and≥153 (2 hour] and the WHO criteria [≥126 mg/dL (fasting, and 140 mg/dL (2 hour]. Results: From July 2011 to March 2012, the prevalence of GDM was 10.1% [95% confidence interval (CI: 6.2–14.0] when the cut-off determined by the HAPO trial was applied. Applying the older WHO criteria yielded a prevalence of 6.6% (95% CI 3.3–9.8. Age, parity, and BMI emerged as characteristics that may be significantly associated with GDM in this population. Other risk factors that are commonly used in screening guidelines were not applicable in this diabetes-naïve population. Discussion: The prevalence of GDM is lower in this population compared with other populations, but still complicates 10% of pregnancies. New evidence regarding gestational diabetes raises new dilemmas for healthcare providers in resource-poor settings. Efforts to identify and treat patients at risk for adverse outcomes need to be balanced with awareness of the risks and burdens associated with over diagnosis and unnecessary interventions. Screening approaches based on risk factors or using higher cut-off values may help minimize this burden and identify those most likely to benefit from intervention.

  7. Clinical effect of metformin in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Al-Shareef

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the clinical value and of metformin as mono-therapy versus other treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. Major electronic databases, the reference lists of relevant articles and databases of ongoing trials were searched. Authors of reviews and metformin manufacturers were contacted in order to obtain more references and reports of unpublished trials. The methodological quality of these reports, included randomised controlled trials (RCTs was assessed using the National Health System Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (NHS CRD checklist. The search identified 1,825 studies. Three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Two RCTs had been completed and one was still ongoing. In the metformin group there were significant reductions of mean change of HBA1c from baseline. It reduced by -0.71% (P = 0.0002 and in the other trial the result was reduced by -1.10 (95% CI: -1.19 to -1.01. In addition, more patients (48.1% in the metformin group achieved good glycaemic control (<7% at week 24. The mean changes in FPG from baseline were significantly (P < 0.05 different in the metformin group (-16.6%, for week 18 and week 24 20.6%. In the second trial there was a significant (P < 0.001 reduction in the adjusted mean of FPG from baseline in the metformin group, while there was an increase in the placebo group ( -42.9 mg/dl vs. +21.4mg/dl with mean difference of -64.80 in favour of the metformin group. For BMI, significant (P < 0.001 differences were seen at week 12 and week 24 (0.07 and 0.55 kg 2 for metformin and glimepiride respectively. There was no significant difference between the placebo and metformin in the other trials. For lipid value there was a significant decrease in LDL levels in the metformin group. No significant changes were found in the other lipid parameters after adjusting. There were more adverse events in the metformin group but they were not statistically significant. There was a limited but not

  8. Utilization of International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria vs. a two-step approach to screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese women with twin pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Chen, Y; Zhou, Q; Shi, H; Cheng, W W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate prevalence and pregnancy outcomes using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria and screening protocol vs. a standard two-step screening approach for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese twin pregnancies. A retrospective cohort study for pregnancies during 2007-2013 was performed in a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China. Data were abstracted from the medical records of twin pregnancies delivered at the hospital. During the period 2007-2011, this hospital used a two-step approach with a 50 g screening with a cut-off value of ≥ 7.8 mmol/l followed by a 100 g diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) utilizing Carpenter-Coustan criteria. In 2012-2013, the hospital switched to the IADPSG protocol of universal 75 g OGTT. Among 1461 twin pregnancies, 643 were screened utilizing IADPSG criteria and 818 using the two-step protocol. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed more frequently in the IADPSG group than in the two-step group [20.4% and 7.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.30-4.52]. During the IADPSG period, the incidence of pre-eclampsia was 38% lower in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies compared with the two-step period (aOR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.44-0.87). We observed no significant differences in most perinatal outcomes between the two groups. Compared with a standard two-step approach to screening and diagnosis, the IADPSG screening method resulted in a three-fold increase in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus in twin pregnancies, with a 38% lower risk of pre-eclampsia but no significant difference in most perinatal outcomes in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  9. Determining utility values in patients with anterior cruciate ligament tears using clinical scoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szucs Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several instruments and clinical scoring systems have been established to evaluate patients with ligamentous knee injuries. A comparison of individual articles in the literature is challenging, not only because of heterogeneity in methodology, but also due to the variety of the scoring systems used to document clinical outcomes. There is limited information about the correlation between used scores and quality of life with no information being available on the impact of each score on the utility values. The aim of this study was to compare the most commonly used scores for evaluating patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, and to establish corresponding utility values. These values will be used for the interpretation and comparison of outcome results in the currently available literature for different treatment options. Methods Four hypothetical vignettes were defined, based on different levels of activities after rupture of the ACL to simulate typical situations seen in daily practice. A questionnaire, including the Health Utility Index (HUI for utility values, the IKDC subjective score, the Lysholm and the Tegner score, was created and 25 orthopedic surgeons were asked to fill the questionnaire for each hypothetical patient as proxies for all patients they had treated and who would fit in that hypothetical vignette. Results The utility value as an indicator for quality of life increased with the level of activity. Having discomforts already during normal activities of daily living was rated with a mean utility value of 0.37 ± 0.19, half of that of a situation where mild sport activity was possible without discomfort (0.78 ± 0.11. All investigated scores were able to distinguish clearly (p Conclusions Here we report the correlation between the most commonly used scores for the assessment of patients with a ruptured ACL and utility values as an indicator of quality of life. Assumptions were based on expert

  10. The utility of observational studies in clinical decision making: lessons learned from statin trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, JoAnne M; Mendys, Phillip M; Liu, Larry Z; Simpson, Ross J

    2010-05-01

    Contemporary clinical decision making is well supported by a wide variety of information sources, including clinical practice guidelines, position papers, and insights from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Much of our fundamental understanding of cardiovascular risk factors is based on multiple observations from major epidemiologic studies, such as The Seven Country Studies and the US-based Framingham Heart Study. These studies provided the framework for the development of clinical practice guidelines, including the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel series. The objective of this article is to highlight the value of observational studies as a complement to clinical trial data for clinical decision making in real-world practice. Although RCTs are still the benchmark for assessing clinical efficacy and safety of a specific therapeutic approach, they may be of limited utility to practitioners who must then adapt the lessons learned from the trial into the patient care environment. The use of well-structured observational studies can improve our understanding of the translation of clinical trials into clinical practice, as demonstrated here with the example of statins. Although such studies have their own limitations, improved techniques for design and analysis have reduced the impact of bias and confounders. The introduction of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines has provided more uniformity for such studies. When used together with RCTs, observational studies can enhance our understanding of effectiveness and utility in real-world clinical practice. In the examples of statin observational studies, the results suggest that relative effectiveness of different statins and potential impact of switching statins should be carefully considered in treating individual patients by practicing physicians.

  11. Homeless Veterans' Use of Peer Mentors and Effects on Costs and Utilization in VA Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Lo, Jeanie; Gehlert, Elizabeth; Johnson, Erin E; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-06-01

    The study compared health care utilization and costs among homeless veterans randomly assigned to peer mentors or usual care and described contacts with peer mentors. Homeless patients at four Department of Veterans Affairs clinics were randomly assigned to a peer mentor (N=195) or to usual care (N=180). Administrative data on utilization and costs over a six-month follow-up were combined with peer mentors' reports of patient contacts. Most patients (87%) in the peer mentor group had at least one peer contact. Patients in this group spent the largest proportions of time discussing housing and health issues with peer mentors and had more outpatient encounters than those in usual care, although differences were not significant. No other between-group differences were found in utilization or costs. Although significant impacts of peer mentors on health care patterns or costs were not detected, some patients had frequent contact with peer mentors.

  12. Utilization of a Clinical Trial Management System for the Whole Clinical Trial Process as an Integrated Database: System Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Koo, HaYeong; Yoo, Soyoung; Choi, Chang-Min; Beck, Sung-Ho; Kim, Tae Won

    2018-04-24

    Clinical trials pose potential risks in both communications and management due to the various stakeholders involved when performing clinical trials. The academic medical center has a responsibility and obligation to conduct and manage clinical trials while maintaining a sufficiently high level of quality, therefore it is necessary to build an information technology system to support standardized clinical trial processes and comply with relevant regulations. The objective of the study was to address the challenges identified while performing clinical trials at an academic medical center, Asan Medical Center (AMC) in Korea, by developing and utilizing a clinical trial management system (CTMS) that complies with standardized processes from multiple departments or units, controlled vocabularies, security, and privacy regulations. This study describes the methods, considerations, and recommendations for the development and utilization of the CTMS as a consolidated research database in an academic medical center. A task force was formed to define and standardize the clinical trial performance process at the site level. On the basis of the agreed standardized process, the CTMS was designed and developed as an all-in-one system complying with privacy and security regulations. In this study, the processes and standard mapped vocabularies of a clinical trial were established at the academic medical center. On the basis of these processes and vocabularies, a CTMS was built which interfaces with the existing trial systems such as the electronic institutional review board health information system, enterprise resource planning, and the barcode system. To protect patient data, the CTMS implements data governance and access rules, and excludes 21 personal health identifiers according to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy rule and Korean privacy laws. Since December 2014, the CTMS has been successfully implemented and used by 881 internal and

  13. Clinical utility of multigene profiling assays in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M C; Souter, L H; Kamel-Reid, S; Rutherford, M; Bedard, P; Trudeau, M; Hart, J; Eisen, A

    2017-10-01

    This clinical practice guideline was developed to determine the level of evidence supporting the clinical utility of commercially available multigene profiling assays and to provide guidance about whether certain breast cancer patient populations in Ontario would benefit from alternative tests in addition to Oncotype dx (Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA, U.S.A.). A systematic electronic Ovid search of the medline and embase databases sought out systematic reviews and primary literature. A systematic review and practice guideline was written by a working group and was then reviewed and approved by Cancer Care Ontario's Molecular Oncology Advisory Committee. Twenty-four studies assessing the clinical utility of Oncotype dx, Prosigna (NanoString Technologies, Seattle, WA, U.S.A.), EndoPredict (Myriad Genetics, Salt Lake City, U.S.A.), and MammaPrint (Agendia, Irvine, CA, U.S.A.) were included in the evidence base. The clinical utility of multigene profiling assays is currently established for an appropriate subset of patients with estrogen receptor-positive, her2-negative, node-negative breast cancer for whom a decision to give chemotherapy is difficult to make. For patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumours who receive tamoxifen alone, Oncotype dx, Prosigna, and EndoPredict validly identify a low-risk population with favourable outcomes, indicating that a low-risk assay result is actionable and the decision to withhold chemotherapy is supported. Clinical evidence indicates that a high Oncotype dx recurrence score can predict for chemotherapy benefit, but a high Prosigna or EndoPredict score, although prognostic, is not, based on clinical trial evidence, directly actionable. Prosigna and EndoPredict are statistically more likely to identify a population at risk for recurrence beyond 5 years, but that information is currently not actionable because of a lack of interventional studies.

  14. Utility of Arden Syntax for Representation of Fuzzy Logic in Clinical Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenders, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has established that fuzzy logic is prevalent in clinical practice guidelines and that Arden Syntax is suitable for representing clinical quality measures (CQMs). Approved since then, Arden Syntax v2.9 (2012) has formal constructs for fuzzy logic even as new formalisms are proposed to represent quality logic. Determine the prevalence of fuzzy logic in CQMs and assess the utility of a contemporary version of Arden Syntax for representing them. Linguistic variables were tabulated in the 329 Assessing Care of the Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE-3) CQMs, and these logic statements were encoded in Arden Syntax. In a total of 392 CQMs, linguistic variables occurred in 30.6%, and Arden Syntax could be used to represent these formally. Fuzzy logic occurs commonly in CQMs, and Arden Syntax offers particular utility for the representations of these constructs.

  15. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves insulin sensitivity and blood sugar in overweight type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a double-blind randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbolouki, Shokouh; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Derakhshanian, Hoda; Hosseinzadeh, Payam; Zareei, Mahnaz; Hashemi, Seyed Behnam; Dorosty, Ahmad Reza; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Djalali, Mahmoud

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in humans, and its incidence is increasing rapidly worldwide. Although polyunsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects on diabetes mellitus, previous data regarding the possible positive effects of n-3 fatty acids on glycaemic indices were inconclusive. We conducted a double-blind randomised clinical trial to determine the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on overweight patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial was conducted on a total of 67 overweight patients with T2DM for a duration of three months. Of these 67 patients, 32 received 2 g purified EPA daily, while 35 received a placebo of 2 g corn oil daily. The patients' fasting plasma glucose (FPG), serum insulin, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin sensitivity indices were assessed. After three months of EPA supplementation, the group that received EPA showed significant decreases in FPG (p < 0.001), HbA1c (p = 0.01) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p = 0.032), when compared to the placebo group. EPA supplementation resulted in decreased serum insulin levels, with the levels between the EPA and placebo groups showing a significant difference (p = 0.004). The results of our study indicate that EPA supplementation could improve insulin sensitivity. It was able to decrease serum insulin, FPG, HbA1c and HOMA-IR. EPA could have beneficial effects on glycaemic indices in patients with T2DM.

  16. Clinical utility of EEG in diagnosing and monitoring epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, W O; Rubboli, G; Kaplan, P W; Mirsatari, S M; Radhakrishnan, K; Gloss, D; Caboclo, L O; Drislane, F W; Koutroumanidis, M; Schomer, D L; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, D; Cook, Mark; Beniczky, S

    2018-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) remains an essential diagnostic tool for people with epilepsy (PWE). The International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology produces new guidelines as an educational service for clinicians to address gaps in knowledge in clinical neurophysiology. The current guideline was prepared in response to gaps present in epilepsy-related neurophysiological assessment and is not intended to replace sound clinical judgement in the care of PWE. Furthermore, addressing specific pathophysiological conditions of the brain that produce epilepsy is of primary importance though is beyond the scope of this guideline. Instead, our goal is to summarize the scientific evidence for the utility of EEG when diagnosing and monitoring PWE. Copyright © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Utilizing data grid architecture for the backup and recovery of clinical image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J; Zhou, M Z; Documet, J

    2005-01-01

    Grid Computing represents the latest and most exciting technology to evolve from the familiar realm of parallel, peer-to-peer and client-server models. However, there has been limited investigation into the impact of this emerging technology in medical imaging and informatics. In particular, PACS technology, an established clinical image repository system, while having matured significantly during the past ten years, still remains weak in the area of clinical image data backup. Current solutions are expensive or time consuming and the technology is far from foolproof. Many large-scale PACS archive systems still encounter downtime for hours or days, which has the critical effect of crippling daily clinical operations. In this paper, a review of current backup solutions will be presented along with a brief introduction to grid technology. Finally, research and development utilizing the grid architecture for the recovery of clinical image data, in particular, PACS image data, will be presented. The focus of this paper is centered on applying a grid computing architecture to a DICOM environment since DICOM has become the standard for clinical image data and PACS utilizes this standard. A federation of PACS can be created allowing a failed PACS archive to recover its image data from others in the federation in a seamless fashion. The design reflects the five-layer architecture of grid computing: Fabric, Resource, Connectivity, Collective, and Application Layers. The testbed Data Grid is composed of one research laboratory and two clinical sites. The Globus 3.0 Toolkit (Co-developed by the Argonne National Laboratory and Information Sciences Institute, USC) for developing the core and user level middleware is utilized to achieve grid connectivity. The successful implementation and evaluation of utilizing data grid architecture for clinical PACS data backup and recovery will provide an understanding of the methodology for using Data Grid in clinical image data backup for

  18. Integrating utilization-focused evaluation with business process modeling for clinical research improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Rosas, Scott; Trochim, William M K

    2010-10-01

    New discoveries in basic science are creating extraordinary opportunities to design novel biomedical preventions and therapeutics for human disease. But the clinical evaluation of these new interventions is, in many instances, being hindered by a variety of legal, regulatory, policy and operational factors, few of which enhance research quality, the safety of study participants or research ethics. With the goal of helping increase the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical research, we have examined how the integration of utilization-focused evaluation with elements of business process modeling can reveal opportunities for systematic improvements in clinical research. Using data from the NIH global HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, we analyzed the absolute and relative times required to traverse defined phases associated with specific activities within the clinical protocol lifecycle. Using simple median duration and Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis, we show how such time-based analyses can provide a rationale for the prioritization of research process analysis and re-engineering, as well as a means for statistically assessing the impact of policy modifications, resource utilization, re-engineered processes and best practices. Successfully applied, this approach can help researchers be more efficient in capitalizing on new science to speed the development of improved interventions for human disease.

  19. Clinical Utility and Limitations of Intraoperative Monitoring of Visual Evoked Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yeda; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES During surgeries that put the visual pathway at risk of injury, continuous monitoring of the visual function is desirable. However, the intraoperative monitoring of the visual evoked potential (VEP) is not yet widely used. We evaluate here the clinical utility of intraoperative VEP monitoring. METHODS We analyzed retrospectively 46 consecutive surgeries in 2011-2013. High luminance stimulating devices delivered flash stimuli on the closed eyelid during intravenous anesthesia. We...

  20. Diabetes mellitus and abnormal glucose tolerance development after gestational diabetes: A three-year, prospective, randomized, clinical-based, Mediterranean lifestyle interventional study with parallel groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Del Valle, Laura; Torrejón, Maria José; Barca, Idoya; Calvo, María Isabel; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel A; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2015-08-01

    Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in later life. The study aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention for the prevention of glucose disorders (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or DM2) in women with prior GDM. A total of 260 women with prior GDM who presented with normal fasting plasma glucose at six to twelve weeks postpartum were randomized into two groups: a Mediterranean lifestyle intervention group (n = 130) who underwent an educational program on nutrition and a monitored physical activity program and a control group (n = 130) with a conventional follow-up. A total of 237 women completed the three-year follow-up (126 in the intervention group and 111 in the control group). Their glucose disorders rates, clinical and metabolic changes and rates of adherence to the Mediterranean lifestyle were analyzed. Less women in the intervention group (42.8%) developed glucose disorders at the end of the three-year follow-up period compared with the control group (56.75%), p women with prior GDM. Body weight gain and an unhealthy fat intake pattern were found to be the most predictive factors for the development of glucose disorders. Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN24165302. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/pf/24165302. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. PATIENT CHARACTERISITCS AND PHYSICIAN FACTORS DETERMINING THE UTILIZATION OF AUTOMATIC CLINICAL ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Juni Angkasawati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The changing of disease patterns from infectious diseases to heart, cancer, and degenerative diseases needs advanced technologies to support diagnosis and to give therapies. The Automatic Clinical Analyzer (ACA is one of modem laboratory equipments which continuously developed to enhance patient service outcomes. Previous researches showed its utilization rates varied 20-46.6% from total capacities per year. It indicated low utilization problems. So this research aimed patient characteristics and physician factors determining the utilization of the ACA. This was a descriptive study with a to-cross sectional design. Data were collected by interview to patients visited laboratories and physicians who referred patients for determine laboratory examinations using the ACA. The study was conducted in 2 (two public hospital laboratories and 4(four private clinical laboratories in Surabaya and Malang, East Java Province. Data were analyzed descriptively. Results showed that the patient characteristics who used ACA were higher proportion of those with older aged, women and senior high school to above education levels. Access to the services was also a determining factor of the ACA use because further distance increased transportation cost to reach the facilities. It also showed that the higher patient income received more services from the ACA and likely to visit private laboratories. From the physician view points, the factor determining the ACA use were that exmination results supported diagnosis, quickly be knew or received and easy to get. The study recommends to conduct further ACA studies associated with feasibility and effective cost to respond equity problems and the efficiency of ACA use. Key words: utilization, Automatic Clinical Analyzer, patients, physicians

  2. Utilization of the Nursing Process to Foster Clinical Reasoning During a Simulation Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lambie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursing practice includes complex reasoning and multifaceted decision making with minimal standardized guidance in how to evaluate this phenomenon among nursing students. Learning outcomes related to the clinical reasoning process among novice baccalaureate nursing students during a simulation experience were evaluated. Nursing process records were utilized to evaluate and foster the development of clinical reasoning in a high-fidelity medical-surgical simulation experience. Students were unable to describe and process pertinent patient information appropriately prior to the simulation experience. Students’ ability to identify pertinent patient cues and plan appropriate patient care improved following the simulation. The learning activity afforded a structured opportunity to identify cues, prioritize the proper course of nursing interventions, and engage in collaboration among peers. The simulation experience provides faculty insight into the students’ clinical reasoning processes, while providing students with a clear framework for successfully accomplishing learning outcomes.

  3. Clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care behaviours in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus: A multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, Davide; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; Riegel, Barbara; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Paturzo, Marco; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2016-11-01

    Self-care is vital for patients with heart failure to maintain health and quality of life, and it is even more vital for those who are also affected by diabetes mellitus, since they are at higher risk of worse outcomes. The literature is unclear on the influence of diabetes on heart failure self-care as well as on the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on self-care. (1) To compare self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of patients with heart failure and diabetes versus those heart failure patients without diabetes; (2) to estimate if the presence of diabetes influences self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of heart failure patients; (3) to identify socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence in patients with heart failure and diabetes. Secondary analysis of data from a multicentre cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinics from 29 Italian provinces. 1192 adults with confirmed diagnosis of heart failure. Socio-demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. Self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence were measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2; each scale has a standardized score from 0 to 100, where a score diabetes. In these 379, heart failure self-care behaviours were suboptimal (means range from 53.2 to 55.6). No statistically significant differences were found in any of the three self-care measures in heart failure patients with and without diabetes. The presence of diabetes did not influence self-care maintenance (p=0.12), self-care management (p=0.21) or self-care confidence (p=0.51). Age (p=0.04), number of medications (p=0.01), presence of a caregiver (p=0.04), family income (p=0.009) and self-care confidence (pdiabetes mellitus. This population needs more intensive interventions to improve self-care. Determinants of self-care in

  4. Clinical utility of marketing terms used for over-the-counter dermatologic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozalis, Emily; Patel, Shivani

    2018-04-19

    Cosmetic products are commonly marketed using dermatologic terms such as "hypoallergenic," "non-comedogenic," "fragrance-free," etc. The clinical relevance of these claims can be confusing to both patients and clinicians. A systematic review was performed from via a PubMed search of published articles from January 1985 to October 2017 to further describe and elucidate the clinical utility of a predefined list of common dermatologic terms used by pharmaceutical companies to market over the counter products. The terms "fragrance-free," "hypoallergenic," "non-comedogenic," and "oil-free" on cosmetic product labels are not regulated by any governing body and provide varied clinical utility. Products labeled as having "natural ingredients" are not necessarily safer or less irritating to patients with atopy or a history of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite the increasing popularity of "paraben-free" cosmetics, parabens are safe for patients in the quantities used in cosmetic products and can be safely used in patients who don't exhibit contact dermatitis to this preservative. A working knowledge of common cosmetic ingredients may help dermatologists counsel patients on which products to avoid for their specific dermatologic conditions.

  5. Clinical utility of circulating cell-free DNA in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan A Lima Pereira

    Full Text Available Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA isolated from the plasma of cancer patients (pts has been shown to reflect the genomic mutation profile of the tumor. However, physician and patient assessment of clinical utility of these assays in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has not been previously described.Patients were prospectively consented to a prospective genomic matching protocol (Assessment of Targeted Therapies Against Colorectal Cancer [ATTACC], with collection of blood for cfDNA extraction and sequencing of a 54-gene panel in a CLIA-certified lab. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue from prior resections or biopsies underwent 50-gene sequencing. Results from both assays were returned to the treating physicians for patient care and clinical trial selection. Follow-up surveys of treating physicians and chart reviews assessed clinical utility.128 mCRC pts were enrolled between 6/2014 and 1/2015. Results were returned in median of 13 and 26 days for cfDNA and FFPE sequencing, respectively. With cfDNA sequencing, 78% (100/128 of samples had a detectable somatic genomic alteration. 50% of cfDNA cases had potentially actionable alterations, and 60% of these could be genomically matched to at least one clinical trial in our institution. 50% (15/30 of these pts enrolled onto an identified matched trial. Physicians reported that the cfDNA testing improved the quality of care they could provide in 73% of the cases, and that 89% of pts reported greater satisfaction with the efforts to personalize experimental therapeutic agents.cfDNA sequencing can provide timely information on potentially actionable mutations and amplifications, thereby facilitating clinical trial enrollment and improving the perceived quality of care.

  6. Clinical Utility of Viral Load in Management of Cytomegalovirus Infection after Solid Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The negative impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on transplant outcomes warrants efforts toward improving its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. During the last 2 decades, significant breakthroughs in diagnostic virology have facilitated remarkable improvements in CMV disease management. During this period, CMV nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) evolved to become one of the most commonly performed tests in clinical virology laboratories. NAT provides a means for rapid and sensitive diagnosis of CMV infection in transplant recipients. Viral quantification also introduced several principles of CMV disease management. Specifically, viral load has been utilized (i) for prognostication of CMV disease, (ii) to guide preemptive therapy, (iii) to assess the efficacy of antiviral treatment, (iv) to guide the duration of treatment, and (v) to indicate the risk of clinical relapse or antiviral drug resistance. However, there remain important limitations that require further optimization, including the interassay variability in viral load reporting, which has limited the generation of standardized viral load thresholds for various clinical indications. The recent introduction of an international reference standard should advance the major goal of uniform viral load reporting and interpretation. However, it has also become apparent that other aspects of NAT should be standardized, including sample selection, nucleic acid extraction, amplification, detection, and calibration, among others. This review article synthesizes the vast amount of information on CMV NAT and provides a timely review of the clinical utility of viral load testing in the management of CMV in solid organ transplant recipients. Current limitations are highlighted, and avenues for further research are suggested to optimize the clinical application of NAT in the management of CMV after transplantation. PMID:24092851

  7. [Clinical recommendations for sport practice in diabetic patients (RECORD Guide). Diabetes Mellitus Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition (SEEN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo-Fernández, Manuel; Escalada San Martín, Javier; Gómez-Peralta, Fernando; Rozas Moreno, Pedro; Marco Martínez, Amparo; Botella-Serrano, Marta; Tejera Pérez, Cristina; López Fernández, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Sporting activity is becoming a common practice in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This situation requires both a preliminary medical assessment and a wide range of changes in treatment which have scarcely been addressed in medical literature. To prepare a clinical guideline on the medical approach to patients with diabetes who practice sport regularly. An expert panel from the Diabetes Mellitus Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition (SEEN) reviewed the most relevant literature in each of the sections. Based both on this review and on data from the experience of a number of athletes with DM, a number of recommendations were agreed within each section. Finally, the Working Group and representatives of the SEEN jointly discussed all these recommendations. The guideline provides recommendations ranging from medical assessment before patients with DM start to practice sport to actions during and after physical activity. Recommendations are also given on aspects such as the impact of sport on blood glucose control, training schemes, or special risk situations. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging Utility of Virtual Reality as a Multidisciplinary Tool in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Davis, Steven; Lee, Danny; Barber, Scott; Sikka, Neal

    2017-10-01

    Among the more recent products borne of the evolution of digital technology, virtual reality (VR) is gaining a foothold in clinical medicine as an adjunct to traditional therapies. Early studies suggest a growing role for VR applications in pain management, clinical skills training, cognitive assessment and cognitive therapy, and physical rehabilitation. To complete a review of the literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE databases with the following search terms: "virtual reality," "procedural medicine," "oncology," "physical therapy," and "burn." We further limited our search to publications in the English language. Boolean operators were used to combine search terms. The included search terms yielded 97 potential articles, of which 45 were identified as meeting study criteria, and are included in this review. These articles provide data, which strongly support the hypothesis that VR simulations can enhance pain management (by reducing patient perception of pain and anxiety), can augment clinical training curricula and physical rehabilitation protocols (through immersive audiovisual environments), and can improve clinical assessment of cognitive function (through improved ecological validity). Through computer-generated, life-like digital landscapes, VR stands to change the current approach to pain management, medical training, neurocognitive diagnosis, and physical rehabilitation. Additional studies are needed to help define best practices in VR utilization, and to explore new therapeutic uses for VR in clinical practice.

  9. Advanced exudative retinopathy with neovascular glaucoma as the clinical presentation of diabetes mellitus and severe combined hyperlipidemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinawat, Suthasinee; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal; Sinawat, Supat

    2014-10-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with bilateralprogressive visual loss for 5 months. Visual acuity was reduced to countingfingers in the right eye and light perception in the left. Although neovascularizations were detected in the angles of the eyes, neovascular glaucoma and rubeosis iridis were demonstrated only in the left. Fundus examination showed bilateral advanced exudative retinopathy in both eyes. Severe attenuated retinal arteries and enlarged cupping with disc pallor were observed in the left eye. Generalized eruptive xanthomas were found on the back and extremities. Extreme dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol 1311 mg/dl and triglycerides 6356 mg/dl) and diabetes mellitus (fasting plasma glucose 325 mg/dl and HbA1 c 12.1%) were first diagnosed. The serum lipid profiles and glucose levels were dramatically decreased within a month after treatment with subcutaneous insulin injections and oral hypolipidemic agents; notwithstanding, his vision was not significantly improved, even after treatment with intravitreal anti-VEGF injection, intravitreal steroid injection and panretinal photocoagulation. The principle causes of advanced exudative retinopathy are severe breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier due to diabetes mellitus and altered retinal pigment epithelium lipid metabolism. In ourpatient, central retinal vascular occlusion was also the suspected cause ofneovascular glaucoma.

  10. SELF-CARE ACTIVITIES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO METABOLIC AND CLINICAL CONTROL OF PEOPLE WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Claudia Martins Coelhoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudio transversal que buscó evaluar actividades de autocuidado con el diabetes mellitus tipo 2 y verificar su relación con características sociodemográficas y con datos clínicos. La muestra se constituyó de 218 personas en seguimiento ambulatorio. Las actividades de autocuidado fueron evaluados utilizando un cuestionario traducido y validado en Brasil. Los elementos de este cuestionario que tuvieron los promedios más altos se relacionan con la terapia con medicamentos, y los menores con la actividad física. Edad inversamente correlacionada con la actividad física y el cuidado de los pies, y el momento del diagnóstico mostró una correlación directa con la monitorización de la glucosa. Los datos mostraron que las actividades de autocuidado relacionadas con los cambios de comportamiento son las que requieren mayores inversiones para alcanzar los objetivos de la atención, y la edad y el diagnóstico de tiempo deben ser considerados en la planificación de los cuidados de enfermería a la persona con el diabetes mellitus.

  11. Neuromuscular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bril, Vera

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a modern global epidemic, with steadily increasing prevalence rates related to lifestyle such that 27% of individuals aged 65 years or older have diabetes mellitus, 95% of whom have type 2. This article reviews the effects of diabetes mellitus on the neuromuscular system. Diabetes mellitus leads to diverse forms of peripheral neuropathy as the major neuromuscular complication. Both focal and diffuse types of neuropathy can develop, with the most common form being diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Small fibers are damaged early in the development of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy and are not assessed by nerve conduction studies. Small fiber damage occurs even in the prediabetes stage. No disease-modifying therapy for diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is available at this time, but this complication can be limited in patients who have type 1 diabetes mellitus with strict glycemic control; the same outcome is not clearly observed in patients who have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recently, the evidence base for symptomatic treatments of painful diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy underwent systematic review. Effective evidence-based treatments include some anticonvulsants (eg, pregabalin, gabapentin), antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline, duloxetine), opioids (eg, morphine sulfate, oxycodone), capsaicin cream, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. This article reviews the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy and discusses recent consensus opinion on the objective confirmation needed for the diagnosis in the clinical research setting. The evidence from clinical trials shows that intensive glycemic control reduces prevalence of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, but variable outcomes are observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Finally, despite the lack of disease-modifying treatment, effective evidence-based therapy can

  12. [Impact of the level of metabolic control on the non-surgical periodontal therapy outcomes in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients--clinical effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnić, Jelena; Djurić, Milanko; Predin, Tanja; Gusić, Ivana; Petrović, Djordje; Andjelković, Aleksandra; Bajkin, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as a complex metabolic disease influences functioning of numerous organs. Chronic periodontitis is one of frequent diabetic complications. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy between diabetes mellitus type 2 patients (DM type 2) and non-diabetic individuals (control group). Our study included 41 DM type 2 subjects and 21 non-diabetic individuals, all of them with chronic periodontitis. The diabetic group was divided into two subgroups based on the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as follows: D1 - 18 subjects with good metabolic control (HbA1c or = 7%). State of oral hygiene and periodontal clinical parameters of subjects, such as: plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), papilla bleeding index (PBI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL), were evaluated at the baseline and 3 months after scaling and root-planning. ANOVA test showed that there was no statistically significant difference of treatment success between studied groups in relation to GI (p = 0.52), PBI (p = 0.36) and CAL (p = 0.11). Reduction of PI and PPD in the control group (deltaPI = 0.84; deltaPPD = 0.35 mm) was significantly higher (p diabetes (group D1 deltaPI = 0.60, deltaPPD = 0.11 mm; group D2 deltaPI = 0.53, deltaPPD = 0.11 mm). Although there were differences in treatment success between DM subjects and non-diabetic individuals, they were not significant for the most measured parameters. The results of this study did not absolutely support the assumption that the level of glycemic control significantly affected the periodontal therapy outcome in diabetics.

  13. Clinical profile, outcomes, and progression to type 2 diabetes among Indian women with gestational diabetes mellitus seen at a diabetes center in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manni Mohanraj Mahalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the clinical profile, maternal and fetal outcomes, and the conversion rates to diabetes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM seen at a tertiary care diabetes center in urban south India. Materials and Methods: Clinical case records of 898 women with GDM seen between 1991 and 2011 were extracted from the Diabetes Electronic Medical Records (DEMR of a tertiary care diabetes center in Chennai, south India and their clinical profile was analyzed. Follow-up data of 174 GDM women was available. To determine the conversion rates to diabetes, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was done in these women. Glucose tolerance status postpartum was classified based on World Health Organization (WHO 2006 criteria. Results: The mean maternal age of the women was 29 ± 4 years and mean age of gestation at first visit were 24 ± 8.4 weeks. Seventy percent of the women had a family history of diabetes. Seventy-eight percent of the women delivered full-term babies and 65% underwent a cesarean section. The average weight gain during pregnancy was 10.0 ± 4.2 kg. Macrosomia was present in 17.9% of the babies, hypoglycemia in 10.4%, congenital anomalies in 4.3%, and the neonatal mortality rate was 1.9%. Mean follow-up duration of the 174 women of whom outcome data was available was 4.5 years. Out of the 174, 101 women who were followed-up developed diabetes, of whom half developed diabetes within 5 years and over 90%, within 10 years of the delivery. Conclusions: Progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Indian women with GDM is rapid. There is an urgent need to develop standardized protocols for GDM care in India that can improve the maternal and fetal outcomes and help prevent future diabetes in women with GDM.

  14. Diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Gerdes, V. E.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Meesters, E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol

  15. Dressing-related trauma: clinical sequelae and resource utilization in a UK setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth B

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Charlesworth,1 Claire Pilling,1 Paul Chadwick,2 Martyn Butcher31Adelphi Values, Macclesfield, 2Salford Royal Foundation Trust, Salford, 3Northern Devon Healthcare Trust, Devon, UKBackground: Dressings are the mainstay of wound care management; however, adherence of the dressing to the wound or periwound skin is common and can lead to dressing-related pain and trauma. Dressing-related trauma is recognized as a clinical and economic burden to patients and health care providers. This study was conducted to garner expert opinion on clinical sequelae and resource use associated with dressing-related trauma in a UK setting.Methods: This was an exploratory study with two phases: qualitative pilot interviews with six wound care specialists to explore dressing-related trauma concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization; and online quantitative research with 30 wound care specialists to validate and quantify the concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization explored in the first phase of the study. Data were collected on mean health care professional time, material costs, pharmaceutical costs, and inpatient management per sequela occurrence until resolution. Data were analyzed to give total costs per sequela and concept occurrence.Results: The results demonstrate that dressing-related trauma is a clinically relevant concept. The main types of dressing-related trauma concepts included skin reactions, adherence to the wound, skin stripping, maceration, drying, and plugging of the wound. These were the foundation for a number of clinical sequelae, including wound enlargement, increased exudate, bleeding, infection, pain, itching/excoriation, edema, dermatitis, inflammation, and anxiety. Mean total costs range from £56 to £175 for the complete onward management of each occurrence of the six main concepts.Conclusion: These results provide insight into the hidden costs of dressing-related trauma in a UK setting. This research successfully conceptualized

  16. Clinical Utility of Preoperative Computed Tomography in Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Gostout, Bobbie S; Dowdy, Sean C; Multinu, Francesco; Casarin, Jvan; Cliby, William A; Frigerio, Luigi; Kim, Bohyun; Weaver, Amy L; Glaser, Gretchen E; Mariani, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical utility of routine preoperative pelvic and abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations in patients with endometrial cancer (EC). We retrospectively reviewed records from patients with EC who underwent a preoperative endometrial biopsy and had surgery at our institution from January 1999 through December 2008. In the subset with an abdominal CT scan obtained within 3 months before surgery, we evaluated the clinical utility of the CT scan. Overall, 224 patients (18%) had a preoperative endometrial biopsy and an available CT scan. Gross intra-abdominal disease was observed in 10% and 20% of patients with preoperative diagnosis of endometrioid G3 and type II EC, respectively, whereas less than 5% of patients had a preoperative diagnosis of hyperplasia or low-grade EC. When examining retroperitoneal findings, we observed that a negative CT scan of the pelvis did not exclude the presence of pelvic node metastasis. Alternately, a negative CT scan in the para-aortic area generally reduced the probability of finding para-aortic dissemination but with an overall low sensitivity (42%). However, the sensitivity for para-aortic dissemination was as high as 67% in patients with G3 endometrioid cancer. In the case of negative para-aortic nodes in the CT scan, the risk of para-aortic node metastases decreased from 18.8% to 7.5% in patients with endometrioid G3 EC. Up to 15% of patients with endometrioid G3 cancer had clinically relevant incidental findings that necessitated medical or surgical intervention. In patients with endometrioid G3 and type II EC diagnosed by the preoperative biopsy, CT scans may help guide the operative plan by facilitating preoperative identification of gross intra-abdominal disease and enlarged positive para-aortic nodes that are not detectable during physical examinations. In addition, CT may reveal other clinically relevant incidental findings.

  17. Perceptions of clinical utility of an Augmented Reality musical software among health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Ana Grasielle Dionísio; de Assis, Gilda Aparecida; do Nascimento, Marilena; de Deus Lopes, Roseli

    2017-04-01

    Augmented Reality musical software (GenVirtual) is a technology, which primarily allows users to develop music activities for rehabilitation. This study aimed to analyse the perceptions of health care professionals regarding the clinical utility of GenVirtual. A second objective was to identify improvements to GenVirtual software and similar technologies. Music therapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapist who assist people with physical and cognitive disabilities were enrolled in three focus groups. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected through inductive thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: the use of GenVirtual in health care areas; opportunities for realistic application of GenVirtual; and limitations in the use of GenVirtual. The registration units identified were: motor stimulation, cognitive stimulation, verbal learning, recreation activity, musicality, accessibility, motivation, sonic accuracy, interference of lighting, poor sound, children and adults. This research suggested that the GenVirtual is a complementary tool to conventional clinical practice and has great potential to motor and cognitive rehabilitation of children and adults. Implications for Rehabilitation Gaining health professional' perceptions of the Augmented Reality musical game (GenVirtual) give valuable information as to the clinical utility of the software. GenVirtual was perceived as a tool that could be used as enhancing the motor and cognitive rehabilitation process. GenVirtual was viewed as a tool that could enhance clinical practice and communication among various agencies, but it was suggested that it should be used with caution to avoid confusion and replacement of important services.

  18. Clinical utility of fetal autopsy and its impact on genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Lewis, Leslie; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Mathew, Mary; Adiga, Prashanth K; Vasudeva, Akhila; Kumar, Pratap; Shetty, Jyothi; Shah, Hitesh; Girisha, Katta M

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to analyze the utility of fetal autopsy in terms of its contribution to establishing a definitive diagnosis and its impact on genetic counseling. Detailed fetal autopsy was carried out in fetuses referred for examination. Clinical utility of fetal autopsy and its impact on counseling were measured by adapting previously published parameters. We performed autopsy in 230 fetuses. There were 106 cases with single system and 92 cases with multisystem involvement. We confirmed prenatal findings in 23% of cases and observed additional findings in 37% of cases. In 23% of cases, autopsy findings differed enough to change the diagnosis. However, in 17% of fetuses, no cause of fetal loss was determined. Risk of recurrence became clear in 30.3% of the fetuses, and risk remained the same, but the diagnosis was different in 4.8% of cases after autopsy. Hence, autopsy led to refinement of the risk of recurrence in 36% of cases. Autopsy aided prenatal counseling of couples in 77% of cases by either confirming the prenatal findings (35%) or providing new information/ruling out a diagnosis (42%). The present study quantifies the utility of fetal autopsy in reproductive genetic counseling in a large cohort. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A novel misoprostol delivery system for induction of labor: clinical utility and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson ML

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan L Stephenson, Deborah A WingDivision of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA, USAAbstract: Induction of labor is one of the most commonly performed obstetric procedures and will likely become more common as the reproductive population in developed nations changes. As the proportion of women undergoing induction grows, there is a constant search for more efficacious ways to induce labor while maintaining fetal and maternal safety as well as patient satisfaction. With almost half of induced labors requiring cervical ripening, methods for achieving active labor and vaginal delivery are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective induction agents, and specifically vaginal misoprostol, used off-label, have been widely utilized to initiate cervical ripening and active labor. The challenge is to administer this medication accurately while maintaining the ability to discontinue the medication when needed. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening utilizing a delivery system that controls medication release and can be rapidly removed. This paper reviews the design, development, and clinical utility of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor as well as patient considerations related to the delivery system.Keywords: misoprostol, induction, cervical ripening, vaginal insert

  20. A novel misoprostol delivery system for induction of labor: clinical utility and patient considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Megan L; Wing, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    Induction of labor is one of the most commonly performed obstetric procedures and will likely become more common as the reproductive population in developed nations changes. As the proportion of women undergoing induction grows, there is a constant search for more efficacious ways to induce labor while maintaining fetal and maternal safety as well as patient satisfaction. With almost half of induced labors requiring cervical ripening, methods for achieving active labor and vaginal delivery are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective induction agents, and specifically vaginal misoprostol, used off-label, have been widely utilized to initiate cervical ripening and active labor. The challenge is to administer this medication accurately while maintaining the ability to discontinue the medication when needed. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening utilizing a delivery system that controls medication release and can be rapidly removed. This paper reviews the design, development, and clinical utility of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor as well as patient considerations related to the delivery system. PMID:25960635

  1. Pathologic examination of the placenta and its clinical utility: a survey of obstetrics and gynecology providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odibo, Imelda; Gehlot, Ashita; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T; Magann, Everett F

    2016-01-01

    To determine provider awareness of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) recommended guidelines for examination of placenta and evaluate the Obstetrician -Gynecologist's perception of the clinical utility of placenta pathology reports. An anonymous survey of Obstetrician Gynecologists who attended the national conference of The Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (CAOG) in 2013 assessing their knowledge of the CAP guidelines and utilization of information obtained from pathology reports. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test were used to evaluate association between specialists and non-specialist providers as related to survey questions and multivariable logistic regression used to explore factors associated with utilization and awareness of the guidelines. A total of 218 providers attended the conference and 111 surveys were completed. Only 36% of participants were aware of the CAP guidelines for pathologic examination of the placenta. The odds that a physician with more than 15 years of experience will send a placenta for examination was 0.210 times that of physicians with less than 15 years of experience (CI 0.084, 0.521). The odds for awareness of the CAP guideline among subspecialists who participated in the study were 3.630 times the odds for non-specialist (CI 1.44, 9.147). In addition, the odds of sending a placenta for those physicians in a community hospital are 0.300 times that of physicians in a University hospital (CI 0.110, 0.820). The presence of a pathologist skilled in obstetrics and gynecology did not seem to affect awareness of the CAP guidelines, perception of the usefulness of the guidelines and likelihood of sending a placenta for examination. Only 21% of participants reported understanding the nomenclature used in pathology reports "all the time". Participants ranked the explanation of adverse pregnancy outcome as the most useful clinical application of placenta pathologic examination and most advocated for continued

  2. Clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of the sitagliptin-metformin combination in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Q

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Du, Yan-Jun Wang, Sheng Yang, Ping HanDepartment of Endocrinology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM continues to increase each year. However, the efficacy of glucose-lowering therapies remains unsatisfactory. Moreover, the clinical characteristics and manifestations of DM in Chinese patients are different from those in Western patients. Thus, it is imperative to develop an optimal treatment protocol for lowering blood glucose levels in Chinese patients with DM. Sitagliptin has been used in People’s Republic of China, and sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy may not alter their individual pharmacokinetics. To date, several clinical trials undertaken to investigate the efficacy of sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy have revealed that it effectively controlled glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial plasma glucose levels to a greater extent than sitagliptin or metformin alone. In addition, the combined therapy was well tolerated and induced few side effects, which were largely mild. Furthermore, the combined therapy was easy to administer, and the patients receiving this therapy showed good compliance. Therefore, for Chinese patients with type 2 DM, sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy is preferred.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, sitagliptin, metformin

  3. The role of genealogy and clinical family histories in documenting possible inheritance patterns for diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era: part 1. The clinical case of Josephine Imperato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2009-10-01

    Establishing the role of heredity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) is challenging. While type 2 DM frequently displays a pattern of familial aggregation, many other risk factors are responsible for the clinical expression of the disease. This paper reviews a number of the early twentieth-century studies of inheritance patterns for type 2 DM and presents in detail the history of Josephine Foniciello Imperato (Maria Giuseppa Foniciello) who died from the disease in New York City at the age of 52 years on 14 November 1921, ten months before commercial insulin became available.

  4. Echo-planar MR cerebral blood volume mapping of glomas. Clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronen, H.J.; Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki; Glass, J.; Pardo, F.S.; Belliveau, J.W.; Gruber, M.L.; Buchbinder, B.R.; Gazit, I.E.; Linggood, R.M.; Fischman, A.J.; Rosen, F.S.; Hochberg, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Neovascularization is a common phenomenon in gliomas. MR imaging cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping utilizes ultrafast echo-planar imaging and simultaneous use of gadolinium-based contrast material. To determine the utility of MR CBV mapping in the clinical evaluation of gliomas, we followed 15 patients with serial studies. This technique provided functional information that was not evident with conventional CT or MR imaging. Low-grade tumors demonstrated homogeneously low CBV, while high-grade tumors often showed areas of both high and low CBV. The maximum tumor CBV/white matter ratio was compared between low- (n=3) and high-grade gliomas (n=5) in patients without previous treatment and with histologic verification (n=8) and was significantly higher in high-grade gliomas (p<0.01), High CBV foci in nonenhancing tumor areas were present in 2 cases. The distinction between radiation necrosis and active tumor could be made correctly in 3 of 4 cases. The information provided by MR CBV mapping has the potential to be an adjunct in the clinical care of glioma patients. (orig.)

  5. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Nine month progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures in clinical practice. Several methods of determining efficacy will be evaluated to determine those most suitable. Nuclear medicine methods will be confined to the study of lung diseases by pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. In addition to evaluating the above methods data will be obtained to determine the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and efficiency of the test under consideration. These values, corrected for prevalence of the disease processes under consideration will then be compared to the values obtained by the MACRO and MICRO methods and will help to bound the clinical reliability of the diagnostic method depending on the degree to which the several methods trend together. Depending on the practicality of these two methods, in addition to the determination of efficacy, cost effectiveness factors and benefit-risk estimates which are used to apply to radiation effects will be determined for nuclear medicine studies of the brain, bone, heart, liver and thyroid subsequently. The measurement techniques will then be utilized to establish guidelines for the most useful applications of the given procedure so that clinicians will be able to obtain a pretest estimate of the utility of the nuclear medicine test.

  6. Do Circulating Tumor Cells, Exosomes, and Circulating Tumor Nucleic Acids Have Clinical Utility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Bert; Cankovic, Milena; Furtado, Larissa V.; Meier, Frederick; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing and screening for tumors through noninvasive means represent an important paradigm shift in precision medicine. In contrast to tissue biopsy, detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor nucleic acids provides a minimally invasive method for predictive and prognostic marker detection. This allows early and serial assessment of metastatic disease, including follow-up during remission, characterization of treatment effects, and clonal evolution. Isolation and characterization of CTCs and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are likely to improve cancer diagnosis, treatment, and minimal residual disease monitoring. However, more trials are required to validate the clinical utility of precise molecular markers for a variety of tumor types. This review focuses on the clinical utility of CTCs and ctDNA testing in patients with solid tumors, including somatic and epigenetic alterations that can be detected. A comparison of methods used to isolate and detect CTCs and some of the intricacies of the characterization of the ctDNA are also provided. PMID:25908243

  7. Harnessing clinical psychiatric data with an electronic assessment tool (OPCRIT+: the utility of symptom dimensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip James Brittain

    Full Text Available Progress in personalised psychiatry is dependent on researchers having access to systematic and accurately acquired symptom data across clinical diagnoses. We have developed a structured psychiatric assessment tool, OPCRIT+, that is being introduced into the electronic medical records system of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust which can help to achieve this. In this report we examine the utility of the symptom data being collected with the tool. Cross-sectional mental state data from a mixed-diagnostic cohort of 876 inpatients was subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA. Six components, explaining 46% of the variance in recorded symptoms, were extracted. The components represented dimensions of mania, depression, positive symptoms, anxiety, negative symptoms and disorganization. As indicated by component scores, different clinical diagnoses demonstrated distinct symptom profiles characterized by wide-ranging levels of severity. When comparing the predictive value of symptoms against diagnosis for a variety of clinical outcome measures (e.g. 'Overactive, aggressive behaviour', symptoms proved superior in five instances (R(2 range: 0.06-0.28 whereas diagnosis was best just once (R(2:0.25. This report demonstrates that symptom data being routinely gathered in an NHS trust, when documented on the appropriate tool, have considerable potential for onward use in a variety of clinical and research applications via representation as dimensions of psychopathology.

  8. Acceptance of Using an Ecosystem of Mobile Apps for Use in Diabetes Clinic for Self-Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Sarita; Parry, Dave; Petrova, Krassie; Rowan, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) for self-management of diseases such as diabetes and for general well-being, including keeping track of food, diet, and exercise, are widely available. However, consumers face a flood of new mobile apps in the app stores and have no guidance from clinicians about choosing the appropriate app. As much as clinicians would like to support a patient-centered approach and promote health and wellness mobile apps, they may be unable to provide advice due to the lack of comprehensive and reliable app reviews. This research reviewed a selection of health and wellness mobile apps suitable for the self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A prototype of an ecosystem that integrated the data generated by the apps was built and its usefulness and ease of use were evaluated. The results show that the ecosystem can provide support for GDM self-management by sharing health and wellness data across the diabetes clinic.

  9. Patients utilizing a free clinic: physical and mental health, health literacy, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Tabler, Jennifer; Ashby, Jeanie; Olson, Lenora M

    2013-08-01

    This cross sectional study assessed the physical and mental health, health literacy and social support of the uninsured utilizing a free clinic to develop intervention programs and research projects to improve the health of free clinic patients. Free clinics are nonprofit organizations that provide underserved and uninsured individuals access to a broad array of free or low cost healthcare services. English or Spanish speaking patients (N = 187) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Physical, mental and oral health, health literacy, and social support were measured using standardized instruments. Eighty-two participants (45 US born and 37 non-US born) chose the English version of the survey (English speakers) while 105 participants (2 US born and 103 non-US born) chose the Spanish version (Spanish speakers). Overall, both the physical and mental health functioning of the participants was lower than that of the US general population. The participants reported being moderately depressed. US-born English speakers reported the poorest physical and mental health while Spanish speakers reported the best physical health and the lowest level of depression. A higher level of health literacy was associated with better physical health functioning, whereas reporting higher social support was associated with better mental health functioning and less severe depression. Because most free clinics have limited resources, developing services and programs that fit free clinics' circumstances are needed. Our study finding indicates that health literacy education, mental health services, and social support are key services needed by free clinic patients to achieve better health.

  10. Patient profiles and clinical utility of mepolizumab in severe eosinophilic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldar P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pranabashis Haldar Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK Abstract: Mepolizumab (Nucala® is an effective and specific anti-eosinophil molecular therapy that has recently been approved as add-on therapy for the management of severe eosinophilic asthma by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, European Medicines Agency (EMA; European Union and more recently National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE; UK. It is one of several molecular therapies in development for this indication and is illustrative of the strategic trajectory for pharmaceutical drug development taken over the past decade in several disease areas. Molecular therapies offer the prospect of improved specificity and effectiveness of biological effect. However, this necessitates a clear understanding of the underlying mechanistic pathways underpinning pathological processes, to inform drug development that yields novel more efficacious treatment options with a better clinical profile than existing agents. For the first time, utilization of molecular therapies in clinical trials is providing a novel in vivo model to characterize the association between specific pathways and clinical disease expression. It is increasingly recognized that asthma exhibits both clinical and pathological heterogeneity. It follows that a one-size-fits-all approach will not be appropriate and cost-effectiveness may only be achieved by identifying responder subgroups. This so-called personalized approach to therapy is being supported by the parallel development of companion biomarkers for clinical application. In this review, the author summarizes the clinical studies, their interpretation and the lessons learnt with mepolizumab that have informed our understanding of the approach to personalized molecular therapy in asthma. Keywords: IL-5, Nucala, exacerbations 

  11. Developing a clinical utility framework to evaluate prediction models in radiogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Liu, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Page, David C.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-03-01

    Combining imaging and genetic information to predict disease presence and behavior is being codified into an emerging discipline called "radiogenomics." Optimal evaluation methodologies for radiogenomics techniques have not been established. We aim to develop a clinical decision framework based on utility analysis to assess prediction models for breast cancer. Our data comes from a retrospective case-control study, collecting Gail model risk factors, genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms-SNPs), and mammographic features in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We first constructed three logistic regression models built on different sets of predictive features: (1) Gail, (2) Gail+SNP, and (3) Gail+SNP+BI-RADS. Then, we generated ROC curves for three models. After we assigned utility values for each category of findings (true negative, false positive, false negative and true positive), we pursued optimal operating points on ROC curves to achieve maximum expected utility (MEU) of breast cancer diagnosis. We used McNemar's test to compare the predictive performance of the three models. We found that SNPs and BI-RADS features augmented the baseline Gail model in terms of the area under ROC curve (AUC) and MEU. SNPs improved sensitivity of the Gail model (0.276 vs. 0.147) and reduced specificity (0.855 vs. 0.912). When additional mammographic features were added, sensitivity increased to 0.457 and specificity to 0.872. SNPs and mammographic features played a significant role in breast cancer risk estimation (p-value < 0.001). Our decision framework comprising utility analysis and McNemar's test provides a novel framework to evaluate prediction models in the realm of radiogenomics.

  12. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  13. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain clinical utility of pregabalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinik AI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aaron I Vinik, Carolina M Casellini Strelitz Diabetes Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Abstract: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy

  14. The Clinical Utility and Diagnostic Performance of MRI for Identification and Classification of Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Quatman-Yates, Catherine C.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Paterno, Mark V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a common clinical tool used to diagnose and monitor the progression and/or healing of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature relative to the following questions: (1) Is MRI a valid, sensitive, specific, accurate, and reliable imaging modality to identify knee osteochondritis dissecans compared with arthroscopy? (2) Is MRI a sensitive tool that can be utilized to characterize lesion severity and stability of osteochondritis dissecans fragments in the knee? Methods: A systematic search was performed in December 2010 with use of PubMed MEDLINE (from 1966), CINAHL (from 1982), SPORTDiscus (from 1985), Scopus (from 1996), and EMBASE (from 1974) databases. Results: Seven studies, four Level-II and three Level-III investigations, met the specified inclusion criteria. No randomized controlled studies were identified. Because of inconsistencies between imaging techniques and methodological shortcomings of many of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. Conclusions: The limited available evidence, methodological inconsistencies in imaging techniques, and lack of standardized grading criteria used in current studies prevent clear conclusions regarding the diagnostic and specific staging equivalency of MRI with arthroscopy. However, available evidence supports the use of MRI to detect the stability or instability of the lesion. Given the benefits of the use of MRI as a noninvasive tool to diagnose, predict lesion progression, and assess clinical outcomes of treatment, there is a pressing need for high-level, systematic, sound, and thorough studies related to the clinical utility of MRI for assessing osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22637210

  15. Clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants within the child health services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kine Johansen

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants (SOMP-I when used by nurses in routine child healthcare by analyzing the nurses' SOMP-I assessments and the actions taken when motor problems were suspected.Infants from three child health centers in Uppsala County, Sweden, were consecutively enrolled in a longitudinal study. The 242 infants were assessed using SOMP-I by the nurse responsible for the infant as part of the regular well-child visits at as close to 2, 4, 6 and 10 months of age as possible. The nurses noted actions taken such as giving advice, scheduling an extra follow-up or referring the infant to specialized care. The infants' motor development was reassessed at 18 months of age through review of medical records or parental report.The assessments of level of motor development at 2 and 10 months showed a distribution corresponding to the percentile distribution of the SOMP-I method. Fewer infants than expected were assessed as delayed at 4 and 6 months or deficient in quality at all assessment ages. When an infant was assessed as delayed in level or deficient in quality, the likelihood of the nurse taking actions increased. This increased further if both delay and quality deficit were found at the same assessment or if one or both were found at repeated assessments. The reassessment of the motor development at 18 months did not reveal any missed infants with major motor impairments.The use of SOMP-I appears to demonstrate favorable clinical utility in routine child healthcare as tested here. Child health nurses can assess early motor performance using this standardized assessment method, and using the method appears to support them the clinical decision-making.

  16. Demographic and Clinical Profiles of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients Initiating Canagliflozin Versus DPP-4 Inhibitors in a Large U.S. Managed Care Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Michael; Peng, Xiaomei; Geremakis, Caroline; Bae, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Canagliflozin is the first sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor-a new class of oral antidiabetic (OAD) medication-approved for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment in the United States. Approved less than 2 years ago, use of canagliflozin is largely uncharacterized. To investigate and compare baseline demographic, clinical, and economic characteristics of patients initiating canagliflozin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in the real-world setting. Using administrative claims data from a large, geographically diverse U.S. managed care organization, this retrospective study assessed adult T2DM patients (aged ≥ 18 years) initiating treatment with canagli-flozin or DPP-4 agents. Eligible patients had ≥1 medical claim with a T2DM diagnosis and ≥ 1 outpatient pharmacy claim for canagliflozin or a DPP-4 agent between January 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013. Patients with ≥ 1 canagliflozin fill were selected first and assigned to the canagliflozin cohort following a hierarchical approach; the date of the earliest canagliflozin fill was defined as the index date. Remaining patients with DPP-4 fills were then assigned to the DPP-4 cohort, with the index date as the first DPP-4 fill. Only patients with at least 12 months of pre-index (baseline) enrollment were included. Patients with fills for their cohort-defining drug over 3 months before the index date were excluded in order to focus on new initiators. A subset of patients with ≥ 3 months of continuous enrollment following their index dates was used to examine medication patterns after initiation. Patients with hyperglycemia; type 1, gestational, or nonclinical diabetes; or diabetes with hyperosmolar coma were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and economic characteristics were assessed over baseline and compared using two-sample t-tests or chi-square/Fisher's exact tests. Multivariable logistic regression models were built to assess baseline factors associated with

  17. A versatilidade clínica do arco utilidade The clinical versatility of the utility archwire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Antonio de Figueiredo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: dentro da ciência Bioprogressiva, o arco utilidade, juntamente com o quadri-hélice, é o dispositivo mais conhecido e utilizado para o tratamento de inúmeras más oclusões. Com um desenho ao mesmo tempo simples e original, o arco utilidade tornou-se parte integrante do arsenal ortodôntico utilizado nos períodos das dentaduras mista e permanente. O nome do arco é uma referência à grande versatilidade que este dispositivo oferece, e devido aos vários efeitos que o mesmo pode promover durante o tratamento. OBJETIVO: este artigo destina-se a discutir a fabricação, a ativação e o uso clínico do arco utilidade de Ricketts no tratamento ortodôntico, além de descrever alguns dos princípios da técnica ortodôntica Bioprogressiva. CONCLUSÃO: pode-se concluir que o arco utilidade é um aparelho extremamente versátil, com inúmeras possibilidades clínicas, sendo capaz de intruir, extruir, avançar ou retrair os incisivos superiores e inferiores; manter, diminuir ou aumentar o espaço no arco inferior; além de ancorar os molares inferiores. Entretanto, uma das maiores vantagens de seu uso consiste na correção de más oclusões do tipo Classe II, com mordida profunda.INTRODUCTION: The utility archwire, along with the quad-helix, is the most widely known and used device within the Bioprogressive technique for the treatment of several malocclusions. Featuring a simple yet original design, the utility archwire has become an integral part of the orthodontic arsenal, with applications in the periods of mixed and permanent dentition. The name of this archwire refers to its great versatility, and to the multiple effects it can have during treatment. OBJECTIVE: This article aims to discuss the production, application and clinical use of the Ricketts utility archwire in orthodontic treatments, as well as to describe some of the basics aspects of the Bioprogressive orthodontic technique. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the

  18. Clinical utility of machine-learning approaches in schizophrenia: improving diagnostic confidence for translational neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Liddle, Peter F; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning approaches are becoming commonplace in the neuroimaging literature as potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for the study of clinical populations. However, very few studies provide clinically informative measures to aid in decision-making and resource allocation. Head-to-head comparison of neuroimaging-based multivariate classifiers is an essential first step to promote translation of these tools to clinical practice. We systematically evaluated the classifier performance using back-to-back structural MRI in two field strengths (3- and 7-T) to discriminate patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) from healthy controls (n = 20). Gray matter (GM) and white matter images were used as inputs into a support vector machine to classify patients and control subjects. Seven Tesla classifiers outperformed the 3-T classifiers with accuracy reaching as high as 77% for the 7-T GM classifier compared to 66.6% for the 3-T GM classifier. Furthermore, diagnostic odds ratio (a measure that is not affected by variations in sample characteristics) and number needed to predict (a measure based on Bayesian certainty of a test result) indicated superior performance of the 7-T classifiers, whereby for each correct diagnosis made, the number of patients that need to be examined using the 7-T GM classifier was one less than the number that need to be examined if a different classifier was used. Using a hypothetical example, we highlight how these findings could have significant implications for clinical decision-making. We encourage the reporting of measures proposed here in future studies utilizing machine-learning approaches. This will not only promote the search for an optimum diagnostic tool but also aid in the translation of neuroimaging to clinical use.

  19. Implementation of an acute venous thromboembolism clinical pathway reduces healthcare utilization and mitigates health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misky, Gregory J; Carlson, Todd; Thompson, Elaina; Trujillo, Toby; Nordenholz, Kristen

    2014-07-01

    Acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is prevalent, expensive, and deadly. Published data at our institution identified significant VTE care variation based on payer source. We developed a VTE clinical pathway to standardize care, decrease hospital utilization, provide education, and mitigate disparities. Target population for our interdisciplinary pathway was acute medical VTE patients. The intervention included order sets, system-wide education, follow-up phone calls, and coordinated posthospital care. Study data (n = 241) were compared to historical data (n = 234), evaluating outcomes of hospital admission, length of stay (LOS), and reutilization, stratified by payer source. A total of 241 patients entered the VTE clinical care pathway: 107 with deep venous thrombosis (44.4%) and 134 with a pulmonary embolism (55.6%). Within the pathway, uninsured VTE patients were admitted at a lower rate than insured patients (65.9 vs 79.1%; P = 0.032). LOS decreased from 4.4 to 3.1 days (P historical patients (9.4%, P = 0.254). Individual cost of care decreased from $7610 to $5295 (P cost, particularly among uninsured patients. Results of this novel study demonstrate a model for improving transitional care coordination with local community health clinics and delivering care to vulnerable populations. Other disease populations may benefit from the development of a similar model. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  20. The presence, predictive utility, and clinical significance of body dysmorphic symptoms in women with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Both eating disorders (EDs) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are disorders of body image. This study aimed to assess the presence, predictive utility, and impact of clinical features commonly associated with BDD in women with EDs. Methods Participants recruited from two non-clinical cohorts of women, symptomatic and asymptomatic of EDs, completed a survey on ED (EDE-Q) and BDD (BDDE-SR) psychopathology, psychological distress (K-10), and quality of life (SF-12). Results A strong correlation was observed between the total BDDE-SR and the global EDE-Q scores (r = 0.79, p 0.05) measured appearance checking, reassurance-seeking, camouflaging, comparison-making, and social avoidance. In addition to these behaviors, inspection of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) revealed that BDDE-SR items measuring preoccupation and dissatisfaction with appearance were most predictive of ED cases (Se and Sp > 0.60). Higher total BDDE-SR scores were associated with greater distress on the K-10 and poorer quality of life on the SF-12 (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Clinical features central to the model of BDD are common in, predictive of, and associated with impairment in women with EDs. Practice implications are that these features be included in the assessment and treatment of EDs. PMID:24999401

  1. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  2. Development of clinical utility of zoledronic acid and patient considerations in the treatment of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann D Ringe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Johann D RingeDirektor der Med. Klinik 4, Allgemeine Innere, und Westdeutsches Osteoporose Zentrum (WOZ, Klinikum Leverkusen gGmbH, Leverkusen, GermanyAbstract: Osteoporosis is a major health concern, which results in the increased risk of fractures. There is a high risk for the first or consecutive fractures leading to considerable morbidity and debilitating consequences if osteoporosis is untreated. Currently, bisphosphonates are the mainstay of treatment for osteoporosis though long-term persistence and adherence to bisphosphonates, especially those taken orally, remain low. This medication noncompliance has serious consequences on osteoporotic patients as it is associated with a significantly higher fracture risk. Intravenous (IV zoledronic acid (ZOL, developed to increase compliance by overcoming the frequent and burdensome dosing requirements of oral bisphosphonates, is the first and the only once-yearly bisphosphonate globally approved for use in the treatment of up to 6 indications of osteoporosis. Several clinical studies have documented that a single infusion of IV ZOL resulted in decreased bone turnover and improved bone density for at least 12 months post infusion. This article traces the development of ZOL’s clinical utility and evaluates its patient preference by collating data from all major clinical trials, studying the efficacy and safety of ZOL in the treatment of osteoporosis and other benign bone disorders.Keywords: bisphosphonates, patient preference, efficacy, safety, Paget’s disease

  3. Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichiro; Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    It is believed that the pancreas is low sensitive to radiation. In this chapter, the effect of radiation on the pancreas is discussed in the light of the radiosensitivity of the pancreas in animal experiments and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in A-bomb survivors. In an experiment on the whole-body irradiation with 800 rad using rats, a decrease in insulin secretion itself has not been noted, although a decrease in blood insulin and an increase in glucagon were associated with transiently increased blood glucose. In other studies, there was neither histologically nor endocrinologically abnormal findings due to several hundreds rad of radiation in the acute stage. For A-bomb survivors, blood levels of insulin tended to be slightly increased in the 40-59 age group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤1.5 km than those exposed at ≥3.0 km; and in the other age groups, there was no tendency for decreased blood levels of insulin. The ABCC-RERF Adult Health Study data (1958-1960) has revealed that there is no statistically significant correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and A-bomb radiation; nor has this been noted in any other study. Neither the prevalence of diabetes mellitus nor its complications is found to be independent upon distance from the hypocenter. (N.K.)

  4. Analysis of the Implementation of Standardized Clinical Protocol «Diabetes Mellitus Type 2» by Quality Indicators in Institutions of Kyiv Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Tkachenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Ukraine, a standardized clinical protocol (SCP to provide medical care in diabetes mellitus type 2 (order of the Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine dated 21.12.2012 № 1118, which identifies 4 quality indicators, is being implemented. The objective of research — to analyze the implementation of SCP based on monitoring of quality indicators in the institutions of the Kyiv region. Materials and Methods. Technique for assessing the quality of diabetes care, one element of which is the monitoring of quality indicators specified in SCP, has been developed and applied. Collection and analysis of information was carried out by forms of primary records № 025/030 and 030/o, forms of statistical reporting № 12 and 20. Statistical analysis was performed using Excel 2007, SPSS. Results. Today, primary health care institutions in Kyiv region developed local protocols that confirms the implementation of the first quality indicator, in accordance with the desired level of the indicator value by SCP. The second indicator — the percentage of patients who were defined the level of glycated hemoglobin in the reporting period amounted to 12.2 %, which is higher than in 2012 (8.84 %, but remains low. The third quality indicator — the percentage of patients who were admitted to hospital for diabetes mellitus and its complications during the reporting period amounted to 15.01 %, while in 2012 it stood at 8.66 %. For comparison, this figure in 2007 was 9.37 %. Conclusions. The quality of care at an early stage of implementation is not enough, partly due to the lack of awareness by physicians of major provisions of the protocol, lack of equipment, the need of payment by a patient for medical services specified in the protocol, lack of doctors’ understanding of the characteristics of different types of medical and technological documents and difficulties in the development and implementation of local protocols, particularly. The obtained results are

  5. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were...... evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement....

  6. Clinical utility of Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) among patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    for comorbid personality disorder among patients suffering from depression would be of clinical use. METHOD: The present study aimed to assess the utility of the Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) as a screen for personality disorder in a population of patients recently......BACKGROUND: Personality disorder frequently co-occurs with depression and seems to be associated with a poorer outcome of treatment and increased risk for recurrences. However, the diagnosing of personality disorder can be lengthy and requires some training. Therefore, a brief screening interview...... diagnosed with first episode depression. A total number of 394 patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis of a single depressive episode were sampled consecutively via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register during a 2years inclusion period and assessed by the screening interview and, subsequently...

  7. Occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3D interior design software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwa, Anita; Money, Arthur G; Spiliotopoulou, Georgia; Mcintyre, Anne

    2013-07-01

    The 3D interior design software (3DIDS) is a technology, which primarily allows users to simulate their homes and visualize any changes prior to implementing them. This feasibility study aimed to examine occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3DIDS. A secondary aim was to explore the attitudes of occupational therapists towards technology in general. Three focus groups were conducted with 25 occupational therapists working with older people in the UK. The qualitative data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The three main themes that were identified were usage and attitudes of technology, opportunities for realistic application of the 3DIDS and related threats and benefits for the occupational therapy profession. Occupational therapists had a positive attitude towards technology. They suggested that the 3DIDS could be used in discharge planning and in rehabilitation. They viewed it as a tool that could enhance their status within the health care profession and improve communication, but not as a tool that should replace the role of the occupational therapist. This research offers new and important findings about the utilization of the 3DIDS by occupational therapists and provides information as to where this technology should be trialled.

  8. The clinical utilization of radiation therapy in Korea between 2009 and 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Kyu; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung; Cha, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyun Jin [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical utilization of radiation therapy (RT) in Korea between 2009 and 2013. We analyzed open claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The subjects were patients who had diagnostic codes C00-C97 or D00-D48 according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, with procedure codes indicating RT treatment. The total number of patients who received RT in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 45,571, 49,593, 54,671, 59,172, and 61,485, respectively. Among them, the total numbers of male and female patients were 20,780/24,791 in 2009, 22,711/26,882 in 2010, 24,872/29,799 in 2011, 27,101/32,071 in 2012, and 27,941/33,544 in 2013. The five cancers that were most frequently treated with RT between 2009 and 2012 were breast, lung, colorectal, liver, and uterine cervical cancers. However, the fifth most common cancer treated with RT that replaced uterine cervical cancer in 2013 was prostate cancer. The three leading types of cancer among the male patients were lung, colorectal, and liver cancers, whereas in female patients, they were breast, uterine cervical, and lung cancers. The type of cancer most commonly treated by RT was cancer of the central nervous system in patients aged 20 years or less, breast cancer in patients aged 30–50 years, and lung cancer in patients aged 60 years or more. Data from this study provided the clinical utilization of RT in Korea between 2009 and 2013.

  9. Clinical utility of computed tomographic lung volumes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Sei Won; Huh, Jin Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2014-01-01

    Published data concerning the utility of computed tomography (CT)-based lung volumes are limited to correlation with lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the CT expiratory-to-inspiratory lung volume ratio (CT Vratio) by assessing the relationship with clinically relevant outcomes. A total of 75 stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients having pulmonary function testing and volumetric CT at full inspiration and expiration were retrospectively evaluated. Inspiratory and expiratory CT lung volumes were measured using in-house software. Correlation of the CT Vratio with patient-centered outcomes, including the modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea score, the 6-min walk distance (6MWD), the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and multidimensional COPD severity indices, such as the BMI, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index (BODE) and age, dyspnea, and airflow obstruction (ADO), were analyzed. The CT Vratio correlated significantly with BMI (r = -0.528, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio was also significantly associated with MMRC dyspnea (r = 0.387, p = 0.001), 6MWD (r = -0.459, p < 0.001), and SGRQ (r = 0.369, p = 0.001) scores. Finally, the CT Vratio had significant correlations with the BODE and ADO multidimensional COPD severity indices (r = 0.605, p < 0.001; r = 0.411, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio had significant correlations with patient-centered outcomes and multidimensional COPD severity indices. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  11. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badowski ME

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Melissa E Badowski,1 Sarah E Perez2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Section of Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol, anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone, or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide. The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg, dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. Keywords: dronabinol, weight loss, HIV/AIDS, HIV wasting syndrome, cachexia

  12. Drug utilization pattern in a pain clinic of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients attend the Pain Clinic with varieties of complains of pain, like low back pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, headache, facial pain, different neuralgias and other neuropathic pain states. They receive a multimodal treatment for their pain, Multimodal pain therapy is an integrated multidisciplinary treatment in small groups with a closely coordinated therapeutic approach. Drugs that are prescribed for treatment are not only NSAIDS or Opioids, but also various groups of adjuvant pain medications like anti-epileptics, antidepressants etc. Aim: To find out the drug utilization pattern in the Pain Clinic of a tertiary care medical college hospital in Eastern India. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional; unicentric study was conducted in the Pain Clinic during April 2013 to June 2013. New patients who were willing to participate in the study were enrolled as per selection criteria. A copy of prescriptions were collected from the patients. The drugs prescription patterns were analyzed. Result: 319 patients were included in this study in three months period and their prescriptions were analyzed. Female patients (222 were more in number than male (97. As single prescription and also as combination therapy, paracetamol was found to be the most frequently prescribed drug. Frequently used adjuvant pain medications were found to be pregabalin (21.63% and amitriptyline (16.92%.. Antacid was commonly prescribed as gastroprotective agent. Among drug combinations paracetamol (325 mg + tramadol (37.5 mg combination was used most frequently. (55.17%. Conclusion: In this uncentric study we found that patacetamol, tramadol, pregabalin and amitriptyline are the commonly used medications in a pain clinic. We need more multi-centric and comparative Indian studies.

  13. Clinical utility and patient consideration in the use of lenalidomide for multiple myeloma in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wang, Hongfeng Guo, Xin Zhou Department of Hematology, Wuxi People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM is an incurable hematologic malignancy caused by the autonomous growth of malignant plasma cells. In the last decade, the introduction of novel targeted agents such as thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide has dramatically improved the clinical outcome of MM patients in both the frontline and recurrent settings. Lenalidomide is a synthetic derivative of thalidomide, which has been shown to significantly improve overall survival, time to progression, and overall response rates in patients with MM. The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of lenalidomide in patients with MM in 2013. In a Phase II trial, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone was associated with a high response rate and acceptable safety profile in heavily pretreated Chinese patients with relapsed/refractory MM, including those with renal impairment and IgD subtype. However, lenalidomide will remain as a second-line antimyeloma drug in the near future because of its high price and the policy of health insurance reimbursement in People’s Republic of China. In this review, we summarize the clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of lenalidomide for MM in Chinese patients. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to investigate the better quality, longer duration, and more clinically meaningful outcomes of lenalidomide in the treatment of MM in Chinese patients. Keywords: lenalidomide, multiple myeloma, clinical efficacy, Chinese patients

  14. Use of basal insulin and the associated clinical outcomes among elderly nursing home residents with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a retrospective chart review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis KL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keith L Davis,1 Wenhui Wei,2 Juliana L Meyers,1 Brett S Kilpatrick,3 Naushira Pandya4 1RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Sanofi US, Inc, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 3AnalytiCare, LLC, Glenview, IL, USA; 4Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA Background: The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in long-term care (LTC settings can be complex as a result of age-related complications. Despite guideline recommendations, sliding scale insulin remains commonplace in the LTC setting and data on basal insulin use are lacking.Methods: This retrospective study used medical chart data and the Minimum Data Set from elderly LTC facility patients who received basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin for the treatment of diabetes, to investigate the practice patterns and associated clinical outcomes.Results: A total of 2,096 elderly, insulin-treated patients in LTC were identified, with 59.5% of them (N=1,247 receiving basal insulin. Of these, more than 50% of patients received sliding scale insulin in co-administration with basal insulin. Despite its ease of use, insulin pen use was very low, at 14.6%. Significant differences were observed between the basal insulin groups for glycated hemoglobin level and dosing frequency. Hypoglycemia was uncommon -17.2% of patients experienced at least one event, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of hypoglycemia between the groups.Conclusion: These data suggest the underutilization of basal insulin in the LTC setting and worryingly high combinational use with sliding scale insulin. Differences in glycated hemoglobin and dosing frequencies between types of basal insulin warrant further comparative effectiveness studies. Keywords: long-term care, nursing homes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, NPH insulin

  15. Inulin controls inflammation and metabolic endotoxemia in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Parvin; Gargari, Bahram Pourghassem; Jafar-Abadi, Mohammad Asghari; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar

    2014-02-01

    There is limited evidence on the effects of prebiotics on inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of inulin supplementation on inflammatory indices and metabolic endotoxemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The participants included diabetic females (n = 49). They were divided into an intervention group (n = 24) as well as a control group (n = 25) and received 10 g/d inulin or maltodextrin for 8 weeks, respectively. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), HbA1c, insulin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were measured pre and post intervention. Inulin-supplemented patients exhibited a significant decrease in FBS (8.5%), HbA1c (10.4%), fasting insulin (34.3%), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (39.5%), hs-CRP (35.6%), TNF-α (23.1%), and LPS (27.9%) compared with the maltodextrin group (p metabolic endotoxemia in women with type 2 diabetes.

  16. The impact on clinical outcome of high prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ching-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both colorectal cancer (CRC and diabetes mellitus (DM are important public health problems worldwide. As there are controversies about survival impact on CRC patients with preexisting DM, the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the incidence and the survival impact of preexisting DM on the long-term outcomes of patients with CRC in Taiwan. Methods From January 2002 to December 2008, 1,197 consecutive patients with histologically proven primary CRC, who received surgical treatment at a single institution, were enrolled. The clinicopathologic features between these patients with and without DM were retrospectively investigated. Moreover, we intended to analyze the impact of DM on overall survival (OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS rates. Results Of 1,197 CRC patients, 23.6% of patients had either a reported history of DM or were currently taking one or more diabetes-controlling medications. CRC patients with DM were significantly older than those without DM (P P vs 6.01%, P = 0.040. Conclusions A considerably high prevalence of DM in CRC patients but no significant impact of DM on survival was observed in the single-institution retrospective study, regardless of cancer stages and tumor locations. Therefore, treatment strategies for CRC patients with DM should be the same as patients without DM.

  17. The validity and clinical utility of structured diagnoses of antisocial personality disorder with forensic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Avellan, Luisa E; McGauley, Gillian A; Campbell, Colin D; Fonagy, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Current DSM-based instruments for personality disorders (PDs) limit the investigation of the course and outcome of treatment of these disorders. This study examined the validity of the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200 (SWAP-200) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II PD (SCID-II) in a sample of forensic PD patients. Results based on 66 participants indicated that the SWAP-200 Q-factors reduced the frequency of diagnostic comorbidity of PD categories by half compared with the SCID-II. Only the SWAP-200's Antisocial PD category showed good convergent and discriminant validity with respect to other instruments describing aspects of PD. The validity of the cutoff score for severe antisocial PD was confirmed, and this category predicted severe incidents in the hospital at 1 year of follow-up. A violence risk scale was constructed, which differentiated violent and nonviolent offenders. The results support the validity of the SWAP-200 and its potential clinical utility with forensic PD patients.

  18. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawuyi LE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lola Elizabeth Lawuyi, Avinash Gurbaxani Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, Dubai, UAE Abstract: The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3% by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis, miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. Keywords: cataract extraction surgery, ketorolac, mydriasis, miosis, Omidria™, phenylephrine

  19. A clinical utility study of exome sequencing versus conventional genetic testing in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Lisenka E L M; van Nimwegen, Kirsten J M; Schieving, Jolanda H; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Yntema, Helger G; Pfundt, Rolph; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Krabbenborg, Lotte; Brunner, Han G; van der Burg, Simone; Grutters, Janneke; Veltman, Joris A; Willemsen, Michèl A A P

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of novel genetic diagnostic tests is generally driven by technological advances because they promise shorter turnaround times and/or higher diagnostic yields. Other aspects, including impact on clinical management or cost-effectiveness, are often not assessed in detail prior to implementation. We studied the clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in complex pediatric neurology in terms of diagnostic yield and costs. We analyzed 150 patients (and their parents) presenting with complex neurological disorders of suspected genetic origin. In a parallel study, all patients received both the standard diagnostic workup (e.g., cerebral imaging, muscle biopsies or lumbar punctures, and sequential gene-by-gene-based testing) and WES simultaneously. Our unique study design allowed direct comparison of diagnostic yield of both trajectories and provided insight into the economic implications of implementing WES in this diagnostic trajectory. We showed that WES identified significantly more conclusive diagnoses (29.3%) than the standard care pathway (7.3%) without incurring higher costs. Exploratory analysis of WES as a first-tier diagnostic test indicates that WES may even be cost-saving, depending on the extent of other tests being omitted. Our data support such a use of WES in pediatric neurology for disorders of presumed genetic origin.Genet Med advance online publication 23 March 2017.

  20. Clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided prostate biopsy: Preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Adam J.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Wang, Zhen J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided biopsy in patients with known or suspected prostate cancer. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 men with known or suspected prostate cancer in whom MRI-guided biopsy was clinically requested after multiparametric endorectal MRI showed one or more appropriate targets. One to six 18-gauge biopsy cores were obtained from each patient. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy results and post MRI-guided biopsy complications were also recorded. Results MRI-guided biopsy was positive in 5 of 7 patients with suspected prostate cancer (including 2 of 4 with prior negative ultrasound-guided biopsies), in 8 of 12 with known untreated prostate cancer (including 5 where MRI-guided biopsy demonstrated a higher Gleason score than ultrasound guided biopsy results), and in 3 of 5 with treated cancer. MRI-guided biopsies had a significantly higher maximum percentage of cancer in positive cores when compared to ultrasound guided biopsy (mean of 37 ± 8% versus 13 ± 4%; p = 0.01). No serious post-biopsy complications occurred. Conclusion Our preliminary experience suggests endorectal MRI-guided biopsy may safely contribute to the management of patients with known or suspected prostate cancer by making a new diagnosis of malignancy, upgrading previously diagnosed disease, or diagnosing local recurrence. PMID:24924999

  1. Impact of the level of metabolic control on the non-surgical periodontal therapy outcomes in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients: Clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirnić Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as a complex metabolic disease influences functioning of numerous organs. Chronic periodontitis is one of frequent diabetic complications. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects of non­surgical periodontal therapy between diabetes mellitus type 2 patients (DM type 2 and non­diabetic individuals (control group. Methods. Our study included 41 DM type 2 subjects and 21 non­diabetic individuals, all of them with chronic periodontitis. The diabetic group was divided into two subgroups based on the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c as follows: D1 - 18 subjects with good metabolic control (HbA1c<7%, and D2 - 23 subjects with poor metabolic (HbA1c≥7%. State of oral hygiene and periodontal clinical parameters of subjects, such as: plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, papilla bleeding index (PBI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment level (CAL, were evaluated at the baseline and 3 months after scaling and root­planning. Results. ANOVA test showed that there was no statistically significant difference of treatment success between studied groups in relation to GI (p=0.52, PBI (p=0.36 and CAL (p=0.11. Reduction of PI and PPD in the control group (ΔPI=0.84; ΔPPD=0.35 mm was significantly higher (p<0.05 than the reduction of PI and PPD in patients with the diabetes (group D1 ΔPI=0.60, ΔPPD=0.11 mm; group D2 ΔPI=0.53, ΔPPD=0.11 mm. Conclusion. Although there were differences in treatment success between DM subjects and non­diabetic individuals, they were not significant for the most measured parameters. The results of this study did not absolutely support the assumption that the level of glycemic control significantly affected the periodontal therapy outcome in diabetics. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  2. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Paulina A; González, Alvaro J; Pérez, María E; Kattan, Javier; Fabres, Jorge G; Tapia, José L; González, Hernán S

    2014-01-01

    to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR) were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. ten of the 21 monitored infants (48%) presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25%) encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%), all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43%) evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  4. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhusal S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Santosh Bhusal,1 Sherilyn Diomampo,1 Marina N Magrey2 1Division of Rheumatology, Metrohealth Medical Center, 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine at Metrohealth Medical Center, Cleveland OH, USA Abstract: Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Keywords: fibrositis, myofascial pain, diffuse pain syndrome, lyrica

  5. 78 FR 12821 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ...-2012-0350] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  6. 77 FR 20874 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  7. 75 FR 27616 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in... by complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving... vehicle if that person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus...

  8. 77 FR 43417 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...-2012-0109] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  9. 77 FR 43901 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ...-2012-0108] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  10. 77 FR 65929 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...-2012-0219] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  11. 78 FR 1926 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...-2012-0347] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  12. 78 FR 5559 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ...-2012-0348] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  13. 77 FR 33264 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ...-2012-0044] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  14. 77 FR 75493 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ...-2012-0282] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  15. 77 FR 38383 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...-2012-0107] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  16. 77 FR 51845 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ...-2012-0163] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  17. 77 FR 70529 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...-2012-0281] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  18. 77 FR 75492 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ...-2012-0283] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  19. 77 FR 64585 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...-2012-0218] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  20. 77 FR 29446 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ...-2012-0043] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... vehicle if that person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus...

  1. 77 FR 59450 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ...-2012-0164] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the Applicants The... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  2. 77 FR 46791 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...-2012-0162] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor... complying with the current regulation 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3). Diabetes Mellitus and Driving Experience of the... person has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring...

  3. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Skiadopoulos, Dionysios

    2013-01-01

    This theses on Diabetes Mellitus aims at giving an insight at various aspects of this chronic disease and the risk factors that lead to it; the varius ways it develops in the human body; the old and new approaches to treatment, both from a pharmacological and a non- pharmacologiacal point of view; ways to prevent and to manage the diabetes complications; how to improve the live of the diabetic patients who are faced with not only physical but also psychological problems; statistical data from...

  4. Clinical pharmaceutical analysis the treatment of hypertension in patients with diabetes mellitus in the hospital Mnazi Mnoja (Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. А. Moroz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of arterial hypertension (AH in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM is a significant problem of practical medicine in many aspects. In order to study the pertinence of the schemes in practice of the treatment of AH in diabetic patients with current guidelines we analyzed medical records of 348 patients aged 38 to 70 years (mean age, 49 ± 0,43 years, corresponding to the criteria in the hospital named after V.I. Lenin (Mnazi Mmoja Zanzibar (Tanzania. The investigated were divided into two groups matched for age and sex composition of the groups. The first group consisted of 301 patients with a combination of AH and DM (study group, and the second one (control consisted of 47 hypertensive patients without DM. It has been found the preference to use of converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, respectively 83.1% and 91.5% according to the groups. In the group of the study was much larger variation of combinations of drugs, which is comparable with the existing guidelines of prescribing medicines according to the state of the target organs. The prevailing use of a combination of an ACE inhibitor, calcium channel blocker and diuretic (69.4%. There was irrational look because of absence in the arsenal of drugs non- dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, modern beta-blockers (bisoprolol, carvedilol and the widespread use of thiazide diuretics as monotherapy use against DM. Based on the completed research the practical recommendations involved phasing of antihypertensive drugs prescription (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or a non- dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, and then adding of the other preparations due to the therapeutic effect.

  5. Clinical Evaluation of OneTouch Diabetes Management Software System in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Min Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOneTouch Diabetes Management Software (OTDMS is an efficient way to track and monitor the blood glucose level. It is possible to download data from the OneTouch Ultra via the meter's data port, and to transform the numbers of the blood glucose level into a graph, a chart, or statistics. The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether the use of OTDMS in consultation hours would improve patients' knowledge of diabetes mellitus (DM, compliance, satisfaction with doctor and medical treatment, doctor-patient reliability, and glucose control.MethodsAll patients were randomized into either the OTDMS group using OneTouch Ultra or the control groups not using it. Both groups had conventional DM education and only the OTDMS group used data from OTDMS as explanation materials during consultation hours. At enrollment and after 6 months, we performed a questionnaire survey consisting of the diabetes knowledge test, items for compliance of treatment, patient's satisfaction, doctor-patient reliability, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c.ResultsWe analyzed 6-month follow-up data from 92 patients (OTDMS 42 vs. control 50. Both groups showed significant improvements in HbA1c, diabetes knowledge, compliance, reliability, and satisfaction after 6 months. However, there were no significant differences between OTDMS and control groups overall. Only "weekly frequency of checking blood glucose level" of compliance and "trying to follow doctor's order" of reliability showed better results in the OTDMS group.ConclusionUsing the OTDMS system for explanation during consultation hours seems to be more helpful to improve patient's compliance and reliability, especially for checking blood glucose level and trying to follow the doctor's order.

  6. A clinical evaluation of skin tags in relation to obesity, type 2 diabetis mellitus, age, and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Soliman El Safoury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags (STs have been investigated as a marker of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, yet the relation of STs to obesity is still a matter of controversy. Aim : The aim of the study is to explore the relation of number, size and color of STs to obesity, diabetes, sex and age in one study. Methods: The study included 245 nondiabetic (123 males and 122 females and 276 diabetic (122 males and 154 females subjects. We recorded age, sex, body mass index (BMI, relevant habits, STs color, size, and number in different anatomical sites. Results: The presence and the mean number of STs was more in obese than nonobese participants (P = 0.006 and P < 0.001, respectively and was not affected by sex. However, the number increased significantly with age. The presence of mixed-color STs was related to obese (P < 0.001 participants. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that only BMI was significantly associated with the mixed-color STs (OR = 3.5, P < 0.001. The association of DM (OR = 1.7 with mixed-color STs was nonsignificant (P = 0.073. Neither age nor sex had any association with mixed-color STs. Within cases that developed mixed-color STs, the multivariate analysis showed that only BMI had a significant correlation to the number of STs (beta = 0.256, P = 0.034. Conclusion: The study showed that not only the number but also the presence of mixed-color ST was related to obesity, but not to diabetes. The presence of mixed-color STs in nondiabetic subjects needs close inspection of BMI.

  7. Determination of vasculopathy-related indexes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-bin MA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determined the serum lipid profile, coagulation function and platelet parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and provide a basis for the prevention of diabetes related complications. Methods Two-hundred and forty-six T2DM patients (113 males and 133 females, aged 60.2±15.3 years, disease course 5-22 years hospitalized in the Navy General Hospital of PLA from March to December, 2012, were involved in the present study. The patients were divided into complication group (n=140 and no complication group (n=106 according to whether there were diabetes related complications, and 120 healthy individuals were recruited as control group. The levels of serum total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, prothrombin time (PT, fibrinogen (FIB, platelet count (PLT, and platelet size distribution width (PDW, mean platelet volume (MPV, and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR were determined and compared among the 3 groups. Results The levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, MPV, PDW, P-LCR and FIB were significantly higher in complication group than those in no complication group and control group (P<0.05, and PLT, APTT and PT were significantly lower than those in no complication group and control group (P<0.05. No significant difference of HDL-C levels was found among the 3 groups. Conclusions The blood of patients with T2DM was in hyperviscous and/or hypercoagulable states, and it is prone to induce vascular complications. Monitoring serum lipid profile, coagulation function and platelet parameters should be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of diabetes complications. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.015

  8. Screening uptake rates and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in primary versus secondary care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dea, Angela

    2014-01-17

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are well recognized, and there is increasing evidence to support treatment of the condition. However, clear guidance on the ideal approach to screening for GDM is lacking. Professional groups continue to debate whether selective screening (based on risk factors) or universal screening is the most appropriate approach. Additionally, there is ongoing debate about what levels of glucose abnormalities during pregnancy respond best to treatment and which maternal and neonatal outcomes benefit most from treatment. Furthermore, the implications of possible screening options on health care costs are not well established. In response to this uncertainty there have been repeated calls for well-designed, randomised trials to determine the efficacy of screening, diagnosis, and management plans for GDM. We describe a randomised controlled trial to investigate screening uptake rates and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening in primary versus secondary care settings. The objective of this study is to assess screening uptake rates, and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening for GDM in primary versus secondary care.

  9. Lack of clinical utility of urine gram stain for suspected urinary tract infection in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Gaviria-Agudelo, Claudia; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Doern, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children. Urine culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the utility of urine Gram stain relative to urinalysis (UA) is unclear. We reviewed 312 pediatric patients with suspected UTI who had urine culture, UA, and urine Gram stain performed from a single urine specimen. UA was considered positive if ≥10 leukocytes per oil immersion field were seen or if either nitrates or leukocyte esterase testing was positive. Urine Gram stain was considered positive if any organisms were seen. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using urine culture as the gold standard. Thirty-seven (12%) patients had a culture-proven UTI. Compared to urine Gram stain, UA had equal sensitivity (97.3% versus 97.5%) and higher specificity (85% versus 74%). Empirical therapy was prescribed before the Gram stain result was known in 40 (49%) patients and after in 42 (51%) patients. The antibiotics chosen did not differ between the two groups (P=0.81), nor did they differ for patients with Gram-negative rods on urine Gram stain compared to those with Gram-positive cocci (P=0.67). From these data, we conclude that UA has excellent negative predictive value that is not enhanced by urine Gram stain and that antibiotic selection did not vary based on the urine Gram stain result. In conclusion, the clinical utility of urine Gram stain does not warrant the time or cost it requires. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Impact of nonintrusive clinical decision support systems on laboratory test utilization in a large academic centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kevin P; Chida, Natasha; Apfel, Ariella; Feldman, Leonard; Greenbaum, Adena; Tuddenham, Susan; Kendall, Emily A; Pahwa, Amit

    2018-02-15

    The near-universal prevalence of electronic health records (EHRs) has made the utilization of clinical decision support systems (CDSS) an integral strategy for improving the value of laboratory ordering. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of nonintrusive CDSS on inpatient laboratory utilization in large academic centres. Red blood cell folate, hepatitis C virus viral loads and genotypes, and type and screens were selected for study. We incorporated the appropriate indications for these labs into text that accompanied the laboratory orders in our hospital's EHR. Providers could proceed with the order without additional clicks. An interrupted time-series analysis was performed, and the primary outcome was the rate of tests ordered on all inpatient medicine floors. The rate of folate tests ordered per monthly admissions showed no significant level change at the time of the intervention with only a slight decrease in rate of 0.0109 (P = .07). There was a 43% decrease in the rate of hepatitis C virus tests per monthly admissions immediately after the intervention with a decrease of 0.0135 tests per monthly admissions (P = .02). The rate of type and screens orders per patient days each month had a significant downward trend by 0.114 before the intervention (P = .04) but no significant level change at the time of the intervention or significant change in rate after the intervention. Our study suggests that nonintrusive CDSS should be evaluated for individual laboratory tests to ensure only effective alerts continue to be used so as to avoid increasing EHR fatigue. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The clinical utility of normal findings on noninvasive cardiac assessment in the prediction of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sanjay; O'Neal, Wesley T; Broughton, Stephen T; Shah, Amit J; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2017-04-01

    The absence of abnormalities on noninvasive cardiac assessment possibly confers a reduced risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) despite the presence of traditional risk factors. Normal findings on noninvasive cardiac assessment are associated with a lower risk of AF development. We examined the clinical utility of normal findings on routine noninvasive cardiac assessment in 5331 participants (85% white; 57% women) from the Cardiovascular Health Study who were free of baseline AF. The combination of a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) + normal echocardiogram was assessed for the development of AF events. A normal ECG was defined as the absence of major or minor Minnesota code abnormalities. A normal echocardiogram was defined as the absence of contractile dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities, or abnormal left ventricular mass. Cox regression was used to compute the 10-year risk of developing AF. During the 10-year study period, a total of 951 (18%) AF events were detected. A normal ECG (multivariable hazard ratio [HR]: 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.92) and normal echocardiogram (multivariable HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.65-0.87) were associated with a reduced risk of AF in isolation. This association improved in those with normal ECG + normal echocardiogram (multivariable HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.55-0.79) compared with participants who had abnormal ECG + abnormal echocardiogram (referent). Normal findings on routine noninvasive cardiac assessment identify persons in whom the risk of AF is low. Further studies are needed to explore the utility of this profile regarding the decision to implement certain risk factor modification strategies in older adults to reduce AF burden. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Routine clinical application of the FRAXA Pfu PCR assay: limits and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, D F; Milana, G; Dell'Albani, P; Roccazzello, A M; Insirello, E; Pavone, L; Mollica, F

    1996-11-01

    Fragile X genotype is characterized by the excessive amplification of an unstable region of DNA: a trinucleotide repeat CGG of variable copy number present in the FRAXA locus. Methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the CGG repeat region could facilitate the development of a rapid screening assay. Unfortunately, amplification across CGG repeats can be inefficient and unreliable due to their 100% G + C base composition. The utility of the exonuclease-deficient Pfu polymerase for amplification and detection of the CGG repeats at the FRAXA locus has been reported. In the present study we analysed the utility of a Pfu PCR assay as a rapid initial screening method to rule out a diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in males with mental retardation. Affected males did not show any amplification products or a smear of amplification products between 350 and 550 bp. Only 10% of affected male samples did not show any amplification products, while the vast majority showed the amplification smear. The amplification smears represent a serious drawback of the method, since they cannot be distinguished from the amplification products of normal samples after separation in 1% agarose gel. Several modifications of the PCR conditions were attempted to eliminate this problem, but none was appropriate for clinical applications. However, the problem was easily solved by using a higher resolution electrophoretic system that allows a clear distinction of normal bands from pathological smears. We tested the specificity of the Pfu PCR assay, followed by an improved MetaPhor gel electrophoretic separation of PCR products, on 50 samples from normal males and 24 samples form affected males. The results showed that this method is a rapid, sensitive and specific assay for the exclusion of fragile X syndrome diagnosis in mentally retarded males.

  13. Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated With the Timing of Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Previously Treated With Oral Antidiabetes Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip; Zhou, Steve; Durden, Emily; Farr, Amanda M; Gill, Jasvinder; Wei, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) not achieving glycemic targets using oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), studies suggest that timely insulin initiation has clinical benefits. Insulin initiation at the early versus late stage of disease progression has not been explored in detail. This retrospective database analysis investigated clinical and economic outcomes associated with the timing of insulin initiation in patients with T2DM treated with ≥1 OAD in a real-world US setting. This study linked data from the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Commercial database, Medicare Supplemental database, and Quintiles Electronic Medical Records database. A total of 1830 patients with T2DM were included. Patients were grouped according to their OAD use before basal insulin initiation (1, 2, or ≥3 OADs) as a proxy for the timing of insulin initiation. Clinical and economic outcomes were evaluated over 1 year of follow-up. During follow-up the 1 OAD group, compared with the 2 and ≥3 OADs groups, had a greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (-1.7% vs -1.0% vs -0.9%, respectively; P health care costs ($21,167 vs $21,060 vs $20,133, respectively). This study shows that early insulin initiation (represented by the 1 OAD group) may be clinically beneficial to patients with T2DM not controlled with OADs, without adding to costs. This supports the call for timely initiation of individualized insulin therapy in this population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetes mellitus prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review lifestyle modification interventions and pharmacological clinical studies designed to prevent diabetes and provide evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of Diabetes Mellitus. A review of relevant literature compiled via a literature search (PUBMED) of English-language publications between 1997 and 2010 was conducted. It is found that people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus can halt the development of the disease. Lifestyle modification intervention with reduction of 5%-10% of excess body weight and increase in moderate physical activity by 150 min/wk has consistently proven to reduce the appearance of diabetes in different at-risk populations. Pharmacologic interventions have also demonstrated the prevention of the appearance of diabetes in persons at risk. Bariatric surgery has decreased the appearance of diabetes patients in a select group of individuals. The progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus can be prevented. Lifestyle modification intervention changes with weight loss and increased physical activity are currently recommended for the prevention of diabetes.

  15. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Aben, Katja K.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Beuselinck, Benoit; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Bunker, Clareann H.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Carter, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Claes, Kathleen B.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Cook, Linda S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; deFazio, Anna; Dennis, Joseph; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed M.; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Santos Silva, Isabel Dos; du Bois, Andreas; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Duran, Mercedes; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert P.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Ellis, Steve D.; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Fontaine, Annette; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Fostira, Florentia; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Friel, Grace; Frost, Debra; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H.; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Guénel, Pascal; Guzman, Starr R.; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Halverson, Sandra L.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Harter, Philipp; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Sue; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Johnson, Nichola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kabisch, Maria; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kataja, Vesa; Kauff, Noah; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kerin, Michael J.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Knight, Julia A.; Knol-Bout, Jacoba P.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Krakstad, Camilla; Kristensen, Vessela; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Larson, Melissa C.; Lasa, Aadriana; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Li, Jingmei; Liang, Dong; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Karen H.; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Mai, Phuong L.; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W.M.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Maugard, Christine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McGuire, Valerie; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menkiszak, Janusz; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Müller, Heiko; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Muranen, Taru A.; Narod, Steven A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Finn C.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olson, Sara H.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Ottini, Laura; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Perkins, Jo; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C.; Platte, Radka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Harvey A.; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Salani, Ritu; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schrauder, Michael G.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwaab, Ira; Scuvera, Giulietta; Sellers, Thomas A.; Severi, Gianluca; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Smeets, Dominiek; Sohn, Christof; Soller, Maria; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston, Lara; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Madas; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vachon, Celine M.; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Asperen, C.J.; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Vergote, Ignace; Verhoef, Senno; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vijai, Joseph; Vitonis, Allison F.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walsh, Christine; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weischer, Maren; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Weltens, Caroline; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, Hannah P.; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3′ UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. Methods Centralized genotyping and analysis were performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). Results We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR= 0.99, 95% CI 0.94–1.04,p = 0.74) or breast cancer (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.94–1.01, p = 0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.97–1.23, p = 0.14, breast cancer HR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.97–1.12, p = 0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.71–1.13, p = 0.34, breast cancer HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.19, p = 0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.83–1.07, p = 0.38), breast cancer (HR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.87–1.06, p = 0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. Conclusions rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers. PMID:25940428

  16. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E; Aben, Katja K; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Antoniou, Antonis C; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Beuselinck, Benoit; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Bunker, Clareann H; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Carter, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Linda S; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; deFazio, Anna; Dennis, Joseph; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed M; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; du Bois, Andreas; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Duran, Mercedes; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert P; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B; Ellis, Steve D; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Fontaine, Annette; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Fostira, Florentia; Fridley, Brooke L; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Friel, Grace; Frost, Debra; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodman, Marc T; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Gschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guzman, Starr R; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Halverson, Sandra L; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harter, Philipp; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Healey, Sue; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; T Hildebrandt, Michelle A; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Johnson, Nichola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kabisch, Maria; Karlan, Beth Y; Kataja, Vesa; Kauff, Noah; Kelemen, Linda E; Kerin, Michael J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Knight, Julia A; Knol-Bout, Jacoba P; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Krakstad, Camilla; Kristensen, Vessela; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Larson, Melissa C; Lasa, Adriana; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D; Le Marchand, Loic; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Liang, Dong; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Mai, Phuong L; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; Massuger, Leon F A G; Maugard, Christine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McGuire, Valerie; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menkiszak, Janusz; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Müller, Heiko; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Muranen, Taru A; Narod, Steven A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Finn C; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olson, Sara H; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Ottini, Laura; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Perkins, Jo; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C; Platte, Radka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Poole, Elizabeth M; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Reed, Malcolm W R; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Harvey A; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Romero, Atocha; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Salani, Ritu; Salvesen, Helga B; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schrauder, Michael G; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwaab, Ira; Scuvera, Giulietta; Sellers, Thomas A; Severi, Gianluca; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Smeets, Dominiek; Sohn, Christof; Soller, Maria; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston, Lara; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Pamela J; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Vachon, Celine M; Van 't Veer, Laura J; van Altena, Anne M; Van Asperen, C J; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Vergote, Ignace; Verhoef, Senno; Vierkant, Robert A; Vijai, Joseph; Vitonis, Allison F; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walsh, Christine; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weischer, Maren; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Weltens, Caroline; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, Hannah P; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Pilar Zamora, M; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Rookus, Matti A; Hooning, Maartje J; Goode, Ellen L

    2016-05-01

    Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3' UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. Centralized genotyping and analysis were performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.04, p=0.74) or breast cancer (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.01, p=0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.97-1.23, p=0.14, breast cancer HR=1.04, 95% CI 0.97-1.12, p=0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.71-1.13, p=0.34, breast cancer HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94-1.19, p=0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83-1.07, p=0.38), breast cancer (HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.06, p=0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergic Rhinitis in Preschool Children and the Clinical Utility of FeNO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jisun; Choi, Yean Jung; Lee, Eun; Cho, Hyun Ju; Yang, Song I; Kim, Young Ho; Jung, Young Ho; Seo, Ju Hee; Kwon, Ji Won; Kim, Hyo Bin; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Bong Seong; Shim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Joo Shil; Hong, Soo Jong

    2017-07-01

    The nature of allergic rhinitis (AR) in preschool aged children remains incompletely characterized. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of AR and its associated risk factors in preschool-aged children and to assess the clinical utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). This general population-based, cross-sectional survey included 933 preschool-aged (3- to 7-year-old) children from Korea. Current AR was defined as having nasal symptoms within the last 12 months and physician-diagnosed AR. The prevalence of current AR in preschool children was 17.0% (156/919). Mold exposure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-2.43) and the use of antibiotics (aOR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.33-2.90) during infancy were associated with an increased risk of current AR, whereas having an older sibling (aOR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.35-0.75) reduced the risk. Children with current atopic AR had significantly higher geometric mean levels of FeNO compared to those with non-atopic rhinitis (12.43; range of 1standard deviation [SD], 7.31-21.14 vs 8.25; range of 1SD, 5.62-12.10, P=0.001) or non-atopic healthy children (8.58; range of 1SD, 5.51-13.38, Ppreschool children.

  18. Clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for an outpatient fibromyalgia education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seungree; Tin, Diane; Bain, Lorna; Thorne, J Carter; Ginsburg, Liane

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the context of evaluating the Fibromyalgia Outpatient Education Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre (Newmarket, Canada). A pre-test/post-test design was implemented for data analysis. A total of 232 patients' data were obtained through retrospective patient chart review. Complete pre-post data were available for 70 patients and qualitative analysis was done for 12 patients. Main outcome measures included HADS and Arthritis Self-Efficacy (ASE) scores. At the end of the education program, subgroups of patients (high attendance, high exercise habit, low medication) experienced significant improvement on HADS-depression and ASE scores. Linear regression analysis found that HADS pre-program scores explain far more variance in HADS post-test scores than ASE pre-program scores explain in ASE post-program scores; more variance in ASE post-program scores was explained by other variables. In contrast to the quantitative analysis of the Anxiety subscale of HADS, patients in the focus group indicated that their anxiety level decreased through attending the education program. These findings suggest that HADS is an appropriate tool for evaluating fibromyalgia and related patient education programs. Moreover, patient education programs have positive effects on enhancing patients' psychological well-being and self-confidence in controlling fibromyalgia-related symptoms.

  19. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  20. Clinicians' Judgments of the Clinical Utility of Personality Disorder Trait Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Cristina; Sleep, Chelsea E; Widiger, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Proposed for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) was a five-domain, 25-dimensional trait model that would have constituted a significant part of the diagnostic criteria for each personality disorder. A primary concern with respect to the proposal was that clinicians might find such an approach to be unacceptable. This study provides results from three independent data collections that compared clinicians' clinical utility ratings for each iteration of the DSM-5 dimensional trait assignments, along with an alternative list of traits derived from the Five Factor Form (FFF). The clinicians considered the final trait assignments that were posted for the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, and schizoid personality disorders to be significantly less acceptable than the original assignments. They also considered the FFF trait assignments to be preferable to the DSM-5 final postings with respect to the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, dependent, and histrionic personality disorders. The implications of these results for future editions of the diagnostic manual are discussed.

  1. Exertional dyspnoea in interstitial lung diseases: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bonini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of pathologies characterised by alveolar and interstitial damage, pulmonary inflammation (usually associated with fibrosis, decreased lung function and impaired gas exchange, which can be attributed to either a known or an unknown aetiology. Dyspnoea is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in patients with ILD, significantly impacting quality of life. The mechanisms causing dyspnoea are complex and not yet fully understood. However, it is recognised that dyspnoea occurs when there is an imbalance between the central respiratory efferent drive and the response of the respiratory musculature. The respiratory derangement observed in ILD patients at rest is even more evident during exercise. Pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for exertional dyspnoea and reduced exercise tolerance include altered respiratory mechanics, impaired gas exchange, cardiovascular abnormalities and peripheral muscle dysfunction. This review describes the respiratory physiology of ILD, both at rest and during exercise, and aims to provide comprehensive and updated evidence on the clinical utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in the assessment and management of these pathological entities. In addition, the role of exercise training and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in the ILD population is addressed.

  2. Clinical utility of 18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic imaging of patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis include chest X-rays and computed tomography (CT scans. Reports have suggested a role for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT scans. We report on the clinical utility of 18 FDG PET/CT in two patients. Case 1: A 38-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active supraclavicular and chest lymph nodes. An aspiration cytology of the cervical lymph node revealed caseating granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Case 2: A 58-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active lymph nodes in the neck. A biopsy of the cervical lymph node revealed epithelioid granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Both patients were started on standard antitubercular therapy with a subsequent marked reduction of activity. PET/CT scans may suggest the sites of safe high-yield biopsies.

  3. Bayesian probability analysis: a prospective demonstration of its clinical utility in diagnosing coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrano, R.; Yiannikas, J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Rincon, G.; Go, R.T.; Williams, G.; Leatherman, J.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four patients referred for coronary arteriography were prospectively studied with stress electrocardiography, stress thallium scintigraphy, cine fluoroscopy (for coronary calcifications), and coronary angiography. Pretest probabilities of coronary disease were determined based on age, sex, and type of chest pain. These and pooled literature values for the conditional probabilities of test results based on disease state were used in Bayes theorem to calculate posttest probabilities of disease. The results of the three noninvasive tests were compared for statistical independence, a necessary condition for their simultaneous use in Bayes theorem. The test results were found to demonstrate pairwise independence in patients with and those without disease. Some dependencies that were observed between the test results and the clinical variables of age and sex were not sufficient to invalidate application of the theorem. Sixty-eight of the study patients had at least one major coronary artery obstruction of greater than 50%. When these patients were divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-probability subgroups according to their pretest probabilities, noninvasive test results analyzed by Bayesian probability analysis appropriately advanced 17 of them by at least one probability subgroup while only seven were moved backward. Of the 76 patients without disease, 34 were appropriately moved into a lower probability subgroup while 10 were incorrectly moved up. We conclude that posttest probabilities calculated from Bayes theorem more accurately classified patients with and without disease than did pretest probabilities, thus demonstrating the utility of the theorem in this application

  4. Comparison of clinical utility between diaphragm excursion and thickening change using ultrasonography to predict extubation success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Wan; Lee, Seung Jun; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Ho Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Both diaphragmatic excursion and change in muscle thickening are measured using ultrasonography (US) to assess diaphragm function and mechanical ventilation weaning outcomes. However, which parameter can better predict successful extubation remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical utility of these two diaphragmatic parameters to predict extubation success. Methods This study included patients subjected to extubation trial in the medical or surgical intensive care unit of a university-affiliated hospital from May 2015 through February 2016. Diaphragm excursion and percent of thickening change (Δtdi%) were measured using US within 24 hours before extubation. Results Sixty patients were included, and 78.3% (47/60) of these patients were successfully extubated, whereas 21.7% (13/60) were not. The median degree of excursion was greater in patients with extubation success than in those with extubation failure (1.65 cm vs. 0.8 cm, p success had a greater Δtdi% than those with extubation failure (42.1% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.03). The areas under the receiver operating curve for excursion and Δtdi% were 0.836 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.717 to 0.919) and 0.698 (95% CI, 0.566 to 0.810), respectively (p = 0.017). Conclusions Diaphragm excursion seems more accurate than a change in the diaphragm thickness to predict extubation success. PMID:29050461

  5. An assessment of the clinical utility of serum ALT and AST in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson; Zeng; Rock; Yoshida

    2000-07-01

    Background: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is frequently used as the sole biochemical marker for chronic hepatitis C (CHC), however, its value may be normal in cases with active disease. Recently, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) has been suggested as a useful predictor of liver pathology and conflicting results were obtained by using AST/ALT ratio to predict cirrhosis. Aims: To evaluate clinical utility of serum ALT and AST in CHC. Methods: The charts of 133 patients with CHC, whose ALT and AST were simultaneously tested from 1994 to 1996, were reviewed. ALT and AST were analyzed for both the entire cohort of patients and subgroups stratified for histopathology, age, gender, alcohol consumption, and risk factors of transmission. In 53 patients, the AST/ALT ratio was evaluated during interferon treatment. Results: The elevation of ALT significantly correlated with that of AST (r=0.79). The AST/ALT ratio increased with liver histological progression. The ratio >/=1 was predominantly in cirrhotic patients. During treatment the ratio increased. The AST remained elevated in eight of the 33 patients in whom the ALT had returned to normal during and after treatment. Conclusions: Both ALT and AST are useful markers for CHC. However, the AST may elevate alone, suggesting that measuring AST may be useful when the ALT is consistently normal. The AST/ALT ratio varies in different patients but increases with histological progression of fibrosis. An AST/ALT ratio >/=1 is highly suggestive of the presence of cirrhosis.

  6. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen doubling times: clinical utility of this predictor of prostate cancer behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lee, W. Robert; Slivjak, Anne; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The distribution of pretreatment and posttreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling times (PSADT) varies widely. This report examines the pretreatment PSADT as an independent predictor of biochemical freedom from disease (bNED) and describes the clinical utility of PSADT. Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine patients with T1-3 NX, M-0 prostate cancer treated between February 1989 and November 1993 have pretreatment PSADTs calculated from three or more PSA levels. Biochemical disease-free (bNED) survival (failure is PSA ≥ 1.5 ngm/ml and rising) is evaluated by multivariate analysis of common prognostic indicators and PSADT. Results: Prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) is a significant predictor of survival along with radiation dose. Patients with a pretreatment PSADT of < 12 months show 50% failure by 18 months, while those with a PSADT that is not increasing show only 3% failure at 3 years. Conclusions: Prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) is a predictor of bNED outcome in prostate cancer. Patients with PSADT < 12 months have aggressive disease and should be considered for multimodal therapy. Slow PSADT (≥ 5 years) is observed in 57% of patients, and this end point may be considered in the decision to observe rather than to treat. After treatment failure, the PSADT may be used to determine which patients do not need immediate androgen deprivation

  7. Clinical utility of self-disclosure for adults who stutter: Apologetic versus informative statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Courtney T; Croft, Robyn; Gkalitsiou, Zoi; Hampton, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the clinical utility of self-disclosure, particularly, whether disclosing in an informative manner would result in more positive observer ratings of the speaker who stutters than either disclosing in an apologetic manner or choosing not to self-disclose at all. Observers (N=338) were randomly assigned to view one of six possible videos (i.e., adult male informative self-disclosure, adult male apologetic self-disclosure, adult male no self-disclosure, adult female informative self-disclosure, adult female apologetic self-disclosure, adult female no self-disclosure). Observers completed a survey assessing their perceptions of the speaker they viewed immediately after watching the video. Results suggest that self-disclosing in an informative manner leads to significantly more positive observer ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. In contrast, use of an apologetic statement, for the most part, does not yield significantly more positive ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. Clinicians should recommend their clients self-disclose in an informative manner to facilitate more positive observer perceptions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Assessing the Clinical Utility of SNP Microarray for Prader-Willi Syndrome due to Uniparental Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stephanie L; Hashimoto, Sayaka; McKinney, Aimee; Mihalic Mosher, Theresa; Pyatt, Robert; Reshmi, Shalini C; Astbury, Caroline; Hickey, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15 is one of the molecular causes of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a multisystem disorder which presents with neonatal hypotonia and feeding difficulty. Current diagnostic algorithms differ regarding the use of SNP microarray to detect PWS. We retrospectively examined the frequency with which SNP microarray could identify regions of homozygosity (ROH) in patients with PWS. We determined that 7/12 (58%) patients with previously confirmed PWS by methylation analysis and microsatellite-positive UPD studies had ROH (>10 Mb) by SNP microarray. Additional assessment of 5,000 clinical microarrays, performed from 2013 to present, determined that only a single case of ROH for chromosome 15 was not caused by an imprinting disorder or identity by descent. We observed that ROH for chromosome 15 is rarely incidental and strongly associated with hypotonic infants having features of PWS. Although UPD microsatellite studies remain essential to definitively establish the presence of UPD, SNP microarray has important utility in the timely diagnostic algorithm for PWS. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in tuberculosis (TB) patients: clinical and radiologic features in the TB-DM association based on a five-year hospital study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Jovana M; Pavlovic, Aleksandar D; Bulajić, Milica V; Pešut, Dragica P

    2018-03-01

    A previously known association of tuberculosis (TB), now a global emergency, with diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease of increasing prevalence worldwide, has resurfaced. DM is a recognised TB risk factor and M. tuberculosis infection usually disturbs glycoregulation. We aimed to estimate DM prevalence among TB patients and to analyse clinical and radiologic manifestations of TB in this group. The cross-sectional study included 1017 patients discharged with a TB diagnosis from a tertiary level facility in a five-year period. After exclusion of 128 patients with TB sequelae, we selected 889 patients with confirmed active TB, and the final selection led to 88 subjects with both active TB and DM. DM was found in 9.89% of active TB patients. Testing hypotheses for single-sample proportions showed that the prevalence was significantly higher than the prevalence in the general population (pTB in 96.3% of the 88 subjects, and extrapulmonary in 3.4%, the latter more frequently in women (p=0.08). Cavities were more frequently found in tobacco smokers compared to non-smokers (p=0.002) and in patients living in rural settings (p=0.002); haemoptysis was detected more frequently in men compared to women (p=0.044). Half of the patients had no fever at all, and only 14.8% had tachycardia. Auscultatory findings were positive in 57 (64.8%) patients. Radiographic changes were atypical in 17/88 (19.3%) patients and included pulmonary bases in seven patients, upper lobe anterior segment, and disseminated miliary pattern in two patients. DM prevalence is significantly higher among TB patients compared to the general population. The mean age of TB patients with DM is significantly higher than expected in TB patients alone. Knowledge of TB clinical and radiologic variations in this group of patients may reduce the delay in TB diagnosis with its clinical and epidemiologic consequences.

  10. UISESS scale for staging and classifying clinical-epidemiological risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus and for establishing multidisciplinary preventive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Alba, Javier E; Salcedo Rocha, Ana L; Colunga Rodríguez, Cecilia; González Barrera, Juan Antonio; Herrera Solís, Evangelina; Milke Najar, María Eugenia

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study is the creation and use of a five-stage scale for the description of the health status of a type 2 diabetes mellitus patient population, as individuals and as a set. The scale, named UISESS, ranges from the pre-pathological to the sequelae stage, and can help orient multidisciplinary prevention actions. SETTING AND SAMPLING: A sample of nondiabetics (n = 404), together with a census of all type 2 diabetic patients (n = 2,702) over 30 years of age, were obtained from a family medicine clinic of the Mexican Federal Social Security System (IMSS) in Guadalajara, Mexico. A descriptive study in which the Natural History of the Disease and an epidemiological focus on risk were used to create the UISESS scale. Case histories of a total of 3,106 persons from a family practice clinic were used. The data was classified in five stages and three risk control levels were used for analysis. In the type 2 diabetic group, the average age was 57.6 years; 58% were women. In the nondiabetic group, the average age was 55.38 years; 63% were women. The UISESS scale was applied. A large majority (86%) of the studied type 2 diabetic patients were classified within unfavorable stages for controlling their illness, and 65% of the 3,106 people were at high or very high risk of increasing deterioration of their health status. The UISESS scale appears to be a useful tool to detect the distribution, evolution and control of type 2 diabetes in a population attended at the outpatient clinic of a family medicine unit, according to the Natural History of the Disease.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Peer Educator Outreach on the Likelihood and Acceleration of Clinic Utilization among Sex Workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathy Krishnamurthy

    Full Text Available Peer-led outreach is a critical element of HIV and STI-reduction interventions aimed at sex workers. We study the association between peer-led outreach to sex workers and the time to utilize health facilities for timely STI syndromic-detection and treatment. Using data on the timing of peer-outreach interventions and clinic visits, we utilize an Extended Cox model to assess whether peer educator outreach intensity is associated with accelerated clinic utilization among sex workers.Our data comes from 2705 female sex workers registered into Pragati, a women-in-sex-work outreach program, and followed from 2008 through 2012. We analyze this data using an Extended Cox model with the density of peer educator visits in a 30-day rolling window as the key predictor, while controlling for the sex workers' age, client volume, location of sex work, and education level. The principal outcome of interest is the timing of the first voluntary clinic utilization.More frequent peer visit is associated with earlier first clinic visit (HR: 1.83, 95% CI, 1.75-1.91, p < .001. In addition, 18% of all syndrome-based STI detected come from clinic visits in which the sex worker reports no symptoms, underscoring the importance of inducing clinic visits in the detection of STI. Additional models to test the robustness of these findings indicate consistent beneficial effect of peer educator outreach.Peer outreach density is associated with increased likelihood of-and shortened duration to-clinic utilization among female sex workers, suggesting potential staff resourcing implications. Given the observational nature of our study, however, these findings should be interpreted as an association rather than as a causal relationship.

  12. Use of basal insulin and the associated clinical outcomes among elderly nursing home residents with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a retrospective chart review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Keith L; Wei, Wenhui; Meyers, Juliana L; Kilpatrick, Brett S; Pandya, Naushira

    2014-01-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in long-term care (LTC) settings can be complex as a result of age-related complications. Despite guideline recommendations, sliding scale insulin remains commonplace in the LTC setting and data on basal insulin use are lacking. This retrospective study used medical chart data and the Minimum Data Set from elderly LTC facility patients who received basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin) for the treatment of diabetes, to investigate the practice patterns and associated clinical outcomes. A total of 2,096 elderly, insulin-treated patients in LTC were identified, with 59.5% of them (N=1,247) receiving basal insulin. Of these, more than 50% of patients received sliding scale insulin in co-administration with basal insulin. Despite its ease of use, insulin pen use was very low, at 14.6%. Significant differences were observed between the basal insulin groups for glycated hemoglobin level and dosing frequency. Hypoglycemia was uncommon -17.2% of patients experienced at least one event, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of hypoglycemia between the groups. These data suggest the underutilization of basal insulin in the LTC setting and worryingly high combinational use with sliding scale insulin. Differences in glycated hemoglobin and dosing frequencies between types of basal insulin warrant further comparative effectiveness studies.

  13. Unsatisfactory Glucose Management and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Real World of Clinical Practice: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ru; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Zhong-Shang; Gao, Ling; Zuo, Chang-Ting

    2018-05-05

    Facing the increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this study aimed to evaluate the management of GDM and its association with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The data of 996 inpatients with GDM who terminated pregnancies in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2015 were collected. Treatments during pregnancy and the last hospital admission before delivery were analyzed. Pregnancy outcomes of the GDM patients were compared with 996 nondiabetic subjects matched by delivery year and gestational age. The association between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and adverse pregnancy outcomes was examined by logistic regression analyses. The average prevalence of GDM over the 5 years was 4.4% (1330/30,191). Within the GDM patients, 42.8% (426/996) received dietary intervention, whereas 19.1% (190/996) received insulin treatment. Adverse outcomes were more likely to occur in patients with unsatisfactory control of blood glucose such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, χ 2 = 13.373, P < 0.01). Elevated FPG was identified as an independent risk factor for premature birth (odds ratio [OR] = 1.460, P < 0.001), neonatal care unit admission (OR = 1.284, P < 0.001), RDS (OR = 1.322, P = 0.001), and stillbirth (OR = 1.427, P < 0.001). Management of GDM in the real world of clinical practice was unsatisfactory, which might have contributed to adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  14. Clinical characteristics, healthcare costs, and resource utilization in hepatitis C vary by genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby Hunter, Alyssa; Rosenblatt, Lisa; Patel, Chad; Blauer-Peterson, Cori; Anduze-Faris, Beatrice

    2017-05-01

    In the United States, approximately 3 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Genotypes of HCV variably affect disease progression and treatment response. However, the relationships between HCV genotypes and liver disease progression, healthcare resource utilization, and healthcare costs have not been fully explored. In this retrospective study of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), healthcare claims from a large US health plan were used to collect data on patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Main outcome measures include healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) and healthcare costs. Linked laboratory data provided genotype and select measures to determine liver disease severity. The sample (mean age 50.6 years, 63.5% male) included 10,331 patients, of whom 79.1% had genotype (GT)1, 12.8% had GT2, and 8.1% had GT3. Descriptive analyses demonstrated variation by HCV genotype in liver and non-liver related comorbidities, liver disease severity, and healthcare costs. The highest percentage of patients with liver-related comorbidities and advanced liver disease was found among those with GT3. Meanwhile, patients with GT2 had lower HCRU and the lowest costs, and patients with GT1 had the highest total all-cause costs. These differences may reflect differing rates of non-liver-related comorbidities and all-cause care. Multivariable analyses showed that genotype was a significant predictor of costs and liver disease severity: compared with patients having GT1, those with GT3 were significantly more likely to have advanced liver disease. Patients with GT2 were significantly less likely to have advanced disease and more likely to have lower all-cause costs. Results may not be generalizable to patients outside the represented commercial insurance plans, and analysis of a prevalent population may underestimate HCRU and costs relative to a sample of treated patients. These results suggest that liver disease progression varies by genotype and

  15. Nigella sativa improves glycemic control and ameliorates oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: placebo controlled participant blinded clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Kaatabi

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients.114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57 received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57 received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator.Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180 ± 5.75 to 180 ± 5.59 in control Vs from 195 ± 6.57 to 172 ± 5.83 in NS group, HbA1c (from 8.2 ± 0.12 to 8.5 ± 0.14 in control VS from 8.6 ± 0.13 to 8.2 ± 0.14 in NS group, and TBARS (from 48.3 ± 6.89 to 52.9 ± 5.82 in control VS from 54.1 ± 4.64 to 41.9 ± 3.16 in NS group, in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period.Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs.Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI CTRI/2013/06/003781.

  16. Nigella sativa Improves Glycemic Control and Ameliorates Oxidative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Placebo Controlled Participant Blinded Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatabi, Huda; Bamosa, Abdullah Omar; Badar, Ahmed; Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen; Abou-Hozaifa, Bodour; Lebda, Fatma; Al-Khadra, Akram; Al-Almaie, Sameeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS) in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year) of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients. Methods 114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57) received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57) received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator. Results Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180±5.75 to 180±5.59 in control Vs from 195±6.57 to 172 ±5.83 in NS group), HbA1c (from 8.2±0.12 to 8.5±0.14 in control VS from 8.6±0.13 to 8.2±0.14 in NS group), and TBARS (from 48.3±6.89 to 52.9 ±5.82 in control VS from 54.1±4.64 to 41.9 ±3.16 in NS group), in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period. Conclusion Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. Trial Registration

  17. Effects of repeated use of the American Osteopathic Association's Clinical Assessment Program on measures of care for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubrook, Jay H; Snow, Richard J; McGill, Sharon L

    2011-01-01

    The American Osteopathic Association developed its Clinical Assessment Program (AOA-CAP) for Residencies to provide a mechanism for osteopathic residency programs to measure and improve their quality of patient care. To compare program performance in processes of care and intermediate outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus in residency programs that contributed data to the AOA-CAP for the first time vs residency programs that contributed data repeatedly. Osteopathic family medicine residency programs that entered data into the AOA-CAP diabetes registry between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, were included in the present study. Residency programs were separated into those that entered data into the registry for the first time during the 2005-2007 cycle (ie, first-time programs) and those that also entered data into the registry during the previous cycle (2003-2005) (ie, repeat programs). Measures of processes of care were annual foot examination, annual referral for ophthalmologic examination, annual microalbuminuria screening, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) if albuminuria is present, use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs if hypertension is present, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) test in the previous year, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test in the previous year. Measures of intermediate outcomes were control of blood pressure, HbA(1c), and LDL-C. Processes of care and outcome composite scores were also computed. Data from 52 osteopathic family medicine residency programs consisting of 2568 patient cases were analyzed. Twenty-three first-time programs with 992 cases and 29 repeat programs with 1576 cases entered data into the registry in the 2005-2007 cycle. Repeat programs had statistically significant better performance than first-time programs in the composite measure of processes of care (P=.0023)-largely the result of increased use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in patients with

  18. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  19. Clinical utility and impact of autopsies on clinical practice among doctors in a large teaching hospital in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edem Tette

    2014-02-01

    : Strengthening the interaction between doctors and pathologists is essential in improving the autopsy process and utilization in the hospital. KBTH should create opportunities for doctors to attend autopsy demonstrations and for pathologists to attend clinicopathological meetings in the hospital.

  20. A European chart review study on early rheumatoid arthritis treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Solem, Caitlyn; Majer, Istvan; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Tarallo, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review aimed to provide a current, real-world overview of biologic usage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Germany, Spain, and the UK, and estimate clinical and healthcare utilization outcomes associated with early versus late treatment. Adults (≥18 years) with a confirmed RA diagnosis between January 2008 and December 2010, who received biologic treatment for ≥3 months and had ≥12 months of follow-up were included. Early treatment was receipt of biologic agent ≤1 year after RA diagnosis. Outcomes included 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) reduction of ≥1.2 from biologic start and remission (DAS28 < 2.6). Time to outcome was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Of 328 patients enrolled (Germany [n = 111], Spain [n = 106], UK [n = 111]), 58.2 % received early biologic (Germany: 55.0 %, UK: 55.9 %, Spain: 64.2 %; p = 0.321). First-line biologics were more frequent in Spain (26.4 %) and Germany (19.8 %) versus the UK (7.2 %; p < 0.001). Late-treated patients were hospitalized more often than early-treated patients (10.5 vs 2.9 % [p = 0.006] for 9.0 vs 5.4 mean inpatient days [p = 0.408]). DAS28 was 5.1 at biologic initiation (n = 310); 73.5 % of patients had a DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 and 44.5 % achieved remission. More patients had DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 (79.2 vs 65.9 %; p = 0.009) and remission (51.1 vs 35.6 %; p = 0.007) with early versus late treatment, with a significant difference in Kaplan-Meier curves when indexing on time since diagnosis (p < 0.001) and biologic start (p = 0.024). In RA patients receiving biologic therapy, over half received biologic therapy early. Early initiation was associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced hospitalization rates versus late treatment.

  1. Disturbance of inorganic phosphate metabolism in diabetes mellitus: clinical manifestations of phosphorus-depletion syndrome during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lervang H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Jørn Ditzel, Hans-Henrik LervangDepartment of Endocrinology, and Center for Prevention of Struma and Metabolic Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aarhus University, DenmarkAbstract: The acute effects of intracellular phosphate depletion and hypophosphatemia on organs and tissues in and during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA have been reviewed. When insufficient phosphate and/or oxygen are available for high energy phosphate synthesis, cell homeostasis cannot be maintained and cell integrity may be impaired. The clinical consequences are recognized as occasional cause of morbidity and mortality. Although phosphate repletion has not been routinely recommended in the treatment of DKA, physicians should be aware of these clinical conditions and phosphate repletion in such situations should be considered.Keywords: high energy phosphates, hypoxia, fructose 1,6-diphosphate

  2. Update on the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus in the management of transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revollo J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jane Revollo Department of Pharmacy, Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami Leonard M Miller School of Medicine Miami, FL, USAThe review by Posadas Salas and Srinivas of the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus formulations in the management of transplant patients1 was timely and relevant. It is worth noting, however, the data were presented in a way that overlooked several key differences between two distinct once-daily tacrolimus formulations. These formulations differ in bioavailability, Cmax, Tmax, dose required to achieve target trough levels, and time to reach target trough. The specific formulation and dosing information of one product was detailed in this review (described as modified release 4 [MR-4]; Astagraf®, Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokyo, Japan, but no formulation or dosing details were provided for a very different once-daily tacrolimus formulation (LCP-Tacro™; Veloxis Pharmaceuticals A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark for which a thorough review was recently published.2 The latter product is currently approved in Europe and under review by the US Food and Drug Administration in the US. In presenting data in this review, the authors did not identify which product was investigated in each of the studies discussed. This could easily lead to misinterpretation of results or erroneous conclusions, ie, that both once-daily formulations are the same. In fact, a careful parsing of the data clearly demonstrates that they are not equivalent. Misunderstanding of this point could have a potentially serious impact on appropriate dosing, safety, and patient management in the post-transplant setting. Differentiation between the two products is needed to clarify what appear to be conflicting results of the studies presented in this review.View original paper by Posadas Salas and Srinivas

  3. Clinical utility and limitations of intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yeda; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During surgeries that put the visual pathway at risk of injury, continuous monitoring of the visual function is desirable. However, the intraoperative monitoring of the visual evoked potential (VEP) is not yet widely used. We evaluate here the clinical utility of intraoperative VEP monitoring. We analyzed retrospectively 46 consecutive surgeries in 2011-2013. High luminance stimulating devices delivered flash stimuli on the closed eyelid during intravenous anesthesia. We monitored VEP features N75 and P100 and took patients' preoperative and postoperative visual function from patient charts. Postoperative ophthalmologic workup was performed in 25 (54%) patients and preoperatively in 28 (61%) patients. VEP recordings were feasible in 62 of 85 eyes (73%) in 46 patients. All 23 eyes without VEP had impaired vision. During surgery, VEPs remained stable throughout surgery in 50 eyes. In 44 of these, visual function did not deteriorate and three patients (6 eyes) developed hemianopia. VEP decreased transiently in 10 eyes and visual function of all was preserved. VEPs were lost permanently in 2 eyes in two patients without new postoperative visual impairment. Satisfactory intraoperative VEP monitoring was feasible in all patients except in those with severe visual impairment. Preservation of VEPs predicted preserved visual function. During resection of lesions in the visual cortex, VEP monitoring could not detect new major visual field defects due to injury in the posterior visual pathway. Intraoperative VEPs were sensitive enough to detect vascular damage during aneurysm clipping and mechanical manipulation of the anterior visual pathway in an early reversible stage. Intraoperative VEP monitoring influenced surgical decisions in selected patients and proved to be a useful supplement to the toolbox of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

  4. Clinical utility and limitations of intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda Luo

    Full Text Available During surgeries that put the visual pathway at risk of injury, continuous monitoring of the visual function is desirable. However, the intraoperative monitoring of the visual evoked potential (VEP is not yet widely used. We evaluate here the clinical utility of intraoperative VEP monitoring.We analyzed retrospectively 46 consecutive surgeries in 2011-2013. High luminance stimulating devices delivered flash stimuli on the closed eyelid during intravenous anesthesia. We monitored VEP features N75 and P100 and took patients' preoperative and postoperative visual function from patient charts. Postoperative ophthalmologic workup was performed in 25 (54% patients and preoperatively in 28 (61% patients.VEP recordings were feasible in 62 of 85 eyes (73% in 46 patients. All 23 eyes without VEP had impaired vision. During surgery, VEPs remained stable throughout surgery in 50 eyes. In 44 of these, visual function did not deteriorate and three patients (6 eyes developed hemianopia. VEP decreased transiently in 10 eyes and visual function of all was preserved. VEPs were lost permanently in 2 eyes in two patients without new postoperative visual impairment.Satisfactory intraoperative VEP monitoring was feasible in all patients except in those with severe visual impairment. Preservation of VEPs predicted preserved visual function. During resection of lesions in the visual cortex, VEP monitoring could not detect new major visual field defects due to injury in the posterior visual pathway. Intraoperative VEPs were sensitive enough to detect vascular damage during aneurysm clipping and mechanical manipulation of the anterior visual pathway in an early reversible stage. Intraoperative VEP monitoring influenced surgical decisions in selected patients and proved to be a useful supplement to the toolbox of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

  5. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  6. Cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus; a hospital-based clinical prospective trial in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haleem, A.; Rehman, A.U.; Saleem, A.; Memon, S.; Memon, N.; Fahim, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    To know the outcomes of cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus using optical coherence tomography. Methods: This non-concurrent, clinical, prospective study was carried out at Al-Ibrahim Eye Hospital, Karachi, from January to August 2015. After phacoemulsification with injectable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, eyes of patients were analysed. The patients were divided into diabetic and non-diabetic groups visual acuity, optical coherence tomography and dilated fundus examination were performed preoperatively (baseline) and post-operative 1st week and 6th week. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 100 subjects, there were 50(50%) each in diabetic and non-diabetic group. Subsequently, 14(14%) patients were lost to follow-up, and 86 eyes of 86(86%) patients were analysed. Of them, 37(43%) were male and 49(57%) were female. The mean age of participants was 52.21+-7.43 years (range: 38-62 years). The non-diabetic group had 41(47.7%) patients and the diabetic group had 45(52.3%). There was no clinically significant cystoid macular oedema in either group. Central foveal thickness > 43.94 micro m was observed in 1(2.5%) eye in the non-diabetic group and in none in the diabetic group at 1st post-operative week. At the 6th post-operative week, none of eyes in the non-diabetic group and 2(4.44%) eyes of the diabetic group showed macular oedema. There was no statistically significant difference in mean foveal volume between both groups at 1st week (p=0.896) and 6th week (p=0.230). Conclusion: Cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification was equally present in both diabetics and non-diabetics without any retinopathy. (author)

  7. Socio-demographic and clinical differences in subjects with tuberculosis with and without diabetes mellitus in Brazil--a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Santos, Barbara; Locatelli, Rodrigo; Horta, Bernardo L; Faerstein, Eduardo; Sanchez, Mauro N; Riley, Lee W; Maciel, Ethel Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated the relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and tuberculosis (TB), but the nature of this relationship is not fully understood. TB incidence may be influenced by immunosuppression from DM, but this association may be confounded by other clinical and socioeconomic factors. We aimed to assess socio-demographic and clinical differences in TB patients with and without DM. Using the Brazilian national surveillance system (SINAN), we compared 1,797 subjects with TB and DM with 29,275 subjects diagnosed with TB only in 2009. We performed multivariate analysis to identify factors associated with the presence of DM among TB patients. Subjects with TB - DM were older; have initial positive sputum smear test (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60), and were more likely to die from TB (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.03-2.01). They were less likely to have been institutionalized [in prison, shelter, orphanage, psychiatric hospital (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.60-0.93)]; developed extra pulmonary TB (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.51-0.75) and to return to TB treatment after abandonment (OR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.86). Prevalence of NCD continues to rise in developing countries, especially with the rise of elderly population, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases will be urgent. DM and TB represent a critical intersection between communicable and non-communicable diseases in these countries and the effect of DM on TB incidence and outcomes provide numerous opportunities for collaboration and management of these complex diseases in the national public health programs.

  8. Quality assessment of recent evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Muhammad A; Al-Fahed, Ousama B; Arif, Samir I; Amer, Yasser S; Titi, Maher A; Al-Rukban, Mohammed O

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide and national public health problem that has a great impact on the population in Saudi Arabia. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are cornerstones in improving the health care provided for patients with diabetes. This study evaluated the methodological rigour, transparency, and applicability of recently published CPGs. Our group conducted a systematic search for recently published CPGs for T2DM. The searching and screening for Source CPGs were guided by tools from the ADAPTE methods with specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Five reviewers using the second version of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument independently assessed the quality of the retrieved Source CPGs. Domains of Scope and purpose and Clarity of presentation received the highest scores in all CPGs. Most of the assessed CPGs (86%) were considered with high overall quality and were recommended for use. Rigour of development and applicability domains were together highest in 3 CPGs (43%). The overall high quality of DM CPGs published in the last 3 years demonstrated the continuous development and improvement in CPG methodologies and standards. Health care professionals should consider the quality of any CPG for T2DM before deciding to use it in their daily clinical practice. Three CPGs have been identified, using the AGREE criteria, as high-quality and trustworthy. Ideally, the resources provided by the AGREE trust including the AGREE II Instrument should be used by a clinician to scan through the large number of published T2DM CPGs to identify the CPGs with high methodological quality and applicability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Identifying role of perceived quality and satisfaction on the utilization status of the community clinic services; Bangladesh context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rizwanul M; Abdullah, Mamun S; Rahman, Anisur M; Alam, Ashraful M

    2016-06-24

    Bangladesh is one among the few countries of the world that provides free medical services at the community level through various public health facilities. It is now evident that, clients' perceived quality of services and their expectations of service standards affect health service utilization to a great extent. The aim of the study was to develop and validate the measures for perception and satisfaction of primary health care quality in Bangladesh context and to identify their aspects on the utilization status of the Community Clinic services. This mixed method cross sectional survey was conducted from January to June 2012, in the catchment area of 12 community clinics. Since most of the outcome indicators focus mainly on women and children, women having children less than 2 years of age were randomly assigned and interviewed for the study purpose. Data were collected through FGD, Key informants interview and a pretested semi- structured questionnaire. About 95 % of the respondents were Muslims and 5 % were Hindus. The average age of the respondents was 23.38 (SD 4.15) and almost all of them are home makers. The average monthly expenditure of their family was 95US $ (SD 32US$). At the beginning of the study, two psychometric research instruments; 24 items perceived quality of primary care services PQPCS scale (chronbach's α = .89) and 22 items community clinic service satisfaction CCSS scale (chronbach's α = .97), were constructed and validated. This study showed less educated, poor, landless mothers utilized the community clinic services more than their educated and wealthier counterpart. Women who lived in their own residence used the community clinic services more frequently than those who lived in a rental house. Perceptions concerning skill and competence of the health care provider and satisfaction indicating interpersonal communication and attitude of the care provider were important predictors for community clinic service utilization

  10. Clinical utility and validity of the Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) among a multicenter sample of youth with chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Flowers, Stacy R.; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Guite, Jessica W.; Logan, Deirdre E.; Lynch-Jordan, Anne M; Palermo, Tonya M.; Wilson, Anna C.

    2011-01-01

    The Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) is a well-established and commonly used measure of physical functioning and disability in youth with chronic pain. Further validation of the measure has been called for, in particular, examination of the clinical utility and factor structure of the measure. To address this need, we utilized a large multicenter dataset of pediatric patients with chronic pain who had completed the FDI and other measures assessing pain and emotional functioning. Clinical reference points to allow for interpretation of raw scores were developed to enhance clinical utility of the measure and exploratory factor analysis was performed to examine its factor structure. Participants included 1300 youth ages 8 to 18 years (M=14.2 years; 76% female) with chronic pain. Examination of the distribution of FDI scores and validation with measures of depressive symptoms and pain intensity yielded three distinct categories of disability: No/Minimal Disability, Moderate Disability and Severe Disability. Factor analysis of FDI scores revealed a two-factor solution representing vigorous Physical Activities and non-physically strenuous Daily Activities. The three-level classification system and factor structure were further explored via comparison across the four most commonly encountered pain conditions in clinical settings (head, back, abdominal and widespread pain). Our findings provide important new information regarding the clinical utility and validity of the FDI. This will greatly enhance the interpretability of scores for research and clinical use in a wide range of pediatric pain conditions. In particular these findings will facilitate use of the FDI as an outcome measure in future clinical trials. PMID:21458162

  11. Developing a science of clinical utility in diagnostic classification systems field study strategies for ICD-11 mental and behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jared W; Reed, Geoffrey M; Roberts, Michael C; Evans, Spencer C; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Robles, Rebeca; Rebello, Tahilia; Sharan, Pratap; Gureje, Oye; First, Michael B; Andrews, Howard F; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luís; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zielasek, Juergen; Saxena, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse has developed a systematic program of field studies to evaluate and improve the clinical utility of the proposed diagnostic guidelines for mental and behavioral disorders in the Eleventh Revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11). The clinical utility of a diagnostic classification is critical to its function as the interface between health encounters and health information, and to making the ICD-11 be a more effective tool for helping the WHO's 194 member countries, including the United States, reduce the global disease burden of mental disorders. This article describes the WHO's efforts to develop a science of clinical utility in regard to one of the two major classification systems for mental disorders. We present the rationale and methodologies for an integrated and complementary set of field study strategies, including large international surveys, formative field studies of the structure of clinicians' conceptualization of mental disorders, case-controlled field studies using experimental methodologies to evaluate the impact of proposed changes to the diagnostic guidelines on clinicians' diagnostic decision making, and ecological implementation field studies of clinical utility in the global settings in which the guidelines will ultimately be implemented. The results of these studies have already been used in making decisions about the structure and content of ICD-11. If clinical utility is indeed among the highest aims of diagnostic systems for mental disorders, as their developers routinely claim, future revision efforts should continue to build on these efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Utility of direct immunofluorescence testing for IgA in patients with high and low clinical suspicion for dermatitis herpetiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Granter, Scott R

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of direct immunofluorescence (DIF) testing for the characteristic immunoglobulin A deposits of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) in patients stratified into high and low clinical suspicion subgroups. We retrospectively analyzed the results of H&E and DIF testing in 77 cases of suspected DH and separated them into high and low clinical suspicion subgroups based on clinical impression at the time of biopsy. The overall sensitivity and specificity of routine (H&E) histologic evaluation were 0.75 and 0.951, respectively. Although there were 13 cases of DH (of 36 total cases) in the high clinical suspicion subgroup, there were only three (of 41 total cases) in the low clinical suspicion subgroup. In the high clinical suspicion subgroup, the positive predictive value (PPV) was 0.9, and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.846. Alternatively, the PPV was 0.6 and the NPV was 1.0 for the low clinical suspicion subgroup. Histologic false negatives did occur, but all were in patients within the high clinical suspicion subgroup. It is anticipated that the NPV and PPV will vary due to differing clinical practice characteristics; however, in patients with a low clinical suspicion for DH, these data argue that it may be reasonable to first perform a biopsy for routine histologic evaluation before requesting DIF analysis. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  13. Distinct clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities for diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yuji; Takano, Koji; Kishihara, Eriko; Watanabe, Michiko; Ichikawa, Raishi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes often develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Reportedly, DKA in type 2 diabetes has higher mortality despite its limited occurrence. The exact clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities yielding successful outcomes in DKA type 2 diabetes remain unknown. This retrospective study compared the clinical features and detailed treatment of consecutive type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients hospitalized with DKA between January 2001 and December 2014. We report on 127 patients with type 1 and 74 patients with type 2 diabetes whose DKA was successfully treated. The most frequent precipitating cause for DKA was infectious disease for patients with type 1 diabetes and consumption of sugar-containing beverages for those with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes patients showed higher mean plasma glucose levels than those with type 1 diabetes (48.4±21.6, vs. 37.1±16.4mmol/l, Ptype 1 diabetes patients, those with type 2 diabetes required distinctly higher daily total insulin dosage (35.9±37.0U, vs. 20.2±23.3U, P2.69L, vs. 2.29±1.57L, P23.9±36.5mEq, vs. 11.2±17.9mEq, Ptype 2 diabetes required management with a modified treatment protocol to resolve their profound hyperglycemia and dehydration compared with those with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Translating state-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques to clinical use: A systematic review of clinical studies utilizing DTI, MT, MWF, MRS, and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan R. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: State-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques are emerging with great potential to improve the diagnosis and management of various spinal pathologies, but the current body of evidence has only showed limited clinical utility to date. Among these imaging tools DTI is the most mature, but further work is necessary to standardize and validate its use before it will be adopted in the clinical realm. Large, well-designed studies with a priori hypotheses, standardized acquisition methods, detailed clinical data collection, and robust automated analysis techniques are needed to fully demonstrate the potential of these rapidly evolving techniques.

  15. A comparison of two measures of quality of life of Nigerian clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, B A; Mosaku, S K; Ikem, R T

    2009-09-01

    We present data comparing the quality of life effects of type 2 diabetes determined by the Bradley well-being questionnaire and the WHOQOL-BREF, a generic instrument. We also present data on the reliability and validity of these instruments. The Well-being and the WHO-bref were administered on fifty-three consecutive type 2 diabetics. The internal consistency of the quality of life scales was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Convergent, discriminant, and known groups validity were determined and compared. Our patients had a mean age of 55.8+/-13 years. 31(58.5%) were males and all patients had been diabetic for 7.9+/-7.1 years. 13(24.5%) were being treated with oral agents, 14(26.4%) were on insulin and 26(49.1%) were on combined therapy. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.31 to 0.72 on the Well-being subscales and from 0.47 to 0.78 on the WHOQOL-BREF subscales. Both scales were modestly related to one another. In general the quality of life measures were not influenced by characteristics such as age, gender, marital or educational status. Both scales were not influenced significantly by treatment type or the severity or number of complications. Our study has shown how two different measures of quality of life perform in patients with type 2 diabetes. Even though the subscales of the Well-being and WHOQOL-BREF were not very sensitive to external criteria of disease impact (complications) casting a doubt on their utility as psychological outcome measures, they demonstrated fairly reasonable internal consistency in our patients with type 2 diabetes. Further larger studies are thus required to clarify this given our present limitations.

  16. Clinical Efficacy of Actovegin in Complex Treatment of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 with Diabetic Polyneuropathy Against Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pankiv

    2013-03-01

    (n = 28 group. Patients of study group in addition to the basic therapy received intravenous infusions of 400 mg of Actovegin for 10 days. It is found that the use of Actovegin in comprehensive treatment of DM type 2 with DPN against AH improves the clinical picture of the disease, which is associated with reduction in intensity of thirst, dry mouth, weakness, rapid fatigability, headache and dizziness, normalization of blood pressure. Actovegin has a positive effect on symptoms of DPN, resulting an increase in all kinds of sensitivity, decrease in degree of pain syndrome. Administration of Actovegin in the treatment of DM type 2 improves the glycemic profile, reduces the level of peripheral insulin resistance, and also has a beneficial potentiating action on the abnormal lipid metabolism.

  17. Factors associated with utilization of a free HIV VCT clinic by female sex workers in Jinan City, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Bing; Pan, Jingbin; Sengupta, Sohini; Emrick, Catherine Boland; Cohen, Myron S; Henderson, Gail E

    2011-05-01

    Based on our previous qualitative exploration, this research presents the second phase in our study of factors associated with utilization of a free HIV VCT clinic in Jinan City, Northern China, by female sex workers (FSWs). A total of 970 FSWs from entertainment venues were interviewed and prospectively followed to determine who ultimately sought and received VCT at the clinic, compared to those who did not. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were performed on factors drawn from the Ecological Perspective, hypothesized to be associated with utilization of testing at the VCT clinic. Despite 69% of FSWs expressing willingness to attend the VCT clinic, only 11% were actually tested. The multiple logistic regression model that provided best goodness of fit included the covariates of willingness to attend the VCT clinic (Adjusted OR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.62-6.59), low perceived HIV infection risk (Adjusted OR 0.64, 95% CI: 0.35-1.11), low fear of FSWs status disclosure in the clinic (Adjusted OR 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31-0.94) and influence of acquaintances (Adjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI: 0.29-0.89) and peers (Adjusted OR 2.45, 95% CI: 1.40-4.50). This is the first study in China to follow FSWs longitudinally to measure factors related to VCT utilization. The low utilization of VCT services by participants in our study is similar to prior reports throughout China. FSWs' access to VCT service is associated with intrapersonal, institutional, and particularly, interpersonal factors. Based on these findings, we recommend emphasis on confidentiality of services, VCT education for influential peers, and introduction of HIV rapid testing on site.

  18. The Prevalence and Specificity of Depression Diagnosis in a Clinic-Based Population of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Shah, Nina; Naqibuddin, Mohammad; Payne, Jennifer L; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Wand, Gary S; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Langan, Susan; Lyketsos, Constantine

    To estimate the crude prevalence of minor depressive disorder (MinD) in a clinic-based population of adults with type 2 diabetes. We screened a clinical sample of 702 adults with type 2 diabetes for depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and performed a structured diagnostic psychiatric interview on 52 screen-positive and a convenience sample of 51 screen-negative individuals. Depressive disorder diagnoses were made using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) Text Revised criteria and categorized as MinD, major depressive disorder (MDD), or no depressive disorder. We estimated prevalence of MinD and MDD and derived 95% CIs. The crude prevalence of current, past, and current or past MinD was 4.3% (95% CI: 0.9-9.2%), 9.6% (95% CI: 3.9-15.9%), and 13.9% (95% CI: 7.7-21.2%), respectively. The crude prevalence of current, past, and current or past MDD was slightly higher-5.0% (95% CI: 1.9-9.4%), 12.0% (95% CI: 6.1-19.5%), and 17.0% (95% CI: 10.1-24.8%), respectively. There was a high prevalence of coexisting anxiety disorders in individuals with MinD (42.2%) and MDD (8.1%). Hemoglobin A1c levels were not significantly different in individuals with MinD or MDD compared to those without a depressive disorder. MinD is comparably prevalent to MDD in patients with type 2 diabetes; both disorders are associated with concomitant anxiety disorders. MinD is not included in the DSM-5; however, our data support continuing to examine patients with chronic medical conditions for MinD. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical utility of raltegravir for the treatment of HIV infection in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available James Nuttall,1 Tammy Meyers,2 Brian Eley11Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; 2Department of Paediatrics, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaAbstract: Raltegravir (RAL is the first integrase strand transfer inhibitor and has been shown to provide potent antiretroviral (ARV activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in both ARV treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced individuals. Following initial US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of RAL for treatment of HIV-1-infected adults in 2007, an ongoing pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy study in ARV-experienced children and adolescents led to extension of FDA approval to children and adolescents aged 2–18 years in 2011. Availability of chewable tablets for children aged 2–11 years is a significant advantage, and twice-daily dosing is recommended based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Granules for oral suspension in children 4 weeks to 2 years of age are currently under evaluation and clinical trials in neonates are imminent. Coadministration of RAL and the anti-tuberculosis drug rifampin (RIF results in reduced RAL exposure. Evaluation of a double RAL dosing strategy in children requiring cotreatment with RIF is planned. RAL is generally well tolerated and has a good overall safety profile. Further data is required for children before RAL can be recommended in first-line ARV treatment regimens. RAL is also under investigation for use in preventing mother-to-child transmission both during pregnancy and in the HIV-exposed neonate. Currently, the main therapeutic role for RAL in children is for treatment failure and multi-drug resistant cases where the inclusion of RAL in combination with optimal background therapy has demonstrated successful

  20. Basic Evaluation of Analytical Performance and Clinical Utility of Immunoradiometric TSH Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhy, Il Kyo; Cho, Bo Youn; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki; Lee, Mun Ho

    1987-01-01

    To assess the analytic performance of immunoradiometric TSH assay (IRMA TSH), assay precision determined by intra and interassay variance, assay accuracy determined by dilution and recovery study, were evaluated by using two commercial kit (Abott and Daichi). Normal range of basal serum TSH and TRH stimulated TSH increment were also determined in 234 healthy subjects (male 110, female 124; age 20-70) and 30 volunteers (male 10, female 20; age 21-26). In addition, basal TSH levels of 70 patients with untreated hyperthyroidism, 50 untreated hypothyroidism, and 60 euthyroidism were measured to assess the clinical utility of IRMA TSH. The detection limit of IRMA TSH was 0.04 mU/l and 0.08 mU/l by Abott Kit and Daichi kit respectively. Using Abott kit, intraassay variance were 2.0, 3.1 and 1.4% in mean TSH concentration 2.4, 31.6 and 98.2 mU/l repectively and interassay variance were 2.0 and 3.2% in mean TSH concentration 2.3 and 31.3 mU/l. Mean recovery rate was 92.5% and dilution study showed nearly straight line. When Daichi kit was used, intrasssay variance were 5.6, 5.2 and 6.2% in mean TSH concentration of 2.4, 31.6 and 98.2 mU/1 respectively and interassay variance were 7.1 and 7.4% in mean TSH of 2.3 and 31.3 mU,/l. Mean recovery rate was 89.9%. Normal range of basal TSH and TRH stimulated peak TSH were 0.38-4.02 mU/1 and 2.85-30.8 mU/1 repectively (95% confidence interval, Abott kit used). Sensitivity and specificity of basal TSH levels for diagnosing hypothyroidism as well as specificity for diagnosing hyperthyroidism were 100% by using both kit. Sensitivity of basal TSH level for diagnosing hyperthyroidism was 100% when TSH levels were measured by Abott kit while that was 80.9% when measured by Daichi kit. These results suggest that IRMA TSH was very precise and accurate method and might be used as a first line test in the evaluation of thyroid function

  1. Clinical utility of quantitative multi-antibody Polycheck immunoassays in the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Maciej; Oralewska, Beata; Cielecka-Kuszyk, Joanna; Trojanowska, Ilona; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-05-06

    To evaluate the clinical utility of multi-antibody strategies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD), the new quantitative Polycheck immunoassays were analysed. Polycheck Celiac Panels (PCPs) are immunoenzyme screening assays for the quantitative measurement of coeliac-specific immunoglobulin class G (IgG) or class A (IgA) in serum. Lines of relevant antigens are coated together with five IgG or IgA standard lines used for the standard curve as positive control. PCP IgA consists of human recombinant human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) as targets to detect IgA antibodies. PCP IgG consists of tTG, DGP and IF (intrinsic factor) antigens to detect antibodies in IgG class. PCPs were performed on 50 CD patients, including 6 cases with selective IgA deficiency, and 50 non-coeliac controls. CD diagnosis was performed according to the ESPGHAN recommendations: The presence of specific anti-tTG-IgA or anti-DGP-IgG (in the case of IgA deficiency) antibodies, typical histopathological changes in duodenal mucosa described in Marsh-Oberhüber classification as at least grade 2. The diagnosis of the majority of the control subjects was functional gastrointestinal disorders. The PCP results were compared with reference EliA Celikey. The usage of PCPs led to the correct identification of all CD patients. In our study, PCPs showed 100% agreement with the histopathological results. PCP IgA test showed a 98% concordance and correlated positively (R = 0.651, P = 0.0014) with EliA Celikey test. The highest specificity and positive predictive value (both 100%) were observed for the detection of Polycheck anti-tTG-IgA antibodies. The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (both 100%) were achieved by Polycheck anti-DGP-IgG antibody detection. The best performance (98% sensitivity and negative predictive value, 100% specificity and positive predictive value, diagnostic accuracy - AU ROC 99%) was observed for the strategy of using both PCP

  2. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  3. Utility of two methodologies in the clinical assessment of oral dryness in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachita Kodandera Chengappa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A good correlation of CODS with sialometry scores indicates that CODS can be utilized for semiquantitative assessment of oral dryness. It appears that UWS has poor correlation with duration of menopause. Xerostomia and UWS were not significantly related.

  4. Drug-eluting stents with biodegradable polymer for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus: clinical outcome at 2 years in a large population of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiemer M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Marcus Wiemer,1 Gian Battista Danzi,2 Nick West,3 Vassilios Voudris,4 René Koning,5 Stefan Hoffmann,6 Mario Lombardi,7 Josepa Mauri,8 Rade Babic,9 Fraser Witherow10On behalf of the NOBORI 2 Investigators 1Department of Cardiology, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine–Westphalia, Ruhr University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany; 2Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy; 3Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK; 4Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens, Greece; 5Clinique Saint Hilaire, Rouen, France; 6Vivantes Netzwerk für Gesundheit GmbH, Berlin, Germany; 7Azienda Ospedaliera Villa Sofia, Palermo, Italy; 8Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain; 9Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases Dedinje, Belgrade, Serbia; 10Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, UK Objective: This study investigates the safety and efficacy of a third-generation drug-eluting stent (DES with biodegradable polymer in the complex patient population of diabetes mellitus (DM. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN81649913. Background: Percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with DM are associated with a higher incidence of death, restenosis, and stent thrombosis as compared to non-diabetic patients. The use of a DES has been shown to improve outcomes in diabetic patients. Methods: Out of 3,067 patients, enrolled in 126 centers worldwide in the NOBORI 2 registry, 888 patients suffered from DM, 213 of them (14% being insulin-dependent DM (IDDM. Two years’ follow-up has been completed in this study. Results: At 1- and 2-year follow-up, 97% and 95% of the patients, respectively, were available. The reported target lesion failure (TLF rates at 1- and 2-year follow-up were 6.0% and 7.2% in the DM group, respectively, and 3.0% and 4.2% in the non-DM group, respectively (P<0.001 for both years. Inside the DM group, the TLF rates of 9.9% and 11.7% at the 1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively, in patients with IDDM were significantly higher than the TLF rates of 4

  5. Impact of early in-hospital medication review by clinical pharmacists on health services utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne M Hohl

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events are a leading cause of emergency department visits and unplanned admissions, and prolong hospital stays. Medication review interventions aim to identify adverse drug events and optimize medication use. Previous evaluations of in-hospital medication reviews have focused on interventions at discharge, with an unclear effect on health outcomes. We assessed the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on the health outcomes of high-risk patients.We used a quasi-randomized design to evaluate a quality improvement project in three hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. We incorporated a clinical decision rule into emergency department triage pathways, allowing nurses to identify patients at high-risk for adverse drug events. After randomly selecting the first eligible patient for participation, clinical pharmacists systematically allocated subsequent high-risk patients to medication review or usual care. Medication review included obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing the patient's medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The primary outcome was the number of days spent in-hospital over 30 days, and was ascertained using administrative data. We used median and inverse propensity score weighted logistic regression modeling to determine the effect of pharmacist-led medication review on downstream health services use.Of 10,807 high-risk patients, 6,416 received early pharmacist-led medication review and 4,391 usual care. Their baseline characteristics were balanced. The median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.48 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.00 to 0.96; p = 0.058 in the medication review group compared to usual care, representing an 8% reduction in the median length of stay. Among patients under 80 years of age, the median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.60 days (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.17; p = 0.03, representing 11% reduction in the median length of stay

  6. Content of Diabetes-Associated Autoantibodies against Islet Autoantigens (IA-2A, GADA, IAA and the Level of Different Cytokines in Children and Adolescents on the Pre-Clinical and Early Clinical Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Popova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the data on the immunological mechanisms of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM on the preclinical and early clinical stages of disease formation on the basis of studying the features of T1DM pathogenesis, monitoring the process of autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β-cells by determining the content of diabetes-associated auto-antibodies (the incidence and titers dynamics, the study of the characteristics of cytokine secretion on the pre-clinical stage of T1DM development in children and adolescents. Introduction of new approaches to pre-clinical diagnosis of T1DM allowed determine the group of marker-positive children with burdened heredity and predictable risk of disease development. The study involved 450 healthy normoglycemic children and adolescents aged from 7 to 15 years old. It was revealed that 94 (26.7 % of 366 children with burdened hereditary by at least two-fold determination of DAAb had an increased DAAb titer, mainly GADA and IA-2A, the clinical debut of T1DM manifested in 49 (52.1 % of them from 6 months to 12 years (30.9 ± 3.2 months. T1DM developed in the same period in a child, that was 0.8 % of the 272 (73.3 % DAAb-negative children. There was determined a formula of combined incidence and values of simultaneously elevated DAAb titers to islet autoantigens, namely IA-2A + GADA, which are predictor of the duration of T1DM pre-clinical stage and debut occurrence. It has been also established a disturbance of cytokine production (increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-6 and FNO-α, IL-8 and IL-16 while reduced concentration of IL-4 in blood plasma as a key factor in the T1DM pathogenesis that causes the debut occurrence, and aggressiveness of its course.

  7. Clinical and scientific results in perinatal care of pregnancy complicated by insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelmis, J

    1998-01-01

    At the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Perinatal Unit for Diabetes and Fetal Growth, School of Medicine, Zagreb, perinatal care of pregnancies complicated with insulin dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM), has been performed for more than 36 years. The intention of this review is to show our own results in the management of IDDM pregnancies and the latest clinical advances in perinatal care of such pregnancies. Pregnancy complicated with IDDM is at risk because of numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Recent advances in medicine, especially in diabetology and perinatology, helps clinician avoid or lessen antenatal or perinatal complications in IDDM pregnancies. The main result of improved perinatal care is that today fetal and neonatal mortality in IDDM pregnancy is almost equal to that of healthy pregnant population. Intensive preconceptual care and optimal regulation of IDDM have resulted not only in decreased perinatal mortality but also in a decreased rate of congenital malformation. Tight glycemia control during pregnancy has a beneficial effect on fetal growth. Intensive control of fetal growth, verification of lung maturation at term by amniocenthesis, and control of fetal oxygenation will result in delivery of a mature eutrophic newborn with the lowest rate of neonatal complications possible. Perinatal mortality of less than 2% in IDDM pregnancy can be obtained by planned delivery between 38 and 39 weeks of gestation by either vaginal route or cesarean section, depending on indications. After delivery, intensive care of the newborn is necessary.

  8. Random blood glucose may be used to assess long-term glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a rural African clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jon B; Nordin, Lovisa S; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Thomsen, Jakúp A; Street, Laura A; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Christensen, Dirk L

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of random blood glucose (RBG) on good glycaemic control among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a rural African setting. Cross-sectional study at St. Francis' Hospital in eastern Zambia. RBG and HbA1c were measured during one clinical review only. Other information obtained was age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, urine albumin-creatinine ratio, duration since diagnosis and medication. One hundred and one patients with DM (type 1 DM = 23, type 2 DM = 78) were included. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient revealed a significant correlation between RBG and HbA1c among the patients with type 2 DM (r = 0.73, P < 0.001) but not patients with type 1 DM (r = 0.17, P = 0.44). Furthermore, in a multivariate linear regression model (R(2) = 0.71) RBG (per mmol/l increment) (B = 0.28, 95% CI:0.24-0.32, P < 0.001) was significantly associated with HbA1c among the patients with type 2 DM. Based on ROC analysis (AUC = 0.80, SE = 0.05), RBG ≤7.5 mmol/l was determined as the optimal cut-off value for good glycaemic control (HbA1c <7.0% [53 mmol/mol]) among patients with type 2 DM (sensitivity = 76.7%; specificity = 70.8%; positive predictive value = 62.2%; negative predictive value = 82.9%). Random blood glucose could possibly be used to assess glycaemic control among patients with type 2 DM in rural settings of sub-Saharan Africa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Effect of Green Tea versus Sour Tea on Insulin Resistance, Lipids Profiles and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: By decreasing oxidative stress and whereby decreasing insulin resistance, it may be possible to decrease complications of Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Green tea and sour tea contain phytochemicals which have anti-oxidative function. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of sour and green tea consumption on insulin resistance and oxidative stress in DM. Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial in which 100 type 2 diabetes patients were randomly assigned into sour tea group (ST and green tea group (GT. The patients were instructed to drink 150ml sour tea and green tea infusion, respectively, three times a day for 4 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, fructosamine, lipid profiles, fasting blood insulin (FBI, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; beta cell function (b%, insulin sensitivity (S% and malondialdehyde (MDA were monitored. Results: HDL-c significantly increased in both groups. The median of FBI in GT showed significant decrease (8.5 to 6.6 μIU/mL unlike the ST which showed significant increase (8.2 to 16.3 μIU/mL. The median of HOMA-IR after the intervention in GT showed lower levels than the ST (1.1 vs. 1.6, P=0.004. The median of b% only in ST showed significant increase from 38.2% at the baseline to 47.7% after the intervention. The mean of S% only in ST showed significant decrease after the intervention. Conclusion: This study shows that the use of 150 ml infusion of green tea or sour tea, three times a day for four weeks, has positive effect on insulin resistance and certain lipoproteins in type 2 DM. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201107317161N1

  10. Trends in the utilization of medical imaging from 2003 to 2011: clinical encounters offer a complementary patient-centered focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodoo, Martey S; Duszak, Richard; Hughes, Danny R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate trends in utilization and spending for medical imaging, using medical visits resulting in imaging as a novel metric of utilization. Utilization and spending for medical imaging were examined using (1) Medicare Part B claims data from 2003 to 2011 to measure per-enrollee spending and (2) household component events data on the elderly Medicare-age population from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2003 to 2010 to measure utilization as a function of clinical encounters. Annual health spending and Medicare payments for imaging for the elderly population grew from $294 per enrollee in 2003 to $418 in 2006 and had declined to $390 by 2011. Over this entire time, however, annual medical visits by a similar Medicare-age (≥ 65 years old) population resulting in imaging trended consistently downward, from 12.8% in 2003 to 10.6% in 2011. Despite early growth and then more recent declines in average Medicare spending per enrollee since 2003, the percentage of patient encounters resulting in medical imaging has significantly and consistently declined nationwide. Spending alone is thus an incomplete measure of changes in the role and utilization of medical imaging in overall patient care. As policymakers focus on medical imaging, a thoughtful analysis of payment policy influencing imaging utilization, and its role in concurrent and downstream patient care, will be critical to ensure appropriate patient access. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nurses' evaluations of the feasibility and the clinical utility of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélinas, Céline

    2010-06-01

    Feasibility and clinical utility are essential characteristics to consider when it comes to developing or selecting a pain assessment tool to implement into practice. However, these characteristics have not been widely studied with available pain assessment tools in critically ill adults. The objective of this study was to describe nurses' evaluations of the feasibility and clinical utility of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in assessing pain in critically ill ventilated adults. A descriptive design was used. Of the 51 nurses who used the CPOT with the enrolled patients (n = 55), 33 returned their completed evaluation form. Overall, the feasibility and clinical utility of the CPOT were positively evaluated by the nurse participants. More than 90% of them supported that the directives about the use of the CPOT were clear and that it was simple to understand and easy to complete. Regarding its clinical utility, a little more than 70% of the nurses mentioned that the CPOT was helpful for nursing practice and recommended its use routinely. They acknowledged that the CPOT provided them with a common language and a standardized way to assess patients' pain. Half of the nurse participants supported that the CPOT had influenced their practice. On the other hand, six nurses mentioned that they were already sensitive to nonverbal cues of pain before the introduction of the CPOT. In conclusion, the CPOT is a valid behavioral pain scale, which has been suggested by experts in recent critical reviews. So far, the CPOT is being used for research purposes and has been implemented into clinical practice of various health care centers of North America. (c) 2010 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Effectiveness and Changes in Care Utilization Derived from a Military Adolescent Multi-Disciplinary Headache Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-07

    clinics. Chronic headaches within the adolescent population have ben shown to have great morbidity on patient lives, including but no limited to missed...school/work days, and loss of parental work time getting to appointments. Some studies have been completed regarding chronic adolescent headaches, but at...this time nothing has been published regarding multi-disciplinary chronic headache clinics for adolescent children of military personnel. The purpose

  13. Clinical application of probiotics in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonucci, Livia Bordalo; Olbrich Dos Santos, Karina Maria; Licursi de Oliveira, Leandro; Rocha Ribeiro, Sonia Machado; Duarte Martino, Hercia Stampini

    2017-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been associated with dysbiosis and one of the possible routes to restore a healthy gut microbiota is by the regular ingestion of probiotics. We aimed to investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control, lipid profile, inflammation, oxidative stress and short chain fatty acids in T2D. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 50 volunteers consumed daily 120 g/d of fermented milk for 6 wk. Participants were assigned into two groups: probiotic group, consuming fermented milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12 (10 9  colony-forming units/d, each) and control group, consuming conventional fermented milk. Anthropometric measurements, body composition, fasting blood and faecal samples were taken at baseline and after 6 wk. 45 subjects out of 50 (90%) completed follow-up. After 6 wk, there was a significant decrease in fructosamine levels (-9.91 mmol/L; p = 0.04) and hemoglobin A 1 c tended to be lower (-0.67%; p=0.06) in probiotic group. TNF-α and resistin were significantly reduced in probiotic and control groups (-1.5 and -1.3 pg/mL, -.1 and -2.8 ng/mL, respectively), while IL-10 was significantly reduced (- 0.65 pg/mL; p probiotic and control groups, respectively; p probiotic group; p=0.02), total cholesterol (+0.55 for control group vs -0.15 for probiotic group; p=0.04) and LDL-cholesterol (+0.36 for control group vs -0.20 for probiotic group p=0.03). Probiotic consumption improved the glycemic control in T2D subjects, however, the intake of fermented milk seems to be involved with others metabolic changes, such as decrease in inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and resistin) and increase in the acetic acid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of genealogy and clinical family histories in documenting possible inheritance patterns for diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era: part 2. Genealogic evidence for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Josephine Imperato's paternal and maternal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2009-12-01

    Part 2 presents detailed genealogic information on Josephine Imperato's paternal and maternal lineages extending from four to seven generations into the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries. Among these lineages are some where early adult death over successive generations is perhaps indicative of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). These lineages, all in the town of San Prisco in Italy, include both paternal and maternal ones with the following surnames: Casaccia, Casertano, Cipriano, de Angelis, de Paulis, Peccerillo, Foniciello, di Monaco, Vaccarella, Valenziano, Ventriglia, and Zibella. Genealogic studies of eighteenth and nineteenth century vital records in this area of Italy cannot definitively establish type 2 diabetes mellitus as either an immediate or contributory cause of death. This is because causes of death were not recorded and because disease diagnostic capabilities were largely absent. Genealogic studies of those who lived in Italy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries can at best provide data on approximate age at time of death. Early adult death in this era was not uncommon. However, its presence over several successive generations in a lineage raises the possibility of inherited diseases prominent among which is type 2 DM.

  15. Clinical profile of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with sodium- glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors and experience in real-world clinical practice in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuatrecasas, Gabriel; Goñi-Goicoechea, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    The main aim of the treatment of type 2 diabetes is overall control of cardiovascular risk factors. Almost 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes do not achieve glycaemic targets, and a much higher percentage do not achieve weight and blood pressure targets, despite the therapeutic arsenal that has appeared in the last decade for the treatment of this disease. In addition, antidiabetic secretatogues and insulin are associated with weight gain and an increased risk of hyperglycaemic episodes. Clinical practice guidelines recommend sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) as an alternative in the same therapeutic step as the other options after initiation of metformin therapy. The present study reviews the most appropriate patient profile for SGLT2i therapy, based on their safety and efficacy demonstrated in controlled clinical trials. The article discusses which patients are at risk of experiencing the possible secondary effects due to the mechanism of action of this new therapeutic class, in whom SGLT2i should be used with caution. These considerations on the profile of patients suitable for SGLT2i therapy are contrasted with the results obtained in daily clinical practice, both in retrospective studies from other countries and from real-world experiences in Spain. This article presents a selection of studies performed in distinct centres with a minimum follow-up of 6 months and compares their results with those from clinical trials. SGLT2i are used in clinical practice in any therapeutic step and the efficacy results are very similar to those reported by controlled clinical trials, with a slightly higher proportion of genitourinary infections and a low dropout rate. Half the reported patients are diabetics receiving insulin therapy plus a gliflozin, showing the wide uptake of this therapeutic strategy by clinicians. SGLT2i are especially attractive due to their additional effectiveness in weight and blood pressure control and the possibility of using them

  16. Impact of standardized clinical assessment and management plans on resource utilization and costs in children after the arterial switch operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Rahul H; Jurgen, Brittney; Hamershock, Rose A; Friedman, Kevin G; Marshall, Audrey C; Samnaliev, Mihail; Graham, Dionne A; Jenkins, Kathy; Lock, James E; Powell, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) are a quality improvement initiative designed to reduce unnecessary utilization, decrease practice variation, and improve patient outcomes. We created a novel methodology, the SCAMP managed episode of care (SMEOC), which encompasses multiple encounters to assess the impact of the arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP on total costs. All ASO SCAMP patients (dates March 2009 to July 2015) were compared to a control group of ASO patients (January 2001 to February 2009). Patients were divided into "younger" (stress tests (P = .01), and a 14% total reduction in costs. The total cost savings of the ASO SCAMP was $216 649 in the first 6 years of the SCAMP. There was no difference in clinical outcomes between the historical and SCAMP cohorts. SCAMPs can improve resource utilization and reduce costs after the ASO operation while maintaining quality of care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cancer clinical trials in the era of genomic signatures: biomedical innovation, clinical utility, and regulatory-scientific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli-Laven, Nina; Bourret, Pascale; Keating, Peter; Cambrosio, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The paper examines two large-scale, North American and European clinical trials designed to validate two commercially available genomic tumor signatures that predict a patient's risk of breast cancer recurrence and response to chemotherapy. The paper builds on empirical evidence from the two trials to explore the emergence of diverse regulatory-scientific hybrids; that is, the paper discusses configurations of genomic practice and bioclinical work that depend on linkages between technical, commercial, patient, clinical, and legal interests and institutions. The development of the genomic signatures for each trial--Oncotype DX and MammaPrint--has followed quite different routes. Oncotype began as a commercial platform: the company that produced it did not discover a signature but rather constructed it by asking users at every step what clinical question they wanted the signature to answer and what data would be credible in that regard. The test has been designed to minimally disrupt existing clinical workflows. MammaPrint, on the other hand, began as a breast cancer signature: the researchers who discovered it, at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), established a company to commercialize it as a test after the fact. MammaPrint requires a change in pathologists' routines. Thus, while these two trials signify a new departure for clinical cancer trials on a number of levels--they both incorporate new models of interaction between biotech companies and public research, and they both aim to establish the clinical relevance of genomic markers--they also embody different socio-technical scripts: one attempts to accommodate established routines, while the other openly challenges prevailing evidential hierarchies and existing biomedical configurations.

  18. The clinical utility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harianto, Harry; Valente, Michael; Hoetomo, Soenarno; Anpalahan, Mahesan

    2014-01-01

    The current evidence suggests that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) should be an integral part of the diagnosis and management of hypertension. However, its uptake in routine clinical practice has been variable. This paper reviews the current evidence for the role of ABPM in clinical practice, including in hypotensive disorders and in specific comorbidities. It further discusses the clinical significance of abnormal ambulatory blood pressure patterns and hypertensive syndromes such as white coat, masked and resistant hypertension.

  19. Increasing Rural Health Clinic Utilization with SMS Updates: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Chicoine, Luke E.; Guzman, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines an alternative to monitoring staff at a public health clinic in rural Uganda. The program sent SMS updates regarding confirmed attendance of clinic staff and activities to randomly selected cell phone-owning households in the local community. A difference-in-difference approach is used to evaluate the impact of the SMS program, and finds the messages led to an increase in clinic attendance, the receipt of medicine, and reduced duration of illness for young children aged si...

  20. HLA-typing, clinical, and immunological characterization of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus phenotype from the German/Austrian DPV database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awa, Wendy L; Boehm, Bernard O; Rosinger, Silke; Achenbach, Peter; Ziegler, Anette G; Krause, Stephanie; Meissner, Thomas; Wiegand, Susanne; Reinehr, Thomas; Kapellen, Thomas; Karges, Beate; Eiermann, Thomas; Schober, Edith; Holl, Reinhard W

    2013-12-01

    To characterize the clinical and immunological features of HLA-typed youth with pediatric onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). One hundred and seven patients with clinically diagnosed T2DM (aged ≤20 yr at diagnosis) were examined. DNA and serum, obtained after a median diabetes duration of 2.2 (Q1-Q3: 0.8-4.6) yr, were used for centralized HLA-typing and autoantibody (GADA, IA-2A, ZnT8A) measurements. 64.6% of patients were female and median age at diagnosis was 13.8 (Q1-Q3: 11.6-15.4) yr. Patients were obese [median body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS): 2.6 (2.0-3.1)], 88.0% had a family history of diabetes and 40.2% a migration background. Islet autoantibodies were detected in 16 (15.0%), among which 7 (6.5%) had multiple islet autoantibodies. Autoantibody positive patients had poorer metabolic control than autoantibody negative patients [glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 8.1 (6.9-10.1) % vs. 6.6 (5.9-8.0) %; p = 0.033], while patients with HLA-DR genetic risk had higher BMI-SDS than those with HLA-DRXX [2.6 (2.4-3.7) vs. 2.4 (1.7-2.9); p = 0.007]. Metabolic syndrome (61.7%), microalbuminuria (13.4%), and retinopathy (3.9%) were diagnosed. Therapies used were lifestyle only (35.5%), oral anti-diabetics (OAD) only (43.3 %), insulin +  OAD (15.9%) and insulin only (5.6%). Patients with β-cell autoimmunity or HLA-DR genetic risk more frequently used insulin than confirmed T2DM patients (50.0 vs. 22.0%; p = 0.037) and less often had diabetic relatives (61.1 vs. 86.0%; p = 0.030). T2DM was confirmed in about 90% of patients while about 10% with β-cell autoimmunity or HLA-DR genetic risk likely had either T1.5DM or 'double diabetes' or an unknown diabetes type. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinical utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes with the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagoulias GS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available George S Panagoulias,1 John Doupis2,3 11st Department of Propaedeutic and Internal Medicine, Athens University Medical School, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Salamis Naval Hospital, Athens, Greece; 3Diabetes Division, Iatriko Paleou Falirou Medical Center, Athens, Greece Abstract: Fixed-dose combination (FDC products represent a widely accepted approach to type 2 diabetes treatment, given that monotherapies sometimes fail to meet the treatment targets – obtaining a sustained reduction in micro- and macrovascular complications. Saxagliptin (SAXA/metformin (MET FDC tablets can be used either alone or in combination with glyburide, thiazolidinediones, or insulin. It has been proven that the SAXA/MET combination leads to a significant improvement in glycemic control compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes that is inadequately controlled with MET alone. In addition, this FDC has been proven to be safe for people with diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular disease, elderly patients, and patients with impaired renal function (>30 mL/minute, with dosage modification. Patient compliance, adherence, and persistence to the therapeutic regimen has been shown to be very good, while the titration of each compound according to the patient's profile is easy, given the availability of different formulations. The SAXA/MET FDC is a patient-friendly, dosage-flexible, and hypoglycemia-safe regimen with very few adverse events and a neutral or even favorable effect on body weight. It achieves significant glycosylated hemoglobin A1c reduction helping the patient to achieve his/her individual glycemic goals. Keywords: DPP-4 inhibitors, saxagliptin, metformin, fixed-dose combination products, FDC products

  2. Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus Adversely Affect Outcomes after Cardiac Surgery in Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamszad, Pirouz; Rossano, Joseph W; Marino, Bradley S; Lowry, Adam W; Knudson, Jarrod D

    2016-09-01

    To assess how obesity or diabetes mellitus impacts outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery in pediatric hospitals. A multi-institutional, matched case-control study of the Pediatric Health Information System database was performed. Tertiary children's hospitals in the United States. All cardiac surgical cases in patients with obesity or diabetes mellitus between 2004 and 2012 were included. Cases were matched to controls by age, sex, race, and Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score. Mortality, surgical complications, and hospital utilization. Differences in outcome measures were assessed by chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. P value obesity or diabetes mellitus were matched to 629 controls. Cases demonstrated lower median household income than those in the control group ($38,031 [IQR $31,900-$48,844] vs. ($41,896 [IQR $32,854-$56,020], P 96 hours (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7) and higher rate of total parenteral nutrition use (7.2% vs. 4.5%, P = .040). Median hospital charges were higher in cases (clinical: $6,696 vs. $5,872; laboratory: $14,168 vs. $12,251; pharmacy: $12,971 vs. $10,426; imaging: $6,259 vs. $5,660; P ≤ .030 for all). The presence of obesity or diabetes mellitus was associated with increased postoperative morbidity, hospital utilization, and cost in patients undergoing cardiac surgery in pediatric hospitals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies.18F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  4. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. (18)F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  5. Clinical utility of the Tower of London--Drexel University, Second Edition (TOLDX) after adolescent traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Jacobus; Larsen, Tory

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 43 adolescents with traumatic brain injury was evaluated on the Tower of London-Drexel University, second edition (TOLDX; Culbertson & Zillmer, 2005), and compared to that of 43 demographically matched healthy controls. TOLDX variables had a classification accuracy of 69.77%, with clinical patients demonstrating deficits in pre-planning of a schema as well as keeping subgoals in spatial working memory during execution. Time to follow commands and diffuse lesions on neuroimaging accounted for moderate amounts of variance in TOLDX variables. The findings support the clinical utility of the TOLDX in the assessment of adolescents with traumatic brain injury.

  6. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-08-30

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  7. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-06-10

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  8. Clinical Utility and Safety of a Model-Based Patient-Tailored Dose of Vancomycin in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Stéphanie; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Biran, Valérie; Lopez, Emmanuel; Madeleneau, Doriane; Wallon, Camille; Zana-Taïeb, Elodie; Virlouvet, Anne-Laure; Rioualen, Stéphane; Zhao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling has often been applied to evaluate vancomycin pharmacokinetics in neonates. However, clinical application of the model-based personalized vancomycin therapy is still limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility and safety of a model-based patient-tailored dose of vancomycin in neonates. A model-based vancomycin dosing calculator, developed from a population pharmacokinetic study, has been integrated into the routine clinical care in 3 neonatal intensive care units (Robert Debré, Cochin Port Royal, and Clocheville hospitals) between 2012 and 2014. The target attainment rate, defined as the percentage of patients with a first therapeutic drug monitoring serum vancomycin concentration achieving the target window of 15 to 25 mg/liter, was selected as an endpoint for evaluating the clinical utility. The safety evaluation was focused on nephrotoxicity. The clinical application of the model-based patient-tailored dose of vancomycin has been demonstrated in 190 neonates. The mean (standard deviation) gestational and postnatal ages of the study population were 31.1 (4.9) weeks and 16.7 (21.7) days, respectively. The target attainment rate increased from 41% to 72% without any case of vancomycin-related nephrotoxicity. This proof-of-concept study provides evidence for integrating model-based antimicrobial therapy in neonatal routine care. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cell counting through CellSearch®: the dilemma of a concept suspended in Limbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondi C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Raimondi,1 Angela Gradilone,1 Giuseppe Naso,2 Enrico Cortesi,2 Paola Gazzaniga1 1Dipartimento Medicina Molecolare, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomopatologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy Abstract: To date, 10 years after the first demonstration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer using the US Food and Drug Administration–cleared system CellSearch®, the potential utility of CTCs in early clinical development of drugs, their role as a surrogate marker of response to therapy, and their molecular analysis for patient stratification for targeted therapies are still major unsolved questions. Great expectations are pinned on the ongoing interventional trials aimed to demonstrate that CTCs might be of value for guiding treatment of patients and predicting cancer progression. To fill the gap between theory and practice with regard to the clinical utility of CTCs, a bridge is needed, taking into account innovative design for clinical trials, a revised definition of traditional CTCs, next-generation CTC technology, the potential clinical application of CTC analysis in non-validated settings of disease, and finally, expanding the number of patients enrolled in the studies. In this regard, the results of the first European pooled analysis definitely validated the independent prognostic value of CTC counting in metastatic breast cancer patients. Keywords: CTC, clinical trials, prognosis

  10. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis screening for school, community, and clinical health promotion practice utilizing the PRECEDE-PROCEED model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Lawrence A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a commonly performed procedure for school children during the high risk years. The PRECEDE-PROCEDE (PP model is a health promotion planning model that has not been utilized for the clinical diagnosis of AIS. The purpose of this research is to study AIS in the school age population using the PP model and its relevance for community, school, and clinical health promotion. Methods MEDLINE was utilized to locate AIS data. Studies were screened for relevance and applicability under the auspices of the PP model. Where data was unavailable, expert opinion was utilized based on consensus. Results The social assessment of quality of life is limited with few studies approaching the long-term effects of AIS. Epidemiologically, AIS is the most common form of scoliosis and leading orthopedic problem in children. Behavioral/environmental studies focus on discovering etiologic relationships yet this data is confounded because AIS is not a behavioral. Illness and parenting health behaviors can be appreciated. The educational diagnosis is confounded because AIS is an orthopedic disorder and not behavioral. The administration/policy diagnosis is hindered in that scoliosis screening programs are not considered cost-effective. Policies are determined in some schools because 26 states mandate school scoliosis screening. There exists potential error with the Adam's test. The most widely used measure in the PP model, the Health Belief Model, has not been utilized in any AIS research. Conclusion The PP model is a useful tool for a comprehensive study of a particular health concern. This research showed where gaps in AIS research exist suggesting that there may be problems to the implementation of school screening. Until research disparities are filled, implementation of AIS screening by school, community, and clinical health promotion will be compromised. Lack of data and perceived importance by

  11. Depression among patients with diabetes mellitus in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Depression is associated with diabetes mellitus and affects treatment goals negatively. We aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and identify its socio-demographic or clinical correlates among patients with diabetes mellitus attending an out-patient clinic in Nigeria. Methods. Two hundred ...

  12. Using Merged Clinical and Claims Registry Data to Identify High Utilizers of Surgical Inpatient Care 1 Year after Colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stey, Anne M; Russell, Marcia M; Zingmond, David S; Gibbons, Melinda M; Hall, Bruce L; Needleman, Jack; Lawson, Elise H; Liu, Nancy; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-08-01

    Under bundled payment initiatives, providers will be held financially responsible for patients' acute and post-acute care costs. Certain patients, termed high utilizers, use disproportionate shares of resources during 1 year. The aim of this study was to identify high utilizers, describe their costs, and determine whether preoperative characteristics predict high utilizer status. Colectomy patients with 1-year follow-up were identified in a linked clinical (American College of Surgeons NSQIP) and administrative (Medicare inpatient claims) dataset (2005 to 2008). Cost of inpatient care was calculated by multiplying patient Medicare charges in each cost center by cost-to-charge ratios from the Medicare cost reports. A mixed-effects logistic model quantified the association between preoperative characteristics and being a high utilizer after elective and emergent colectomies. One thousand and fifty-five of 10,561 colectomy patients accounted for >50% of the inpatient care cost of the entire cohort during 1 year postoperatively. This top decile of patients were labeled high utilizers and had substantially greater costs in the following cost centers: intensive care ($36,322 vs $0), respiratory ($2,875 vs $22), radiology ($649 vs $29), and cardiology ($5,057 vs $166) (all p < 0.001). High utilizers more frequently had emergent index colectomies (43% vs 17%; p < 0.001). Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists class IV and V had 2-fold increased odds of being high utilizers after both elective (odds ratio = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.89-3.90) and emergent colectomies (odds ratio = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.23-3.55). Patients in the top cost decile account for the majority of costs in the year after colectomy, disproportionately accumulate those costs in particular cost centers, and can be identified preoperatively. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Application of Targeted Deep Sequencing in Solid-Cancer Patients and Utility for Biomarker-Selected Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Nayoung K D; Park, Joon Oh; Ahn, Soomin; Yun, Jae-Won; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Peter J; Kim, Hee Cheol; Sohn, Tae Sung; Choi, Dong Il; Cho, Jong Ho; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Hong, Sung No; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Jeeyun

    2017-10-01

    Molecular profiling of actionable mutations in refractory cancer patients has the potential to enable "precision medicine," wherein individualized therapies are guided based on genomic profiling. The molecular-screening program was intended to route participants to different candidate drugs in trials based on clinical-sequencing reports. In this screening program, we used a custom target-enrichment panel consisting of cancer-related genes to interrogate single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy number variants, and a subset of gene fusions. From August 2014 through April 2015, 654 patients consented to participate in the program at Samsung Medical Center. Of these patients, 588 passed the quality control process for the 381-gene cancer-panel test, and 418 patients were included in the final analysis as being eligible for any anticancer treatment (127 gastric cancer, 122 colorectal cancer, 62 pancreatic/biliary tract cancer, 67 sarcoma/other cancer, and 40 genitourinary cancer patients). Of the 418 patients, 55 (12%) harbored a biomarker that guided them to a biomarker-selected clinical trial, and 184 (44%) patients harbored at least one genomic alteration that was potentially targetable. This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase. This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  14. The clinical utility of naturalistic action test in differentiating mild cognitive impairment from early dementia in memory clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Irene; Ntlholang, Ontefetse; Crosby, Lisa; Cunningham, Conal; Lawlor, Brian

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the validity of the Naturalistic Action Test in differentiating Mild Cognitive Impairment from early dementia compared to clinical diagnosis and ascertain Naturalistic Action Test cut-off points. This was a cross-sectional study of 70 consecutive patients diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment attending the memory clinic in St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Patients with a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment who attended for routine annual assessment were asked to participate in the study. The Naturalistic Action Test was carried out after the patient had completed their routine assessment in the clinic. The Area under the Curve, AUC ± SE was 0.808 ± 0.058, p Test. The difference was not related to age, sex, level of education or informant. Using the Youden index, we determined a Naturalistic Action Test cut-off score of ≥11 for Mild Cognitive Impairment in our study (PPV 50%, NPV 91%, sensitivity 78%, specificity 73% and accuracy of 74%). There was discrepancy in 18 patients using the new cut-off point (≥11 for Mild Cognitive Impairment vs ≤10 for dementia). The Naturalistic Action Test is a useful tool that can increase diagnostic accuracy in differentiating Mild Cognitive Impairment from early dementia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Immediate effect of passive static stretching versus resistance exercises on postprandial blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudut, Peeyoosha; Rajan, Abey P

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly rising all over the globe at an alarming rate. In India, more than 61.3 million people have been presently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is possible to control the circulating blood glucose levels by reducing life style risk factors through physical activities comprising of muscle stretches, aerobic training, resistance exercises (REs), yoga, etc. The aim of this study is to identify and compare the immediate effect of passive static stretching (PSS) versus RE on blood glucose level in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study included 51 participants between the age of 40-65 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to study the immediate effect of 60-min PSS (n=25) and 60-min RE (n=26). The outcome measure was blood glucose level which was checked by glucometer (free-style neo). Blood sugar was assessed at 3 points of time that included fasting blood sugar level, 2 hr after the meal and immediately after the exercise regimen. Results of this study showed significant reduction in blood glucose level in subjects according to glucometer with PSS ( P =0.000) and RE ( P =0.00). However, both groups demonstrated equal effect in terms of lowering blood sugar level immediately after the exercise. The conclusion is both PSS and RE are effective in reducing postprandial blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mellitus and must be prescribed for the patients who demonstrate difficulty in controlling post prandial spike.

  16. Are Clinical Trial Experiences Utilized?: A Differentiated Model of Medical Sites’ Information Transfer Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Schultz, Carsten; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The collaboration with medical professionals in pharmaceutical clinical trials facilitates opportunities to gain valuable market information concerning product functionality issues, as well as issues related to market implementation and adoption. However, previous research on trial management lacks...

  17. Temporal query of attribute-value patient data: utilizing the constraints of clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Aniruddha M.; Brandt, Cynthia; Nadkarni, Prakash M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe an interface and architecture for ad hoc temporal query of TrialDB, a clinical study data management system (CSDMS). A clinical study focuses primarily on the effect of therapy on a group of patients, who have individually enrolled in a study at different times. Relative times (chronological offsets from the time of enrollment) are therefore more useful than absolute times when collectively describing therapeutic or adverse events. For logistic reasons, study parameter values are typically recorded at fixed relative times (‘study events’), which serve as timestamps and can be used by CSDMS temporal query algorithms to simplify temporal computations. The entity-attribute-value model of clinical data storage, used by both CSDMSs and clinical patient record systems, complicates temporal query. To apply temporal operators, data for parameters of interest must first be transiently converted into conventional relational form, with one column per parameter. PMID:12706183

  18. Clinical utility of neurostimulation devices in the treatment of overactive bladder: current perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.A.W.; Martens, F.M.J.; Wall, L.L. de; Breda, H.M.K. van; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This review describes the evidence from established and experimental therapies that use electrical nerve stimulation to treat lower urinary tract dysfunction. METHODS: Clinical studies on established treatments such as percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (P-PTNS),

  19. Utility of Amyloid and FDG-PET in Clinical Practice: Differences Between Secondary and Tertiary Care Memory Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Carmen; Suarez, Andrea Gonzalez; Pozueta, Ana; Riancho, Javier; Kazimierczak, Martha; Bravo, Maria; Jimenez Bonilla, Julio; de Arcocha Torres, Marıa; Quirce, Remedios; Banzo, Ignacio; Vazquez-Higuera, Jose Luis; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Eloy; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2018-04-27

    The clinical utility of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) has not been fully established. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of amyloid imaging on clinical decision making in a secondary care unit and compare our results with a previous study in a tertiary center following the same methods. We reviewed retrospectively 151 cognitively impaired patients who underwent amyloid (Pittsburgh compound B [PiB]) PET and were evaluated clinically before and after the scan in a secondary care unit. One hundred and fifty concurrently underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. We assessed changes between the pre- and post-PET clinical diagnosis and Alzheimer's disease treatment plan. The association between PiB/FDG results and changes in management was evaluated using χ2 and multivariate logistic regression. Concordance between classification based on scan readings and baseline diagnosis was 66% for PiB and 47% for FDG. The primary diagnosis changed after PET in 17.2% of cases. When examined independently, discordant PiB and discordant FDG were both associated with diagnostic change (p PET due to a higher likelihood of diagnostic change. We found that changes in diagnosis after PET in our secondary center almost doubled those of our previous analysis of a tertiary unit (9% versus 17.2%). Our results offer some clues about the rational use of amyloid PET in a secondary care memory unit stressing its utility in mild cognitive impairment patients.

  20. Optimizing postpartum care for the patient with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Noelle G; Niznik, Charlotte M; Yee, Lynn M

    2017-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus poses well-established risks to both the mother and infant. As >50% of women with gestational diabetes mellitus will develop type 2 diabetes mellitus in their lifetime, performing postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing is paramount to initiation of appropriate lifestyle interventions and pharmacologic therapy. Nonetheless, test completion among women with gestational diabetes mellitus is estimated to be diabetes mellitus. Based on existing evidence, we propose best practices for the postpartum care of women with gestational diabetes mellitus: (1) enhanced patient support for identifying long-term health care providers, (2) patient-centered medical home utilization when possible, (3) patient and provider test reminders, and (4) formalized obstetrician-primary care provider hand offs using the Situation Background Assessment Recommendation (SBAR) mnemonic. These strategies deserve future investigation to solidify a multilevel approach for identifying and preventing the continuum of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and safety of linagliptin in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled by metformin: A multinational 24-week, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing; Yang, Jinkui; Yang, Gangyi; Gong, Yan; Patel, Sanjay; Zhang, Candice; Izumoto, Toshiyasu; Ning, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Asia, clinical trials for glucose-lowering therapies are often dominated by Caucasian and/or Western populations. The present Phase III randomized placebo-controlled double-blind, 24-week study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin added to metformin in Asian T2DM patients. In all, 306 patients (n = 265 Chinese; n = 24 Malaysian; n = 17 Filipino), aged 18-80 years with HbA1c between ≥7.0 and ≤10.0% and on metformin therapy were randomized (2:1) to either linagliptin 5 mg daily or placebo added to metformin. Antidiabetes drugs other than metformin were washed out prior to randomization. The primary endpoint was change in mean HbA1c from baseline after 24 weeks. Baseline characteristics were well-matched between the groups (overall mean [±SD] HbA1c 8.0 ± 0.8%). Adjusted mean (±SE) HbA1c decreased in the linagliptin and placebo groups by -0.66 ± 0.05 and -0.14 ± 0.07%, respectively (placebo-corrected difference -0.52 ± 0.09%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.70, -0.34; P < 0.0001). In patients with baseline HbA1c ≥8.5%, the placebo-corrected decrease in HbA1c was -0.89 ± 0.17% (P < 0.0001). Adverse events occurred in similar proportions in the linagliptin and placebo patients (27.3% and 28.0%, respectively) and few were considered drug-related (2.4% and 0.0%, respectively). Hypoglycemia occurred in 1.0% of patients in both groups. Linagliptin therapy was weight neutral. Linagliptin 5 mg was efficacious and well tolerated over 24 weeks in Asian patients with T2DM inadequately controlled by metformin. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for inactive people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: design of a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heijden Marion MP

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sufficient exercise is important for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, as it can prevent future health problems. Despite, it is estimated that only 30-40% of people with T2DM are sufficiently active. One of the psychosocial constructs that is believed to influence physical activity behaviour, is exercise self-efficacy. The goal of this study is to evaluate a patient-tailored exercise intervention for people with T2DM that takes exercise self-efficacy into account. Methods/Design This study is conducted as a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients are eligible when they are diagnosed with T2DM, exercise less than advised in the ADA guideline of 150 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, have an BMI >25 and are between 18 and 80 years old. Recruitment takes place at a Primary care organization of general practitioners and practice nurses in the south of the Netherlands. Participants are allocated to three groups: An advice intervention -for participants with a high exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention, an intensive intervention -for participants with a low exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention accomplished by a group based intervention, and a control group in which participants receive regular Dutch diabetes care. The primary outcome measure of this study is physical activity. Secondary outcome measures are health status, (symptoms of depression, exercise self-efficacy, Body Mass Index (BMI, blood pressure and glycemic control. Discussion We aimed to design an intervention that can be implemented in Primary care, but also to design an easy accessible program. This study is innovative as it is -to our best knowledge- the first study that takes level of exercise self-efficacy of people with T2DM into account by means of giving extra support to those with the

  3. Clinical study on the effect of simvastatin on the bone healing in elderly patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture merged with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of simvastatin on the bone mineral density (BMD and bone metabolism in elderly patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture merged with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods: A total of 120 patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture merged with T2DM who were admitted in our hospital from June, 2014 to October, 2016 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group (n=60. The patients in the two groups were given minimally invasive PFNA, and blood sugar and blood pressure reducing. The patients in the control group were given alendronate sodium, 70 mg/time, 1 time/week. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given simvastatin, 40 mg/time,1 time/every night. After 6-month treatment, the efficacy was evaluated. The morning fasting peripheral venous blood before and after treatment in the two groups was collected. The full automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the serum Ca, P, and GHb. ECLI was used to detect the serum OC and BAP. ELISA was used to detect the serum TRACP-5b and s-CTX. The dual energy X-ray absorptiomery was used to detect BMD level of the forearm, femoral neck, and anterial position of lumbar spine. Results: Ca, P, and GHb levels after treatment in the two groups were not significantly changed (P>0.05. BMD level of the forearm, femoral neck, and anterial position of lumbar spine after treatment in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05. OC and BAP levels after treatment in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05, while s-CTX and TRACP-5b levels were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Simvastatin can significantly improve the bone metabolism abnormality in elderly patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture merged with T2DM, enhance BMD, and promote the bone formation and fracture

  4. The Clinical Utility of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray in Patients With Epilepsy at a Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabik, Sarah A; Standridge, Shannon M; Greiner, Hansel M; Neilson, Derek E; Pilipenko, Valentina V; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Connor, Jessica A; Spaeth, Christine G

    2015-11-01

    Microarray testing has revolutionized clinical cytogenetics, as it provides a significantly higher resolution and greater clinical yield than karyotype analysis. This study assessed the clinical utility of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray in patients with epilepsy. Study subjects were patients between the ages of birth to 23 years who were diagnosed with epilepsy and had a microarray performed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Statistical analysis explored the association of microarray results and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seizure type, and structural malformations. Approximately 17.7% (26/147) of participants had an abnormal microarray as defined by laboratory guidelines. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal brain MRI or seizure type between the abnormal and normal microarray groups. There was a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malformations (P microarrays. Clinicians should consider microarray analysis in individuals who have epilepsy, especially in combination with musculoskeletal malformation or cardiovascular malformation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Podocyte injury in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Nikolaevna Bobkova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of podocyte injury and their correlation with metabolic and haemodynamic disorders in diabetes mellitus are considered in detail; the results of the last experimental and clinical studies on this problem are presented in this review. Authors shined the biomarkers, reflecting expressiveness of podocytopathy and structural and functional glomerular changes at diabetic nephropathy. Modern possibilities of treatment for their correction to prevent diabetic nephropathy progression are discussed.

  6. Association and clinical utility of NAT2 in the prediction of isoniazid-induced liver injury in Singaporean patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Ling Chan

    Full Text Available Isoniazid (INH is part of the first-line-therapy for tuberculosis (TB but can cause drug-induced liver injury (DILI. Several candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been previously identified but the clinical utility of these SNPs in the prediction of INH-DILI remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the association between selected candidate SNPs and the risk of INH-DILI and to assess the clinical validity of associated variants in a Singaporean population.This was a case-control study where 24 INH-DILI cases and 79 controls were recruited from the TB control unit in a tertiary hospital. Logistic regression was used to test for the association between candidate SNPs and INH-DILI. NAT2 acetylator status was inferred from genotypes and tested for association with INH-DILI. Finally, clinical validity measures were estimated for significant variants.Two SNPs in NAT2 (rs1041983 and rs1495741 and NAT2 slow acetylators (SA were significantly associated with INH-DILI (OR (95% CI = 13.86 (4.30-44.70, 0.10 (0.03-0.33 and 9.98 (3.32-33.80, respectively. Based on an INH-DILI prevalence of 10%, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of NAT2 SA were 75%, 78%, 28% and 97%, respectively. The population attributable fraction (PAF and number needed to test (NNT for NAT2 SA were estimated to be 0.67 and 4.08, respectively. A model with clinical and NAT2 acetylator status provided significantly better prediction for INH-DILI than a clinical model alone (area under receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.863 vs. 0.766, respectively, p = 0.027.We show the association between NAT2 SA and INH-DILI in a Singaporean population and demonstrated its clinical utility in the prediction of INH-DILI.

  7. Utilization of Clinical Trials Registries in Obstetrics and Gynecology Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibens, Michael E; Chong, A Benjamin; Vassar, Matt

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the use of clinical trials registries in published obstetrics and gynecologic systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We performed a metaepidemiologic study of systematic reviews between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, from six obstetric and gynecologic journals (Obstetrics & Gynecology, Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, Human Reproduction Update, Gynecologic Oncology, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology). All systematic reviews included after exclusions were independently reviewed to determine whether clinical trials registries had been included as part of the search process. Studies that reported using a trials registry were further examined to determine whether trial data were included in the analysis of these systematic reviews. Our initial search resulted in 292 articles, which was narrowed to 256 after exclusions. Of the 256 systematic reviews meeting our selection criteria, 47 (18.4%) used a clinical trials registry. Eleven of the 47 (23.4%) systematic reviews found unpublished data and two included unpublished data in their results. A majority of systematic reviews in clinical obstetrics and gynecology journals do not conduct searches of clinical trials registries or do not make use of data obtained from these searches. Failure to make use of such data may lead to an inaccurate summary of available evidence and may contribute to an overrepresentation of published, statistically significant outcomes.

  8. Assessing the Accuracy of Eyelid Measurements Utilizing the Volk Eye Check System and Clinical Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kunal R; Yeganeh, Amir; Goldberg, Robert A; Rootman, Daniel B

    2017-08-23

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy of marginal reflex distance 1 (MRD1) measurements obtained by the Volk Eye Check system, a modified smartphone that measures MRD1 automatically, relative to clinical and digital measurements. In this prospective observational study of adults with normal eyelids and ptosis, MRD1 was measured clinically, digitally, and automatically with the Volk device. Eyes were divided into successful versus unsuccessful Volk trial groups; successful eyes were then subdivided into control and ptosis subgroups. The primary outcome measures were mean MRD1 obtained by the 3 modalities. Secondary outcome measures included the success rate of the device and the prevalence of ptosis within the successful and unsuccessful groups. In the overall sample of 88 eyes, clinical and digital MRD1 were not significantly different. Among eyes with successful Volk trials, significant differences in MRD1 measured by the 3 modalities were as follows: in the successful group, Volk MRD1 (3.05 mm) was significantly (p MRD1 (2.68 mm); in the ptosis subgroup, Volk MRD1 (2.47 mm) was significantly higher than clinical (2.05 mm; p MRD1 (1.91 mm; p MRD1 (mean difference, 1.21 mm; p MRD1 well in normal patients but overestimates MRD1 in patients with ptosis. It may be most appropriate in assessing patients with normal or elevated eyelid position. Clinical and digital MRD1 measurements were not different than each other.

  9. Utilizing the language of Jean Watson's caring theory within a computerized clinical documentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The healthcare facility described in the following article is part of an eight-hospital organization that adopted Watson's Theory of Caring as part of their nursing philosophy. According to Watson, this theory is an attempt to find and deepen the language specific to nurse caring relations and its many meanings. Yet during the implementation of the theory within the setting described, it was noted that there was no mechanism in the current documentation system for clinical nursing staff to document the patient experience using any language specific to the theory. Nursing members recognized an opportunity to develop a new context in charting during an extensive clinical documentation system upgrade. A discussion of the steps taken and the results within the clinical documentation system supporting the newly adopted caring philosophy are summarized here.

  10. The clinical utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: recent in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstock, A. William; Kwock, Lester; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Schiro, Sharon; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has resulted in improved outcomes in patients treated with gastrointestinal malignancies and squamous cancers of the head and neck. In our first aim, we proposed that the enhanced cell kill and tumor regression observed with the combination of 5-FU and radiation is related to radiation potentiating the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU. Using fluorine-19 ( 19 F) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) we non-invasively determined the tumor clearance rates of 5-FU +/- radiation in an animal model and used this research tool to predict tumor response in patients receiving concurrent radiation and 5-FU therapy. Our second aim was to evaluate the use of proton ( 1 H) nmr spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the spectral characteristics of malignant tumors in the head and neck and liver and correlate these clinical observations with in vitro and in vivo data. Materials and Methods: 1 H and 19 F spectroscopic analysis were performed with a 2.0T Otsuka magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. 1 H nmr patient studies were done on a clinical 1.5T Philips MR system. In vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies were performed on a 11 T Bruker nmr system. Animal experiments for the 19 F nmr studies were performed on 3-6 week old female (Nu/Nu) athymic nude mice. Animals were injected s.c. with 10 6 human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. At a tumor size of 1.0 cm, animals in the first group received i.v. 5-FU (100 mg/kg) immediately prior to spectroscopic analysis. Animals in the second group were treated with a single radiation dose of either 2 Gy or 10 Gy just prior to the 5-FU injection and subsequent spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analyses were performed at 20-30 minute intervals for 4-6 hr's. Results: 19 F nmr: A decrease in tumor clearance was observed in tumors pre-treated with a single dose of irradiation (2.0 Gy and 10 Gy). The clearance rate of the 5-FU for non-irradiated animals was 0.0178 min

  11. Establishing the clinical utility of epigenetic markers in cancer: many challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzour, Peter; Hesson, Luke B; Ward, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    The use of epigenetic biomarkers in cancer management relies on the availability of robust assays and evidence that these markers are able to segregate clinically significant groups of patients. While many cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic modifications, it is far simpler to develop molecular tests that detect genetic rather than epigenetic changes. In this special report, we will describe the challenges associated with developing epigenetic assays and the practical issues that must be overcome before they can be used in the clinic.

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians sh...

  13. An assessment of the clinical utility of routine antenatal screening of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This prospective study was designed to provide the frequencies of the haemoglobin genotypes, ABO and Rh blood groups and their effects on the haematocrit values among pregnant women in Port Harcourt. One hundred and eighty (180) pregnant women at their first clinic attendance and in their first pregnancy (parity - 0) ...

  14. The Clinical Utility of Personality Subtypes in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Crosby, Ross D.; Ringham, Rebecca M.; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Gaskill, Jill A.; Forbush, Kelsie T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Elucidation of clinically relevant subtypes has been proposed as a means of advancing treatment research, but classifying anorexia nervosa (AN) patients into restricting and binge-eating/purging types has demonstrated limited predictive validity. This study aimed to evaluate whether an approach to classifying eating disorder patients on…

  15. Pitfalls in non-utilization of basic clinical methods in the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early detection and intervention usually lead to more favourable outcomes. However, CKD is sometimes under diagnosed except in its very late stages where little can be done. This is partly because a lot of interns and physicians do not apply basic clinical methods of history, physical examination and laboratory ...

  16. Monitoring treatment response in psoriasis: current perspectives on the clinical utility of reflectance confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agozzino M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marina Agozzino,1 Cecilia Noal,2 Francesco Lacarrubba,3 Marco Ardigò4 1Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Dermatology Unit, University of Trieste, Trieste, 3Dermatology Clinic, University of Catania, Catania, 4Clinical Dermatology Department, San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Rome, Italy Abstract: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM evaluation of inflammatory skin diseases represents a relatively new technique that, during the past 5 years, has attracted increasing interest, with consequent progressive increment of publications in literature. The success of RCM is directly related to the high need for noninvasive techniques able to both reduce the number of skin biopsies and support clinical diagnosis and patient management. RCM helps to visualize microscopic descriptors of plaque psoriasis (PP with good reproducibility between observers and a high grade of correspondence with histopathology. Several clinical tests are used for the therapeutic management of PP, but they are limited by subjective interpretation. Skin biopsy presents objective interpretation, but the procedure is invasive and not repeatable. RCM has been used not only for the evaluation of skin cancer or inflammatory skin diseases, but also for monitoring the efficacy of different treatments in PP. In this review, we present some examples of RCM applications in therapeutic psoriasis follow-up. Keywords: reflectance confocal microscopy, psoriasis noninvasive follow-up, psoriasis monitoring

  17. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A. Berchuck (Andrew); S.E. Johnatty (Sharon); K.K.H. Aben (Katja); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); E. Alducci (Elisa); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); C. Apicella (Carmel); V. Arndt (Volker); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); A. Ashworth (Alan); L. Baglietto (Laura); R. Balleine (Rosemary); E.V. Bandera (Elisa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); Y.T. Bean (Yukie); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Berger (Andreas); R. Berger (Raanan); B. Beuselinck (B.); M. Bisogna (Maria); L. Bjorge (Line); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); A. Bojesen (Anders); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); L.A. Brinton (Louise); A. Brooks-Wilson (Angela); F. Bruinsma (Fiona); J. Brunet (Joan); T. Brüning (Thomas); A. Budzilowska (Agnieszka); C.H. Bunker (Clareann H.); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); R. Butzow (Ralf); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); I. Campbell (Ian); J. Carter (Jonathan); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); J.M. Collée (Margriet); L.S. Cook (Linda S.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); D.W. Cramer (Daniel); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); C. Cybulski (Cezary); K. Czene (Kamila); F. Damiola (Francesca); A. Dansonka-Mieszkowska (Agnieszka); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. DeFazio (Anna); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); E. Dicks (Ed); O. Díez (Orland); J.A. Doherty (Jennifer A.); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); T. Dörk (Thilo); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); A. Du Bois (Andreas); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Duran (Mercedes); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Edwards (Robert); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A.B. Ekici (Arif); S.D. Ellis (Steve); C.W. Engel (Christoph); M. Eriksson (Mikael); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); A. Fontaine (Annette); S. Fortuzzi (S.); F. Fostira (Florentia); B.L. Fridley (Brooke); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); G. Friel (Grace); D. Frost (Debra); J. Garber (Judy); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A. Gentry-Maharaj (Aleksandra); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R. Glasspool (Rosalind); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.T. Goodman (Marc T.); M. Gore (Martin); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); M. Grip (Mervi); J. Gronwald (Jacek); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); P. Guénel (Pascal); S.R. Guzman (Starr R.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); P. Hall (Per); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); P. Harter (Philipp); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); S. Healey (Sue); R. Hein (Rebecca); P.U. Heitz; B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); M.A. T Hildebrandt (Michelle A.); C.K. Høgdall (Claus); E. Høgdall (Estrid); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); A. Jensen (Allan); U.B. Jensen; N. Johnson (Nichola); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Kabisch (Maria); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); V. Kataja (Vesa); N. Kauff (Noah); L.E. Kelemen (Linda); M. Kerin (Michael); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); M. Kjaer (Michael); J.A. Knight (Julia); J.P. Knol-Bout (Jacoba P.); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); C. Krakstad (Camilla); V. Kristensen (Vessela); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); J. Kupryjanczyk (Jolanta); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); S. Lambrechts (Sandrina); M.C. Larson (Melissa); A. Lasa (Adriana); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Lazaro (Conxi); N. Le (Nhu); L. Le Marchand (Loic); A. Leminen (Arto); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); D.A. Levine (Douglas); J. Li (Jingmei); D. Liang (Dong); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J. Long (Jirong); K.H. Lu (Karen); J. Lubinski (Jan); L. Lundvall (Lene); G. Lurie (Galina); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Mariette (F.); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L.F. Massuger (Leon); C. Maugard; S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); W.P. McGuire; C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); I. McNeish (Iain); A. Meindl (Alfons); F. Menegaux (Florence); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); U. Menon (Usha); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); N. Miller (Nicola); R.L. Milne (Roger); F. Modugno (Francesmary); M. Montagna (Marco); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten B.); H. Mul̈ler (Heiko); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); S.A. Narod (Steven A.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R.B. Ness (Roberta B.); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); F. Nielsen (Finn); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Odunsi (Kunle); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); S.H. Olson (Sara); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); I. Orlow (Irene); N. Orr (Nick); S. Orsulic (Sandra); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Ottini (Laura); J. Paul (James); C.L. Pearce (Celeste); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); T. Pejovic (Tanja); L.M. Pelttari (Liisa); J. Perkins (Jo); J. Permuth-Wey (Jenny); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.C. Pike (Malcolm C.); R. Platte (Radka); J. Plisiecka-Halasa (Joanna); E.M. Poole (Elizabeth); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm W.R.); G. Rennert (Gad); H. Risch (Harvey); M. Robson (Mark); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); A. Romero (Atocha); M.A. Rossing (Mary Anne); J.H. Rothstein (Joseph H.); A. Rudolph (Anja); I.B. Runnebaum (Ingo); R. Salani (Ritu); H.B. Salvesen (Helga); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); A. Schrauder (André); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); I. Schwaab (Ira); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); T.A. Sellers (Thomas A.); G. Severi (Gianluca); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Shrubsole (Martha); N. Siddiqui (Nadeem); W. Sieh (Weiva); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Smeets (Dominiek); C. Sohn (Christof); M. Soller (Maria); H. Song (Honglin); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); C. Stegmaier (Christa); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); L. Sucheston (Lara); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); I.L. Tangen (Ingvild L.); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; K.L. Terry (Kathryn); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); P.J. Thompson (Pamela J.); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); N. Tung (Nadine); S. Tworoger (Shelley); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); C. Vachon (Celine); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); A.M. van Altena (Anne); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Van Den Berg (David); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); E. Van Nieuwenhuysen (Els); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); I. Vergote (Ignace); S. Verhoef; R.A. Vierkant (Robert); J. Vijai (Joseph); A.F. Vitonis (Allison); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); C.S. Walsh (Christine); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); M. Weischer (Maren); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); C. Weltens (Caroline); N. Wentzensen (N.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); L.R. Wilkens (Lynne R.); R. Winqvist (Robert); A.H. Wu (Anna); X. Wu (Xifeng); H.P. Yang (Hannah P.); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); W. Zheng (Wei); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); E.L. Goode (Ellen L.); Breast Cancer Family Register; EMBRACE; GENICA Network; HEBON; SWE-BRCA

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3′ UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies,

  18. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Aben, Katja K.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Beuselinck, Benoit; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Bruning, Thomas; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Bunker, Clareann H.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Carter, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Collee, J. Margriet; Cook, Linda S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; deFazio, Anna; Dennis, Joseph; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed M.; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dork, Thilo; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; du Bois, Andreas; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Duran, Mercedes; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert P.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Ellis, Steve D.; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Fontaine, Annette; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Fostira, Florentia; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Friel, Grace; Frost, Debra; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H.; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Guenel, Pascal; Guzman, Starr R.; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Halverson, Sandra L.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harter, Philipp; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Sue; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Bogdan, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Johnson, Nichola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kabisch, Maria; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kataja, Vesa; Kauff, Noah; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kerin, Michael J.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Knight, Julia A.; Knol-Bout, Jacoba P.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Krakstad, Camilla; Kristensen, Vessela; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Larson, Melissa C.; Lasa, Adriana; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Li, Jingmei; Liang, Dong; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Karen H.; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Mai, Phuong L.; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Maugard, Christine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McGuire, Valerie; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Lain; Meindi, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Menendez, Primitiva; Menkiszak, Janusz; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Mueller, Heiko; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Muranen, Taru A.; Narod, Steven A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Finn C.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Berge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olson, Sara H.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Ottini, Laura; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Perkins, Jo; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C.; Platte, Radka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkas, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Harvey A.; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Salani, Ritu; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schrauder, Michael G.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwaab, Ira; Scuvera, Giulietta; Sellers, Thomas A.; Severi, Gianluca; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Smeets, Dominiek; Sohn, Christof; Soller, Maria; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston, Lara; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Therese; Tsimiklis, Helen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vachon, Celine M.; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Asperen, C. J.; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doom, Helena C.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Vergote, Ignace; Verhoef, Senno; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vijai, Joseph; Vitonis, Allison F.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walsh, Christine; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weischer, Maren; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Weltens, Caroline; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, Hannah P.; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Goode, Ellen L.

    Objective. Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3' UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing

  19. Evaluation of the clinical utility of a rapid blood test for human leptospirosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eapen, C. K.; Sugathan, Sheela; Kuriakose, Mariamma; Abdoel, Theresia; Smits, Henk L.

    2002-01-01

    A rapid assay device for the detection of Leptospira-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies was applied on whole blood samples collected from a group of consecutive patients admitted with clinical suspicion of leptospirosis to a district hospital in Kerala, India. The hospital is located in an

  20. The validity and clinical utility of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) with older adult New Zealanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Margaret H; Fletcher, Richard B; Merrick, Paul L

    2014-02-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) has established use with older adult populations in New Zealand but few studies have evaluated its psychometric properties. Research with the psychometric properties of the HADS in elderly populations has primarily used correlational methods that do not allow for the effects of measurement error to be observed. The hypothesized tripartite model of anxiety and depression within the HADS was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) methods. Overall, 203 community-dwelling older adults who were recruited from older adult community groups completed the HADS. Competing two- and three-factor structures were trialled using CFA. A three-factor model indicated a lack of differentiation between factors and poor clinical utility and was rejected in favor of a two-factor model. Significant correlations were observed between the anxiety and depression factors on the two-factor model, but it was considered to have validity for older adult samples. Good internal consistency was found for the HADS. A two-factor model of the HADS was favored due to the lack of differentiation between factors on the three-factor model, and the higher clinical utility of a two-factor solution. The validity of the HADS may be limited by over-diagnosing anxiety in non-clinical populations. It is recommended that the HADS be used to measure change over time through treatment and not be used as a diagnostic tool until future research establishes appropriate norms and cut-offs.

  1. The Clinical Utility of Next Generation Sequencing Results in a Community-Based Hereditary Cancer Risk Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, A E; Garby, C A; Pearson, E J; Walker, S A; Panos, L E; Blum, Joanne L

    2017-02-01

    Since the 2013 Supreme Court ruling on BRCA1/BRCA2 patenting, hereditary cancer gene panels now include BRCA1 and BRCA2, making these panels an option for first-tier testing. However, questions remain about the clinical utility and implications of these panels for medical management with inclusion of genes of unknown to moderate penetrance. To better understand how use of these panels affected our practice, we reviewed patients who underwent testing in our clinic from July 1, 2013 through May 23, 2014. Indications for testing included personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. A total of 136 patients underwent panel testing via a single commercial laboratory; 12 (8.8 %) patients were positive for a pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutation (four BRCA2 mutations, two TP53 mutations, one CDH1 mutation, two ATM mutations, and one patient each with a CHEK2, NBN, or PALB2 mutation). Of these positive patients, 100 % met the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer genetic testing (2.2014). Mutations in seven of twelve (58 %) patients led to changes in medical management; three of seven (43 %) had a non-BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. Our findings suggest that there is clinical utility of panels that include genes of unknown to moderate penetrance.

  2. Improvement in resource utilization after development of a clinical pathway for patients with pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynski, W W; Spitz, K; Hartz, A; Guse, C; Larson, D L

    1998-11-01

    Clinical pathways are interdisciplinary patient care plans intended to reduce variance and improve quality of care while lowering health care cost. This study was undertaken to determine whether the development of a clinical pathway for care of patients with pressure ulcers can indeed decrease health care costs while preserving quality of care. A clinical pathway for surgical reconstruction of pressure ulcers was developed by standardizing the current practices of our plastic surgeon group. The pathway provided direction in optimal scheduling of physician interventions along with nursing, physical and occupational therapies, and spinal cord rehabilitation interventions. It covered all potential elements of patient care, including laboratory, radiology, dietary services, intravenous fluids, and use of specialty beds. It defined patient outcomes and outlined discharge planning. Pathways were distributed throughout all services caring for patients with pressure ulcers. Patient charts and billing data were reviewed for the 16-month periods before and after initiation of the pathway. No other significant changes in treatment occurred during this time frame. Ninety-seven patient charts were examined (54 before pathway and 43 after pathway implementation). Parameters evaluated included length of stay and total charges (including bed use, medications, laboratory tests, and radiology). Patient readmission rate was also examined. A significant reduction in patient length of stay and total charges was achieved after implementation of the clinical pathway. Reduction was seen not only for patients treated with flaps by plastic surgery but also for patients with pressure ulcers who were not specifically targeted such as those from other services. The readmission rate decreased slightly, although not significantly, after the pathway inception. Total cost saving was almost $11,000 per patient (23 percent). In conclusion, implementation of a clinical pathway, because it

  3. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Adjacent Segment Disease: Clinical Outcomes and Cost Utility of Surgical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Wilson, Robert J; Burns, Katharine M; Mioton, Lauren M; Wright, Brian T; Adogwa, Owoicho; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2016-07-01

    Retrospective review. Determine clinical outcomes and cost utility of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of adjacent segment disease (ASD). The incidence of symptomatic ASD after ACDF has been estimated to occur in up to 26% of patients. Commonly, these patients will undergo an additional ACDF procedure. However, there are currently no studies available that adequately describe the clinical outcomes or cost utility of performing ACDF for ASD. A retrospective review of 40 patients undergoing ACDF for ASD was performed. Baseline and 2-year neck and arm pain (NRS-NP, NRS-AP), neck disability index (NDI), physical and mental quality of life (SF-12 PCS & MCS), and Zung depression score (ZDS) were assessed. Two-year total neck-related medical resource utilization, amount of missed work, and health-state values were determined. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated from EQ-5D assessments with US valuation. Comprehensive costs (indirect, direct, and total cost) and the value (cost-per-QALY gained) of performing ACDF for ASD were assessed. Performing ACDF to treat ASD resulted in significant improvements (P<0.05) in NRS-NP, NRS-AP, NDI, SF-12 PCS, and ZDS outcome measures. Patient-reported health states also significantly improved, with a mean cumulative 2-year gain of 0.54 QALYs. The mean 2-year cost of surgery was $32,616 (direct cost: $25,391; indirect cost: $7225). ACDF for the treatment of ASD was associated with a mean 2-year cost per QALY gained of $60,526. Performing ACDF for ASD resulted in significant improvements in patient pain, disability, and quality of life. Further, the mean 2-year cost-per-QALY was determined to be $60,526, which suggests surgical intervention to be cost effective. This study is the first to provide evidence that performing an ACDF for ASD is both clinically and cost effective.

  4. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  5. Total-body photography in skin cancer screening: the clinical utility of standardized imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Alexandra; Meyerle, Jon H

    2017-05-01

    Early detection of skin cancer is essential to reducing morbidity and mortality from both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Total-body skin examinations (TBSEs) may improve early detection of malignant melanomas (MMs) but are controversial due to the poor quality of data available to establish a mortality benefit from skin cancer screening. Total-body photography (TBP) promises to provide a way forward by lowering the costs of dermatologic screening while simultaneously leveraging technology to increase patient access to dermatologic care. Standardized TBP also offers the ability for dermatologists to work synergistically with modern computer technology involving algorithms capable of analyzing high-quality images to flag concerning lesions that may require closer evaluation. On a population level, inexpensive TBP has the potential to increase access to skin cancer screening and it has several specific applications in a military population. The utility of standardized TBP is reviewed in the context of skin cancer screening and teledermatology.

  6. Exploring the Impact of Language Services on Utilization and Clinical Outcomes for Diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Karen; Choi, Yoon Susan; Trebino, Lisa; Hicks, LeRoi; Friedman, Elisa; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant health disparities exist between limited English proficient and English-proficient patients. Little is known about the impact of language services on chronic disease outcomes such as for diabetes. Methods/Principal Findings To determine whether the amount and type of language services received during primary care visits had an impact on diabetes-related outcomes (hospitalization, emergency room utilization, glycemic control) in limited English proficient patients, a retrospective cohort design was utilized. Hospital and medical record data was examined for 1425 limited English proficient patients in the Cambridge Health Alliance diabetes registry. We categorized patients receiving usual care into 7 groups based on the amount and combination of language services (language concordant providers, formal interpretation and nothing) received at primary care visits during a 9 month period. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression were used to determine relationships between language service categories and outcomes in the subsequent 6 months. Thirty-one percent of patients (445) had no documentation of interpreter use or seeing a language concordant provider in any visits. Patients who received 100% of their primary care visits with language concordant providers were least likely to have diabetes-related emergency department visits compared to other groups (pEnglish proficient patients with diabetes. However, given the lack of such providers in sufficient numbers to meet patients' communication needs, strategies are needed to both increase their numbers and ensure that the highest risk patients receive the most appropriate language services. In addition, systems serving diverse populations must clarify why some limited English proficient patients do not receive language services at some or all of their visits and whether this has an impact on quality of care. PMID:22675571

  7. Gender, alexithymia and physical inactivity associated with abdominal obesity in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a cross sectional study at a secondary care hospital diabetes clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Melin, Eva O.; Svensson, Ralph; Thunander, Maria; Hillman, Magnus; Thulesius, Hans O.; Landin-Olsson, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Background Obesity is linked to cardiovascular diseases and increasingly common in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) since the introduction of intensified insulin therapy. Our main aim was to explore associations between obesity and depression, anxiety, alexithymia and self-image measures and to control for lifestyle variables in a sample of persons with T1DM. Secondary aims were to explore associations between abdominal and general obesity and cardiovascular complications in T1DM. Methods Cros...

  8. Clinical Utility of Virtual Reality in Pain Management: A Comprehensive Research Review from 2009 to 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Matsangidou, Maria; Ang, Chee Siang; Sakel, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality is a technology that allows users to experience a computer-simulated reality with visual, auditory, tactile and olfactory interactions. In the past decades, there have been considerable interests in using Virtual Reality for clinical purposes, including pain management. This article provides a systematic review of research on Virtual Reality and pain management, with an aim to understand the feasibilities of current Virtual Reality technologies and content design approaches in...

  9. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure devices: safety, efficacy, and clinical utility

    OpenAIRE

    Swaans, Martin; Wintgens,Lisette; Alipour,Arash; Rensing,Benno; Boersma,Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Martin J Swaans, Lisette IS Wintgens, Arash Alipour,  Benno JWM Rensing, Lucas VA Boersma Department of Cardiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the clinical practice. One of the major complications of AF is a thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event. Up to 20% of all strokes are caused by AF. Thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event in patients with AF occurs due ...

  10. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Badowski ME; Perez SE

    2016-01-01

    Melissa E Badowski,1 Sarah E Perez2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Section of Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite ...

  11. Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    patients with cystic fibrosis and activated protein C-resistance, Pediatr Radiol (1998), Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, New York, 1998, Jul;28(7...Bodies: Sonographic Diagnosis and Therapeutic Management. Ultrasound Clinics. October 2007. Vol. 2, Issue 2, 669-81. Close JK, Shiels WE II...Interventional Radiology Techniques in the Treatment of Cystic Lesions of the Pediatric Head and Neck Midwest Society for Pediatric Radiology Fall Conference

  12. Prevalence of eating disorders and psychiatric comorbidity in a clinical sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients Prevalência de transtornos alimentares e comorbidade psiquiátrica em uma amostra clínica de pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papelbaum

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A few studies have shown high rates of eating disorders and psychiatric morbidity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVE: disturbed eating behavior and psychiatric comorbidity in a sample of T2DM patients. METHODS: Seventy type 2 diabetes mellitus patients between 40 and 65 years of age (mean, 52.9 ± 6.8 from a diabetes outpatient clinic were sequentially evaluated. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Binge Eating Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess eating disorders and other psychiatric comorbidity. In addition to the descriptive analysis of the data, we compared groups divided based on the presence of obesity (evaluated by the body mass index or an eating disorder. RESULTS: Twenty percent of the sample displayed an eating disorder. Binge eating disorder was the predominant eating disorder diagnosis (10%. Overall, the group of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented rates of psychiatric comorbidity comparable to those seen in their nonobese counterparts. However, the presence of an eating disorder was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of anxiety disorders (57.1% x 28.6%; p = 0.044. CONCLUSIONS: In our study sample, the occurrence of eating disorders was increased compared to rates observed in the general population, with the predominance of binge eating disorder. The presence of an eating disorder in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients was associated with higher rates of anxiety disorders.INTRODUÇÃO: Alguns estudos têm demonstrado uma freqüência elevada de transtornos alimentares (TA e morbidade psiquiátrica em pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2 (DM2. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a presença de alterações do comportamento alimentar e comorbidade psiquiátrica em uma amostra de pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2. MÉTODOS: Setenta pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2, com idade entre 40 e 65 anos (média de 52,9 ± 6,8, em tratamento

  13. Clinical Utility of YKL-40 in Polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Hironao; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Ran; Enomoto, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yuzo; Kono, Masato; Karayama, Masato; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Murakami, Akihiro; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is involved in polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), a disease associated with poor prognoses. Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (YKL-40) has pleiotropic biological activities involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and tissue remodeling; however, the clinical application of YKL-40 remains limited. We investigated the clinical significance of YKL-40 in PM/DM-ILD. Sixty-nine consecutive patients with PM/DM-ILD and 34 healthy controls were analyzed. We measured baseline and followup serum YKL-40 using an ELISA, evaluated the association of YKL-40 with clinical variables and survival, and examined YKL-40 expression in lung specimens from patients with PM/DM-ILD using immunohistochemistry. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly greater in patients with PM/DM-ILD compared with healthy controls (p 40 was correlated with arterial oxygen pressure (r = -0.40, p 40 and lower percent-predicted forced vital capacity were independently associated with a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that YKL-40 expression was enhanced in aggregated intraalveolar macrophages and hyperproliferative alveolar epithelial cells in patients with PM/DM-ILD. YKL-40 is a promising biomarker for evaluating PM/DM-ILD activity/severity and predicting disease prognosis. Insights into YKL-40 might help elucidate the pathogenesis of PM/DM-ILD.

  14. Topical lotions utilized in outpatient rehabilitation clinics as a potential source of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G; Levine, David; Bage, Julie; Giles, David K; Collier, A Grace

    2018-02-26

    Soft tissue mobilization and massage requiring lotions or creams are commonly used interventions in outpatient rehabilitation clinics. For at least 50 years hand creams used in healthcare settings have been found to be contaminated by bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the current state of bacterial contamination of lotions used in clinics and to determine the efficacy of lotion preservatives to kill bacteria. Unopened containers of lotions were studied, along with 81 lotion containers used in 22 outpatient clinics in southeast Tennessee and northwest Georgia. Three sites on each container were sampled using sterile swabs. At a microbiology lab, bacterial growth media was inoculated and incubated. Of the 81 containers sampled, 16 supported bacterial growth (19.8%). Container threads displayed the highest contamination compared with other container locations (p < 0.01). No bacteria were found in unopened lotion containers, although when challenged with live bacterial cultures lotion preservatives did not kill bacteria tested. Enrichment cultures using lotions studied here supported the growth of several bacterial species. These findings suggest the need for standardized protocols to help reduce potential healthcare-associated infections due to use of lotions. Improved efficacy of preservatives added to lotions should be a priority.

  15. New developments in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: clinical utility of bedaquiline and delamanid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigden G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Grania Brigden,1 Cathy Hewison,2 Francis Varaine21Access Campaign, Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland; 2Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France Abstract: The current treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB is long, complex, and associated with severe and life-threatening side effects and poor outcomes. For the first time in nearly 50 years, there have been two new drugs registered for use in multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB. Bedaquiline, a diarylquinoline, and delamanid, a nitromidoxazole, have received conditional stringent regulatory approval and have World Health Organization interim policy guidance for their use. As countries improve and scale up their diagnostic services, increasing number of patients with MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB are identified. These two new drugs offer a real opportunity to improve the outcomes of these patients. This article reviews the evidence for these two new drugs and discusses the clinical questions raised as they are used outside clinical trial settings. It also reviews the importance of the accompanying drugs