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Sample records for melatonin inhibits human

  1. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-12-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462-484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake-metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities.

  2. Melatonin inhibits the migration of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell lines involving JNK/MAPK pathway.

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    Qiaoyun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominately by the pineal gland, exhibits a variety of physiological functions, possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. But, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects are unknown. The present study explored the effects of melatonin on the migration of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and its mechanism. METHODS: MTT assay was employed to measure the viability of A549 cells treated with different concentrations of melatonin. The effect of melatonin on the migration of A549 cells was analyzed by wound healing assay. Occludin location was observed by immunofluorescence. The expression of occludin, osteopontin (OPN, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC, JNK were detected by western blots. RESULTS: After A549 cells were treated with melatonin, the viability and migration of the cells were inhibited significantly. The relative migration rate of A549 cells treated with melatonin was only about 20% at 24 h. The expression level of OPN, MLCK and phosphorylation of MLC of A549 cells were reduced, while the expression of occludin was conversely elevated, and occludin located on the cell surface was obviously increased. The phosphorylation status of JNK in A549 cells was also reduced when cells were treated by melatonin. CONCLUSIONS: Melatonin significantly inhibits the migration of A549 cells, and this may be associated with the down-regulation of the expression of OPN, MLCK, phosphorylation of MLC, and up-regulation of the expression of occludin involving JNK/MAPK pathway.

  3. Effects of melatonin on prepulse inhibition, habituation and sensitization of the human startle reflex in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Emilia K; Ucar, Ebru; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which is demonstrated to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with blunted melatonin secretion is regularly found in patients...... with schizophrenia and it is theorized that these may contribute to their attentional deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute melatonin on healthy human sensorimotor gating. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin or placebo after which their levels of PPI were...... assessed. Melatonin significantly reduced startle magnitude and ratings of alertness, but did not influence PPI, nor sensitization and habituation. However, when taking baseline scores in consideration, melatonin significantly increased PPI in low scoring individuals while significantly decreasing...

  4. mt1 Melatonin receptor in the primate adrenal gland: inhibition of adrenocorticotropin-stimulated cortisol production by melatonin.

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    Torres-Farfan, Claudia; Richter, Hans G; Rojas-García, Pedro; Vergara, Marcela; Forcelledo, María L; Valladares, Luis E; Torrealba, Fernando; Valenzuela, Guillermo J; Serón-Ferré, María

    2003-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin participates in circadian, seasonal, and reproductive physiology. The presence of melatonin binding sites in human brain and peripheral tissues is well documented. However, in the mammalian adrenal gland, low-affinity melatonin binding sites have been detected only in the rat by some but not all authors. Conflicting evidence for a regulatory role of melatonin on adrenal cortisol production, prompted us to investigate this possibility in a New World primate, the capuchin monkey. Expression of melatonin receptors in the adrenal cortex was demonstrated through pharmacological characterization and autoradiographic localization of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites (dissociation constant = 96.9 +/- 15 pM; maximal binding capacity = 3.8 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein). The mt1 identity of these receptors was established by cDNA sequencing. Melatonin treatment of dispersed cells and explants from adrenal gland did not affect basal cortisol production. However, cortisol production stimulated by 100 nM ACTH was significantly inhibited by low melatonin concentrations (0.1-100 nM); this inhibitory effect was reversed by the mt1/MT2 melatonin antagonist luzindole. Melatonin also inhibited dibutyril-cAMP-stimulated cortisol production, suggesting that melatonin acts through a cAMP-independent signaling pathway. The present data demonstrate that the primate adrenal gland cortex expresses functional mt1 melatonin receptors and shows that melatonin inhibits ACTH-stimulated cortisol production.

  5. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

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    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (PPiracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  6. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport.

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    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-06-01

    1 Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. 2 The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (Paniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. 4 There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. 5 Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis.

  7. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    OpenAIRE

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide...

  8. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

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    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  9. Melatonin increases reactive aggression in humans.

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    Liu, Jinting; Zhong, Ru; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Haibo; Eisenegger, Christoph; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2017-10-01

    Melatonin, a hormone released preferentially by the pineal gland during the night, affects circadian rhythms and aging processes. As animal studies have shown that melatonin increases resident-intruder aggression, this study aimed to investigate the impact of melatonin treatment on human aggression. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled between-participant design, 63 healthy male volunteers completed the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP) after oral administration of melatonin or placebo. We found that when given the opportunity to administer high or low punishments to an opponent, participants who ingested melatonin selected the high punishment more often than those who ingested placebo. The increased reactive aggression under melatonin administration remained after controlling for inhibitory ability, trait aggression, trait impulsiveness, circadian preference, perceptual sensibility to noise, and changes in subjective sleepiness and emotional states. This study provides novel and direct evidence for the involvement of melatonin in human social processes.

  10. The Safety of Melatonin in Humans

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    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenür, Ismayil; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin has been investigated as treatment for a number of medical and surgical diseases, demonstrating encouraging results. The aim of this review was to present and evaluate the literature concerning the possible adverse effects and safety of exogenous melatonin in humans. Furthermore......, we provide recommendations concerning the possible risks of melatonin use in specific patient groups. In general, animal and human studies documented that short-term use of melatonin is safe, even in extreme doses. Only mild adverse effects, such as dizziness, headache, nausea and sleepiness have...... been reported. No studies have indicated that exogenous melatonin should induce any serious adverse effects. Similarly, randomized clinical studies indicate that long-term melatonin treatment causes only mild adverse effects comparable to placebo. Long-term safety of melatonin in children...

  11. Clinical significance of melatonin receptors in the human myometrium.

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    Olcese, James; Beesley, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    To review and update the research on melatonin receptor expression in the human myometrium, in particular as it pertains to uterine contractility at labor. Summary of previous studies with the addition of new data on the transcriptional regulation of melatonin receptor expression in human myometrial cells. Not applicable. Late-term pregnant volunteers. Biopsy collection for in vitro analyses provided the original data. More recently, uterine contractions in late-term pregnant volunteers were assessed before, during, and after acute white-light exposure. Melatonin receptor signaling in myometrial cells and uterine contractions in late-term pregnant volunteers. Melatonin acts through the MTNR1B melatonin receptor that is expressed in the myometrium at late term to synergistically enhance oxytocin-dependent signaling and contractions. Acute inhibition of endogenous melatonin levels with light reversibly suppresses uterine contractions. These results point to a significant role for circulating melatonin in the timing and degree of uterine contractions in late-term pregnancy. Understanding the regulation of melatonin receptors remains a future objective. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Melatonin inhibits proliferation and invasion via repression of miRNA-155 in glioma cells.

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    Gu, Junyi; Lu, Zhongsheng; Ji, Chenghong; Chen, Yuchao; Liu, Yuzhao; Lei, Zhe; Wang, Longqiang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Li, Xiangdong

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine mostly synthesized in the pineal gland, exerts the anti-cancer effect by various mechanisms in glioma cells. Our previous study showed that miR-155 promoted glioma cell proliferation and invasion. However, the question of whether melatonin may inhibit glioma by regulating miRNAs has not yet been addressed. In this study, we found that melatonin (100μM, 1μM and 1nM) significantly inhibited the expression of miR-155 in human glioma cell lines U87, U373 and U251. Especially, the lowest expression of miR-155 was detected in 1μM melatonin-treated glioma cells. Melatonin (1μM) inhibits cell proliferation of U87 by promoting cell apoptosis. Nevertheless, melatonin had no effect on cell cycle distribution of U87 cells. Moreover, U87 cells treated with 1μM melatonin presented significantly lower migration and invasion ability when compared with control cells. Importantly, melatonin inhibited c-MYB expression, and c-MYB knockdown reduced miR-155 expression and migration and invasion in U87 cells. Taken together, for the first time, our findings show that melatonin inhibits miR-155 expression and thereby represses glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and suggest that melatonin may downregulate the expression of miR-155 via repression of c-MYB. This will provide a theoretical basis for revealing the anti-glioma mechanisms of melatonin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Melatonin and pregnancy in the human.

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    Tamura, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Terron, M Pilar; Flores, Luis J; Manchester, Lucien C; Tan, Dun-Xian; Sugino, Norihiro; Reiter, Russel J

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to access the current state of knowledge concerning the role for melatonin in human pregnancy. Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted nightly by pineal gland and regulates biological rhythms. The nighttime serum concentration of melatonin shows an incremental change toward the end of pregnancy. This small lipophilic indoleamine crosses the placenta freely without being altered. Maternal melatonin enters the fetal circulation with ease providing photoperiodic information to the fetus. Melatonin works in a variety of ways as a circadian rhythm modulator, endocrine modulator, immunomodulator, direct free radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant and cytoprotective agent in human pregnancy, and it appears to be essential for successful pregnancy. It also seems to be involved in correcting the pathophysiology of complications during pregnancy including those due to abortion, pre-eclampsia and fetal brain damage. The scientific evidence supporting a role for melatonin in human pregnancy is summarized.

  14. Carbamate Insecticides Target Human Melatonin Receptors.

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    Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V

    2017-02-20

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) are among the most toxic insecticides, implicated in a variety of diseases including diabetes and cancer among others. Using an integrated pharmacoinformatics based screening approach, we have identified these insecticides to be structural mimics of the neurohormone melatonin and were able to bind to the putative melatonin binding sites in MT 1 and MT 2 melatonin receptors in silico. Carbaryl and carbofuran then were tested for competition with 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin (300 pM) binding to hMT 1 or hMT 2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells. Carbaryl and carbofuran showed higher affinity for competition with 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin binding to the hMT 2 compared to the hMT 1 melatonin receptor (33 and 35-fold difference, respectively) as predicted by the molecular modeling. In the presence of GTP (100 μM), which decouples the G-protein linked receptors to modulate signaling, the apparent efficacy of carbaryl and carbofuran for 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin binding for the hMT 1 melatonin receptor was not affected but significantly decreased for the hMT 2 melatonin receptor compatible with receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and agonist efficacy, respectively. Altogether, our data points to a potentially new mechanism through which carbamate insecticides carbaryl and carbofuran could impact human health by altering the homeostatic balance of key regulatory processes by directly binding to melatonin receptors.

  15. Effect of melatonin on human nighttime endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotoxaemia is widely used as an experimental model to study sepsis under controlled conditions. Nighttime endotoxaemia induces a more pronounced inflammatory stress response compared to daytime. Previously, we have shown that melatonin has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects...... in inflammatory response to daytime endotoxaemia. Herein, we examined the effect of melatonin in response to human nighttime endotoxaemia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded cross-over trial. Subjects were induced...... by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg body weight intravenously at 24:00. One hour prior to induction of endotoxaemia, an 8-h infusion of melatonin 100 mg or placebo was initiated. Blood samples were drawn before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after induction of endotoxaemia and plasma was tested for pro...

  16. Effect of Melatonin on Human Nighttime Endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endotoxaemia is widely used as an experimental model to study sepsis under controlled conditions. Nighttime endotoxaemia induces a more pronounced inflammatory stress response compared to daytime. Previously, we have shown that melatonin has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects...... in inflammatory response to daytime endotoxaemia. Herein, we examined the effect of melatonin in response to human nighttime endotoxaemia. Patients and Methods: Twelve healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded cross-over trial. Subjects were induced...... by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg body weight intravenously at 24:00. One hour prior to induction of endotoxaemia, an 8-h infusion of melatonin 100 mg or placebo was initiated. Blood samples were drawn before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after induction of endotoxaemia and plasma was tested for pro...

  17. Detection of melatonin receptor mRNA in human muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei

    2004-01-01

    To verify the expression of melatonin receptor mRNA in human, muscle, muscle beside vertebrae was collected to obtain total RNA and the mRNA of melatonin receptor was detected by RT-PCR method. The electrophoretic results of RT-PCR products by mt 1 and MT 2 primer were all positive and the sequence is corresponding with human melatonin receptor cDNA. It suggests that melatonin may act on the muscle beside vertebrae directly and regulate its growth and development. (authors)

  18. Melatonin synthesis in the human ciliary body triggered by TRPV4 activation: Involvement of AANAT phosphorylation.

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    Alkozi, Hanan Awad; Perez de Lara, María J; Pintor, Jesús

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin is a substance synthesized in the pineal gland as well as in other organs. This substance is involved in many ocular functions, giving its synthesis in numerous eye structures. Melatonin is synthesized from serotonin through two enzymes, the first limiting step into the synthesis of melatonin being aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). In this current study, AANAT phosphorylation after the activation of TRPV4 was studied using human non-pigmented epithelial ciliary body cells. Firstly, it was necessary to determine the adequate time and dose of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A to reach the maximal phosphorylation of AANAT. An increase of 72% was observed after 5 min incubation with 10 nM GSK (**p melatonin synthesis. The involvement of a TRPV4 channel in melatonin synthesis was verified by antagonist and siRNA studies as a previous step to studying intracellular signalling. Studies performed on the second messengers involved in GSK induced AANAT phosphorylation were carried out by inhibiting several pathways. In conclusion, the activation of calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II was confirmed, as shown by the cascade seen in AANAT phosphorylation (***p melatonin levels. In conclusion, the activation of a TRPV4 present in human ciliary body epithelial cells produced an increase in AANAT phosphorylation and a further melatonin increase by a mechanism in which Ca-calmodulin and the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Melatonin reduces cortisol response to ACTH in humans].

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    Campino, Carmen; Valenzuela, Francisco; Arteaga, Eugenio; Torres-Farfán, Claudia; Trucco, Cristián; Velasco, Alfredo; Guzmán, Sergio; Serón-Ferré, María

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in human tissues but they have not been reported in human adrenal gland. To assess if the human adrenal gland expresses melatonin receptors and if melatonin affects cortisol response to ACTH in dexamethasone suppressed volunteers. Adrenal glands were obtained from 4 patients undergoing unilateral nephrectomy-adrenalectomy for renal cancer. Expression of mRNA MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors was measured by Reverse TranscriPtase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The effect of melatonin on the response to intravenous (i.v.) ACTH was tested (randomized cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial) in eight young healthy males pretreated with dexamethasone (1 mg) at 23:00 h. On the next day, at 08:00 h, an i.v. line was inserted, at 08:30 h, and after a blood sample, subjects ingested 6 mg melatonin or placebo. At 09:00 h, 1-24 ACTH (Cortrosyn, 1 microg/1.73 m2 body surface area) was injected, drawing samples at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after. Melatonin, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, aldosterone, DHEA-S, testosterone and prolactin were measured by immunoassay. The four adrenal glands expressed only MT1 receptor mRNA. Melatonin ingestion reduced the cortisol response to ACTH from 14.6 +/- 1.45 microg/dl at 60 min in the placebo group to 10.8 +/- 1.2 microg/dl in the melatonin group (p melatonin receptor in the human adrenal, and the melatonin reduction of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production suggest a direct melatonin action on the adrenal gland.

  20. Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchester, Lucien C; Coto-Montes, Ana; Boga, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is remarkably functionally diverse with actions as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, circadian rhythm regulator, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulating molecule, and as an oncostatic agent. We hypothesize that the initial and primary function of melatonin in photosynthetic...... cyanobacteria, which appeared on Earth 3.5-3.2 billion years ago, was as an antioxidant. The evolution of melatonin as an antioxidant by this organism was necessary as photosynthesis is associated with the generation of toxic-free radicals. The other secondary functions of melatonin came about much later...... in evolution. We also surmise that mitochondria and chloroplasts may be primary sites of melatonin synthesis in all eukaryotic cells that possess these organelles. This prediction is made on the basis that mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes developed from purple nonsulfur bacteria (which also produce...

  1. Melatonin promotes cardiomyogenesis of embryonic stem cells via inhibition of HIF-1α stabilization.

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    Kudová, Jana; Vašíček, Ondřej; Číž, Milan; Kubala, Lukáš

    2016-11-01

    Melatonin, a molecule involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms, has protective effects against myocardial injuries. However, its capability to regulate the maturation of cardiac progenitor cells is unclear. Recently, several studies have shown that melatonin inhibits the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), important signaling molecules with cardioprotective effects. In this study, by employing differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells, we report that melatonin significantly upregulated the expression of cardiac cell-specific markers (myosin heavy chains six and seven) as well as the percentage of myosin heavy chain-positive cells. Importantly, melatonin decreased HIF-1α stabilization and transcriptional activity and, in contrast, induced HIF-2α stabilization. Interestingly, the deletion of HIF-1α completely inhibited the pro-cardiomyogenic effect of melatonin as well as the melatonin-mediated HIF-2α stabilization. Moreover, melatonin increased Sirt-1 levels in a HIF-1α-dependent manner. Taken together, we provide new evidence of a time-specific inhibition of HIF-1α stabilization as an essential feature of melatonin-induced cardiomyogenesis and unexpected different roles of HIF-1α stabilization during various stages of cardiac development. These results uncover new mechanisms underlying the maturation of cardiac progenitor cells and can help in the development of novel strategies for using melatonin in cardiac regeneration therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Melatonin as a regulator of human sleep and circadian systems].

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    Mishima, Kazuo

    2012-07-01

    Melatonin(N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is synthesized from tryptophan and is intensively secreted into the blood only in darkness (nighttime) by the pineal gland. Melatonin is not only the most reliable marker of internal circadian phase but also a potent sleep-promoting and circadian phase regulatory agent in humans. There is evidence that daytime administered melatonin is able to exhibit short-acting hypnagogic effect and phase-shifting of the circadian rhythms such that sleep timing and associated various physiological functions realign at a new desired phase. Under favor of these properties, melatonin and melatonin receptor agonists have been shown to be potent therapeutic agents for the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and some type of insomnia.

  3. Effect of Melatonin on Human Dental Papilla Cells

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    Ryusuke Tachibana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin regulates a variety of biological processes, which are the control of circadian rhythms, regulation of seasonal reproductive function and body temperature, free radical scavenging and so on. Our previous studies have shown that various cells exist in human and mouse tooth germs that express the melatonin 1a receptor (Mel1aR. However, little is known about the effects of melatonin on tooth development and growth. The present study was performed to examine the possibility that melatonin might exert its influence on tooth development. DP-805 cells, a human dental papilla cell line, were shown to express Mel1aR. Expression levels of mRNA for Mel1aR in DP-805 cells increased until 3 days after reaching confluence and decreased thereafter. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that melatonin increased the expression of mRNAs for osteopontin (OPN, osteocalcin (OCN, bone sialoprotein (BSP, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 and dentin sialophosphoprotin (DSPP. Melatonin also enhanced the mineralized matrix formation in DP-805 cell cultures in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that melatonin may play a physiological role in tooth development/growth by regulating the cellular function of odontogenic cells in tooth germs.

  4. Effect of melatonin on human nighttime endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg body weight intravenously at 24:00. One hour prior to induction of endotoxaemia, an 8-h infusion of melatonin 100 mg or placebo was initiated. Blood samples were drawn before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after induction of endotoxaemia and plasma was tested for pro...... (malondialdehyde (MDA)) and antioxidative enzyme (ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA)). RESULTS: Compared to placebo, melatonin did not reduce plasma levels of any of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers and it also failed to influence levels of AA, DHA and MDA. CONCLUSION: Melatonin has no beneficial...

  5. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

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    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  6. Maternal melatonin selectively inhibits cortisol production in the primate fetal adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Farfan, Claudia; Richter, Hans G; Germain, Alfredo M; Valenzuela, Guillermo J; Campino, Carmen; Rojas-García, Pedro; Forcelledo, María Luisa; Torrealba, Fernando; Serón-Ferré, María

    2004-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that in primates, maternal melatonin restrains fetal and newborn adrenal cortisol production. A functional G-protein-coupled MT1 membrane-bound melatonin receptor was detected in 90% gestation capuchin monkey fetal adrenals by (a) 2-[(125)I] iodomelatonin binding (K(d), 75.7 +/- 6.9 pm; B(max), 2.6 +/- 0.4 fmol (mg protein)(-1)), (b) cDNA identification, and (c) melatonin inhibition of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)- and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated cortisol but not of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHAS) production in vitro. Melatonin also inhibited ACTH-induced 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA expression. To assess the physiological relevance of these findings, we next studied the effect of chronic maternal melatonin suppression (induced by exposure to constant light during the last third of gestation) on maternal plasma oestradiol during gestation and on plasma cortisol concentration in the 4- to 6-day-old newborn. Constant light suppressed maternal melatonin without affecting maternal plasma oestradiol concentration, consistent with no effect on fetal DHAS, the precursor of maternal oestradiol. However, newborns from mothers under constant light condition had twice as much plasma cortisol as newborns from mothers maintained under a normal light-dark schedule. Newborns from mothers exposed to chronic constant light and daily melatonin replacement had normal plasma cortisol concentration. Our results support a role of maternal melatonin in fetal and neonatal primate cortisol regulation.

  7. Melatonin exerts direct inhibitory actions on ACTH responses in the human adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campino, C; Valenzuela, F J; Torres-Farfan, C; Reynolds, H E; Abarzua-Catalan, L; Arteaga, E; Trucco, C; Guzmán, S; Valenzuela, G J; Seron-Ferre, M

    2011-05-01

    In nonhuman primates and rodents, melatonin acting directly on the adrenal gland, inhibits glucocorticoid response to ACTH. In these species, an intrinsic adrenal circadian clock is involved in ACTH-stimulated glucocorticoid production. We investigated whether these findings apply to the human adrenal gland by determining i) expression of clock genes in vivo and ii) direct effects of melatonin in ACTH-stimulated adrenal explants over a) expression of the clock genes PER1 (Period 1) mRNA and BMAL1 [Brain-Muscle (ARNT)-like] protein, ACTH-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and b) over cortisol and progesterone production. Adrenal tissue was obtained from 6 renal cancer patients undergoing unilateral nephrectomy-adrenalectomy. Expression of the clock genes PER1, PER2, CRY2 (Cryptochrome 2), CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput) and BMAL1, was investigated by RT-PCR in a normal adrenal and in an adenoma. In independent experiments, explants from 4 normal adrenals were preincubated in culture medium (6 h) followed by 12 h in: medium alone; ACTH (100 nM); ACTH plus melatonin (100 nM); and melatonin alone. The explants' content of PER1 mRNA (real-time PCR) and StAR, 3β-HSD, BMAL1 (immuno slot-blot), and their cortisol and progesterone production (RIA) were measured. The human adrenal gland expresses the clock genes PER1, PER2, CRY2, CLOCK, and BMAL1. ACTH increased PER1 mRNA, BMAL1, StAR, and 3β-HSD protein levels, and cortisol and progesterone production. Melatonin inhibited these ACTH effects. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, direct inhibitory effects of melatonin upon several ACTH responses in the human adrenal gland. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Melatonin promotes sleep in mice by inhibiting orexin neurons in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2018-04-14

    Melatonin promotes sleep. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Orexin neurons in the perifornical lateral-hypothalamus (PFH) are pivotal for wake-promotion. Does melatonin promote sleep by inhibiting orexin neurons? We used C57BL/6J mice and designed four experiments to address this question. Experiment 1 used double-labeled immunofluorescence and examined the presence of melatonin receptors on orexin neurons. Second, mice, implanted with bilateral guides targeted toward PFH, and sleep-recording electrodes, were infused with melatonin (500 pmole/50 nl/side) at dark onset (onset of active period) and spontaneous bouts of sleep-wakefulness were examined. Third, mice, implanted with bilateral guides into the PFH, were infused with melatonin (500 pmole/50 nl/side) at dark onset and euthanized two hours later, to examine activation of orexin neurons using c-Fos expression in orexin neurons. Fourth, mice, implanted with PFH bilateral guides and sleep- recording electrodes, were infused with melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, (10pmol/50 nL/side) at lights-onset (onset of sleep period) and spontaneous bouts of sleep-wakefulness were examined. Our results suggests that orexin neurons express MT1, but not MT2 receptors. Melatonin infusion into the PFH, at dark onset, site-specifically and significantly increased NREM sleep (43.7%, p=0.003) and reduced wakefulness (12.3%, p=0.013). Local melatonin infusion at dark-onset inhibited orexin neurons as evident by a significant reduction (66%, p=0.0004) in the number of orexin neurons expressing c-Fos. Finally, luzindole infusion induced blockade of melatonin receptors in PFH, at sleep onset significantly increased wakefulness (44.1%, p=0.015). Based on these results we suggest that melatonin may act via the MT1 receptors to inhibit orexin neurons and promote sleep. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Melatonin antagonizes interleukin-18-mediated inhibition on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Xingye; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei; Tan, DunXian; Shen, Jianxiong

    2017-09-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing, pluripotent and undifferentiated cells which have the potential to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. NSC therapy for tissue regeneration, thus, gains popularity. However, the low survivals rate of the transplanted cell impedes its utilities. In this study, we tested whether melatonin, a potent antioxidant, could promote the NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation, especially, in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18). Our results showed that melatonin per se indeed exhibited beneficial effects on NSCs and IL-18 inhibited NSC proliferation, neurosphere formation and their differentiation into neurons. All inhibitory effects of IL-18 on NSCs were significantly reduced by melatonin treatment. Moreover, melatonin application increased the production of both brain-derived and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF) in IL-18-stimulated NSCs. It was observed that inhibition of BDNF or GDNF hindered the protective effects of melatonin on NSCs. A potentially protective mechanism of melatonin on the inhibition of NSC's differentiation caused IL-18 may attribute to the up-regulation of these two major neurotrophic factors, BNDF and GNDF. The findings indicate that melatonin may play an important role promoting the survival of NSCs in neuroinflammatory diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Melatonin Cytotoxicity Is Associated to Warburg Effect Inhibition in Ewing Sarcoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Sanchez-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Melatonin kills or inhibits the proliferation of different cancer cell types, and this is associated with an increase or a decrease in reactive oxygen species, respectively. Intracellular oxidants originate mainly from oxidative metabolism, and cancer cells frequently show alterations in this metabolic pathway, such as the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis. Thus, we hypothesized that melatonin could also regulate differentially oxidative metabolism in cells where it is cytotoxic (Ewing sarcoma cells and in cells where it inhibits proliferation (chondrosarcoma cells. Ewing sarcoma cells but not chondrosarcoma cells showed a metabolic profile consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glucose uptake, LDH activity, lactate production and HIF-1α activation. Melatonin reversed Ewing sarcoma metabolic profile and this effect was associated with its cytotoxicity. The differential regulation of metabolism by melatonin could explain why the hormone is harmless for a wide spectrum of normal and only a few tumoral cells, while it kills specific tumor cell types.

  11. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  12. Melatonin suppresses markers of inflammation and oxidative damage in a human daytime endotoxemia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin used as an exogenous drug has been documented to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in animal model. We aimed to examine the effect of melatonin in an experimental human sepsis model.......Melatonin used as an exogenous drug has been documented to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in animal model. We aimed to examine the effect of melatonin in an experimental human sepsis model....

  13. Melatonin suppresses acrolein-induced IL-8 production in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2012-04-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) causes harmful alterations in the lungs and airway structures and functions that characterize chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition to COPD, active cigarette smoking causes other respiratory diseases and diminishes health status. Furthermore, recent studies show that, α, β-unsaturated aldehyde acrolein in CS induces the production of interleukin (IL)-8, which is known to be related to bronchitis, rhinitis, pulmonary fibrosis, and asthma. In addition, lung and pulmonary fibroblasts secrete IL-8, which has a chemotactic effect on leukocytes, and which in turn, play a critical role in lung inflammation. On the other hand, melatonin regulates circadian rhythm homeostasis in humans and has many other effects, which include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by the reduced expressions of iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6 and increased glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase activities. In this study, we investigated whether melatonin suppresses acrolein-induced IL-8 secretion in human pulmonary fibroblasts (HPFs). It was found that acrolein-induced IL-8 production was accompanied by increased levels of phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in HPFs, and that melatonin suppressed IL-8 production in HPFs. These results suggest that melatonin suppresses acrolein-induced IL-8 production via ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal inhibition in HPFs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Melatonin Inhibits Embryonic Salivary Gland Branching Morphogenesis by Regulating Both Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Jiro; Sakai, Manabu; Uchida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Wataru; Nohara, Kanji; Maruyama, Yusuke; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Sakai, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many organs, including salivary glands, lung, and kidney, are formed by epithelial branching during embryonic development. Branching morphogenesis occurs via either local outgrowths or the formation of clefts that subdivide epithelia into buds. This process is promoted by various factors, but the mechanism of branching morphogenesis is not fully understood. Here we have defined melatonin as a potential negative regulator or “brake” of branching morphogenesis, shown that the levels of it and its receptors decline when branching morphogenesis begins, and identified the process that it regulates. Melatonin has various physiological functions, including circadian rhythm regulation, free-radical scavenging, and gonadal development. Furthermore, melatonin is present in saliva and may have an important physiological role in the oral cavity. In this study, we found that the melatonin receptor is highly expressed on the acinar epithelium of the embryonic submandibular gland. We also found that exogenous melatonin reduces salivary gland size and inhibits branching morphogenesis. We suggest that this inhibition does not depend on changes in either proliferation or apoptosis, but rather relates to changes in epithelial cell adhesion and morphology. In summary, we have demonstrated a novel function of melatonin in organ formation during embryonic development. PMID:25876057

  15. Melatonin alleviates inflammasome-induced pyroptosis through inhibiting NF-κB/GSDMD signal in mice adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Gan, Lu; Xu, Yatao; Luo, Dan; Ren, Qian; Wu, Song; Sun, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Pyroptosis is a proinflammatory form of cell death that is associated with pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Melatonin is substantially reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting inflammasome activation. However, the effects of melatonin on inflammasome-induced pyroptosis in adipocytes remain elusive. Here, we demonstrated that melatonin alleviated lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome formation in mice adipose tissue. The NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated pyroptosis was also inhibited by melatonin in adipocytes. Further analysis revealed that gasdermin D (GSDMD), the key executioner of pyroptosis, was the target for melatonin inhibition of adipocyte pyroptosis. Importantly, we determined that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal was required for the GSDMD-mediated pyroptosis in adipocytes. We also confirmed that melatonin alleviated adipocyte pyroptosis by transcriptional suppression of GSDMD. Moreover, GSDMD physically interacted with interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) and subsequently formed a complex to promote adipocyte pyroptosis. Melatonin also attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pyroptosis, which was induced by LPS or obesity. In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin alleviates inflammasome-induced pyroptosis by blocking NF-κB/GSDMD signal in mice adipose tissue. Our data reveal a novel function of melatonin on adipocyte pyroptosis, suggesting a new potential therapy for melatonin to prevent and treat obesity caused systemic inflammatory response. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Melatonin inhibits endothelin-1 and induces endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dysfunction of vasculature play a central role in the pathophysiology of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of melatonin on reducing liver I/R injury in rats. Four study groups were formed: (1) saline ...

  17. Melatonin, Aging and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    2001-01-01

    ... conditions for tumor induction, promotion and progression. The pineal gland, via its hormone melatonin, has been shown by numerous laboratories to inhibit the proliferation of both human and animal models of breast cancer...

  18. Melatonin Nanoparticles Adsorbed to Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres as Activators of Human Colostrum Macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, C.D.C.P.; Honorio-Frana, A.C.; Fagundes, D.L.G.; Guimares, P.C.L.; Franca, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of hormones associated with polymeric matrices has amplified the possibility of obtaining new drugs to activate the immune system. Melatonin has been reported as an important immunomodulatory agent that can improve many cell activation processes. It is possible that the association of melatonin with polymers could influence its effects on cellular function. Thus, this study verified the adsorption of the hormone melatonin to polyethylene glycol (PEG) microspheres and analyzed its ability to modulate the functional activity of human colostrum phagocytes. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses revealed that melatonin was able to adsorb to the PEG microspheres. This system increased the release of superoxide and intracellular calcium. There was an increase of phagocytic and microbicidal activity by colostrum phagocytes when in the presence of melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres. The modified delivery of melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres may be an additional mechanism for its microbicidal activity and represents an important potential treatment for gastrointestinal infections of newborns.

  19. Melatonin suppresses thyroid cancer growth and overcomes radioresistance via inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and induction of ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Wei Zou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine carcinoma with increasing incidence worldwide and anaplastic subtypes are frequently associated with cancer related death. Radioresistance of thyroid cancer often leads to therapy failure and cancer-related death. In this study, we found that melatonin showed potent suppressive roles on NF-κB signaling via inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and generated redox stress in thyroid cancer including the anaplastic subtypes. Our data showed that melatonin significantly decreased cell viability, suppressed cell migration and induced apoptosis in thyroid cancer cell lines in vitro and impaired tumor growth in the subcutaneous mouse model in vivo. By contrast, irradiation of thyroid cancer cells resulted in elevated level of phosphorylated p65, which could be reversed by cotreatment with melatonin. Consequently, melatonin synergized with irradiation to induce cytotoxicity to thyroid cancer, especially in the undifferentiated subgroups. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin may exert anti-tumor activities against thyroid carcinoma by inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Radio-sensitization by melatonin may have clinical benefits in thyroid cancer. Keywords: Melatonin, Thyroid cancer, Radioresistance, p65, Reactive oxygen species

  20. Inhibition of iron overload-induced apoptosis and necrosis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Yuan; Yan, Gege; Liu, Tianyi; Feng, Chao; Gong, Rui; Yuan, Ye; Ding, Fengzhi; Zhang, Lai; Idiiatullina, Elina; Pavlov, Valentin; Han, Zhenbo; Ma, Wenya; Huang, Qi; Yu, Ying; Bao, Zhengyi; Wang, Xiuxiu; Hua, Bingjie; Du, Zhimin; Cai, Benzhi; Yang, Lei

    2017-05-09

    Iron overload induces severe damage to several vital organs such as the liver, heart and bone, and thus contributes to the dysfunction of these organs. The aim of this study is to investigate whether iron overload causes the apoptosis and necrosis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and melatonin may prevent its toxicity. Perls' Prussion blue staining showed that exposure to increased concentrations of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) induced a gradual increase of intracellular iron level in BMSCs. Trypan blue staining demonstrated that FAC decreased the viability of BMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, melatonin protected BMSCs against apoptosis and necrosis induced by FAC and it was vertified by Live/Dead, TUNEL and PI/Hoechst stainings. Furthermore, melatonin pretreatment suppressed FAC-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation. Western blot showed that exposure to FAC resulted in the decrease of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and Cleaved Caspase-3, and necrosis-related proteins RIP1 and RIP3, which were significantly inhibited by melatonin treatment. At last, melatonin receptor blocker luzindole failed to block the protection of BMSCs apoptosis and necrosis by melatonin. Taken together, melatonin protected BMSCs from iron overload induced apoptosis and necrosis by regulating Bcl-2, Bax, Cleaved Caspase-3, RIP1 and RIP3 pathways.

  1. Melatonin inhibits snake venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress and augments treatment efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rachana D; Katkar, Gajanan D; Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Swethakumar, Basavarajaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2017-05-01

    Snakebite is a neglected health hazard. Its patho-physiology has largely been focused on systemic and local toxicities; whereas, venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress has long been ignored. Antivenom therapy although neutralizes venom lethality and saves many lives, remains ineffective against oxidative stress. This prompted us to complement antivenom with an antioxidant molecule melatonin that would protect against oxidative stress and increase the efficacy of the existing snakebite therapy. Here we show that D. russelli and E. carinatus venoms induce strong oxidative stress that persists even after antivenom administration in mice model. Additionally, antivenoms also induce oxidative stress. Polyvalent antivenom induce more oxidative stress than monovalent antivenom. Strikingly, antivenom and melatonin together not only inhibit venom and antivenom induced oxidative stress but also significantly reduce the neutralizing antivenom dose. This study provides a therapeutic potential for enhancing the existing snakebite therapy. The combined treatment of antivenom+melatonin would prevent the upsurge of oxidative stress as well as minimize the antivenom load. Thus the investigation offers immense scope for physicians and toxinologists to reinvestigate, design new strategies and think beyond the conventional mode of antivenom therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutual effects of melatonin and activin on induction of aldosterone production by human adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takayuki; Otsuka, Fumio; Tsukamoto-Yamauchi, Naoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Hosoya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Eri; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Komatsubara, Motoshi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin has been reported to suppress adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in the anterior pituitary and cortisol production in the adrenal by different mechanisms. However, the effect of melatonin on aldosterone production has remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of melatonin in the regulation of aldosterone production using human adrenocortical H295R cells by focusing on the activin system expressed in the adrenal. Melatonin receptor MT1 mRNA and protein were expressed in H295R cells and the expression levels of MT1 were increased by activin treatment. Activin increased ACTH-induced, but not angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced, aldosterone production. Melatonin alone did not affect basal synthesis of either aldosterone or cortisol. However, melatonin effectively enhanced aldosterone production induced by co-treatment with ACTH and activin, although melatonin had no effect on aldosterone production induced by Ang II in combination with activin. These changes in steroidogenesis became apparent when the steroid production was evaluated by the ratio of aldosterone/cortisol. Melatonin also enhanced dibutyryl-AMP-induced aldosterone/cortisol levels in the presence of activin, suggesting a functional link to the cAMP-PKA pathway for induction of aldosterone production by melatonin and activin. In accordance with the data for steroids, ACTH-induced, but not Ang II-induced, cAMP synthesis was also amplified by co-treatment with melatonin and activin. Furthermore, the ratio of ACTH-induced mRNA level of CYP11B2 compared with that of CYP17 was amplified in the condition of treatment with both melatonin and activin. In addition, melatonin increased expression of the activin type-I receptor ALK-4 but suppressed expression of inhibitory Smads6/7, leading to the enhancement of Smad2 phosphorylation. Collectively, the results showed that melatonin facilitated aldosterone production induced by ACTH and activin via the cAMP-PKA pathway. The results also

  3. MELATONIN: POTENTIAL UTILITY FOR IMPROVING PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J REITER; Fatih GULTEKIN; Luis J FLORES; Ma Pilar TERRON; Dun-Xian TAN

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the beneficial actions of melatonin in various experimental conditions/diseases and identifies where the use of melatonin may be helpful in improving public health. The nightly use of melatonin supplements by humans often improves their sleep and helps correct the circadian dyssynchronization associated with “jet lag”. Additionally, melatonin has been found effective in curtailing the growth of a variety of experimental cancers. Mechanistically, this is achieved by melatonin’s ability to limit fatty acid uptake, especially linoleic acid, by tumor cells. Fatty acids are growth factors for many tumors. Additionally, melatonin inhibits the elevated telomerase activity of tumor cells thus making them more fragile and vulnerable to chemotherapies. Melatonin also may inhibit angiogenesis in tumors by suppressing endothelin-1 production and the indole interferes with the stimulatory action of steroids on hormone-responsive tumors. As an ubiquitously-acting antioxidant, melatonin reduces cardiac damage during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury (heart attack and during I/R to the brain (stroke. Melatonin also limits the toxicity of amyloid  peptide and of neurofibrillary tangles, two of the cardinal signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Collectively, these data suggest supplementation with melatonin, whose endogenous levels decrease with age, may improve the quality of life in the aged and, as a consequence, be beneficial for public health generally. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(2.000: 131-158

  4. Melatonin intake and potential chronobiological effects on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Domingos, Ana Luiza; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Bressan, Josefina

    2017-08-11

    Melatonin is an indolamine with a recognized chronobiotic role. In turn, the supplementation of melatonin through capsules has been shown to be efficient in the modulation of inflammatory markers, oxidative stress, as well as in the control of hypertension and metabolic syndrome. However, the science of nutrition is interested in the study of the food sources of this hormone and its possible therapeutic effects. Thus, this review aimed to identify and present scientific papers that quantified melatonin in foods and evaluated its application in intervention studies. In total, 278 studies were found, of which 17 were included in this review. The results show that meats, fish, eggs, cereals, tubers, oilseeds, mushrooms, fruits, vegetables, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and dairy products had some items analyzed for their melatonin concentrations. The concentrations reported presented considerable amplitude among different foods and even within the same species, possibly due to differences in cultivation and different hormonal dosing techniques. Also, different concentrations of melatonin can be presented for the same food when submitted to processes such as cooking, roasting or fermentation. The intervention studies presented positive results regarding the consumption of foods rich in melatonin and clinical-metabolic indicators. However, in order to guide nutritional behavior, it is necessary to consult a composition table that makes melatonin concentrations available and considers the processes involved in the preparation of the food. With this table, it will be possible to analyze the real effect of habitual consumption of melatonin from food on health.

  5. Melatonin and breast cancer: Evidences from preclinical and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatka, Peter; Zubor, Pavol; Busselberg, Dietrich; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Adamek, Mariusz; Petrovic, Daniel; Opatrilova, Radka; Gazdikova, Katarina; Caprnda, Martin; Rodrigo, Luis; Danko, Jan; Kruzliak, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The breast cancer affects women with high mortality and morbidity worldwide. The risk is highest in the most developed world but also is markedly rising in the developing countries. It is well documented that melatonin has a significant anti-tumor activities demonstrated on various cancer types in a plethora of preclinical studies. In breast cancer, melatonin is capable to disrupt estrogen-dependent cell signaling, resulting in a reduction of estrogen-stimulated cells, moreover, it's obvious neuro-immunomodulatory effect in organism was described. Several prospective studies have demonstrated the inverse correlation between melatonin metabolites and the risk of breast cancer. This correlation was confirmed by observational studies that found lower melatonin levels in breast cancer patients. Moreover, clinical studies have showed that circadian disruption of melatonin synthesis, specifically night shift work, is linked to increased breast cancer risk. In this regard, proper light/dark exposure with more selective use of light at night along with oral supplementation of melatonin may have benefits for high-risk women. The results of current preclinical studies, the mechanism of action, and clinical efficacy of melatonin in breast cancer are reviewed in this paper. Melatonin alone or in combined administration seems to be appropriate drug for the treatment of early stages of breast cancer with documented low toxicity over a wide range of doses. These and other issues are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  7. Human MT2 melatonin receptor and its melatonin recognition site: a structural model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luley, Ladislav; Stockner, T; Sovová, Žofie; Mazna, Petr; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Teisinger, Jan

    Roč.272, č.S1 (2005), s. 222-223 ISSN 1474-3833. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : melatonin receptor * model * structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Melatonin Protects Cultured Tobacco Cells against Lead-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of Cytochrome c Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kobylińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin was discovered in plants more than two decades ago and, especially in the last decade, it has captured the interests of plant biologists. Beyond its possible participation in photoperiod processes and its role as a direct free radical scavenger as well as an indirect antioxidant, melatonin is also involved in plant defense strategies/reactions. However, the mechanisms that this indoleamine activates to improve plant stress tolerance still require identification and clarification. In the present report, the ability of exogenous melatonin to protect Nicotiana tabacum L. line Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2 suspension cells against the toxic exposure to lead was examined. Studies related to cell proliferation and viability, DNA fragmentation, possible translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, cell morphology after fluorescence staining and also the in situ accumulation of superoxide radicals measured via the nitro blue tetrazolium reducing test, were conducted. This work establishes a novel finding by correcting the inhibition of release of mitochondrial ctytocrome c in to the cytoplasm with the high accumulation of superoxide radicals. The results show that pretreatment with 200 nm of melatonin protected tobacco cells from DNA damage caused by lead. Melatonin, as an efficacious antioxidant, limited superoxide radical accumulation as well as cytochrome c release thereby, it likely prevents the activation of the cascade of processes leading to cell death. Fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide documented that lead-stressed cells additionally treated with melatonin displayed intact nuclei. The results revealed that melatonin at proper dosage could significantly increase BY-2 cell proliferation and protected them against death. It was proved that melatonin could function as an effective priming agent to promote survival of tobacco cells under harmful lead-induced stress conditions.

  9. Melatonin in humans: Possible involvement in SIDS, and use in contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Lynch, Harry J.; Sturner, William Q.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively few tools exist for assessing the possible involvement of melatonin in normal or abnormal physiologlcal and behavioral states. One cannot perform the classic ablation experiment of endocrinologists by cavalierly removing the human's pineal, nor derive the same effect pharmacologically by administering a drug which blocks the actions of the indole on its receptors (because no such drugs, demonstrated to work in humans, exist). About all that can be done is to administer the melatonin and see what happens, or measure its levels in a body fluid and determine whether its temporal patterns track those of the physiological or behavioral variable being examined. The clinical state of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) which apparently is associated with abnormalities in melatonin concentrations within body fluids obtained at autopsy is described. New data which suggest that exogenous melatonin has sufficient antigonadal potency to allow it to replace estrogen and, acting in combination with norethisterone, serve as a useful contraceptive agent is summarized.

  10. Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Mediavilla, M D; Tan, D X; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous clinical trials have examined the therapeutic usefulness of melatonin in different fields of medicine. The objective of this article is to review, in depth, the science regarding clinical trials performed to date. The efficacy of melatonin has been assessed as a treatment of ocular diseases, blood diseases, gastrointestinal tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, sleep disturbances, aging and depression. Melatonin has been also used as a complementary treatment in anaesthesia, hemodialysis, in vitro fertilization and neonatal care. The conclusion of the current review is that the use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy seems to be well funded for macular degeneration, glaucoma, protection of the gastric mucosa, irritable bowel syndrome, arterial hypertension, diabetes, side effects of chemotherapy and radiation in cancer patients or hemodialysis in patients with renal insufficiency and, especially, for sleep disorders of circadian etiology (jet lag, delayed sleep phase syndrome, sleep deterioration associated with aging, etc.) as well as in those related with neurological degenerative diseases (Alzheimer, etc.,) or Smith-Magenis syndrome. The utility of melatonin in anesthetic procedures has been also confirmed. More clinical studies are required to clarify whether, as the preliminary data suggest, melatonin is useful for treatment of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neoplasias or neonatal care. Preliminary data regarding the utility of melatonin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis are either ambiguous or negative. Although in a few cases melatonin seems to aggravate some conditions, the vast majority of studies document the very low toxicity of melatonin over a wide range of doses.

  11. Prospective Study on Salivary Evening Melatonin and Sleep before and after Pinealectomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawik, Helen; Stoffel, Michael; Riedl, Lina; Veselý, Zdenko; Behr, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Pohl, Corina; Meyer, Bernhard; Wiegand, Michael; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    Melatonin is secreted systemically from the pineal gland maximally at night but is also produced locally in many tissues. Its chronobiological function is mainly exerted by pineal melatonin. It is a feedback regulator of the main circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and of many peripheral oscillators. Although exogenous melatonin is approved for circadian rhythm sleep disorders and old-age insomnia, research on endogenous melatonin in humans is hindered by the great interindividual variability of its amount and circadian rhythm. Single case studies on pinealectomized patients report on disrupted but also hypersomnic sleep. This is the first systematic prospective report on sleep with respect to pinealectomy due to pinealocytoma World Health Organization grade I without chemo- or radiotherapy. Before and after pinealectomy, 8 patients completed questionnaires on sleep quality and circadian rhythm (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire), 2 nights of polysomnography, salivary evening melatonin profiles, and qualitative assessment of 2 weeks of actigraphy and sleep logs. Six patients were assessed retrospectively up to 4 years after pinealectomy. Before pinealectomy, all but 1 patient showed an evening melatonin rise typical for indifferent chronotypes. After pinealectomy, evening saliva melatonin was markedly diminished, mostly below the detection limit of the assay (0.09 pg/mL). No systematic change in subjective sleep quality or standard measures of polysomnography was found. Mean pre- and postoperative sleep efficiency was 94% and 95%, and mean sleep-onset latency was 21 and 17 min, respectively. Sleep-wake rhythm during normal daily life did not change. Retrospective patients had a reduced sleep efficiency (90%) and more stage changes, although this was not significantly different from prospective patients. In conclusion, melatonin does seem to have a modulatory, not a

  12. Comparison of the effects of acute fluvoxamine and desipramine administration on melatonin and cortisol production in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, D J; Bojkowski, C J; Arendt, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Acute administration of the specific serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluvoxamine (100 mg at 16.00 h), markedly increased nocturnal plasma melatonin concentrations, with high levels extending into the morning hours. 2. Acute administration of the noradrenaline uptake inhibitor, desipramine (DMI) (100 mg at 16.00 h), increased evening plasma melatonin concentrations. 3. Both drug treatments increased the duration of melatonin secretion, fluvoxamine significantly delaying the offset time and DMI significantly advancing the onset time. 4. The stimulatory effect of DMI on plasma melatonin was mirrored by increased urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) excretion. 5. On the contrary, there was no correlation between plasma melatonin and urinary aMT6s concentrations following fluvoxamine treatment, suggesting that fluvoxamine may inhibit the metabolism of melatonin. 6. Treatment with DMI increased plasma cortisol concentrations in the evening and early morning, treatment with fluvoxamine increased plasma cortisol at 03.00 h, 10.00 h and 11.00 h. 7. The drug treatments affected different aspects of the nocturnal plasma melatonin profile suggesting that the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm may depend upon serotonin availability and/or melatonin metabolism whilst the onset of melatonin production depends upon noradrenaline availability. PMID:8186063

  13. Melatonin Inhibits the Proliferation of Gastric Cancer Cells Through Regulating the miR-16-5p-Smad3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenyu; Huang, Qun; Zhu, Hongyu

    2018-03-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer is steadily increasing annually around the world, which required further investigation about alternative therapy strategies. Melatonin, an indoleamine synthesized in the pineal gland, has shown dramatic anticancer effect in several cancers, however, the function of melatonin in gastric cancer needs to be characterized. In this study, we found that melatonin inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been attractive targets for many anticancer drugs. To explore the underlying molecular mechanism by which melatonin attenuated the growth of cancer cells, miRNA microarray analysis was performed to screen the miRNAs, which significantly altered after melatonin treatment. The result showed that melatonin administration enhanced the expression of miR-16-5p. Further molecular mechanism research revealed that miR-16-5p targeted Smad3 and consequently negatively regulated the abundance of Smad3. Consistently, melatonin exposure decreased the level of Smad3 and overexpression of Smad3 attenuated the inhibitory effect of melatonin in gastric cancer cells. These results uncovered the anticancer effect of melatonin and highlighted the critical roles of miR-16-5p-Smad3 pathway in melatonin-induced growth defects of gastric cancers.

  14. Melatonin the "light of night" in human biology and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Savvidou, Olga D

    2007-04-04

    Melatonin "the light of night" is secreted from the pineal gland principally at night. The hormone is involved in sleep regulation, as well as in a number of other cyclical bodily activities and circadian rhythm in humans. Melatonin is exclusively involved in signalling the 'time of day' and 'time of year' (hence considered to help both clock and calendar functions) to all tissues and is thus considered to be the body's chronological pacemaker or 'Zeitgeber'. The last decades melatonin has been used as a therapeutic chemical in a large spectrum of diseases, mainly in sleep disturbances and tumours and may play a role in the biologic regulation of mood, affective disorders, cardiovascular system, reproduction and aging. There are few papers regarding melatonin and its role in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Melatonin may play a role in the pathogenesis of scoliosis (neuroendocrine hypothesis) but at present, the data available cannot clearly support this hypothesis. Uncertainties and doubts still surround the role of melatonin in human physiology and pathophysiology and future research is needed.

  15. Melatonin the "light of night" in human biology and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvidou Olga D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melatonin "the light of night" is secreted from the pineal gland principally at night. The hormone is involved in sleep regulation, as well as in a number of other cyclical bodily activities and circadian rhythm in humans. Melatonin is exclusively involved in signalling the 'time of day' and 'time of year' (hence considered to help both clock and calendar functions to all tissues and is thus considered to be the body's chronological pacemaker or 'Zeitgeber'. The last decades melatonin has been used as a therapeutic chemical in a large spectrum of diseases, mainly in sleep disturbances and tumours and may play a role in the biologic regulation of mood, affective disorders, cardiovascular system, reproduction and aging. There are few papers regarding melatonin and its role in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Melatonin may play a role in the pathogenesis of scoliosis (neuroendocrine hypothesis but at present, the data available cannot clearly support this hypothesis. Uncertainties and doubts still surround the role of melatonin in human physiology and pathophysiology and future research is needed.

  16. Melatonin inhibits type 1 interferon signaling of toll-like receptor 4 via heme oxygenase-1 induction in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2012-08-01

    The cytoprotective mechanisms of melatonin in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury associated with heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling pathway downstream of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were investigated. Rats were subjected to 60min of ischemia followed by 5-hr reperfusion. Melatonin (10mg/kg) or vehicle (5% ethanol in saline) was administered intraperitoneally 15min prior to ischemia and immediately before reperfusion. Rats were pretreated with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 10mg/kg, i.p.), a HO-1 inhibitor, at 16 and 3hr prior to ischemia. Melatonin attenuated the I/R-induced increase in serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and ZnPP reversed this attenuation. Melatonin augmented the levels of HO activity and HO-1 protein and mRNA expression, and this enhancement was reversed by ZnPP. Melatonin enhanced the level of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, and ZnPP reversed this increase. Overexpression of TLR4 and its adaptor proteins, toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), induced by I/R, was attenuated by melatonin; ZnPP reversed the effect of melatonin on TLR4 and TRIF expression. Melatonin suppressed the increased interaction between TLR4/TRIF and TLR4/MyD88, which was reversed by ZnPP. Melatonin attenuated the increased levels of JAK2 and STAT1 activation as well as IFN-β, and ZnPP reversed these inhibitory effects of melatonin. Melatonin inhibited the level of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL-10), and ZnPP reversed this inhibition. Our findings suggest that melatonin protects the liver against I/R injury by HO-1 overexpression, which suppresses the type 1 IFN signaling pathway downstream of TLR4. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. MT1 melatonin receptors and their role in the oncostatic action of melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Danielczyk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, strongly inhibits the growth of cancer cells [i]in vitro[/i] and [i]in vivo[/i]. Some publications indicate that the addition of melatonin to culture medium slows the proliferation of some cancer cell lines. It is also suggested that melatonin used as an adjuvant benefits the effectiveness and tolerance of chemotherapy. The mechanisms of this are not fully understood, but melatonin receptors might be one of the most important elements. Two distinct types of membrane-bound melatonin receptors have been identified in humans: MT1 (Mel1a and MT2 (Mel1b receptors. These subtypes are 60�0homologous at the amino-acid level. MT1 receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors. Through the α subunit of G protein, melatonin receptors stimulate an adenylate cyclase and decrease the level of cAMP. This has a significant influence on cell proliferation and has been confirmed in many tests on different cell lines, such as S-19, B-16 murine melanoma cells, and breast cancer cells. It seems that expression of the MT1 melatonin receptors benefits the efficacy of melatonin treatment. Melatonin and its receptors may provide a promising way to establish new alternative therapeutic approaches in human cancer prevention.

  18. Melatonin modulates permeability transition pore and 5-hydroxydecanoate induced KATPchannel inhibition in isolated brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the magnitude of mitochondria in neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria play a key role in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Melatonin (Mel), an indoleamine produced in several organs including the pineal gland has been known for its neuroprotective actions. In our study, we have investigated whether the mitochondrial ATP sensitive potassium (mtK ATP ) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and calcium (Ca 2+ ) affects permeability transition pore (PTP) alterations in isolated brain mitochondria treated with melatonin (Mel) and cyclosporin A (CsA). Mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ), ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated in isolated brain mitochondria. In our results, mitochondrial swelling stimulated by exposing Ca 2+ ions and 5-HD associated by mPTP opening as depicted by modulation of CsA and Mel. In addition, Ca 2+ and 5-HD decreased Δψ m , depleted intracellular ROS, and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (state 3 and state 4) in isolated brain mitochondria. Addition of Mel and CsA has shown significant restoration in mitochondrial swelling, Δψ m , intracellular ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration in isolated brain mitochondria. Therefore, we speculate the modulatory effect of Mel and CsA in mitochondria treated with 5-HD and Ca 2+ hinders the mPTP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular oxidative stress. We conclude that inhibition of mPT is one likely mechanism of CsA's and its neuroprotective actions. Development of neuroprotective agents including Mel targeting the mPTP therefore bears hope for future treatment of severe neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  20. Human transporters, PEPT1/2, facilitate melatonin transportation into mitochondria of cancer cells: An implication of the therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiaokui; Wang, Chao; Yu, Zhenlong; Peng, Yulin; Wang, Shumei; Feng, Shengnan; Zhang, Shouji; Tian, Xiangge; Sun, Chengpeng; Liu, Kexin; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is present in virtually all organisms from bacteria to mammals, and it exhibits a broad spectrum of biological functions, including synchronization of circadian rhythms and oncostatic activity. Several functions of melatonin are mediated by its membrane receptors, but others are receptor-independent. For the latter, melatonin is required to penetrate membrane and enters intracellular compartments. However, the mechanism by which melatonin enters cells remains debatable. In this study, it was identified that melatonin and its sulfation metabolites were the substrates of oligopeptide transporter (PEPT) 1/2 and organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, respectively. The docking analysis showed that the binding of melatonin to PEPT1/2 was attributed to their low binding energy and suitable binding conformation in which melatonin was embedded in the active site of PEPT1/2 and fitted well with the cavity in three-dimensional space. PEPT1/2 transporters play a pivotal role in melatonin uptake in cells. Melatonin's membrane transportation via PEPT1/2 renders its oncostatic effect in malignant cells. For the first time, PEPT1/2 were identified to localize in the mitochondrial membrane of human cancer cell lines of PC3 and U118. PEPT1/2 facilitated the transportation of melatonin into mitochondria. Melatonin accumulation in mitochondria induced apoptosis of PC3 and U118 cells. Thus, PEPT1/2 can potentially be used as a cancer cell-targeted melatonin delivery system to improve the therapeutic effects of melatonin in cancer treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Melatonin: an Inhibitor of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Steven M.; Belancio, Victoria P.; Dauchy, Robert T.; Xiang, Shulin; Brimer, Samantha; Mao, Lulu; Hauch, Adam; Lundberg, Peter W.; Summers, Whitney; Yuan, Lin; Frasch, Tripp; Blask, David E.

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses recent work on melatonin-mediated circadian regulation and metabolic and molecular signaling mechanisms involved in human breast cancer growth and associated consequences of circadian disruption by exposure to light at night (LEN). The anti-cancer actions of the circadian melatonin signal in human breast cancer cell lines and xenografts heavily involve MT1 receptor-mediated mechanisms. In estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive human breast cancer, melatonin, via the MT1 receptor, suppresses ERα mRNA expression and ERα transcriptional activity. As well, melatonin regulates the transactivation of other members of the nuclear receptor super-family, estrogen metabolizing enzymes, and the expression of core clock and clock-related genes. Furthermore, melatonin also suppresses tumor aerobic metabolism (Warburg effect), and, subsequently, cell-signaling pathways critical to cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and drug resistance. Melatonin demonstrates both cytostatic and cytotoxic activity in breast cancer cells that appears to be cell type specific. Melatonin also possesses anti-invasive/anti-metastatic actions that involve multiple pathways including inhibition of p38 MAPK and repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Studies demonstrate that melatonin promotes genomic stability by inhibiting the expression of LINE-1 retrotransposons. Finally, research in animal and human models indicate that LEN induced disruption of the circadian nocturnal melatonin signal promotes the growth, metabolism, and signaling of human breast cancer to drive breast tumors to endocrine and chemotherapeutic resistance. These data provide the strongest understanding and support of the mechanisms underpinning the epidemiologic demonstration of elevated breast cancer risk in night shift workers and other individuals increasingly exposed to LEN. PMID:25876649

  2. Melatonin affects membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species, caspase3 activity and AKT phosphorylation in frozen thawed human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Atefeh; Adutwum, Emmanuel; Yari, Abazar; Salehi, Ensieh; Mikaeili, Saideh; Dashtestani, Fariba; Abolhassani, Farid; Rashki, Leila; Shiasi, Setareh; Asadi, Ebrahim

    2018-04-01

    Cryopreservation is known to induce oxidative stress in spermatozoa. Although melatonin has powerful antioxidant properties, little is known about its effects on human sperm quality during cryopreservation. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of melatonin treatment on human sperm parameters essential for fertilization. We first evaluated the effects of various concentrations of melatonin (0-15 mM) on human sperm parameters such as motility, viability and levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species during cryopreservation in order to identify an optimal dose with the greatest effects for further studies. Liquefied semen samples were then divided into three aliquots: cryopreserved without melatonin (control), cryopreserved with 3 mM melatonin and fresh groups. After being thawed, samples were evaluated for motility, viability, membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, caspase-3 activity and AKT phosphorylation. Treatment of spermatozoa with the various concentrations of melatonin significantly increased their motility and viability and decreased their intracellular reactive oxygen species levels compared with the control group. The optimal melatonin concentration (3 mM) significantly decreased the intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, caspase-3 activity and the percentage of both dead and apoptotic-like sperm cells and increased the vitality, progressive motility and total motility and AKT phosphorylation compared with the control group. Thus, melatonin exerts protective effects against cryodamage during human spermatozoa cryopreservation and may exert its effects via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  3. Placental melatonin production and melatonin receptor expression are altered in preeclampsia: new insights into the role of this hormone in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoix, Dave; Guérin, Pascale; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2012-11-01

    The melatonin system in preeclamptic pregnancies has been largely overlooked, especially in the placenta. We have previously documented melatonin production and expression of its receptors in normal human placentas. In addition, we and others have shown a beneficial role of melatonin in placental and fetal functions. In line with this, decreased maternal blood levels of melatonin are found in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancies. However, melatonin production and expression of its receptors in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancy placentas has never been examined. This study compares (i) melatonin-synthesizing enzyme expression and activity, (ii) melatonin and serotonin, melatonin's immediate precursor, levels and (iii) expression of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in placentas from preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies. Protein and mRNA expression of aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), the melatonin-synthesizing enzymes, as well as MT1 and MT2 receptors were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. The activities of melatonin-synthesizing enzymes were assessed by radiometric assays while melatonin levels were determined by LC-MS/MS. There is a significant inhibition of AANAT, melatonin's rate-limiting enzyme, expression and activity in preeclamptic placentas, correlating with decreased melatonin levels. Likewise, MT1 and MT2 expression is significantly reduced in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancy placentas. We propose that reduced maternal plasma melatonin levels may be an early diagnostic tool to identify pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. This study indicates a clinical utility of melatonin as a potential treatment for preeclampsia in women where reduced maternal plasma levels have been identified. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, K; Plomp, R; Lao, O; Middleton, B; Revell, VL; Skene, DJ; Kayser, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean ± SD: 23 ± 5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g...

  5. Resetting of circadian melatonin and cortisol rhythms in humans by ordinary room light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, D. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a weak photic stimulus can reset the endogenous circadian rhythms of plasma melatonin and plasma cortisol in human subjects. A stimulus consisting of three cycles of 5 h exposures to ordinary room light (approximately 180 lux), centered 1.5 h after the endogenous temperature nadir, significantly phase-advanced the plasma melatonin rhythm in eight healthy young men compared with the phase delays observed in eight control subjects who underwent the same protocol but were exposed to darkness (p melatonin and plasma cortisol maintained stable temporal relationships with the endogenous core body temperature cycle, consistent with the conclusion that exposure to ordinary indoor room light had shifted a master circadian pacemaker.

  6. The anti-oxidant effects of melatonin derivatives on human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiphatwatcharaded, Chawapon; Puthongking, Ploenthip; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Johns, Nutjaree Pratheepawanit; Sakolchai, Sumon; Mahakunakorn, Pramote

    2017-07-01

    Aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the anti-oxidant activity of indole ring modified melatonin derivatives as compared with melatonin in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. Anti-oxidant activity of melatonin (MLT), acetyl-melatonin (AMLT) and benzoyl-melatonin (BMLT) was evaluated by5 standard methods as follows: 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH); ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP); superoxide anion scavenging; nitric oxide (NO) scavenging; and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs).Evaluation of cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) and protectivity against H 2 O 2 induced cellular damage was performed via MTT assay in HGF cells. According to the standard anti-oxidant assays, the antioxidant power of AMLT and BMLT were slightly less than MLT in FRAP and superoxide scavenging assays. In the NO scavenging and TBARs assays, BMLT and AMLT were more potent than MLT, whereas DPPH assays demonstrated that MLT was more potent than others. BMLT and AMLT had more potent anti-oxidant and protective activities against H 2 O 2 in HGF cells as compared with MLT. MLT derivatives demonstrated different anti-oxidant activities as compared with MLT, depending upon assays. These findings imply that N-indole substitution of MLT may help to improve hydrogen atom transfer to free radicals but electron transfer property is slightly decreased. Anti-oxidant and protective effects of melatonin derivatives (AMLT and BMLT) on human gingival fibroblasts imply the potential use of these molecules as alternative therapeutics for chronic inflammatory oral diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exogenous melatonin supplementation prevents oxidative stress-evoked DNA damage in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Ignacio; Monllor, Fabian; Marchena, Ana María; Ortiz, Agueda; Lozano, Graciela; Jiménez, Maria Isabel; Gaspar, Pilar; García, Juan F; Pariente, Jose A; Rodríguez, Ana B; Espino, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for sperm physiological functions such as capacitation, hyperactivation, and acrosome reaction, on the one hand, and for stimulating the apoptotic processes involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, on the other hand. However, the imbalance between production and removal of ROS leads to oxidative stress, which is referred to as one of the main factors involved in male infertility. The pineal hormone melatonin, given its low toxicity and well-known antioxidant capacity, could be an excellent candidate to improve sperm quality. For this reason, the objective of the present work was to analyze whether long-term supplementation with melatonin to infertile men affects human sperm quality and the quality of the embryos retrieved from their couples. Our findings showed that the daily supplementation of 6 mg melatonin, as early as after 45 days of treatment, produced an increase in melatonin endogenous levels, indirectly measured as urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6-s), an enhancement of both urinary and seminal total antioxidant capacity, and a consequent reduction in oxidative damage caused in sperm DNA. Moreover, couples whose men were given melatonin showed a statistically significant increase in the percentage of grade A (embryo with blastomeres of equal size; no cytoplasmic fragmentation), B (embryo with blastomeres of equal size; minor cytoplasmic fragmentation), and C (embryo with blastomeres of distinctly unequal size; significant cytoplasmic fragmentation) embryos at the expense of grade D (embryo with blastomeres of equal or unequal size; severe or complete fragmentation.) embryos which were clearly reduced. In summary, melatonin supplementation improves human sperm quality, which is essential to achieve successful natural and/or assisted reproduction outcome. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Melatonin inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of nitric oxide and interleukin-6 in murine macrophages by suppressing NF-κB and STAT1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2011-03-01

    Although a range of biological and pharmacological activities of melatonin have been reported, little is known about its potential anti-inflammatory efficacy in periodontal disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of melatonin on the production of inflammatory mediators by murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a major cause of inflammatory reactions in the periodontium, and sought to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. Melatonin suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. P. intermedia LPS-induced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity was significantly inhibited by melatonin. Melatonin did not reduce NF-κB transcriptional activity at the level of IκB-α degradation. Melatonin blocked NF-κB signaling through the inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and suppressed STAT1 signaling. Although further research is required to clarify the detailed mechanism of action, we conclude that melatonin may contribute to blockade of the host-destructive processes mediated by these two proinflammatory mediators and could be a highly efficient modulator of host response in the treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Schindler, Carina; Eichhorn, Karsten; Kley, Franziska; Erren, Thomas C

    2009-09-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression.

  10. Melatonin supplementation ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced by strenuous exercise in adult human males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Julio J; Díaz-Castro, Javier; Kajarabille, Naroa; García, Carmen; Guisado, Isabel M; De Teresa, Carlos; Guisado, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Strenuous exercise induces inflammatory reactions together with high production of free radicals and subsequent muscle damage. This study was designed to investigate for the first time and simultaneously whether over-expression of inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, and alterations in biochemical parameters induced by acute exercise could be prevented by melatonin. This indoleamine is a potent, endogenously produced free radical scavenger and a broad-spectrum antioxidant; consequently, it might have positive effects on the recovery following an exercise session. The participants were classified into two groups: melatonin-treated men (MG) and placebo-treated individuals (controls group, CG). The physical test consisted in a constant run that combined several degrees of high effort (mountain run and ultra-endurance). The total distance of the run was 50 km with almost 2800 m of ramp in permanent climbing and very changeable climatic conditions. Exercise was associated with a significant increase in TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ra (in blood), and also an increase in 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and isoprostane levels (in urine), and indicated the degree of oxidative stress and inflammation induced. Oral supplementation of melatonin during high-intensity exercise proved efficient in reducing the degree of oxidative stress (lower levels of lipid peroxidation, with a significant increase in antioxidative enzyme activities); this would lead to the maintenance of the cellular integrity and reduce secondary tissue damage. Data obtained also indicate that melatonin has potent protective effects, by preventing over-expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and inhibiting the effects of several pro-inflammatory cytokines. In summary, melatonin supplementation before strenuous exercise reduced muscle damage through modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation signaling associated with this physical challenge. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Melatonin regulates PARP1 to control the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in human fetal lung fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Songtao; Wang, Xiaojiao; Geng, Peiliang; Tang, Xudong; Xiang, Lisha; Lu, Xin; Li, Jianjun; Ruan, Zhihua; Chen, Jianfang; Xie, Ganfeng; Wang, Zhe; Ou, Juanjuan; Peng, Yuan; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Xuan; Dong, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Miao, Hongming; Chen, Hongshan; Liang, Houjie

    2017-08-01

    Cellular senescence is an important tumor-suppressive mechanism. However, acquisition of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in senescent cells has deleterious effects on the tissue microenvironment and, paradoxically, promotes tumor progression. In a drug screen, we identified melatonin as a novel SASP suppressor in human cells. Strikingly, melatonin blunts global SASP gene expression upon oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). Moreover, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a sensor of DNA damage, was identified as a new melatonin-dependent regulator of SASP gene induction upon OIS. Here, we report two different but potentially coherent epigenetic strategies for melatonin regulation of SASP. The interaction between the telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) and PARP-1 stimulates the SASP, which was attenuated by 67.9% (illustrated by the case of IL8) by treatment with melatonin. Through binding to macroH2A1.1, PARP-1 recruits CREB-binding protein (CBP) to mediate acetylation of H2BK120, which positively regulates the expression of target SASP genes, and this process is interrupted by melatonin. Consequently, the findings provide novel insight into melatonin's epigenetic role via modulating PARP-1 in suppression of SASP gene expression in OIS-induced senescent cells. Our studies identify melatonin as a novel anti-SASP molecule, define PARP-1 as a new target by which melatonin regulates SASP, and establish a new epigenetic paradigm for a pharmacological mechanism by which melatonin interrupts PARP-1 interaction with the telomeric long noncoding RNA(lncRNA) or chromatin. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Rescue of proinflammatory cytokine-inhibited chondrogenesis by the antiarthritic effect of melatonin in synovium mesenchymal stem cells via suppression of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Yong; Chen, Sijin; Tan, Zifang; Xiong, Ke; Li, Yan; Ye, Yun; Luo, Zong-Ping; He, Fan; Gong, Yihong

    2014-03-01

    Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) often occurs in diseased joints in which the inflamed microenvironment impairs chondrogenic maturation and causes neocartilage degradation. In this environment, melatonin exerts an antioxidant effect by scavenging free radicals. This study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects of melatonin on human MSCs in a proinflammatory cytokine-induced arthritic environment. MSCs were induced toward chondrogenesis in the presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) with or without melatonin. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, antioxidant enzymes, and cell viability were then assessed. Deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagens was also determined by histological analysis. Gene expression of chondrogenic markers and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the involvement of the melatonin receptor and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in chondrogenesis was investigated using pharmacologic inhibitors. The results showed that melatonin significantly reduced ROS accumulation and increased SOD expression. Both IL-1β and TNF-α had an inhibitory effect on the chondrogenesis of MSCs, but melatonin successfully restored the low expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic genes. Melatonin prevented cartilage degradation by downregulating MMPs. The addition of luzindole and SOD inhibitors abrogated the protective effect of melatonin associated with increased levels of ROS and MMPs. These results demonstrated that proinflammatory cytokines impair the chondrogenesis of MSCs, which was rescued by melatonin treatment. This chondroprotective effect was potentially correlated to decreased ROS, preserved SOD, and suppressed levels of MMPs. Thus, melatonin provides a new strategy for promoting cell-based cartilage regeneration in diseased or injured joints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  13. Long term inhibition by estradiol or progesterone of melatonin secretion after administration of a mammary carcinogen, the dimethyl benz(a)anthracene, in Sprague-Dawley female rat; inhibitory effect of Melatonin on mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonage-Canonico, Marianne Beau Yon; Lenoir, Véronique; Martin, Antoine; Scholler, Robert; Kerdelhué, Bernard

    2003-06-01

    A single intragastric administration of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) has been shown to induce mammary tumors in young cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats. The appearance of the tumors is preceded by a series of neuroendocrine disturbances, including attenuation of the preovulatory Luteinizing Hormone surge and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone release and amplification of the preovulatory 17beta-Estradiol (E2) surge. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a single administration of DMBA increases the E2 and Progesterone inhibition of the spontaneous and Isoproterenol-induced Melatonin (MT) secretion from the pineal gland, during the latency phase. Also, the incidence of mammary tumors, as well as the possible preventive effect of various doses of Melatonin, were recorded up to 6 months after daily administration. For all studies, Sprague-Dawley rats, 55-60 days of age, received, on the Estrous day of the Estrous cycle, a single dose of 15 mg DMBA delivered by intragastric intubation. For the study on ovarian steroids, they were ovariectomized 5 days later and then sacrificed by decapitation at 10 a.m., one month later. Pineal glands were removed and placed in perifusion chambers containing Hanks 199 medium. The medium was saturated with O2/CO2 (95%/5%) and its pH was 7.4. Ten independent chambers were immersed in a water bath at 37 degrees C. Each pineal gland received medium (flow rate: 0.16 ml/min) through a system of input lines. The fractions were collected every 10 min, and immediately frozen at -20 degrees C until Melatonin RIA. Experiments were repeated to obtain up to five experimental points for each treatment. E2 (10(-11)-10(-9) M) and Progesterone (10(-9)-10(-7) M) were applied during the entire perifusion period (7 h). Isoproterenol (10(-6) M) was applied for 20 min after 2.5 h in perifusion. Melatonin concentrations and Areas Under the Curves were compared using two-factor ANOVA as well as parametric or nonparametric two-sample methods

  14. Melatonin protects against blood-brain barrier damage by inhibiting the TLR4/ NF-κB signaling pathway after LPS treatment in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Wang, Zhouguang; Pan, Shulin; Zhang, Hongyu; Fang, Mingchu; Jiang, Huai; Zhang, Hao; Gao, Zhengzheng; Xu, Kebin; Li, Zhenmao; Xiao, Jian; Lin, Zhenlang

    2017-05-09

    Hypoxic-ischemic and inflammatory (HII) induces the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) which leads to inflammatory responses and neuronal cell death, resulting in brain secondary damage. Previous studies showed that melatonin produced potent neuroprotective effects in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic models. However, the relationship between BBB disruption and melatonin in HII was still unclear. The present study therefore investigated the beneficial effects of melatonin on BBB after HII and the underlying mechanisms. HII animal model was conducted by receiving lipopolysaccharide followed by 90 min hypoxia-ischaemia in postnatal day 2 Sprague-Dawley rat pups. Melatonin was injected intraperitoneally 1 h before lipopolysaccharide injection and then once a day for 1 week to evaluate the long-term effects. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin administration inhibited the disruption of BBB permeability and improved the white matter recovery in HII model rats. Melatonin significantly attenuated the degradation of junction proteins and the neuroprotective role was related to the inhibition of microglial toll-like receptor 4/ nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, our data demonstrated that therapeutic strategies targeting inflammation might be suitable for the therapy of preserving BBB integrity after HII.

  15. Melatonin phase-shifts human circadian rhythms with no evidence of changes in the duration of endogenous melatonin secretion or the 24-hour production of reproductive hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Rajaratnam, SMW; Dijk, D-J; Middleton, B; Stone, BM; Arendt, J

    2003-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin is a popular treatment for sleep and circadian rhythm disruption. Melatonin administered at optimal times of the day for treatment often results in a prolonged melatonin profile. In photoperiodic (day length-dependent) species, changes in melatonin profile duration influence the timing of seasonal rhythms. We investigated the effects of an artificially prolonged melatonin profile on endogenous melatonin and cortisol rhythms, wrist actigraphy, and reproductive horm...

  16. Melatonin increases the effect of 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, Roberto; Bejarano, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Ana Beatriz; Pariente, José Antonio; Espino, Javier

    2018-03-01

    Melatonin has antitumor activity via several mechanisms including its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Moreover, it has been proven that melatonin in combination with chemotherapeutic agents enhances chemotherapy-triggered apoptosis in several types of cancer. Therefore, this study was intended to evaluate whether melatonin is able to strengthen the anti-cancer potential of different chemotherapeutic drugs in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. We found that treatment with 20 µM cisplatin (CIS) or 1 mM 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for 72 h induced a decrease in HT-29 cell viability. Furthermore, 1 mM melatonin significantly (P < 0.05) increased the cytotoxic effects of 5-FU. Likewise, simultaneous stimulation with 1 mM melatonin and 1 mM 5-FU significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the ratio of cells with an overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species and substantially augmented the population of apoptotic cells compared to the treatment with 5-FU alone. Nonetheless, melatonin only displayed moderate chemosensitizing effects in CIS-treated HT-29 cells, as suggested by a slight increment in the fraction of early apoptotic cells that was observed only after 48 h. Consistently, co-stimulation of HT-29 cells with 20 µM CIS or 1 mM 5-FU in the presence of 1 mM melatonin further increased caspase-3 activation. Apart from this, the cytostatic activity displayed by CIS due to S phase arrest was not affected by concomitant stimulation with melatonin. Overall, our results indicate that melatonin increases the sensitivity of HT-29 cells to 5-FU treatment and, consequently, the indolamine could be potentially applied to colorectal adenocarcinoma treatment as a potent chemosensitizing agent.

  17. Melatonin promotes hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells: clinical implications for the prevention of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Ah; Noh, Kwantae; Jue, Seong-Suk; Lee, So-Youn; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin's effect on hepatic differentiation of stem cells remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the action of melatonin on hepatic differentiation as well as its related signaling pathways of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and to examine the therapeutic effects of a combination of melatonin and hDPSC transplantation on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 )-induced liver fibrosis in mice. In vitro hepatic differentiation was assessed by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and mRNA expression for hepatocyte markers. Liver fibrosis model was established by injecting 0.5 mL/kg CCl4 followed by treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, twice a week) and hDPSCs. In vivo therapeutic effects were evaluated by histopathology and by means of liver function tests including measurement of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and ammonia levels. Melatonin promoted hepatic differentiation based on mRNA expression of differentiation markers and PAS-stained glycogen-laden cells. In addition, melatonin increased bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 expression and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, which was blocked by the BMP antagonist noggin. Furthermore, melatonin activated p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in hDPSCs. Melatonin-induced hepatic differentiation was attenuated by inhibitors of BMP, p38, ERK, and NF-κB. Compared to treatment of CCl4 -injured mice with either melatonin or hDPSC transplantation alone, the combination of melatonin and hDPSC significantly suppressed liver fibrosis and restored ALT, AST, and ammonia levels. For the first time, this study demonstrates that melatonin promotes hepatic differentiation of hDPSCs by modulating the BMP, p38, ERK, and NF-κB pathway. Combined treatment of grafted hDPSCs and melatonin could be a viable approach for the treatment of liver cirrhosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Katrin; Plomp, Rosina; Lao, Oscar; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean±SD: 23±5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g., PER1-3, REV-ERBα) remained unaffected. These data suggest that the core clock mechanism in peripheral oscillators is compromised during acute sleep deprivation.

  19. Human Gut Bacteria Are Sensitive to Melatonin and Express Endogenous Circadian Rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiffin K Paulose

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are fundamental properties of most eukaryotes, but evidence of biological clocks that drive these rhythms in prokaryotes has been restricted to Cyanobacteria. In vertebrates, the gastrointestinal system expresses circadian patterns of gene expression, motility and secretion in vivo and in vitro, and recent studies suggest that the enteric microbiome is regulated by the host's circadian clock. However, it is not clear how the host's clock regulates the microbiome. Here, we demonstrate at least one species of commensal bacterium from the human gastrointestinal system, Enterobacter aerogenes, is sensitive to the neurohormone melatonin, which is secreted into the gastrointestinal lumen, and expresses circadian patterns of swarming and motility. Melatonin specifically increases the magnitude of swarming in cultures of E. aerogenes, but not in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The swarming appears to occur daily, and transformation of E. aerogenes with a flagellar motor-protein driven lux plasmid confirms a temperature-compensated circadian rhythm of luciferase activity, which is synchronized in the presence of melatonin. Altogether, these data demonstrate a circadian clock in a non-cyanobacterial prokaryote and suggest the human circadian system may regulate its microbiome through the entrainment of bacterial clocks.

  20. Melatonin inhibits prostaglandin E2- and sodium nitroprusside-induced ion secretion in rat distal colon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrnka, Libor; Hock, Miroslav; Rybová, Markéta; Pácha, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 581, 1-2 (2008), s. 164-170 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP305/03/D140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : melatonin * secretion * colon Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.787, year: 2008

  1. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of proliferation of adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an extremely addictive stimulatory drug. A recent study suggested that METH may cause an impairment in the proliferation of hippocampal neural progenitor cells, but the underlying mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Blood and cerebrospinal levels of melatonin derive primarily from the pineal gland, and that performs many biological functions. Our previous study demonstrated that melatonin promotes the proliferation of progenitor cells originating from the hippocampus. In this study, hippocampal progenitor cells from adult Wistar rats were used to determine the effects of METH on cell proliferation and the mechanisms underlying these effects. We investigated the effects of melatonin on the METH-induced alteration in cell proliferation. The results demonstrated that 500 μm METH induced a decrease (63.0%) in neurosphere cell proliferation and altered the expression of neuronal phenotype markers in the neurosphere cell population. Moreover, METH induced an increase in the protein expression of the tumor suppressor p53 (124.4%) and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP) (1) (p21) (128.1%), resulting in the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus. We also found that METH altered the expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A (79.6%) and NR2B (126.7%) and Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) (74.0%). In addition, pretreatment with 1 μm melatonin attenuated the effects induced by METH treatment. According to these results, we concluded that METH induces a reduction in cell proliferation by upregulating the cell cycle regulators p53/p21 and promoting the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus and that melatonin ameliorates these negative effects of METH. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The role of proline residues in the structure and function of human MT2 melatonin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazna, Petr; Grycova, Lenka; Balik, Ales; Zemkova, Hana; Friedlova, Eliska; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas; Teisinger, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin functions as an essential regulator of various physiological processes in all vertebrate species. In mammals, two G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (GPCR) mediate some melatonin's actions: MT1 and MT2. Transmembrane domains (TM) of most GPCRs contain a set of highly conserved proline residues that presumably play important structural and functional roles. As TM segments of MT2 receptor display several interesting differences in expression of specific proline residues compared to other rhodopsin-like receptors (rGPCRs), we investigated the role of proline residues in the structure and function of this receptor. All prolines in TM segments of MT2 receptor were individually replaced with alanine and/or glycine. In addition, the unusual NAxxY motif located in TM7 was mutated to generate highly conserved NPxxY motif found in the majority of rGPCR proteins. Following transient expression in CHO-K1 cells, binding properties of the mutant receptors and their ability to transduce signals were analyzed using (125)I-mel- and [(35)S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, respectively. The impact of the performed mutations on the receptor structure was assessed by molecular dynamic simulations of MT2 receptors embedded in the fully hydrated phospholipid bilayer. Our results indicate that residues P174, P212 and P266 are important for the ligand binding and/or signaling of the human MT2 receptor. We also show that changes within the unusual NAxxY sequence in the TM7 (mutations A305P and A305V) produce defective MT2 receptors indicating an important role of this motif in the function of melatonin receptors.

  3. Melatonin-Induced Temporal Up-Regulation of Gene Expression Related to Ubiquitin/Proteasome System (UPS in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Koyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing understanding that melatonin and the ubiquitin/ proteasome system (UPS interact to regulate multiple cellular functions. Post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination are important modulators of signaling processes, cell cycle and many other cellular functions. Previously, we reported a melatonin-induced upregulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS in Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, and that P. falciparum protein kinase 7 influences this process. This implies a role of melatonin, an indolamine, in modulating intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. In this report we demonstrate by qPCR analysis, that melatonin induces gene upregulation in nine out of fourteen genes of the UPS, consisting of the same set of genes previously reported, between 4 to 5 h after melatonin treatment. We demonstrate that melatonin causes a temporally controlled gene expression of UPS members.

  4. Melatonin-induced temporal up-regulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Fernanda C; Azevedo, Mauro F; Budu, Alexandre; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Garcia, Célia R S

    2014-12-03

    There is an increasing understanding that melatonin and the ubiquitin/ proteasome system (UPS) interact to regulate multiple cellular functions. Post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination are important modulators of signaling processes, cell cycle and many other cellular functions. Previously, we reported a melatonin-induced upregulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, and that P. falciparum protein kinase 7 influences this process. This implies a role of melatonin, an indolamine, in modulating intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. In this report we demonstrate by qPCR analysis, that melatonin induces gene upregulation in nine out of fourteen genes of the UPS, consisting of the same set of genes previously reported, between 4 to 5 h after melatonin treatment. We demonstrate that melatonin causes a temporally controlled gene expression of UPS members.

  5. Thermoregulatory effect in humans of suppressed endogenous melatonin by pre-sleep bright-light exposure in a cold environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Keita; Arikura, Satoshi; Kozaki, Tomoaki; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Yasukouchi, Akira

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the physiological function of suppressed melatonin through thermoregulation in a cold environment. Interactions between thermoregulation directly affected by exposure to a cold environment and indirectly affected by endogenous melatonin suppression by bright-light exposure were examined. Ten male subjects were exposed to two different illumination intensities (30 and 5000 lux) for 4.5 h, and two different ambient temperatures (15 and 27 degrees C) for 2 h before sleep under dark and thermoneutral conditions. Salivary melatonin level was suppressed by bright light (p cold ambient temperature (p cold exposure than thermoneutral conditions (cold: -0.54 +/- 0.07 degrees C/h; thermoneutral: -0.16 +/- 0.03 degrees C/h; p cold exposure masked the circadian rhythm with a precipitous decrease in T(re). A significant correlation between the T(re) nadir and melatonin level (r = -0.774, p cold exposure. These results suggest that suppressed endogenous melatonin inhibits the downregulation of the body temperature set-point during sleep.

  6. Melatonin potentiates “inside-out” nano-thermotherapy in human breast cancer cells: a potential cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded nanocomposite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wensheng; Gao, Qin; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Guo, Zhenhu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiumei; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose With the wide recognition of oncostatic effect of melatonin, the current study proposes a potential breast cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded magnetic nanocomposite particles (Melatonin-MNPs). Methods Melatonin-MNPs were fabricated by the single emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. Results Based on the facilitated transport of melatonin by the GLUT overexpressed on the cell membrane, such Melatonin-MNPs can be more favorably uptaken by MCF-7 cells compared with the melatonin-free nanocomposite particles, which indicates the cancer targeting ability of melatonin molecule. Inductive heating can be generated by exposure to the Melatonin-MNPs internalized within cancer cells under alternative magnetic field, so as to achieve the “inside-out” magnetic nano-thermotherapy. In addition to demonstrating the superior cytotoxic effect of such nano-thermotherapy over the conventional exogenous heating by metal bath, more importantly, the sustainable release of melatonin from the Melatonin-MNPs can be greatly promoted upon responsive to the magnetic heating. The multimodality treatment based on Melatonin-MNPs can lead to more significant decrease in cell viability than any single treatment, suggesting the potentiated effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic response to nano-thermotherapy. Conclusion This study is the first to fabricate the precisely engineered melatonin-loaded multifunctional nanocomposite particles and demonstrate the potential in breast cancer target multimodality treatment. PMID:29066887

  7. Melatonin potentiates "inside-out" nano-thermotherapy in human breast cancer cells: a potential cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wensheng; Gao, Qin; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Guo, Zhenhu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiumei; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    With the wide recognition of oncostatic effect of melatonin, the current study proposes a potential breast cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded magnetic nanocomposite particles (Melatonin-MNPs). Melatonin-MNPs were fabricated by the single emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. Based on the facilitated transport of melatonin by the GLUT overexpressed on the cell membrane, such Melatonin-MNPs can be more favorably uptaken by MCF-7 cells compared with the melatonin-free nanocomposite particles, which indicates the cancer targeting ability of melatonin molecule. Inductive heating can be generated by exposure to the Melatonin-MNPs internalized within cancer cells under alternative magnetic field, so as to achieve the "inside-out" magnetic nano-thermotherapy. In addition to demonstrating the superior cytotoxic effect of such nano-thermotherapy over the conventional exogenous heating by metal bath, more importantly, the sustainable release of melatonin from the Melatonin-MNPs can be greatly promoted upon responsive to the magnetic heating. The multimodality treatment based on Melatonin-MNPs can lead to more significant decrease in cell viability than any single treatment, suggesting the potentiated effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic response to nano-thermotherapy. This study is the first to fabricate the precisely engineered melatonin-loaded multifunctional nanocomposite particles and demonstrate the potential in breast cancer target multimodality treatment.

  8. A radiobiological review on melatonin. A novel radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi Hosseinidokht, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. For the sake of improvement in radiation therapy, radiobiology plays a crucial role through explaining observed phenomena, and suggesting improvements to existing therapies. Due to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, radiobiologists have long been interested in identifying novel, nontoxic, effective, and convenient compounds to protect humans against radiation induced normal tissue injuries. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, has been documented to ameliorate the oxidative injuries due to ionizing radiation. This article reviews different features that make melatonin a potentially useful radioprotector. Moreover, based on radiobiological models we hypothesize that melatonin may postpone the saturation of repair enzymes which leads to repairing more induced damage by repair system and more importantly allows the use of higher doses of radiation during radiotherapy to get a better therapeutic ratio. The implications of the accumulated observations suggest by virtue of melatonin's radioprotective and anticancer effects; it is time to use it as a radioprotector both for radiation workers and patients suffering from cancer either alone for cancer inhibition or in combination with traditional radiotherapy for getting a favorable efficacy/toxicity ratio during the treatment. Although compelling evidence suggests that melatonin may be effective for a variety of disorders, the optimum dose of melatonin for human radioprotection is yet to be determined by further research. We propose that, in the future melatonin improve therapeutic ratio in radiation oncology.

  9. Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    2013-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as 'possibly carcinogenic' to humans that might transform normal cells into cancer cells. Owing to high utilisation of electricity in day-to-day life, exposure to power-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) EMFs is unavoidable. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by pineal gland activity in the brain that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle. How man-made EMFs may influence the pineal gland is still unsolved. The pineal gland is likely to sense EMFs as light but, as a consequence, may decrease the melatonin production. In this study, more than one hundred experimental data of human and animal studies of changes in melatonin levels due to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields exposure were analysed. Then, the results of this study were compared with the International Committee of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit and also with the existing experimental results in the literature for the biological effect of magnetic fields, in order to quantify the effects. The results show that this comparison does not seem to be consistent despite the fact that it offers an advantage of drawing attention to the importance of the exposure limits to weak EMFs. In addition to those inconsistent results, the following were also observed from this work: (i) the ICNIRP recommendations are meant for the well-known acute effects, because effects of the exposure duration cannot be considered and (ii) the significance of not replicating the existing experimental studies is another limitation in the power-frequency EMFs. Regardless of these issues, the above observation agrees with our earlier study in which it was confirmed that it is not a reliable method to characterise biological effects by observing only the ratio of AC magnetic field strength to frequency. This is because exposure duration does not include the ICNIRP limit. Furthermore, the results show the significance of

  10. Human Primary Trophoblast Cell Culture Model to Study the Protective Effects of Melatonin Against Hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Clabault, Hélène; Laurent, Laetitia; Hudon-Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Salustiano, Eugênia Maria Assunção; Fortier, Marlène; Bienvenue-Pariseault, Josianne; Wong Yen, Philippe; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2016-07-30

    This protocol describes how villous cytotrophoblast cells are isolated from placentas at term by successive enzymatic digestions, followed by density centrifugation, media gradient isolation and immunomagnetic purification. As observed in vivo, mononucleated villous cytotrophoblast cells in primary culture differentiate into multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast cells after 72 hr. Compared to normoxia (8% O2), villous cytotrophoblast cells that undergo hypoxia/reoxygenation (0.5% / 8% O2) undergo increased oxidative stress and intrinsic apoptosis, similar to that observed in vivo in pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction. In this context, primary villous trophoblasts cultured under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions represent a unique experimental system to better understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways that are altered in human placenta and facilitate the search for effective drugs that protect against certain pregnancy disorders. Human villous trophoblasts produce melatonin and express its synthesizing enzymes and receptors. Melatonin has been suggested as a treatment for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction because of its protective antioxidant effects. In the primary villous cytotrophoblast cell model described in this paper, melatonin has no effect on trophoblast cells in normoxic state but restores the redox balance of syncytiotrophoblast cells disrupted by hypoxia/reoxygenation. Thus, human villous trophoblast cells in primary culture are an excellent approach to study the mechanisms behind the protective effects of melatonin on placental function during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  11. Hypertension and Cardiovascular Remodelling in Rats Exposed to Continuous Light: Protection by ACE-Inhibition and Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor Simko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of rats to continuous light attenuates melatonin production and results in hypertension development. This study investigated whether hypertension induced by continuous light (24 hours/day exposure induces heart and aorta remodelling and if these alterations are prevented by melatonin or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril. Four groups of 3-month-old male Wistar rats (10 per group were treated as follows for six weeks: untreated controls, exposed to continuous light, light-exposed, and treated with either captopril (100 mg/kg/day or melatonin (10 mg/kg/day. Exposure to continuous light led to hypertension, left ventricular (LV hypertrophy and fibrosis, and enhancement of the oxidative load in the LV and aorta. Increase in systolic blood pressure by continuous light exposure was prevented completely by captopril and partially by melatonin. Both captopril and melatonin reduced the wall thickness and cross-sectional area of the aorta and reduced the level of oxidative stress. However, only captopril reduced LV hypertrophy development and only melatonin reduced LV hydroxyproline concentration in insoluble and total collagen in rats exposed to continuous light. In conclusion, captopril prevented LV hypertrophy development in the continuous light-induced hypertension model, while only melatonin significantly reduced fibrosis. This antifibrotic action of melatonin may be protective in hypertensive heart disease.

  12. Stress inhibition of melatonin synthesis in the pineal organ of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is mediated by cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Patiño, Marcos A; Gesto, Manuel; Conde-Sieira, Marta; Soengas, José L; Míguez, Jesús M

    2014-04-15

    Cortisol has been suggested to mediate the effect of stress on pineal melatonin synthesis in fish. Therefore, we aimed to determine how pineal melatonin synthesis is affected by exposing rainbow trout to different stressors, such as hypoxia, chasing and high stocking density. In addition, to test the hypothesis that cortisol is a mediator of such stress-induced effects, a set of animals were intraperitoneally implanted with coconut oil alone or containing cortisol (50 mg kg(-1) body mass) and sampled 5 or 48 h post-injection at midday and midnight. The specificity of such effect was also assessed in cultured pineal organs exposed to cortisol alone or with the general glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, mifepristone (RU486). Stress (in particular chasing and high stocking density) affected the patterns of plasma and pineal organ melatonin content during both day and night, with the greatest reduction occurring at night. The decrease in nocturnal melatonin levels in the pineal organ of stressed fish was accompanied by increased serotonin content and decreased AANAT2 enzymatic activity and mRNA abundance. Similar effects on pineal melatonin synthesis to those elicited by stress were observed in trout implanted with cortisol for either 5 or 48 h. These data indicate that stress negatively influences the synthesis of melatonin in the pineal organ, thus attenuating the day-night variations of circulating melatonin. The effect might be mediated by increased cortisol, which binds to trout pineal organ-specific glucocorticoid receptors to modulate melatonin rhythms. Our results in cultured pineal organs support this. Considering the role of melatonin in the synchronization of daily and annual rhythms, the results suggest that stress-induced alterations in melatonin synthesis could affect the availability of fish to integrate rhythmic environmental information.

  13. Melatonin: Action as antioxidant and potential applications in human disease and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Collin, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    This review aims at describing the beneficial properties of melatonin related to its antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress, i.e., an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defences, is involved in several pathological conditions such as cardiovascular or neurological disease, and in aging. Therefore, research for antioxidants has developed. However, classical antioxidants often failed to exhibit beneficial effects, especially in metabolic diseases. Melatonin has been shown as a specific antioxidant due to its amphiphilic feature that allows it to cross physiological barriers, thereby reducing oxidative damage in both lipid and aqueous cell environments. Studies on the antioxidant action of melatonin are reported, with a special mention to water gamma radiolysis as a method to produce oxygen-derived free radicals, and on structure-activity relationships of melatonin derivatives. Mass spectrometry-based techniques have been developed to identify melatonin oxidation products. Besides its ability to scavenge several radical species, melatonin regulates the activity of antioxidant enzymes (indirect antioxidant properties). Efficient detection methods confirmed the presence of melatonin in several plant products. Therapeutic potential of melatonin relies either on increasing melatonin dietary intake or on supplementation with supraphysiological dosages. Clinical trials showed that melatonin could be efficient in preventing cell damage, as well under acute (sepsis, asphyxia in newborns) as under chronic (metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, inflammation, aging). Its global action on oxidative stress, together with its rhythmicity that plays a role in several metabolic functions, lead melatonin to be of great interest for future clinical research in order to improve public health.

  14. Melatonin and female reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Akihisa; Taketani, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Manabu; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Maekawa, Ryo; Aasada, Hiromi; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Sugino, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is secreted during the dark hours at night by the pineal gland. After entering the circulation, melatonin acts as an endocrine factor and a chemical messenger of light and darkness. It regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. It also affects the brain, immune, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal, bone and endocrine functions and acts as an oncostatic and anti-aging molecule. Many of melatonin's actions are mediated through interactions with specific membrane-bound receptors expressed not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral tissues. Melatonin also acts through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms, for example serving as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. At both physiological and pharmacological concentrations, melatonin attenuates and counteracts oxidative stress and regulates cellular metabolism. Growing scientific evidence of reproductive physiology supports the role of melatonin in human reproduction. This review was conducted to investigate the effects of melatonin on female reproduction and to summarize our findings in this field. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Extended Culture of Encapsulated Human Blastocysts in Alginate Hydrogel Containing Decidualized Endometrial Stromal Cells in the Presence of Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Fatemeh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Extended in vitro culture of human embryos beyond blastocyst stage could serve as a tool to explore the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying embryo development and to identify factors regulating pregnancy outcomes. This study presents the first report on the maintenance of human embryo in vitro by alginate co-encapsulation of human blastocyst and decidualized endometrial stromal cells (EnSCs) under melatonin-fortified culture conditions. The effectiveness of the 3D culture system was studied through monitoring of embryo development in terms of survival time, viability, morphological changes, and production of the two hormones of 17b-oestradiol and human chorionic gonadotropin. The embryo structural integrity was preserved during alginate encapsulation; however, only 23 % of the encapsulated embryos could retain in the hydrogels over time and survived until day 4 post-encapsulation. The culture medium fortification with melatonin significantly elevated the maintenance rate of expanded embryos in alginate beads by 65 % and prolonged survival time of human embryos to day 5. Furthermore, embryo co-culture with EnSCs using melatonin-fortified medium increased the survival time of encapsulated embryos to 44 %. The levels of two measured hormones significantly rose at day 4 in comparison with day 2 post-encapsulation especially in the group co-encapsulated with EnSCs and cultivated in melatonin-fortified culture medium. These data are the first evidence representing in vitro development of human embryos until day 10 post-fertilization. This achievement can facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms regulating human embryo development.

  16. Analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of melatonin in a human inflammatory pain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Gögenur, Ismail; Fenger, Andreas Q

    2015-01-01

    Antinociceptive effects of melatonin have been documented in a wide range of experimental animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic, antihyperalgesic, and anti-inflammatory properties of melatonin using a validated burn injury (BI) model in healthy male volunteers....... The design was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm crossover study. Each volunteer participated in 3 identical study sessions with intravenous administration of placebo, melatonin 10 mg, or melatonin 100 mg. Sixty minutes after bolus injection of study medication, a BI was induced...... as primary outcomes. Twenty-nine volunteers were randomized and completed the study. While the BI induced large secondary hyperalgesia areas and significantly increased the markers of inflammation, no significant effects of melatonin were observed with respect to primary or secondary outcomes, compared...

  17. Expression of melatonin receptor MT1 in cells of human invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Karolina; Pula, Bartosz; Zemla, Agata; Owczarek, Tomasz; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In humans, two main types of membrane melatonin receptors have been identified, MT1 and MT2. Expression of MT1 in neoplastic cells seems to increase the efficacy of melatonin's oncostatic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution and the intensity of MT1 expression in breast cancer cells and to correlate it with clinicopathological factors. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 190 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDC) and molecular studies were performed on 29 cases of frozen tumor fragments and selected breast cancer cell lines. Most of the studied tumors manifested a membranous/cytoplasmic IHC expression of MT1. In IDC, the MT1 expression was higher than in fibrocystic breast disease. MT1 expression was higher in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and HER2 positive (HER2+) tumors. Triple negative tumors (TN) manifested the lowest MT1 expression level. The lowest MT1 protein expression level was noted in the TN breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared with ER+ cell lines MCF-7 and SK-BR-3. MT1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the malignancy grade of the studied IDC cases. Moreover, higher MT1 expression was associated with patients' longer overall survival (OS) in the group of ER+ breast cancers and treated with tamoxifen. Multivariate analysis indicated that MT1 was an independent prognostic factor in the ER+ tumors for OS and event-free survival in the ER+ tumors. The results of this study may point to a potential prognostic and therapeutic significance of MT1 in IDC. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Elevated levels of mitochonrial respiratory complexes activities and ATP production in 17-β-estradiol-induced prolactin-secretory tumor cells in male rats are inhibited by melatonin in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Qiang; Yang, Quan-Hui; Xu, Rong-Kun; Xu, Jian-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Our earlier studies indicate that melatonin inhibits the proliferation of prolactinoma and induces apoptosis of pituitary prolactin-secreting tumor in rats. Melatonin has also been shown to induce apoptosis and to reduce the production of ATP in breast tumor cells. This study analyzed the levels of the four mitochondrial respiratory complexes and the production of ATP and also the effects of melatonin treatment of prolactinoma. In the in vivo study, mitochondria were harvested from control pituitaries or prolactinoma collected from the pituitaries of melatonin- and 17-β-estradiol (E2)-treated male rats. In the in vitro study, prolactinoma cells mitochondria were harvested. Activities of the four mitochondrial respiratory complexes were assayed using fluorometer. ATP production of prolactinoma cells was estimated using bioluminescent methods. Elevated levels of four mitochondrial respiratory complexes activities and ATP production were recorded in prolactinoma cells. Moreover, in both in vivo and in vitro studies, melatonin inhibited the activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and the production of ATP in prolactinoma cells. There is a link between mitochondrial function increase and tumorigenesis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of pituitary prolactin-secreting tumor of rats via the induction of mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of energy metabolism.

  19. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21-28 yr) lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2) s(-1)), intermittent red light (1 min on/off), or bright white light (2,500 lux) near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group). Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69), with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light.

  20. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ho Mien

    Full Text Available Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21-28 yr lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2 s(-1, intermittent red light (1 min on/off, or bright white light (2,500 lux near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group. Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69, with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light.

  1. Effects of ghrelin, leptin and melatonin on the levels of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme activity and viability of the HCT 116 human colorectal carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Pilc-Gumuła, Katarzyna; Bułdak, Łukasz; Witkowska, Daria; Kukla, Michał; Polaniak, Renata; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including colon cancer. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that produces biologically active substances, such as leptin and ghrelin. Recent research has suggested that adipose-derived hormones may be associated with mechanisms linked to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Furthermore, previous studies have demonstrated that pineal gland-derived melatonin possesses important oncostatic and antioxidant properties. The present study aimed to determine the effects of the adipokines ghrelin and leptin, and the melatonin on intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of selected antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase. The effects of these compounds were also determined on the viability of HCT 116 human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro. The pro-oxidant and growth inhibitory effects of melatonin resulted in an accumulation of ROS and decreased antioxidant capacity in melatonin-treated cells. Ghrelin administration alone caused a significant decrease in the levels of ROS, due to an increased activity of CAT in the HCT 116 cells. In addition, the present study observed increased lipid peroxidation following melatonin treatment, and decreased levels of malondialdehyde following ghrelin or leptin treatment. In conclusion, ghrelin, leptin and melatonin have various influences on the antioxidant capacity of HCT 116 cells. Compared with the adipokines, treatment with melatonin increased ROS levels and decreased cellular viability.

  2. Melatonin in Retinal Physiology and Pathology: The Case of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, an indoleamine, is synthesized mainly in the pineal gland in a circadian fashion, but it is produced in many other organs, including the retina, which seems to be especially important as the eye is a primary recipient of circadian signals. Melatonin displays strong antioxidative properties, which predispose it to play a protective role in many human pathologies associated with oxidative stress, including premature aging and degenerative disease. Therefore, melatonin may play a role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a disease affecting photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE with an established role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Several studies have shown that melatonin could exert the protective effect against damage to RPE cells evoked by reactive oxygen species (ROS, but it has also been reported to increase ROS-induced damage to photoreceptors and RPE. Melatonin behaves like synthetic mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, which concentrate in mitochondria at relatively high levels; thus, melatonin may prevent mitochondrial damage in AMD. The retina contains telomerase, an enzyme implicated in maintaining the length of telomeres, and oxidative stress inhibits telomere synthesis, while melatonin overcomes this effect. These features support considering melatonin as a preventive and therapeutic agent in the treatment of AMD.

  3. Association of Nocturnal Melatonin Secretion With Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Young Women

    OpenAIRE

    McMullan, Ciaran J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Forman, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin ameliorates insulin resistance in animals, while among humans, polymorphisms in the melatonin receptor gene are associated with insulin resistance. We aimed to investigate the association of endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion with insulin resistance in humans. We analyzed the association between endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion, estimated by measuring the main melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, from the first morning urinary void, and the prevalence ...

  4. Melatonin-based pickering emulsion for skin's photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Joana; Ascenso, Andreia; Gonçalves, Lídia M; Gouveia, Luís F; Manteigas, Patrícia; Pinto, Pedro; Oliveira, Eduardo; Almeida, António J; Ribeiro, Helena M

    2016-06-01

    Based on its antioxidant activity, melatonin was recently found to have a protection effect against photocarcinogenesis. This work aimed to develop an innovative sunscreen formulation based on the Pickering emulsions concept, stabilized by physical UV filters, modified starch and natural oils associated to melatonin as a key strategy for prevention against UV-induced skin damage. For this purpose, melatonin was incorporated in Pickering emulsions that were characterized using physicochemical, in vitro and in vivo testing. Physicochemical studies included physical and chemical stability by a thorough pharmaceutical control. The possible protective effects of melatonin against UV-induced cell damage in HaCaT cell lines were investigated in vitro. The safety assessment and the in vivo biological properties of the final formulations, including Human Repeat Insult Patch Test and sunscreen water resistance tests were also evaluated. These studies demonstrated that melatonin sunscreen Pickering emulsion was beneficial and presented a powerful protection against UVB-induced damage in HaCat cells, including inhibition of apoptosis. The inclusion of zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, green coffee oil and starch ensured a high SPF (50+) against UVA and UVB. The combination of melatonin, multifunctional solid particles and green coffee oil, contributed to achieve a stable, effective and innovative sunscreen with a meaningful synergistic protection against oxidative stress.

  5. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  6. Complementary actions of melatonin on angiogenic factors, the angiopoietin/Tie2 axis and VEGF, in co‑cultures of human endothelial and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, Alicia; González, Alicia; Alonso-González, Carolina; Menéndez-Menéndez, Javier; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Cos, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Melatonin exerts oncostatic activity in breast cancer through antiangiogenic actions. There, the aim of the present study was to ascertain whether melatonin modulates, in a coordinated action, angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1), ANG-2, their cognate Tie2 receptor and VEGF in co-cultures of human endothelial cells (HUVECs) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. To accomplish this we used co-cultures of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) or non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF‑10A) with endothelial cells (HUVECs). The presence of breast cancer cells increased HUVEC proliferation and 1 mM melatonin prevented this effect. ANG-1, ANG-2 and VEGF levels in co-culture media and mRNA expression were upregulated and Tie2 mRNA expression was downregulated in the HUVECs and MCF-7. Melatonin (1 mM) downregulated ANG-1, ANG-2 and VEGF levels in the co-culture media and mRNA expression in both types of cells and upregulated Tie2 mRNA expression in HUVECs. ANG-1, ANG-2, Tie2 and VEGF mRNA expression were not modified during HUVEC/MCF-10A co-culture. Estradiol (10 nM) increased ANG-1, ANG-2 and VEGF mRNA expression in HUVECs and melatonin (1 mM) counteracted this effect. We conclude that melatonin simultaneously coordinates downregulation of angiopoietins with a reduction in VEGF, which could be an effective therapeutic strategy for blocking tumor angiogenesis.

  7. Melatonin protects against lipid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in hepatocytes and inhibits stellate cell activation during hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nabanita; Mandala, Ashok; Naaz, Shamreen; Giri, Suresh; Jain, Mukul; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Reiter, Russel J; Roy, Sib Sankar

    2017-05-01

    Lipid generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in consequence to mitochondrial fission followed by inflammation in propagating hepatic fibrosis. The interaction of SIRT1/Mitofusin2 is critical for maintaining mitochondrial integrity and functioning, which is disrupted upon excess lipid infiltration during the progression of steatohepatitis. The complex interplay between hepatic stellate cells and steatotic hepatocytes is critically regulated by extracellular factors including increased circulating free fatty acids during fibrogenesis. Melatonin, a potent antioxidant, protects against lipid-mediated mitochondrial ROS generation. Lipotoxicity induces disruption of SIRT1 and Mitofusin2 interaction leading to mitochondrial morphological disintegration in hepatocytes. Further, fragmented mitochondria leads to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and melatonin protects against all these lipotoxicity-mediated dysfunctions. These impaired mitochondrial dynamics also enhances the cellular glycolytic flux and reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate that potentiates ROS production. High glycolytic flux generates metabolically unfavorable milieu in hepatocytes leading to inflammation, which is abrogated by melatonin. The melatonin-mediated protection against mitochondrial dysfunction was also observed in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice through restoration of enzymatic activities associated with respiratory chain and TCA cycle. Subsequently, melatonin reduces hepatic fat deposition and inflammation in HFD-fed mice. Thus, melatonin disrupts the interaction between steatotic hepatocyte and stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter to abrogate collagen deposition. Altogether, the results of the current study document that the pharmacological intervention with low dose of melatonin could abrogate lipotoxicity-mediated hepatic stellate cell activation and prevent the fibrosis progression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A

  8. Assessment of the radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human lymphocytes irradiated with gamma-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Miocic, S.; Ramic, S.; Milic, M.; Viculin, T.

    2005-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human peripheral blood irradiated with g-rays were investigated using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Duplicate blood samples were pre-treated with amifostine (7.7 mM), melatonin (2 mM) and their combination for 30 minutes. Negative controls were also included. After treatment with radioprotectors, one blood sample from each experimental group was exposed to g-rays from a 6 0C o source. The radiation dose absorbed was 2 Gy. Pre-treated irradiated blood samples showed a decrease in the total number of MN and in the number of cells with more than one MN. Moreover, they also showed significantly lower mean SCE values. Our results indicate that amifostine, melatonin and their combination in vitro have radioprotective effects on g-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no significant genotoxicity. Therefore, it may be reasonable to use them in combination, adjusting the doses of amifostine to achieve the best radioprotective effect with as few side effects as possible. Before employment, this combination should be extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, using the same and other biomarkers for different radiation dose and concentration ranges of both radioprotectors.(author)

  9. Differential regulation of circadian melatonin rhythm and sleep-wake cycle by bright lights and nonphotic time cues in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yujiro; Hashimoto, Satoko; Masubuchi, Satoru; Natsubori, Akiyo; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that physical exercise under dim lights (sleep-wake cycle but not the circadian melatonin rhythm to an 8-h phase-advanced sleep schedule, indicating differential effects of physical exercise on the human circadian system. The present study examined the effects of bright light (>5,000 lux) on exercise-induced acceleration of reentrainment because timed bright lights are known to reset the circadian pacemaker. Fifteen male subjects spent 12 days in temporal isolation. The sleep schedule was advanced from habitual sleep times by 8 h for 4 days, which was followed by a free-run session. In the shift session, bright lights were given during the waking time. Subjects in the exercise group performed 2-h bicycle running twice a day. Subjects in the control kept quiet. As a result, the sleep-wake cycle was fully entrained by the shift schedule in both groups. Bright light may strengthen the resetting potency of the shift schedule. By contrast, the circadian melatonin rhythm was phase-advanced by 6.9 h on average in the exercise group but only by 2.0 h in the control. Thus physical exercise prevented otherwise unavoidable internal desynchronization. Polysomnographical analyses revealed that deterioration of sleep quality by shift schedule was protected by physical exercise under bright lights. These findings indicate differential regulation of sleep-wake cycle and circadian melatonin rhythm by physical exercise in humans. The melatonin rhythm is regulated primarily by bright lights, whereas the sleep-wake cycle is by nonphotic time cues, such as physical exercise and shift schedule. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  11. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  12. Suppression of Osteoclastogenesis by Melatonin: A Melatonin Receptor-Independent Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Ha Jin; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2017-05-26

    In vertebrates, melatonin is primarily secreted from the pineal gland but it affects various biological processes including the sleep-wake cycle, vasomotor control, immune system and bone homeostasis. Melatonin has been known to promote osteoblast differentiation and bone maturation, but a direct role of melatonin on osteoclast differentiation is still elusive. The present study investigated the effect of melatonin on the differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts. The presence of melatonin significantly reduced receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the melatonin receptor failed to overcome the anti-osteoclastogenic effect of melatonin. Although melatonin treatment did not affect the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), it markedly inhibited the activation of NF-κB and subsequent induction of nuclear factor of activated T cell cytoplasmic 1(NFATc1). Thus, our results suggest that melatonin could suppress osteoclast differentiation through downregulation of NF-κB pathway with concomitant decrease in the NFATc1 transcription factor induction. Furthermore, melatonin seems to have an anti-osteoclastogenic effect independent of plasma membrane melatonin receptors. In addition to previously reported properties of melatonin, our study proposes another aspect of melatonin and bone homeostasis.

  13. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jinyoung; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Park, Sookyoung; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-06-20

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation ( fmr ) gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm.

  14. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Won

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD. FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation (fmr gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm.

  15. A radiobiological review on melatonin. A novel radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, A.; Ghobadi, G.; Ghazi-Khansari, M.

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the fact that radiotherapy is a common and effective tool for cancer treatment; the radio sensitivity of normal tissues adjacent to the tumor which are unavoidably exposed to radiation limits therapeutic gain. For the sake of improvement in radiation therapy, radiobiology- the study of the action of ionizing radiation on living things- plays a crucial role through explaining observed phenomena, and suggesting improvements to existing therapies. Due to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, radiobiologists have long been interested in identifying novel, nontoxic, effective, and convenient compounds to protect humans against radiation induced normal tissue injuries. In hundreds of investigations, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, has been documented to ameliorate the oxidative injuries due to ionizing radiation. This article reviews different features that make melatonin a potentially useful radioprotector. Moreover, based on radiobiological models we can hypothesize that melatonin may postpone the saturation of repair enzymes which leads to repairing more induced damage by repair system and more importantly allows the use of higher doses of radiation during radiotherapy to get a better therapeutic ratio. The implications of the accumulated observations suggest by virtue of melatonin's radioprotective and anticancer effects; it is time to use it as a radioprotector both for radiation workers and patients suffering from cancer either alone for cancer inhibition or in combination with traditional radiotherapy for getting a favorable efficacy/toxicity ratio during the treatment. Although compelling evidence suggests that melatonin may be effective for a variety of disorders, the optimum dose of melatonin for human radioprotection is yet to be determined. We propose that, in the future, melatonin improve the therapeutic ratio in radiation oncology. (author)

  16. Effects of a four-day nocturnal melatonin treatment on the 24 h plasma melatonin, cortisol and prolactin profiles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallo, C; Zaidan, R; Faure, A; Brun, J; Chazot, G; Claustrat, B

    1988-12-01

    An oral preparation of melatonin was administered daily at 22.00 h to 6 healthy volunteers during summer on 4 consecutive days (days 1-4). The daily dose was 8 mg of melatonin as a single. Three 24-h melatonin, cortisol and prolactin profiles were determined in plasma by radioimmunological methods: 1) before treatment (day 0); 2) the first day after the 4-day treatment had been stopped (day 5), 3) the third day after withdrawal of this treatment (day 7). For the melatonin rhythm, an advanced phase was observed at day 7 vs day 0, whereas the amplitude and the mesor were not modified, whatever the day. For the prolactin profile, a significant increase as compared with the control day (day 0) was detected only at day 7 between 19.00 and 21.00 h. No modification was recorded for the plasma cortisol secretion. These results suggest that melatonin, when administered at a high dose over a short period, can influence the endocrine rhythms, and especially its own endogenous secretion. This effect must be investigated over several days after the treatment has ended.

  17. Radioprotective Effect and Follow-up of Melatonin as Antifertility Drug in Male Adult Mice submitted to Whole-Body γ Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.S.; Mansour, H.H.; El-Shamy, E.; Sallam, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Melatonin is universal antioxidant for both man and animals and a substance normally produced in the human body. Radioprotective and follow up of melatonin as anti-fertility drug in whole body γ-irradiated male adult mice were studied. The alterations occurred in reproductive system and biochemical aspects in mice were evaluated. Control group, melatonin treated (received 10 mg/kg body wt for 20 successive days), following up for melatonin treated (2 recovery periods; 60 and 120 days), irradiated (2 Gy-γ-rays), pre-treated (received melatonin before irradiation) and following up for pre-treated (2 recovery periods) groups were designed. Body and testes wt, micronucleus test (MN), chromosomal aberration (CA), seminal plasma melatonin, sperm quality (count, motility and abnormal forms) and hormonal assay in serum (melatonin, testosterone, FSH and prolactin) were recorded for fertility assessment. Oxidative parameters in testis tissue (malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO)) and biochemical assay (protein and lipid fractions in serum) were investigated for judgment melatonin radioprotective efficacy. Irradiation intensifies the processes of lipo peroxidation and oxidative modification of lipids and proteins with synchronized inhibition of the anti oxidative protection system. Melatonin administration against a background of radiation caused a distinctly expressed antioxidant effect

  18. Melatonin and cortisol profiles in patients with pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Daniel; Sowiński, Jerzy; Nowak, Stanisław; Ciesielska, Anna; Moskal, Jakub; Marcinkowski, Jerzy T

    2015-01-01

    The optic tract section at the optic chiasm is expected to disturb the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) rhythm, circadian rhythm and melatonin secretion rhythms in humans, although detailed studies have never been conducted. The aim of this paper was to describe melatonin and cortisol profiles in patients with a pituitary tumor exerting optic chiasm compression. Six patients with pituitary tumors of different size, four of whom had significant optic chiasm compression, were examined. In each brain, MRI, an ophthalmological examination including the vision field and laboratory tests were performed. Melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured at 22:00 h, 02:00 h, 06:00 h, and 10:00 h in patients lying in a dark, isolated room. One of the four cases with significant optic chiasm compression presented a flattened melatonin rhythm. The melatonin rhythm was also disturbed in one patient without optic chiasm compression. Larger tumors may play a role in the destruction of neurons connecting the retina with the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and breaking of basic way for inhibiting effect to the SCN from the retina. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of 45...... min are well established. Several questions relate to what constitutes a clinically effective plasma concentration, the choice of ideal administration route, and the optimal method of analysis. Furthermore, investigations of melatonin metabolites in humans are urgently needed in order to characterize...

  20. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search......), and bioavailability. RESULTS: The literature search identified 392 records. Twenty-two studies were included in the review. Melatonin dosages varied between 0.3 and 100 mg and were administered either orally or intravenously. Cmax ranged from 72.1 (10 ml/h; 0.02 mg, IV) to 101,163 pg/ml (100 mg, oral). Tmax ranged......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  1. Melatonin promotes survival of nonvascularized fat grafts and enhances the viability and migration of human adipose-derived stem cells via down-regulation of acute inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaun S; Zhan, Weiqing; Poon, Christopher J; Han, Xiaolian; Marre, Diego; Boodhun, Sholeh; Palmer, Jason A; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Morrison, Wayne A

    2018-02-01

    Nonvascularized fat grafting is a valuable technique for soft tissue reconstruction but poor survival of fat in the host environment remains a problem. A process known as cell-assisted transfer is used to enhance fat graft retention by adding stromal vascular fraction, an adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) rich content to lipoaspirate. We have recently shown that the use of melatonin, a reactive oxygen species scavenger, protects human ASCs from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and cell death in vitro but its role as a pharmacological adjunct in clinical fat grafting has not been studied. Herein, the effect of melatonin was examined on human ASCs in vitro using survival and functional assays including the MTT assay, CellTox Green assay, monolayer scratch assay as well as a human cytokine chemoluminescence, and tumour necrosis factor-α assay. Further, the effect of melatonin-treated fat grafts was tested in vivo with a murine model. Haematoxylin and eosin staining, perilipin and CD31 immunostaining were performed with morphometric analysis of adipose tissue. The results demonstrate that, in vitro, the addition of melatonin to ASCs significantly improved their cell-viability, promoted cell migration and preserved membrane integrity as compared to controls. In addition, it induced a potent anti-inflammatory response by downregulating acute inflammatory cytokines particularly tumour necrosis factor-α. For the first time, it is demonstrated in vivo that melatonin enhances fat graft volume retention by reducing inflammation and increasing the percentage of adipose volume within fat grafts with comparable volumes to that of cell-assisted lipotransfer. Based on these novel findings, melatonin may be a useful pharmacological adjunct in clinical fat grafting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-[125I]iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references

  3. EEG and ocular correlates of circadian melatonin phase and human performance decrements during sleep loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajochen, C.; Khalsa, S. B.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between slow eye movements (SEMs), eye blink rate, waking electroencephalogram (EEG) power density, neurobehavioral performance, and the circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin in a cohort of 10 healthy men during up to 32 h of sustained wakefulness. The time course of neurobehavioral performance was characterized by fairly stable levels throughout the first 16 h of wakefulness followed by deterioration during the phase of melatonin secretion. This deterioration was closely associated with an increase in SEMs. Frontal low-frequency EEG activity (1-7 Hz) exhibited a prominent increase with time awake and little circadian modulation. EEG alpha activity exhibited circadian modulation. The dynamics of SEMs and EEG activity were phase locked to changes in neurobehavioral performance and lagged the plasma melatonin rhythm. The data indicate that frontal areas of the brain are more susceptible to sleep loss than occipital areas. Frontal EEG activity and ocular parameters may be used to monitor and predict changes in neurobehavioral performance associated with sleep loss and circadian misalignment.

  4. Absence of an increase in the duration of the circadian melatonin secretory episode in totally blind human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Duffy, J. F.; Khalsa, S. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The daily rhythm of melatonin influences multiple physiological measures, including sleep tendency, circadian rhythms, and reproductive function in seasonally breeding mammals. The biological signal for photoperiodic changes in seasonally breeding mammals is a change in the duration of melatonin secretion, which in a natural environment reflects the different durations of daylight across the year, with longer nights leading to a longer duration of melatonin secretion. These seasonal changes in the duration of melatonin secretion do not simply reflect the known acute suppression of melatonin secretion by ocular light exposure, but also represent long-term changes in the endogenous nocturnal melatonin episode that persist in constant conditions. As the eyes of totally blind individuals do not transmit ocular light information, we hypothesized that the duration of the melatonin secretory episode in blind subjects would be longer than those in sighted individuals, who are exposed to light for all their waking hours in an urban environment. We assessed the melatonin secretory profile during constant posture, dim light conditions in 17 blind and 157 sighted adults, all of whom were healthy and using no prescription or nonprescription medications. The duration of melatonin secretion was not significantly different between blind and sighted individuals. Healthy blind individuals after years without ocular light exposure do not have a longer duration of melatonin secretion than healthy sighted individuals.

  5. Role of melatonin in embryo fetal development

    OpenAIRE

    Voiculescu, SE; Zygouropoulos, N; Zahiu, CD; Zagrean, AM

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine produced by the pineal gland and secreted in a circadian manner. In the past few decades, research over this topic has been enhanced. Melatonin has many important roles in the human physiology: regulator of the circadian rhythms, sleep inducer, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic. This paper reviews the involvement of melatonin in embryo fetal development. The pineal gland develops completely postpartum, so both the embryo and the fetus are dependent on the maternal mela...

  6. Dietary Sources and Bioactivities of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Meng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a serious worldwide health threat, affecting nearly one third of the general population. Melatonin has been reported to improve sleep efficiency and it was found that eating melatonin-rich foods could assist sleep. During the last decades, melatonin has been widely identified and qualified in various foods from fungi to animals and plants. Eggs and fish are higher melatonin-containing food groups in animal foods, whereas in plant foods, nuts are with the highest content of melatonin. Some kinds of mushrooms, cereals and germinated legumes or seeds are also good dietary sources of melatonin. It has been proved that the melatonin concentration in human serum could significantly increase after the consumption of melatonin containing food. Furthermore, studies show that melatonin exhibits many bioactivities, such as antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory characteristics, boosting immunity, anticancer activity, cardiovascular protection, anti-diabetic, anti-obese, neuroprotective and anti-aging activity. This review summaries the dietary sources and bioactivities of melatonin, with special attention paid to the mechanisms of action.

  7. A novel synthetic derivative of melatonin, 5-hydroxy-2’-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS), inhibits inflammatory responses via regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Do-Wan [Department of Biotechnology, Research Institute of Inflammatory Disease, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hee Jae [Marine Natural Products Chemistry Laboratory, Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Ji-Won; Ji, Young-Eun; Jang, Cheol-Hun; Koppula, Sushruta; Kang, Tae-Bong [Department of Biotechnology, Research Institute of Inflammatory Disease, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ho, E-mail: kwangho@kku.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, Research Institute of Inflammatory Disease, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Melatonin is substantially reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we synthesized a novel melatonin derivative, 5-hydroxy-2′-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS), which displayed superior anti-inflammatory properties to its parent compound. Further, we explored its underlying mechanisms in cellular and experimental animal models. Lipopolysaccharide was used to induce in vitro inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages. LPS-primed macrophages were pulsed with biologically unrelated toxic molecules to evaluate the role of HIS on inflammasome activation. In vivo verifications were carried out using acute lung injury (ALI) and Escherichia coli-induced septic shock mouse models. HIS inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators and cytokines such as nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase 2, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HIS suppressed the infiltration of immune cells into the lung and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid in the ALI mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of HIS were mediated through the regulation of the TIR domain-containing, adaptor-inducing, interferon-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathway from toll-like receptors. Further, HIS attenuated IL-1β secretion via the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation independent of mitochondrial ROS production. Furthermore, HIS suppressed IL-1β, IL-6 and interferon-β production in peritoneal lavage in the Escherichia coli-induced sepsis mouse model. In conclusion, HIS exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects via the regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation. Notably, the superior anti-inflammatory properties of this derivative compared with its parent compound could be a promising lead for treating various inflammatory-mediated diseases. - Highlights: • Νovel compound, 5-hydroxy-2′-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS) was

  8. The ammonium sulfate inhibition of human angiogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Tsirkone, Vicky G; Dossi, Kyriaki; Kassouni, Aikaterini G; Liggri, Panagiota G V; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Stravodimos, George A; Balatsos, Nikolaos A A; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the inhibition of human angiogenin by ammonium sulfate. The inhibitory potency of ammonium sulfate for human angiogenin (IC50 = 123.5 ± 14.9 mm) is comparable to that previously reported for RNase A (119.0 ± 6.5 mm) and RNase 2 (95.7 ± 9.3 mm). However, analysis of two X-ray crystal structures of human angiogenin in complex with sulfate anions (in acidic and basic pH environments, respectively) indicates an entirely distinct mechanism of inhibition. While ammonium sulfate inhibits the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase A and RNase 2 by binding to the active site of these enzymes, sulfate anions bind only to peripheral substrate anion-binding subsites of human angiogenin, and not to the active site. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Melatonin Inhibits Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-7 (AR-V7)-Induced Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB) Activation and NF-κB Activator-Induced AR-V7 Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells: Potential Implications for the Use of Melatonin in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent Wing Sun; Yau, Wing Lung; Tam, Chun Wai; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Shiu, Stephen Yuen Wing

    2017-05-31

    A major current challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, which can be initially controlled by medical or surgical castration, is the development of effective, safe, and affordable therapies against progression of the disease to the stage of castration resistance. Here, we showed that in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells transiently overexpressing androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was activated and could result in up-regulated interleukin ( IL ) -6 gene expression, indicating a positive interaction between AR-V7 expression and activated NF-κB/IL-6 signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) pathogenesis. Importantly, both AR-V7-induced NF-κB activation and IL-6 gene transcription in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells could be inhibited by melatonin. Furthermore, stimulation of AR-V7 mRNA expression in LNCaP cells by betulinic acid, a pharmacological NF-κB activator, was reduced by melatonin treatment. Our data support the presence of bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 expression and NF-κB activation in CRPC pathogenesis. Of note, melatonin, by inhibiting NF-κB activation via the previously-reported MT₁ receptor-mediated antiproliferative pathway, can disrupt these bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 and NF-κB and thereby delay the development of castration resistance in advanced prostate cancer. Apparently, this therapeutic potential of melatonin in advanced prostate cancer/CRPC management is worth translation in the clinic via combined androgen depletion and melatonin repletion.

  10. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the "Perioceutics" Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    "Perioceutics" including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential "perioceutics" treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence factors (kgp, rgpA, rgpB, hag

  11. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the "Perioceutics" Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available "Perioceutics" including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential "perioceutics" treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS-induced inflammation.Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence factors (kgp, rgp

  12. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates tumor growth in PTEN-mutated gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huihui; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Shangrong; Zhao, Chenggang; Yang, Haoran; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou; Wu, Lijun; Chen, Xueran

    2018-02-19

    More than 40% of glioma patients have tumors that harbor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) mutations; this disease is associated with poor therapeutic resistance and outcome. Such mutations are linked to increased cell survival and growth, decreased apoptosis, and drug resistance; thus, new therapeutic strategies focusing on inhibiting glioma tumorigenesis and progression are urgently needed. Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominantly by the pineal gland, mediates a variety of physiological functions and possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Here, we analyzed the relationship between PTEN and the inhibitory effect of melatonin in primary human glioma cells and cultured glioma cell lines. The results showed that melatonin can inhibit glioma cell growth both in culture and in vivo. This inhibition was associated with PTEN levels, which significantly correlated with the expression level of MT1 in patients. In fact, c-fos-mediated MT1 was shown to be a key modulator of the effect of melatonin on gliomas that harbor wild type PTEN. Taken together, these data suggest that melatonin-MT1 receptor complexes represent a potential target for the treatment of glioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Melatonin attenuates inflammation of acute pulpitis subjected to dental pulp injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Guo; Lin, Jia-Ji; Wang, Zhao-Ling; Cai, Wen-Ke; Wang, Pei-Na; Jia, Qian; Zhang, An-Sheng; Wu, Gao-Yi; Zhu, Guo-Xiong; Ni, Long-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulpitis (AP), one of the most common diseases in the endodontics, usually causes severe pain to the patients, which makes the search for therapeutic target of AP essential in clinic. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is widely involved in the mechanism of pulp inflammation, while melatonin has been reported to have an inhibition for a various kinds of inflammation. We hereby studied whether melatonin can regulate the expression of TLR4/NF-ĸB signaling in the pulp tissue of AP and in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Two left dental pulps of the adult rat were drilled open to establish the AP model, and the serum levels of melatonin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 18 (IL-18) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), were assessed at 1, 3 and 5 d post injury. At the same time points, the expression of TLR4 signaling in the pulp was explored by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The AP rats were administered an abdominal injection of melatonin to assess whether melatonin rescued AP and TLR4/NF-ĸB signaling. Dental pulp injury led to an approximately five-day period acute pulp inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and a significant up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-18 and TNF-α in the serum. ELISA results showed that the level of melatonin in the serum decreased due to AP, while an abdominal injection of melatonin suppressed the increase in serum cytokines and the percentage of necrosis at the 5 d of the injured pulp. Consistent with the inflammation in AP rats, TLR4, NF-ĸB, TNF-α and IL-1β in the pulp were increased post AP compared with the baseline expression. And melatonin showed an inhibition on TLR4/NF-ĸB signaling as well as IL-1β and TNF-α production in the pulp of AP rats. Furthermore, melatonin could also regulate the expression of TLR4/NF-ĸB signaling in LPS-stimulated HDPCs. These data suggested that dental pulp injury induced AP and reduced the serum level of melatonin and that

  14. Comparison of the effects of acute fluvoxamine and desipramine administration on melatonin and cortisol production in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, D J; Bojkowski, C J; Arendt, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Acute administration of the specific serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluvoxamine (100 mg at 16.00 h), markedly increased nocturnal plasma melatonin concentrations, with high levels extending into the morning hours. 2. Acute administration of the noradrenaline uptake inhibitor, desipramine (DMI) (100 mg at 16.00 h), increased evening plasma melatonin concentrations. 3. Both drug treatments increased the duration of melatonin secretion, fluvoxamine significantly delaying the offset time and DMI ...

  15. Melatonin partially protects 661W cells from H2O2-induced death by inhibiting Fas/FasL-caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Baba, Kenkichi; Janjua, Uzair; Piano, Ilaria; Gargini, Claudia; Tosini, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that melatonin (MEL) signaling is involved in the modulation of photoreceptor viability during aging. Recent work by our laboratory suggested that MEL may protect cones by modulating the Fas/FasL-caspase-3 pathway. In this study, we first investigated the presence of MEL receptors (MT 1 and MT 2 ) in 661W cells, then whether MEL can prevent H 2 O 2 -induced cell death, and last, through which pathway MEL confers protection. The mRNA and proteins of the MEL receptors were detected with quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and immunocytochemistry, respectively. To test the protective effect of MEL, 661W cells were treated with H 2 O 2 for 2 h in the presence or absence of MEL, a MEL agonist, and an antagonist. To study the pathways involved in H 2 O 2 -mediated cell death, a Fas/FasL antagonist was used before the exposure to H 2 O 2 . Finally, Fas/FasL and caspase-3 mRNA was analyzed with q-PCR and immunocytochemistry in cells treated with H 2 O 2 and/or MEL. Cell viability was analyzed by using Trypan Blue. Both MEL receptors (MT 1 and MT 2 ) were detected at the mRNA and protein levels in 661W cells. MEL partially prevented H 2 O 2 -mediated cell death (20-25%). This effect was replicated with IIK7 (a melatonin receptor agonist) when used at a concentration of 1 µM. Preincubation with luzindole (a melatonin receptor antagonist) blocked MEL protection. Kp7-6, an antagonist of Fas/FasL, blocked cell death caused by H 2 O 2 similarly to what was observed for MEL. Fas, FasL, and caspase-3 expression was increased in cells treated with H 2 O 2 , and this effect was prevented by MEL. Finally, MEL treatment partially prevented the activation of caspase-3 caused by H 2 O 2 . The results demonstrate that MEL receptors are present and functional in 661W cells. MEL can prevent photoreceptor cell death induced by H 2 O 2 via the inhibition of the proapoptotic pathway Fas/FasL-caspase-3.

  16. Molecular determinants of the agonist binding site of human MT2 melatonin receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berka, Karel; Mazna, Petr; Jelínková, Irena; Balík, Aleš; Svoboda, Petr; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, Tomáš; Teisinger, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 26-26 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /4./. 10.03.2005-12.03.2005, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/04/0496; GA ČR GA204/03/0714; GA AV ČR KJB5011308; GA MŠk LZ1K03020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : MT2 * melatonin * modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  17. The role of proline residues in the structure and function of human MT2 melatonin receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazna, Petr; Gryčová, Lenka; Balík, Aleš; Zemková, Hana; Friedlová, Eliška; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, Tomáš; Teisinger, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2008), s. 361-372 ISSN 0742-3098 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/04/0496; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/07/0915; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600110701 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : melatonin receptor * proline * molecular dynamic simulations Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.056, year: 2008

  18. An ancestral haplotype of the human PERIOD2 gene associates with reduced sensitivity to light-induced melatonin suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiho Akiyama

    Full Text Available Humans show various responses to the environmental stimulus in individual levels as "physiological variations." However, it has been unclear if these are caused by genetic variations. In this study, we examined the association between the physiological variation of response to light-stimulus and genetic polymorphisms. We collected physiological data from 43 subjects, including light-induced melatonin suppression, and performed haplotype analyses on the clock genes, PER2 and PER3, exhibiting geographical differentiation of allele frequencies. Among the haplotypes of PER3, no significant difference in light sensitivity was found. However, three common haplotypes of PER2 accounted for more than 96% of the chromosomes in subjects, and 1 of those 3 had a significantly low-sensitive response to light-stimulus (P < 0.05. The homozygote of the low-sensitive PER2 haplotype showed significantly lower percentages of melatonin suppression (P < 0.05, and the heterozygotes of the haplotypes varied their ratios, indicating that the physiological variation for light-sensitivity is evidently related to the PER2 polymorphism. Compared with global haplotype frequencies, the haplotype with a low-sensitive response was more frequent in Africans than in non-Africans, and came to the root in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting that the low light-sensitive haplotype is the ancestral type, whereas the other haplotypes with high sensitivity to light are the derived types. Hence, we speculate that the high light-sensitive haplotypes have spread throughout the world after the Out-of-Africa migration of modern humans.

  19. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

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    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  20. A train of blue light pulses delivered through closed eyelids suppresses melatonin and phase shifts the human circadian system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Andrew Bierman, Mark S ReaLighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USAAbstract: A model of circadian phototransduction was published in 2005 to predict the spectral sensitivity of the human circadian system to narrow-band and polychromatic light sources by combining responses to light from the spectral-opponent “blue” versus “yellow” cone bipolar pathway with direct responses to light by the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In the model, depolarizing “blue” responses, but not hyperpolarizing “yellow” responses, from the “blue” versus “yellow” pathway are combined with the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell responses. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell neurons are known to be much slower to respond to light than the cone pathway, so an implication of the model is that periodic flashes of “blue” light, but not “yellow” light, would be effective for stimulating the circadian system. A within-subjects study was designed to test the implications of the model regarding retinal exposures to brief flashes of light. The study was also aimed at broadening the foundation for clinical treatment of circadian sleep disorders by delivering flashing light through closed eyelids while people were asleep. In addition to a dark control night, the eyelids of 16 subjects were exposed to three light-stimulus conditions in the phase delay portion of the phase response curve while they were asleep: (1 2-second flashes of 111 W/m2 of blue (λmax ≈ 480 nm light once every minute for 1 hour, (2 131 W/m2 of green (λmax ≈ 527 nm light, continuously on for 1 hour, and (3 2-second flashes of the same green light once every minute for 1 hour. Inferential statistics showed that the blue flash light-stimulus condition significantly delayed circadian phase and significantly suppressed nocturnal melatonin. The results of this study further our

  1. The role of melatonin in the light of current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Algiert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shed new light on the role of melatonin. Local tissue synthesis has been investigated. A special system responsible for the synthesis and metabolism of melatonin has developed in the human skin. The primary role of melatonin is the regulation of circadian rhythms, but studies have demonstrated the diversity of its activities. Potent antioxidant action of melatonin in the skin is emphasized. The skin has developed a specific antioxidant melatoninergic system which protects against oxidative stress. Presence of melatonin metabolites in the skin confirms its strong antioxidant properties. Melatonin has the ability to restore the physiological balance between synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins by induction of heme oxygenase in murine fibroblasts irradiated with UVR. There is a hypothesis concerning the participation of melatonin in etiology of vitiligo. Disturbances of melatonin skin synthesis and dysregulation of its receptors may explain the pathogenesis of disease.

  2. Pineal factors other than melatonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebels, I.

    Some sheep pineal factors other than melatonin are described. A “nonmelatonin” antigonadotropic activity has been detected by application of the inhibition of compensatory ovarian hypertrophy (COH) in unilaterally ovariectomized adult Charles River CD-1 mice. The factor has been extracted from

  3. Melatonin receptors: Current status, facts, and hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankov, B.; Reiter, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the identification of melatonin binding sites, commonly identified as melatonin receptors by many authors, in recent years. The bulk of these studies have investigated the sites using either autoradiographic and biochemical techniques with the majority of the experiments being done on the rat, Djungarian and Syrian hamster, and sheep, although human tissue has also been employed. Many of the studies have identified melatonin binding in the central nervous system with either tritium- or iodine-labelled ligands. The latter ligand seems to provide the most reproducible and consistent data. Of the central neural tissues examined, the suprachiasmatic nuclei are most frequently mentioned as a location for melatonin binding sites although binding seems to be widespread in the brain. The other tissue that has been prominently mentioned as a site for melatonin binding is the pars tuberalis of the anterior pituitary gland. There may be time-dependent variations in melatonin binding densities in both neural and pituitary gland tissue. Very few attempts have been made to identify melatonin binding outside of the central nervous system despite the widespread actions of melatonin. Preliminary experiments have been carried out on the intracellular second messengers which mediate the actions of melatonin

  4. Dietary factors and fluctuating levels of melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Peuhkuri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is secreted principally by the pineal gland and mainly at nighttime. The primary physiological function is to convey information of the daily cycle of light and darkness to the body. In addition, it may have other health-related functions. Melatonin is synthesized from tryptophan, an essential dietary amino acid. It has been demonstrated that some nutritional factors, such as intake of vegetables, caffeine, and some vitamins and minerals, could modify melatonin production but with less intensity than light, the most dominant synchronizer of melatonin production. This review will focus on the nutritional factors apart from the intake of tryptophan that affect melatonin levels in humans. Overall, foods containing melatonin or promoting the synthesis of it by impacting the availability of tryptophan, as well those containing vitamins and minerals which are needed as co-factors and activators in the synthesis of melatonin, may modulate the levels of melatonin. Even so, the influence of daytime diet on the synthesis of nocturnal melatonin is limited, however, the influence of the diet seems to be more obvious on the daytime levels.

  5. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-05-16

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro. PMID:28422711

  7. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  8. Protective mechanisms of melatonin against hydrogen-peroxide-induced toxicity in human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Safa, Majid; Kamrava, Seyed Kamran; Darabi, Radbod; Hayat, Parisa; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2017-07-01

    Many obstacles compromise the efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) by inducing apoptosis in the grafted BM-MSCs. The current study investigates the effect of melatonin on important mediators involved in survival of BM-MSCs in hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) apoptosis model. In brief, BM-MSCs were isolated, treated with melatonin, and then exposed to H 2 O 2 . Their viability was assessed by MTT assay and apoptotic fractions were evaluated through Annexin V, Hoechst staining, and ADP/ATP ratio. Oxidative stress biomarkers including ROS, total antioxidant power (TAP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity, glutathione (GSH), thiol molecules, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were determined. Secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) were measured by ELISA assay. The protein expression of caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2, was also evaluated by Western blotting. Melatonin pretreatment significantly increased viability and decreased apoptotic fraction of H 2 O 2 -exposed BM-MSCs. Melatonin also decreased ROS generation, as well as increasing the activity of SOD and CAT enzymes and GSH content. Secretion of inflammatory cytokines in H 2 O 2 -exposed cells was also reduced by melatonin. Expression of caspase-3 and Bax proteins in H 2 O 2 -exposed cells was diminished by melatonin pretreatment. The findings suggest that melatonin may be an effective protective agent against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in MSC.

  9. Role of melatonin in embryo fetal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, S E; Zygouropoulos, N; Zahiu, C D; Zagrean, A M

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine produced by the pineal gland and secreted in a circadian manner. In the past few decades, research over this topic has been enhanced. Melatonin has many important roles in the human physiology: regulator of the circadian rhythms, sleep inducer, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic. This paper reviews the involvement of melatonin in embryo fetal development. The pineal gland develops completely postpartum, so both the embryo and the fetus are dependent on the maternal melatonin provided transplacentally. Melatonin appears to be involved in the normal outcome of pregnancy beginning with the oocyte quality and finishing with the parturition. Its pregnancy night-time concentrations increase after 24 weeks of gestation, with significantly high levels after 32 weeks. Melatonin receptors are widespread in the embryo and fetus since early stages. There is solid evidence that melatonin is neuroprotective and has a positive effect on the outcome of the compromised pregnancies. In addition, chronodisruption leads to a reproductive dysfunction. Thus, the influence of melatonin on the developing human fetus may not be limited to the entertaining of circadian rhythmicity, but further studies are needed.

  10. Expression of melatonin receptors in arteries involved in thermoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, M.; Laitinen, J.T.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Melatonin binding sites were localized and characterized in the vasculature of the rat by using the melatonin analogue 2-[125I]iodomelatonin (125I-melatonin) and quantitative in vitro autoradiography. The expression of these sites was restricted to the caudal artery and to the arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. The arterial 125I-melatonin binding was stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies revealed that the binding represented a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 3.4 x 10(-11) M in the anterior cerebral artery and 1.05 x 10(-10) M in the caudal artery. The binding capacities (Bmax) in these arteries were 19 and 15 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The relative order of potency of indoles for inhibition of 125I-melatonin binding at these sites was typical of a melatonin receptor: 2-iodomelatonin greater than melatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin much much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine. Norepinephrine-induced contraction of the caudal artery in vitro was significantly prolonged and potentiated by melatonin in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that these arterial binding sites are functional melatonin receptors. Neither primary steps in smooth muscle contraction (inositol phospholipid hydrolysis) nor relaxation (adenylate cyclase activation) were affected by melatonin. Melatonin, through its action on the tone of these arteries, may cause circulatory adjustments in these arteries, which are believed to be involved in thermoregulation

  11. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the “Perioceutics” Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Aim “Perioceutics” including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential “perioceutics” treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Methods Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence

  12. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    A number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, and elevated blood pressure are collectively known as metabolic syndrome (MS). Since mitochondrial activity is modulated by the availability of energy in cells, the disruption of key regulators of metabolism in MS not only affects the activity of mitochondria but also their dynamics and turnover. Therefore, a link of MS with mitochondrial dysfunction has been suspected since long. As a chronobiotic/cytoprotective agent, melatonin has a special place in prevention and treatment of MS. Melatonin levels are reduced in diseases associated with insulin resistance like MS. Melatonin improves sleep efficiency and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, partly for its role as a metabolic regulator and mitochondrial protector. We discuss in the present review the several cytoprotective melatonin actions that attenuate inflammatory responses in MS. The clinical data that support the potential therapeutical value of melatonin in human MS are reviewed.

  13. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaleh Emamgholipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1 control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h; (2 melatonin (1 mM for 12 h; (3 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h; (4 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM. The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression.

  14. Phase advancing human circadian rhythms with morning bright light, afternoon melatonin, and gradually shifted sleep: can we reduce morning bright-light duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2015-02-01

    Efficient treatments to phase-advance human circadian rhythms are needed to attenuate circadian misalignment and the associated negative health outcomes that accompany early-morning shift work, early school start times, jet lag, and delayed sleep phase disorder. This study compared three morning bright-light exposure patterns from a single light box (to mimic home treatment) in combination with afternoon melatonin. Fifty adults (27 males) aged 25.9 ± 5.1 years participated. Sleep/dark was advanced 1 h/day for three treatment days. Participants took 0.5 mg of melatonin 5 h before the baseline bedtime on treatment day 1, and an hour earlier each treatment day. They were exposed to one of three bright-light (~5000 lux) patterns upon waking each morning: four 30-min exposures separated by 30 min of room light (2-h group), four 15-min exposures separated by 45 min of room light (1-h group), and one 30-min exposure (0.5-h group). Dim-light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) before and after treatment determined the phase advance. Compared to the 2-h group (phase shift = 2.4 ± 0.8 h), smaller phase-advance shifts were seen in the 1-h (1.7 ± 0.7 h) and 0.5-h (1.8 ± 0.8 h) groups. The 2-h pattern produced the largest phase advance; however, the single 30-min bright-light exposure was as effective as 1 h of bright light spread over 3.25 h, and it produced 75% of the phase shift observed with 2 h of bright light. A 30-min morning bright-light exposure with afternoon melatonin is an efficient treatment to phase-advance human circadian rhythms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase advancing human circadian rhythms with morning bright light, afternoon melatonin, and gradually shifted sleep: can we reduce morning bright light duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Eastman, Charmane I.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Efficient treatments to phase advance human circadian rhythms are needed to attenuate circadian misalignment and the associated negative health outcomes that accompany early morning shift work, early school start times, jet lag, and delayed sleep phase disorder. This study compared three morning bright light exposure patterns from a single light box (to mimic home treatment) in combination with afternoon melatonin. METHODS Fifty adults (27 males) aged 25.9±5.1 years participated. Sleep/dark was advanced 1 hour/day for 3 treatment days. Participants took 0.5 mg melatonin 5 hours before baseline bedtime on treatment day 1, and an hour earlier each treatment day. They were exposed to one of three bright light (~5000 lux) patterns upon waking each morning: four 30-minute exposures separated by 30 minutes of room light (2 h group); four 15-minute exposures separated by 45 minutes of room light (1 h group), and one 30-minute exposure (0.5 h group). Dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) before and after treatment determined the phase advance. RESULTS Compared to the 2 h group (phase shift=2.4±0.8 h), smaller phase advance shifts were seen in the 1 h (1.7±0.7 h) and 0.5 h (1.8±0.8 h) groups. The 2-hour pattern produced the largest phase advance; however, the single 30-minute bright light exposure was as effective as 1 hour of bright light spread over 3.25 h, and produced 75% of the phase shift observed with 2 hours of bright light. CONCLUSIONS A 30-minute morning bright light exposure with afternoon melatonin is an efficient treatment to phase advance human circadian rhythms. PMID:25620199

  16. Study on the Antiradiation role of Melatonin: An investigation on Induced Oxidative Stress Mice by Radiomimetic Drug Cyclophosphamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manda, K.; Bhatia, A. L.

    2004-07-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated an altered pineal function in cancer patients. Owing to the document antineoplastic activity of the pineal gland, these anomalies could have a prognostic significance. This study was carried out to monitor the effect of higher blood levels of melatonin, the most important pineal hormone, which could be applied in relation to the response to chemotherapy in human neoplasms. Cyclophosphamide is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and well-known mutagen and clastogen. It is an alkylating agent, producing highly active carbonium ion, which the extremely electron-rich area of the nucleic acids and proteins. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of melatonin against cyclophosphamide induced oxidative stress in mice tissues. Lipid perioxidation. Reduced glutathione (GSH), Glutathione disulphide (GSSG), Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and serum phosphatase level taken as endpoints. Twenty days oral administration with melatonin (0.25 mg/Kg body weight) followed by an acute treatment with cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg b. w.) inhibited the radiomimetic drug-induced augmented level of lipid peroxidation, Blood GSSG and acid phosphatase. Cyclophosphamide induced depletion in the level of GSH, GSH-Px and alkaline phosphatase is ameliorated significantly by melatonin administration. The findings support the results showing melatonin as a free radical scavenger, and singlet oxygen quencher. Results clearly indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin against the radiomimetic drug which could be effectively used selectively for the protection of normal tissue during chemotherapy. (Author) 34 refs.

  17. Study on the Antiradiation role of Melatonin: An investigation on Induced Oxidative Stress Mice by Radiomimetic Drug Cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, K.; Bhatia, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated an altered pineal function in cancer patients. Owing to the document antineoplastic activity of the pineal gland, these anomalies could have a prognostic significance. This study was carried out to monitor the effect of higher blood levels of melatonin, the most important pineal hormone, which could be applied in relation to the response to chemotherapy in human neoplasms. Cyclophosphamide is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and well-known mutagen and clastogen. It is an alkylating agent, producing highly active carbonium ion, which the extremely electron-rich area of the nucleic acids and proteins. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of melatonin against cyclophosphamide induced oxidative stress in mice tissues. Lipid perioxidation. Reduced glutathione (GSH), Glutathione disulphide (GSSG), Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and serum phosphatase level taken as endpoints. Twenty days oral administration with melatonin (0.25 mg/Kg body weight) followed by an acute treatment with cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg b. w.) inhibited the radiomimetic drug-induced augmented level of lipid peroxidation, Blood GSSG and acid phosphatase. Cyclophosphamide induced depletion in the level of GSH, GSH-Px and alkaline phosphatase is ameliorated significantly by melatonin administration. The findings support the results showing melatonin as a free radical scavenger, and singlet oxygen quencher. Results clearly indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin against the radiomimetic drug which could be effectively used selectively for the protection of normal tissue during chemotherapy. (Author) 34 refs

  18. Melatonin Inhibits Neural Cell Apoptosis and Promotes Locomotor Recovery via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoliang; Zhou, Zipeng; Gao, Shuang; Guo, Yue; Gao, Kai; Wang, Haoyu; Dang, Xiaoqian

    2017-08-01

    The spinal cord is highly sensitive to spinal cord injury (SCI) by external mechanical damage, resulting in irreversible neurological damage. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway can effectively reduce apoptosis and protect against SCI. Melatonin, an indoleamine originally isolated from bovine pineal tissue, exerts neuroprotective effects after SCI through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin exhibited neuroprotective effects on neuronal apoptosis and supported functional recovery in a rat SCI model by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We found that melatonin administration after SCI significantly upregulated the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 phosphorylation (p-LRP-6), lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1) and β-catenin protein in the spinal cord. Melatonin enhanced motor neuronal survival in the spinal cord ventral horn and improved the locomotor functions of rats after SCI. Melatonin administration after SCI also reduced the expression levels of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in the spinal cord and the proportion of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells, but increased the expression level of Bcl-2. These results suggest that melatonin attenuated SCI by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  19. Melatonin and Fertoprotective Adjuvants: Prevention against Premature Ovarian Failure during Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hoon; Hong, Kwonho; Choi, Youngsok

    2017-06-07

    Premature ovarian failure is one of the side effects of chemotherapy in pre-menopausal cancer patients. Preservation of fertility has become increasingly important in improving the quality of life of completely recovered cancer patients. Among the possible strategies for preserving fertility such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation, co-treatment with a pharmacological adjuvant is highly effective and poses less of a burden on the human body. Melatonin is generally produced in various tissues and acts as a universally acting antioxidant in cells. Melatonin is now more widely used in various biological processes including treating insomnia and an adjuvant during chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the information indicating that melatonin may be useful for reducing and preventing premature ovarian failure in chemotherapy-treated female patients. We also mention that many adjuvants other than melatonin are developed and used to inhibit chemotherapy-induced infertility. This information will give us novel insights on the clinical use of melatonin and other agents as fertoprotective adjuvants for female cancer patients.

  20. Melatonin as an angiogenesis inhibitor to combat cancer: Mechanistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradel, Nasser Hashemi; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Moloudizargari, Milad; Negahdari, Babak; Haghi-Aminjan, Hamed; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-11-15

    Melatonin, a pineal indolamine, participates in different body functions and is shown to possess diverse biological activities such as anti-tumor action. Angiogenesis inhibition is one of the mechanisms by which melatonin exerts its oncostatic effects. Increased angiogenesis is a major feature of tumor progression, thus angiogenesis inhibition is a critical step in cancer therapy. Melatonin employs a variety of mechanisms to target nutrients and oxygen supply to cancer cells. At the transcriptional level, hypoxia induced factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the genes under its control, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are the main targets of melatonin for inhibition of angiogenesis. Melatonin prevents translocation of HIF-1α into the nucleus thereby hindering VEGF expression and also prevents the formation of HIF-1α, phospho-STAT3 and CBP/p300 complex which is involved in the expression of angiogenesis-related genes. Angiostatic properties of melatonin could be also due to its ability to inhibit VEGFR2's activation and expression. Other angiostatic mechanisms of melatonin include the inhibition of endothelial cell migration, invasion, and tube formation. In the present study, we have reviewed the molecular anti-angiogenesis pathways mediated by melatonin and the responsible mechanisms in various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Melatonin in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhi Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive cognition deficit, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques (SP of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, mainly containing the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. Multiple factors contribute to the etiology of AD in terms of initiation and progression. Melatonin is an endogenously produced hormone in the brain and decreases during aging and in patients with AD. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from Aβ-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties. It not only inhibits Aβ generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with Aβ. Our studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood, a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting the cholinergic system and in anti-inflammation. The aim of this review is to stimulate interest in melatonin as a potentially useful agent in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  2. The role of melatonin as an antioxidant in the follicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is secreted during the dark hours at night by pineal gland, and it regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. It has been believed that melatonin regulates ovarian function by the regulation of gonadotropin release in the hypothalamus-pituitary gland axis via its specific receptors. In addition to the receptor mediated action, the discovery of melatonin as a direct free radical scavenger has greatly broadened the understanding of melatonin's mechanisms which benefit reproductive physiology. Higher concentrations of melatonin have been found in human preovulatory follicular fluid compared to serum, and there is growing evidence of the direct effects of melatonin on ovarian function especially oocyte maturation and embryo development. Many scientists have focused on the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation and embryo development as an anti-oxidant to reduce oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species, which are produced during ovulation process. The beneficial effects of melatonin administration on oocyte maturation and embryo development have been confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments in animals. This review also discusses the first application of melatonin to the clinical treatment of infertile women and confirms that melatonin administration reduces intrafollicular oxidative damage and increase fertilization rates. This review summarizes our recent works and new findings related to the reported beneficial effects of melatonin on reproductive physiology in its role as a reducer of oxidative stress, especially on oocyte maturation and embryo development.

  3. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  4. Melatonin reduces the severity of experimental amoebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honório-França Adenilda C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melatonin has immunomodulatory effects but very little is known about its influence in protozoan infections, such as Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebiasis, a disease with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous melatonin interference in experimental amoebiasis and on interactions between human blood cells and E. histolytica trophozoites. Methods The effect of melatonin was investigated in models of experimental amoebiasis in hamsters and rats by evaluating the area of necrosis induced by E. histolytica. The activity of melatonin on the interactions between leukocytes and amoebae was determined by examining leukophagocytosis. For in vitro tests, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear human blood leucocytes were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites. Results The areas of amoebic necrosis were significantly reduced in animals treated with melatonin. Melatonin treatment increased leukophagocytosis but was associated with a greater number of dead amoebae. Conclusions These results suggest that melatonin may play a beneficial role in the control of amoebic lesions, raising the possibility that this drug may be used as an adjuvant in anti-amoebic therapy.

  5. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  6. Thirty four years since the discovery of gastrointestinal melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenik, G A

    2008-08-01

    After the discovery of melatonin in the pineal gland by Lerner and co-workers in 1958, melatonin was also detected in the retina and the human appendix. Later, melatonin was confirmed immunohistologically in all segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), in the guts of bovine embryos and in the GIT of low vertebrates. Melatonin was also confirmed in the pancreas and the hepatobiliary system. Melatonin is produced in the enteroendocrine cells of the GIT mucosa. The concentrations of melatonin in the GIT are 10-100x higher than in the plasma and the total amount of melatonin in the GIT is around 400x higher than the amount of melatonin in the pineal gland. Similar to pineal melatonin, GIT melatonin is a multifunctional compound which exhibits some general as well as some specific effects, depending on the organ and the location of GIT tissue. In the GIT, melatonin exhibits endocrine, paracrine, autocrine and luminal actions. Generally, the episodic secretion of melatonin from the GIT is related to the intake and digestion of food and to the prevention of tissue damage caused by hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes. Some actions, such as the scavenging of hydroxyl free radicals, immunoenhancement and antioxidant effects are of general nature, whereas others, such as an increase of mucosal blood flow, the reduction of peristalsis and the regulation of fecal water content, are specific to the tubular GIT. Generally, melatonin actions oppose those of serotonin. Laboratory and clinical studies indicate that the utilization of melatonin can prevent or treat pathological conditions such as esophageal and gastric ulcers, pancreatitis, colitis, irritable bowel disease, and colon cancer.

  7. Melatonin maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and attenuates activation of initiator (casp-9) and effector caspases (casp-3/casp-7) and PARP in UVR-exposed HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Zmijewski, M A; Wortsman, J; Slominski, A

    2008-05-01

    Melatonin is a recognized antioxidant with high potential as a protective agent in many conditions related to oxidative stress such as neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia/reperfusion syndromes, sepsis and aging. These processes may be favorably affected by melatonin through its radical scavenging properties and/or antiapoptotic activity. Also, there is increasing evidence that these effects of melatonin could be relevant in keratinocytes, the main cell population of the skin where it would contribute to protection against damage induced by ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We therefore investigated the kinetics of UVR-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes characterizing the morphological and mitochondrial changes, the caspases-dependent apoptotic pathways and involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation as well as the protective effects of melatonin. When irradiated with UVB radiation (50 mJ/cm(2)), melatonin treated, cultured keratinocytes were more confluent, showed less cell blebbing, more uniform shape and less nuclear condensation as compared to irradiated, nonmelatonin-treated controls. Preincubation with melatonin also led to normalization of the decreased UVR-induced mitochondrial membrane potential. These melatonin effects were followed by suppression of the activation of mitochondrial pathway-related initiator caspase 9 (casp-9), but not of death receptor-dependent casp-8 between 24 and 48 hr after UVR exposure. Melatonin down-regulated effector caspases (casp-3/casp-7) at 24-48 hr post-UV irradiation and reduced PARP activation at 24 hr. Thus, melatonin is particularly active in UV-irradiated keratinocytes maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibiting the consecutive activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and reducing PARP activation. In conclusion, these data provide detailed evidence for specific antiapoptotic mechanisms of melatonin in UVR-induced damage of human keratinocytes.

  8. Protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guoxi; Tian, Yinggang; Wang, Haiyu; Liu, Fangning; Xie, Guanghong

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of melatonin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of melatonin on LPS-induced mastitis both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, our results showed that melatonin attenuated LPS-induced mammary histopathologic changes and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Melatonin also inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in mammary tissues. In vitro, melatonin was found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in mouse mammary epithelial cells. Melatonin also suppressed LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, melatonin was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ. Inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 reduced the anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin. In conclusion, we found that melatonin, for the first time, had protective effects on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of melatonin was through activating PPAR-γ which subsequently inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  10. Melatonin in edible plants identified by radioimmunoassay and by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbels, R.; Klenke, E.; Schnakenberg, E.; Ehlers, C.; Schloot, W.; Reiter, R.J.; Goebel, A.; Schiware, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Melatonin, the chief hormone of the pineal gland in vertebrates, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. Among many functions, melatonin synchronizes circadian and circannual rhythms, stimulates immune function, may increase life span, inhibits growth of cancer cells in vitro and cancer progression and promotion in vivo, and was recently shown to be a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant. Hydroxyl radicals are highly toxic by-products of oxygen metabolism that damage cellular DNA and other macromolecules. Herein we report that melatonin, in varying concentrations, is also found in a variety of plants. Melatonin concentrations, measured in nine different plants by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0 to 862 pg melatonin/mg protein. The presence of melatonin was verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Our findings suggest that the consumption of plant materials that contain high levels of melatonin could alter blood melatonin levels of the indole as well as provide protection of macromolecules against oxidative damage. (au) 30 refs

  11. High Concentration of Melatonin Regulates Leaf Development by Suppressing Cell Proliferation and Endoreduplication in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiannan; An, Bang; Shi, Haitao; Luo, Hongli; He, Chaozu

    2017-05-05

    N -acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine (Melatonin), as a crucial messenger in plants, functions in adjusting biological rhythms, stress tolerance, plant growth and development. Several studies have shown the retardation effect of exogenous melatonin treatment on plant growth and development. However, the in vivo role of melatonin in regulating plant leaf growth and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In this study, we found that high concentration of melatonin suppressed leaf growth in Arabidopsis by reducing both cell size and cell number. Further kinetic analysis of the fifth leaves showed that melatonin remarkably inhibited cell division rate. Additionally, flow cytometic analysis indicated that melatonin negatively regulated endoreduplication during leaf development. Consistently, the expression analysis revealed that melatonin regulated the transcriptional levels of key genes of cell cycle and ribosome. Taken together, this study suggests that high concentration of melatonin negatively regulated the leaf growth and development in Arabidopsis , through modulation of endoreduplication and the transcripts of cell cycle and ribosomal key genes.

  12. Melatonin as a radioprotective agent: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, Russel J.; Tan, D.-X.; Herman, Terence S.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, is well known for its functional versatility. In hundreds of investigations, melatonin has been documented as a direct free radical scavenger and an indirect antioxidant, as well as an important immunomodulatory agent. The radical scavenging ability of melatonin is believed to work via electron donation to detoxify a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including the highly toxic hydroxyl radical. It has long been recognized that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation are brought about by both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct action produces disruption of sensitive molecules in the cells, whereas the indirect effects (∼70%) result from its interaction with water molecules, which results in the production of highly reactive free radicals such as · OH, · H, and e aq - and their subsequent action on subcellular structures. The hydroxyl radical scavenging ability of melatonin was used as a rationale to determine its radioprotective efficiency. Indeed, the results from many in vitro and in vivo investigations have confirmed that melatonin protects mammalian cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, several clinical reports indicate that melatonin administration, either alone or in combination with traditional radiotherapy, results in a favorable efficacy:toxicity ratio during the treatment of human cancers. This article reviews the literature from laboratory investigations that document the ability of melatonin to scavenge a variety of free radicals (including the hydroxyl radical induced by ionizing radiation) and summarizes the evidence that should be used to design larger translational research-based clinical trials using melatonin as a radioprotector and also in cancer radiotherapy. The potential use of melatonin for protecting individuals from radiation terrorism is also considered

  13. Spice phenolics inhibit human PMNL 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N Satya; Raghavendra, R; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2004-06-01

    A wide variety of phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in spices possess potent antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. We examined whether 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme involved in biosynthesis of leukotrienes is a possible target for the spices. Effect of aqueous extracts of turmeric, cloves, pepper, chili, cinnamon, onion and also their respective active principles viz., curcumin, eugenol, piperine, capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, quercetin, and allyl sulfide were tested on human PMNL 5-LO activity by spectrophotomeric and HPLC methods. The formation of 5-LO product 5-HETE was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 0.122-1.44 mg for aqueous extracts of spices and 25-83 microM for active principles, respectively. The order of inhibitory activity was of quercetin>eugenol>curcumin>cinnamaldehyde>piperine>capsaicin>allyl sulfide. Quercetin, eugenol and curcumin with one or more phenolic ring and methoxy groups in their structure showed high inhibitory effect, while the non-phenolic spice principle allyl sulfide showed least inhibitory effect on 5-LO. The inhibitory effect of quercetin, curcumin and eugenol was similar to that of synthetic 5-LO inhibitors-phenidone and NDGA. Moreover, the inhibitory potency of aqueous extracts of spice correlated with the active principles of their respective spices. The synergistic or antagonistic effect of mixtures of spice active principles and spice extracts were investigated and all the combinations of spice active principles/extracts exerted synergistic effect in inhibiting 5-LO activity. These findings clearly suggest that phenolic compounds present in spices might have physiological role in modulating 5-LO pathway.

  14. Melatonin identified in meats and other food stuffs: potentially nutritional impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Zanghi, Brian M; Manchester, Lucien C; Reiter, Russel J

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin has been identified in primitive photosynthetic bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals including humans. Vegetables, fruits, cereals, wine, and beers all contain melatonin. However, the melatonin content in meats has not been reported previously. Here, for the first time, we report melatonin in meats, eggs, colostrum, and in other edible food products. The levels of melatonin measured by HPLC, in lamb, beef, pork, chicken, and fish, are comparable to other food stuffs (in the range of ng/g). These levels are significantly higher than melatonin concentrations in the blood of vertebrates. As melatonin is a potent antioxidant, its presence in the meat could contribute to shelf life duration as well as preserve their quality and taste. In addition, the consumption of these foods by humans or animals could have health benefits considering the important functions of melatonin as a potent free radical scavenger and antioxidant. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Melatonin: Bone Metabolism in Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny López-Martínez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, bone tissue undergoes a continuous process of resorption and formation. Melatonin, with its antioxidant properties and its ability to detoxify free radicals, as suggested by Conconi et al. (2000 may interfere in the osteoclast function and thereby inhibit bone resorption, as suggested by Schroeder et al. (1981. Inhibition of bone resorption may be enhanced by a reaction of indoleamine in osteoclastogenesis. That it has been observed melatonin, at pharmacological doses, decrease bone mass resorption by suppressing through down regulation of the RANK-L, as suggested by Penarrocha Diago et al. (2005 and Steflik et al. (1994. These data point an osteogenic effect towards that may be of melatonin of clinical importance, as it could be used as a therapeutic agent in situations in which would be advantageous bone formation, such as in the treatment of fractures or osteoporosis or their use as, a bioactive surface on implant as suggested by Lissoni et al. (1991.

  16. Effects of sleep and sleep deprivation on interleukin-6, growth hormone, cortisol, and melatonin levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwine, L; Hauger, R L; Gillin, J C; Irwin, M

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of nocturnal sleep, partial night sleep deprivation, and sleep stages on circulating concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in relation to the secretory profiles of GH, cortisol, and melatonin. In 31 healthy male volunteers, blood samples were obtained every 30 min during 2 nights: uninterrupted, baseline sleep and partial sleep deprivation-early night (awake until 0300 h). Sleep was measured by electroencephalogram polysomnography. Sleep onset was associated with an increase in serum levels of IL-6 (P cortisol and melatonin showed no concordance with sleep. Loss of sleep may serve to decrease nocturnal IL-6 levels, with effects on the integrity of immune system functioning. Alternatively, given the association between sleep stages and IL-6 levels, depressed or aged populations who show increased amounts of REM sleep and a relative loss of slow wave sleep may have elevated nocturnal concentrations of IL-6 with implications for inflammatory disease risk.

  17. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Melatonin and Cancer Hallmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Wamidh H. Talib

    2018-01-01

    Melatonin is a natural indoleamine produced by the pineal gland that has many functions, including regulation of the circadian rhythm. Many studies have reported the anticancer effect of melatonin against a myriad of cancer types. Cancer hallmarks include sustained proliferation, evading growth suppressors, metastasis, replicative immortality, angiogenesis, resisting cell death, altered cellular energetics, and immune evasion. Melatonin anticancer activity is mediated by interfering with vari...

  19. Circadian temperature and melatonin rhythms, sleep, and neurobehavioral function in humans living on a 20-h day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J. K.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of homeostatic and circadian processes in the regulation of waking neurobehavioral functions and sleep was studied in six healthy young subjects. Subjects were scheduled to 15-24 repetitions of a 20-h rest/activity cycle, resulting in desynchrony between the sleep-wake cycle and the circadian rhythms of body temperature and melatonin. The circadian components of cognitive throughput, short-term memory, alertness, psychomotor vigilance, and sleep disruption were at peak levels near the temperature maximum, shortly before melatonin secretion onset. These measures exhibited their circadian nadir at or shortly after the temperature minimum, which in turn was shortly after the melatonin maximum. Neurobehavioral measures showed impairment toward the end of the 13-h 20-min scheduled wake episodes. This wake-dependent deterioration of neurobehavioral functions can be offset by the circadian drive for wakefulness, which peaks in the latter half of the habitual waking day during entrainment. The data demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of many neurobehavioral functions to circadian phase and the accumulation of homeostatic drive for sleep.

  20. Taxon- and Site-Specific Melatonin Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is catabolized both enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Nonenzymatic processes mediated by free radicals, singlet oxygen, other reactive intermediates such as HOCl and peroxynitrite, or pseudoenzymatic mechanisms are not species- or tissue-specific, but vary considerably in their extent. Higher rates of nonenzymatic melatonin metabolism can be expected upon UV exposure, e.g., in plants and in the human skin. Additionally, melatonin is more strongly nonenzymatically degraded at sites of inflammation. Typical products are several hydroxylated derivatives of melatonin and N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK. Most of these products are also formed by enzymatic catalysis. Considerable taxon- and site-specific differences are observed in the main enzymatic routes of catabolism. Formation of 6-hydroxymelatonin by cytochrome P450 subforms are prevailing in vertebrates, predominantly in the liver, but also in the brain. In pineal gland and non-mammalian retina, deacetylation to 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT plays a certain role. This pathway is quantitatively prevalent in dinoflagellates, in which 5-MT induces cyst formation and is further converted to 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid, an end product released to the water. In plants, the major route is catalyzed by melatonin 2-hydroxylase, whose product is tautomerized to 3-acetamidoethyl-3-hydroxy-5-methoxyindolin-2-one (AMIO, which exceeds the levels of melatonin. Formation and properties of various secondary products are discussed.

  1. Radioimmunoassay for Melatonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapp, E.; Skinner, R.G.; Phillips, V.

    1980-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for melatonin has been developed and used to measure the level of melatonin of male and post-menopausal female patients coming to operation for benign and malignant conditions. The amount of melatonin in the serum of the females was considerably lower than that in males. No difference could be found between patients suffering from benign and malignant conditions. A patient with a non-parenchymatous pineal tumour had considerably lower levels in the serum at three months after surgery and radiotherapy. A further month later melatonin could not be found in samples of serum taken over a 24-hour period. (author)

  2. Peripheral Reproductive Organ Health and Melatonin: Ready for Prime Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J. Reiter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has a wide variety of beneficial actions at the level of the gonads and their adnexa. Some actions are mediated via its classic membrane melatonin receptors while others seem to be receptor-independent. This review summarizes many of the published reports which confirm that melatonin, which is produced in the ovary, aids in advancing follicular maturation and preserving the integrity of the ovum prior to and at the time of ovulation. Likewise, when ova are collected for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, treating them with melatonin improves implantation and pregnancy rates. Melatonin synthesis as well as its receptors have also been identified in the placenta. In this organ, melatonin seems to be of particular importance for the maintenance of the optimal turnover of cells in the villous trophoblast via its ability to regulate apoptosis. For male gametes, melatonin has also proven useful in protecting them from oxidative damage and preserving their viability. Incubation of ejaculated animal sperm improves their motility and prolongs their viability. For human sperm as well, melatonin is also a valuable agent for protecting them from free radical damage. In general, the direct actions of melatonin on the gonads and adnexa of mammals indicate it is an important agent for maintaining optimal reproductive physiology.

  3. Peripheral Reproductive Organ Health and Melatonin: Ready for Prime Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J.; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin has a wide variety of beneficial actions at the level of the gonads and their adnexa. Some actions are mediated via its classic membrane melatonin receptors while others seem to be receptor-independent. This review summarizes many of the published reports which confirm that melatonin, which is produced in the ovary, aids in advancing follicular maturation and preserving the integrity of the ovum prior to and at the time of ovulation. Likewise, when ova are collected for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, treating them with melatonin improves implantation and pregnancy rates. Melatonin synthesis as well as its receptors have also been identified in the placenta. In this organ, melatonin seems to be of particular importance for the maintenance of the optimal turnover of cells in the villous trophoblast via its ability to regulate apoptosis. For male gametes, melatonin has also proven useful in protecting them from oxidative damage and preserving their viability. Incubation of ejaculated animal sperm improves their motility and prolongs their viability. For human sperm as well, melatonin is also a valuable agent for protecting them from free radical damage. In general, the direct actions of melatonin on the gonads and adnexa of mammals indicate it is an important agent for maintaining optimal reproductive physiology. PMID:23549263

  4. Circadian System and Melatonin Hormone: Risk Factors for Complications during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Valenzuela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a complex and well-regulated temporal event in which several steps are finely orchestrated including implantation, decidualization, placentation, and partum and any temporary alteration has serious effects on fetal and maternal health. Interestingly, alterations of circadian rhythms (i.e., shiftwork have been correlated with increased risk of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, and preeclampsia. In the last few years evidence is accumulating that the placenta may have a functional circadian system and express the clock genes Bmal1, Per1-2, and Clock. On the other hand, there is evidence that the human placenta synthesizes melatonin, hormone involved in the regulation of the circadian system in other tissues. Moreover, is unknown the role of this local production of melatonin and whether this production have a circadian pattern. Available information indicates that melatonin induces in placenta the expression of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, prevents the injury produced by oxidative stress, and inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF a gene that in other tissues is controlled by clock genes. In this review we aim to analyze available information regarding clock genes and clock genes controlled genes such as VEGF and the possible role of melatonin synthesis in the placenta.

  5. Sodic alkaline stress mitigation by exogenous melatonin in tomato needs nitric oxide as a downstream signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gong, Biao; Jin, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Yang, Fengjuan; Li, Yan; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to determine the interactive effect of exogenous melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) on sodic alkaline stress mitigation in tomato seedlings. It was observed that exogenous melatonin treatment elevated NO levels in alkaline-stressed tomato roots. However, exogenous NO had little effects on melatonin levels. Importantly, melatonin-induced NO generation was accompanied by increased tolerance to alkaline stress. Chemical scavenging of NO reduced melatonin-induced alkaline stress tolerance and defense genes' expression. However, inhibition of melatonin biosynthesis had a little effect on NO-induced alkaline stress tolerance. These results strongly suggest that NO, acting as a downstream signal, is involved in the melatonin-induced tomato tolerance to alkaline stress. This process creates a new signaling pathway for improving stress tolerance in plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  7. Paraquat inhibits progesterone synthesis in human placental mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milczarek, Ryszard; Sokołowska, Ewa; Rybakowska, Iwona; Kaletha, Krystian; Klimek, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    Human placenta mitochondria produces huge amounts of progesterone necessary for maintaining the pregnancy. Lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria inhibits progesterone synthesis and that inhibition can be reversed by superoxide dismutase and other antioxidants. Paraquat (PQ) a highly toxic herbicide generates superoxide radical inside cells and induces lipid peroxidation. Hence, it is supposed to stimulate lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria and in consequence to inhibit a placental mitochondrial steroidogenesis. Placentas were obtained from normal pregnancies. All experiments were done using isolated human placental mitochondria. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation was determined as tiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). A conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone or pregnenolone to progesterone was measured using radiolabeled steroids and thin layer chromatography. PQ enhanced the iron-dependent lipid peroxidation as also PQ heightened the inhibitory action of this process on progesterone synthesis in isolated human placental mitochondria. Paradoxically, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) reversed the inhibition of progesterone synthesis only minimally although it strongly inhibited PQ stimulated iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. When iron was absent, PQ stimulated only negligible lipid peroxidation but strongly inhibited progesterone synthesis. SOD had no effect on inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ. PQ strongly inhibited of the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone but had not got any influence on the enzymatic activity of mitochondrial 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. PQ strongly decreased the efficiency of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reduction as well as it promoted the rapid oxidation of the pre-reduced mitochondrial cytochrome P450. However PQ has not inhibited combined activity of adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin. We conclude that the most important reason of the inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ

  8. Tryptophan-enriched cereal intake improves nocturnal sleep, melatonin, serotonin, and total antioxidant capacity levels and mood in elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, R; Matito, S; Cubero, J; Paredes, S D; Franco, L; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C

    2013-08-01

    Melatonin and serotonin rhythms, which exhibit a close association with the endogenous circadian component of sleep, are attenuated with increasing age. This decrease seems to be linked to sleep alterations in the elderly. Chrononutrition is a field of chronobiology that establishes the principle of consuming foodstuffs at times of the day when they are more useful for health, improving, therefore, biorhythms and physical performance. Our aim was to analyze whether the consumption of cereals enriched with tryptophan, the precursor of both serotonin and melatonin, may help in the reconsolidation of the sleep/wake cycle and counteract depression and anxiety in 35 middle-aged/elderly (aged 55-75 year) volunteers in a simple blind assay. Data were collected for 3 weeks according to the following schedule: The control week participants consumed standard cereals (22.5 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) at breakfast and dinner; for the treatment week, cereals enriched with a higher dose of tryptophan (60 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) were eaten at both breakfast and dinner; the posttreatment week volunteers consumed their usual diet. Each participant wore a wrist actimeter that logged activity during the whole experiment. Urine was collected to analyze melatonin and serotonin urinary metabolites and to measure total antioxidant capacity. The consumption of cereals containing the higher dose in tryptophan increased sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, immobile time, and decreased total nocturnal activity, sleep fragmentation index, and sleep latency. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels, and urinary total antioxidant capacity also increased respectively after tryptophan-enriched cereal ingestion as well as improving anxiety and depression symptoms. Cereals enriched with tryptophan may be useful as a chrononutrition tool for alterations in the sleep/wake cycle due to age.

  9. Ligand binding to the human MT2 melatonin receptor: The role of residues in transmembrane domains 3, 6, and 7

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazna, Petr; Berka, K.; Jelínková, Irena; Balík, Aleš; Svoboda, Petr; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, T.; Teisinger, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 332, č. 3 (2005), s. 726-734 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5011308; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1479; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/03/0714; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/04/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : MT2 melatonin receptor * homology modeling * binding study Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2005

  10. Effects of melatonin on severe crush spinal cord injury-induced reactive astrocyte and scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krityakiarana, Warin; Sompup, Kamonrapat; Jongkamonwiwat, Nopporn; Mukda, Sujira; Pinilla, Fernando Gomez; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri

    2016-12-01

    The present work aimed at analyzing the effects of melatonin on scar formation after spinal cord injury (SCI). Upregulation of reactive astrocyte under SCI pathological conditions has been presented in several studies. It has been proved that the crucial factor in triggering this upregulation is proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, scar formation is an important barrier to axonal regeneration through the lesion area. Melatonin plays an important role in reducing inflammation, but its effects on scar formation in the injured spinal cord remain unknown. Hence, we used the model of severe crush injury in mice to investigate the effects of melatonin on scar formation. Mice were randomly separated into four groups; SCI, SCI+Melatonin 1 (single dose), SCI+Melatonin 14 (14 daily doses), and control. Melatonin was administered by intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg) after injury. Immunohistochemical analysis, Western blot, and behavioral evaluation were used to explore the effects of melatonin after SCI for 14 days. The melatonin-treated mice presented higher expression of neuronal markers (P < 0.001). Remarkably, the inflammatory response appeared to be greatly reduced in the SCI+Melatonin 14 group (P < 0.001), which also displayed less scar formation (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that melatonin inhibits scar formation by acting on inflammatory cytokines after SCI. Overall, our results suggest that melatonin is a promising treatment strategy after SCI that deserves further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tiotropium bromide inhibits human monocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurai M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiotropium bromide (Spiriva® is used as a bronchodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, clinical evidence suggests that tiotropium bromide may improve COPD by mechanisms beyond bronchodilation. We hypothesized that tiotropium bromide may act as an anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting monocyte chemotaxis, a process that plays an important role in the lung inflammation of COPD. To test this hypothesis monocytes were pretreated with tiotropium bromide prior to exposure to chemotactic agents and monocyte chemotactic activity (MCA was evaluated with a blind chamber technique. Tiotropium bromide inhibited MCA in a dose- and time- dependent manner (respectively, p< 0.01 by directly acting on the monocyte. Acetylcholine (ACh challenge increased MCA (p< 0.01, and tiotropium bromide effectively reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA by ACh. The inhibition of MCA by tiotropium bromide was reversed by a muscarinic type 3 (M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist (p< 0.01, and was not effected by an M2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, a selective M3 receptor agonist, cevimeline, and Gq protein stimulator, Pasteurella multocida toxin, significantly increased MCA (P < 0.01, and tiotropium bromide pretreatment reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA induced by these agents. These results suggest that tiotropium might regulate monocyte chemotaxis, in part, by interfering with M3-muscarinic receptor coupled Gq protein signal transduction. These results provide new insight that an anti-cholinergic therapeutic may provide anti-inflammatory action in the pulmonary system.

  12. Participation of MT3 melatonin receptors in the synergistic effect of melatonin on cytotoxic and apoptotic actions evoked by chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, Roberto; Bejarano, Ignacio; Espino, Javier; Rodríguez, Ana B; Pariente, José A

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin has antitumor activity via several mechanisms including its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in addition to its potent antioxidant actions. Therefore, melatonin may be useful in the treatment of tumors in association with chemotherapy drugs. This study was performed to study the role of melatonin receptors on the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agents cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in two tumor cell lines, such as human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells and cervical cancer HeLa cells. We found that both melatonin and the two chemotherapeutic agents tested induced a decrease in HT-29 and HeLa cell viability. Furthermore, melatonin significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapeutic agents, particularly, in 5-fluorouracil-challenged cells. Stimulation of cells with either of the two chemotherapeutic agents in the presence of melatonin further increased caspase-3 activation. Concomitant treatments with melatonin and chemotherapeutic agents augmented the population of apoptotic cells compared to the treatments with chemotherapeutics alone. Blockade of MT1 and/or MT2 receptors with luzindole or 4-P-PDOT was unable to reverse the enhancing effects of melatonin on both cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activation and the amount of apoptotic cells evoked by the chemotherapeutic agents, whereas when MT3 receptors were blocked with prazosin, the synergistic effect of melatonin with chemotherapy on cytotoxicity and apoptosis was reversed. Our findings provided evidence that in vitro melatonin strongly enhances chemotherapeutic-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in two tumor cell lines, namely HT-29 and HeLa cells and, this potentiating effect of melatonin is mediated by MT3 receptor stimulation.

  13. Melatonin and the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin protects the electron transport chain (ETC) in multiple ways. It reduces levels of ·NO by downregulating inducible and inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, nNOS), thereby preventing excessive levels of peroxynitrite. Both ·NO and peroxynitrite-derived free radicals, such as ·NO 2 , hydroxyl (·OH) and carbonate radicals (CO 3 · - ) cause blockades or bottlenecks in the ETC, by ·NO binding to irons, protein nitrosation, nitration and oxidation, changes that lead to electron overflow or even backflow and, thus, increased formation of superoxide anions (O 2 · - ). Melatonin improves the intramitochondrial antioxidative defense by enhancing reduced glutathione levels and inducing glutathione peroxidase and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) in the matrix and Cu,Zn-SOD in the intermembrane space. An additional action concerns the inhibition of cardiolipin peroxidation. This oxidative change in the membrane does not only initiate apoptosis or mitophagy, as usually considered, but also seems to occur at low rate, e.g., in aging, and impairs the structural integrity of Complexes III and IV. Moreover, elevated levels of melatonin inhibit the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and shorten its duration. Additionally, high-affinity binding sites in mitochondria have been described. The assumption of direct binding to the amphipathic ramp of Complex I would require further substantiation. The mitochondrial presence of the melatonin receptor MT 1 offers the possibility that melatonin acts via an inhibitory G protein, soluble adenylyl cyclase, decreased cAMP and lowered protein kinase A activity, a signaling pathway shown to reduce Complex I activity in the case of a mitochondrial cannabinoid receptor.

  14. Melatonin Secretion during a Short Nap Fosters Subsequent Feedback Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Christian D; Davoli, Valentia; Schürger, David; Prehn-Kristensen, Alexander; Baving, Lioba

    2017-01-01

    Sleep helps to protect and renew hippocampus-dependent declarative learning. Less is known about forms of learning that mainly engage the dopaminergic reward system. Animal studies showed that exogenous melatonin modulates the responses of the dopaminergic reward system and acts as a neuroprotectant promoting memory. In humans, melatonin is mainly secreted in darkness during evening hours supporting sleep. In this study, we investigate the effects of a short period of daytime sleep (nap) and endogenous melatonin on reward learning. Twenty-seven healthy, adult students took part in an experiment, either taking a 90-min afternoon nap or watching videos (within-subject design). Before and after the sleep vs. wake interval, saliva melatonin levels and reward learning were measured, and in the nap condition, a polysomnogram was obtained. Reward learning was assessed using a two-alternative probabilistic reinforcement-learning task. Sleep itself and subjective arousal or valence had no significant effects on reward learning. However, this study showed for the first time that an afternoon nap can elicit a small but significant melatonin response in about 41% of the participants and that the magnitude of the melatonin response predicts subsequent reward learning. Only in melatonin responders did a short nap improve reward learning. The difference between melatonin-responders and non-responders occurred very early during learning indicating that melatonin might have improved working memory rather than reward learning. Future studies should use paradigms differentiating working memory and reward learning to clarify which aspect of human feedback learning might profit from melatonin.

  15. Melatonin sensitizes human cervical cancer HeLa cells to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis: effects on oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, Roberto; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B; Espino, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has antitumor activity via several mechanisms including its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects as well as its potent antioxidant actions, although recent evidence has indicated that melatonin may perform pro-oxidant actions in tumor cells. Therefore, melatonin may be useful in the treatment of tumors in association with chemotherapy drugs. This study was intended to evaluate the in vitro effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic actions of various chemotherapeutic agents in cervical cancer HeLa cells. Herein, we found that both melatonin and three of the chemotherapeutic drugs tested, namely cisplatin (CIS), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and doxorubicin, induced a decrease in HeLa cell viability. Furthermore, melatonin significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of such chemotherapeutic agents. Consistently, costimulation of HeLa cells with any chemotherapeutic agent in the presence of melatonin further increased caspase-3 activation, particularly in CIS- and 5-FU-challenged cells. Likewise, concomitant treatments with melatonin and CIS significantly enhanced the ratio of cells entering mitochondrial apoptosis due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, substantially augmented the population of apoptotic cells, and markedly enlarged DNA fragmentation compared to the treatments with CIS alone. Nonetheless, melatonin only displayed moderate chemosensitizing effects in 5-FU-stimulated HeLa cells, as suggested by slight increments in the percentage of cells stimulated for ROS production and in the proportion of early apoptotic cells compared to the treatments with 5-FU alone. In summary, our findings provided evidence that in vitro melatonin strongly enhances CIS-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HeLa cells and, hence, the indoleamine could be potentially applied to cervical cancer treatment as a powerful synergistic agent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Does supplementation of in-vitro culture medium with melatonin improve IVF outcome in PCOS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Park, Eun A; Kim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Won Yun; Cho, Jung Hyun; Lee, Woo Sik; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, You Shin; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid (FF) contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcomes of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Melatonin concentrations in the culture media of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and the clinical outcomes after using IVM media with or without melatonin were analysed. In the culture media of GC or COC, melatonin concentrations gradually increased. When human chorionic gonadotrophin priming protocols were used, implantation rates in the melatonin-supplemented group were higher than those of the non-supplemented control group (PPregnancy rates were also higher, although not significantly. The findings suggest that the addition of melatonin to IVM media may improve the cytoplasmic maturation of human immature oocytes and subsequent clinical outcomes. It is speculated that follicular melatonin may be released from luteinizing GC during late folliculogenesis and that melatonin supplementation may be used to improve the clinical outcomes of IVM IVF-embryo transfer. Melatonin is primarily produced by the pineal gland and regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. Interestingly, human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. However, in contrast to animal studies, the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation in the human system has not yet been investigated. So, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcome of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for PCOS patients. The melatonin concentrations in culture medium of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and the

  17. Solubilization and purification of melatonin receptors from lizard brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkees, S.A.; Conron, R.W. Jr.; Reppert, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Melatonin receptors in lizard brain were identified and characterized using 125 I-labeled melatonin ([ 125 I]MEL) after solubilization with the detergent digitonin. Saturation studies of solubilized material revealed a high affinity binding site, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 181 +/- 45 pM. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs, but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of solubilized material with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, guanosine 5'-(3-O-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S), significantly reduced receptor affinity. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized melatonin receptors revealed a high affinity, large (Mr 400,000) peak of specific binding. Pretreatment with GTP-gamma-S before solubilization resulted in elution of a lower affinity, smaller (Mr 150,000) peak of specific binding. To purify solubilized receptors, a novel affinity chromatography resin was developed by coupling 6-hydroxymelatonin with Epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B. Using this resin, melatonin receptors were purified approximately 10,000-fold. Purified material retained the pharmacologic specificity of melatonin receptors. These results show that melatonin receptors that bind ligand after detergent treatment can be solubilized and substantially purified by affinity chromatography

  18. Melatonin and Atopy: Role in Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Experimental data suggest that melatonin inhibits development of atopic eczema and reduces serum total IgE and IL-4. Allergic asthma is a condition characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the presence of IgE antibodies in response to inhaled allergens; often there is also enhanced total serum IgE levels. Melatonin regulates smooth muscle tone and influences the immune response. Melatonin may, however, act as a pro-inflammatory agent in asthma leading to bronchial constriction. The safety of melatonin as a sleep-inducing agent has been confirmed in asthmatic subjects, but its routine use is not recommended in bronchial asthma. This review summarizes what is known about the role of melatonin as an immunomodulatory agent in asthma and atopic eczema.

  19. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  20. Fluconazole inhibits human adrenocortical steroidogenesis in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van der Pas (Rob); L.J. Hofland (Leo); J. Hofland (Johannes); A.E. Taylor (A.); W. Arlt (Wiebke); J. Steenbergen (Jacobie); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); F.H. de Jong (Frank); R.A. Feelders (Richard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe antifungal agent ketoconazole is often used to suppress cortisol production in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS). However, ketoconazole has serious side effects and is hepatotoxic. Here, the in vitro effects of ketoconazole and fluconazole, which might be less toxic, on human

  1. Luteoloside Inhibits Proliferation of Human Chronic Myeloid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of luteoloside on the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and whether luteoloside induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in K562 cells. Methods: Luteoloside's cytotoxicity was assessed using a cell counting kit. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry ...

  2. Temporally distinct effects of stress and corticosterone on diel melatonin rhythms of red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterschmidt, Deborah I; Mason, Robert T

    2010-10-01

    Circadian and circannual rhythms in physiology and behavior are temporally organized via hormonal signals that reflect changing environmental cues. Interactions between endocrine signals are in turn important for integrating multiple physiological and behavioral rhythms. In the present study, we examined interactions between melatonin, the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and corticosterone in a well-studied population of red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). We demonstrate that 4h of capture stress significantly increased photophasic melatonin and decreased scotophasic melatonin concentrations of male snakes. Treatment with exogenous corticosterone (15 and 60 μg) did not mimic the effects of stress on diel melatonin rhythms. To determine if capture stress decreases scotophasic melatonin by depleting the precursors necessary for melatonin synthesis, we used a paradigm in which snakes were treated with the melatonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (0.6 and 1.2mg) to elevate melatonin concentrations. Pretreatment of snakes with both capture stress and exogenous corticosterone blocked the effect of 5-hydroxytryptophan on scotophasic melatonin. Thus, although corticosterone itself does not influence melatonin rhythms of snakes, corticosterone can inhibit the synthesis of melatonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan. These experiments suggest that the initial versus later phases of an acute physiological stress response have temporally distinct effects on melatonin synthesis: activation of the sympathoadrenal system increases melatonin, while increased glucocorticoids can inhibit melatonin synthesis. Collectively, we demonstrate that a physiological coupling between melatonin, glucocorticoids, and the sympathoadrenal system is conserved in this ectothermic model and propose that such interactions may mediate stress-induced changes in physiology and behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cooperative inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activities by hexachlorophene in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Matsuoka, M; Igisu, H; Ikeda, M

    1997-01-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) all hemolyzed washed human erythrocytes and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activities in erythrocyte membrane. HCP was much more potent in either effect than any other compound examined. The inhibition of AchE activities by HCP was reversed on adding albumin. The dose-response curves by HCP and PCP were sigmoidal, indicating cooperative inhibition, while those by 2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,6-TCP were not. Furthermore, the cooperativity of the inhibition by HCP was greater than by PCP. Differing from that by PCP, the cooperativity of inhibition increased depending on the temperature (13, 25, 37 degrees C) and decreased when the membrane was treated with Triton X-100. The cooperativity was also decreased in the presence of albumin. On a Scatchard plot analysis, erythrocyte membranes appeared to have multiple binding sites of different affinities for HCP; binding of HCP to the low affinity site [dissociation constant (Kd) 4.7 x 10(-5) M] seemed to be responsible for the observed cooperative inhibition of AchE activities. Neither neostigmine nor fenitrothion altered the cooperativity. HCP seems to be the most potent cooperative inhibitor of AchE in human erythrocyte membranes known to date. HCP may be useful to examine AchE and milieu in human erythrocyte membranes.

  4. Increased melatonin in oral mucosal tissue of oral lichen planus (OLP) patients: A possible link between melatonin and its role in oral mucosal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengtrakoon, Kirawut; Wannakasemsuk, Worraned; Vichitrananda, Vilasinee; Klanrit, Poramaporn; Hormdee, Doosadee; Noisombut, Rajda; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham

    2017-06-01

    The existence of extra-pineal melatonin has been observed in various tissues. No prior studies of melatonin in human oral mucosal tissue under the condition of chronic inflammation have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of melatonin in oral mucosal tissue of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) which was considered as a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated disease causing oral mucosal damage and ulcerations. Sections from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients (n=30), and control subjects (n=30) were used in this study. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and the semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the levels of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT: a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of melatonin), melatonin, and melatonin receptor 1 (MT1) in oral mucosa of OLP patients and normal oral mucosa of control subjects. AANAT, melatonin, and MT1were detected in oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients and control subjects. Immunostaining scores of AANAT, melatonin, and MT1 in oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (p=0.002, pmelatonin, and MT1 in the inflamed oral mucosal tissue of OLP patients imply that chronic inflammation may induce the local biosynthesis of melatonin via AANAT, and may enhance the action of melatonin via MT1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using [ 125 I]melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37 degree C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of [ 125 I]melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of [ 125 I]melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the [ 125 I]melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland

  6. MELATONIN-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF PC12 CELL GROWTH IS MEDIATED BY ITS GI COUPLED TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTORS. (R826248)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pertussis toxin, an uncoupler of Gi protein from adenylate cyclase, and luzindole, a competitive inhibitor of melatonin receptor binding, were examined for their ability to inhibit melatonin-induced suppression of PC12 cell growth. Both agents inhibited the mela...

  7. Inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by pentacyclic triterpenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Feng

    Full Text Available Inhibiting human neutrophil elastase (HNE is a promising strategy for treating inflammatory lung diseases, such as H1N1 and SARS virus infections. The use of sivelestat, the only clinically registered synthesized HNE inhibitor, is largely limited by its risk of organ toxicity because it irreversibly inhibits HNE. Therefore, potent reversible HNE inhibitors are promising alternatives to sivelestat.An in vitro HNE inhibition assay was employed to screen a series of triterpenes. Six pentacyclic triterpenes, but not tetracyclic triterpenes, significantly inhibited HNE. Of these pentacyclic triterpenes, ursolic acid exhibited the highest inhibitory potency (IC50 = 5.51 µM. The HNE inhibitory activity of ursolic acid was further verified using a mouse model of acute smoke-induced lung inflammation. The results of nuclear magnetic resonance and HNE inhibition kinetic analysis showed that the pentacyclic triterpenes competitively and reversibly inhibited HNE. Molecular docking experiments indicated that the molecular scaffold, 28-COOH, and a double bond at an appropriate location in the pentacyclic triterpenes are important for their inhibitory activity.Our results provide insights into the effects of pentacyclic triterpenes on lung inflammatory actions through reversible inhibition of HNE activity.

  8. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs can originate from early life through so-called the “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD or “developmental programming”. The DOHaD concept offers the “reprogramming” strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evidence support that melatonin is closely inter-related to other proposed mechanisms contributing to the developmental programming of a variety of chronic NCDs. Recent animal studies have begun to unravel the multifunctional roles of melatonin in many experimental models of developmental programming. Even though some progress has been made in research on melatonin as a reprogramming strategy to prevent DOHaD-related NCDs, future human studies should aim at filling the translational gap between animal models and clinical trials. Here, we review several key themes on the reprogramming effects of melatonin in DOHaD research. We have particularly focused on the following areas: mechanisms of developmental programming; the interrelationship between melatonin and mechanisms underlying developmental programming; pathophysiological roles of melatonin in pregnancy and fetal development; and insight provided by animal models to support melatonin as a reprogramming therapy. Rates of NCDs are increasing faster than anticipated all over the world. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand reprogramming mechanisms of melatonin and to translate experimental research into clinical practice for halting a growing list of DOHaD-related NCDs.

  9. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-02-16

    Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can originate from early life through so-called the "developmental origins of health and disease" (DOHaD) or "developmental programming". The DOHaD concept offers the "reprogramming" strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evidence support that melatonin is closely inter-related to other proposed mechanisms contributing to the developmental programming of a variety of chronic NCDs. Recent animal studies have begun to unravel the multifunctional roles of melatonin in many experimental models of developmental programming. Even though some progress has been made in research on melatonin as a reprogramming strategy to prevent DOHaD-related NCDs, future human studies should aim at filling the translational gap between animal models and clinical trials. Here, we review several key themes on the reprogramming effects of melatonin in DOHaD research. We have particularly focused on the following areas: mechanisms of developmental programming; the interrelationship between melatonin and mechanisms underlying developmental programming; pathophysiological roles of melatonin in pregnancy and fetal development; and insight provided by animal models to support melatonin as a reprogramming therapy. Rates of NCDs are increasing faster than anticipated all over the world. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand reprogramming mechanisms of melatonin and to translate experimental research into clinical practice for halting a growing list of DOHaD-related NCDs.

  10. Antioxidant properties of melatonin--an emerging mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C E; Steketee, J D; Saphier, D

    1998-11-15

    Over three centuries ago, the French philosopher René Descartes described the pineal gland as "the seat of the soul." However, it was not until the late 1950s that the chemical identity and biosynthesis of melatonin, the principal hormone secreted by the pineal body, were revealed. Melatonin, named from the Greek melanos, meaning black, and tonos, meaning color, is a biogenic amine with structural similarities to serotonin. The mechanisms mediating the synthesis of melatonin are transcriptionally regulated by the photoperiodic environment. Once synthesized, the neurohormone is a biologic modulator of mood, sleep, sexual behavior, reproductive alterations, immunologic function, and circadian rhythms. Moreover, melatonin exerts its regulatory roles through high-affinity, pertussis toxin-sensitive, G-protein (or guanine nucleotide binding protein) coupled receptors that reside primarily in the eye, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels, and brain. Additional evidence also indicates a role for melatonin in aging and age-related diseases, probably related to its efficient free radical scavenger (or antioxidant) activity. The potential clinical benefit of melatonin as an antioxidant is remarkable, suggesting that it may be of use in the treatment of many pathophysiological disease states including various cancers, hypertension, pulmonary diseases, and a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes the biosynthesis of melatonin and its many endocrine and physiological functions, including its therapeutic potential in human disease states. Emphasis is placed on the recent speculations indicating that this pineal hormone serves as an endogenous antioxidant agent with proficient free radical scavenging activity.

  11. Some Determinants of Latent Inhibition in Human Predictive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineno, Oskar; de la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Lubow, R. E.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2006-01-01

    The present experiments assessed the effects of different manipulations between cue preexposure and cue-outcome pairings on latent inhibition (LI) in a predictive learning task with human participants. To facilitate LI, preexposure and acquisition with the target cues took place while participants performed a secondary task. Presentation of…

  12. MELATONIN DAN MELATONIN RECEPTOR AGONIST SEBAGAI PENANGANAN INSOMNIA PRIMER KRONIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Ayu Maha Iswari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a hormone that has an important role in the mechanism of sleep. Hypnotic effects of melatonin and melatonin receptor agonist are mediated via MT1 and MT2 receptors, especially in circadian rhythm pacemaker, suprachiasmatic nucleus, which is worked on the hypothalamic sleep switch. This mechanism is quite different with the GABAergic drugs such as benzodiazepine. Agonist melatonin triggers the initiation of sleep and normalize circadian rhythms so that makes it easier to maintain sleep. The main disadvantage of melatonin in helping sleep maintenance on primary insomnia is that the half life is very short. The solution to this problem is the use of prolonged-release melatonin and melatonin receptor agonist agents such as ramelteon. Melatoninergic agonist does not cause withdrawal effects, dependence, as well as cognitive and psychomotor disorders as often happens on the use of benzodiazepine.  

  13. Melatonin, mitochondria and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatu, Ovidiu C; Amaral, Fernanda G; Campos, Luciana A; Cipolla-Neto, Jose

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin, due to its multiple means and mechanisms of action, plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the organismal physiology by fine tunning several functions. The cardiovascular system is an important site of action as melatonin regulates blood pressure both by central and peripheral interventions, in addition to its relation with the renin-angiotensin system. Besides, the systemic management of several processes, melatonin acts on mitochondria regulation to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system. Hypertension affects target organs in different ways and cellular energy metabolism is frequently involved due to mitochondrial alterations that include a rise in reactive oxygen species production and an ATP synthesis decrease. The discussion that follows shows the role played by melatonin in the regulation of mitochondrial physiology in several levels of the cardiovascular system, including brain, heart, kidney, blood vessels and, particularly, regulating the renin-angiotensin system. This discussion shows the putative importance of using melatonin as a therapeutic tool involving its antioxidant potential and its action on mitochondrial physiology in the cardiovascular system.

  14. Melatonin labelled by hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope exchange of melatonin with deuterium (D 2 O) and tritium (HTO) oxides under different conditions is studied. Simplicity of isotope exchange of hydrogens of the indole ring of melatonin in the acidic medium decreases in series H 4 >H 2 >H 6 >>H 7 , that permits to suggest the way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in positions 4,6 and 2 of the indole ring. The way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in position 2 according to the reaction of desulfation 2-(2,4-dinitrophenylsulphenyl) melatonin at catalyst Ni(Re)(D) is suggested

  15. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D 2 O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H 4 > H 2 H 6 >> H 7 , enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  16. Quantification of the neurotransmitters melatonin and N-acetyl-serotonin in human serum by supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolrab, Denise; Frühauf, Peter; Gerner, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.gerner@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-21

    The aim of this study was developing a supercritical fluid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SFC-MS/MS) method and an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method, for the analysis of N-acetyl-serotonin (NAS) and melatonin (Mel) in human serum, and to compare the performance of these methods. Deuterated isotopologues of the neurotransmitters were synthesized and evaluated for suitability as internal standards in sample preparation. Liquid-liquid extraction was selected as sample preparation procedure. With chloroform, the best extraction solvent tested, an extraction yield of 48 ± 2% for N-acetyl-serotonin and 101 ± 10% for melatonin was achieved. SFC separation was accomplished within 3 min on a BEH stationary phase, employing isocratic elution with 90% carbon dioxide and 0.1% formic acid as well as 0.05% ammonium formate in methanol. For the 4 min UHPLC gradient separation with 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol, respectively, a Kinetex XB-C18 was used as stationary phase. Both chromatographic techniques were optimized regarding mobile phase composition, additives to the mobile phase and column temperature. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis was used for quantification of the metabolites. Both methods were validated regarding retention time stability, LOD, LOQ, repeatability and reproducibility of quantification, process efficiency, extraction recovery and matrix effects. LOD and LOQ were 0.017 and 0.05 pg μL{sup −1} for NAS and 0.006 and 0.018 pg μL{sup −1} for Mel in SFC-MS/MS compared to 0.028 and 0.1 pg μL{sup −1} for NAS and 0.006 and 0.017 pg μL{sup −1} for Mel in UHPLC-MS/MS. - Highlights: • Use of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) hyphenated with MS/MS. • Separation of biological relevant polar metabolites with SFC. • Critical comparison of validation parameters obtained with UHPLC.

  17. A role for melatonin in maintaining the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance by influencing leukocyte migration and apoptosis in carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepka, Magdalena; Szwejser, Ewa; Pijanowski, Lukasz; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy; Chadzinska, Magdalena

    2015-11-01

    Melatonin is responsible for the synchronization of many physiological processes, including the immune response. Here we focus on the expression of melatonin MT1 receptors in/on leukocytes, and on the effects of melatonin administration on the inflammatory processes of carp. For the first time, we showed that fish leukocytes express MT1 receptors, implicating direct responsiveness to melatonin stimulation. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin modulated the immune response. The most potent effects of melatonin concerned the regulation of leukocyte migration. Melatonin reduced chemotaxis of leukocytes towards CXC chemokines in vitro. In vivo, during zymosan induced peritonitis, i.p. administration of melatonin reduced the number of neutrophils. This correlated with a melatonin-induced decrease of gene expression of the CXCa chemokine. Moreover, melatonin induced a decrease of the respiratory burst in inflammatory leukocytes. Although these data do suggest a potent anti-inflammatory function for this hormone, melatonin-induced inhibition of leukocyte apoptosis clearly indicates towards a dual function. These results show that also in carp, melatonin performs a pleiotropic and extra-pineal function that is important in maintaining the delicate pro- and anti-inflammatory balance during infection. They furthermore demonstrate that neuroendocrine-immune interaction via melatonin is evolutionary conserved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Triclocarban and Triclosan Inhibit Human Aromatase via Different Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huitao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human aromatase (CYP19A1 is an important enzyme, which produces estrogen from androgen for maintaining the female reproductive function and pregnancy. Triclocarban and triclosan are antimicrobial chemicals added to personal care, household, and industrial products. They could be endocrine disruptors and may disrupt human CYP19A1 activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of triclocarban and triclosan on estradiol production and human CYP19A1 activity in JEG-3 cells. Triclocarban and triclosan reduced estradiol production in JEG-3 cells. Triclocarban and triclosan inhibited human CYP19A1 with IC50 values of 15.81 and 6.26 μM, respectively. Triclosan competitively inhibited CYP19A1, while triclocarban noncompetitively inhibited this enzyme. Docking study showed that triclosan bound to the steroid-binding pocket of CYP19A1, while triclocarban was off this target, suggesting a different mechanism. In conclusion, triclocarban and triclosan are inhibitors of human CYP19A1.

  19. Effects of exogenous melatonin on human pituitary and adrenal secretions. Hormonal responses to specific stimuli after acute administration of different doses at two opposite circadian stages in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccotti, P; Terzolo, M; Piovesan, A; Torta, M; Vignani, A; Angeli, A

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of an acute oral administration of 2 dosages (100 and 1 mg) of melatonin (MT) vs placebo (PL) on pituitary release of LH, FSH, TSH and PRL after GnRH + TRH and on the adrenocortical release of cortisol, aldosterone and progesterone after ACTH in healthy adult males. We carried out a double blind study on 6 volunteers in winter-early spring, at 2 opposite phases of the circadian cycle: 08(00) and 20(00). Injection of GnRH (100 micrograms), TRH (200 micrograms) and ACTH (10 micrograms of the synthetic analogue ACTH 1-17, alsactide) was performed 1 h after MT or PL ingestion. The measurement of plasma MT levels confirmed its effective gastrointestinal absorption after both doses. The hormonal patterns were superimposable after MT and PL. A higher response of FSH, PRL, cortisol and aldosterone was observed in the evening vs morning protocols independently of previous treatment (MT or PL). Our data demonstrate that the acute oral administration of 2 different doses of MT at 2 opposite circadian stages is ineffective as to the modification of a variety of pituitary and adrenocortical responses in human male subjects. The circadian chronosusceptibility of pituitary and adrenocortical cells to specific stimuli deserves interest to future investigation.

  20. Ketamine inhibits human sperm function by Ca(2+)-related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanqiao; Zou, Qianxing; Li, Bingda; Chen, Houyang; Du, Xiaohong; Weng, Shiqi; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Xuhui

    2016-09-09

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, which was widely used in human and animal medicine, has become a popular recreational drug, as it can induce hallucinatory effects. Ketamine abuse can cause serious damage to many aspects of the organism, mainly reflected in the nervous system and urinary system. It has also been reported that ketamine can impair the male genital system. However, the detailed effect of ketamine on human spermatozoa remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vitro effects of ketamine on human sperm functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were treated in vitro with different concentrations of ketamine (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 g/L). The results showed that 0.25-1 g/L ketamine inhibited sperm total motility, progressive motility and linear velocity, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the sperm's ability to penetrate viscous medium and the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were significantly inhibited by ketamine. Ketamine did not affect sperm viability, capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is a central factor in the regulation of human sperm function, was decreased by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the currents of the sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel, CatSper, which modulates Ca(2+) influx in sperm, were inhibited by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ketamine induces its toxic effects on human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca(2+)]i through inhibition of CatSper channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Melatonin – apleiotropic hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Brzęczek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a tryptophan derivative, is synthesised in mammals mainly in the pineal gland. It coordinates the biological clock by regulating the circadian rhythm. Its production is dependent on light and its concentrations change with age. Thanks to its specific chemical structure, melatonin is capable of crossing all biological barriers in the organism and affecting other tissues and cells, both in indirect and direct ways. Its mechanism of action involves binding with membrane receptors, nuclear receptors and intracellular proteins. Melatonin shows antioxidant activity. Moreover, its immunomodulatory and antilipid effects as well as its role in secreting other hormones, such as prolactin, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, somatotropin, thyroliberin, adrenocorticotropin hormone or corticosteroids, are essential. In the recent years, research studies have been mainly focussed on the potential influence of melatonin on the aetiology and development of various disease entities, such as sleep disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancers, psychiatric and neurological conditions, cardiovascular diseases or conditions with bone turnover disorders. Indications for melatonin use in paediatrics are being discussed more and more frequently. Among others, authors debate on its use in dyssomnias in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, supportive treatment in febrile seizures and epilepsy as well as potential use in paediatric anaesthesia. The molecular mechanism and broad-spectrum action of melatonin have not been sufficiently researched and its clinical relevance is often underestimated. This hormone is a promising link in achieving alternative therapeutic solutions.

  2. Regulatory role of melatonin and BMP-4 in prolactin production by rat pituitary lactotrope GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Ochi, Kanako; Fujisawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Nahoko; Komatsubara, Motoshi; Nishiyama, Yuki; Tsukamoto-Yamauchi, Naoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Wada, Jun; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-08-01

    The effects of melatonin on prolactin production and its regulatory mechanism remain uncertain. We investigated the regulatory role of melatonin in prolactin production using rat pituitary lactotrope GH3 cells by focusing on the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) system. Melatonin receptor activation, induced by melatonin and its receptor agonist ramelteon, significantly suppressed basal and forskolin-induced prolactin secretion and prolactin mRNA expression in GH3 cells. The melatonin MT2 receptor was predominantly expressed in GH3 cells, and the inhibitory effects of melatonin on prolactin production were reversed by treatment with the receptor antagonist luzindole, suggesting functional involvement of MT2 action in the suppression of prolactin release. Melatonin receptor activation also suppressed BMP-4-induced prolactin expression by inhibiting phosphorylation of Smad and transcription of the BMP-target gene Id-1, while BMP-4 treatment upregulated MT2 expression. Melatonin receptor activation suppressed basal, BMP-4-induced and forskolin-induced cAMP synthesis; however, BtcAMP-induced prolactin mRNA expression was not affected by melatonin or ramelteon, suggesting that MT2 activation leads to inhibition of prolactin production through the suppression of Smad signaling and cAMP synthesis. Experiments using intracellular signal inhibitors revealed that the ERK pathway is, at least in part, involved in prolactin induction by GH3 cells. Thus, a new regulatory role of melatonin involving BMP-4 in prolactin secretion was uncovered in lactotrope GH3 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Melatonin resists oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruijun; Cui, Min; Lin, Hui; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Songfeng; Shao, Zengwu

    2018-04-15

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is thought to be the major cause of low back pain (LBP), which is still in lack of effective etiological treatment. Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to participate in the impairment of nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). As the most important neuroendocrine hormone in biological clock regulation, melatonin (MLT) is also featured by good antioxidant effect. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanisms of melatonin on oxidative stress-induced damage in rat NPCs. Cytotoxicity of H 2 O 2 and protecting effect of melatonin were analyzed with Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Cell apoptosis rate was detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. DCFH-DA probe was used for the reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes were analyzed with JC-1 probe. Intracellular oxidation product and reductants were measured through enzymatic reactions. Extracellular matrix (ECM) and apoptosis associated proteins were analyzed with Western blot assays. Melatonin preserved cell viability of NPCs under oxidative stress. The apoptosis rate, ROS level and malonaldehyde (MDA) declined with melatonin. MLT/H 2 O 2 group showed higher activities of GSH and SOD. The fall of MMP receded and the expression of ECM protein increased with treatment of melatonin. The mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was inhibited by melatonin. Melatonin alleviated the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of NPCs. Melatonin could be a promising alternative in treatment of IVDD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Melatonin as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant: one of evolution's best ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun Xian; Jou, Mei Jie; Galano, Annia; Xu, Bing

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin is an ancient antioxidant. After its initial development in bacteria, it has been retained throughout evolution such that it may be or may have been present in every species that have existed. Even though it has been maintained throughout evolution during the diversification of species, melatonin's chemical structure has never changed; thus, the melatonin present in currently living humans is identical to that present in cyanobacteria that have existed on Earth for billions of years. Melatonin in the systemic circulation of mammals quickly disappears from the blood presumably due to its uptake by cells, particularly when they are under high oxidative stress conditions. The measurement of the subcellular distribution of melatonin has shown that the concentration of this indole in the mitochondria greatly exceeds that in the blood. Melatonin presumably enters mitochondria through oligopeptide transporters, PEPT1, and PEPT2. Thus, melatonin is specifically targeted to the mitochondria where it seems to function as an apex antioxidant. In addition to being taken up from the circulation, melatonin may be produced in the mitochondria as well. During evolution, mitochondria likely originated when melatonin-forming bacteria were engulfed as food by ancestral prokaryotes. Over time, engulfed bacteria evolved into mitochondria; this is known as the endosymbiotic theory of the origin of mitochondria. When they did so, the mitochondria retained the ability to synthesize melatonin. Thus, melatonin is not only taken up by mitochondria but these organelles, in addition to many other functions, also probably produce melatonin as well. Melatonin's high concentrations and multiple actions as an antioxidant provide potent antioxidant protection to these organelles which are exposed to abundant free radicals.

  5. Physiological Markers of Motor Inhibition during Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Julie; Greenhouse, Ian; Labruna, Ludovica; Ivry, Richard B

    2017-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies in humans have shown that many behaviors engage processes that suppress excitability within the corticospinal tract. Inhibition of the motor output pathway has been extensively studied in the context of action stopping, where a planned movement needs to be abruptly aborted. Recent TMS work has also revealed markers of motor inhibition during the preparation of movement. Here, we review the evidence for motor inhibition during action stopping and action preparation, focusing on studies that have used TMS to monitor changes in the excitability of the corticospinal pathway. We discuss how these physiological results have motivated theoretical models of how the brain selects actions, regulates movement initiation and execution, and switches from one state to another. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Independence of circadian entrainment state and responses to melatonin in male Siberian hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorman Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal fluctuations in physiology and behavior depend on the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion programmed by the circadian system. A melatonin signal of a given duration, however, can elicit different responses depending on whether an animal was previously exposed to longer or shorter photoperiod signals (i.e., its photoperiodic history. This report examined in male Siberian hamsters which of two aspects of photoperiod history – prior melatonin exposure or entrainment state of the circadian system – is critical for generating contingent responses to a common photoperiodic signal. Results In Experiment #1, daily melatonin infusions of 5 or 10 h duration stimulated or inhibited gonadal growth, respectively, but had no effect on entrainment of the locomotor activity rhythm to long or short daylengths, thereby demonstrating that melatonin history and entrainment status could be experimentally dissociated. These manipulations were repeated in Experiment #2, and animals were subsequently exposed to a 12 week regimen of naturalistic melatonin signals shown in previous experiments to reveal photoperiodic history effects. Gonadal responses differed as a function of prior melatonin exposure but were unaffected by the circadian entrainment state. Experiment #3 demonstrated that a new photoperiodic history could be imparted during four weeks of exposure to long photoperiods. This effect, moreover, was blocked in animals treated concurrently with constant release melatonin capsules that obscured the endogenous melatonin signal: Following removal of the implants, the gonadal response depended not on the immediately antecedent circadian entrainment state, but on the more remote photoperiodic conditions prior to the melatonin implant. Conclusions The interpretation of photoperiodic signals as a function of prior conditions depends specifically on the history of melatonin exposure. The photoperiodic regulation of circadian

  7. Exogenous melatonin improves Malus resistance to Marssonina apple blotch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lihua; Wang, Ping; Li, Mingjun; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Cuiying; Liang, Dong; Wu, Shan; Ma, Xinli; Li, Chao; Zou, Yangjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-05-01

    We examined whether exogenously applied melatonin could improve resistance to Marssonina apple blotch (Diplocarpon mali) by apple [Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh. cv. Donghongguo]. This serious disease leads to premature defoliation in the main regions of apple production. When plants were pretreated with melatonin, resistance was increased in the leaves. We investigated the potential roles for melatonin in modulating levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well the activities of antioxidant enzymes and pathogenesis-related proteins during these plant-pathogen interactions. Pretreatment enabled plants to maintain intracellular H2O2 concentrations at steady-state levels and enhance the activities of plant defence-related enzymes, possibly improving disease resistance. Because melatonin is safe and beneficial to animals and humans, exogenous pretreatment might represent a promising cultivation strategy to protect plants against this pathogen infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Melatonin improves bone mineral density at the femoral neck in postmenopausal women with osteopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Anne Kristine; Sikjaer, Tanja; Heickendorff, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is known for its regulation of circadian rhythm. Recently, studies have shown that melatonin may have a positive effect on the skeleton. By increasing age, the melatonin levels decrease, which may lead to a further imbalanced bone remodeling. We aimed to investigate whether treatment...... with melatonin could improve bone mass and integrity in humans. In a double-blind RCT, we randomized 81 postmenopausal osteopenic women to 1-yr nightly treatment with melatonin 1 mg (N = 20), 3 mg (N = 20), or placebo (N = 41). At baseline and after 1-yr treatment, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) by dual...... X-ray absorptiometry, quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and high-resolution peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT) and determined calciotropic hormones and bone markers. Mean age of the study subjects was 63 (range 56-73) yr. Compared to placebo, femoral neck BMD increased by 1.4% in response to melatonin...

  9. Metformin and Its Sulfenamide Prodrugs Inhibit Human Cholinesterase Activity

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    Magdalena Markowicz-Piasecka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of epidemiological and pathophysiological studies suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may predispose to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The two conditions present similar glucose levels, insulin resistance, and biochemical etiologies such as inflammation and oxidative stress. The diabetic state also contributes to increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, which is one of the factors leading to neurodegeneration in AD. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the effects of metformin, phenformin, and metformin sulfenamide prodrugs on the activity of human AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE and establish the type of inhibition. Metformin inhibited 50% of the AChE activity at micromolar concentrations (2.35 μmol/mL, mixed type of inhibition and seemed to be selective towards AChE since it presented low anti-BuChE activity. The tested metformin prodrugs inhibited cholinesterases (ChE at nanomolar range and thus were more active than metformin or phenformin. The cyclohexyl sulfenamide prodrug demonstrated the highest activity towards both AChE (IC50 = 890 nmol/mL, noncompetitive inhibition and BuChE (IC50 = 28 nmol/mL, mixed type inhibition, while the octyl sulfenamide prodrug did not present anti-AChE activity, but exhibited mixed inhibition towards BuChE (IC50 = 184 nmol/mL. Therefore, these two bulkier prodrugs were concluded to be the most selective compounds for BuChE over AChE. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that biguanides present a novel class of inhibitors for AChE and BuChE and encourages further studies of these compounds for developing both selective and nonselective inhibitors of ChEs in the future.

  10. Cadmium inhibits human DNA mismatch repair in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzen, Anne; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2004-01-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a human carcinogen that inhibits DNA repair activities. We show that DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-mediated cell cycle arrest after alkylation damage is suppressed by exposure to Cd and that this effect is reversed by preincubation with excess of zinc (Zn). We show that Cd-mediated inactivation of MMR activity is not caused by disruption of complex formation between the MMR proteins hEXO1-hMutSα and hEXO1-hMutLα nor does Cd inhibit 5'-exonuclease activity of hEXO1 in vitro. Thus, our studies show that exposure of human cells to Cd suppresses MMR activity, a repair activity known to play an important role in colon cancer and that this effect can be reversed by Zn treatment

  11. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  12. Melatonin as a potential anticarcinogen for non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Wang, Dongjin; Di, Shouyin; Hu, Wei; Liu, Dong; Li, Xiaofei; Reiter, Russel J.; Yan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Melatonin, an indoleamine discovered in the pineal gland, exerts pleiotropic anticancer effects against a variety of cancer types. In particular, melatonin may be an important anticancer drug in the treatment of NSCLC. Herein, we review the correlation between the disruption of the melatonin rhythm and NSCLC incidence; we also evaluate the evidence related to the effects of melatonin in inhibiting lung carcinogenesis. Special focus is placed on the oncostatic effects of melatonin, including anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of invasion and metastasis, and enhancement of immunomodulation. We suggest the drug synergy of melatonin with radio- or chemotherapy for NSCLC could prove to be useful. Taken together, the information complied herein may serve as a comprehensive reference for the anticancer mechanisms of melatonin against NSCLC, and may be helpful for the design of future experimental research and for advancing melatonin as a therapeutic agent for NSCLC. PMID:27102150

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 2 inhibits ghrelin secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Kerem; Hagemann, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    drop in ghrelin levels are poorly understood. In the present study we addressed, whether (1) exogenous GLP-2 administration decreases ghrelin levels and (2) what other endogenous factors are related to ghrelin secretion under fasting conditions. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifteen healthy male volunteers...... contrast, there was no detectable association between fasting ghrelin levels and the ambient concentrations of glucagon or intact GLP-2. CONCLUSIONS: GLP-2 inhibits ghrelin secretion in humans at plasma levels of approximately 200 pmol/l. However, the physiological...

  14. Aspirin inhibits human telomerase activation in unstable carotid plaques

    OpenAIRE

    LI, FANGMING; GUO, YI; JIANG, XIN; ZHONG, JIANXIN; LI, GUANDONG; SUN, SHENGGANG

    2013-01-01

    The activation of telomerase in unstable plaques is an important factor in atherosclerosis, and may be predictive of the risk of cerebrovascular diseases. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a subunit of telomerase that is essential for telomerase activation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether aspirin inhibits the activation of telomerase and hTERT in unstable carotid plaques. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) derived from carotid plaques were isolated fr...

  15. IL-17 inhibits chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineages, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Here we investigated the effects of IL-17, a key cytokine in chronic inflammation, on chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. METHODS: Human bone marrow MSCs were pellet cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing TGF-β3. Chondrogenic differentiation was detected by cartilage matrix accumulation and chondrogenic marker gene expression. RESULTS: Over-expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic marker genes was noted in chondrogenic cultures, but was inhibited by IL-17 in a dose-dependent manner. Expression and phosphorylation of SOX9, the master transcription factor for chondrogenesis, were induced within 2 days and phosphorylated SOX9 was stably maintained until day 21. IL-17 did not alter total SOX9 expression, but significantly suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. At day 7, IL-17 also suppressed the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA, which is known to phosphorylate SOX9. H89, a selective PKA inhibitor, also suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation, expression of chondrogenic markers and cartilage matrix, and also decreased chondrogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17 inhibited chondrogenesis of human MSCs through the suppression of PKA activity and SOX9 phosphorylation. These results suggest that chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs can be inhibited by a mechanism triggered by IL-17 under chronic inflammation.

  16. Melatonin rescues cardiovascular dysfunction during hypoxic development in the chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Nozomi; Skeffington, Katie L; Beck, Christian; Niu, Youguo; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-01-01

    There is a search for rescue therapy against fetal origins of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy complicated by chronic fetal hypoxia, particularly following clinical diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Melatonin protects the placenta in adverse pregnancy; however, whether melatonin protects the fetal heart and vasculature in hypoxic pregnancy independent of effects on the placenta is unknown. Whether melatonin can rescue fetal cardiovascular dysfunction when treatment commences following FGR diagnosis is also unknown. We isolated the effects of melatonin on the developing cardiovascular system of the chick embryo during hypoxic incubation. We tested the hypothesis that melatonin directly protects the fetal cardiovascular system in adverse development and that it can rescue dysfunction following FGR diagnosis. Chick embryos were incubated under normoxia or hypoxia (14% O2) from day 1 ± melatonin treatment (1 mg/kg/day) from day 13 of incubation (term ~21 days). Melatonin in hypoxic chick embryos rescued cardiac systolic dysfunction, impaired cardiac contractility and relaxability, increased cardiac sympathetic dominance, and endothelial dysfunction in peripheral circulations. The mechanisms involved included reduced oxidative stress, enhanced antioxidant capacity and restored vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and NO bioavailability. Melatonin treatment of the chick embryo starting at day 13 of incubation, equivalent to ca. 25 wk of gestation in human pregnancy, rescues early origins of cardiovascular dysfunction during hypoxic development. Melatonin may be a suitable antioxidant candidate for translation to human therapy to protect the fetal cardiovascular system in adverse pregnancy. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Melatonin-induced increase in sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to sorafenib is associated with reactive oxygen species production and mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Ordóñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; Méndez-Blanco, Carolina; Baulies, Anna; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Mauriz, José L; González-Gallego, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Effects of sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are frequently transient due to tumor-acquired resistance, a phenotype that could be targeted by other molecules to reduce this adaptive response. Because melatonin is known to exert antitumor effects in HCC cells, this study investigated whether and how melatonin reduces resistance to sorafenib. Susceptibility to sorafenib (10 nmol/L to 50 μmol/L) in the presence of melatonin (1 and 2 mmol/L) was assessed in HCC cell lines HepG2, HuH7, and Hep3B. Cell viability was reduced by sorafenib from 1 μmol/L in HepG2 or HuH7 cells, and 2.5 μmol/L in Hep3B cells. Co-administration of melatonin and sorafenib exhibited a synergistic cytotoxic effect on HepG2 and HuH7 cells, while Hep3B cells displayed susceptibility to doses of sorafenib that had no effect when administrated alone. Co-administration of 2.5 μmol/L sorafenib and 1 mmol/L melatonin induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells, increasing PARP hydrolysis and BAX expression. We also observed an early colocalization of mitochondria with lysosomes, correlating with the expression of mitophagy markers PINK1 and Parkin and a reduction of mitofusin-2 and mtDNA compared with sorafenib administration alone. Moreover, increased reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization were elicited by drug combination, suggesting their contribution to mitophagy induction. Interestingly, Parkin silencing by siRNA to impair mitophagy significantly reduced cell killing, PARP cleavage, and BAX expression. These results demonstrate that the pro-oxidant capacity of melatonin and its impact on mitochondria stability and turnover via mitophagy increase sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of sorafenib. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  19. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  20. Melatonin attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Zichuan; Hu, Xuanyang; Wang, Liangliang; Shi, Jiawei; Tao, Yunxia; Wu, Xiexing; Hou, Zhenyang; Guo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Wang, Zhirong; Geng, Dechun

    2017-03-15

    Wear debris-induced inhibition of bone regeneration and extensive bone resorption were common features in peri-prosthetic osteolysis (PPO). Here, we investigated the effect of melatonin on titanium particle-stimulated osteolysis in a murine calvariae model and mouse-mesenchymal-stem cells (mMSCs) culture system. Melatonin inhibited titanium particle-induced osteolysis and increased bone formation at osteolytic sites, confirmed by radiological and histomorphometric data. Furthermore, osteoclast numbers decreased dramatically in the low- and high-melatonin administration mice, as respectively, compared with the untreated animals. Melatonin alleviated titanium particle-induced depression of osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in mMSCs. Mechanistically, melatonin was found to reduce the degradation of β-catenin, levels of which were decreased in presence of titanium particles both in vivo and in vitro. To further ensure whether the protective effect of melatonin was mediated by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, ICG-001, a selective β-catenin inhibitor, was added to the melatonin-treated groups and was found to attenuate the effect of melatonin on mMSC mineralization. We also demonstrated that melatonin modulated the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings strongly suggest that melatonin represents a promising candidate in the treatment of PPO. Peri-prosthetic osteolysis, initiated by wear debris-induced inhibition of bone regeneration and extensive bone resorption, is the leading cause for implant failure and reason for revision surgery. In the current study, we demonstrated for the first time that melatonin can induce bone regeneration and reduce bone resorption at osteolytic sites caused by titanium-particle stimulation. These effects might be mediated by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and enhancing osteogenic

  1. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U- 14 C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production

  2. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC

  3. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  4. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Melatonin prevents experimental preterm labor and increases offspring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Sordelli, Micaela S; Salazar, Ana I; Aisemberg, Julieta; Bariani, María V; Cella, Maximiliano; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Franchi, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Preterm delivery is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and contributes to delayed physical and cognitive development in children. At present, there is no efficient therapy to prevent preterm labor. A large body of evidence suggests that intra-amniotic infections may be a significant and potentially preventable cause of preterm birth. This work assessed the effect of melatonin in a murine model of inflammation-associated preterm delivery which mimics central features of preterm infection in humans. For this purpose, preterm labor was induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 10.00 hr (10 μg LPS) and 13.00 hr (20 μg LPS) on day 15 of pregnancy. On day 14 of pregnancy, a pellet of melatonin (25 mg) had been subcutaneously implanted into a group of animals. In the absence of melatonin, a 100% incidence of preterm birth was observed in LPS-treated animals, and the fetuses showed widespread damage. By comparison, treatment with melatonin prevented preterm birth in 50% of the cases, and all pups from melatonin-treated females were born alive and their body weight did not differ from control animals. Melatonin significantly prevented the LPS-induced rises in uterine prostaglandin (PG) E2 , PGF2α, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. In addition, melatonin prevented the LPS-induced increase in uterine nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. Collectively, our results suggest that melatonin could be a new therapeutic tool to prevent preterm labor and to increase offspring survival. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of oral melatonin on the electroretinogram cone response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosolen Serge G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the eye, melatonin plays a role in promoting light sensitivity at night and modulating many aspects of circadian retinal physiology. It is also an inhibitor of retinal dopamine, which is a promoter of day vision through the cone system. Consequently, it is possible that oral melatonin (an inhibitor of retinal dopamine taken to alleviate circadian disorders may affect cone functioning. Our aim was to assess the impact of melatonin on the cone response of the human retina using electroretinography (ERG. Methods Twelve healthy participants aged between 18 to 52 years old were submitted to a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover, and counterbalanced-order design. The subjects were tested on 2 sessions beginning first with a baseline ERG, followed by the administration of the placebo or melatonin condition and then, 30 min later, a second ERG to test the effect. Results Following oral melatonin administration, a significant decrease of about 8% of the cone maximal response was observed (mean 6.9 μV ± SEM 2.0; P = 0.0065 along with a prolonged b-wave implicit time of 0.4 ms ± 0.1, 50 minutes after ingestion. Conclusion Oral melatonin appears to reach the eye through the circulation. When it is administered at a time of day when it is not usually present, melatonin appears to reduce input to retinal cones. We believe that the impact of melatonin on retinal function should be taken into consideration when used without supervision in chronic self-medication for sleep or circadian disorder treatment.

  7. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Semak, Igor; Kim, Tae-Kang; Janjetovic, Zorica; Slominski, Radomir M; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2017-11-01

    The skin being a protective barrier between external and internal (body) environments has the sensory and adaptive capacity to maintain local and global body homeostasis in response to noxious factors. An important part of the skin response to stress is its ability for melatonin synthesis and subsequent metabolism through the indolic and kynuric pathways. Indeed, melatonin and its metabolites have emerged as indispensable for physiological skin functions and for effective protection of a cutaneous homeostasis from hostile environmental factors. Moreover, they attenuate the pathological processes including carcinogenesis and other hyperproliferative/inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, mitochondria appear to be a central hub of melatonin metabolism in the skin cells. Furthermore, substantial evidence has accumulated on the protective role of the melatonin against ultraviolet radiation and the attendant mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin and its metabolites appear to have a modulatory impact on mitochondrion redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, as well as the anti-apoptotic effects. Of note, some metabolites exhibit even greater impact than melatonin alone. Herein, we emphasize that melatonin-mitochondria axis would control integumental functions designed to protect local and perhaps global homeostasis. Given the phylogenetic origin and primordial actions of melatonin, we propose that the melatonin-related mitochondrial functions represent an evolutionary conserved mechanism involved in cellular adaptive response to skin injury and repair.

  8. Melatonin effects on luteinizing hormone in postmenopausal women: a pilot clinical trial NCT00288262

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline Lawrence E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many mammals, the duration of the nocturnal melatonin elevation regulates seasonal changes in reproductive hormones such as luteinizing hormone (LH. Melatonin's effects on human reproductive endocrinology are uncertain. It is thought that the same hypothalamic pulse generator may both trigger the pulsatile release of GnRH and LH and also cause hot flashes. Thus, if melatonin suppressed this pulse generator in postmenopausal women, it might moderate hot flashes. This clinical trial tested the hypothesis that melatonin could suppress LH and relieve hot flashes. Methods Twenty postmenopausal women troubled by hot flashes underwent one week of baseline observation followed by 4 weeks of a randomized controlled trial of melatonin or matched placebo. The three randomized treatments were melatonin 0.5 mg 2.5–3 hours before bedtime, melatonin 0.5 mg upon morning awakening, or placebo capsules. Twelve of the women were admitted to the GCRC at baseline and at the end of randomized treatment for 24-hour sampling of blood for LH. Morning urine samples were collected twice weekly to measure LH excretion. Subjective responses measured throughout baseline and treatment included sleep and hot flash logs, the CESD and QIDS depression self-ratings, and the SAFTEE physical symptom inventory. Results Urinary LH tended to increase from baseline to the end of treatment. Contrasts among the 3 randomized groups were statistically marginal, but there was relative suppression combining the groups given melatonin as contrasted to the placebo group (p Conclusion The data are consistent with the hypothesis that melatonin suppresses LH in postmenopausal women. An effect related to the duration of nocturnal melatonin elevation is suggested. Effects of melatonin on reproductive endocrinology should be studied further in younger women and in men. Larger studies of melatonin effects on postmenopausal symptoms would be worthwhile.

  9. Lipoxygenase-mediated pro-radical effect of melatonin via stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, F.; Sestili, P.; Martinelli, C.; Paolillo, M.; Paternoster, L.; Albertini, M.C.; Accorsi, A.; Gualandi, G.; Ghibelli, L.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that melatonin immediately and transiently stimulates intracellular free radical production on a set of leukocytes, possibly as a consequence of calmodulin binding. We show here that melatonin-induced ROS are produced by lipoxygenase (LOX), since they are prevented by a set of LOX inhibitors, and are accompanied by increase of the 5-LOX product 5-HETE. LOX activation is accompanied by strong liberation of AA; inhibition of Ca 2+ -independent, but not Ca 2+ -dependent, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), prevents both melatonin-induced arachidonic acid and ROS production, whereas LOX inhibition only prevents ROS, indicating that PLA2 is upstream with respect to LOX, as occurs in many signaling pathways. Chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of melatonin-calmodulin interaction, inhibits both ROS and arachidonic acid production, thus possibly placing calmodulin at the origin of a melatonin-induced pro-radical pathway. Interestingly, it is known that Ca 2+ -independent PLA2 binds to calmodulin: our results are compatible with PLA2 being liberated by melatonin from a steady-state calmodulin sequestration, thus initiating an arachidonate signal transduction. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway through which melatonin may participate to the inflammatory response.

  10. Coffee and caffeine potentiate the antiamyloidogenic activity of melatonin via inhibition of Aβ oligomerization and modulation of the Tau-mediated pathway in N2a/APP cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang LF

    2014-12-01

    , Akt, Tau, Wnt3α, β-catenin, and Nrf2 were detected by Western blot assay. The results showed that regimen 1 produced an additive antiamyloidogenic effect with significantly reduced extracellular levels of Aβ40/42 and Aβ42 oligomers. Regimen 2 did not result in remarkable effects, and regimen 3 showed a less antiamyloidogenic effect compared to regimen 1. Coff or Caff, plus Mel reduced oxidative stress in N2a/APP cells via the Nrf2 pathway. Coff or Caff, plus Mel inhibited GSK3β, Akt, PI3K p55, and Tau phosphorylation but enhanced PI3K p85 and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in N2a/APP cells. Coff or Caff, plus Mel downregulated Wnt3α expression but upregulated β-catenin. However, Coff or Caff plus Mel did not significantly alter the production of T helper cell (Th1-related interleukin (IL-12 and interferon (IFN-γ and Th2-related IL-4 and IL-10 in N2a/APP cells. The autophagy of cells was not affected by the combinations. Taken together, combination of Caff or Coff, before treatment with Mel elicits an additive antiamyloidogenic effects in N2a/APP cells, probably through inhibition of Aβ oligomerization and modulation of the Akt/GSK3β/Tau signaling pathway.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, Aβ oligomer, coffee, caffeine, melatonin, Tau, Nrf2, chronotherapy, Akt

  11. Melatonin reduces noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction in the uterine artery of pregnant hooded seals (Cystophora cristata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokkan, Karl-Arne; Aarseth, Jo Jorem

    2004-01-01

    In pregnant seals the dive-associated constriction of the uterine artery is inhibited for unknown reasons. The seal fetus has an extremely large and active pineal gland, not found in any other mammals. We have investigated if the pineal hormone melatonin affects fetal blood supply during diving. Using isolated ring segments of the uterine artery from pregnant hooded seals (Cystophora cristata), we measured the change in isometric tension caused by noradrenaline (NA) with and without physiological concentrations of melatonin. Melatonin alone had no effects while NA increased the tension in a dose-dependent manner. The NA-induced tension was about 70% reduced by melatonin, but was completely recovered after washout of melatonin. These results indicate that the large and active pineal gland of the fetal seal may be involved in upholding maternal uterine blood flow during diving.

  12. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  13. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  14. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  15. Melatonin and serotonin effects on gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, P J; Krolczyk, G; Gil, K; Zurowski, D; Nowak, L

    2007-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents the most important extra pineal source of melatonin. Presence of melatonin (M) suggests that this hormone is somehow involved in digestive pathophysiology. Release of GI melatonin from serotonin-rich enterochromaffin EC cells of the GI mucosa suggest close antagonistic relationship with serotonin (S) and seem to be related to periodicity of food intake. Food deprivation resulted in an increase of tissue and plasma concentrations of M. Its also act as an autocrine and paracrine hormone affecting not only epithelium and immune system but also smooth muscle of the digestive tract. Low doses M improve gastrointestinal transit and affect MMC. M reinforce MMCs cyclic pattern but inhibits spiking bowel activity. Pharmacological doses of M delay gastric emptying via mechanisms that involve CCK2 and 5HT3 receptors. M released in response to lipid infusion exerts a modulatory influence that decreases the inhibitory effects of the ileal brake on gastric emptying. On isolated bowel S induces dose dependent increase in tone and reduction in amplitude of contraction which is affected by M. M reduced the tone but not amplitude or frequency of contraction. M is a promising therapeutic agent for IBS with activities independent of its effects on sleep, anxiety or depression. Since of its unique properties M could be considered for prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, gastric ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome.

  16. Effects of a chronic reduction of short-wavelength light input on melatonin and sleep patterns in humans: evidence for adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Marina C; Beersma, Domien G M; Bollen, Pauline; van der Linden, Matthijs L; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2014-06-01

    Light is an important environmental stimulus for the entrainment of the circadian clock and for increasing alertness. The intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells in the retina play an important role in transferring this light information to the circadian system and they are elicited in particular by short-wavelength light. Exposure to short wavelengths is reduced, for instance, in elderly people due to yellowing of the ocular lenses. This reduction may be involved in the disrupted circadian rhythms observed in aged subjects. Here, we tested the effects of reduced blue light exposure in young healthy subjects (n = 15) by using soft orange contact lenses (SOCL). We showed (as expected) that a reduction in the melatonin suppressing effect of light is observed when subjects wear the SOCL. However, after chronic exposure to reduced (short wavelength) light for two consecutive weeks we observed an increase in sensitivity of the melatonin suppression response. The response normalized as if it took place under a polychromatic light pulse. No differences were found in the dim light melatonin onset or in the amplitude of the melatonin rhythms after chronic reduced blue light exposure. The effects on sleep parameters were limited. Our results demonstrate that the non-visual light system of healthy young subjects is capable of adapting to changes in the spectral composition of environmental light exposure. The present results emphasize the importance of considering not only the short-term effects of changes in environmental light characteristics.

  17. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy.

  18. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  19. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori haemagglutination activity by human salivary mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, A; Tzouvelekis, L; Spiliadis, C; Blackwell, C C; Weir, D M

    1990-10-01

    Thirty isolates of Helicobacter pylori from gastric biopsies agglutinated human erythrocyte suspensions. Crude mucin preparations derived from saliva of 20 different donors were examined for their ability to inhibit haemagglutination. All mucin preparations exhibited strong inhibitory activity. Removal of sialic residues from mucin preparations by treatment with neuraminidase resulted in a substantial reduction of their inhibitory activity. The mucin preparations had no bactericidal or aggregation activity for H. pylori. These results are discussed in the context of the role of mucins in colonization of the gastric mucosa by H. pylori.

  20. Melatonin protects chondrocytes from impairment induced by glucocorticoids via NAD+-dependent SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Kang, Xiaomin; Qin, Na; Li, Feng; Jin, Xinxin; Ma, Zhengmin; Qian, Zhuang; Wu, Shufang

    2017-10-01

    Intra-articular injection of glucocorticoids is used to relieve pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis patients, which is occasionally accompanied with the serious side effects of glucocorticoids in collagen-producing tissue. Melatonin is the major hormone released from the pineal gland and its beneficial effects on cartilage has been suggested. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of melatonin on matrix degeneration in chondrocytes induced by dexamethasone (Dex). The chondrocytes isolated from mice knee joint were treated with Dex, melatonin, EX527 and siRNA targeted for SIRT6, respectively. Dex treatment induced the loss of the extracellular matrix, NAD + /NADH ratio and NADPH concentration in chondrocytes. Melatonin alone have no effect on the quantity of proteoglycans and collagen type IIa1, however, the pretreatment of melatonin reversed the negative effects induced by Dex. Meanwhile, the significant decrease in NAD + /NADH ratio and NADPH concentration in Dex group were up-regulated by pretreatment of melatonin. Furthermore, it was revealed that inhibition of SIRT1 blocked the protective effects of melatonin. The enhancement of NAD + -dependent SIRT1 activity contributes to the chondroprotecfive effects of melatonin, which has a great benefit to prevent dexamethasone-induced chondrocytes impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Melatonin increases survival of HaCaT keratinocytes by suppressing UV-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Zbytek, B; Sayre, R M; Apostolov, E O; Basnakian, A G; Sweatman, T W; Wortsman, J; Elsner, P; Slominski, A

    2006-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent antioxidant and direct radical scavenger. As keratinocytes represent the major population in the skin and UV light causes damage to these cells, the possible protective effects of melatonin against UV-induced cell damage in HaCaT keratinocytes were investigated in vitro. Cells were preincubated with melatonin at graded concentrations from 10(-9) to 10(-3) m for 30 min prior to UV irradiation at doses of 25 and 50 mJ/cm2. Biological markers of cellular viability such as DNA synthesis and colony-forming efficiency as well as molecular markers of apoptosis were measured. DNA synthesis was determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into insoluble cellular fraction, clonogenicity through plating efficiency experiments and apoptosis by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. DNA synthesis experiments showed a strong protective effect by preincubation with melatonin at concentrations of 10(-4) m (P UV incubation protective effect. These results indicate that preincubation is a requirement for melatonin to exert its protective effects. The mechanism of melatonin's protective effect (10(-6) to 10(-3) m) includes inhibition of apoptosis as measured by TUNEL assay. Moreover, the biological significance of these effects is supported by clonogenic studies showing a significantly higher number of colonies in cultures treated with melatonin compared to controls. Thus, pretreatment with melatonin led to strong protection against UVB-induced damage in keratinocytes.

  2. Placental melatonin system is present throughout pregnancy and regulates villous trophoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed; Lacasse, Andrée-Anne; Lanoix, Dave; Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Boulard, Véronique; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin is highly produced in the placenta where it protects against molecular damage and cellular dysfunction arising from hypoxia/re-oxygenation-induced oxidative stress as observed in primary cultures of syncytiotrophoblast. However, little is known about melatonin and its receptors in the human placenta throughout pregnancy and their role in villous trophoblast development. The purpose of this study was to determine melatonin-synthesizing enzymes, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), and melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) expression throughout pregnancy as well as the role of melatonin and its receptors in villous trophoblast syncytialization. Our data show that the melatonin generating system is expressed throughout pregnancy (from week 7 to term) in placental tissues. AANAT and HIOMT show maximal expression at the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. MT1 receptor expression is maximal at the 1st trimester compared to the 2nd and 3rd trimesters, while MT2 receptor expression does not change significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, during primary villous cytotrophoblast syncytialization, MT1 receptor expression increases, while MT2 receptor expression decreases. Treatment of primary villous cytotrophoblast with an increasing concentration of melatonin (10 pM-1 mM) increases the fusion index (syncytium formation; 21% augmentation at 1 mM melatonin vs. vehicle) and β-hCG secretion (121% augmentation at 1 mM melatonin vs. vehicle). This effect of melatonin appears to be mediated via its MT1 and MT2 receptors. In sum, melatonin machinery (synthetizing enzymes and receptors) is expressed in human placenta throughout pregnancy and promotes syncytium formation, suggesting an essential role of this indolamine in placental function and pregnancy well-being. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Melatonin, a possible promising panacea for premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Guo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is characterized by impairment of ovarian function unrelated to elevatedfollicle-stimulating hormone (FSH before the age of 40. The consequence of POF is severe and distinctive, presentingfrom infertility to symptoms caused by hormone deprivation. The mechanism of POF remains unclearand current treatments are therefore ineffective. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is a neuroendocrinalhormone chiefly secreted by the pineal body. Melatonin exerts extensive physiological and pharmacologicaleffects on the biological rhythm, oxidative stress, reproduction, autoimmune and tumourigenesis. However,current researches have not yet brought melatonin into the study of POF. In the present review, we have involvedstate-of-the-art research progress of melatonin in ovary with regard to oxidation, follicle formation and function,and ovarian autoimmune disorders since these aspects mainly dispose to POF development. The features thatmelatonin scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS, directly and indirectly induces follicle maturation, ovulationand inhibits apoptosis, and modulates autoimmune derangements in the ovaries are highly indicative that melatonincan effect in combating POF. Also, in this respect we have discussed the possibility of applying melatoninin the treatment of POF and have listed evidence of studies in vitro and in vivo. Vacant research directions aresubsequently suggested and the future application of melatonin in POF treatment is prospected.

  4. Melatonin, Light and Circadian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-25

    bifida occulta , and sarcoidosis, all show loss of the melatonin circadian rhythm, with psoriasis vulgaris, spina bifida occulta , and sarcoidosis...autonomic neuro- pathy show decreased nocturnal melatonin (Checkley and Palazidou, 1988). Klinefelter’s syndrome, Turners syndrome, psoriasis vulgaris, spina

  5. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling

  6. Aliphatic alcohols in spirits inhibit phagocytosis by human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, László; Árnyas, Ervin M; Bujdosó, Orsolya; Baranyi, Gergő; Rácz, Gábor; Ádány, Róza; McKee, Martin; Szűcs, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    A large volume of alcoholic beverages containing aliphatic alcohols is consumed worldwide. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of ethanol-induced immunosuppression in heavy drinkers, thereby increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, the aliphatic alcohols contained in alcoholic beverages might also impair immune cell function, thereby contributing to a further decrease in microbicidal activity. Previous research has shown that aliphatic alcohols inhibit phagocytosis by granulocytes but their effect on human monocytes has not been studied. This is important as they play a crucial role in engulfment and killing of pathogenic microorganisms and a decrease in their phagocytic activity could lead to impaired antimicrobial defence in heavy drinkers. The aim of this study was to measure monocyte phagocytosis following their treatment with those aliphatic alcohols detected in alcoholic beverages. Monocytes were separated from human peripheral blood and phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan particles by monocytes treated with ethanol and aliphatic alcohols individually and in combination was determined. It was shown that these alcohols could suppress the phagocytic activity of monocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and when combined with ethanol, they caused a further decrease in phagocytosis. Due to their additive effects, it is possible that they may inhibit phagocytosis in a clinically meaningful way in alcoholics and episodic heavy drinkers thereby contribute to their increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, further research is needed to address this question.

  7. Effects of melatonin and ethanol on the heart rate of Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kohn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, an endogenous hormone that may regulate circadian rhythms by modulating cholinergic activity, is increasing in popular use as a natural treatment for sleep disorders. However, the effects of melatonin on the human heart are not well characterized, and the consequences of combining alcohol with melatonin are unknown. The myogenic heart of the water flea Daphnia magna (D. magna is regulated by inhibitory cholinergic neurons that modulate cardiac function, including heart rate. D. magna is a useful model organism for cardiovascular function, due to its physical transparency and susceptibility to cardioactive drugs known to affect the human heart. In this study, the effects of immersion in 10 mg/L melatonin and 5% ethanol on the heart rate of D. magna were quantified. Two-hour exposure to melatonin caused a significant decrease in heart rate, from 228 ± 2 bpm to 167 ± 8 bpm. Six-minute immersion in ethanol also significantly depressed the heart rate to 176 ± 10 bpm. Pretreatment with melatonin prior to the addition of ethanol resulted in a greater decrease in heart rate (89 ± 7 bpm than ethanol or melatonin alone. These findings indicate that melatonin and alcohol may combine to cause a greater depressive effect on cardiac function.

  8. The modulatory effect of substance P on rat pineal norepinephrine release and melatonin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukda, Sujira; Møller, Morten; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2009-01-01

    Secretion of melatonin by the mammalian pineal gland is primarily regulated by the release of norepinephrine (NE) from sympathetic nerve terminals that originate from the superior cervical ganglia. Peptidergic nerves that originate in the perikarya located in the sensory trigeminal ganglia also...... or melatonin secretion in rat pineal organ cultures. However, in the presence of NE, substance P inhibited the NE-induced increase in AANAT activity and melatonin secretion. This is the first time that a function for substance P in the mammalian pineal gland has been demonstrated....

  9. Amplitude reduction and phase shifts of melatonin, cortisol and other circadian rhythms after a gradual advance of sleep and light exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Duffy, Jeanne F; Silva, Edward J; Shanahan, Theresa L; Boivin, Diane B; Czeisler, Charles A

    2012-01-01

    The phase and amplitude of rhythms in physiology and behavior are generated by circadian oscillators and entrained to the 24-h day by exposure to the light-dark cycle and feedback from the sleep-wake cycle. The extent to which the phase and amplitude of multiple rhythms are similarly affected during altered timing of light exposure and the sleep-wake cycle has not been fully characterized. We assessed the phase and amplitude of the rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, cortisol, alertness, performance and sleep after a perturbation of entrainment by a gradual advance of the sleep-wake schedule (10 h in 5 days) and associated light-dark cycle in 14 healthy men. The light-dark cycle consisted either of moderate intensity 'room' light (∼90-150 lux) or moderate light supplemented with bright light (∼10,000 lux) for 5 to 8 hours following sleep. After the advance of the sleep-wake schedule in moderate light, no significant advance of the melatonin rhythm was observed whereas, after bright light supplementation the phase advance was 8.1 h (SEM 0.7 h). Individual differences in phase shifts correlated across variables. The amplitude of the melatonin rhythm assessed under constant conditions was reduced after moderate light by 54% (17-94%) and after bright light by 52% (range 12-84%), as compared to the amplitude at baseline in the presence of a sleep-wake cycle. Individual differences in amplitude reduction of the melatonin rhythm correlated with the amplitude of body temperature, cortisol and alertness. Alterations in the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and associated bright or moderate light exposure can lead to changes in phase and reduction of circadian amplitude which are consistent across multiple variables but differ between individuals. These data have implications for our understanding of circadian organization and the negative health outcomes associated with shift-work, jet-lag and exposure to artificial light.

  10. New developments in the treatment of primary insomnia in elderly patients: focus on prolonged-release melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigo DE

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel P Cardinali, María F Vidal, Daniel E VigoDepartment of Teaching and Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: A temporal relationship between the nocturnal rise in melatonin secretion and the increase in sleep propensity at the beginning of the night, coupled with the sleep-promoting effects of exogenous melatonin, indicate that melatonin is involved in the regulation of sleep. This action is attributed to the MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and other brain areas. The sleep-promoting actions of melatonin, which are demonstrable in healthy humans, have been found to be useful in subjects suffering from circadian rhythm sleep disorders and in elderly patients, who had low nocturnal melatonin production and secretion. The effectiveness of melatonin in treating sleep disturbances in these patients is relevant because the sleep-promoting compounds that are usually prescribed, such as benzodiazepines and related drugs, have many adverse effects, such as next-day hangover, dependence, and impairment of memory. Melatonin has been used for improving sleep in patients with insomnia mainly because it does not cause any hangover or show any addictive potential. However, there is a lack of consistency concerning its therapeutic value (partly because of its short half-life and the small quantities of melatonin used. Thus, attention has been focused either on the development of more potent melatonin analogs with prolonged effects or on the design of slow-release melatonin preparations. A prolonged-release preparation of melatonin 2 mg (Circadin® has been approved for the treatment of primary insomnia in patients aged ≥55 years in the European Union. This prolonged-release preparation of melatonin had no effect on psychomotor functions, memory recall, or driving skills during the night or the next morning relative to placebo

  11. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, K i , and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH 4 , binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  12. Kinetic, thermodynamic and X-ray structural insights into the interaction of melatonin and analogues with quinone reductase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamini, Barbara; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (UIC)

    2008-09-12

    Melatonin exerts its biological effects through at least two transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, and a lower-affinity cytosolic binding site, designated MT3. MT3 has recently been identified as QR2 (quinone reductase 2) (EC 1.10.99.2) which is of significance since it links the antioxidant effects of melatonin to a mechanism of action. Initially, QR2 was believed to function analogously to QR1 in protecting cells from highly reactive quinones. However, recent studies indicate that QR2 may actually transform certain quinone substrates into more highly reactive compounds capable of causing cellular damage. Therefore it is hypothesized that inhibition of QR2 in certain cases may lead to protection of cells against these highly reactive species. Since melatonin is known to inhibit QR2 activity, but its binding site and mode of inhibition are not known, we determined the mechanism of inhibition of QR2 by melatonin and a series of melatonin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) analogues, and we determined the X-ray structures of melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin in complex with QR2 to between 1.5 and 1.8 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) resolution. Finally, the thermodynamic binding constants for melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin were determined by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry). The kinetic results indicate that melatonin is a competitive inhibitor against N-methyldihydronicotinamide (K{sub i} = 7.2 {mu}M) and uncompetitive against menadione (K{sub i} = 92 {mu}M), and the X-ray structures shows that melatonin binds in multiple orientations within the active sites of the QR2 dimer as opposed to an allosteric site. These results provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of melatonin and analogues to QR2.

  13. Kinetic, thermodynamic and X-ray structural insights into the interaction of melatonin and analogues with quinone reductase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamini, Barbara; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2008-07-01

    Melatonin exerts its biological effects through at least two transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, and a lower-affinity cytosolic binding site, designated MT3. MT3 has recently been identified as QR2 (quinone reductase 2) (EC 1.10.99.2) which is of significance since it links the antioxidant effects of melatonin to a mechanism of action. Initially, QR2 was believed to function analogously to QR1 in protecting cells from highly reactive quinones. However, recent studies indicate that QR2 may actually transform certain quinone substrates into more highly reactive compounds capable of causing cellular damage. Therefore it is hypothesized that inhibition of QR2 in certain cases may lead to protection of cells against these highly reactive species. Since melatonin is known to inhibit QR2 activity, but its binding site and mode of inhibition are not known, we determined the mechanism of inhibition of QR2 by melatonin and a series of melatonin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) analogues, and we determined the X-ray structures of melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin in complex with QR2 to between 1.5 and 1.8 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. Finally, the thermodynamic binding constants for melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin were determined by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry). The kinetic results indicate that melatonin is a competitive inhibitor against N-methyldihydronicotinamide (K(i)=7.2 microM) and uncompetitive against menadione (K(i)=92 microM), and the X-ray structures shows that melatonin binds in multiple orientations within the active sites of the QR2 dimer as opposed to an allosteric site. These results provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of melatonin and analogues to QR2.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin on soluble Aβ1-42-induced cortical neurodegeneration via Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunli; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Shuman; Ren, Lili; Lv, Yiheng; Yin, Rui; Bi, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Soluble Aβ 1-42 oligomers play a vital role in the development and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Melatonin could delay the progress of AD through multiple mechanisms. Reelin-Dab1 signaling plays an important role in AD, including neuronal function and synaptic plasticity. However, whether melatonin could exert its neuroprotective function against soluble Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity during AD development through regulating Reelin-Dab1 signaling remains poorly understood. AD rat model was established by soluble Aβ 1-42 repeated intracerebroventricular injection. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses, the effect of melatonin on synaptic plasticity, neuritic degeneration, and astrocyte activation was investigated in cerebral cortex. Meanwhile, the expression of Reelin and Dab1 was also examined in cerebral cortex. In our in vitro study, Reelin-Dab1 signaling was inhibited by Reelin antibody, and neuroprotective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 was further determined. Melatonin ameliorated the neurotoxiciy and astrocyte activation induced by Aβ 1-42 in the cerebral cortex. Melatonin also blocked the reduction in Reelin and Dab1 expression induced by Aβ 1-42 . Using in vitro study, Reelin inactivation completely abolished the protective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity. Melatonin might play its neuroprotective role against Aβ 1-42 through mediating Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway. Melatonin could be a safe and remarkable therapeutic candidate for AD and other aged-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Radogna, Flavia

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10-9 vs. 10-5M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10-5M, but drops to 10-9M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  16. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr 51 Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function

  17. Dexamethasone inhibits IL-9 production by human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormont Francoise

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 9 (IL-9 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells. Its effects include stimulation of mucus production, enhanced mast cell proliferation, enhanced eosinophil function, and IgE production. These effects are consistent with a role in allergic diseases. Glucocorticoids have potent anti-inflammatory effects, including suppression of cytokine synthesis, and are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions. Methods We examined the effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex on IL-9 mRNA expression and protein secretion with real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were prepared from human volunteers and activated with OKT3. CD4+ T cells were purified from PBMC and activated with OKT3 plus PMA. Results IL-9 mRNA abundance and protein secretion were both markedly reduced following treatment of activated PBMC with Dex. mRNA levels were reduced to 0.7% of control values and protein secretion was reduced to 2.8% of controls. In CD4+ T cells, Dex reduced protein secretion to a similar extent. The IC50 value of Dex on mRNA expression was 4 nM. Conclusion These results indicate that IL-9 production is very markedly inhibited by Dex. The findings raise the possibility that the beneficial effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of allergic diseases are in part mediated by inhibition of IL-9 production.

  18. Oxymetazoline inhibits and resolves inflammatory reactions in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Speier, Ingrid; Oswald, Barbara; Maier, Konrad L; Karg, Erwin; Ramseger, René

    2009-07-01

    The nasal decongestant oxymetazoline (OMZ) exhibits anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties (I. Beck-Speier et al., J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2006;316:842-851). In a follow up study, we hypothesized that OMZ generates pro-resolving lipoxins being paralleled by production of immune-modulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and anti-inflammatory 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE] and depletion of pro-inflammatory leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). Human neutrophils (PMN) were chosen as the cellular system. The effect of OMZ on these parameters as well as on respiratory burst activity and oxidative stress marker 8-isprostane was analyzed in unstimulated and co-stimulated PMN by ultrafine carbon particles (UCP) or opsonized zymosan (OZ), respectively. In unstimulated cells, OMZ induced formation of PGE(2), 15(S)-HETE, and LXA(4). The levels of LTB(4) and 8-isoprostane were not affected, whereas respiratory burst activity was drastically inhibited. In UCP- and OZ-stimulated control cells, all parameters were elevated. Here, OMZ maintained the increased levels of PGE(2), 15(S)-HETE, and LXA(4), but substantially suppressed levels of LTB(4) and 8-isoprostane and inhibited the respiratory burst activity. These findings suggest a switch from the pro-inflammatory eicosanoid class LTB(4) to the pro-resolving LXA(4). Since LXA(4) is most relevant in returning inflamed tissue to homeostasis, OMZ is postulated to terminate rhinitis-related inflammation, thus contributing to shortening of disease duration.

  19. Amniotic membrane inhibits squamous metaplasia of human conjunctival epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yehui; Qiu, Fangfang; Qu, Yang-Luowa; Li, Cheng; Shao, Yi; Xiao, Qiguo; Liu, Zuguo; Li, Wei

    2011-07-01

    Squamous metaplasia is a common pathological process that occurs in the ocular surface epithelium. At present, there is no effective treatment for this abnormality. In the current study, we established an ex vivo conjunctival squamous metaplasia model by culturing human conjunctival tissues at an air-liquid interface for durations of up to 12 days. We then investigated the effects of amniotic membrane (AM) on squamous metaplasia through coculture of conjunctival tissues with AM or AM extract. We found that metaplasia features such as hyperproliferation and abnormal epidermal differentiation of conjunctival epithelium could be inhibited by AM or its extract. In addition, existing squamous metaplasia of conjunctival epithelium could be reversed to a nearly normal phenotype by AM. The mechanism by which AM prevents squamous metaplasia may involve downregulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and Wnt signaling pathways, which were activated in conjunctival explants cultured with an airlift technique. In conclusion, AM can inhibit and reverse squamous metaplasia of conjunctival epithelium. This finding may shed new light on prevention and treatment of diseases that involve epithelial squamous metaplasia.

  20. Involvement of the nitric oxide in melatonin-mediated protection against injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenguo; He, Yifan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gu, Wenzhen; Wu, Zhi; Zhu, Xiao; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2018-05-01

    Melatonin is a hormone mainly synthesized by the pineal gland in vertebrates and known well as an endogenous regulator of circadian and seasonal rhythms. It has been demonstrated that melatonin is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes showing antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions. Accumulating evidence has clearly revealed that melatonin regulates NO/NOS system through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This article reviews the latest evidence for the effects of melatonin on NO/NOS regulation in different organs and disease conditions, the potential cellular mechanisms by which melatonin is involved in organ protection are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radioimmunoassay of serum concentrations of melatonin in sheep exposed to different lighting regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollag, M.D.; Niswender, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    A specific and sensitive double-antibody radioimmunoassay for melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) was developed. The least detectable concentration of melatonin standard was 10 pmolar (2.3 pg/tube) with 50 percent inhibition resulting when the concentration was 100 pmolar (23 pg/tube). Inhibition curves obtained with increasing quantities of melatonin or increasing quantities of chloroform extracts of ovine sera were parallel. Concentrations of melatonin could be accurately determined when 31 to 1000 pg were added to 1 ml ovine serum. Serum samples with melatonin concentrations of 1000 pg/ml, 500 pg/ml and 75 pg/ml had intra-assay coefficients of variation of 9.1 percent, 8.6 percent, and 17.4 percent, respectively. The respective inter-assay coefficients of variation were 22.7 percent, 18.1 percent, and 37.1 percent. Ewes exposed to a 12 h light:12 h dark lighting regimen demonstrated a circadian rhythm in serum concentrations of melatonin. Concentrations ranged from 10 to 30 pg/ml during periods of light to 100 to 300 pg/ml during periods of dark. During exposure to continuous light, the circadian rhythm was abolished and concentrations of melatonin were maintained at 10 to 50 pg/ml. When exposed to conditions of continuous dark the circadian rhythm persisted. A precipitous drop in serum concentrations of melatonin resulted when ewes experiencing peak melatonin concentrations were exposed to light. Concentrations returned to peak levels when the lights were turned off 3.5 h later

  2. Astaxanthin inhibits gemcitabine-resistant human pancreatic cancer progression through EMT inhibition and gemcitabine resensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Li, Hai-Ying; Wu, Jian-Song; Niu, Qiang; Duan, Wei-Hong; Han, Qing-Zeng; Ji, Wang-Ming; Zhang, Tao; Lv, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer rapidly acquires resistance to chemotherapy resulting in its being difficult to treat. Gemcitabine is the current clinical chemotherapy strategy; however, owing to gemcitabine resistance, it is only able to prolong the life of patients with pancreatic cancer for a limited number of months. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of gemcitabine resistance and selecting a suitable combination of agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is required. Astaxanthin (ASX) is able to resensitize gemcitabine-resistant human pancreatic cancer cells (GR-HPCCs) to gemcitabine. ASX was identified to upregulate human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) and downregulate ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase (RRM) 1 and 2 to enhance gemcitabine-induced cell death in GR-HPCCs treated with gemcitabine, and also downregulates TWIST1 and ZEB1 to inhibit the gemcitabine-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in GR-HPCCs and to mediate hENT1, RRM1 and RRM2. Furthermore, ASX acts through the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway to mediate TWIST1, ZEB1, hENT1, RRM1 and RRM2, regulating the gemcitabine-induced EMT phenotype and gemcitabine-induced cell death. Co-treatment with ASX and gemcitabine in a tumor xenograft model induced by GR-HPCCs supported the in vitro results. The results of the present study provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  3. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, Flavia; Paternoster, Laura; De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia; Ammendola, Sergio; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria; Ghibelli, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  4. Biological functions of melatonin in relation to pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Luengtrakoon, Kirawut; Wannakasemsuk, Worraned; Vichitrananda, Vilasinee; Klanrit, Poramaporn; Hormdee, Doosadee; Noisombut, Rajda

    2017-07-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is considered as a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated disease causing oral mucosal damage and ulcerations. Accumulated data support the involvement of cell-mediated immune dysfunction in the development of OLP. However, the connection between neuroendocrine system and oral immune response in OLP patients has never been clarified. Melatonin is considered as a major chronobiotic hormone produced mainly by the pineal gland. This gland is recognized as a regulator of circadian rhythm and a sensor in the immune response through the NF-kB transduction pathway. It was suggested that pineal-derived melatonin and extra-pineal melatonin synthesized at the site of inflamed lesion might play a role in inflammatory response. According to our immunohistochemical study, expression of melatonin could be detected in human oral mucosa. In addition, increased levels of melatonin were observed in inflamed oral mucosa of OLP patients. We hypothesize that chronic inflammation possibly induces the local biosynthesis of melatonin in inflamed oral mucosa. We also speculate that melatonin in oral mucosa may play a cytoprotective role through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Moreover, melatonin may play an immunomodulatory role in relation to pathogenesis of OLP. Our hypothesis provides a new implication for upcoming research on the connection between circadian neuroendocrine network and immune response in oral mucosal compartments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of tart cherry juice (Prunus cerasus) on melatonin levels and enhanced sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Bell, Phillip G; Tallent, Jamie; Middleton, Benita; McHugh, Malachy P; Ellis, Jason

    2012-12-01

    Tart Montmorency cherries have been reported to contain high levels of phytochemicals including melatonin, a molecule critical in regulating the sleep-wake cycle in humans. The aim of our investigation was to ascertain whether ingestion of a tart cherry juice concentrate would increase the urinary melatonin levels in healthy adults and improve sleep quality. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 20 volunteers consumed either a placebo or tart cherry juice concentrate for 7 days. Measures of sleep quality recorded by actigraphy and subjective sleep questionnaires were completed. Sequential urine samples over 48 h were collected and urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (major metabolite of melatonin) determined; cosinor analysis was used to determine melatonin circadian rhythm (mesor, acrophase and amplitude). In addition, total urinary melatonin content was determined over the sampled period. Trial differences were determined using a repeated measures ANOVA. Total melatonin content was significantly elevated (P sleep time and sleep efficiency total (P melatonin circardian rhythm, there was a trend to a higher mesor and amplitude. These data suggest that consumption of a tart cherry juice concentrate provides an increase in exogenous melatonin that is beneficial in improving sleep duration and quality in healthy men and women and might be of benefit in managing disturbed sleep.

  6. Melatonin improves memory acquisition under stress independent of stress hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Spillmann, Maria; Bärtschi, Carmen; Wolf, Oliver T; Weber, Cora S; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H

    2009-03-01

    Animal studies suggest that the pineal hormone melatonin influences basal stress hormone levels and dampens hormone reactivity to stress. We investigated whether melatonin also has a suppressive effect on stress-induced catecholamine and cortisol release in humans. As stress hormones affect memory processing, we further examined a possible accompanying modulation of memory function. Fifty healthy young men received a single oral dose of either 3 mg melatonin (n = 27) or placebo medication (n = 23). One hour later, they were exposed to a standardized psychosocial laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). During stress, subjects encoded objects distributed in the test room, for which memory was assessed a day later ("memory encoding under stress"). Fifteen minutes following stress, memory retrieval for words learnt the day before was tested ("memory retrieval after stress"). Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, salivary free cortisol levels and psychological responses (attention, wakefulness) were repeatedly measured before and after stress exposure. Melatonin specifically enhanced recognition memory accuracy of objects encoded under stress (p cortisol levels were highest, retrieval of memories acquired the day before was not influenced by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin did not influence stress-induced elevation of catecholamine and cortisol levels which in turn did not correlate with the effects of melatonin on memory. The findings point to a primary action of melatonin on central nervous stimulus processing under conditions of stress and possibly on memory consolidation and exclude any substantial suppressive action of the substance on hormonal stress responses.

  7. Melatonin in Pregnancy: Effects on Brain Development and CNS Programming Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Assunção Salustiano, Eugênia Maria; Yen, Philippe Wong; Soliman, Ahmed; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is an important neuroprotective factor and its receptors are expressed in the fetal brain. During normal pregnancy, maternal melatonin level increases progressively until term and is highly transferred to the fetus, with an important role in brain formation and differentiation. Maternal melatonin provides the first circadian signal to the fetus. This indolamine is also produced de novo and plays a protective role in the human placenta. In pregnancy disorders, both maternal and placental melatonin levels are decreased. Alteration in maternal melatonin level has been associated with disrupted brain programming with long-term effects. Melatonin has strong antioxidant protective effects directly and indirectly via the activation of its receptors. The fetal brain is highly susceptible to oxygenation variation and oxidative stress that can lead to neuronal development disruption. Based on that, several approaches have been tested as a treatment in case of pregnancy disorders and melatonin, through its neuroprotective effect, has been recently accepted against fetal brain injury. This review provides an overview about the protective effects of melatonin during pregnancy and on fetal brain development.

  8. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 ± 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% ± 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 ± 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  9. Regulation of pineal melatonin secretion: comparison between mammals and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, B; Rékási, Z; Ghosh, M; Csernus, V

    1996-01-01

    The melatonin secretory pattern of the perifused rat and chicken pineal was compared in response to different lighting conditions and norepinephrine administration. The following main differences were observed. 1. Explanted (perifused) rat pineal showed, after a rapid initial surge, a steady continuous basal secretion of melatonin. This was independent from the day-night (light-dark) periods. Chicken pineal, however, showed a characteristic daily rhythm of melatonin production with peak in the dark and nadir in the light phase. 2. This daily rhythm could not be extinguished by keeping the pineal donor birds in constant light- or constant dark environment for at least 2 weeks immediately before sacrifice. 3. Short light impulse (5 min), applied in the middle of the dark phase, was ineffective in birds. Keeping the perifusion chambers in continuous light or darkness, however, depressed the amplitude of the circadian rhythm even in the next cycle. 4. Rat pineal responds to norepinephrine stimulation with a dose-related increase of melatonin release, independently from the phase of the day, while in the chicken, norepinephrine slightly inhibits both the diurnal and the nocturnal level of melatonin secretion. 5. It can be inferred that melatonin secretion of the mammalian pineal gland is primarily regulated by a peripheral (sympathetic) innervation. This is modulated, under in vivo circumstances, by different environmental factors, mainly by light conditions transmitted by neural mechanisms. In contrast, the primary secretory process of the avian pineal is based on an intrinsic circadian rhythm. This might be genetically coded or maintained by yet unknown neurohormonal mechanisms and/or external factors (e.g. magnetic fields). This fairly stable circadian rhythm is only modulated by environmental lighting conditions.

  10. Melatonin: current status and future perspectives in plant science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azher Nawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is a ubiquitous molecule with pleiotropic actions in different organisms. It performs many important functions in human, animals and plants; these range from regulating circadian rhythms in animals to controlling senescence in plants. In this review, we summarize the available information regarding the presence of melatonin in different plant species, along with highlighting its biosynthesis and mechanisms of action. We also collected the available information on the effects of melatonin application on commercially important crops to improve their growth and development. Additionally, we have identified many new aspects where melatonin may have possible roles in plants, for example, its function in improving the storage life and quality of fruits and vegetables, its role in vascular reconnection during the grafting process and nutrient uptake from roots by modifying root architecture. Another potentially important aspect is the production of melatonin-rich food crops (cereals, fruits and vegetables through combination of conventional and modern breeding approaches, to increase plant resistance against biotic and abiotic stress, leading to improved crop yields and the nutraceutical value of produce to solve food security issues.

  11. Delayed senescence of apple leaves by exogenous melatonin treatment: toward regulating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Yin, Lihua; Liang, Dong; Li, Chao; Ma, Fengwang; Yue, Zhiyong

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the effects of exogenous melatonin on apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Golden Delicious) leaves and investigate its possible physiological role in delaying leaf senescence. Detached leaves treated with 10 mm melatonin solutions clearly showed a slowing in their process of dark-induced senescence, as evidenced by both biochemical and molecular parameters. Melatonin delayed the normal reduction in chlorophyll content and maximum potential photosystem II efficiency (F(v) /F(m) ). It also suppressed the transcript levels of a key chlorophyll degradation gene, pheide a oxygenase (PAO), and the senescence-associated gene 12 (SAG12). This outcome was thought to be because of the enhanced antioxidant capabilities of melatonin. Indeed, H(2) O(2) accumulation was inhibited by exogenous melatonin, which might have resulted from direct reactive oxygen species scavenging by melatonin and a great enhancement of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), which acted on both mRNA and protein activity levels. Melatonin treatment led to the maintenance of higher contents of ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) but less dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) compared with the control, possibly through its regulation of the AsA-GSH cycle. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Reflex inhibition of electrically induced muscle cramps in hypohydrated humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Mack, Gary W; Knight, Kenneth L; Hopkins, J Ty; Draper, David O; Fields, Paul J; Hunter, Iain

    2010-05-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that ingesting small volumes of pickle juice relieves muscle cramps within 35 s of ingestion. No experimental evidence exists supporting the ingestion of pickle juice as a treatment for skeletal muscle cramps. On two different days (1 wk apart), muscle cramps were induced in the flexor hallucis brevis (FHB) of hypohydrated male subjects (approximately 3% body weight loss and plasma osmolality approximately 295 mOsm x kg(-1) H2O) via percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation. Thirty minutes later, a second FHB muscle cramp was induced and was followed immediately by the ingestion of 1 mL x kg(-1) body weight of deionized water or pickle juice (73.9 +/- 2.8 mL). Cramp duration and FHB EMG activity during the cramp were quantified, as well as the change in plasma constituents. Cramp duration (water = 151.9 +/- 12.9 s and pickle juice = 153.2 +/- 23.7 s) and FHB EMG activity (water = 60% +/- 6% and pickle juice = 68% +/- 9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction EMG activity) were similar during the initial cramp induction without fluid ingestion (P > 0.05). During FHB muscle cramp induction combined with fluid ingestion, FHB EMG activity was again similar (water = 55% +/- 9% and pickle juice = 66% +/- 9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction EMG activity, P > 0.05). However, cramp duration was 49.1 +/- 14.6 s shorter after pickle juice ingestion than water (84.6 +/- 18.5 vs 133.7 +/- 15.9 s, respectively, P cramps in hypohydrated humans. This effect could not be explained by rapid restoration of body fluids or electrolytes. We suspect that the rapid inhibition of the electrically induced cramps reflects a neurally mediated reflex that originates in the oropharyngeal region and acts to inhibit the firing of alpha motor neurons of the cramping muscle.

  13. Novel non-indolic melatonin receptor agonists differentially entrain endogenous melatonin rhythm and increase its amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, W.J; de Vries, J.B; Homan, E.J; Brons, H.F; Copinga, S; Gruppen, G; Beresford, I.J M; Hagan, R.M; Grol, Cor; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we have examined the ability of melatonin and four synthetic melatonin receptor agonists to entrain endogenous melatonin secretion in rats, free running in constant darkness. The circadian melatonin profile was measured by trans-pineal microdialysis, which not only reveals the time of

  14. Retinoid inhibition of in vitro invasion of human amnion basement membrane by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazely, F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects measured were the inhibition of tumor cell migration through the basement membrane (BM) and tumor cell degradative enzyme activity on 3 H-proline labeled collagenous and non collagenous components of the BM. The human lung carcinoma A549 or the human Ewing's sarcoma TC-106 cell lines treated with retinoids for two days were incubated on the BM in the absence of retinoids. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell invasion was produced by retinoids. Among the retinoids tested the most powerful was retinol acetate which inhibited invasion by 50% of A549 cells at a concentration of 0.09 μg/ml, and TC-106 cells at 0.08 μg/ml. Retinol acetate inhibited A549 and TC-106 cell growth by approximately 50% at levels almost 100-fold higher than those needed for antiinvasive activity. Retinol acetate was about 20 times more potent than retinoic acid and 30 times more than retinol palmitate. Furthermore, A549 cells treated with retinol acetate, under conditions whereby an anti-invasive state was induced,showed an increase in the number of cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABP), a decrease in the activity of type IV collagenase and ectosialyltransferase, and no change in the activity of transglutaminase

  15. Melatonin deficiency hypothesis in delirium: a synthesis of current evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2013-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin plays a major role in circadian sleep-wake rhythm in many mammals, including humans. Patients with acute confusional state or delirium, especially those with underlying cognitive impairment, frequently suffer from sleep disturbances and disturbed circadian rhythm. In

  16. Melatonin modulates drug-induced acute porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Lelli

    Full Text Available This work investigated the modulation by melatonin (Mel of the effects of the porphyrinogenic drugs 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-collidine (DDC on oxidative environment, glucose biosynthesis and heme pathway parameters. Administration of Mel before rat intoxication with AIA/DDC showed a clear beneficial effect in all cases. Mel induced decreases of 42% and 35% in the excretion of the hemeprecursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG, respectively, and a 33% decrease in the induction of the heme regulatory enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S. The activity of the glucose metabolism enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, which had been diminished by the porphyrinogenic treatment, was restored by 45% when animals were pre-treated with Mel. Mel abolished the modest decrease in glucose 6-phospatase (G6Pase activity caused by AIA/DDC treatment. The oxidative status of lipids was attenuated by Mel treatment in homogenates by 47%, whereas no statistically significant AIA/DDC-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was observed in microsomes after Mel pre-treatment. We hypothesize that Mel may be scavenging reactive species of oxygen (ROS that could be damaging lipids, PEPCK, G6Pase and ferrochelatase (FQ. Additionally, Mel administration resulted in the repression of the key enzyme ALA-S, and this could be due to an increase in glucose levels, which is known to inhibit ALA-S induction. The consequent decrease in levels of the heme precursors ALA and PBG had a beneficial effect on the drug-induced porphyria. The results obtained open the possibility of further research on the use of melatonin as a co-treatment option in acute porphyria. Keywords: Melatonin, Glucose synthesis, Heme pathway, Acute porphyria, Oxidative stress

  17. Molecular modeling of human MT2 melatonin receptor: the role of Val204, Leu272 and Tyr298 in ligand binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazna, Petr; Obšilová, Veronika; Jelínková, Irena; Balík, Aleš; Berka, K.; Sovová, Žofie; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Svoboda, Petr; Obšil, T.; Teisinger, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 4 (2004), s. 836-842 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR GA309/04/0496; GA ČR GA204/03/0714; GA AV ČR IAA5011103; GA AV ČR IAA5011408; GA AV ČR KJB5011308; GA MŠk LN00A141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100001 Keywords : homology modeling * MT2 melatonin receptor * site-directed mutagenesis Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.824, year: 2004

  18. Amplitude Reduction and Phase Shifts of Melatonin, Cortisol and Other Circadian Rhythms after a Gradual Advance of Sleep and Light Exposure in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Duffy, Jeanne F.; Silva, Edward J.; Shanahan, Theresa L.; Boivin, Diane B.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The phase and amplitude of rhythms in physiology and behavior are generated by circadian oscillators and entrained to the 24-h day by exposure to the light-dark cycle and feedback from the sleep-wake cycle. The extent to which the phase and amplitude of multiple rhythms are similarly affected during altered timing of light exposure and the sleep-wake cycle has not been fully characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the phase and amplitude of the rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, cortisol, alertness, performance and sleep after a perturbation of entrainment by a gradual advance of the sleep-wake schedule (10 h in 5 days) and associated light-dark cycle in 14 healthy men. The light-dark cycle consisted either of moderate intensity ‘room’ light (∼90–150 lux) or moderate light supplemented with bright light (∼10,000 lux) for 5 to 8 hours following sleep. After the advance of the sleep-wake schedule in moderate light, no significant advance of the melatonin rhythm was observed whereas, after bright light supplementation the phase advance was 8.1 h (SEM 0.7 h). Individual differences in phase shifts correlated across variables. The amplitude of the melatonin rhythm assessed under constant conditions was reduced after moderate light by 54% (17–94%) and after bright light by 52% (range 12–84%), as compared to the amplitude at baseline in the presence of a sleep-wake cycle. Individual differences in amplitude reduction of the melatonin rhythm correlated with the amplitude of body temperature, cortisol and alertness. Conclusions/Significance Alterations in the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and associated bright or moderate light exposure can lead to changes in phase and reduction of circadian amplitude which are consistent across multiple variables but differ between individuals. These data have implications for our understanding of circadian organization and the negative health outcomes associated with shift-work, jet

  19. Amplitude reduction and phase shifts of melatonin, cortisol and other circadian rhythms after a gradual advance of sleep and light exposure in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derk-Jan Dijk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The phase and amplitude of rhythms in physiology and behavior are generated by circadian oscillators and entrained to the 24-h day by exposure to the light-dark cycle and feedback from the sleep-wake cycle. The extent to which the phase and amplitude of multiple rhythms are similarly affected during altered timing of light exposure and the sleep-wake cycle has not been fully characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the phase and amplitude of the rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, cortisol, alertness, performance and sleep after a perturbation of entrainment by a gradual advance of the sleep-wake schedule (10 h in 5 days and associated light-dark cycle in 14 healthy men. The light-dark cycle consisted either of moderate intensity 'room' light (∼90-150 lux or moderate light supplemented with bright light (∼10,000 lux for 5 to 8 hours following sleep. After the advance of the sleep-wake schedule in moderate light, no significant advance of the melatonin rhythm was observed whereas, after bright light supplementation the phase advance was 8.1 h (SEM 0.7 h. Individual differences in phase shifts correlated across variables. The amplitude of the melatonin rhythm assessed under constant conditions was reduced after moderate light by 54% (17-94% and after bright light by 52% (range 12-84%, as compared to the amplitude at baseline in the presence of a sleep-wake cycle. Individual differences in amplitude reduction of the melatonin rhythm correlated with the amplitude of body temperature, cortisol and alertness. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Alterations in the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and associated bright or moderate light exposure can lead to changes in phase and reduction of circadian amplitude which are consistent across multiple variables but differ between individuals. These data have implications for our understanding of circadian organization and the negative health outcomes associated with shift

  20. Melatonin Attenuates Potato Late Blight by Disrupting Cell Growth, Stress Tolerance, Fungicide Susceptibility and Homeostasis of Gene Expression in Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans is the causal agent of potato late blight, which caused the devastating Irish Potato Famine during 1845-1852. Until now, potato late blight is still the most serious threat to potato growth and has caused significant economic losses worldwide. Melatonin can induce plant innate immunity against pathogen infection, but the direct effects of melatonin on plant pathogens are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the direct effects of melatonin on P. infestans. Exogenous melatonin significantly attenuated the potato late blight by inhibiting mycelial growth, changing cell ultrastructure, and reducing stress tolerance of P. infestans. Notably, synergistic anti-fungal effects of melatonin with fungicides on P. infestans suggest that melatonin could reduce the dose levels and enhance the efficacy of fungicide against potato late blight. A transcriptome analysis was carried out to mine downstream genes whose expression levels were affected by melatonin. The analysis of the transcriptome suggests that 66 differentially expressed genes involved in amino acid metabolic processes were significantly affected by melatonin. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes associated with stress tolerance, fungicide resistance, and virulence were also affected. These findings contribute to a new understanding of the direct functions of the melatonin on P. infestans and provide a potential ecofriendly biocontrol approach using a melatonin-based paradigm and application to prevent potato late blight.

  1. Effects of melatonin on 2-deoxy-[1-14C]glucose uptake within rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassone, V.M.; Roberts, M.H.; Moore, R.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that metabolic activity, shown by autoradiographic determination of 2-deoxy-[1- 14 C]glucose (2-DG) uptake, within the rat hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) was inhibited by subcutaneous injection of 1 mg/kg melatonin. To determine whether this effect was specific to a particular time of day, the effects of melatonin on 2-DG uptake were studied in several hypothalamic areas, including the SCN, supraoptic nuclei (SON), lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) every 4 h throughout the circadian day. In a second experiment, the effects of different melatonin doses were studied at the time of day at which melatonin had its maximal effect to determine the dose-response relationship of melatonin-induced inhibition of SCN 2-DG uptake. The data indicate that melatonin inhibited 2-DG uptake in the SCN alone at one time of day, primarily at circadian time (CT) 6 and CT10, 2-6 h before subjective dusk, and secondarily at CT22, just before subjective dawn. This effect was dose dependent with a 50% effective dose of 1.49 +/- 2.30 micrograms/kg. The temporal and dose-response characteristics of these effects are similar to those characterizing the entraining effects of melatonin on circadian patterns of locomotion and drinking

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-11-01

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE 2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Triiodothyronine inhibits transcription from the human growth hormone promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, A; Louette, J; Voz, M L; Tixier-Vidal, A; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-07-09

    Three DNA constructs, the natural human growth hormone gene (hGH-hGH) its 500 bp promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (hGH-CAT), and its structural part linked to the herpes virus thymidine kinase promoter (TK-hGH) were introduced into rat pituitary GC cells by DEAE-dextran transfection. Transient expression was followed as a function of triiodothyronine (T3) concentration. The hGH-CAT expression was specifically inhibited by T3 following a typical dose-response curve while hGH-GH gene expression was not significantly modified. The transient expression of TK-hGH increased as a function of T3 concentration. These results indicate that T3 exerts two opposite effects on hGH gene expression. First, it down-regulates expression by acting on the promoter; second, it up-regulates expression by acting on the structural part of the gene. These action could be due to regulation of transcription and mRNA stabilization, respectively.

  4. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment

  5. Aeromedical Aspects of Melatonin-An Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, Donald

    1998-01-01

    ... melatonin on the modulation of circadian rhythms. For the self-treatment of sleep disorders and other benefits, melatonin usage has been extolled to the extent that 20 million new consumers were added to the U.S...

  6. Outcomes of topical applications of melatonin in implant dentistry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; Boquete-Castro, Ana; Guardia, Javier; Piattelli, Adriano; Perrotti, Vittoria; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Due to its antioxidant properties and its ability to detoxify free radicals, melatonin may interfere in the function of osteoclasts and thereby inhibit bone resorption. This inhibition of bone resorption may be enhanced by a reaction of indolamine in osteoclastogenesis and this may contribute to certain benefits in implantology. This systematic literature review on the use of melatonin in implant dentistry aims to provide guidelines for clinicians. PubMed, Science Direct, ISI Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane base databases were used to identify articles published between 1999 and 2013 on melatonin use in implant dentistry. Ten articles were selected consisting of 9 animal research studies and 1 review article, involving 60 Beagle dogs, 57 rats, and 30 rabbits and a total of 352 implants. Melatonin, which is released into the saliva, has important implications in the oral cavity. To achieve dental implant stability, osseointegration involves a cascade of protein and cell apposition, vascular invasion, bone formation, and maturation. This process may be accelerated by local delivery of growth-promoting factors, as occurs with the topical application of melatonin over the implant surface. The experimental evidence suggests that topical applications of melatonin may be useful in oral surgery and implant dentistry, increasing bone-to-implant contact values and new bone formation, and so improving the success and long-term survival of implant treatments.

  7. Melatonin regulates CRE-dependent gene transcription underlying osteoblast proliferation by activating Src and PKA in parallel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Yue

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a relationship between melatonin and idiopathic scoliosis, including our previous work which demonstrated that melatonin can inhibit osteoblast proliferation; however, the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we utilized a MTT assay to show that melatonin significantly reduces osteoblast proliferation in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. Through a combination of techniques, including real-time PCR, MTT assays, immunofluorescence, and luciferase assays, we confirmed that melatonin-induced changes in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) reduced transcriptional activity in a melatonin receptor-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment of osteoblasts with the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 up-regulated other cascades upstream of CREB. We next treated cells with PKA and Src inhibitors and observed that melatonin can also activate the protein kinase A (PKA) and Src pathways. To examine whether Src is upstream from the cAMP-PKA pathway, we measured cAMP levels in response to melatonin with and without a Src inhibitor (PP2) and found that PP2 had no additional effect. Therefore, the transcription-dependent mechanisms involved in CREB phosphorylation, along with melatonin, activated Src via a parallel signaling pathway that was separate from that of PKA. Finally, we transfected osteoblasts with lentiviral CREB short hairpin (sh) RNAs and found a decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and osteoblast proliferation. These results suggest that CREB and PCNA are downstream targets of melatonin signaling, and that the down-regulation of CREB, which is regulated via PKA and Src pathways, contributes to the melatonin-induced inhibition of osteoblast proliferation.

  8. Effects of pressure on the skin exerted by clothing on responses of urinary catecholamines and cortisol, heart rate and nocturnal urinary melatonin in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yuki; Kioka, Etsuko; Tokura, Hiromi

    2002-09-01

    The study investigated how the pressure exerted on the skin by clothing worn while working in the daytime affected the urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol, heart rate, and also melatonin secretion at night. Nine young women (experiment I) and seven young women (experiment II) participated. Participants wore either a 100% cotton jacket (tight clothes, TC) or a 100% cotton T-shirt (loose clothes, LC). Loose-fitting, 100% cotton tank tops and panties were worn as underwear in both the TC and the LC groups. The main results can be summarized as follows: (1) urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol was facilitated, and the amounts of urinary excretion were significantly higher when TC were worn. Heart rate was significantly higher in the TC group; (2) nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion was significantly greater in the TC group. These results are discussed in terms of an enhancement of diurnal sympathetic nervous system activity caused by pressure on the skin produced by tight clothing.

  9. A carnivore species (Canis familiaris) expresses circadian melatonin rhythm in the peripheral blood and melatonin receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankov, B.; Moeller, M.; Lucini, V.; Capsono, S.; Fraschini, F.

    1994-01-01

    Dogs kept under controlled photoperiodic conditions of 12h light and 12h dark expressed a clear diurnal melatonin rhythm in the peripheral blood, with a swift peak restricted to the late part of the scotophase. The highest density of high-affinity, G-protein-linked 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites was found in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland. Binding sites were found also in the pars distalis, and light microscopy/high-resolution autoradiography showed that binding was located exclusively over the chromophobe and basophilic cells forming the adenopituitary zona tuberalis, well developed in the species, and extending into the gland as a continuation of pars tuberalis. Cords of basophilic cells located in the pars distalis proper also expressed high receptor density. Quantitative autoradiography inhibition experiments revealed that the apparent melatonin inhibitory constant in all those areas was around 0.1 nmol/l, which is a physiologically appropriate value considering the peripheral blood melatonin levels. Co-incubation with guanosine 3-thiotriphosphate led to a consequential decrease in the binding density. Collectively, these data show that the dog possesses all the prerequisites for an efficient network adapted to photoperiodic time measurements. A circadian melatonin signal in the peripheral blood and an apparently functional readout receptor system located in key positions within the brain are both present in this species. 43 refs. 6 figs., 1 tabs

  10. Mood Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Quera Salva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse.

  11. Effects of melatonin and its receptor antagonist on retinal pigment epithelial cells against hydrogen peroxide damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Richard B.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Chen, Min; McCormick, Steven A.; Walsh, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Recently, we reported finding that circulating melatonin levels in age-related macular degeneration patients were significantly lower than those in age-matched controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that melatonin deficiency may play a role in the oxidative damage of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by testing the protective effect of melatonin and its receptor antagonist on RPE cells exposed to H2O2 damage. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were subjected to oxidative stress induced by 0.5 mM H2O2. Cell viability was measured using the microculture tetrazoline test (MTT) assay. Cells were pretreated with or without melatonin for 24 h. Luzindole (50 μM), a melatonin membrane-receptor antagonist, was added to the culture 1 h before melatonin to distinguish direct antioxidant effects from indirect receptor-dependent effects. All tests were performed in triplicate. Results H2O2 at 0.5 mM decreased cell viability to 20% of control levels. Melatonin showed dose-dependent protective effects on RPE cells against H2O2. Cell viability of RPE cells pretreated with 10−10, 10−8, 10−6, and 10−4 M melatonin for 24 h was 130%, 160%, 187%, and 230% of cells treated with H2O2 alone (all p<0.05). Using cells cultured without H2O2 as the control, cell viability of cells treated with H2O2 after pretreatment with 10−10-10−4 M melatonin was still significantly lower than that of the controls, suggesting that melatonin significantly decreased but did not completely abolish the in vitro cytotoxic effects of H2O2. Luzindole completely blocked melatonin’s protective effects at low concentrations of melatonin (10−10-10−8 M) but not at high concentrations (10−6-10−4 M). Conclusions Melatonin has a partial protective effect on RPE cells against H2O2 damage across a wide range of concentrations (10−10-10−4 M). This protective effect occurs through the activation of melatonin membrane receptors at low concentrations (10−10

  12. Jagged1 inhibits osteoprotegerin expression by human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manokawinchoke, J; Sumrejkanchanakij, P; Subbalekha, K; Pavasant, P; Osathanon, T

    2016-12-01

    Notch signaling regulates bone homeostasis. The present study investigated the effect of Jagged1 on osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression in human periodontal ligament stromal (hPDL) cells. hPDL cells were seeded on to indirect immobilized Jagged1 surfaces. OPG expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lentiviral small hairpin RNA particles against NOTCH2 were employed to inhibit NOTCH2 expression. Osteoclast formation was evaluated using RAW264.7 cells. An influence of exogenous OPG on osteogenic differentiation was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Alizarin Red S staining. Jagged1 significantly enhanced HES1 and HEY1mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, OPG mRNA and protein levels dramatically decreased upon exposing hPDL cells to Jagged1. However, RANKL mRNA levels were not significantly different. There was also no difference in M-CSF and MCP-1mRNA expression. A γ-secretase inhibitor and cycloheximide treatment rescued Jagged1-attenuated OPG expression. Furthermore, shNOTCH2 overexpressing hPDL cells did not exhibit a decrease in OPG expression upon exposure to Jagged1, implying the involvement of NOTCH2 in the regulatory mechanism. Culturing RAW264.7 cells with conditioned medium from Jagged1-treated hPDL cells enhanced osteoclast formation compared with those cultured with conditioned medium of the control group. Lastly, OPG treatment did not influence osteogenic differentiation by hPDL cells. These results suggest that Jagged1 activates Notch signaling in hPDL cells, leading to decreased OPG expression. This may imply an indirect role of Jagged1 on the regulation of osteoclast differentiation via hPDL cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Different Intensities of Treadmill Running Exercise do Not Alter Melatonin Levels in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionara Rodrigues Siqueira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular and moderate exercise has been considered an interesting neuroprotective strategy. Our research group demonstrated that a protocol of moderate exercise on a treadmill reduced, while a protocol of high-intensity exercise increased in vitro ischemic cell damage in Wistar rats. The molecular mechanisms by which physical exercise exerts neuroprotective effects remain unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that exercise may have short- and long-term effects on melatonin secretion in humans. Melatonin, the main product of the pineal gland, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in models of brain and spinal cord injury and cerebral ischemia. A dual modulation of melatonin secretion by physical activity has also been demonstrated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different exercise intensities, moderate- and high-intensity exercise, on serum melatonin levels in rats. Methods: Thirty-five adult male Wistar rats were divided into non-exercised (sedentary and exercised (20- or 60-min sessions groups. The exercise protocols consisted of two weeks of daily treadmill training. Blood samples were collected approximately 16 hours after the last training session (8:00-10:00 and melatonin levels were assayed by ELISA. Results: The exercise protocols, two weeks of 20 min/day or 60 min/day of treadmill running, did not affect serum melatonin levels. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that melatonin levels may not be directly involved in the exercise-induced, intensity-dependent dual effect on in vitro ischemia.

  14. Changes in morning salivary melatonin correlate with prefrontal responses during working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Kent, Haley C; Knight, Sara A; Alkozei, Anna

    2018-04-11

    Humans demonstrate a circadian rhythm of melatonin production that closely tracks the daily light/dark cycle, with profound increases in circulating levels during the night-time and nearly nonexistent levels during daylight hours. Although melatonin is known to play a role in preparing the brain and body for sleep, its effects on cognition and brain function are not well understood. We hypothesized that declines in morning melatonin would be associated with increased functional activation within cortical regions involved in alertness, attention, and executive function. We measured the change in salivary melatonin from mid-morning to late-morning in 26 healthy young adults who were also exposed to a 30-min period of blue or amber light followed by functional MRI during a working memory task (N-back). Brain activation was regressed on the change in melatonin scores from the mid-morning to late-morning saliva samples and the role of light exposure was also assessed. Although overall melatonin levels did not change significantly over the morning at the group level, individual declines in salivary melatonin were associated with significant increases in activation within the left dorsomedial and right inferior lateral prefrontal cortex during the 2-back condition (Pmorning are associated with increased prefrontal cortex functioning and may play a role in the increased frontal activation that occurs following awakening.

  15. Dietary intake of melatonin from tropical fruit altered urinary excretion of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Nutjaree Pratheepawanit; Johns, Jeffrey; Porasuphatana, Supatra; Plaimee, Preeyaporn; Sae-Teaw, Manit

    2013-01-30

    This study assessed the melatonin content of six tropical fruits and examined whether human consumption could contribute to dietary melatonin as measured by 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6-s, a marker of circulating melatonin in the body). Melatonin was extracted using methanol and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. In a clinical crossover study, 30 healthy volunteers consumed selected fruits one at a time, with a 1week wash-out period between fruits, until completing all six fruits. Most fruits had moderate melatonin content. Significant increases in urine aMT6-s concentrations were seen after the consumption of pineapple (266%, p = 0.004), banana (180%, p = 0.001), and orange (47%, p = 0.007). The need to analyze melatonin both in fruit and as in vivo uptake was demonstrated. Further study is warranted regarding the clinical effect of fruit consumption in people with age-related melatonin reduction problems such as sleeplessness and illnesses involving oxidative damage.

  16. Circadian variations in melatonin and cortisol in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, G; Sharma, V P; Verma, N S

    2016-05-01

    In cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI), afferent and efferent circuits that influence the basal production of melatonin and cortisol may be disrupted and hence disrupt the basal functions of human physiology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess circadian changes, if any, in serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Serum levels of cortisol and melatonin were measured at 6-h intervals of the day (0600, 1200, 1800 and 0000 hours) in 22 CSCI patients, as well as 22 healthy controls. Significantly higher melatonin levels were observed in the patient group in morning hours, whereas a significantly lower level of melatonin was found during the night time in the patient group than in the control group. Moreover, significantly higher values were obtained in the evening and night time serum cortisol levels among the patients compared with controls. Further, when the mean values of cortisol throughout the day were tested among patient and control groups similar circadian rhythm was found. The only difference being that serum cortisol declined much more in controls in evening and night samples as compared with CSCI patients. We conclude that circadian variations exist in the circulating levels of serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Low levels of melatonin secretion during night may contribute to the pervasive sleep disruption and increased pain perception.

  17. Melatonin improves memory acquisition under stress independent of stress hormone release

    OpenAIRE

    Rimmele, U; Spillmann, M; Bärtschi, C; Wolf, O T; Weber, C S; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, P H

    2009-01-01

    RATIONALE: Animal studies suggest that the pineal hormone melatonin influences basal stress hormone levels and dampens hormone reactivity to stress. OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether melatonin also has a suppressive effect on stress-induced catecholamine and cortisol release in humans. As stress hormones affect memory processing, we further examined a possible accompanying modulation of memory function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty healthy young men received a single oral dose of either 3...

  18. Melatonin is involved in skotomorphogenesis by regulating brassinosteroids biosynthesis in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ok Jin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2018-04-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis catalyzing the conversion of serotonin into N-acetylserotonin. In plants, SNAT is encoded by two isogenes of which SNAT1 is constitutively expressed and its overexpression confers increased yield in rice. However, the role of SNAT2 remains to be clarified. In contrast to SNAT1, the diurnal rhythm of SNAT2 mRNA expression peaks at night. In this study, transgenic rice plants in which SNAT2 expression was suppressed by RNAi technology showed a decrease in melatonin and a dwarf phenotype with erect leaves, reminiscent of brassinosteroids (BRs)-deficient mutants. Of note, the dwarf phenotype was dependent on the presence of dark, suggesting that melatonin is involved in dark growth (skotomorphogenesis). In support of this suggestion, SNAT2 RNAi lines exhibited photomorphogenic phenotypes such as inhibition of internodes and increased expression of light-inducible CAB genes in the dark. The causative gene for the melatonin-mediated BRs biosynthetic gene was DWARF4, a rate limiting BRs biosynthetic gene. Exogenous melatonin treatment induced several BRs biosynthetic genes, including DWARF4, D11, and RAVL1. As expected from the erect leaves, the SNAT2 RNAi lines produced less BRs than the wild type. Our results show for the first time that melatonin is a positive regulator of dark growth or shade outgrowth by regulating BR biosynthesis in plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The protective properties of melatonin against aluminium-induced neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2015-06-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This experimental study investigated the neuroprotective effect of melatonin (Mel; 10 mg/kg bwt) on aluminium chloride (AlCl3 ; 34 mg/kg bwt) induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Adult male albino Wistar rats were injected with AlCl3 for 7 days. The effect on brain structure, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) levels, glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GPx and GR), apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bcl-2) and an apoptotic enzyme (caspase-3) was investigated. No apparent changes occurred following the injection of melatonin. Melatonin pretreatment of the AlCl3 -administered rats reduced brain damage, and the tissues appeared like those of the control rats. Compared to treatment with AlCl3 , pretreatment with melatonin decreased LPO and NO levels and increased the GSH content and antioxidant enzyme activity. Moreover, melatonin increased the levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, decreased the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, and inhibited caspase-3 activity. Therefore, our results indicate that melatonin may provide therapeutic value against aluminium-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alternations in the rat brain and that these effects may be related to anti-apoptotic and antioxidant activities. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2015 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  20. Potential utility of melatonin as an antioxidant during pregnancy and in the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversa, Salvatore; Pellegrino, Salvatore; Barberi, Ignazio; Reiter, Russel J; Gitto, Eloisa

    2012-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various diseases during pregnancy and the perinatal period. Newborns are more prone to oxidative stress than individuals later in life. During pregnancy, increased oxygen demand augments the rate of production of ROS and women, even during normal pregnancies, experience elevated oxidative stress compared with non-pregnant women. ROS generation is also increased in the placenta during preeclampsia. Melatonin is a highly effective direct free-radical scavenger, indirect antioxidant, and cytoprotective agent in human pregnancy and it appears to be essential for successful pregnancy. This suggests a role for melatonin in human reproduction and in neonatal pathologies (asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, etc.). This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the role for melatonin in human pregnancy and in the newborn. Numerous studies agree that short-term melatonin therapy is highly effective in reducing complications during pregnancy and in the neonatal period. No significant toxicity or treatment-related side effects with long-term melatonin therapy in children and adults have been reported. Treatment with melatonin might result in a wide range of health benefits, including improved quality of life and reduced healthcare costs.

  1. Melatonin-induced increase of lipid droplets accumulation and in vitro maturation in porcine oocytes is mediated by mitochondrial quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Yin, Chao; Gong, Yabin; Liu, Jie; Guo, Huiduo; Zhao, Ruqian

    2018-01-01

    Melatonin, the major pineal secretory product, has a significant impact on the female reproductive system. Recently, the beneficial effects of melatonin on mammalian oocyte maturation and embryonic development have drawn increased attention. However, the exact underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. This study demonstrates that supplementing melatonin to in vitro maturation (IVM) medium enhances IVM rate, lipid droplets (LDs) accumulation as well as triglyceride content in porcine oocytes. Decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity as well as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) content indicated that melatonin induced a decrease of mitochondrial activity. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) which encodes essential subunits of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), was not affected by melatonin. However, the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes was significantly down-regulated after melatonin treatment. The DNA methyltransferase DNMT1, which regulates methylation and expression of mtDNA, was increased and translocated into the mitochondria in melatonin-treated oocytes. The inhibitory effect of melatonin on the expression of mtDNA was significantly prevented by simultaneous addition of DNMT1 inhibitor, which suggests that melatonin regulates the transcription of mtDNA through up-regulation of DNMT1 and mtDNA methylation. Increase of triglyceride contents after inhibition of OXPHOS indicated that mitochondrial quiescence is crucial for LDs accumulation in oocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin-induced reduction in mROS production and increase in IVM, and LDs accumulation in porcine oocytes is mediated by mitochondrial quiescence. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Di Bella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate. The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation. All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases.

  3. Melatonin confers plant tolerance against cadmium stress via the decrease of cadmium accumulation and reestablishment of microRNA-mediated redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quan; Chen, Ziping; Yu, Xiuli; Cui, Weiti; Pan, Jincheng; Zhao, Gan; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wenbiao

    2017-08-01

    Although melatonin-alleviated cadmium (Cd) toxicity both in animals and plants have been well studied, little is known about its regulatory mechanisms in plants. Here, we discovered that Cd stress stimulated the production of endogenous melatonin in alfalfa seedling root tissues. The pretreatment with exogenous melatonin not only increased melatonin content, but also alleviated Cd-induced seedling growth inhibition. The melatonin-rich transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing alfalfa SNAT (a melatonin synthetic gene) exhibited more tolerance than wild-type plants under Cd conditions. Cd content was also reduced in root tissues. In comparison with Cd stress alone, ABC transporter and PCR2 transcripts in alfalfa seedlings, PDR8 and HMA4 in Arabidopsis, were up-regulated by melatonin. By contrast, Nramp6 transcripts were down-regulated. Changes in above transporters were correlated with the less accumulation of Cd. Additionally Cd-triggered redox imbalance was improved by melatonin. These could be supported by the changes of the Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase gene regulated by miR398a and miR398b. Histochemical staining, laser scanning confocal microscope, and H 2 O 2 contents analyses showed the similar tendencies. Taking together, we clearly suggested that melatonin enhanced Cd tolerance via decreasing cadmium accumulation and reestablishing the microRNAs-mediated redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Melatonin disturbs SUMOylation mediated crosstalk between c-Myc and Nestin via MT1 activation and promotes the sensitivity of Paclitaxel in brain cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Jung, Ji Hoon; Shin, Eun Ah; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2018-04-14

    Here the underlying antitumor mechanism of melatonin and its potency as a sensitizer of Paclitaxel was investigated in X02 cancer stem cells. Melatonin suppressed sphere formation and induced G2/M arrest in X02 cells expressing Nestin, CD133, CXCR4 and SOX-2 as biomarkers of stemness. Furthermore, melatonin reduced the expression of CDK2, CDK4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc and upregulated cyclin B1 in X02 cells. Notably, genes of c-Myc related mRNAs were differentially expressed in melatonin treated X02 cells by microarray analysis. Consistently, melatonin reduced the expression of c-Myc at mRNA and protein levels, which was blocked by MG132. Of note, overexpression of c-Myc increased the expression of Nestin, while overexpression of Nestin enhanced c-Myc through crosstalk despite different locations, nucleus and cytoplasm. Interestingly, melatonin attenuated small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1) more than SUMO-2 or SUMO-3 and disturbed nuclear translocation of Nestin for direct binding to c-Myc by SUMOylation of SUMO-1 protein by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation. Also, melatonin reduced trimethylated histone H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 more than dimethylation in X02 cells by Western blotting and Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Notably, melatonin upregulated MT1, not MT2, in X02 cells and melatonin receptor inhibitor Luzindole blocked the ability of melatonin to decrease the expression of Nestin, p-c-Myc(S62) and c-Myc. Furthermore, melatonin promoted cytotoxicity, sub G1 accumulation and apoptotic body formation by Paclitaxcel in X02 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that melatonin inhibits stemness via suppression of c-Myc, Nestin, and histone methylation via MT1 activation and promotes anticancer effect of Paclitaxcel in brain cancer stem cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs and epilepsy are often associated with sexual disorder in women such as hyperandrogenism, menstrual disorders and ovarian cysts. In children, until puberty, a hormone imbalance may influence many aspects of development, e.g. growth and sexual maturation. The aromatase complex...... is the enzyme system that converts androgens to estrogens and consequently an inhibition may induce a hormone imbalance. Twelve antiepileptic drugs, used in mono or polytherapy for the treatment of children, were tested for their ability to inhibit aromatase (CYP19) with commercially available microsomes from...

  7. Sustained melatonin treatment blocks body mass, pelage, reproductive, and fever responses to short day lengths in female Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Ashley M; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-09-01

    Winter imposes physiological challenges on individuals including increased thermoregulatory demands, risk of infection, and decreased food availability. To survive these challenges, animals living outside the tropics must appropriately distribute their energetic costs across the year, including reproduction and immune function. Individuals of many species use the annual cycle of changing day lengths (photoperiod), which is encoded by the nightly duration of melatonin secretion, to adjust physiology. Siberian hamsters exposed to short days (SD) (long nights/prolonged endogenous melatonin secretion) enhance some aspects of immune function, but curtail other energetically expensive immune functions including the febrile response. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we determined whether sustained melatonin treatment would inhibit the development of the SD phenotype in female hamsters as it does in males. Second, we examined whether the SD attenuation of fever would be blocked by continuous exposure to exogenous melatonin. Hamsters were implanted with melatonin or empty capsules, housed in either long days (LD) or SD for 8-9 weeks, and then challenged with lipopolysaccharide; body temperature and locomotor activity were recorded. Unlike hamsters with empty capsules, hamsters with melatonin implants did not respond to SD and maintained a LD phenotype including summer-like spleen, uterine and body masses, and pelage characteristics. Further, sustained melatonin treatment blocked the SD attenuation of febrile responses and prolonged the behavioral components of the sickness response. These results suggest that the daily fluctuations in endogenous melatonin may be masked by continuous exposure to exogenous melatonin, thus inhibiting functional photoperiodic responses to SD. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms and anxiety in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Andersen, Lærke T; Madsen, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are known problems in patients with breast cancer. The effect of melatonin as an antidepressant in humans with cancer has not been investigated. We investigated whether melatonin could lower the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer...... in a three-month period after surgery and assessed the effect of melatonin on subjective parameters: anxiety, sleep, general well-being, fatigue, pain and sleepiness. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial undertaken from July 2011 to December 2012 at a department of breast surgery in Copenhagen......, Denmark. Women, 30-75 years, undergoing surgery for breast cancer and without signs of depression on Major Depression Inventory (MDI) were included 1 week before surgery and received 6 mg oral melatonin or placebo for 3 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of depressive symptoms measured by MDI...

  9. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Schneider, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly...... performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase......, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore...

  10. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery--a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose...... of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation during the pre-, intra-, and postoperative period. Six patients undergoing...... aortic surgery received 10 (n = 2), 30 (n = 2) or 60 (n = 2) mg melatonin intravenously in the intraoperative phase and 10 mg orally for three nights after surgery. Patients were monitored for hemodynamic parameters during and after surgery. Any unexpected events during the hospitalization were...

  11. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery--a safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose...... of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation during the pre-, intra-, and postoperative period. Six patients undergoing......-reactive protein (CRP) were also measured for 4 days after surgery. Melatonin administration did not change hemodynamic parameters (mean arterial pressure or pulse rate) during surgery (P = 0.499 and 0.149, respectively), but oxidative stress parameters (MDA and AA) decreased significantly (P = 0.014 and 0...

  12. In vitro inhibition of the paraoxonase from human serum with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... precipitation and sepharose-4B-L-tyrosine-1-napthylamine hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Sulfonamide was an ... of interaction of sulfonamide with the purified enzyme indicated a different inhibition pattern for two substrates. ..... Boyd AE (1988). Sulfonylurea receptors, ion channels and fruit flies.

  13. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-dose systemic administration was continuously used. The HSurvivinT34A plasmid (5 g/one) complexed with a cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) significantly inhibited tumour growth in our model. We observed microvessel density degradation by CD31 immunohistochemistry and apoptotic cell increase by TUNEL ...

  14. Inhibition of rat, mouse, and human glutathione S-transferase by eugenol and its oxidation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Ploemen, J.H.T.M.; Jespersen, S.; Greef, J. van der; Verhagen, H.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1996-01-01

    The irreversible and reversible inhibition of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) by eugenol was studied in rat, mouse and man. Using liver cytosol of human, rat and mouse, species differences were found in the rate of irreversible inhibition of GSTs by eugenol in the presence of the enzyme

  15. Melatonin reduces hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) induced autophagy and apoptosis: An in vivo and in vitro investigation in experimental models of neonatal HI brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Wang, Zhouguang; Liu, Yanlong; Pan, Shulin; Zhang, Hao; Fang, Mingchu; Jiang, Huai; Yin, Jiayu; Zou, Shuangshuang; Li, Zhenmao; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Zhenlang; Xiao, Jian

    2017-07-13

    Melatonin has neuroprotective effects in many diseases, including neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) brain injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of melatonin both in vivo and in vitro and associated molecular mechanisms behind these effects. Postnatal day 7 male and female rat pups were subjected to unilateral HI, melatonin was injected intraperitoneally 1h before HI and an additional six doses were administered at 24h intervals. The pups were sacrificed at 24h and 7 d after HI. Pre-treatment with melatonin significantly reduced brain damage at 7 d after HI, with 15mg/kg melatonin achieving over 30% recovery in tissue loss compared to vehicle-treated animals. Autophagy and apoptotic cell death as indicated by autophagy associated proteins, cleaved caspase 3 and Tunel staining, was significantly inhibited after melatonin treatment in vivo as well as in PC12 cells. Melatonin treatment also significantly increased the GAP43 in the cortex. In conclusion, melatonin treatment reduced neonatal rat brain injury after HI, and this appeared to be related to inhibiting autophagy as well as reducing apoptotic cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical Uses of Melatonin in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J. Sánchez-Barceló

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the results of clinical trials of treatments with melatonin conducted in children, mostly focused on sleep disorders of different origin. Melatonin is beneficial not only in the treatment of dyssomnias, especially delayed sleep phase syndrome, but also on sleep disorders present in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity, autism spectrum disorders, and, in general, in all sleep disturbances associated with mental, neurologic, or other medical disorders. Sedative properties of melatonin have been used in diagnostic situations requiring sedation or as a premedicant in children undergoing anesthetic procedures. Epilepsy and febrile seizures are also susceptible to treatment with melatonin, alone or associated with conventional antiepileptic drugs. Melatonin has been also used to prevent the progression in some cases of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. In newborns, and particularly those delivered preterm, melatonin has been used to reduce oxidative stress associated with sepsis, asphyxia, respiratory distress, or surgical stress. Finally, the administration of melatonin, melatonin analogues, or melatonin precursors to the infants through the breast-feeding, or by milk formula adapted for day and night, improves their nocturnal sleep. Side effects of melatonin treatments in children have not been reported. Although the above-described results are promising, specific studies to resolve the problem of dosage, formulations, and length of treatment are necessary.

  17. Melatonin increases anagen hair rate in women with androgenetic alopecia or diffuse alopecia: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Burmeister, G; Schmidt, H W; Elsner, P

    2004-02-01

    In addition to the well-known hormonal influences of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone on the hair cycle, melatonin has been reported to have a beneficial effect on hair growth in animals. The effect of melatonin on hair growth in humans has not been investigated so far. To examine whether topically applied melatonin influences anagen and telogen hair rate in women with androgenetic or diffuse hair loss. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 40 women suffering from diffuse alopecia or androgenetic alopecia. A 0.1% melatonin or a placebo solution was applied on the scalp once daily for 6 months and trichograms were performed to assess anagen and telogen hair rate. To monitor effects of treatment on physiological melatonin levels, blood samples were taken over the whole study period. Melatonin led to a significantly increased anagen hair rate in occipital hair in women with androgenetic hair loss compared with placebo (n=12; P=0.012). For frontal hair, melatonin gave a significant increase in the group with diffuse alopecia (n=28; P=0.046). The occipital hair samples of patients with diffuse alopecia and the frontal hair counts of those with androgenetic alopecia also showed an increase of anagen hair, but differences were not significant. Plasma melatonin levels increased under treatment with melatonin, but did not exceed the physiological night peak. To the authors' knowledge, this pilot study is the first to show that topically applied melatonin might influence hair growth in humans in vivo. The mode of action is not known, but the effect might result from an induction of anagen phase.

  18. Clinical Uses of Melatonin in Neurological Diseases and Mental and Behavioural Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Barcelo, Emilio J; Rueda, Noemi; Mediavilla, María D; Martinez-Cue, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J

    2017-11-20

    Melatonin is a molecule with numerous properties applicable to the treatment of neurological diseases. Among these properties are the following: potent scavenger of oxygen and nitrogen reactive species, anti-inflammatory features, immuno-enhancing nature, and modulation of circadian rhythmicity. Furthermore, low concentrations of melatonin are usually found in patients with neurological diseases and mental disorders. The positive results obtained in experimental models of diverse pathologies, including diseases of the nervous system (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, epilepsy, headaches, etc.) as well as mental and behavioural disordes (e.g., autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders, etc.), have served as a basis for the design of clinical trials to study melatonin's possible usefulness in human pathology, although the satisfactory results obtained from the laboratory "bench" are not always applicable to the patient's "bedside". In this article, we review those papers describing the results of the administration of melatonin to humans for various therapeutic purposes in the field of neuropathology. Clinical trials with strong methodologies and appropriate doses of melatonin are necessary to support or reject the usefulness of melatonin in neurological diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  20. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated....... Physiological postprandial ileal lipid concentrations dose dependently inhibited human digestive pancreatic protease and bile acid output, but not intestinal motor activity. Thus physiological postprandial ileal nutrient exposure may be of importance for the termination of digestive secretory responses...

  1. TEAD1 inhibits prolactin gene expression in cultured human uterine decidual cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Cherie A.; Bachurski, Cindy J.; Schroeder, Jennifer; Stanek, Jerzy; Handwerger, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Forced overexpression of TEAD1 in human uterine fibroblast (HUF) and human endometrial stromal cells markedly inhibited prolactin promoter activity in both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal inhibition of greater than 90%. Conversely, the knockdown of TEAD1 expression in HUF cells with a TEAD1 siRNA resulted in a 75–80% increase in prolactin mRNA levels (P

  2. Triclocarban and Triclosan Inhibit Human Aromatase via Different Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huitao; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Lanlan; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Jin, Lixu; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Human aromatase (CYP19A1) is an important enzyme, which produces estrogen from androgen for maintaining the female reproductive function and pregnancy. Triclocarban and triclosan are antimicrobial chemicals added to personal care, household, and industrial products. They could be endocrine disruptors and may disrupt human CYP19A1 activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of triclocarban and triclosan on estradiol production and human CYP19A1 activity in JEG-3 cells. Tricloca...

  3. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the

  4. Melatonin as Protection Against Radiation Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P H; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    -hormone melatonin is a free radical scavenger, and induces several anti-oxidative enzymes. This review investigates the scientific literature on the protective effects of melatonin against exposure to ionizing radiation, and discusses the clinical potential of melatonin as prophylactic treatment against ionizing...... radiation damage. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed and included experimental or clinical studies written in English that investigated the protective effects of melatonin against gamma or X-ray irradiation in vivo. Studies were excluded if patients were treated with chemotherapy...... concomitantly. Results: 37 studies were included in the review. All were of experimental case-control design and employed animals. The studies demonstrated that exogenous melatonin reduced oxidative stress and inflammation in all investigated tissues. Furthermore, melatonin increased 30-day survival...

  5. In vitro inhibition of the paraoxonase from human serum with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... at 595 nm according to Bradford (Bradford, 1976), with bovine se- rum albumin as a standard. Purification of paraoxonase. Human serum was isolated from 50 ml fresh human blood and put into a dry tube. For this, the blood samples were centrifuged at. 1500 rpm for 15 min and the serum was removed.

  6. Curcumin inhibits invasion and metastasis in the human ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... Effects of curcumin on invasion and metastasis in the human ovarian cancer cells SKOV3 and approach if this ... number of cells in curcumin treated group to migrate to filter coated with Matrigel was reduced compared with the control ..... on human cervical carcinoma Hela cells in vitro and in vivo. Chinese.

  7. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP3–Ca2+ signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuyama, Wakako; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mossaad, Ehab; Kawai, Satoru; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca 2+ oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca 2+ - and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca 2+ ) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca 2+ imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca 2+ oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP 3 –Ca 2+ and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum

  8. Melatonin improves the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged mouse oocytes by stabilizing ovastacin and Juno to promote sperm binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Lu, Yajuan; Zhang, Mianqun; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Cui, Zhaokang; Xiong, Bo

    2017-03-01

    What are the underlying mechanisms of the decline in the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged oocytes? Melatonin improves the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged oocytes by reducing aging-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and inhibiting apoptosis and by maintaining the levels and localization of the fertilization proteins, ovastacin and Juno. Following ovulation, the quality of mammalian metaphase II oocytes irreversibly deteriorates over time with a concomitant loss of fertilization ability. Melatonin has been found to prevent post-ovulatory oocyte aging and extend the window for optimal fertilization in mice. Mouse oocytes were randomly assigned to three groups and aged in vitro for 0, 6, 12 and 24 h, respectively. Increasing concentrations of melatonin (10-9 M, 10-7 M, 10-5 M and 10-3 M) were added to the 24 h aging group. Sperm binding assays, in-vitro fertilization, immunofluorescent staining and western blotting were performed to investigate key regulators and events during fertilization of post-ovulatory aged mouse oocytes. We found that the actin cap which promotes a cortical granule (CG) free domain is disrupted with a re-distribution of CGs in the subcortex of aged oocytes. Ovastacin, a CG metalloendoprotease, is mis-located and prematurely exocytosed in aged oocytes with subsequent cleavage of the zona pellucida protein ZP2. This disrupts the sperm recognition domain and dramatically reduces the number of sperm binding to the zona pellucida. The abundance of Juno, the sperm receptor on the oocyte membrane, also is reduced in aged oocytes. Exposure of aged oocytes to melatonin significantly elevates in-vitro fertilization rates potentially by rescuing the above age-associated defects of fertilization, and reducing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. N/A. We explored the mechanisms of the decline in fertilization ability decline in aged mouse oocytes, in vitro but not in vivo. Our findings may contribute to the development a more

  9. Melatonin in Antinociception: Its Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Lauterbach, Edward C; Ho, Khek Yu; Acuña-Castroviejo, Dario; Zakaria, Rahimah; Brzezinski, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    The intensity of pain sensation exhibits marked day and night variations. Since the intensity of pain perception is low during dark hours of the night when melatonin levels are high, this hormone has been implicated as one of the prime antinociceptive substances. A number of studies have examined the antinociceptive role of melatonin in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain animal models. It has been demonstrated that melatonin exerts antinociceptive actions by acting at both spinal cord a...

  10. Deciphering the Function of the Blunt Circadian Rhythm of Melatonin in the Newborn Lamb: Impact on Adrenal and Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seron-Ferre, Maria; Torres-Farfan, Claudia; Valenzuela, Francisco J; Castillo-Galan, Sebastian; Rojas, Auristela; Mendez, Natalia; Reynolds, Henry; Valenzuela, Guillermo J; Llanos, Anibal J

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal lambs, as with human and other neonates, have low arrhythmic endogenous levels of melatonin for several weeks until they start their own pineal rhythm of melatonin production at approximately 2 weeks of life. During pregnancy, daily rhythmic transfer of maternal melatonin to the fetus has important physiological roles in sheep, nonhuman primates, and rats. This melatonin rhythm provides a circadian signal and also participates in adjusting the physiology of several organs in preparation for extrauterine life. We propose that the ensuing absence of a melatonin rhythm plays a role in neonatal adaptation. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of imposing a high-amplitude melatonin rhythm in the newborn lamb on (1) clock time-related changes in cortisol and plasma variables and (2) clock time-related changes of gene expression of clock genes and selected functional genes in the adrenal gland and heart. We treated newborn lambs with a daily oral dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) from birth to 5 days of age, recreating a high-amplitude melatonin rhythm. This treatment suppressed clock time-related changes of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, clock gene expression, and functional genes in the newborn adrenal gland. In the heart, it decreased heart/body weight ratio, increased expression of Anp and Bnp, and resulted in different heart gene expression from control newborns. The interference of this postnatal melatonin treatment with the normal postnatal pattern of adrenocortical function and heart development support a physiological role for the window of flat postnatal melatonin levels during the neonatal transition. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  11. Potential adverse effects of antenatal melatonin as a treatment for intrauterine growth restriction: findings in pregnant sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Candia, Alejandro; Veliz, Marcelino; Araya, Claudio; Quezada, Sebastian; Ebensperger, Germán; Serón-Ferré, María; Reyes, Roberto V; Llanos, Aníbal J; Herrera, Emilio A

    2016-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is a condition in which the fetus has a birthweight and/or length melatonin acts as an umbilical vasodilator and a potent antioxidant that has not been evaluated in pregnancies under chronic hypoxia that induce fetal growth restriction. However, this neurohormone has been proposed as a pharmacologic therapy for complicated pregnancies. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of prenatal administration of melatonin during the last trimester of pregnancy on the biometry of the growth-restricted lambs because of developmental hypoxia. Further, we aimed to determine melatonin and cortisol levels and oxidative stress markers in plasma of pregnant ewes during the treatment. High-altitude pregnant sheep received either vehicle (n = 5; 5 mL 1.4% ethanol) or melatonin (n = 7; 10 mg/kg(-1)day(-1) in 5 mL 1.4% ethanol) daily during the last one-third of gestation. Maternal plasma levels of melatonin, cortisol, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress were determined along treatment. At birth, neonates were examined, weighed, and measured (biparietal diameter, abdominal diameter, and crown-rump length). Antenatal treatment with melatonin markedly decreased neonatal biometry and weight at birth. Additionally, melatonin treatment increased the length of gestation by 7.5% and shifted the time of delivery. Furthermore, the prenatal treatment doubled plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol and significantly improved the antioxidant capacity of the pregnant ewes. Our findings indicate that antenatal melatonin induces further intrauterine growth restriction but improves the maternal plasma antioxidant capacity. Additional studies should address the efficiency and safety of antenatal melatonin before clinical attempts on humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I and growth inhibition of human cancer cell lines by an oleanane from Junellia aspera (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungitore, C R; Padron, J M; Leon, L G; Garcia, C; Ciuffo, G M; Martin, V S; Tonn, C E

    2007-05-15

    DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases are enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism events such as replication, transcription, recombination, and chromosome segregation during mitosis. Thus, DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases inhibitors could be expected to have antitumor effects. Naturally occurring triterpenoids isolated from Junellia aspera (Gillies & Hook; Moldenke) (Verbenaceae) were assayed for human DNA topoisomerase I and Taq DNA polymerase inhibitory activities. Maslinic acid (2) and its diacetyl derivative (7) showed human DNA topoisomerase I inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 76-80 microM and growth inhibition against various human solid tumour cell lines with GI50 values in the range of 5-18 microM. The triterpene frames could be used for screening new inhibitors of the enzyme, and computer-simulated drug design using the frame and pocket structure of enzyme may in theory be a possible approach to develop new inhibitors.

  13. Melatonin treatment for insomnia in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendz, Lisa M; Scates, Ann C

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of melatonin for the treatment of insomnia in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Literature was accessed through MEDLINE (1948-August 2009), EMBASE (1950-August 2009), and Scopus (1960-August 2009) using the terms melatonin, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), pediatric, insomnia, sleep disorder, and sleep. In addition, reference citations from publications identified were reviewed for relevant information. All English-language articles and human studies were identified and evaluated. Results from all identified randomized trials (n = 5), safety studies (n = 1), long-term follow-up studies (n = 1), post hoc retrospective analyses (n = 1), meta-analyses (n = 2), review articles (n = 9), and letters (n = 1) were summarized. Pediatric insomnia is prevalent in children with ADHD and impacts academic performance, social functioning, overall health, and family life. First-line therapy includes ruling out differential diagnoses, optimizing ADHD stimulant treatment, and initiating good sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy. Adjuvant pharmacotherapy is then an option and melatonin is often prescribed. Melatonin regulates circadian rhythm sleep disorders such as sleep-onset insomnia (SOI) in children with ADHD. Four studies in children with ADHD and insomnia showed improvement in sleep onset and sleep latency. Studies included children 6-14 years old and melatonin doses ranged from 3 to 6 mg administered within a few hours of a scheduled bedtime. In all studies, adverse events were transient and mild. The available melatonin studies are limited by small size and short duration; variable SOI criteria, ADHD criteria, and treatment assessments; and lack of generalizability. Available data suggest that melatonin is a well-tolerated and efficacious treatment option for pediatric patients with chronic SOI and ADHD. Regulated melatonin products and larger, well-designed trials to establish optimal

  14. Potential Utility of Melatonin in Preeclampsia, Intrauterine Fetal Growth Retardation, and Perinatal Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Reiter, Russel J; Gitto, Eloisa

    2016-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases during gestation and the perinatal period. During pregnancy, increased oxygen demand augments the rate of production of free radicals. Oxidative stress is involved in pregnancy disorders including preeclampsia and intrauterine fetal growth retardation (IUGR). Moreover, increased levels of oxidative stress and reduced antioxidative capacities may contribute to the pathogenesis of perinatal asphyxia. Melatonin, an efficient antioxidant agent, diffuses through biological membranes easily and exerts pleiotropic actions on every cell and appears to be essential for successful gestation. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge concerning the role of melatonin in reducing complications during human pregnancy and in the perinatal period. Melatonin levels are altered in women with abnormally functioning placentae during preeclampsia and IUGR. Short-term melatonin therapy is highly effective and safe in reducing complications during pregnancy and in the perinatal period. Because melatonin has been shown to be safe for both mother and fetus, it could be an attractive therapy in pregnancy and is considered a promising neuroprotective agent in perinatal asphyxia. We believe that the use of melatonin treatment during the late fetal and early neonatal period might result in a wide range of health benefits, improved quality of life, and may help limit complications during the critical periods prior to, and shortly after, delivery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Experience with sustained-release melatonin for the treatment of sleep disorders in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Prokhorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the literature on the role of melatonin in the regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep disorders in the population and in patients with mental diseases are analyzed. The cause of insomnia may be circadian rhythm disorders due to the age-related decline in the elaboration of the endogenous hormones that are responsible for the quality and duration of sleep, one of which is melatonin.Sustained-release melatonin is a synthetic analogue of the endogenous human pineal hormone melatonin. According to clinical findings, the main proven clinical effects of sustained-release melatonin 2 mg are a reduction in the latency of sleep, improvement of its quality, and lack of daytime sleepiness. The drug causes no dependence on its long use and rebound symptoms (increased insomnia symptoms, positively affects cognitive functions, and lowers nocturnal blood pressure in hypertensive patients.The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient with recurrent depressive disorder, in whom sustained-release melatonin 2 mg has demonstrated high efficacy and good tolerability in the combination therapy of sleep disorders in the pattern of depression.

  16. Human milk oligosaccharides inhibit growth of group B Streptococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Szyszka, Alexandra; Escajadillo, Tamara; Huang, Mia; Godula, Kamil; Prudden, Anthony R; Boons, Geert-Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088245489; Lewis, Amanda L; Doran, Kelly S; Nizet, Victor; Bode, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in newborns, typically acquired vertically during childbirth secondary to maternal vaginal colonization. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) have important nutritional and biological activities

  17. Antioxidant Nanoplatforms for Dermal Delivery: Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Aroha Sanchez; Campmany, Ana Cristina Calpena; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent, mainly due to its role as antioxidant. Substantial evidences show that melatonin is potentially effective in a variety of diseases as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The excellent antioxidant capacity with pharmacokinetics characteristics and the emerging search for new pharmaceutical nanotechnology based systems, make it particularly attractive to elaborate nanoplatforms based on melatonin for biomedical or cosmetic dermal applications. Different nanosystems for dermal delivery have been investigated. This review focuses on nanocarrier production strategies, dermal melatonin application and delivery advances in vivo and in vitro. Equally, future perspectives of this assisted melatonin delivery have also been discussed. In the current review, we have revised relevant articles of the available literature using the major scientific databases. One hundred and thirteen papers were included in the review, the majority of which represent latest researches in nanosized platforms for the dermal delivery of melatonin including liposomes, ethosomes, niosomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles and cyclodextrins. Furthermore, relevant papers reporting in vitro and in vivo application studies of these nano-based melatonin platforms were also discussed. The use of nanoplatforms for the dermal melatonin delivery as antioxidant agent could improve the efficacy of conventional melatonin administration due to the preservation of the drug from premature oxidation and the enhancement of drug permeation through the skin providing greater exposure times. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Plasma melatonin is reduced in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliolia, Eirini; Silajdžić, Edina; Nambron, Rajasree; Hill, Nathan R; Doshi, Anisha; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the production of melatonin, a hormone regulating sleep in relation to the light/dark cycle, is altered in Huntington's disease. We analyzed the circadian rhythm of melatonin in a 24-hour study of cohorts of control, premanifest, and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. The mean and acrophase melatonin concentrations were significantly reduced in stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. We also observed a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean and acrophase melatonin in premanifest Huntington's disease subjects. Onset of melatonin rise was significantly more temporally spread in both premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. A nonsignificant trend also was seen for reduced pulsatile secretion of melatonin. Melatonin concentrations are reduced in Huntington's disease. Altered melatonin patterns may provide an explanation for disrupted sleep and circadian behavior in Huntington's disease, and represent a biomarker for disease state. Melatonin therapy may help the sleep disorders seen in Huntington's disease. © © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Nonpineal melatonin in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J J; Gern, W A; Roth, E C; Ralph, C L; Jacobson, E

    1980-10-31

    All living and most fossil representatives of the reptilian subclass Archosauria lack pineal bodies. Arrhythmic, low-level, nonpineal melatonin is present, however, in the blood of Alligator mississippiensis. Although pineal bodies have been implicated in circadian phenomena, these results suggest that arrhytmic melatonin in alligators may not be involved incircadian events and indicate that the pineal is not the only source of the hormone melatonin. The evolutionary loss of the pineal in Archosauria occurred during the Mesozoic, and era noted for its seasonal stability. Arrhythmic melatonin titers inalligators and pineal loss in alligators and other archosaurs may be related to Mesozoic seasonal stability.

  20. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    OpenAIRE

    Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can originate from early life through so-called the “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD) or “developmental programming”. The DOHaD concept offers the “reprogramming” strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evi...

  1. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radogna, F; Albertini, M C; De Nicola, M; Diederich, M; Bejarano, I; Ghibelli, L

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10(-9) vs. 10(-5)M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10(-5)M, but drops to 10(-9)M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun Xian; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A

    2014-01-01

    Research within the last decade has shown melatonin to have previously-unsuspected beneficial actions on the peripheral reproductive organs. Likewise, numerous investigations have documented that stable circadian rhythms are also helpful in maintaining reproductive health. The relationship of melatonin and circadian rhythmicity to maternal and fetal health is summarized in this review. Databases were searched for the related published English literature up to 15 May 2013. The search terms used in various combinations included melatonin, circadian rhythms, biological clock, suprachiasmatic nucleus, ovary, pregnancy, uterus, placenta, fetus, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, ischemia-reperfusion, chronodisruption, antioxidants, oxidative stress and free radicals. The results of the studies uncovered are summarized herein. Both melatonin and circadian rhythms impact reproduction, especially during pregnancy. Melatonin is a multifaceted molecule with direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Melatonin is produced in both the ovary and in the placenta where it protects against molecular mutilation and cellular dysfunction arising from oxidative/nitrosative stress. The placenta, in particular, is often a site of excessive free radical generation due to less than optimal adhesion to the uterine wall, which leads to either persistent hypoxia or intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation, processes that cause massive free radical generation and organ dysfunction. This may contribute to pre-eclampsia and other disorders which often complicate pregnancy. Melatonin has ameliorated free radical damage to the placenta and to the fetus in experiments using non-human mammals. Likewise, the maintenance of a regular maternal light/dark and sleep/wake cycle is important to stabilize circadian rhythms generated by the maternal central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Optimal circadian rhythmicity in the mother is important since her

  3. Exogenous Melatonin Mitigates Acid Rain Stress to Tomato Plants through Modulation of Leaf Ultrastructure, Photosynthesis and Antioxidant Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Biswojit; Hussain, Mubasher; Irshad, Muhammad; Mitra, Sangeeta; Li, Min; Liu, Shuang; Qiu, Dongliang

    2018-02-11

    Acid rain (AR) is a serious global environmental issue causing physio-morphological changes in plants. Melatonin, as an indoleamine molecule, has been known to mediate many physiological processes in plants under different kinds of environmental stress. However, the role of melatonin in acid rain stress tolerance remains inexpressible. This study investigated the possible role of melatonin on different physiological responses involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism in tomato plants under simulated acid rain (SAR) stress. SAR stress caused the inhibition of growth, damaged the grana lamella of the chloroplast, photosynthesis, and increased accumulation of ROS and lipid peroxidation in tomato plants. To cope the detrimental effect of SAR stress, plants under SAR condition had increased both enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant substances compared with control plants. But such an increase in the antioxidant activities were incapable of inhibiting the destructive effect of SAR stress. Meanwhile, melatonin treatment increased SAR-stress tolerance by repairing the grana lamella of the chloroplast, improving photosynthesis and antioxidant activities compared with those in SAR-stressed plants. However, these possible effects of melatonin are dependent on concentration. Moreover, our study suggests that 100-μM melatonin treatment improved the SAR-stress tolerance by increasing photosynthesis and ROS scavenging antioxidant activities in tomato plants.

  4. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of ?-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which ...

  5. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion

  6. Feed-forward inhibition of androgen receptor activity by glucocorticoid action in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Sean M; He, Bin; Newberg, Justin Y; Ochsner, Scott A; Loose, David S; Lanz, Rainer B; McKenna, Neil J; Buehrer, Benjamin M; McGuire, Sean E; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-09-21

    We compared transcriptomes of terminally differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes to identify cell-specific differences. Gene expression and high content analysis (HCA) data identified the androgen receptor (AR) as both expressed and functional, exclusively during early human adipocyte differentiation. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibited human adipocyte maturation by downregulation of adipocyte marker genes, but not in 3T3-L1. It is interesting that AR induction corresponded with dexamethasone activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); however, when exposed to the differentiation cocktail required for adipocyte maturation, AR adopted an antagonist conformation and was transcriptionally repressed. To further explore effectors within the cocktail, we applied an image-based support vector machine (SVM) classification scheme to show that adipocyte differentiation components inhibit AR action. The results demonstrate human adipocyte differentiation, via GR activation, upregulates AR but also inhibits AR transcriptional activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Melatonin and Pancreatic Islets: Interrelationships between Melatonin, Insulin and Glucagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin exerts its influence in the periphery through activation of two specific trans-membrane receptors: MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the islet of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion from β-cells and in glucagon secretion from α-cells. De-synchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genome-wide association studies identifying particularly the MT2 as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. Since melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. This factor has hitherto been underestimated; the disruption of diurnal signaling within the islet may be one of the most important mechanisms leading to metabolic disturbances. The study of melatonin–insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship: an increase in melatonin levels leads to a down-regulation of insulin secretion and vice versa. Elucidation of the possible inverse interrelationship in man may open new avenues in the therapy of diabetes. PMID:23535335

  8. Inhibition of diabetes in NOD mice by human pregnancy factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Khan, A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Benner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of Th1 mediated autoimmune diseases regress in many patients during pregnancy. A prominent feature of pregnancy is the presence of human chorionic gonadotrophin hormone (hCG) in blood and urine. In this report we tested the effect of clinical grade hCG (c-hCG) on the development of

  9. Milk Oligosaccharides Inhibit Human Rotavirus Infectivity in MA104 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucirica, Daniel R; Triantis, Vassilis; Schoemaker, Ruud; Estes, Mary K; Ramani, Sasirekha

    2017-09-01

    Background: Oligosaccharides in milk act as soluble decoy receptors and prevent pathogen adhesion to the infant gut. Milk oligosaccharides reduce infectivity of a porcine rotavirus strain; however, the effects on human rotaviruses are less well understood. Objective: In this study, we determined the effect of specific and abundant milk oligosaccharides on the infectivity of 2 globally dominant human rotavirus strains. Methods: Four milk oligosaccharides-2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), 3'-sialyllactose (3'SL), 6'-sialyllactose (6'SL), and galacto-oligosaccharides-were tested for their effects on the infectivity of human rotaviruses G1P[8] and G2P[4] through fluorescent focus assays on African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (MA104 cells). Oligosaccharides were added at different time points in the infectivity assays. Infections in the absence of oligosaccharides served as controls. Results: When compared with infections in the absence of glycans, all oligosaccharides substantially reduced the infectivity of both human rotavirus strains in vitro; however, virus strain-specific differences in effects were observed. Compared with control infections, the maximum reduction in G1P[8] infectivity was seen with 2'FL when added after the onset of infection (62% reduction, P rotaviruses in MA104 cells, primarily through an effect on the virus. Although breastfed infants are directly protected, the addition of specific oligosaccharides to infant formula may confer these benefits to formula-fed infants. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of human non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of phlomisoside F (PMF) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549 and explore the possible mechanisms. Methods: The anti-proliferative effect of PMF on A549 cells was determined by CCK-8. Subsequently, migration and invasion were ...

  11. Melatonin prevents maternal fructose intake-induced programmed hypertension in the offspring: roles of nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Leu, Steve; Wu, Kay L H; Lee, Wei-Chia; Chan, Julie Y H

    2014-08-01

    Fructose intake has increased globally and is linked to hypertension. Melatonin was reported to prevent hypertension development. In this study, we examined whether maternal high fructose (HF) intake causes programmed hypertension and whether melatonin therapy confers protection against the process, with a focus on the link to epigenetic changes in the kidney using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with HF (60% diet by weight) alone or with additional 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to four groups: control, HF, control + melatonin (M), and HF + M. Maternal HF caused increases in blood pressure (BP) in the 12-wk-old offspring. Melatonin therapy blunted the HF-induced programmed hypertension and increased nitric oxide (NO) level in the kidney. The identified differential expressed gene (DEGs) that are related to regulation of BP included Ephx2, Col1a2, Gucy1a3, Npr3, Aqp2, Hba-a2, and Ptgs1. Of which, melatonin therapy inhibited expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH, Ephx2 gene encoding protein). In addition, we found genes in arachidonic acid metabolism were potentially involved in the HF-induced programmed hypertension and were affected by melatonin therapy. Together, our data suggest that the beneficial effects of melatonin are attributed to its ability to increase NO level in the kidney, epigenetic regulation of genes related to BP control, and inhibition of SEH expression. The roles of DEGs by the NGS in long-term epigenetic changes in the adult offspring kidney require further clarification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Melatonin improves experimental colitis with sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Sook; Chung, Sook-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Ja-Hyun; Kim, Jun-Bong; Kim, Tae-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Shin; Baik, Haing-Woon

    2015-04-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an epidemic phenomenon in modern countries, and its harmful effects are well known. SD acts as an aggravating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Melatonin is a sleep-related neurohormone, also known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the effects of melatonin on colitis have been poorly characterized. Thus, in this study, we assessed the measurable effects of SD on experimental colitis and the protective effects of melatonin. For this purpose, male imprinting control region (ICR) mice (n = 24) were used; the mice were divided into 4 experimental groups as follows: the control, colitis, colitis with SD and colitis with SD and melatonin groups. Colitis was induced by the administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for 6 days. The mice were sleep-deprived for 3 days. Changes in body weight, histological analyses of colon tissues and the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes were evaluated. SD aggravated inflammation and these effects were reversed by melatonin in the mice with colitis. In addition, weight loss in the mice with colitis with SD was significantly reduced by the injection of melatonin. Treatment with melatonin led to high survival rates in the mice, in spite of colitis with SD. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the serum of mice were significantly increased by SD and reduced by melatonin treatment. The melatonin-treated group showed a histological improvement of inflammation. Upon gene analysis, the expression of the inflammatory genes, protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and calmodulin 3 (CALM3), was increased by SD, and the levels decreased following treatment with melatonin. The expression levels of the apoptosis-related inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A (Wnt5a) genes was

  13. Inhibition of human lanosterol synthase by the constituents of Colocasia esculenta (taro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Yuichi; Mutsuga, Motoh; Tanaka, Rie; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Toyoda, Masatake; Goda, Yukihiro; Shibuya, Masaaki; Ebizuka, Yutaka

    2005-02-01

    Ethanol extracts of lyophilized vegetables were tested for inhibition of human lanosterol synthase (hOSC) in order to find the compounds to suppress cholesterol biosynthesis. Of 130 samples tested, twelve samples showed significant inhibition. Among them, Colocasia esculenta (taro) showed the highest inhibition (55% inhibition at 300 microg/ml). Examination of activity variation among eight taro cultivars indicated that "Aichi-wase" and "Yatsugashira" had the most potent activity for hOSC inhibition. In order to identify the active constituent of taro, ethanol extracts of "Aichi-wase" were partitioned with hexane and aqueous methanol, and fractionated by silica gel column chromatography. Inhibitory activity was concentrated in two major active fractions. Further purification of these fractions by preparative HPLC gave three monogalactosyldiacylglycerols and five digalactosyldiacylglycerols as active compounds that showed 28 to 67% inhibitory activities at the concentration 300 microg/ml.

  14. Melatonin action in neonatal gonadotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Aleš; Kretschmannová, Karla; Mazna, Petr; Svobodová, Irena; Zemková, Hana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. S153-S166 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1519; GA AV ČR IAA5011103; GA AV ČR IAA5011408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : melatonin * gonadotrophs * GnRH Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  15. Inhibiting the Ca2+ Influx Induced by Human CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Drews

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD is to use antibodies that bind to small soluble protein aggregates to reduce their toxic effects. However, these therapies are rarely tested in human CSF before clinical trials because of the lack of sensitive methods that enable the measurement of aggregate-induced toxicity at low concentrations. We have developed highly sensitive single vesicle and single-cell-based assays that detect the Ca2+ influx caused by the CSF of individuals affected with AD and healthy controls, and we have found comparable effects for both types of samples. We also show that an extracellular chaperone clusterin; a nanobody specific to the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ; and bapineuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody raised against Aβ, could all reduce the Ca2+ influx caused by synthetic Aβ oligomers but are less effective in CSF. These assays could be used to characterize potential therapeutic agents in CSF before clinical trials.

  16. Gamma-Glutamylcysteine Inhibits Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    lower GSH levels. Our findings indicate antioxidant effects of GGC, possibly due to a -SH group in its structure. Although we found that in vitro GGC...induction of other antiox- idant enzymes, such as Cu/Zn SOD and catalase , through PPARγ path- way (Nakamura and Omaye 2009; Okuno et al., 2010...Human catalase gene is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma through a response element distinct from that of mouse. Endocr J

  17. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  18. Inhibition of human phenol and estrogen sulfotransferase by certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents

    OpenAIRE

    King, Roberta S.; Ghosh, Anasuya A.; Wu, Jinfang

    2006-01-01

    This study was initiated on the hypothesis that aryl acetic acid and aryl carboxylic acid-containing drugs would inhibit human phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1), and that isoform selectivity would depend on the interaction of the aryl portion of the molecule with the acceptor binding site of the sulfotransferase. This hypothesis was based on results with the rat orthologue enzyme showing that oxidation of phenolic substrates to carboxylic acid derivatives resulted in competitive inhibition of...

  19. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3 II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity.

  20. Structural Basis of Human CYP51 Inhibition by Antifungal Azoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strushkevich, Natallia; Usanov, Sergey A.; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (IBC-Belarus)

    2010-09-22

    The obligatory step in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes is demethylation of sterol precursors at the C14-position, which is catalyzed by CYP51 (sterol 14-alpha demethylase) in three sequential reactions. In mammals, the final product of the pathway is cholesterol, while important intermediates, meiosis-activating sterols, are produced by CYP51. Three crystal structures of human CYP51, ligand-free and complexed with antifungal drugs ketoconazole and econazole, were determined, allowing analysis of the molecular basis for functional conservation within the CYP51 family. Azole binding occurs mostly through hydrophobic interactions with conservative residues of the active site. The substantial conformational changes in the B{prime} helix and F-G loop regions are induced upon ligand binding, consistent with the membrane nature of the protein and its substrate. The access channel is typical for mammalian sterol-metabolizing P450 enzymes, but is different from that observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51. Comparison of the azole-bound structures provides insight into the relative binding affinities of human and bacterial P450 enzymes to ketoconazole and fluconazole, which can be useful for the rational design of antifungal compounds and specific modulators of human CYP51.

  1. Melatonin as a Signaling Molecule for Metabolism Regulation in Response to Hypoxia in the Crab Neohelice granulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Everton Maciel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been identified in a variety of crustacean species, but its function is not as well understood as in vertebrates. The present study investigates whether melatonin has an effect on crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH gene expression, oxygen consumption (VO2 and circulating glucose and lactate levels, in response to different dissolved-oxygen concentrations, in the crab Neohelice granulata, as well as whether these possible effects are eyestalk- or receptor-dependent. Melatonin decreased CHH expression in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (2, 200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1 or 2 mgO2·L−1 (200 pmol·crab−1. Since luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1 did not significantly (p > 0.05 alter the melatonin effect, its action does not seem to be mediated by vertebrate-typical MT1 and MT2 receptors. Melatonin (200 pmol·crab−1 increased the levels of glucose and lactate in crabs exposed to 6 mgO2·L−1, and luzindole (200 nmol·crab−1 decreased this effect, indicating that melatonin receptors are involved in hyperglycemia and lactemia. Melatonin showed no effect on VO2. Interestingly, in vitro incubation of eyestalk ganglia for 45 min at 0.7 mgO2·L−1 significantly (p < 0.05 increased melatonin production in this organ. In addition, injections of melatonin significantly increased the levels of circulating melatonin in crabs exposed for 45 min to 6 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1, 2 (200 and 20,000 pmol·crab−1 and 0.7 (200 or 20,000 pmol·crab−1 mgO2·L−1. Therefore, melatonin seems to have an effect on the metabolism of N. granulata. This molecule inhibited the gene expression of CHH and caused an eyestalk- and receptor-dependent hyperglycemia, which suggests that melatonin may have a signaling role in metabolic regulation in this crab.

  2. Effects of melatonin on the proliferation and apoptosis of sheep granulosa cells under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao; He, Chang-Jiu; Ji, Peng-Yun; Zhuo, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiu-Zhi; Wang, Feng; Tan, Dun-Xian; Liu, Guo-Shi

    2014-11-14

    The cross-talk between oocyte and somatic cells plays a crucial role in the regulation of follicular development and oocyte maturation. As a result, granulosa cell apoptosis causes follicular atresia. In this study, sheep granulosa cells were cultured under thermal stress to induce apoptosis, and melatonin (MT) was examined to evaluate its potential effects on heat-induced granulosa cell injury. The results demonstrated that the Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE) of granulosa cells was significantly decreased (heat 19.70% ± 1.29% vs. control 26.96% ± 1.81%, p thermal stress compared with the control group. Melatonin (10⁻⁷ M) remarkably reduced the negative effects caused by thermal stress in the granulosa cells. This reduction was indicated by the improved CFE and decreased apoptotic rate of these cells. The beneficial effects of melatonin on thermal stressed granulosa cells were not inhibited by its membrane receptor antagonist luzindole. A mechanistic exploration indicated that melatonin (10⁻⁷ M) down-regulated p53 and up-regulated Bcl-2 and LHR gene expression of granulosa cells under thermal stress. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of the protective effects of melatonin on granulosa cells during thermal stress.

  3. Melatonin and Vitamin D Interfere with the Adipogenic Fate of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoli, Valentina; Santaniello, Sara; Cruciani, Sara; Ginesu, Giorgio Carlo; Cossu, Maria Laura; Delitala, Alessandro Palmerio; Serra, Pier Andrea; Ventura, Carlo; Maioli, Margherita

    2017-05-05

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) represent one of the cellular populations resident in adipose tissue. They can be recruited under certain stimuli and committed to become preadipocytes, and then mature adipocytes. Controlling stem cell differentiation towards the adipogenic phenotype could have a great impact on future drug development aimed at counteracting fat depots. Stem cell commitment can be influenced by different molecules, such as melatonin, which we have previously shown to be an osteogenic inducer. Here, we aimed at evaluating the effects elicited by melatonin, even in the presence of vitamin D, on ADSC adipogenesis assessed in a specific medium. The transcription of specific adipogenesis orchestrating genes, such as aP2 , peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ( PPAR-γ ), and that of adipocyte-specific genes, including lipoprotein lipase ( LPL ) and acyl-CoA thioesterase 2 ( ACOT2 ), was significantly inhibited in cells that had been treated in the presence of melatonin and vitamin D, alone or in combination. Protein content and lipid accumulation confirmed a reduction in adipogenesis in ADSCs that had been grown in adipogenic conditions, but in the presence of melatonin and/or vitamin D. Our findings indicate the role of melatonin and vitamin D in deciding stem cell fate, and disclose novel therapeutic approaches against fat depots.

  4. Pro-oxidant effect of melatonin in tumour leucocytes: relation with its cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Ignacio; Espino, Javier; Barriga, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin has many effects on a wide range of physiological functions and is involved in a number of pathological events including oncostatic and neoplastic processes. The tissue protective actions of melatonin are attributed to its well-known antioxidant activity though melatonin might also exert pro-oxidant effects, particularly in tumour cells. This study evaluated the pro-oxidant effects of melatonin in tumour cell lines of human haematopoietic origin. Melatonin treatment is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as revealed by the increase in rhodamine-123 fluorescence, which was associated with significant cytotoxicity and activation of caspase activities. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cells with well-known antioxidants, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), trolox, PEG-catalase and reduced glutathione (GSH), reversed the effects of melatonin on both intracellular ROS production, as on the cytotoxicity and caspase activation. This pro-oxidant action of melatonin may assist in limiting tumour cell growth. © 2010 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2010 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  5. Exogenous melatonin administration is beneficial for male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A concern in the use of exogenous melatonin as a therapeutic intervention is that it may interfere with reproductive function. Herein, we report that chronic exogenous melatonin administration does not impair male reproductive function during ageing and at old age in male Sprague Dawley rats. Methods: ...

  6. Exogenous melatonin administration is beneficial for male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: A concern in the use of exogenous melatonin as a therapeutic intervention is that it may interfere with reproductive function. Herein, we report that chronic exogenous melatonin administration does not impair male reproductive function during ageing and at old age in male Sprague Dawley rats.

  7. Effects of Melatonin on Diurnal Mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a substance produced nocturnally by the pineal gland, melatonin may have utility in promoting sleep during diurnal or other unusual sleep periods . Oral...substance produced nocturnally by the pineal gland, melatonin may have utility in promoting sleep during diurnal or other unusual sleep periods . Oral

  8. Melatonin in antinociception: its therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Lauterbach, Edward C; Ho, Khek Yu; Acuña-Castroviejo, Dario; Zakaria, Rahimah; Brzezinski, Amnon

    2012-06-01

    The intensity of pain sensation exhibits marked day and night variations. Since the intensity of pain perception is low during dark hours of the night when melatonin levels are high, this hormone has been implicated as one of the prime antinociceptive substances. A number of studies have examined the antinociceptive role of melatonin in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain animal models. It has been demonstrated that melatonin exerts antinociceptive actions by acting at both spinal cord and supraspinal levels. The mechanism of antinociceptive actions of melatonin involves opioid, benzodiazepine, α(1)- and α(2)-adrenergic, serotonergic and cholinergic receptors. Most importantly however, the involvement of MT(1)/MT(2) melatonergic receptors in the spinal cord has been well documented as an antinociceptive mechanism in a number of animal models of pain perception. Exogenous melatonin has been used effectively in the management of pain in medical conditions such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and migraine and cluster headache. Melatonin has been tried during surgical operating conditions and has been shown to enhance both preoperative and post-operative analgesia. The present review discusses the available evidence indicating that melatonin, acting through MT(1)/MT(2) melatonin receptors, plays an important role in the pathophysiological mechanism of pain.

  9. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit and...

  10. Brassinosteroids inhibit in vitro angiogenesis in human endothelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rárová, L.; Zahler, S.; Liebl, J.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Sedlák, David; Bartůněk, Petr; Kohout, Ladislav; Strnad, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 13 (2012), s. 1502-1509 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Angiogenesis * Human umbilical vein endothelial cells * Migration Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.803, year: 2012

  11. DENV inhibits type I IFN production in infected cells by cleaving human STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aguirre

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a pathogen with a high impact on human health. It replicates in a wide range of cells involved in the immune response. To efficiently infect humans, DENV must evade or inhibit fundamental elements of the innate immune system, namely the type I interferon response. DENV circumvents the host immune response by expressing proteins that antagonize the cellular innate immunity. We have recently documented the inhibition of type I IFN production by the proteolytic activity of DENV NS2B3 protease complex in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. In the present report we identify the human adaptor molecule STING as a target of the NS2B3 protease complex. We characterize the mechanism of inhibition of type I IFN production in primary human MDDCs by this viral factor. Using different human and mouse primary cells lacking STING, we show enhanced DENV replication. Conversely, mutated versions of STING that cannot be cleaved by the DENV NS2B3 protease induced higher levels of type I IFN after infection with DENV. Additionally, we show that DENV NS2B3 is not able to degrade the mouse version of STING, a phenomenon that severely restricts the replication of DENV in mouse cells, suggesting that STING plays a key role in the inhibition of DENV infection and spread in mice.

  12. Breastfeeding may improve nocturnal sleep and reduce infantile colic: potential role of breast milk melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Engler, Anat; Hadash, Amir; Shehadeh, Naim; Pillar, Giora

    2012-04-01

    Melatonin is secreted during the night in adults but not in infants. It has a hypnotic effect as well as a relaxing effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. It is plausible that breast milk, which consists of melatonin, may have an effect on improving infants' sleep and reducing infantile colic. Our first goal was to assess the differences in the prevalence and severity of infantile colic and nocturnal sleep between breast-fed infants and supplement-fed infants. The second was to characterize the profile of melatonin secretion in human breast milk compared to artificial formulas. Ninety-four mothers of healthy 2 to 4-month-old infants filled a questionnaire regarding irritability/potential infantile colic and sleep characteristics. For the second part, we measured melatonin levels in breast milk of five women every 2 h during 24 h and in three samples of commonly used artificial formulas. Exclusively breast-fed infants had a significantly lower incidence of colic attacks (p = 0.04), lower severity of irritability attacks (p = 0.03), and a trend for longer nocturnal sleep duration (p = 0.06). Melatonin in human milk showed a clear circadian curve and was unmeasurable in all artificial milks. Exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced irritability/colic and a tendency toward longer nocturnal sleep. Breast milk (nocturnal) consists of substantial melatonin levels, whereas artificial formulas do not. We speculate that melatonin which is supplied to the infant via breast milk plays a role in improving sleep and reducing colic in breast-fed infants compared to formula-fed ones.

  13. Melatonin and cortisol secretion profile in patients with pineal cyst before and after pineal cyst resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májovský, Martin; Řezáčová, Lenka; Sumová, Alena; Pospíšilová, Lenka; Netuka, David; Bradáč, Ondřej; Beneš, Vladimír

    2017-05-01

    A pineal cyst is a benign affection of the human pineal gland on the borderline between pathology and normality. Only a small percentage of patients present with symptoms and a surgical treatment is indicated in highly selected cases. A melatonin secretion in patients with a pineal cyst before and after a pineal cyst resection has not been studied yet and the effect of surgery on human metabolism is unknown. The present study examined melatonin, cortisol and blood glucose secretion profiles perioperatively in a surgical group of 4 patients. The control group was represented by 3 asymptomatic patients with a pineal cyst. For each patient, 24-h circadian secretion curves of melatonin, cortisol and glycemia were acquired. An analysis of melatonin profiles showed an expected diurnal pattern with the night peak in patients before the surgery and in the control group. In contrast, melatonin levels in patients after the surgery were at their minimum throughout the whole 24-h period. The cortisol secretion was substantially increased in patients after the surgery. Blood glucose sampling showed no statistically significant differences. Clinical results demonstrated statistically significant headache relief measured by Visual Analogue Scale in patients after the surgery. Despite the small number of examined patients, we can conclude that patients with a pineal cyst preserved the physiological secretion of the hormone melatonin while patients who underwent the pineal cyst resection experienced a loss of endogenous pineal melatonin production, which equated with pinealectomy. Surprisingly, cortisol secretion substantially increased in patients after the surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of human arginase I by substrate and product analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Ilies, Monica; Thorn, Katherine J.; Christianson, David W. (UPENN)

    2010-06-21

    Human arginase I is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of l-arginine to generate l-ornithine and urea. We demonstrate that N-hydroxy-l-arginine (NOHA) binds to this enzyme with K{sub d} = 3.6 {micro}M, and nor-N-hydroxy-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) binds with K{sub d} = 517 nM (surface plasmon resonance) or K{sub d} {approx} 50 nM (isothermal titration calorimetry). Crystals of human arginase I complexed with NOHA and nor-NOHA afford 2.04 and 1.55 {angstrom} resolution structures, respectively, which are significantly improved in comparison with previously-determined structures of the corresponding complexes with rat arginase I. Higher resolution structures clarify the binding interactions of the inhibitors. Finally, the crystal structure of the complex with l-lysine (K{sub d} = 13 {micro}M) is reported at 1.90 {angstrom} resolution. This structure confirms the importance of hydrogen bond interactions with inhibitor {alpha}-carboxylate and {alpha}-amino groups as key specificity determinants of amino acid recognition in the arginase active site.

  15. Humanized-VHH Transbodies that Inhibit HCV Protease and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasak Jittavisutthikul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for safe and broadly effective anti-HCV agents that can cope with genetic multiplicity and mutations of the virus. In this study, humanized-camel VHHs to genotype 3a HCV serine protease were produced and were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, penetratin (PEN. Human hepatic (Huh7 cells transfected with the JFH-1 RNA of HCV genotype 2a and treated with the cell penetrable nanobodies (transbodies had a marked reduction of the HCV RNA intracellularly and in their culture fluids, less HCV foci inside the cells and less amounts of HCV core antigen in culture supernatants compared with the infected cells cultured in the medium alone. The PEN-VHH-treated-transfected cells also had up-regulation of the genes coding for the host innate immune response (TRIF, TRAF3, IRF3, IL-28B and IFN-β, indicating that the cell penetrable nanobodies rescued the host innate immune response from the HCV mediated-suppression. Computerized intermolecular docking revealed that the VHHs bound to residues of the protease catalytic triad, oxyanion loop and/or the NS3 N-terminal portion important for non-covalent binding of the NS4A protease cofactor protein. The so-produced transbodies have high potential for testing further as a candidate for safe, broadly effective and virus mutation tolerable anti-HCV agents.

  16. Inhibition of Human Arginase I by Substrate adn Product Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Di Costanzo; M Ilies; K Thorn; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Human arginase I is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea. We demonstrate that N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) binds to this enzyme with K(d)=3.6 microM, and nor-N-hydroxy-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) binds with K(d)=517 nM (surface plasmon resonance) or K(d) approximately 50 nM (isothermal titration calorimetry). Crystals of human arginase I complexed with NOHA and nor-NOHA afford 2.04 and 1.55 A resolution structures, respectively, which are significantly improved in comparison with previously-determined structures of the corresponding complexes with rat arginase I. Higher resolution structures clarify the binding interactions of the inhibitors. Finally, the crystal structure of the complex with L-lysine (K(d)=13 microM) is reported at 1.90 A resolution. This structure confirms the importance of hydrogen bond interactions with inhibitor alpha-carboxylate and alpha-amino groups as key specificity determinants of amino acid recognition in the arginase active site.

  17. Melatonin Secretion Pattern in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melatonin...... secretion and sleep patterns differed in these patients with and without remifentanil infusion. Eight patients were included. Blood-melatonin was taken every 4th hour, and polysomnography was carried out continually during a 48-hour period. American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were used for sleep...... scoring if sleep patterns were identified; otherwise, Watson's classification was applied. As remifentanil was periodically administered during the study, its effect on melatonin and sleep was assessed. Melatonin secretion in these patients followed a phase-delayed diurnal curve. We did not observe any...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Alternative Administration Routes of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P.H.; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melatonin is traditionally administered orally but has a poor and variable bioavailability. This study aims to present an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed...... and included experimental or clinical studies, investigating pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin in vivo. Alternative administration routes were defined as all administration routes except oral and intravenous. Results: 10 studies were included in the review. Intranasal...... administration exhibited a quick absorption rate and high bioavailability. Transdermal administration displayed a variable absorption rate and possible deposition of melatonin in the skin. Oral transmucosal administration of melatonin exhibited a high plasma concentration compared to oral administration...

  19. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis enhances leukocyte rolling and adhesion in human microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Mokarram

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is a multifunctional signaling molecule that regulates important cellular events in inflammation including leukocyte recruitment. Previous studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of NO synthesis induces leukocyte recruitment in various in vitro and animal models. However, it is not known whether NO modulation has similar effects on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions within the human microvasculature. The present study explored the effect of systemic L-NAME treatment on leukocyte recruitment in the SCID-hu mouse model. Methods Human skin xenografts were transplanted in SCID mice to study human leukocyte dynamics in human vasculature. Early events of human leukocyte recruitment in human vasculature were studied using intravital microscopy. NO synthesis was pharmacologically inhibited using NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to elucidate E-selectin expression in human xenograft skin. Human neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions were also studied in an in vitro flow chamber assay system. P- and E-selectin expression on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs was measured using ELISA. Platelet-activating factor (PAF synthesis was detected using a TLC-based assay. Results L-NAME treatment significantly enhanced the rolling and adhesion of human leukocytes to the human vasculature. Functional blocking of P- and E-selectins significantly inhibited rolling but not adhesion induced by inhibition of NO synthesis. Systemic L-NAME treatment enhanced E-selectin expression in human xenograft skin. L-NAME treatment significantly enhanced P- and E-selectin expression on HUVECs. L-NAME treatment did not significantly modify neutrophil rolling or adhesion to HUVECs indicating that L-NAME−induced subtle P- and E-selectin expression was insufficient to elicit dynamic neutrophil-HUVEC interactions in vitro. Moreover, synthesis of endothelial

  20. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...... in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been...

  1. Diterpenoids from Tetraclinis articulata that inhibit various human leukocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Alejandro F; Quílez del Moral, José F; Lucas, Rut; Payá, Miguel; Akssira, Mohamed; Akaad, Said; Mellouki, Fouad

    2003-06-01

    Ten new compounds, eight of them pimarane derivatives (1-8), together with a menthane dimer (9) and a totarane diterpenoid (10), were isolated from the leaves and wood of Tetraclinis articulata. The structures of 1-10 were established by using spectroscopic techniques, including 2D NMR spectra. Pimaranes 1-5 were found to possess an unusual cis interannular union of the B and C rings, which, from a biogenetic perspective, could be derived from the hydration of a carbocation at C-8. Compounds 4-6 and a mixture of 7 and 11 modulated different human leukocyte functions at a concentration of 10 microM, mainly the degranulation process measured as myeloperoxidase release and, to a lesser extent, the superoxide production measured by chemiluminescence.

  2. Absence of a serum melatonin rhythm under acutely extended darkness in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furney Penney

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to studies showing gradual adaptation of melatonin (MT rhythms to an advanced photoperiod in humans and rodents, we previously demonstrated that equine MT rhythms complete a 6-h light/dark (LD phase advance on the first post-shift day. This suggested the possibility that melatonin secretion in the horse may be more strongly light-driven as opposed to endogenously rhythmic and light entrained. The present study investigates whether equine melatonin is endogenously rhythmic in extended darkness (DD. Methods Six healthy, young mares were maintained in a lightproof barn under an LD cycle that mimicked the ambient natural photoperiod outside. Blood samples were collected at 2-h intervals for 48 consecutive h: 24-h in LD, followed by 24-h in extended dark (DD. Serum was harvested and stored at -20°C until melatonin and cortisol were measured by commercial RIA kits. Results Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (n = 6/time point revealed a significant circadian time (CT x lighting condition interaction (p for melatonin with levels non-rhythmic and consistently high during DD (CT 0-24. In contrast, cortisol displayed significant clock-time variation throughout LD and DD (p = .0009 with no CT x light treatment interaction (p = .4018. Cosinor analysis confirmed a significant 24-h temporal variation for melatonin in LD (p = .0002 that was absent in DD (p = .51, while there was an apparent circadian component in cortisol, which approached significance in LD (p = .076, and was highly significant in DD (p = .0059. Conclusions The present finding of no 24 h oscillation in melatonin in DD is the first evidence indicating that melatonin is not gated by a self-sustained circadian process in the horse. Melatonin is therefore not a suitable marker of circadian phase in this species. In conjunction with recent similar findings in reindeer, it appears that biosynthesis of melatonin in the pineal glands of some ungulates is strongly driven

  3. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  4. Policosanol inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and enhances low density lipoprotein processing in cultured human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, R; Fernandez, S I; Del Rio, A; Gonzalez, R M; Fraga, V; Amor, A M; Mas, R M

    1994-01-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of aliphatic primary alcohols isolated and purified from sugar cane wax, that induces cholesterol-lowering effects in experimental models and human beings. When human lung fibroblasts were incubated with policosanol for 48 hours prior to the experiment, a dose dependent inhibition of 14C-acetate incorporation into total cholesterol was observed, whereas labeled mevalonate incorporation was not inhibited. Even when cholesterol synthesis was not strongly inhibited, low density lipoprotein (LDL) processing was markedly enhanced. Thus, LDL binding, internalization and degradation were significantly increased after policosanol treatment. In addition, despite the fact that'cholesterol generation was not inhibited at the lowest dose of policosanol assayed, LDL processing was significantly increased. The current data indicate that policosanol inhibits cholesterol synthesis at the earliest steps of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. On the other hand, this study suggests that the increase in LDL processing may be partially explained by the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, even though an sterol-independent mechanism might be responsible for the enhancement of LDL-receptor activity.

  5. Effects of long-term light, darkness and oral administration of melatonin on serum levels of melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Farhadi; Majid Gharghani; Zahra Farhadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Continuous light or darkness has various effects on different systems. In the present research work, the effects of constant light and darkness exposure of male rats and oral administration of exogenous melatonin on the serum levels of melatonin have been studied. Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups of: (1) Control, (2) melatonin, (3) light, (4) light and melatonin, (5) darkness, and (6) darkness and melatonin. All groups were placed according to...

  6. Replication of many human viruses is refractory to inhibition by endogenous cellular microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogerd, Hal P; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Kennedy, Edward M; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Griffin, Diane E; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-07-01

    The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. Importance: Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  7. Melatonin prevents postovulatory oocyte aging and promotes subsequent embryonic development in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gao, Ying-Ying; Chen, Li; Nie, Zheng-Wen; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Schatten, Heide; Zhang, Xia; Miao, Yi-Liang

    2017-06-26

    Oxidative stress is known as a major contributing factor involved in oocyte aging, which negatively affects oocyte quality and development after fertilization. Melatonin is an effective free radical scavenger and its metabolites AFMK and AMK are powerful detoxifiers that eliminate free radicals. In this study, we used porcine oocytes to test the hypothesis that melatonin could scavenge free radicals produced during oocyte aging, thereby maintaining oocyte quality. We compared reactive oxygen species levels, apoptosis levels, mitochondrial membrane potential ratios, total glutathione contents and expression levels in fresh, aged and melatonin-treated aged porcine oocytes and observed the percentage of blastocyst formation following parthenogenetic activation. We found that melatonin could effectively maintain the morphology of oocytes observed in control oocytes, alleviate oxidative stress, markedly decrease early apoptosis levels, retard the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential and significantly promote subsequent embryonic development in oocytes aged for 24 hr in vitro . These results strongly suggest that melatonin can prevent postovulatory oocyte aging and promote subsequent embryonic development in the pig, which might find practical applications to control oocyte aging in other mammalian species including humans to maintain the quality of human oocytes when performing clinical assisted reproductive technology.

  8. Do magnetic fields cause increased risk of childhood leukemia via melatonin disruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Denis L; Reiter, Russel J

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported associations between exposure to power frequency magnetic fields and increased risk of certain cancer and noncancer illnesses. For childhood leukemia, a doubling of risk has been associated with exposures above 0.3/0.4 microT. Here, we propose that the melatonin hypothesis, in which power frequency magnetic fields suppress the nocturnal production of melatonin in the pineal gland, accounts for the observed increased risk of childhood leukemia. Such melatonin disruption has been shown in animals, especially with exposure to electric and/or rapid on/off magnetic fields. Equivocal evidence has been obtained from controlled laboratory magnetic field exposures of volunteers, although the exposure conditions are generally atypical of neighborhood exposures. In contrast, support for the hypothesis is found in the body of studies showing magnetic field disruption of melatonin in human populations chronically exposed to both electric and magnetic fields associated with electricity distribution. Further support comes from the observation that melatonin is highly protective of oxidative damage to the human haemopoietic system. Aspects of the hypothesis are amenable to further investigation. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  9. Pineal Calcification, Melatonin Production, Aging, Associated Health Consequences and Rejuvenation of the Pineal Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun Xian; Xu, Bing; Zhou, Xinjia; Reiter, Russel J

    2018-01-31

    The pineal gland is a unique organ that synthesizes melatonin as the signaling molecule of natural photoperiodic environment and as a potent neuronal protective antioxidant. An intact and functional pineal gland is necessary for preserving optimal human health. Unfortunately, this gland has the highest calcification rate among all organs and tissues of the human body. Pineal calcification jeopardizes melatonin's synthetic capacity and is associated with a variety of neuronal diseases. In the current review, we summarized the potential mechanisms of how this process may occur under pathological conditions or during aging. We hypothesized that pineal calcification is an active process and resembles in some respects of bone formation. The mesenchymal stem cells and melatonin participate in this process. Finally, we suggest that preservation of pineal health can be achieved by retarding its premature calcification or even rejuvenating the calcified gland.

  10. Inhibition of thermolysin and human alpha-thrombin by cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Böttcher, A; Quezada, C M; Meade, T J; Gray, H B

    1999-05-01

    Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes have been shown to inhibit the replication of the ocular herpes virus. It is well known that these complexes have a high affinity for nitrogenous donors such as histidine residues, and it is possible that they bind to (and inhibit) an enzyme that is crucial to viral replication. In model studies, we have found that [Co(acacen)(NH3)2]+ is an effective irreversible inhibitor of thermolysin at millimolar concentrations; it also inhibits human alpha-thrombin. Axial ligand exchange with an active-site histidine is the proposed mechanism of inhibition. The activity of thermolysin and thrombin can be protected by binding a reversible inhibitor to the active site before addition of the cobalt(III) complex.

  11. Modulation of recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamy, Jean-Charles; Iglesias, Caroline; Lackmy, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The neural control for muscle coordination during human locomotion involves spinal and supraspinal networks, but little is known about the exact mechanisms implicated. The present study focused on modulation of heteronymous recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones at different...... times in the gait cycle, when quadriceps (Quad) muscle activity overlaps that in tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol). The effects of femoral nerve stimulation on ankle motoneurones were investigated during treadmill walking and during tonic co-contraction of Quad and TA/Sol while standing. Recurrent...... inhibition of TA motoneurones depended on the level of background EMG, and was similar during walking and standing for matched background EMG levels. On the other hand, recurrent inhibition in Sol was reduced in early stance, with respect to standing, and enhanced in late stance. Reduced inhibition in Sol...

  12. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  13. Melatonin attenuates D-galactose-induced memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration via RAGE/NF-K B/JNK signaling pathway in aging mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tahir; Badshah, Haroon; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin acts as a pleiotropic agent in various age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the underlying neuroprotective mechanism of melatonin against D-galactose-induced memory and synaptic dysfunction, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. D-galactose was administered (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) for 60 days. After 30 days of D-galactose administration, vehicle (same volume) or melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for 30 days. Our behavioral (Morris water maze and Y-maze test) results revealed that chronic melatonin treatment alleviated D-galactose-induced memory impairment. Additionally, melatonin treatment reversed D-galactose-induced synaptic disorder via increasing the level of memory-related pre-and postsynaptic protein markers. We also determined that melatonin enhances memory function in the D-galactose-treated mice possibly via reduction of elevated ROS and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Furthermore, Western blot and morphological results showed that melatonin treatment significantly reduced D-galactose-induced neuroinflammation through inhibition of microgliosis (Iba-1) and astrocytosis (GFAP), and downregulating other inflammatory mediators such as p-IKKβ, p-NF-K B65, COX2, NOS2, IL-1β, and TNFα. Moreover, melatonin lowered the oxidative stress kinase p-JNK which suppressed various apoptotic markers, that is, cytochrome C, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1, and prevent neurodegeneration. Hence, melatonin attenuated the D-galactose-induced memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration possibly through RAGE/NF-K B/JNK pathway. Taken together, our data suggest that melatonin could be a promising, safe and endogenous compatible antioxidant candidate for age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cordycepin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line H1975 via Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris with notable anticancer activity. Though the prominent inhibitory activity was reported in different kinds of cancer cell lines, the concrete mechanisms remain elusive. It was reported that cordycepin could be converted into tri-phosphates in vivo to confuse a number of enzymes and interfere the normal cell function. For the inhibitory mechanism of EGFR inhibitors and the structure similarity of ATP and tri-phosphated cordycepin, human lung cancer cell line H1975 was employed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cordycepin. The results showed that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that H1975 cells could be arrested at the G0/G1 phase after cordycepin treatment. The expression levels of apoptosis-related protein Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 and phosphorylated expression levels of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 were all decreased compared with the control group stimulated with EGF. However, the protein expression levels of proapoptotic protein Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were increased. These results implied that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via the EGFR signaling pathway. Our results indicated that there was potential to seek a novel EGFR inhibitor from cordycepin and its chemical derivatives.

  15. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  16. Differential inhibition of aflatoxin B1 oxidation by gestodene action on human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B R; Oh, H S; Kim, D H

    1997-11-01

    Human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A is known to be involved in the formation of both aflatoxin B1-exo-8,9-epoxide (exo-epoxidation) and aflatoxin Q1 (3 alpha-hydroxylation). Gestodene, a known inactivator of P450 3A4, inhibited the formation of AFB1 metabolites in a variety of ways depending on the incubation condition. Preincubation of gestodene with human liver microsomes prior to the addition of AFB1 inhibited both exo-epoxidation and 3 alpha-hydroxylation whereas simultaneous incubation of gestodene with AFB1 only inhibited 3 alpha-hydroxylation. These results suggest that two independent substrate binding sites exist in P450 3A4, and AFB1 binds to both of the binding sites. Gestodene selectively binds to one of the binding sites leading to the formation of AFQ1, whereas it does not affect the formation of exo-epoxide via the other binding site.

  17. Tyrisonase inhibition and melanin reduction of human melanocytes (HEMn-MP) using Anacardium occidentale L extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Gaffar, R; Abdul Majid, F A; Sarmidi, M R

    2008-07-01

    Cashew (Anacardium occindentale L) leaves extract (CLE) has potential as tyrosinase inhibitor that can be used for therapeutic in pigmentation problem. This study investigates the real potential of CLE to inhibit tyrosinase and melanin reduction using human epidermal melanocytes. The extracts were exposed to the human melanocytes for more than 24 hours. The CLE extract exhibited potential as tyrosinase inhibitor, reduced melanin and high in antioxidant activity relative to commercial extract of Emblica sp.

  18. Growth inhibition of human cancer cells in vitro by T-type calcium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Yeol; Park, Seong Jun; Park, Sung Jun; Lee, Min Joo; Rhim, Hyewhon; Seo, Seon Hee; Kim, Ki-Sun

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the preliminary biological results that novel T-type calcium channel blockers inhibit the growth of human cancer cells by blocking calcium influx into the cell, based on unknown mechanism on the cell cycle responsible for cellular proliferation. Among the selected compounds from compound library, compound 9c (KYS05041) was identified to be nearly equipotent with Cisplatin against some human cancers in the micromolar range.

  19. Anti-(human immunodeficiency virus) activity of polyoxotungstates and their inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P S; Jones, C J; Mahmood, N; Evans, I G; Goff, M; Cooper, R; Hay, A J

    1995-01-01

    Heteropolyoxotungstates of the Keggin class containing different heteroatoms were tested for inhibition of two strains of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1); they exhibited varying antiviral activity. Compounds containing boron were inactive, only one of those containing phosphorus showed selective anti-viral activity, whereas all silicon-containing compounds exhibited significant anti-viral activity in C8166 cells infected with the IIIB strain. Their effectiveness was some 10-fold higher in JM cells with selectivity indices of about 2000. The silicotungstates were effective inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, showing greater inhibition with RNA/DNA template primers than with DNA/DNA template.primer. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that they inhibit the enzyme by different mechanisms, as, of the four compounds examined, two competed with template.primer and two competed with deoxynucleoside triphosphate. Inhibition of DNA polymerase activity by these compounds was compared using polymerases from different sources, including human; although not necessarily most specific for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, they did not inhibit all DNA polymerases to a similar degree. PMID:7536411

  20. Aspirin-like molecules that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus 1 replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, Cândida F.; Paridaen, Judith T. M. L.; Rutten, Karla; Huigen, Marleen C. D. G.; van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Middel, Jeena; Beerens, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Schuurman, Rob; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Verhoef, Jan; Nottet, Hans S. L. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some anti-inflammatory molecules are also known to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. We found that o-(acetoxyphenyl)hept-2-ynyl sulfide (APHS), a recently synthesized non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecule can inhibit HIV-1 replication. The aim of this study was to clarify

  1. Resveratrol inhibits steroidogenesis in human fetal adrenocortical cells at the end of first trimester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchuk, Iuliia; Morvan, Marie-Line; Søeborg, Tue

    2017-01-01

    SCOPE: Resveratrol has a diverse array of healthful effects on metabolic parameters in different experimental paradigms but has also potential to inhibit steroidogenesis in rodent adrenals. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of resveratrol on human fetal adrenal steroido...

  2. Antiviral activity of human lactoferrin : Inhibition of alphavirus interaction with heparan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, Barry-Lee; Aneke, Onwuchekwa J.C.; Smit, Jolanda; Kimata, Koji; Bittman, Robert; Meijer, Dirk K.F.; Wilschut, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Human lactoferrin is a component of the non-specific immune system with distinct antiviral properties. We used alphaviruses, adapted to interaction with heparan sulfate (HS), as a tool to investigate the mechanism of lactoferrin's antiviral activity. Lactoferrin inhibited infection of BHK-21 cells

  3. Inhibition of polyprotein processing and RNA replication of human rhinovirus by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate involves metal ions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenn, B.M.; Holzer, B.; Gaudernak, E.; Triendl, A.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Seipelt, J.

    2005-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an antiviral compound that was shown to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses (HRVs), poliovirus, and influenza virus. To elucidate the mechanism of PDTC, the effects on the individual steps of the infection cycle of HRV were investigated. PDTC did not

  4. Inhibition of microRNA-383 promotes apoptosis of human colon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of microRNA-383 promotes apoptosis of human colon cancer cells by upregulation of caspase-2 gene expression. Jianfeng Gu1,2, Wei Fu3, Yang Zong2, Qiao Chen2, Xiaojin Zhang2, Jianqing. Meng2, Haixin Qian1*. 1Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, ...

  5. Expression of Q227L-galphas in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells inhibits tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J; Bander, J A; Santore, T A; Chen, Y; Ram, P T; Smit, M J; Iyengar, R

    1998-01-01

    The effects of expression of mutant (Q227L)-activated Galphas and elevation of cAMP on mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) activity and the transformed phenotype were studied in the MCF-7 human mammary epithelial cell line. Elevation of cAMP partially inhibited the epidermal growth

  6. [Melatonin as a most important factor of natural electromagnetic fields impacting patients with hypertensive disease and coronary heart disease. Part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, S I; Breus, T K

    2011-01-01

    Part 1 of this review is devoted to modern concepts of mechanisms of action of weak natural and artificial electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the cardiovascular system at the cellular, molecular, and atomic levels with the participation of Ca2+ and melatonin. EMF are known to affect Ca2+ homeostasis and suppress melatonin activity in a wide wavelength range. Ca2+ ions in pinealocytes are involved in regulation of cAMP synthesis that mediates conversion of serotonin into melatonin. Their leakage from pinealocytes results in a decrease of the cAMP level and thereby suppresses production of melatonin. At the same time, the cyclic circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion controls the overall activity of human body from eating to sleep and metabolism.

  7. Melatonin: General Features and its Role in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Erdem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a growing interest in melatonin all over the world. The main task of protecting the body's biological clock, which set the rhythm of melatonin, involves many biological and physiological processes of the body. Cell renewal, strengthening of the immune system and body temperature regulation are other tasks of melatonin. Melatonin, with its lipophilic property, is the most powerful antioxidant as it can reach all body areas and can easily pass the blood-brain barrier. The fact that individuals with low levels of melatonin have sleep problems lead to the consideration of melatonin as a therapeutic medicine in this field. The detailed researches have shown that melatonin can improve sleep quality without changing the total duration of sleep. Nevertheless, despite high number of researches done, the functions of melatonin have not yet fully understood. Therefore, review of the available information related to melatonin will be guide for researchers in the field.

  8. Melatonin in perioperative medicine: Current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Maitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a new addition to the armamentarium of anesthesiologist, has some unique properties that are highly desirable in routine peri-operative care. Available clinical data show that preoperative melatonin is as effective as benzodiazepines in reducing preoperative anxiety with minimal action on psychomotor performance and sleep wake cycle. It may be considered as a safe and effective alternative of benzodiazepines as preoperative anxiolytic. It may have opioid sparing effect, may reduce intraocular pressure, and have role in prevention of postoperative delirium. The short-term administration of melatonin is free from significant adverse effects also.

  9. Cimicifuga foetida L. inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus in HEp-2 and A549 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo Chih; Chang, Jung San; Chiang, Lien Chai; Lin, Chun Ching

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) causes serious pediatric infection of the lower respiratory tract without effective therapeutic modality. Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (SMGGT; Shoma-kakkon-to) has been proven to be effective at inhibiting HRSV-induced plaque formation, and Cimicifuga foetida is the major constituent of SMGGT. We tested the hypothesis that C. foetida effectively inhibited the cytopathic effects of HRSV by a plaque reduction assay in both human upper (HEp2) and lower (A549) respiratory tract cell lines. Its ability to stimulate anti-viral cytokines was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). C. foetida dose-dependently inhibited HRSV-induced plaque formation (p < 0.0001) before and after viral inoculation, especially in A549 cells (p < 0.0001). C. foetida dose-dependently inhibited viral attachment (p < 0.0001) and could increase heparins effect on viral attachment. In addition, C. foetida time-dependently and dose-dependently (p < 0.0001) inhibited HRSV internalization. C. foetida could stimulate epithelial cells to secrete IFN-β to counteract viral infection. However, C. foetida did not stimulate TNF-α secretion. Therefore, C. foetida could be useful in managing HRSV infection. This is the first evidence to support that C. foetida possesses antiviral activity.

  10. Synergistic inhibition of human cytomegalovirus replication by interferon-alpha/beta and interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that gamma interferon (IFN-γ synergizes with the innate IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β to inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 replication in vitro. To determine whether this phenomenon is shared by other herpesviruses, we investigated the effects of IFNs on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replication. Results We have found that as with HSV-1, IFN-γ synergizes with the innate IFNs (IFN-α/β to potently inhibit HCMV replication in vitro. While pre-treatment of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs with IFN-α, IFN-β or IFN-γ alone inhibited HCMV plaque formation by ~30 to 40-fold, treatment with IFN-α and IFN-γ or IFN-β and IFN-γ inhibited HCMV plaque formation by 163- and 662-fold, respectively. The generation of isobole plots verified that the observed inhibition of HCMV plaque formation and replication in HFFs by IFN-α/β and IFN-γ was a synergistic interaction. Additionally, real-time PCR analyses of the HCMV immediate early (IE genes (IE1 and IE2 revealed that IE mRNA expression was profoundly decreased in cells stimulated with IFN-α/β and IFN-γ (~5-11-fold as compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, decreased IE mRNA expression was accompanied by a decrease in IE protein expression, as demonstrated by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Conclusion These findings suggest that IFN-α/β and IFN-γ synergistically inhibit HCMV replication through a mechanism that may involve the regulation of IE gene expression. We hypothesize that IFN-γ produced by activated cells of the adaptive immune response may potentially synergize with endogenous type I IFNs to inhibit HCMV dissemination in vivo.

  11. Sensory gating, inhibition control and gamma oscillations in the human somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chan, Pei-Ying S; Niddam, David M; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-02-04

    Inhibiting the responses to irrelevant stimuli is an essential component of human cognitive function. Pre-attentive auditory sensory gating (SG), an attenuated neural activation to the second identical stimulus, has been found to be related to the performance of higher-hierarchical brain function. However, it remains unclear whether other cortical regions, such as somatosensory cortex, also possess similar characteristics, or if such a relationship is modality-specific. This study used magnetoencephalography to record neuromagnetic responses to paired-pulse electrical stimulation to median nerve in 22 healthy participants. Somatosensory SG ratio and cortical brain oscillations were obtained and compared with the behavioral performance of inhibition control, as evaluated by somatosensory and auditory Go-Nogo tasks. The results showed that somatosensory P35m SG ratio correlated with behavioral performance of inhibition control. Such relationship was also established in relation to the auditory Go-Nogo task. Finally, a higher frequency value of evoked gamma oscillations was found to relate to a better somatosensory SG ability. In conclusion, our data provided an empirical link between automatic cortical inhibition and behavioral performance of attentive inhibition control. This study invites further research on the relationships among gamma oscillations, neurophysiological indices, and behavioral performance in clinical populations in terms of SG or cortical inhibition.

  12. Mechanism of inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2 by flavonoids: rationale for lead design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lättig, Jens; Böhl, Markus; Fischer, Petra; Tischer, Sandra; Tietböhl, Claudia; Menschikowski, Mario; Gutzeit, Herwig O.; Metz, Peter; Pisabarro, M. Teresa

    2007-08-01

    The human secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2-IIA) is a lipolytic enzyme. Its inhibition leads to a decrease in eicosanoids levels and, thereby, to reduced inflammation. Therefore, PLA2-IIA is of high pharmacological interest in treatment of chronic diseases such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Quercetin and naringenin, amongst other flavonoids, are known for their anti-inflammatory activity by modulation of enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, the mechanism by which flavonoids inhibit Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) remained unclear so far. Flavonoids are widely produced in plant tissues and, thereby, suitable targets for pharmaceutical extractions and chemical syntheses. Our work focuses on understanding the binding modes of flavonoids to PLA2, their inhibition mechanism and the rationale to modify them to obtain potent and specific inhibitors. Our computational and experimental studies focused on a set of 24 compounds including natural flavonoids and naringenin-based derivatives. Experimental results on PLA2-inhibition showed good inhibitory activity for quercetin, kaempferol, and galangin, but relatively poor for naringenin. Several naringenin derivatives were synthesized and tested for affinity and inhibitory activity improvement. 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin revealed comparable PLA2 inhibition to quercetin-like compounds. We characterized the binding mode of these compounds and the determinants for their affinity, selectivity, and inhibitory potency. Based on our results, we suggest C(6) as the most promising position of the flavonoid scaffold to introduce chemical modifications to improve affinity, selectivity, and inhibition of PLA2-IIA by flavonoids.

  13. BET bromodomain inhibition rescues erythropoietin differentiation of human erythroleukemia cell line UT7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Lefèvre, Carine; Granger, Marine; Kadri, Zahra; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UT7 erythroleukemia cells are known to be refractory to differentiate. ► Brief JQ1 treatment initiates the first steps of erythroid differentiation program. ► Engaged UT7 cells then maturate in the presence of erythropoietin. ► Sustained JQ1 treatment inhibits both proliferation and erythroid differentiation. -- Abstract: Malignant transformation is a multistep process requiring oncogenic activation, promoting cellular proliferation, frequently coupled to inhibition of terminal differentiation. Consequently, forcing the reengagement of terminal differentiation of transformed cells coupled or not with an inhibition of their proliferation is a putative therapeutic approach to counteracting tumorigenicity. UT7 is a human leukemic cell line able to grow in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and Epo. This cell line has been widely used to study Epo-R/Epo signaling pathways but is a poor model for erythroid differentiation. We used the BET bromodomain inhibition drug JQ1 to target gene expression, including that of c-Myc. We have shown that only 2 days of JQ1 treatment was required to transitory inhibit Epo-induced UT7 proliferation and to restore terminal erythroid differentiation. This study highlights the importance of a cellular erythroid cycle break mediated by c-Myc inhibition before initiation of the erythropoiesis program and describes a new model for BET bromodomain inhibitor drug application.

  14. BET bromodomain inhibition rescues erythropoietin differentiation of human erythroleukemia cell line UT7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Lefevre, Carine; Granger, Marine; Kadri, Zahra [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chretien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Genetics Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chretien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UT7 erythroleukemia cells are known to be refractory to differentiate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brief JQ1 treatment initiates the first steps of erythroid differentiation program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engaged UT7 cells then maturate in the presence of erythropoietin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustained JQ1 treatment inhibits both proliferation and erythroid differentiation. -- Abstract: Malignant transformation is a multistep process requiring oncogenic activation, promoting cellular proliferation, frequently coupled to inhibition of terminal differentiation. Consequently, forcing the reengagement of terminal differentiation of transformed cells coupled or not with an inhibition of their proliferation is a putative therapeutic approach to counteracting tumorigenicity. UT7 is a human leukemic cell line able to grow in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and Epo. This cell line has been widely used to study Epo-R/Epo signaling pathways but is a poor model for erythroid differentiation. We used the BET bromodomain inhibition drug JQ1 to target gene expression, including that of c-Myc. We have shown that only 2 days of JQ1 treatment was required to transitory inhibit Epo-induced UT7 proliferation and to restore terminal erythroid differentiation. This study highlights the importance of a cellular erythroid cycle break mediated by c-Myc inhibition before initiation of the erythropoiesis program and describes a new model for BET bromodomain inhibitor drug application.

  15. Melatonin: Antioxidant and modulatory properties in age-related changes during Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia H; Colato, Rafaela P; Mazotti, Tamires T; Tazinafo, Lucas F; Toldo, Míriam Paula A; do Vale, Gabriel T; Tirapelli, Carlos R; do Prado, José C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on selected biomarkers of innate and humoral immune response as well as the antioxidant/oxidant status (superoxide dismutase-SOD and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) to understand whether age-related changes would influence the development of acute Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection. Young- (5 weeks) and middle-aged (18 months) Wistar rats were orally treated with melatonin (gavage) (05 mg/kg/day), 9 days after infection. A significant increase in both SOD activity and GSH levels was found in plasma from all middle-aged melatonin-treated animals. Melatonin triggered enhanced expression of major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) antigens on antigen-presenting cell (APC) and peritoneal macrophages in all treated animals. High levels of CD4 + CD28-negative T cells (*PMelatonin induced a significant reduction (***PMelatonin also triggered an upregulation of CD80 and CD86 expression in all young-treated groups. Significant percentages of B and spleen dendritic cells in middle-aged infected and treated animals were observed. Our data reveal new features of melatonin action in inhibiting membrane lipid peroxidation, through the reduction in 8-isoprostane, upregulating the antioxidant defenses and triggering an effective balance in the antioxidant/oxidant status during acute infection. The ability of melatonin to counteract the immune alterations induced by aging added further support to its use as a potential therapeutic target not only for T. cruzi infection but also for other immunocompromised states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Doxorubicin-induced behavioral disturbances in rats: protective effect of melatonin and captopril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziriova, S; Repova Bednarova, K; Krajcirovicova, K; Hrenak, J; Rajkovicova, R; Arendasova, K; Kamodyova, N; Celec, P; Zorad, S; Adamcova, M; Paulis, L; Simko, F

    2014-09-01

    Doxorubicin is a recognized chemotherapeutic agent widely employed in human malignancies. The limiting factor of its use is a number of side effects. The aim of this work was to show, whether administration of doxorubicin could induce behavioral disturbances in rats, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril or melatonin can modify these potential alterations. Four groups of 3-month-old Wistar rats (twelve per group) were treated for 4 weeks: control (placebo-treated), doxorubicin (DOX) (5mg/kg i.v. in a single intravenous dose), DOX rats treated with either melatonin (10mg/kg/24h) or captopril (100mg/kg/24h). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the level of oxidative stress were investigated and behavioral tests of anxiety-open field test (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM) and light-dark box (LDB) were accomplished. Doxorubicin increased significantly systolic blood pressure and parameters of oxidative stress. Moreover, doxorubicin enhanced the level of anxiety in the tests of OF, EPM, and LDB. Captopril and melatonin prevented the blood pressure rise and the enhancement of oxidative load. Importantly, both substances reduced the parameters of anxiety. Chronic administration of captopril or melatonin has shown anxiolytic effect in the model of doxorubicin-induced anxiety. It does not seem unreasonable to suppose that this protective effect of captopril or melatonin against anxiety development might have been related to the antioxidative effects of both substances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yang-Chang [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lan, Yu-Hsuan [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chang, Fang-Rong [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Wen [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  18. Zearalenone Inhibits Rat and Human 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, isoforms 1 (HSD11B1 and 2 (HSD11B2, have been demonstrated to be the regulators of the local level of active glucocorticoid, which has a broad range of physiological actions. In the present study, the potency of zearalenone was tested for the inhibition of HSD11B1 and HSD11B2 in rat and human tissues. Zearalenone showed potent inhibition of HSD11B2 with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 calculated at 49.63 and 32.22 μM for the rat and human, respectively. Results showed that zearalenone competitively inhibited HSD11B2 when a steroid substrate was used. However, it served as an uncompetitive inhibitory factor when the cofactor NAD+ was used. In contrast, the potency of zearalenone to inhibit both rat and human HSD11B1 was diminished, with the concentration of 100 μM causing almost no inhibitory effect on the isoform. In conclusion, we observed that zearalenone is a selective inhibitor of HSD11B2, implying that this agent may cause excessive glucocorticoid action in local tissues such as kidney and placentas.

  19. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....... was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release...

  20. Inhibition of platelet [3H]- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity [ 3 H]-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and α 1 -antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of [ 3 H]-imipramine binding site

  1. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  2. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX......) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating c...

  3. Novel Indole-Based Analogs of Melatonin: Synthesis and in Vitro Antioxidant Activity Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Shirinzadeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to synthesize and examine possible in vitro antioxidant effects of indole-based melatonin analogue compounds. As a part of our ongoing study nineteen indole hydrazide/hydrazone derivatives were synthesized, characterized and their in vitro antioxidant activity was investigated by three different assays: by evaluating their reducing effect against oxidation of a redox sensitive fluorescent probe, by examining their protective effect against H2O2-induced membrane lipid peroxidation and by determining their inhibitory effect on AAPH–induced hemolysis of human erythrocytes. The results indicated significant strong antioxidant activity for most of the compounds, when compared to melatonin.

  4. Melatonin-Induced Protective Effects on Cardiomyocytes Against Reperfusion Injury Partly Through Modulation of IP3R and SERCA2a Via Activation of ERK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunying Hu

    Full Text Available Resumo Background: Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone synthesized primarily by the pineal gland that is indicated to effectively prevent myocardial reperfusion injury. It is unclear whether melatonin protects cardiac function from reperfusion injury by modulating intracellular calcium homeostasis. Objective: Demonstrate that melatonin protect against myocardial reperfusion injury through modulating IP3R and SERCA2a to maintain calcium homeostasis via activation of ERK1 in cardiomyocytes. Methods: In vitro experiments were performed using H9C2 cells undergoing simulative hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R induction. Expression level of ERK1, IP3R and SERCA2a were assessed by Western Blots. Cardiomyocytes apoptosis was detected by TUNEL. Phalloidin-staining was used to assess alteration of actin filament organization of cardiomyocytes. Fura-2 /AM was used to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Performing in vivo experiments, myocardial expression of IP3R and SERCA2a were detected by immunofluorescence staining using myocardial ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R model in rats. Results: In vitro results showed that melatonin induces ERK1 activation in cardiomyocytes against H/R which was inhibited by PD98059 (ERK1 inhibitor. The results showed melatonin inhibit apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and improve actin filament organization in cardiomyocytes against H/R, because both could be reversed by PD98059. Melatonin was showed to reduce calcium overload, further to inhibit IP3R expression and promote SERCA2a expression via ERK1 pathway in cardiomyocytes against H/R. Melatonin induced lower IP3R and higher SERCA2a expression in myocardium that were reversed by PD98059. Conclusion: melatonin-induced cardioprotection against reperfusion injury is at least partly through modulation of IP3R and SERCA2a to maintain intracellular calcium homeostasis via activation of ERK1.

  5. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Dose-Response Trial of the Melatonin Effect on the Pain Threshold of Healthy Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cadore Stefani

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that melatonin may produce antinociception through peripheral and central mechanisms. Based on the preliminary encouraging results of studies of the effects of melatonin on pain modulation, the important question has been raised of whether there is a dose relationship in humans of melatonin on pain modulation.The objective was to evaluate the analgesic dose response of the effects of melatonin on pressure and heat pain threshold and tolerance and the sedative effects.Sixty-one healthy subjects aged 19 to 47 y were randomized into one of four groups: placebo, 0.05 mg/kg sublingual melatonin, 0.15 mg/kg sublingual melatonin or 0.25 mg/kg sublingual melatonin. We determine the pressure pain threshold (PPT and the pressure pain tolerance (PPTo. Quantitative sensory testing (QST was used to measure the heat pain threshold (HPT and the heat pain tolerance (HPTo. Sedation was assessed with a visual analogue scale and bispectral analysis.Serum plasma melatonin levels were directly proportional to the melatonin doses given to each subject. We observed a significant effect associated with dose group. Post hoc analysis indicated significant differences between the placebo vs. the intermediate (0.15 mg/kg and the highest (0.25 mg/kg melatonin doses for all pain threshold and sedation level tests. A linear regression model indicated a significant association between the serum melatonin concentrations and changes in pain threshold and pain tolerance (R(2  = 0.492 for HPT, R(2  = 0.538 for PPT, R(2  = 0.558 for HPTo and R(2  = 0.584 for PPTo.The present data indicate that sublingual melatonin exerts well-defined dose-dependent antinociceptive activity. There is a correlation between the plasma melatonin drug concentration and acute changes in the pain threshold. These results provide additional support for the investigation of melatonin as an analgesic agent. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec: (U1111

  6. Potency of melatonin in living beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Donchan

    2013-09-01

    Living beings are surrounded by various changes exhibiting periodical rhythms in environment. The environmental changes are imprinted in organisms in various pattern. The phenomena are believed to match the external signal with organisms in order to increase their survival rate. The signals are categorized into circadian, seasonal, and annual cycles. Among the cycles, the circadian rhythm is regarded as the most important factor because its periodicity is in harmony with the levels of melatonin secreted from pineal gland. Melatonin is produced by the absence of light and its presence displays darkness. Melatonin plays various roles in creatures. Therefore, this review is to introduce the diverse potential ability of melatonin in manifold aspects in living organism.

  7. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuyama, Wakako [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7 Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mossaad, Ehab [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Kawai, Satoru [Laboratory of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawazu, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: skawazu@obihiro.ac.jp [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca{sup 2+}- and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca{sup 2+} imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum.

  8. miR-141-3p inhibits human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Kassem, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling determines human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation fate into the osteoblast or adipocyte lineage. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 21-25 nucleotides that regulate many aspects of osteoblast biology. Thus, we examined miRNAs regulated by Wnt signaling...... in hMSC. We identified miRNA (miR)-141-3p as a Wnt target which in turn inhibited Wnt signaling. Moreover, miR-141-3p inhibited hMSC proliferation by arresting cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. miR-141-3p inhibited osteoblast differentiation of hMSC as evidenced by reduced alkaline phosphatase...

  9. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  10. Inhibiting actin depolymerization enhances osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Shi, Kaikai; Frary, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton through actin dynamics is involved in a number of biological processes, but its role in human stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation is poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that stabilizing actin filaments by inhibiting gene...... expression of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) in hMSCs, enhanced cell viability and differentiation into osteoblastic cells (OB) in vitro, as well as heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Similarly, treating hMSC with Phalloidin, which is known to stabilize...... polymerized actin filaments, increased hMSCs viability and OB differentiation. Conversely, Cytocholasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, reduced cell viability and inhibited OB differentiation of hMSC. At a molecular level, preventing Cofilin phosphorylation through inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1...

  11. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  12. Human Cerberus prevents nodal-receptor binding, inhibits nodal signaling, and suppresses nodal-mediated phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Aykul

    Full Text Available The Transforming Growth Factor-ß (TGFß family ligand Nodal is an essential embryonic morphogen that is associated with progression of breast and other cancers. It has therefore been suggested that Nodal inhibitors could be used to treat breast cancers where Nodal plays a defined role. As secreted antagonists, such as Cerberus, tightly regulate Nodal signaling during embryonic development, we undertook to produce human Cerberus, characterize its biochemical activities, and determine its effect on human breast cancer cells. Using quantitative methods, we investigated the mechanism of Nodal signaling, we evaluated binding of human Cerberus to Nodal and other TGFß family ligands, and we characterized the mechanism of Nodal inhibition by Cerberus. Using cancer cell assays, we examined the ability of Cerberus to suppress aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes. We found that human Cerberus binds Nodal with high affinity and specificity, blocks binding of Nodal to its signaling partners, and inhibits Nodal signaling. Moreover, we showed that Cerberus profoundly suppresses migration, invasion, and colony forming ability of Nodal expressing and Nodal supplemented breast cancer cells. Taken together, our studies provide mechanistic insights into Nodal signaling and Nodal inhibition with Cerberus and highlight the potential value of Cerberus as anti-Nodal therapeutic.

  13. Cardiac glycosides induce cell death in human cells by inhibiting general protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Perne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides are Na(+/K(+-pump inhibitors widely used to treat heart failure. They are also highly cytotoxic, and studies have suggested specific anti-tumor activity leading to current clinical trials in cancer patients. However, a definitive demonstration of this putative anti-cancer activity and the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive.Using an unbiased transcriptomics approach, we found that cardiac glycosides inhibit general protein synthesis. Protein synthesis inhibition and cytotoxicity were not specific for cancer cells as they were observed in both primary and cancer cell lines. These effects were dependent on the Na(+/K(+-pump as they were rescued by expression of a cardiac glycoside-resistant Na(+/K(+-pump. Unlike human cells, rodent cells are largely resistant to cardiac glycosides in vitro and mice were found to tolerate extremely high levels.The physiological difference between human and mouse explains the previously observed sensitivity of human cancer cells in mouse xenograft experiments. Thus, published mouse xenograft models used to support anti-tumor activity for these drugs require reevaluation. Our finding that cardiac glycosides inhibit protein synthesis provides a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of CGs and raises concerns about ongoing clinical trials to test CGs as anti-cancer agents in humans.

  14. Melatonin pre-treatment mitigates SHSY-5Y cells against oxaliplatin induced mitochondrial stress and apoptotic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Waseem

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin (Oxa treatment to SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells has been shown by previous studies to induce oxidative stress, which in turn modulates intracellular signaling cascades resulting in cell death. While this phenomenon of Oxa-induced neurotoxicity is known, the underlying mechanisms involved in this cell death cascade must be clarified. Moreover, there is still little known regarding the roles of neuronal mitochondria and cytosolic compartments in mediating Oxa-induced neurotoxicity. With a better grasp of the mechanisms driving neurotoxicity in Oxa-treated SH-SY5Y cells, we can then identify certain pathways to target in protecting against neurotoxic cell damage. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether one such agent, melatonin (Mel, could confer protection against Oxa-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Results from the present study found Oxa to significantly reduce SH-SY5Y cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Alternatively, we found Mel pre-treatment to SH-SY5Y cells to attenuate Oxa-induced toxicity, resulting in a markedly increased cell viability. Mel exerted its protective effects by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS production and reducing superoxide radicals inside Oxa-exposed. In addition, we observed pre-treatment with Mel to rescue Oxa-treated cells by protecting mitochondria. As Oxa-treatment alone decreases mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, resulting in an altered Bcl-2/Bax ratio and release of sequestered cytochrome c, so Mel was shown to inhibit these pathways. Mel was also found to inhibit proteolytic activation of caspase 3, inactivation of Poly (ADP Ribose polymerase, and DNA damage, thereby allowing SH-SY5Y cells to resist apoptotic cell death. Collectively, our results suggest a role for melatonin in reducing Oxa induced neurotoxicity. Further studies exploring melatonin's protective effects may prove successful in eliciting pathways to further alter the neurotoxic

  15. CTRP6 inhibits fibrogenesis in TGF-β1-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Rong-hui; Zhu, Xiu-mei; Sun, Yao-wen; Peng, Hui-zi; Wu, Hang-li; Gao, Wen-jie

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM). C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 6 (CTRP6), a member of CTRPs, has been involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of CTRP6 in skin fibrosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CTRP6 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that CTRP6 was lowly expressed in scar tissues and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated dermal fibroblasts. CTRP6 overexpression significantly inhibited the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as well as suppressed the expression of ECM in TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CTRP6 overexpression markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, the data reported here demonstrate that CTRP6 is able to inhibit the proliferation and ECM expression in human dermal fibroblasts through suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that CTRP6 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skin fibrosis. -- Highlights: •CTRP6 expression was decreased in scar tissues and TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits TGF-β1-induced the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits expression of collagen type I and α-SMA. •CTRP6 inhibits the activation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway in dermal fibroblasts.

  16. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  17. Task-related modulation of crossed spinal inhibition between human lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-Boutros, Berthe; Sangari, Sina; Karasu, Aliye; Giboin, Louis-Solal; Marchand-Pauve