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Sample records for melas syndrome family

  1. [Psychiatric disturbances in five patients with MELAS syndrome].

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    Magner, Martin; Honzik, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Dvorakova, Veronika; Hansiková, Hana; Raboch, Jiři; Zeman, Jiři

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders of energetic metabolism (MD) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases manifesting at any age with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms, including psychiatric disorders. The aim of the study was to characterize psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses in five patients with MELAS syndrome between the ages of 17 and 53 years. Four of MELAS patients them harbored the prevalent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation 3243A>G, and one patient had the mtDNA mutation 12706T>C. Three patients had positive family histories for MELAS syndrome. In one patient, depression was diagnosedas the first symptom ofMELAS syndrome. Depression also preceded a stroke-like episode in one patient. Four patients had disturbed cognitive functions, confusional states occurred in three patients. One patient manifested psychotic (schizophrenia-like) symptoms. Mitochondrial disorders deserve consideration as part of the differential diagnosis, especially, if there is suspected involvement of other organ groups or positive family history of MD.

  2. MELAS syndrome: neuroradiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, A.; Romero, A. I.; Bravo, F.; Vida, J. M.; Espejo, S.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) and their contribution to the diagnosis of this entity. We present three patients in which a diagnosis of MELAS syndrome was confirmed by muscle biopsy. CT revealed pathological findings in two patients: bilateral calcifications in the basal nuclei in one and low-attenuation lesions in occipital lobes in the other. Initial or follow-up MR demonstrated pathological findings highly suggestive of MELAS syndrome in all the patients. They consisted of hyperintense lesions in T2-weighted images, located predominantly in the cortex of occipital and parietal lobes. Cerebellar atrophy was also observed in two patients. The clinical signs varied, but epileptic seizures, headache, vomiting, ataxia, muscle weakness and pyramidal involvement were among the major ones. Only one patient presented high lactic acid levels, and in two, the initial muscle biopsy was not conclusive enough to provide the definitive diagnosis. CT and, especially, MR are useful tools in the diagnosis of MELAS syndrome, particularly in those cases in which initial negative laboratory and histological results make diagnosis difficult. (Author) 21 refs

  3. MELAS syndrome: Clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment options.

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    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Adesina, Adekunle M; Jones, Jeremy; Scaglia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders. MELAS syndrome is a multi-organ disease with broad manifestations including stroke-like episodes, dementia, epilepsy, lactic acidemia, myopathy, recurrent headaches, hearing impairment, diabetes, and short stature. The most common mutation associated with MELAS syndrome is the m.3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation results in impaired mitochondrial translation and protein synthesis including the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex subunits leading to impaired mitochondrial energy production. The inability of dysfunctional mitochondria to generate sufficient energy to meet the needs of various organs results in the multi-organ dysfunction observed in MELAS syndrome. Energy deficiency can also stimulate mitochondrial proliferation in the smooth muscle and endothelial cells of small blood vessels leading to angiopathy and impaired blood perfusion in the microvasculature of several organs. These events will contribute to the complications observed in MELAS syndrome particularly the stroke-like episodes. In addition, nitric oxide deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome and can contribute to its complications. There is no specific consensus approach for treating MELAS syndrome. Management is largely symptomatic and should involve a multidisciplinary team. Unblinded studies showed that l-arginine therapy improves stroke-like episode symptoms and decreases the frequency and severity of these episodes. Additionally, carnitine and coenzyme Q10 are commonly used in MELAS syndrome without proven efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy With Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes-MELAS Syndrome.

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    Henry, Caitlin; Patel, Neema; Shaffer, William; Murphy, Lillian; Park, Joe; Spieler, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that results in waxing and waning nervous system and muscle dysfunction. MELAS syndrome may overlap with other neurologic disorders but shows distinctive imaging features. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with atypical stroke-like symptoms, a strong family history of stroke-like symptoms, and a relapsing-remitting course for several years. We discuss the imaging features distinctive to the case, the mechanism of the disease, typical presentation, imaging diagnosis, and disease management. This case is a classic example of the relapse-remitting MELAS syndrome progression with episodic clinical flares and fluctuating patterns of stroke-like lesions on imaging. MELAS is an important diagnostic consideration when neuroimaging reveals a pattern of disappearing and relapsing cortical brain lesions that may occur in different areas of the brain and are not necessarily limited to discrete vascular territories. Future studies should investigate disease mechanisms at the cellular level and the value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques for a targeted approach to therapy.

  5. Renal involvement in MELAS syndrome - a series of 5 cases and review of the literature.

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    Seidowsky, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Maxime; Glowacki, François; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Devaux, Jean-Philippe; de Sainte Foy, Celia Lessore; Provot, François; Gheerbrant, Jean-Dominique; Hummel, Aurelie; Hazzan, Marc; Dracon, Michel; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Copin, Marie-Christine; Noël, Christian; Buob, David

    2013-12-01

    Renal dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a potential clinical feature of mitochondrial cytopathies such as mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lacticacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Five cases of MELAS syndrome with renal involvement from 4 unrelated families are presented in this case series. Three of the 5 patients had a history of maternally-inherited diabetes and/or deafness. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and arteriolar hyaline thickening were the most striking findings on renal biopsy. In addition to clinical presentation with the typical symptoms of MELAS syndrome, genetic testing in these patients identified the A3243G point mutation in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The diagnosis of MELAS syndrome was thus considered to be unequivocal. The incidence of kidney disease in MELAS syndrome may be underestimated although a study is required to investigate this hypothesis. As the A3243G mtDNA mutation leads to a progressive adult-onset form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), screening for the MELAS A3243G mtDNA mutation should therefore be performed especially in patients with maternally-inherited diabetes or hearing loss presenting with FSGS.

  6. Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy With Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes—MELAS Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Caitlin; Patel, Neema; Shaffer, William; Murphy, Lillian; Park, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that results in waxing and waning nervous system and muscle dysfunction. MELAS syndrome may overlap with other neurologic disorders but shows distinctive imaging features. Case Report: We present the case of a 28-year-old female with atypical stroke-like symptoms, a strong family history of stroke-like symptoms, and a relapsing-remitting course for several years. We discuss the imaging features distinctive to the case, the mechanism of the disease, typical presentation, imaging diagnosis, and disease management. Conclusion: This case is a classic example of the relapse-remitting MELAS syndrome progression with episodic clinical flares and fluctuating patterns of stroke-like lesions on imaging. MELAS is an important diagnostic consideration when neuroimaging reveals a pattern of disappearing and relapsing cortical brain lesions that may occur in different areas of the brain and are not necessarily limited to discrete vascular territories. Future studies should investigate disease mechanisms at the cellular level and the value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques for a targeted approach to therapy. PMID:29026367

  7. CT and MRI imaging of the brain in MELAS syndrome.

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    Pauli, Wojciech; Zarzycki, Artur; Krzyształowski, Adam; Walecka, Anna

    2013-07-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) is a rare, multisystem disorder which belongs to a group of mitochondrial metabolic diseases. As other diseases in this group, it is inherited in the maternal line. In this report, we discussed a case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical and radiological picture of MELAS syndrome. We would like to describe characteristic radiological features of MELAS syndrome in CT, MRI and MR spectroscopy of the brain and differential diagnosis. The rarity of this disorder and the complexity of its clinical presentation make MELAS patients among the most difficult to diagnose. Brain imaging studies require a wide differential diagnosis, primarily to distinguish between MELAS and ischemic stroke. Particularly helpful are the MRI and MR spectroscopy techniques.

  8. CT and MRI imaging of the brain in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, Wojciech; Zarzycki, Artur; Krzyształowski, Adam; Walecka, Anna

    2013-01-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) is a rare, multisystem disorder which belongs to a group of mitochondrial metabolic diseases. As other diseases in this group, it is inherited in the maternal line. In this report, we discussed a case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical and radiological picture of MELAS syndrome. We would like to describe characteristic radiological features of MELAS syndrome in CT, MRI and MR spectroscopy of the brain and differential diagnosis. The rarity of this disorder and the complexity of its clinical presentation make MELAS patients among the most difficult to diagnose. Brain imaging studies require a wide differential diagnosis, primarily to distinguish between MELAS and ischemic stroke. Particularly helpful are the MRI and MR spectroscopy techniques

  9. Black Toenail Sign in MELAS Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Wien, Michael; Lee, Bonmyong; Bass, Nancy; Gropman, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder often causing progressive brain injury that is not confined to large arterial territories. Severe insults ultimately lead to gyral necrosis affecting the cortex and juxtacortical white matter; the neuroimaging correlate is partial gyral signal suppression on T2/FLAIR sequences that resemble black toenails. We aimed to characterize the imaging features and the natural history of MELAS-related gyral necrosis. Databases at two children's hospitals were searched for brain magnetic resonance imaging studies of individuals with MELAS. Examinations with motion artifact and those lacking T2/FLAIR sequences were excluded. The location, the cumulative number, and the maximum transverse diameter of necrotic gyral lesions were assessed using T2-weighted images and T2/FLAIR sequences. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was employed to evaluate the relationship between disease duration and the number of necrotic lesions. One hundred twenty-four examinations from patients with 14 unique MELAS patients (16 ± 3 years) were evaluated. Six of the eight patients who developed brain lesions also developed gyral necroses (mean 13, range 0 to 44). Necrotic lesions varied in maximal diameter from 4 to 25 mm. Cumulative necrotic lesions correlated with disease duration (P MELAS syndrome. The extent of gyral necrosis correlates with disease duration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MELAS syndrome presenting as an acute surgical abdomen.

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    Dindyal, S; Mistry, K; Angamuthu, N; Smith, G; Hilton, D; Arumugam, P; Mathew, J

    2014-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial cytopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a syndrome in which signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal disease are uncommon if not rare. We describe the case of a young woman who presented as an acute surgical emergency, diagnosed as toxic megacolon necessitating an emergency total colectomy. MELAS syndrome was suspected postoperatively owing to persistent lactic acidosis and neurological symptoms. The diagnosis was later confirmed with histological and genetic studies. This case highlights the difficulties in diagnosing MELAS because of its unpredictable presentation and clinical course. We therefore recommend a high index of suspicion in cases of an acute surgical abdomen with additional neurological features or raised lactate.

  11. Adrenal insufficiency in a child with MELAS syndrome.

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    Afroze, Bushra; Amjad, Nida; Ibrahim, Shahnaz H; Humayun, Khadija Nuzhat; Yakob, Yusnita

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are established subgroups of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. m.3243A>G a common point mutation is detected in tRNA in majority of patients with MELAS phenotype whereas m.8344A>G point mutation in tRNA is observed, in MERRF phenotype. Adrenal insufficiency has not been reported in mitochondrial disease, except in Kearns-Sayre Syndrome (KSS), which is a mitochondrial deletion syndrome. We report an unusual presentation in a five year old boy who presented with clinical phenotype of MELAS and was found to have m.8344A>G mutation in tRNA. Addison disease was identified due to hyperpigmentation of lips and gums present from early childhood. This is the first report describing adrenal insufficiency in a child with MELAS phenotype. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondria: role of citrulline and arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome.

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    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Craigen, William J; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and generate most of the cellular energy. Mitochondrial disorders result from dysfunctional mitochondria that are unable to generate sufficient ATP to meet the energy needs of various organs. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder. There is growing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome and results in impaired blood perfusion that contributes significantly to several complications including stroke-like episodes, myopathy, and lactic acidosis. Both arginine and citrulline act as NO precursors and their administration results in increased NO production and hence can potentially have therapeutic utility in MELAS syndrome. Citrulline raises NO production to a greater extent than arginine, therefore, citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect. Controlled studies assessing the effects of arginine or citrulline supplementation on different clinical aspects of MELAS syndrome are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Arrhythmia as a cardiac manifestation in MELAS syndrome.

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    Thomas, Tamara; Craigen, William J; Moore, Ryan; Czosek, Richard; Jefferies, John L

    2015-09-01

    A 44-year-old female with a diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome had progressive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on echocardiogram. A Holter monitor demonstrated episodes of non-sustained atrial tachycardia, a finding not been previously described in this population. This unique case of MELAS syndrome demonstrates the known associated cardiac manifestation of LVH and the new finding of atrial tachycardia which may represent the potential for subclinical arrhythmia in this population.

  14. Cognitive impairment, clinical severity and MRI changes in MELAS syndrome.

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    Kraya, Torsten; Neumann, Lena; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Deschauer, Marcus; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Zierz, Stephan; Watzke, Stefan

    2017-12-29

    To examine clinical severity, cognitive impairment, and MRI changes in patients with MELAS syndrome. Cognitive-mnestic functions, brain MRI (lesion load, cella media index) and clinical severity of ten patients with MELAS syndrome were examined. All patients carried the m.3243A>G mutation. The detailed neuropsychological assessment revealed cognitive deficits in attention, executive function, visuoperception, and -construction. There were significant correlations between these cognitive changes, lesion load in MRI, disturbances in everyday life (clinical scale), and high scores in NMDAS. Patients with MELAS syndrome showed no global neuropsychological deficit, but rather distinct cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. MELAS Syndrome and Kidney Disease Without Fanconi Syndrome or Proteinuria: A Case Report.

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    Rudnicki, Michael; Mayr, Johannes A; Zschocke, Johannes; Antretter, Herwig; Regele, Heinz; Feichtinger, René G; Windpessl, Martin; Mayer, Gert; Pölzl, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) represents one of the most frequent mitochondrial disorders. The majority of MELAS cases are caused by m.3243A>G mutation in the mitochondrial MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) . Kidney involvement usually manifests as Fanconi syndrome or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We describe a patient with MELAS mutation, cardiomyopathy, and chronic kidney disease without Fanconi syndrome, proteinuria, or hematuria. While the patient was waitlisted for heart transplantation, her kidney function deteriorated from an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 33 to 20mL/min/1.73m 2 within several months. Kidney biopsy was performed to distinguish decreased kidney perfusion from intrinsic kidney pathology. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed only a moderate degree of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis, but quantitative analysis of the m.3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation revealed high heteroplasmy levels of 89% in the kidney. Functional assessment showed reduced activity of mitochondrial enzymes in kidney tissue, which was confirmed by immunohistology. In conclusion, we describe an unusual case of MELAS syndrome with chronic kidney disease without apparent proteinuria or tubular disorders associated with Fanconi syndrome, but widespread interstitial fibrosis and a high degree of heteroplasmy of the MELAS specific mutation and low mitochondrial activity in the kidney. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anesthetic management of an obstetric patient with MELAS syndrome: case report and literature review.

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    Maurtua, M; Torres, A; Ibarra, V; DeBoer, G; Dolak, J

    2008-10-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) is a mitochondrial disorder associated with neurologic, cardiac, neuromuscular, hepatic, metabolic and gastrointestinal dysfunction and potential anesthetic and obstetric complications. The case of a parturient with MELAS syndrome requiring labor analgesia is presented. A Medline literature search limited to the English language was undertaken to review cases of MELAS syndrome. Based on our experience and literature review, parturients with MELAS syndrome appear to benefit from neuraxial analgesia and anesthesia, which blunt excessive oxygen consumption and acidosis.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.; Phillips, S.; Enzmann, D.

    1990-01-01

    MELAS syndrome is a distinct clinical entity belonging to a group of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies characterized by the tetrad of myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings are reviewed in a patient with MELAS. Serial CT studies demonstrated multiple 'migrating' infarcts in various stages of evolution involving primarily the posterior temporal and occipital regions. MR was more sensitive than CT in demonstrating the number and extent of cortical lesions in this disease entity. (orig.)

  18. [Arreflexic coma and MELAS syndrome].

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    Muñoz-Guillén, N; León-López, R; Ferrer-Higueras, M J; Vargas-Vaserot, F J; Dueñas-Jurado, J M

    2009-01-01

    MELAS is a progressive neurodegenerative and fatal disease characterized by mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. It is the result of a mitochondrial DNA mutation. Although the incidence of MELAS is currently unknown, it is suspected that approximately 1 out of every 5,000 persons world-wide have some type of defect in mitochondrial DNA. Cardinal clinical features observed in more than 90% of the patients include severe headache that may be associated with stroke-like episodes, seizures and the onset of symptoms before the age of 40 years. Diagnosis is established through genetic test or by with muscle biopsies that reveal the presence of ragged-red fibers. Prognosis is poor, with death at an early age. In this article, we present the clinical case of a 31-year old women diagnosed of MELAS syndrome who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital with arreflexic coma.

  19. The effect of citrulline and arginine supplementation on lactic acidemia in MELAS syndrome.

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    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Williamson, Kaitlin C; Craigen, William J; Scaglia, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder in which nitric oxide (NO) deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of several complications including stroke-like episodes and lactic acidosis. Supplementing the NO precursors arginine and citrulline restores NO production in MELAS syndrome. In this study we evaluated the effect of arginine or citrulline on lactic acidemia in adults with MELAS syndrome. Plasma lactate decreased significantly after citrulline supplementation, whereas the effect of arginine supplementation did not reach statistical significance. These results support the potential therapeutic utility of arginine and citrulline in MELAS syndrome and suggest that citrulline supplementation may be more efficacious. However, therapeutic efficacy of these compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  20. MRI evaluation of cerebral perfusion changes in patients with MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Sheng; Qi Zhaoyue; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang; Yang Yanling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the changes of cerebral perfusion in patients with MELAS syndrome by using MR perfusion technique. Methods: Thirteen patients with MELAS syndrome and 13 controls with normal neurological conditions were scanned with the sequence of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery exempting separate T 1 measurement (FAIREST). Their rCBF values were obtained in regions of bilateral basilar nuclei and thalami, as well as bilateral temporal lobes and occipital lobes. Regression analysis was carried out to determine the effect of location and side on the measurement of rCBF in controls. One-way ANOVA was conducted to compare rCBF values among the control group, the lesion ROIs and normal ROIs of the MELAS syndrome group. Results: The values of rCBF were 0.83 ± 0.23, 1.17± 0.30, 0.93 ± 0.28, and 1.11 ± 0.25 for the left basilar ganglia, thalamus, temporal lobe, and occipital lobe respectively, while they were 0.77 ± 0.15, 1.03 ± 0.34, 1.06 ± 0.23, and 1.09 ± 0.23 for the right basilar ganglia, thalamus, temporal lobe, and occipital lobe respectively. Regression analysis revealed no effect of location and side on the rCBF (P>0.05). The rCBF value for control group was 1.00 + 0. 28, while it was 1.01 ± 0.31 for the normal ROIs and 1.95 ± 0.43 for the lesion ROIs in the MELAS syndrome group (F=54.99, P<0.01). The rCBF of the lesion ROIs in the MELAS syndrome group was significantly higher than the normal ROIs and the control group. Conclusion: CBF maps can reveal changes of cerebral blood flow in patients with ictal MELAS, which suggests increased perfusion in the stroke-like lesions. (authors)

  1. Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in a patient with MELAS syndrome -A case report-.

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    Park, Jin Suk; Baek, Chong Wha; Kang, Hyun; Cha, Su Man; Park, Jung Won; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young-Cheol

    2010-04-01

    A 23-year-old woman with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) underwent a laparoscopy-assisted appendectomy. MELAS syndrome is a multisystemic disease caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. General anesthesia has several potential hazards to patients with MELAS syndrome, such as malignant hyperthermia, hypothermia, and metabolic acidosis. In this case, anesthesia was performed with propofol, remifentanil TCI, and atracurium without any surgical or anesthetic complications. We discuss the anesthetic effects of MELAS syndrome.

  2. Treatment options for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa, Kristin M

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by the decreased ability of cells to produce sufficient energy in the form of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Although it is one of the most common maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders, its exact incidence is unknown. Caused most frequently by an A-to-G point mutation at the 3243 position in the mitochondrial DNA, MELAS syndrome has a broad range of clinical manifestations and a highly variable course. The classic neurologic characteristics include encephalopathy, seizures, and stroke-like episodes. In addition to its neurologic manifestations, MELAS syndrome exhibits multisystem effects including cardiac conduction defects, diabetes mellitus, short stature, myopathy, and gastrointestinal disturbances. Unfortunately, no consensus guidelines outlining standard drug regimens exist for this syndrome. Many of the accepted therapies used in treating MELAS syndrome have been identified through a small number of clinical trials or isolated case reports. Currently, the drugs most often used include antioxidants and various vitamins aimed at minimizing the demands on the mitochondria and supporting and maximizing their function. Some of the most frequently prescribed agents include coenzyme Q(10), l-arginine, B vitamins, and levocarnitine. Although articles describing MELAS syndrome are available, few specifically target education for clinical pharmacists. This article will provide pharmacists with a practical resource to enhance their understanding of MELAS syndrome in order to provide safe and effective pharmaceutical care.

  3. Pathology of mitochondria in MELAS syndrome: an ultrastructural study.

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    Felczak, Paulina; Lewandowska, Eliza; Stępniak, Iwona; Ołdak, Monika; Pollak, Agnieszka; Lechowicz, Urszula; Pasennik, Elżbieta; Stępień, Tomasz; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa

    Ultrastructural changes in skeletal muscle biopsy in a 24-year-old female patient with clinically suspected mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome are presented. We observed proliferation and/or pleomorphism of mitochondria in skeletal muscle and smooth muscle cells of arterioles, as well as in pericytes of capillaries. Paracrystalline inclusions were found only in damaged mitochondria of skeletal muscle. Genetic testing revealed a point mutation in A3243G tRNALeu(UUR) typical for MELAS syndrome. We conclude that differentiated pathological changes of mitochondria in the studied types of cells may be associated with the different energy requirements of these cells.

  4. Cortical venous disease severity in MELAS syndrome correlates with brain lesion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, M T; Wien, M; Lee, B; Bass, N; Gropman, A

    2017-08-01

    MELAS syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder typified by recurrent stroke-like episodes, seizures, and progressive brain injury. Abnormal mitochondria have been found in arterial walls implicating a vasculogenic etiology. We have observed abnormal cortical vein T2/FLAIR signal in MELAS patients, potentially representing wall thickening and sluggish flow. We sought to examine the relationship of hyperintense veins and brain lesions in MELAS. Imaging databases at two children's hospitals were searched for brain MRIs from MELAS patients. Artifact, sedated exams, and lack of 2D-T2/FLAIR sequences were exclusion criteria. Each exam was assigned a venous score based on number of T2/FLAIR hyperintense veins: 1 = 20. Cumulative brain lesions and venous score in MELAS and aged-matched normal exams were compared by Mann-Whitney test. A total of 106 exams from 14 unique MELAS patients (mean 16 ± 3 years) and 30 exams from normal aged-matched patients (mean 15 ± 3 years) were evaluated. Median venous score between MELAS and control patients significantly differed (3 versus 1; p MELAS group, venous score correlated with presence (median = 3) or absence (median = 1) of cumulative brain lesions. In all 8 MELAS patients who developed lesions, venous hyperintensity was present prior to, during, and after lesion onset. Venous score did not correlate with brain lesion acuity. Abnormal venous signal correlates with cumulative brain lesion severity in MELAS syndrome. Cortical venous stenosis, congestion, and venous ischemia may be mechanisms of brain injury. Identification of cortical venous pathology may aid in diagnosis and could be predictive of lesion development.

  5. Impaired nitric oxide production in children with MELAS syndrome and the effect of arginine and citrulline supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Hsu, Jean W; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Almannai, Mohammed; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is not fully understood and believed to result from several interacting mechanisms including impaired mitochondrial energy production, microvasculature angiopathy, and nitric oxide (NO) deficiency. NO deficiency in MELAS syndrome is likely to be multifactorial in origin with the decreased availability of the NO precursors, arginine and citrulline, playing a major role. In this study we used stable isotope infusion techniques to assess NO production in children with MELAS syndrome and healthy pediatric controls. We also assessed the effect of oral arginine and citrulline supplementations on NO production in children with MELAS syndrome. When compared to control subjects, children with MELAS syndrome were found to have lower NO production, arginine flux, plasma arginine, and citrulline flux. In children with MELAS syndrome, arginine supplementation resulted in increased NO production, arginine flux, and arginine concentration. Citrulline supplementation resulted in a greater increase of these parameters. Additionally, citrulline supplementation was associated with a robust increase in citrulline concentration and flux and de novo arginine synthesis rate. The greater effect of citrulline in increasing NO production is due to its greater ability to increase arginine availability particularly in the intracellular compartment in which NO synthesis takes place. This study, which is the first one to assess NO metabolism in children with mitochondrial diseases, adds more evidence to the notion that NO deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome, suggests a better effect for citrulline because of its greater role as NO precursor, and indicates that impaired NO production occurs in children as well as adults with MELAS syndrome. Thus, the initiation of treatment with NO precursors may be

  6. Speech-Language and swallowing manifestations and rehabilitation in an 11-year-old girl with MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, V P; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Sonam, Kothari; Taly, Arun B; Gayathri, N; Madhu, N; Sinha, S

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disease. The available studies on MELAS syndrome are limited to evaluation of radiological, audiological, genetic, and neurological findings. Among the various neurological manifestations, speech-language and swallowing manifestations are less discussed in the literature. This report describes the speech-language and swallowing function in an 11-year-old girl with MELAS syndrome. The intervention over a period of 6 months is discussed.

  7. MELAS syndrome associated with a new mitochondrial tRNA-Val gene mutation (m.1616A>G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Yuka; Tanaka, Yuji; Satomi, Kazuo

    2017-09-11

    We describe the case of a 40-year-old-man with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, with cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. He had a mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) mutation (m.1616A>G) of the (tRNA-Val) gene, and it was not found in MELAS syndrome ever before. The presence of this newly observed tRNA-Val mutation (m.1616A>G) may induce multiple respiratory chain enzyme deficiencies and contribute to MELAS syndrome symptoms that are associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We report that the pathognomonic symptom in MELAS syndrome caused by this newly observed mtDNA mutation may be rapid progression of cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome due to the m.3291T>C mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiming; Zhao, Hui; Ji, Kunqian; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old Chinese female harboring the m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene encoding the mitochondrial transfer RNA for leucine. She presented with a complex phenotype characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, frequent myoclonus seizures, recurrent stroke-like episodes, migraine-like headaches with nausea and vomiting, and elevated resting lactate blood level. It is known that the myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and myoclonus epilepsy, while that the mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is characterized by recurrent stroke-like episodes, migraine-like headaches, and elevated resting lactate blood level. So the patient's clinical manifestations suggest the presence of a MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome. Muscle biopsy of the patient showed the presence of numerous scattered ragged-red fibers, some cytochrome c oxidase-deficient fibers, and several strongly succinate dehygrogenase-reactive vessels, suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder. Direct sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of the proband revealed no mutations other than the T-to-C transition at nucleotide position 3291. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the proband and her family revealed maternal inheritance of the mutation in a heteroplasmic manner. The analysis of aerobic respiration and glycolysis demonstrated that the fibroblasts from the patient had mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the m.3291T>C is pathogenic. This study is the first to describe the m.3291T>C mutation in association with the MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome.

  9. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  10. Regression of stroke-like lesions in MELAS-syndrome after seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Barton, Peter

    2010-12-01

    There are some indications that seizure activity promotes the development of stroke-like episodes, or vice versa, in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome or other syndromic mitochondrial disorders. A 41-year-old Caucasian female with MELAS syndrome, presenting with short stature, microcytic anaemia, increased blood-sedimentation rate, myopathy, hyper-gammaglobulinaemia, an iron-metabolism defect, migraine-like headaches, and stroke-like episodes, developed complex partial and generalised seizures at age 32 years. Valproic acid was ineffective but after switching to lamotrigine and lorazepam, she became seizure-free for five years and stroke-like episodes did not recur. Cerebral MRI initially showed enhanced gyral thickening and a non-enhanced T2-hyperintensity over the left parieto-temporo-occipital white matter and cortex and enhanced caudate heads. After two years without seizures, the non-enhanced hyperintense parieto-temporo-occipital lesion had disappeared, being attributed to consequent seizure control. The caudate heads, however, remained hyperintense throughout the observational period. This case indicates that adequate seizure control in a patient with MELAS syndrome may prevent the recurrence of stroke-like episodes and may result in the disappearance of stroke-like lesions on MRI.

  11. A Case of Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS) Syndrome with Intracardiac Thrombus [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jung-Chul; Seol, Myung Do; Yoon, Jin Won; Lee, Young Soo; Kim, Dong-Keun; Choi, Yong Hoon; Ahn, Hyo Seong; Cho, Wook Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a multisystem clinical syndrome manifested by mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and recurrent stroke-like episodes. A 27-year-old female with MELAS syndrome presented with cerebral infarction. Echocardiography revealed a thrombus attached to the apex of the hypertrophied left ventricle, with decreased systolic function. The embolism of the intracardiac thrombus might have been the cause of stroke. There should be more consideration given to the increased possibility of intracardiac thrombus formation when a MELAS patient with cardiac involvement is encountered.

  12. MELAS syndrome, cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and autism associated with the A3260G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Barbara S; Feigenbaum, Annette S J; Robinson, Brian H; Dipchand, Anne I; Simon, David K; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-11-12

    The A to G transition mutation at position 3260 of the mitochondrial genome is usually associated with cardiomyopathy and myopathy. One Japanese kindred reported the phenotype of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) in association with the A3260G mtDNA mutation. We describe the first Caucasian cases of MELAS syndrome associated with the A3260G mutation. Furthermore, this mutation was associated with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, hearing loss, seizures, cardiomyopathy, and autism in the large kindred. We conclude that the A3260G mtDNA mutation is associated with wide phenotypic heterogeneity with MELAS and other "classical" mitochondrial phenotypes being manifestations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute cortical deafness in a child with MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Marie P; Idan, Roni B; Kern, Ilse; Guinand, Nils; Van, Hélène Cao; Toso, Seema; Fluss, Joël

    2016-05-01

    Auditory impairment in mitochondrial disorders are usually due to peripheral sensorineural dysfunction. Central deafness is only rarely reported. We report here an 11-year-old boy with MELAS syndrome who presented with subacute deafness after waking up from sleep. Peripheral hearing loss was rapidly excluded. A brain MRI documented bilateral stroke-like lesions predominantly affecting the superior temporal lobe, including the primary auditory cortex, confirming the central nature of deafness. Slow recovery was observed in the following weeks. This case serves to illustrate the numerous challenges caused by MELAS and the unusual occurrence of acute cortical deafness, that to our knowledge has not be described so far in a child in this setting.

  14. [Mutism and acute behavioral disorders revealing MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans, H; Barroso, B; Bertandeau, E; Bonnan, M; Dakar, A; Demasles, S; Garraud, S; Krim, E; Martin-Négrier, M-L

    2011-11-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a rare genetic mitochondrial disease which can cause cerebral (cerebrovascular accident, migraine, mental deterioration..), sensorial (bilateral symmetrical deafness) and peripheral (muscular involvement, neuropathy) disorders potentially associated with diabetes, renal or cardiac disorders, or growth retardation. Eighty percent of the patients have the 3243 A>G mutation in the leucine RNA transfer gene. Clinical manifestations leading to discovery of the mutation can be extremely varied, affecting patients of different age groups. We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented acute fits of confusion followed by mutism and praxic disorders. History taking revealed recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes, axonal neuropathy, and bilateral symmetrical deafness requiring hearing aids. The initial MRI showed FLAIR sequences with bi-parietal abnormalities, no signs of recent stroke on the DW/B10000 sequences, and basal ganglia calcifications. Blood tests and morphological findings ruled out a vascular origin. Search for lactic acidosis remained constantly negative in blood samples despite positive cerebrospinal fluid samples (N×3). The 3243 A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation was identified. The neuropsychological evaluation revealed a serious dysexecutive syndrome with a major impact on the patient's self sufficiency. Neurocognitive disorders are not common in MELAS syndrome. Brain MRI results and the presence of extra-neurological signs can be helpful for diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Restoration of impaired nitric oxide production in MELAS syndrome with citrulline and arginine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Hsu, Jean W; Emrick, Lisa T; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most common mitochondrial disorders. Although the pathogenesis of stroke-like episodes remains unclear, it has been suggested that mitochondrial proliferation may result in endothelial dysfunction and decreased nitric oxide (NO) availability leading to cerebral ischemic events. This study aimed to assess NO production in subjects with MELAS syndrome and the effect of the NO precursors arginine and citrulline. Using stable isotope infusion techniques, we assessed arginine, citrulline, and NO metabolism in control subjects and subjects with MELAS syndrome before and after arginine or citrulline supplementation. The results showed that subjects with MELAS had lower NO synthesis rate associated with reduced citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis rate, and plasma arginine and citrulline concentrations, and higher plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentration and arginine clearance. We conclude that the observed impaired NO production is due to multiple factors including elevated ADMA, higher arginine clearance, and, most importantly, decreased de novo arginine synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline availability. Arginine and, to a greater extent, citrulline supplementation increased the de novo arginine synthesis rate, the plasma concentrations and flux of arginine and citrulline, and NO production. De novo arginine synthesis increased markedly with citrulline supplementation, explaining the superior efficacy of citrulline in increasing NO production. The improvement in NO production with arginine or citrulline supplementation supports their use in MELAS and suggests that citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect than arginine. These findings can have a broader relevance for other disorders marked by perturbations in NO metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. POLG1 mutations and stroke like episodes: a distinct clinical entity rather than an atypical MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheldi, Antonella; Ronchi, Dario; Bordoni, Andreina; Bordo, Bianca; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Bellotti, Maria Grazia; Corti, Stefania; Lucchini, Valeria; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Baron, Pierluigi; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Colombo, Antonio; Bersano, Anna

    2013-01-15

    POLG1 mutations have been associated with MELAS-like phenotypes. However given several clinical differences it is unknown whether POLG1 mutations are possible causes of MELAS or give raise to a distinct clinical and genetic entity, named POLG1-associated encephalopathy. We describe a 74 years old man carrying POLG1 mutations presenting with strokes, myopathy and ragged red fibers with some atypical aspects for MELAS such as late onset, lack of cerebral calcification and presence of frontal and occipital MRI lesions better consistent with the POLG associated-encephalopathy spectrum. The lack of available data hampers a definite diagnosis in our patient as well as makes it difficult to compare MELAS, which is a clearly defined clinical syndrome, with POLG1-associated encephalopathy, which is so far a purely molecularly defined syndrome with a quite heterogeneous clinical picture. However, the present report contributes to expand the phenotypic spectrum of POLG1 mutations underlining the importance of searching POLG1 mutations in patients with mitochondrial signs and MELAS like phenotypes but negative for common mtDNA mutations.

  17. [Characteristics of anesthesia in patients with MELAS syndrome: Case report of anesthesia in video-assisted thoracoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A; Wappler, F

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a disease triggered by a disorder in energy production within mitochondria. The cause of this syndrome is a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA where in 80% of cases an A-to-G mutation is present at nucleotide 3243 and with a prevalence of 18.4/100,000 in the population. Predominantly affected are organ systems with a high energy metabolism, such as the heart, brain and musculature. During the premedication visit a thorough patient history and examination with respect to neurological impairments must be carried out. Epilepsy and the appropriate permanent medication lead to possible alterations in effectiveness of anesthetics and muscle relaxants which are difficult to predict. An extensive patient cardiac history and a preoperative electrocardiogram (ECG) for an appraisal of possible disorders in the cardiac conduction system and when necessary extended cardiac diagnostics, are recommended. The monitoring must be adapted depending on the functional limitations and the forthcoming intervention and when necessary a postoperative surveillance in an intensive care unit should be initiated. Knowledge of the special features of MELAS syndrome in association with a consideration of the characteristics of anesthesia in MELAS patients and an individually adapted intensified perioperative surveillance, can contribute to a reduction in perioperative morbidity in patients suffering from MELAS syndrome.

  18. Anesthetic Management of Mitochondrial Encephalopathy With Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS Syndrome) in a High-Risk Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Josh D; Higgie, Kushlin; Joshi, Mital; Rucker, Joshua; Farzi, Sahar; Siddiqui, Naveed

    2017-07-15

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like symptoms) is a rare and complex mitochondrial disorder. We present the in-hospital course of a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 0 with MELAS syndrome and severe preeclampsia, complicated by hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and diabetes. A retained placenta with postpartum hemorrhage required urgent instrumental delivery under spinal anesthesia, transfusion, and intensive care unit admission for pulmonary edema, effusions, and atelectasis. Postpartum endometritis and sepsis also were encountered. This is to our knowledge the first case report of obstetric complications in MELAS syndrome and highlights the salient metabolic sequelae of this syndrome.

  19. MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruehl, K.; Kraemer, G.; Bornemann, A.

    1988-01-01

    This is a case report on a patient with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidoses and stroke/like episodes). This study documents, by CT scan, the progression of the disease for 7 years. The first CT scan was normal; all subsequent CT scans were pathological. In addition, one MRI study was done. (orig.) [de

  20. Unique presentation of LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome caused by m.13046T>C in MTND5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarova, Hana; Liskova, Petra; Tesarova, Marketa; Kucerova Vidrova, Vendula; Forgac, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Hansikova, Hana; Honzik, Tomas

    2016-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and mitochondrial encephalopathy, myopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndromes are mitochondrially inherited disorders characterized by acute visual failure and variable multiorgan system presentation, respectively. A 12-year-old girl with otherwise unremarkable medical history presented with abrupt, painless loss of vision. Over the next few months, she developed moderate sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo, migraines, anhedonia and thyroiditis. Ocular examination confirmed bilateral optic nerve atrophy. Metabolic workup documented elevated cerebrospinal fluid lactate. Initial genetic analyses excluded the three most common LHON mutations. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome was performed. Whole mtDNA sequencing revealed a pathogenic heteroplasmic mutation m.13046T>C in MTND5 encoding the ND5 subunit of complex I. This particular variant has previously been described in a single case report of MELAS/Leigh syndrome (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Based on the constellation of clinical symptoms in our patient, we diagnose the condition as LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome. We describe a unique presentation of LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome resulting from a m.13046T>C mutation in a 12-year-old girl. In patients with sudden vision loss in which three of the most prevalent LHON mitochondrial mutations have been ruled out, molecular genetic examination should be extended to other mtDNA-encoded subunits of MTND5 complex I. Furthermore, atypical clinical presentations must be considered, even in well-described phenotypes.

  1. Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes: basic concepts, clinical phenotype, and therapeutic management of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Douglas M; Kaufmann, Petra

    2008-10-01

    Since the initial description almost 25 years ago, the syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) has been a useful model to study the complex interplay of factors that define mitochondrial disease. This syndrome, most commonly caused by an A-to-G transition mutation at position 3243 of the mitochondrial genome, is typified by characteristic neurological manifestations including seizures, encephalopathy, and strokelike episodes, as well as other frequent secondary manifestations including short stature, cognitive impairment, migraines, depression, cardiomyopathy, cardiac conduction defects, and diabetes mellitus. In this review, we discuss the history, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnostic and management strategies of mitochondrial disease in general and of MELAS in particular. We explore features of mitochondrial genetics, including the concepts of heteroplasmy, mitotic segregation, and threshold effect, as a basis for understanding the variability and complicated inheritance patterns seen with this group of diseases. We also describe systemic manifestations of MELAS-associated mutations, including cardiac, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and endothelial abnormalities and pathology, as well as the hypothetical role of derangements to COX enzymatic function in driving the unique pathology and clinical manifestations of MELAS. Although therapeutic options for MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases remain limited, and recent trials have been disappointing, we also consider current and potential therapeutic modalities.

  2. [A study on the expression of anti-mitochondrial antibody in the brain of patients with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Kun; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yan; Piao, Yue-Shan; Lu, De-Hong; Yuan, Yun

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the pathological changes and pathogenesis of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis stroke-like episodes) by using the method of immunohistochemical staining in the brain biopsy specimens with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA). We performed immunohistochemical staining in 3 confirmed MELAS patients' paraffin-imbued brain biopsy specimens. Small vessel proliferation and the uneven thickness of the wall were found in the 3 MELAS patients. A lot of brown deposits was shown in the wall of small vessels and also noted in neurons. The main pathological change in the MELAS brain biopsy immunohistochemical staining with AMA was the small vessel proliferation, indicating that abnormal mitochondria accumulated in the vascular smooth muscle, endothelial cell and neurons of the lesion sites. This finding was consistent with the electron microscopic discovery and valuable for the diagnosis of MELAS.

  3. MELAS and Kearns–Sayre overlap syndrome due to the mtDNA m. A3243G mutation and large-scale mtDNA deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported an unusual manifestation of a 19-year-old Chinese male patient presented with a complex phenotype of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome and Kearns–Sayre syndrome (KSS. He was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of “acute fever, headache and slow reaction for 21 days”. He was initially misdiagnosed as “viral encephalitis”. This Chinese man with significant past medical history of intolerating fatigue presented paroxysmal neurobehavioral attacks that started about 10 years ago. During this span, 3 or 4 attack clusters were described during which several attacks occurred over a few days. The further examination found that the hallmark signs of this patient included progressive myoclonus epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, hearing loss, myopathic weakness, ophthalmoparesis, pigmentary retinopathy and bifascicular heart block (Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome. By young age the disease progression is characterized by the addition of migraine, vomiting, and stroke-like episodes, symptoms of MELAS expression, which indicated completion of the MELAS/KSS overlap syndrome. The m. A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation and single large-scale mtDNA deletions were found in this patient. This mutation has been reported with MELAS, KSS, myopathy, deafness and mental disorder with cognitive impairment. This is the first description with a MELAS/KSS syndrome in Chinese.

  4. Advances in the Treatment of MELAS Syndrome: Could Cognitive Rehabilitation Have a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Rosaria; Russo, Margherita; Leonardi, Simona; Spadaro, Letteria; Cicero, Cettina; Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes syndrome (MELAS) is a rare inherited mitochondrial disorder, commonly due to the m.3243A>G mutation, which typically presents with seizures, headaches, and acute neurological stroke-mimicking deficits. At onset, there is often no general intellectual deterioration in these patients, although specific cognitive deficits in peculiar language domains, visual construction, attention, abstraction, or flexibility may be present. To date, there is no evidence for an effective treatment in individuals with MELAS. Herein, we describe the case of young woman affected by MELAS who underwent an intensive cognitive training by means of the following methods: (a) traditional cognitive training, (b) computerized cognitive training (CCT), and (c) CCT plus a low-intensity aerobic motor exercise. We compared her cognitive and psychological profile at baseline (T0) and at the end of each training (i.e., (Time 1, Time 2, and Time 3 [T3]) using a proper psychometric battery, and we found a greater improvement at T3. Our findings support the idea that the combined CCT with motor training could represent a valuable therapeutic opportunity in MELAS.

  5. N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine SPECT in MELAS syndrome: Comparison with CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Yoshizawa, T.; Takeda, T.; Akisada, M.

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion was studied in three patients with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). Accumulation of the tracer was relatively decreased in the parietooccipital regions and also in the frontotemporal regions after stroke-like episodes. However, quantitative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurement showed that rCBF was relatively well preserved even at these sites, and a hyperemic state was observed at the sites of normal accumulation. IMP SPECT may be useful in the diagnosis and assessment of the progress of the MELAS syndrome

  6. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactate acidosis with stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Igor N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS represent a multisystemic dysfunction due to various mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here we report a patient with genetically confirmed MELAS. Case Outline. A patient is presented whose clinical features involved short stature, easy tendency to fatigue, recurrent seizures, progressive cognitive decline, myopathy, sensorineural deafness, diabetes mellitus as well as stroke-like episodes. The major clinical feature of migraine type headache was not present. Neuroimaging studies revealed signs of ischemic infarctions localized in the posterior regions of the brain cortex. Electron microscopy of the skeletal muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of a large number of mitochondria with paracristal inclusions in the skeletal muscle cells. The diagnosis of MELAS was definitively confirmed by the detection of a specific point mutation A to G at nucleotide position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. Conclusion. When a relatively young patient without common risk factors for ischemic stroke presents with signs of occipitally localized brain infarctions accompanied with multisystemic dysfunction, MELAS syndrome, it is necessary to conduct investigations in order to diagnose the disease.

  7. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Atypical Strokes in a Young African American Male: A Case of Mitochondrial Encephalopathy Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jully M.; Tan, Judy Ann; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Aggarwal, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare but important cause of stroke-like symptoms which can often be missed Thambisetty and Newman 2004. We describe a case of a young male presenting with stroke-like episodes, later diagnosed with MELAS in an attempt to improve the understanding about diagnosing MELAS in the appropriate clinical context. PMID:21789268

  9. Audiological manifestations in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes (MELAS) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, V P; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Sonam, Kothari; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Taly, Arun B; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Chiplunkar, Shwetha; Govindaraju, Chikkanna; Arvinda, H R; Nagappa, Madhu; Sinha, Sanjib; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-09-01

    Reports of audiological manifestations in specific subgroups of mitochondrial disorders are limited. This study aims to describe the audiological findings in patients with MELAS syndrome and m.3243A>G mutation. Audiological evaluation was carried out in eight patients with confirmed MELAS syndrome and m.3243A>G mutation. The evaluation included a complete neurological evaluation, pure tone audiometry (n=8), otoacoustic emissions (n=8) and brainstem evoked response audiometry (n=6), magnetic resonance imaging (n=8) and muscle biospy (n=6). Eight patients (Age range: 5-45 years; M:F-1:3) including six children and two adults underwent formal audiological evaluation. Five patients had hearing loss; of these two had "subclinical hearing loss", one had moderate and two had severe hearing loss. The abnormalities included abnormal audiometry (n=5), otoacoustic emission testing (n=7) and absent brainstem auditory evoked responses (n=1). The findings were suggestive of cochlear involvement in four and retrocochlear in one. This study shows that hearing loss of both cochlear and retrocochlear origin occurs in patients with MELAS and may be subclinical. Early referrals for audiological evaluation is warranted to recognize the subclinical hearing loss in these patients. The therapeutic implications include early interventions in the form of hearing aids, cochlear implants and cautioning the physicians for avoidance of aminoglycosides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MELAS Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Multimodality Imaging Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Seitun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old man presented with chest pain, dyspnea, and lactic acidosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis were detected. The sequencing of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA revealed the presence of A to G mtDNA point mutation at position 3243 (m.3243A>G in tRNALeu(UUR gene. Diagnosis of cardiac involvement in a patient with Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS was made. Due to increased risk of sudden cardiac death, cardioverter defibrillator was implanted.

  11. Application of molecular imaging combined with genetic screening in diagnosing MELAS, diabetes and recurrent pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiping, W; Quwen, L; Hai, Z; Jian, Z; Peiyi, G

    2016-01-01

    We report molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis in a family with 7 members who carried an A3243G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA and p.Thr 137 Met in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes, and recurrent pancreatitis. DNA sequencing was used to detect and validate mitochondrial DNA and PRSS1. We also verified that mitochondrial heterozygous mutations and c.410 C>T mutation causing p.Thr 137 Met could be detected in oral epithelial cells or in urine sediment cells. In addition, molecular imaging was carried out in the affected family members. In this pedigree, MELAS syndrome accompanied by pancreatitis was an important clinical feature, followed by diabetes. Heteroplasmy of the mtDNA A3243G and c.410 C>T mutation of PRSS1 was found in all tissue samples of these patients, but no mutations were found in 520 normal control and normal individuals of the family. However, based on molecular imaging observations, patients with relatively higher lactate/pyruvate levels had more typical and more severe symptoms, particularly those of pancreatic disease (diabetes or pancreatitis). MELAS syndrome may be associated with pancreatitis. For the diagnosis, it is more reasonable to perform molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis.

  12. Ocular findings in MELAS syndrome – a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzejewska, Monika; Chrzanowska, Martyna; Modrzejewska, Anna; Romanowska, Hanna; Ostrowska, Iwona; Giżewska, Maria

    We present a case of a child with MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalo-myopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), discussing clinical manifestation, ocular findings and diagnostic challenges. Predominant ocular symptom was a transient complete visual loss, while the predominant ocular sign was a visual field defect. The diagnosia was based on clinical manifestation, laboratory tests, brain scans and genetic testing which confirmed the pathognomonic mutation in the MTTL1 gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for leucine 3243> G. Ocular examination demonstrated decreased visual acuity (with bilateral best corrected visual acuity of .1). Periodical, transient visual loss and visual field defects were clinically predominant. Specialist investigations were carried out, which demonstrated homonymous hemianopia (kinetic perimetry), bilateral partial optic nerve atrophy (RetCam). Funduscopy and electrophysiology mfERG study did not confirm features of retinitis pigmentosa. The brain scans revealed numerous small cortical ischemic lesions within the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, post-stroke focal areas within the occipital lobes and diffuse calcifications of the basal ganglia. During several years of follow-up, visual field defects showed progressive concentric narrowing. The patient received a long-term treatment with arginine, coenzyme Q and vitamin D, both oral and intravenous, but no beneficial effect for the improvement of ophthalmic condition was observed. As it is the case in severe MELAS syndrome, the course of disease was fatal and the patientdied at the age of 14.

  13. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-11-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q(10) effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. The effect of citrulline and arginine supplementation on lactic acidemia in MELAS syndrome☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Emrick, Lisa T.; Williamson, Kaitlin C.; Craigen, William J.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder in which nitric oxide (NO) deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of several complications including stroke-like episodes and lactic acidosis. Supplementing the NO precursors arginine and citrulline restores NO production in MELAS syndrome. In this study we evaluated the effect of arginine or citrulline on lactic acidemia in adults with MELAS syndrome. Plasma lactate decreased significantly after citrulline supplementation, whereas the effect of arginine supplementation did not reach statistical significance. These results support the potential therapeutic utility of arginine and citrulline in MELAS syndrome and suggest that citrulline supplementation may be more efficacious. However, therapeutic efficacy of these compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25411654

  16. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in MELAS syndrome: comparison with MR finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Jai Keun; Nam, Ji Eun; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Byung Hee; Shin, Hyung Cheol

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate SPECT findings of MELAS syndrome and mitochondrial myopathy and correlate them with MR findings in search of specific imaging features and to assess the role of SPECT in MELAS syndrome. Five patients (four females and one male; age range, 1 to 25 years) who presented with repeated stroke-like episodes or seizures or developmental delay or were asymptomatic but had elevated lactic acid in CSF and serum were evaluated with conventional noncontrast MR imaging and SPECT. MRI demonstrated increased T2 signal intensities in the affected areas of gray and white matters mainly on the parietal (4/5) and occipital lobes (4/5) and in the basal ganglias (1/5), which were not restricted to a specific vascular territory. SPECT demonstrated decreased uptake of Tc-99m ECD on parietal (5/5) and occipital (4/5) and temporal (2/5) and frontal (1/5) lobe and basal ganglia (2/5) and thalami (2/5). In a patient with mitochondrial myopathy who had normal MRI, decreased perfusion is noted on left parietal area and bilateral thalami. Comparison of the numbers of abnormal findings revealed that decreased perfusion seen on SPECT were more numerous than anatomical abnormalities seen on MRI. SPECT may be a sensitive method for pathophysiological study of metabolic disturbances in MELAS. Moreover, in patients with mitochondrial myopathy without clinical encephalopathy, SPECT may play a role in evaluating subclinical encephalopathy even with normal conventional MR findings

  17. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNAVal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Kacem, Maha; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. → Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. → We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA Val gene which was absent in 150 controls. → Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. → The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA Val . This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  18. MELAS syndrome in a child: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bye Young; Hong, Soo Jong; Cho, Jeong Hee; Suh, Dae Chul; Hong, Chang Yee

    1993-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is one of the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, A rare disease caused by a disturbance of the mitochondrial chain of respiration. MELAS is confirmed by typical light and electron microscopic findings: 'ragged red fibers' by modified Gomori trichrome stain on light microscope and numerous abnormal mitochondria on electron microscope. We experienced a boy with the characteristic clinical and pathologic findings of MELAS. Our patient demonstrated bilateral basal ganglia calcifications and infarction at right parieto-occipital and thalamic areas on CT and MR. We found that MRI was more sensitive and represented the infarcted lesions better than CT. Detection of cerebral insults of MELAS by MRI is important in making decision on patient treatment and also in prediction of the patient prognosis

  19. Successful left hemihepatectomy and perioperative management of a patient with biliary cystadenocarcinoma, complicated with MELAS syndrome: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Ayami; Mori, Akira; Doi, Ryuichiro; Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Asano, Noboru; Uemoto, Shinji

    2010-09-01

    Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like syndrome (MELAS) is a rare, fetal disease caused by a mutation in mitochondrial DNA that leads to impaired oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle, the central nervous system, and liver function. This report presents the case of a 50-year-old woman with biliary cystadenocarcinoma complicated by MELAS who underwent a successful left hemihepatectomy. In this case, the diagnostic key for the malignant tumor was an (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study, which was useful even in a patient with MELAS, which causes abnormal glucose metabolism. The perioperative management of such patients includes special precautions to prevent lactic acidosis and deterioration of the reserved liver function after a hepatectomy, since the mitochondrial function in MELAS patients is abnormal. The patient in this report has remained free of liver dysfunctions and cancer recurrence for 2 years following the hepatectomy. This is the first report of a successful major hepatectomy for a patient with MELAS.

  20. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNA{sup Val} mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Kacem, Maha [Service de Medecine interne, C.H.U. Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Hadj Salem, Ikhlass [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. {yields} Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. {yields} We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA{sup Val} gene which was absent in 150 controls. {yields} Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. {yields} The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA{sup Val}. This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  1. [l-arginine efficiency in MELAS syndrome. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutaouakil, F; El Otmani, H; Fadel, H; Sefrioui, F; Slassi, I

    2009-05-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stoke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations of mitochondrial DNA. We report the case of a 12-year-old child with MELAS syndrome who presented with recurrent migraine-like headache and sudden blindness suggesting stroke-like episodes. Furthermore, he developed progressive muscular impairment with bilateral hearing loss. Serum lactate and pyruvate levels were elevated and the muscle biopsy showed an aspect of red-ragged fibers with Gomori trichrome. Brain imaging showed calcifications of basal ganglia on the CT scan and a parieto-occipital high signal on diffusion-weighted MRI. A genetic analysis was not performed but the presence of hearing loss in the patient's mother was suggestive of maternal transmission. Stroke-like episodes in the form of migraine-like headache and blindness were the patient's major complaint and did not improve despite analgesic drugs. After oral administration of l-arginine at the dose of 0.4mg/kg per day, stroke-like symptoms totally and rapidly disappeared. The efficiency of l-arginine in stroke-like episodes was initially reported then confirmed in a controlled study. The pathophysiology of stoke-like episodes and the mechanisms underlying the action of l-arginine are discussed.

  2. [Expression and significance of respiratory chain enzyme of cells in urine sediment in MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-rong; Ma, Yi-nan; Qi, Yu; Liu, Hong-gang

    2013-04-23

    To explore the expression and significance of respiratory chain enzyme of cells in urine sediment in mitochondrial encephalopathy myopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Through enzyme histochemistry, the authors analyzed the changes of respiratory chain enzyme in urine sediment in 20 MELAS patients due to mitochondrial A3243G mutation (MELAS group) and 20 health peoples (control group). And the impact on the expression of protein encoded by nuclear DNA (A21347) and mitochondrial DNA (A6404) was detected by immunochemistry. Image pro Plus 6.0 software was used for analysis of absorbance (A) of staining images as staining intensity. The data were expressed as M (Q1, Q3) and analyzed through statistical software. The staining intensity of complexes Iin the MELAS group was lower than that in the control group (0.06(0.01, 0.12) vs 0.12(0.01, 0.62), P = 0.010). The intergroup staining intensity of complex II showed no marked difference. Increased density of blue particle and cytoplasmic gathering was found in 13 cased (65%) of the MELAS group under light microscope. The staining intensity of complexes IV was expressed at a low level in the MELAS group (0.14(0.03, 0.32) vs 0.23(0.06, 0.43), P = 0.038). The expression of protein encoded by nuclear DNA (A21347) was lower than that in the control group (0.05(0.02, 0.45) vs 0.17(0.03, 0.70), P = 0.000). The expression of protein encoded by mitochondrial DNA (A6404) was also lower than that in the control group (0.03(0.01, 0.07) vs 0.15 (0.09, 0.23), P = 0.000). Abnormal change of respiratory chain enzyme in urine sediment in MELAS due to mitochondrial A3243G mutation and a low expression of proteins encoded by two kinds of DNA in complexes IV can help to confirm the genetic diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies so that different subtypes may be classified and its pathogenesis elucidated.

  3. Chronic kidney disease, severe arterial and arteriolar sclerosis and kidney neoplasia: on the spectrum of kidney involvement in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Bonino, Laura Davico; Campisi, Paola; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Ferraresi, Martina; Fassio, Federica; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Porpiglia, Francesco; Restagno, Gabriella

    2012-02-21

    MELAS syndrome (MIM ID#540000), an acronym for Mitochondrial Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with protean manifestations and occasional kidney involvement. Interest in the latter is rising due to the identification of cases with predominant kidney involvement and to the hypothesis of a link between mitochondrial DNA and kidney neoplasia. We report the case of a 41-year-old male with full blown MELAS syndrome, with lactic acidosis and neurological impairment, affected by the "classic" 3243A > G mutation of mitochondrial DNA, with kidney cancer. After unilateral nephrectomy, he rapidly developed severe kidney functional impairment, with nephrotic proteinuria. Analysis of the kidney tissue at a distance from the two tumor lesions, sampled at the time of nephrectomy was performed in the context of normal blood pressure, recent onset of diabetes and before the appearance of proteinuria. The morphological examination revealed a widespread interstitial fibrosis with dense inflammatory infiltrate and tubular atrophy, mostly with thyroidization pattern. Vascular lesions were prominent: large vessels displayed marked intimal fibrosis and arterioles had hyaline deposits typical of hyaline arteriolosclerosis. These severe vascular lesions explained the different glomerular alterations including ischemic and obsolescent glomeruli, as is commonly observed in the so-called "benign" arteriolonephrosclerosis. Some rare glomeruli showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; as the patient subsequently developed nephrotic syndrome, these lesions suggest that silent ischemic changes may result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis secondary to nephron loss. Nephron loss may trigger glomerular sclerosis, at least in some cases of MELAS-related nephropathy. Thus the incidence of kidney disease in the "survivors" of MELAS syndrome may increase as the support therapy of these patients improves.

  4. Cerebral lactic acidosis correlates with neurological impairment in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P; Shungu, D C; Sano, M C; Jhung, S; Engelstad, K; Mitsis, E; Mao, X; Shanske, S; Hirano, M; DiMauro, S; De Vivo, D C

    2004-04-27

    To evaluate the role of chronic cerebral lactic acidosis in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). The authors studied 91 individuals from 34 families with MELAS and the A3243G point mutation and 15 individuals from two families with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged red fibers (MERRF) and the A8344G mutation. Subjects were divided into four groups. Paternal relatives were studied as controls (Group 1). The maternally related subjects were divided clinically into three groups: asymptomatic (no clinical evidence of neurologic disease) (Group 2), oligosymptomatic (neurologic symptoms but without the full clinical picture of MELAS or MERRF) (Group 3), and symptomatic (fulfilling MELAS or MERRF criteria) (Group 4). The authors performed a standardized neurologic examination, neuropsychological testing, MRS, and leukocyte DNA analysis in all subjects. The symptomatic and oligosymptomatic MELAS subjects had significantly higher ventricular lactate than the other groups. There was a significant correlation between degree of neuropsychological and neurologic impairment and cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular MRS lactate levels. High levels of ventricular lactate, the brain spectroscopic signature of MELAS, are associated with more severe neurologic impairment.

  5. Cerebral hyperperfusion and decreased cerebrovascular reactivity correlate with neurologic disease severity in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, L H; Poublanc, J; Fisher, J A; Sobczyk, O; Wong, T; Hlasny, E; Mikulis, D; Tein, I

    2015-05-01

    To study the mechanisms underlying stroke-like episodes (SLEs) in MELAS syndrome. We performed a case control study in 3 siblings with MELAS syndrome (m.3243A>G tRNA(Leu(UUR))) with variable % mutant mtDNA in blood (35 to 59%) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy study controls and a healthy control population. Subjects were studied at 3T MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL) to measure CBF; CVR was measured as a change in % Blood Oxygen Level Dependent signal (as a surrogate of CBF) to repeated 10 mmHg step increase in arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2). MELAS siblings had decreased CVR (p ≤ 0.002) and increased CBF (p MELAS disease severity and mutation load were inversely correlated with Interictal CVR and directly correlated with frontal CBF. These metrics offer further insight into the cerebrovascular hemodynamics in MELAS syndrome and may serve as noninvasive prognostic markers to stratify risk for SLEs. Class III. Copyright © 2015 © Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvement in symptoms of the syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like symptoms (MELAS) following treatment with sympathomimetic amines--possible implications for improving fecundity in women of advanced reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potestio, C P; Check, J H; Mitchell-Williams, J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sympathomimetic amine therapy on a mitochondrial abnormality known as the mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like symptoms syndrome (MELAS syndrome). Dextroamphetamine sulfate 15 mg extended release capsule was prescribed to a woman with a 25 year history of MELAS syndrome refractory to most other therapies. Within one month of therapy the woman noticed considerable improvement in her chronic fatigue, pain, and edema. The MELAS syndrome is thus another condition to add to the list of various chronic refractory disorders that improve considerably after dextroamphetamine therapy. This is the first mitochondrial disorder shown to improve with sympathomimetic amines which could suggest that dextroamphetamine could prove useful in decreasing the risk of aneuploidy in women of advanced reproductive age.

  7. Whole blood genome-wide expression profiling and network analysis suggest MELAS master regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Susanne; Royer, Loic; Herr, Alexander; Schmiedel, Janet; Deschauer, Marcus; Klopstock, Thomas; Kostic, Vladimir S; Schroeder, Michael; Reichmann, Heinz; Storch, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    The heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation A3243G causes the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome as one of the most frequent mitochondrial diseases. The process of reconfiguration of nuclear gene expression profile to accommodate cellular processes to the functional status of mitochondria might be a key to MELAS disease manifestation and could contribute to its diverse phenotypic presentation. To determine master regulatory protein networks and disease-modifying genes in MELAS syndrome. Analyses of whole blood transcriptomes from 10 MELAS patients using a novel strategy by combining classic Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray profiling with regulatory and protein interaction network analyses. Hierarchical cluster analysis elucidated that the relative abundance of mutant mtDNA molecules is decisive for the nuclear gene expression response. Further analyses confirmed not only transcription factors already known to be involved in mitochondrial diseases (such as TFAM), but also detected the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, nuclear factor Y and cAMP responsive element-binding protein-related transcription factors as novel master regulators for reconfiguration of nuclear gene expression in response to the MELAS mutation. Correlation analyses of gene alterations and clinico-genetic data detected significant correlations between A3243G-induced nuclear gene expression changes and mutant mtDNA load as well as disease characteristics. These potential disease-modifying genes influencing the expression of the MELAS phenotype are mainly related to clusters primarily unrelated to cellular energy metabolism, but important for nucleic acid and protein metabolism, and signal transduction. Our data thus provide a framework to search for new pathogenetic concepts and potential therapeutic approaches to treat the MELAS syndrome.

  8. [Identification of an ideal noninvasive method to detect A3243G gene mutation in MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi-nan; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Song-tao; Xu, Yu-feng; Pei, Pei; Yuan, Yun; Bu, Ding-fang; Qi, Yu

    2008-12-16

    To identify a better non-invasive method to detect the carrier of mitochondrial A3243G mutation, a cause of mitochondrial encephalopathy-lactic acidosis-stroke like episode (MELAS) syndrome. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood, urine, hair follicle, and saliva of 25 MELAS syndrome patients carrying A3243G mutation and their mothers and other maternal relatives, 33 persons in number, and the muscle tissues from 5 patients obtained by biopsy. A3243G mutation was detected by PCR-RFLP method, and the A3243G mutation ratio was identified by measuring the density of each band and calculation with the software AlphaEase 5.0. A3243G mutations were detected in all tissues of the 25 MELAS patients. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine was 62% +/- 9%, significantly higher than that in the blood [(36% +/- 10%), t = -11.13, P < 0.01]. A3243G mutations were detected in at least one tissue of the 28 maternal relatives. The A3243G mutation rates in their urine samples was 33.0% (5.0% - 70.4%), significantly higher than that in their blood samples [8.0% (0 - 33.3%), z = -4.197, P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in A3243G mutation ratio among the samples of hair follicle, saliva, and blood. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine is significantly higher than those in blood samples of the patients and their maternal relatives. A noninvasive method, A3243G mutation ratio analysis of urine is superior to that in blood.

  9. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance H Rodan

    Full Text Available To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by (31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31P-MRS in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes syndrome.We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNA(leu(UUR in MTTL1 gene with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2peak using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine.At baseline (no L-Arg, MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001. On 3(1P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr (p = 0.05, decreased ATP (p = 0.018, and decreased intracellular Mg(2+ (p = 0.0002 when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1 increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT (2 increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3 small increase in VO(2peak. On (31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1 A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis (2 increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP suggesting increased work capacity (3 a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4 increase in torque.These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study.Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446.

  10. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes) Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Lance H; Wells, Greg D; Banks, Laura; Thompson, Sara; Schneiderman, Jane E; Tein, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by (31)Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome. We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNA(leu(UUR)) in MTTL1 gene) with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2peak)) using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine. At baseline (no L-Arg), MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001). On 3(1)P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr) (p = 0.05), decreased ATP (p = 0.018), and decreased intracellular Mg(2+) (p = 0.0002) when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1) increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT) (2) increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3) small increase in VO(2peak). On (31)P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1) A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis) (2) increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP) suggesting increased work capacity (3) a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity) following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4) increase in torque. These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study. Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446.

  11. Defective mitochondrial rRNA methyltransferase MRM2 causes MELAS-like clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; D'Souza, Aaron R; Dallabona, Cristina; Lodi, Tiziana; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Rorbach, Joanna; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Montomoli, Martino; Guerrini, Renzo; Zeviani, Massimo; Calvo, Sarah E; Mootha, Vamsi K; DiMauro, Salvatore; Ferrero, Ileana; Minczuk, Michal

    2017-11-01

    Defects in nuclear-encoded proteins of the mitochondrial translation machinery cause early-onset and tissue-specific deficiency of one or more OXPHOS complexes. Here, we report a 7-year-old Italian boy with childhood-onset rapidly progressive encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes. Multiple OXPHOS defects and decreased mtDNA copy number (40%) were detected in muscle homogenate. Clinical features combined with low level of plasma citrulline were highly suggestive of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, however, the common m.3243 A > G mutation was excluded. Targeted exome sequencing of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteome identified a damaging mutation, c.567 G > A, affecting a highly conserved amino acid residue (p.Gly189Arg) of the MRM2 protein. MRM2 has never before been linked to a human disease and encodes an enzyme responsible for 2'-O-methyl modification at position U1369 in the human mitochondrial 16S rRNA. We generated a knockout yeast model for the orthologous gene that showed a defect in respiration and the reduction of the 2'-O-methyl modification at the equivalent position (U2791) in the yeast mitochondrial 21S rRNA. Complementation with the mrm2 allele carrying the equivalent yeast mutation failed to rescue the respiratory phenotype, which was instead completely rescued by expressing the wild-type allele. Our findings establish that defective MRM2 causes a MELAS-like phenotype, and suggests the genetic screening of the MRM2 gene in patients with a m.3243 A > G negative MELAS-like presentation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Adult-onset of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome presenting as acute meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Fu-Chi; Perng, Cherng-Lih; Tso, An-Chen; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Hsu, Chang-Hung

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disorder with a wide range of multisystemic symptoms. Epileptic seizures are common features of both MELAS and meningoencephalitis and are typically treated with anticonvulsants. To provide the reader with a better understanding of MELAS and the adverse effects of valproic acid. A 47-year-old man with a history of diabetes, hearing loss, sinusitis, and otitis media was brought to our emergency department due to acute onset of fever, headache, generalized seizure, and agitation. Because acute meningoencephalitis was suspected, the patient was treated with antibiotics on an empirical basis. The seizure activity was aggravated by valproic acid and abated after its discontinuation. MELAS was suspected and the diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of a nucleotide 3243 A→G mutation in the mitochondrial DNA. Detailed history-taking and systematic review help emergency physicians differentiate MELAS from meningoencephalitis in patients with the common presentation of epileptic seizures. Use of valproic acid to treat epilepsy in patients suspected of having mitochondrial disease should be avoided. Underlying mitochondrial disease should be suspected if seizure activity worsens with valproic acid therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed tomography and angiography in MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasuo, K.; Tamura, S.; Yasumori, K.; Uchino, A.; Masuda, K.; Goda, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Kamikaseda, K.; Wakuta, Y.; Kishi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Among mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, Pavlakis et al., 1983) is recognized as a distinct syndrome characterized by generalized convulsions and recurrrent stroke-like episodes. The neuroradiological findings of three patients with MELAS are reported here. Retrospective review shows that MELAS should be included in the differential diagnosis of infarct-like lesions of the cerebrum. (orig.)

  14. The accumulation of assembly intermediates of the mitochondrial complex I matrix arm is reduced by limiting glucose uptake in a neuronal-like model of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Guillaume; Benyahia, Rayane; Frey, Samuel; Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Gueguen, Naig; Bris, Celine; Belal, Sophie; Inisan, Aurore; Renaud, Aurelie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Letournel, Franck; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) which combined carbohydrate restriction and the addition of ketone bodies has emerged as an alternative metabolic intervention used as an anticonvulsant therapy or to treat different types of neurological or mitochondrial disorders including MELAS syndrome. MELAS syndrome is a severe mitochondrial disease mainly due to the m.3243A > G mitochondrial DNA mutation. The broad success of KD is due to multiple beneficial mechanisms with distinct effects of very low carbohydrates and ketones. To evaluate the metabolic part of carbohydrate restriction, transmitochondrial neuronal-like cybrid cells carrying the m.3243A > G mutation, shown to be associated with a severe complex I deficiency was exposed during 3 weeks to glucose restriction. Mitochondrial enzyme defects were combined with an accumulation of complex I (CI) matrix intermediates in the untreated mutant cells, leading to a drastic reduction in CI driven respiration. The severe reduction of CI was also paralleled in post-mortem brain tissue of a MELAS patient carrying high mutant load. Importantly, lowering significantly glucose concentration in cell culture improved CI assembly with a significant reduction of matrix assembly intermediates and respiration capacities were restored in a sequential manner. In addition, OXPHOS protein expression and mitochondrial DNA copy number were significantly increased in mutant cells exposed to glucose restriction. The accumulation of CI matrix intermediates appeared as a hallmark of MELAS pathophysiology highlighting a critical pathophysiological mechanism involving CI disassembly, which can be alleviated by lowering glucose fuelling and the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, emphasizing the usefulness of metabolic interventions in MELAS syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [MELAS syndrome as a differential diagnosis of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, J

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactacidosis and stroke-like episode (MELAS) syndrome is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a clinical onset between the first and third decade. The clinical hallmark is the stroke-like-episode, which mimicks ischemic stroke but is usually transient and non-disabling in nature. The morphological equivalent on MRI is a T2-hyperintensity, predominantly over the temporo-parieto-occipital region, not confined to a vascular territory, which is also hyperintense on diffusion weighted imaging and on apparent diffusion coefficient sequences (vasogenic edema, stroke-like lesion). Additional features include seizures, cognitive decline, psychosis, lactic acidosis, migraine, visual impairment, hearing loss, short stature, diabetes, or myopathy. Muscle biopsy typically shows ragged-red fibers, COX-negative fibers, SDH hyperreactivity, and abnormally shaped mitochondria with paracristalline inclusions. The diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of a biochemical respiratory chain defect or one of the disease-causing mutations, of which 80 % affect the mitochondrial tRNALeu gene.

  16. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in MELAS syndrome and mitochondrial myopathy: comparison with MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Jai Keun; Nam, Ji Eun; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Yoon, Choon Sik; Lee, Jong Doo

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT findings of MELAS syndrome and mitochondrial myopathy in correlation with MR imaging in search of specific imaging features. Subjects were five patients (four females and one male; age range, 1 to 25 year) who presented with repeated stroke like episodes, seizures or developmental delay or asymptomatic but had elevated lactic acid in CSF and serum. Conventional non-contrast MR imaging and Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain perfusion SPECT were performed and imaging features were analyzed. MRI demonstrated increased T2 signal intensities in the affected areas of gray and white matters mainly in the parietal (4/5) and occipital lobes (4/5) and in the basal ganglia (1/5), which were not restricted to a specific vascular territory. SPECT demonstrated decreased perfusion in the corresponding regions of MRI lesions. In addition, there were perfusion defects in parietal (1 patient), temporal (2), and frontal (1) lobes and basal ganglia (1) and thalami (2). In a patient with mitochondrial myopathy who had normal MRI, decreased perfusion was noted in left parietal area and bilateral thalami. Tc-99m ECD SPECT imaging in patients with MELAS syndrome and mitochondrial myopathy showed hypoperfusion of parieto-occipital cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and temporal cortex, which were not restricted to a specific vascular territory. There were no specific imaging features on SPECT. The significance of abnormal perfusion on SPECT without corresponding MR abnormalities needs to be evaluated further in larger number of patients

  17. Multimodal imaging-monitored progression of stroke-like episodes in a case of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, Izzie Jacques; Wolff, Valérie; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Marescaux, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We report imaging findings during, between, and after 2 stroke-like episodes in a 45-year-old woman with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome with an A32243G mitochondrial mutation 6 years before. In November 2010, for a first episode, she showed mixed aphasia with logorrhea, disinhibition, agitation, euphoria, and a large left temporoparietal lesion. Symptomatology progressively regressed under L-arginine treatment. She was readmitted in June 2011 for a second episode with great anxiety, disorientation, impaired face recognition, worsening mixed aphasia, and a new right temporal lesion. After additional L-carnitine treatment, she remained without relapse for 14 months.

  18. Identification of FASTKD2 compound heterozygous mutations as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive MELAS-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Da Hye; Choi, Young-Chul; Nam, Da Eun; Choi, Sun Seong; Kim, Ji Won; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a condition that affects many parts of the body, particularly the brain and muscles. This study examined a Korean MELAS-like syndrome patient with seizure, stroke-like episode, and optic atrophy. Target sequencing of whole mtDNA and 73 nuclear genes identified compound heterozygous mutations p.R205X and p.L255P in the FASTKD2. Each of his unaffected parents has one of the two mutations, and both mutations were not found in 302 controls. FASTKD2 encodes a FAS-activated serine-threonine (FAST) kinase domain 2 which locates in the mitochondrial inner compartment. A FASTKD2 nonsense mutation was once reported as the cause of a recessive infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. The present case showed relatively mild symptoms with a late onset age, compared to a previous patient with FASTKD2 mutation, implicating an inter-allelic clinical heterogeneity. Because this study is the second report of an autosomal recessive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy patient with a FASTKD2 mutation, it will extend the phenotypic spectrum of the FASTKD2 mutation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Managing the Earth's Biggest Mass Gathering Event and WASH Conditions: Maha Kumbh Mela (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Annu; Anand, Ankit; Singh, Ravikant; Deka, Mridul; Paul, Abhishek; Borgohain, Sunny; Roy, Nobhojit

    2015-04-13

    Mass gatherings including a large number of people makes the planning and management of the event a difficult task. Kumbh Mela is one such, internationally famous religious mass gathering. It creates the substantial challenge of creating a temporary city in which millions of people can stay for a defined period of time. The arrangements need to allow this very large number of people to reside with proper human waste disposal, medical services, adequate supplies of food and clean water, transportation etc. We report a case study of Maha Kumbh, 2013 which focuses on the management and planning that went into the preparation of Kumbh Mela and understanding its water, sanitation and hygiene conditions. It was an observational cross-sectional study, the field work was done for 13 days, from 21 January to 2 February 2013. Our findings suggest that the Mela committee and all other agencies involved in Mela management proved to be successful in supervising the event and making it convenient, efficient and safe. Health care services and water sanitation and hygiene conditions were found to be satisfactory. BhuleBhatke Kendra (Center for helping people who got separated from their families) had the major task of finding missing people and helping them to meet their families. Some of the shortfalls identified were that drainage was a major problem and some fire incidents were reported. Therefore, improvement in drainage facilities and reduction in fire incidents are essential to making Mela cleaner and safer. The number of persons per toilet was high and there were no separate toilets for males and females. Special facilities and separate toilets for men and women will improve their stay in Mela. Inculcation of modern methods and technologies are likely to help in supporting crowd management and improving water, sanitation and hygiene conditions in the continuously expanding KumbhMela, in the coming years.

  20. Kidney involvement in MELAS syndrome: Description of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcubilla-Prats, Pau; Solé, Manel; Botey, Albert; Grau, Josep Maria; Garrabou, Glòria; Poch, Esteban

    2017-04-21

    MELAS syndrome -myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes- is a maternally-inherited mitochondrial cytopathy related to several mitochondrial DNA mutations, with the A3243G mutation in tRNA Leu gene being the most frequent of them. Apart from its typical symptomatology, patients usually exhibit a maternally-inherited history of neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recent studies have shown that few patients carrying a A3243G mutation also suffer from renal dysfunction, usually in form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In this study we examine kidney involvement in 2 unrelated patients with a A3243G mutation by genetic testing. Both have a maternally-inherited neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent T2DM. A renal biopsy was performed in both patients. One patient developed nephrotic proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with FSGS findings being observed in the kidney biopsy, whereas the other suffered from mild proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with non-specific glomerular changes. The presence of FSGS or other kidney involvement accompanied by hereditary neurosensory deafness and T2DM could be suggestive of a A3243G tRNA Leu mutation and should prompt a genetic testing and an evaluation of potential extrarenal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased cerebral blood flow in MELAS shown by Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, N.J.; Tsay, D.G.; Liu, R.S.; Li, J.Y.; Kong, K.W.; Kwok, C.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    2000-01-01

    We report cerebral SPECT studies on two siblings with the syndrome of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT was performed 8, 19 and 30 days after a stroke-like episode in one case and 10 days after a stroke-like episode, 6 h after a partial seizure and as a follow-up study in the other. Increased blood flow was seen in both these patients with stroke-like episodes due to MELAS. The cause of the increased blood flow is uncertain, but it may be related to the decreased pH created by local increase in lactic acid. (orig.)

  2. The ROS-sensitive microRNA-9/9* controls the expression of mitochondrial tRNA-modifying enzymes and is involved in the molecular mechanism of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Salvador; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antonio L; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathways whose components are mostly unknown. Identification of these components is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases and to discover putative therapeutic targets. MELAS syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial (mt) DNA affecting mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)). Patient and cybrid cells exhibit elevated oxidative stress. Moreover, mutant mt-tRNAs(Leu(UUR)) lack the taurine-containing modification normally present at the wobble uridine (U34) of wild-type mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)), which is considered an etiology of MELAS. However, the molecular mechanism is still unclear. We found that MELAS cybrids exhibit a significant decrease in the steady-state levels of several mt-tRNA-modification enzymes, which is not due to transcriptional regulation. We demonstrated that oxidative stress mediates an NFkB-dependent induction of microRNA-9/9*, which acts as a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the mt-tRNA-modification enzymes GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Down-regulation of these enzymes by microRNA-9/9* affects the U34 modification status of non-mutant tRNAs and contributes to the MELAS phenotype. Anti-microRNA-9 treatments of MELAS cybrids reverse the phenotype, whereas miR-9 transfection of wild-type cells mimics the effects of siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Our data represent the first evidence that an mt-DNA disease can directly affect microRNA expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the modification status of mt-tRNAs is dynamic and that cells respond to stress by modulating the expression of mt-tRNA-modifying enzymes. microRNA-9/9* is a crucial player in mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling as it regulates expression of nuclear genes in response to changes in the functional state of mitochondria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  3. Serial imaging in MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, A.; Oki, J.; Takahashi, S.; Itoh, J.; Kusunoki, Y.; Cho, K.

    1997-01-01

    We report two patients with fatal mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123 I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine was more sensitive to the lesions than CT or MRI. SPECT showed focal hyperperfusion before or during the stroke and diffuse hypoperfusion of the brain, sparing the basal ganglia in the terminal stages. These findings support the theory that metabolic disturbance in the brain causes the ''stroke'' in MELAS. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. β-Lapachone attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS cybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Moon Hee; Kim, Jin Hwan; Seo, Kang-Sik; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Park, Woo Jin

    2014-11-21

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study investigated the efficacy of β-lapachone (β-lap), a natural quinone compound, in rescuing mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS cybrid cells. β-Lap significantly restored energy production and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as normalized the elevated ROS level in MELAS cybrid cells. Additionally, β-lap reduced lactic acidosis and restored glucose uptake in the MELAS cybrid cells. Finally, β-lap activated Sirt1 by increasing the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, which was accompanied by increased mtDNA content. Two other quinone compounds (idebenone and CoQ10) that have rescued mitochondrial dysfunction in previous studies of MELAS cybrid cells had a minimal effect in the current study. Taken together, these results demonstrated that β-lap may provide a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of MELAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute auditory agnosia as the presenting hearing disorder in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Gabriele; Conti, Guido; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Zampetti, Patrizia; Servidei, Serenella

    2008-12-01

    MELAS is commonly associated with peripheral hearing loss. Auditory agnosia is a rare cortical auditory impairment, usually due to bilateral temporal damage. We document, for the first time, auditory agnosia as the presenting hearing disorder in MELAS. A young woman with MELAS (A3243G mtDNA mutation) suffered from acute cortical hearing damage following a single stroke-like episode, in the absence of previous hearing deficits. Audiometric testing showed marked central hearing impairment and very mild sensorineural hearing loss. MRI documented bilateral, acute lesions to superior temporal regions. Neuropsychological tests demonstrated auditory agnosia without aphasia. Our data and a review of published reports show that cortical auditory disorders are relatively frequent in MELAS, probably due to the strikingly high incidence of bilateral and symmetric damage following stroke-like episodes. Acute auditory agnosia can be the presenting hearing deficit in MELAS and, conversely, MELAS should be suspected in young adults with sudden hearing loss.

  6. MR OEF imaging in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) is defined as the ratio of blood oxygen that a tissue takes from the blood flow to maintain function and morphological integrity. OEF reflects the efficiency of oxygen utilization by the tissue and, therefore, is a hemodynamic measure in brain ischemia. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a common mitochondrial disorder. It is characterized by neurological remissions and relapses and associated with progressive neurocognitive deficits. Because of abnormalities of mitochondrial function in MELAS, defects in the oxidative metabolic pathways of energy production decrease the cerebral oxygen utilization and lead to the reduction of OEF. Quantification of OEF can reflect the functional status of cerebral mitochondria and provide insight into the pathophysiological changes in the brain in MELAS. In light of recent advances in MRI, the discovery of the blood-oxygen level-dependent signal has allowed development of MRI methods targeted toward quantitative OEF imaging. A new MR sequence, termed the gradient-echo sampling of spin echo, was successfully developed to enable quantitative assessment of the OEF in the brain tissue. MR OEF imaging in patients with MELAS detects extensive OEF reduction in the stroke-like lesions, as well as in the normal-appearing brain regions. More severe dysfunction of the mitochondria in the stroke-like lesions was implied at the onset of the stroke-like episode. Determination of OEF throughout the episode demonstrated a chronological change in mitochondrial function in individual cases. Such neuroimaging findings might provide some clues in the investigation of the underlying mechanisms of stroke-like episodes.

  7. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Katayama, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kajima, T.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S.

    2000-01-01

    Clinical features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) resemble those of cerebral infarcts, but the pathogenesis of infarct-like lesions is not fully understood. To characterise these infarct-like lesions, we studied two patients with MELAS using diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI before and after stroke-like episodes and measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the new infarct-like lesions. These gave high signal on DWI and had much higher ADC than normal-appearing regions. The ADC remained high even 30 days after a stroke-like episode then decreased in lesions, with or without abnormality as shown by conventional MRI. We speculate that early elevation of ADC in the acute or subacute phase reflects vasogenic rather than cytotoxic edema. The ADC of the lesions, which disappeared almost completely with clinical improvement, returned to normal levels, which may reflect tissue recovery without severe damage. To our knowledge, this is the first study of DWI in MELAS. (orig.)

  8. Genome-Wide Divergence in the West-African Malaria Vector Anopheles melas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Deitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles melas is a member of the recently diverged An. gambiae species complex, a model for speciation studies, and is a locally important malaria vector along the West-African coast where it breeds in brackish water. A recent population genetic study of An. melas revealed species-level genetic differentiation between three population clusters. An. melas West extends from The Gambia to the village of Tiko, Cameroon. The other mainland cluster, An. melas South, extends from the southern Cameroonian village of Ipono to Angola. Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea An. melas populations are genetically isolated from mainland populations. To examine how genetic differentiation between these An. melas forms is distributed across their genomes, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic differentiation and selection using whole genome sequencing data of pooled individuals (Pool-seq from a representative population of each cluster. The An. melas forms exhibit high levels of genetic differentiation throughout their genomes, including the presence of numerous fixed differences between clusters. Although the level of divergence between the clusters is on a par with that of other species within the An. gambiae complex, patterns of genome-wide divergence and diversity do not provide evidence for the presence of pre- and/or postmating isolating mechanisms in the form of speciation islands. These results are consistent with an allopatric divergence process with little or no introgression.

  9. MELA: Modelling in Ecology with Location Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Luisa Vissat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecology studies the interactions between individuals, species and the environment. The ability to predict the dynamics of ecological systems would support the design and monitoring of control strategies and would help to address pressing global environmental issues. It is also important to plan for efficient use of natural resources and maintenance of critical ecosystem services. The mathematical modelling of ecological systems often includes nontrivial specifications of processes that influence the birth, death, development and movement of individuals in the environment, that take into account both biotic and abiotic interactions. To assist in the specification of such models, we introduce MELA, a process algebra for Modelling in Ecology with Location Attributes. Process algebras allow the modeller to describe concurrent systems in a high-level language. A key feature of concurrent systems is that they are composed of agents that can progress simultaneously but also interact - a good match to ecological systems. MELA aims to provide ecologists with a straightforward yet flexible tool for modelling ecological systems, with particular emphasis on the description of space and the environment. Here we present four example MELA models, illustrating the different spatial arrangements which can be accommodated and demonstrating the use of MELA in epidemiological and predator-prey scenarios.

  10. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, Olga Z; Kolesnikova, Olga A; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A; Martin, Robert P; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNA(Leu(UUR)) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders.

  11. The appearance of ADCs in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhenghua; Liu, Xiwei; Hui, Lihong; Xie, Sheng; Xiao, Jiangxi; Jiang, Xuexiang; Zhao, Danhua; Wang, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The exact mechanism of the mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) remain unclear. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique for studying the pathophysiologic change of the MELAS. The purpose of the study is to see whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of MELAS in the non-affected areas is different from the ADC of the normal subjects and to speculate the pathophysiological mechanisms of the MELAS. Sixteen cases of MELAS were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty healthy subjects were chosen to constitute the control group. All of them were performed on the 3.0T whole-body MR scanner with axial view T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (flair), T2-weighted imaging, T1flair, and DWI. An ADC map was reconstructed in the workstation. Two to five regions of interest were put in the non-affected frontal lobe and basal ganglia. All data took statistical analysis. There were significant differences between the ADC of the patients with MELAS and the controls in the non-affected areas, including the superior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, corpus striatum, thalamus, and white matter of the semi-oval centrum. ADCs in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS are higher than those of the normal subjects. Pathological changes take place in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS. (orig.)

  12. The appearance of ADCs in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenghua; Liu, Xiwei; Hui, Lihong; Xie, Sheng; Xiao, Jiangxi; Jiang, Xuexiang [Peking University First Hospital, Center for Functional Imaging, Peking University, The Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Danhua [Peking University First Hospital, The Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Wang, Xiaoying [Peking University First Hospital, Center for Functional Imaging, Peking University, The Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Peking University First Hospital, The Department of Radiology, 8, Xishiku Street, Xicheng District, Beijing (China)

    2011-04-15

    The exact mechanism of the mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) remain unclear. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique for studying the pathophysiologic change of the MELAS. The purpose of the study is to see whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of MELAS in the non-affected areas is different from the ADC of the normal subjects and to speculate the pathophysiological mechanisms of the MELAS. Sixteen cases of MELAS were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty healthy subjects were chosen to constitute the control group. All of them were performed on the 3.0T whole-body MR scanner with axial view T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (flair), T2-weighted imaging, T1flair, and DWI. An ADC map was reconstructed in the workstation. Two to five regions of interest were put in the non-affected frontal lobe and basal ganglia. All data took statistical analysis. There were significant differences between the ADC of the patients with MELAS and the controls in the non-affected areas, including the superior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, corpus striatum, thalamus, and white matter of the semi-oval centrum. ADCs in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS are higher than those of the normal subjects. Pathological changes take place in the non-affected areas of the patients with MELAS. (orig.)

  13. 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HM-PAO SPECT in five patients with MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Shinako; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kitano, Masashi; Horiike, Shigeharu; Kan, Shinichi; Ishii, Katsumi; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Sakai, Fumihiko

    1998-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion was studied in five patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS), using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) or 99m Tc-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime ( 99m Tc-HM-PAO). In four cases, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was evaluated by the method reported by Mastuda et al. Immediately after the stroke-like episodes, accumulation of the tracer was relatively increased in the temporooccipital lobe, and also increased rCBF was shown in the same area. However, the region showed decreased radioactivity at the chronic stage, and rCBF decreased also. These findings are consistent with positron emission tomography (PET) at the acute stage and autopsy. 99m Tc-ECD SPECT and 99m Tc-HM-PAO SPECT may be useful in the diagnosis and assessment of the progress of the MELAS. (author)

  14. ELT-MELAS analyzer and its on-line programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, V.B.; Berezhnoj, V.A.; Glupova

    1976-01-01

    ELT-MELAS device constructed for an automatic analysis of pictures from big bubble chambers is described. It is controlled by a medium-size ICL-1903A computer and has two measuring modes: analysis of the ''agreement'' signal and digitation of slice-scans. Main features of the hardware and of on-line controlling and diagnostic software are presented. The test results of the MELAS complex as well as preliminary results of the scan-slice measurements of pictures from 15sup(') chamber are given

  15. Frequency of MELAS main mutation in a phenotype-targeted young ischemic stroke patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka; Innilä, Markus; Enzinger, Christian; Metso, Tiina M; Curtze, Sami; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Tanislav, Christian; Thijs, Vincent; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Fazekas, Franz; Suomalainen, Anu; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, predominantly mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), may occasionally underlie or coincide with ischemic stroke (IS) in young and middle-aged individuals. We searched for undiagnosed patients with MELAS in a target subpopulation of unselected young IS patients enrolled in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study (sifap1). Among the 3291 IS patients aged 18-55 years recruited to the sifap1 study at 47 centers across 14 European countries, we identified potential MELAS patients with the following phenotypic features: (a) diagnosed cardiomyopathy or (b) presence of two of the three following findings: migraine, short stature (≤165 cm for males; ≤155 cm for females), and diabetes. Identified patients' blood samples underwent analysis of the common MELAS mutation, m.3243A>G in the MTTL1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Clinical and cerebral MRI features of the mutation carriers were reviewed. We analyzed blood samples of 238 patients (177 with cardiomyopathy) leading to identification of four previously unrecognized MELAS main mutation carrier-patients. Their clinical and MRI characteristics were within the expectation for common IS patients except for severe hearing loss in one patient and hyperintensity of the pulvinar thalami on T1-weighted MRI in another one. Genetic testing for the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation in young patients with IS based on phenotypes suggestive of mitochondrial disease identifies previously unrecognized carriers of MELAS main mutation, but does not prove MELAS as the putative cause.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the melA gene, coding for alpha-galactosidase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeström, P L; Liljeström, P

    1987-01-01

    Melibiose uptake and hydrolysis in E.coli is performed by the MelB and MelA proteins, respectively. We report the cloning and sequencing of the melA gene. The nucleotide sequence data showed that melA codes for a 450 amino acid long protein with a molecular weight of 50.6 kd. The sequence data also supported the assumption that the mel locus forms an operon with melA in proximal position. A comparison of MelA with alpha-galactosidase proteins from yeast and human origin showed that these prot...

  17. [Familial Wolfram syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessahraoui, M; Paquis, V; Rouzier, C; Bouziane-Nedjadi, K; Naceur, M; Niar, S; Zennaki, A; Boudraa, G; Touhami, M

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and it is mainly characterized by the presence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Other symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders are less frequent. The WFS1 gene, responsible for the disease and encoding for a transmembrane protein called wolframin, was localized in 1998 on chromosome 4p16. In this report, we present a familial observation of Wolfram syndrome (parents and three children). The propositus was a 6-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus and progressive visual loss. Her family history showed a brother with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness since childhood and a sister with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Thus, association of these familial and personal symptoms is highly suggestive of Wolfram syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis (biology), which showed the presence of WFS1 homozygous mutations c.1113G>A (p.Trp371*) in the three siblings and a heterozygote mutation in the parents. Our observation has demonstrated that pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Retrospective Study and a Description of Cochlear Implantation in a MELAS Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Scarpelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment is common in patients with mitochondrial disorders, affecting over half of all cases at some time in the course of the disease. In some patients, deafness is only part of a multisystem disorder. By contrast, there are also a number of “pure” mitochondrial deafness disorders, the most common probably being maternally inherited. We retrospectively analyzed the last 60 genetically confirmed mitochondrial disorders diagnosed in our Department: 28 had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, whereas 32 didn't present ear's abnormalities, without difference about sex and age of onset between each single group of diseases. We reported also a case of MELAS patient with sensorineural hearing loss, in which cochlear implantation greatly contributed to the patient's quality of life. Our study suggests that sensorineural hearing loss is an important feature in mitochondrial disorders and indicated that cochlear implantation can be recommended for patients with MELAS syndrome and others mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Bollywood Dreams? The Rise of the Asian Mela as a Global Cultural Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Smith

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This article will examine some of the complexities inherent in the development of Asian Mela festivals from small-scale community-based events in India, to national celebrations of Diasporic culture in Western countries. Like Caribbean Carnivals, Melas are becoming more popular as a global cultural tourism phenomenon and are increasingly being promoted to white and tourist audiences. This similarly engenders fears of cultural dilution, distortion, and ‘Othering’. The programming of Melas is apparently keeping pace with the exporting, re-packaging and hybridisation of other forms of Asian culture, such as cuisine, music, fashion, and cinema. But does this symbolise a Bollywood dream or just another post-colonial appropriation of indigenous or Disaporic cultures? Cultural protectionism is certainly a contentious issue within Diasporic communities, where inter-generational differences of opinion can lead to conflict and confusion. Identity construction is complex and worthy of further examination in the context of Melas, which traditionally served to celebrate ethnic community and folk cultures and identities, but are increasingly becoming a showcase for global and hybridised cultural forms. The article will examine these issues, as well as providing an analysis of the factors and mechanisms that are driving the development of Melas forward. This will include the role and vision of artistic directors of Melas, the contribution of ethnic communities to cultural continuity, and issues relating to audience and tourism development. A case study of the Edinburgh Mela will be presented, which exemplifies a number of the aforementioned issues, focusing in particular on national and Diasporic identity construction, and the tensions between popular and traditional cultural forms.

  20. When should MELAS (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes) be the diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare mitochondrial disorder. Diagnostic criteria for MELAS include typical manifestations of the disease: stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (laboratorial or histological) and known mitochondrial DNA gene mutations. Clinical features of MELAS are not necessarily uniform in the early stages of the disease, and correlations between clinical manifestations and physiopathology have not been fully elucidated. It is estimated that point mutations in the tRNALeu(UUR) gene of the DNAmt, mainly A3243G, are responsible for more of 80% of MELAS cases. Morphological changes seen upon muscle biopsy in MELAS include a substantive proportion of ragged red fibers (RRF) and the presence of vessels with a strong reaction for succinate dehydrogenase. In this review, we discuss mainly diagnostic criterion, clinical and laboratory manifestations, brain images, histology and molecular findings as well as some differential diagnoses and current treatments.

  1. Homogentisic acid is the product of MelA, which mediates melanogenesis in the marine bacterium Shewanella colwelliana D.

    OpenAIRE

    Coon, S L; Kotob, S; Jarvis, B B; Wang, S; Fuqua, W C; Weiner, R M

    1994-01-01

    Shewanella colwelliana D is a marine procaryote which produces a diffusible brown pigment that correlates with melA gene expression. Previously, melA had been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli; however, the reaction product of MelA had not been identified. This report identifies that product as homogentisic acid, provides evidence that the pigment is homogentisic acid-melanin (pyomelanin), and suggests that MelA is p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase. This is the first repo...

  2. Childhood cancers in families with and without Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, John A; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Durno, Carol A; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-12-01

    Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes or the EPCAM gene is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other adult malignancies (Lynch syndrome). The risk of childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families, however, is not well studied. Using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we compared the proportion of childhood cancers (diagnosed before 18 years of age) in the first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 781 probands with a pathogenic mutation in one of the MMR genes; MLH1 (n = 275), MSH2 (n = 342), MSH6 (n = 99), or PMS2 (n = 55) or in EPCAM (n = 10) (Lynch syndrome families), with that of 5073 probands with MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (non-Lynch syndrome families). There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of relatives with a childhood cancer between Lynch syndrome families (41/17,230; 0.24%) and non-Lynch syndrome families (179/94,302; 0.19%; p = 0.19). Incidence rate of all childhood cancers was estimated to be 147 (95% CI 107-206) per million population per year in Lynch syndrome families and 115 (95% CI 99.1-134) per million population per year in non-Lynch syndrome families. There was no evidence for a significant increase in the risk of all childhood cancers, hematologic cancers, brain and central nervous system cancers, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, or other cancers in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families.

  3. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    burnout syndrome is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that can occur among workers who interact directly with others. This could affect job performance. The objective was to determine the prevalence of this syndrome and its associated factors among family physicians. a cross-sectional survey applying the Maslach Burnout Inventory was conducted in a selected convenience non-probability sampling of family physicians. Central tendency and dispersion measures were used in determining the prevalence of burnout syndrome; the associated factors were analysed by χ(2) test. there were 59 cases of burnout syndrome, 36 had involvement in a single component, 15 in 2 and 8 were affected in 3 components; we observed that 35 % of positive cases reported doing an average of 10 extra shifts a month (p = 0.013). Having a second job was associated with positive cases of burnout syndrome. the results are consistent with similar studies. Working extra shifts or having a second job were the related factors most associated to this syndrome.

  5. Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) may respond to adjunctive ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriade, Claude; Andrade, Danielle M; Faghfoury, Hanna; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Tai, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome can present management challenges. Refractory seizures and stroke-like episodes leading to disability are common. We analyzed the clinical, electrophysiologic, and radiologic data of a 22-year-old woman with multiple episodes of generalized and focal status epilepticus and migratory cortical stroke-like lesions who underwent muscle biopsy for mitochondrial genome sequencing. Although initial mitochondrial genetic testing was negative, muscle biopsy demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA disease-causing mutation (m.3260A > G). New antiepileptic medications were added with each episode of focal status epilepticus with only temporary improvement, until a modified ketogenic diet and magnesium were introduced, leading to seizure freedom despite development of a new stroke-like lesion, and subsequent decrease in frequency of stroke-like episodes. We propose a metabolic model in which the ketogenic diet may lead to improvement of the function of respiratory chain complexes. The ketogenic diet may lead to improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS, which in turn may promote better seizure control and less frequent stroke-like episodes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Melas Chasma, Day and Night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image is a mosaic of day and night infrared images of Melas Chasma taken by the camera system on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The daytime temperature images are shown in black and white, superimposed on the martian topography. A single nighttime temperature image is superimposed in color. The daytime temperatures range from approximately -35 degrees Celsius (-31 degrees Fahrenheit) in black to -5 degrees Celsius (23 degrees Fahrenheit) in white. Overlapping landslides and individual layers in the walls of Melas Chasma can be seen in this image. The landslides flowed over 100 kilometers (62 miles) across the floor of Melas Chasma, producing deposits with ridges and grooves of alternating warm and cold materials that can still be seen. The temperature differences in the daytime images are due primarily to lighting effects, where sunlit slopes are warm (bright) and shadowed slopes are cool (dark). The nighttime temperature differences are due to differences in the abundance of rocky materials that retain their heat at night and stay relatively warm (red). Fine grained dust and sand (blue) cools off more rapidly at night. These images were acquired using the thermal infrared imaging system infrared Band 9, centered at 12.6 micrometers.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science in Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. Additional science partners are located at the Russian Aviation and Space Agency and at Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL. Aviation and Space Agency and at Los Alamos National Laboratories

  7. Familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome: seven cases from three families in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is rare, and only approximately 3% of patients have affected siblings. METHODS: Herein, we report seven cases of patients with steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome from three Chinese families. Mutational screening of the Nphs2 gene was performed in all the patients. RESULTS: All seven of the familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome cases in our sample exhibited minimal change disease, and one case also presented with mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, according to the renal pathology. No significant was associations were found between Nphs2 gene mutations and the onset of proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome in these familial cases. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of minimal change disease is important, but it is not an unusual finding in patients with familial steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, which appears to be clinically benign and genetically distinct from other types of nephrosis.

  8. [MELAS: Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hidetomo; Ono, Kenjiro

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial disease is caused by a deficiency in the energy supply to cells due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a mitochondrial disease that presents with stroke-like episodes such as acute onset of neurological deficits and characteristic imaging findings. Stroke-like episodes in MELAS have the following features: 1) neurological deficits due to localization of lesions in the brain, 2) episodes often accompany epilepsy, 3) lesions do not follow the vascular supply area, 4) lesions are more often seen in the posterior brain than in the anterior brain, 5) lesions spread to an adjacent area in the brain, and 6) neurological symptoms often disappear together with imaging findings, but later relapse. About 80% of patients with MELAS have an A-to-G transition mutation at the nucleotide pair 3243 in the dihydrouridine loop of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR), which causes the absence of posttranscriptional taurine modification at the wobble nucleotide of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) and disrupts protein synthesis. However, the precise pathophysiology of stroke-like episodes is under investigation, with possible hypotheses for these episodes including mitochondrial angiopathy, mitochondrial cytopathy, and neuron-astrocyte uncoupling. With regard to treatment, L-arginine and taurine have recently been suggested for relief of clinical symptoms.

  9. Familial occurrence of pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovell, A M; Damji, K F; Dohadwala, A A; Hodge, W G; Allingham, R R

    2001-02-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome affects up to 4% of the white population. It is characterized by the presence of transillumination defects, Krukenberg's spindle and dense trabecular meshwork pigmentation. Open-angle glaucoma will develop in as many as 50% of affected patients. In this study we describe the familial occurrence of pigment dispersion syndrome in six North American pedigrees and the phenotypic characteristics with respect to pigment dispersion syndrome and glaucoma. Probands with pigment dispersion syndrome were identified in glaucoma clinics at university eye centres in Ottawa and Durham, NC. Families with two or more affected members were evaluated. All willing members in each family underwent a thorough clinical examination and were classified as affected with pigment dispersion syndrome, suspect or unaffected. The previous medical records were reviewed to obtain the past medical and ocular history, including risk factors for glaucoma. All six families are white. Three families show at least two generations of affected members. Of the 43 subjects examined 58% were women. All 14 affected members showed moderate to heavy trabecular meshwork pigmentation and either Krukenberg's spindle or transillumination defects. The affected members were also considerably more myopic (mean spherical equivalent for the right eye -4.72 dioptres) than the suspect group or the unaffected group (mean spherical equivalent -0.79 D and +1.19 D respectively) (p pigment dispersion syndrome. Our ultimate goal is to identify the gene(s) that causes this disorder in order to clarify its molecular etiology and pathophysiology. This may give rise to a molecular classification of the disease as well as provide the foundation for genetic testing and new treatment approaches.

  10. Epilepsy Characteristics and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Neul; Eom, Soyong; Kim, Se Hoon; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Young-Mock

    2016-11-01

    Epileptic seizures in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are heterogeneous with no pathognomonic features. We reviewed epilepsy characteristics and clinical outcome exclusively in a pediatric population. Twenty-two children and adolescents (13 males) with confirmed mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes due to mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation and epilepsy were recruited. Clinical data including seizure semiology, treatment response, neuroimaging findings, and electroencephalography were analyzed. We also examined the effect of the age at seizure onset and initial symptoms on the clinical variables. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography abnormalities showed no syndrome-specific findings. Focal seizures occurred in 21 of 22 subjects (95.5%), whereas generalized seizures developed in seven of 22 subjects (31.8%). Twenty of 22 subjects (90.9%) achieved partial to complete reduction of clinical seizures for more than one year with a combination of more than two antiepileptic drugs. The subgroup with earlier seizure onset presented significantly earlier and showed significantly higher rates of drug-resistant epilepsy compared with the late onset group, although there were no significant differences in the initial symptoms. The subjects with severe epileptic conditions tended to have more severe clinical dysfunction and more severe organ involvement. Both focal and generalized seizures occurred in patients with MELAS. Epilepsy in this population is drug resistant, but a certain degree of clinical seizure reduction was achievable with antiepileptic drugs, with more favorable outcomes than historically expected. Close observation and active epilepsy treatment of individuals with MELAS episodes and earlier seizure onset might improve the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

  12. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Images PMID:8423616

  13. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Mamoru; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide

    2013-08-16

    Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A) are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  14. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MELAS) with mental disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Koizumi, J.; Shiraishi, H.; Ofuku, K.; Sasaki, M.; Hori, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Anno, I.; Ohkoshi, N.

    1990-01-01

    A case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MELAS) with mental disorder is reported. The SPECT study using 123 I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and MRI study revealed abnormality in the left parieto-occipital areas without abnormality in the brain CT or brain scintigram. These findings suggest a localized dysfunction of the brain capillary endothelium in association with the cerebral involvement of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. (orig.)

  15. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and chorioallantoic membrane. Our results suggest that melA is a useful photoacoustic reporter gene for visualizing bacteria, and further work

  16. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahide Furuno

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  17. MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, Stroke) – a Diagnosis Not to be Missed

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, NM

    2016-09-01

    MELAS is a rare mitochondrial disorder. We report two cases in Irish males where the characteristics were evident, but the diagnosis not made for a considerable period of time. In one of the cases the symptoms were presumed secondary to prematurity. In the other the symptoms were presumed secondary to epilepsy and he had three respiratory arrests secondary to benzodiazepine administration. This report wishes to highlight MELAS as a differential diagnosis in paediatric patients who present with stroke.

  18. [Atypical manifestations in familial type 1 Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, B; Calvas, P; Bazex, J

    1998-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder. Four clinical types are recognized. Three responsible genes have been identified (PAX 3: for type I syndrome, MITF and EDN3 for types II and IV respectively). We report the case of a patient with Waardenburg type I morphotype who had atypical neurological manifestations. Decisive elements for diagnosis were the presence of Waardenburg syndrome in the family and, in affected kin, a mutation causing a shift in PAX 3 gene reading. This case confirms the variability of Waardenburg signs within one family. The association of unusual neurological manifestations in the proband suggested that Vogt Koyanagi Harada disease may have been associated and may show some relationship with familial Waardenburg syndrome.

  19. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Eo, Hong; Yoo, So Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Rha, Jung Ho; Shu, Chang Hae

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p < 0.001), while perfusion imaging demonstrated hyper-perfusion in six acute MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage

  20. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Rha, Jung Ho; Eo, Hong; Yoo, So-Young; Shu, Chang Hae

    2011-01-01

    Objective We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. Materials and Methods We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Results Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. Conclusion The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage. PMID:21228936

  1. Metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine treatment reduce the energetic defect in a neuronal-like model of MELAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Gueguen, Naig; Barth, Magalie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Hancock, Saege; Wallace, Douglas C; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The m.3243A>G variant in the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR) gene is a common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. Phenotypic manifestations depend mainly on the heteroplasmy, i.e. the ratio of mutant to normal mtDNA copies. A high percentage of mutant mtDNA is associated with a severe, life-threatening neurological syndrome known as MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). MELAS is described as a neurovascular disorder primarily affecting the brain and blood vessels, but the pathophysiology of the disease is poorly understood. We developed a series of cybrid cell lines at two different mutant loads: 70% and 100% in the nuclear background of a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). We investigated the impact of the mutation on the metabolism and mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of the cybrids. The m.3243A>G mitochondrial mutation induced a metabolic switch towards glycolysis in the neuronal cells and produced severe defects in respiratory chain assembly and activity. We used two strategies to compensate for the biochemical defects in the mutant cells: one consisted of lowering the glucose content in the culture medium, and the other involved the addition of L-arginine. The reduction of glucose significantly shifted the 100% mutant cells towards the wild-type, reaching a 90% mutant level and restoring respiratory chain complex assembly. The addition of L-arginine, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, improved complex I activity in the mutant cells in which the defective NO metabolism had led to a relative shortage of NO. Thus, metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine therapy may constitute promising therapeutic strategies against MELAS. PMID:22306605

  2. Perfusion status of the stroke-like lesion at the hyperacute stage in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsu-Ling; Chen, Yen-Kung; Chen, Wei-Hung; Wang, Han-Cheng; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2013-02-01

    Hypoperfusion on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the stroke-like lesion (SLL) at the hyperacute stage of mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is considered to be a supportive evidence of the mitochondrial angiopathy theory. Our objectives were to examine whether other neuroimages, especially transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS), done at the hyperacute stage of stroke-like episode (SLE) is consistent with hypoperfusion of the SLL. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SPECT, cerebral angiography, and TCCS of a patient with MELAS syndrome, all of which were performed at the hyperacute stage of one SLE. MRI on the 1st day post SLE showed right temporoparietal lesion with vasogenic edema. SPECT on the 2nd day showed focal decreased uptake of technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) in the same region, but cerebral angiography and TCCS on the 3rd day showed increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and distal arteriole dilation in the same region. TCCS can delineate increased rCBF of the SLL at the hyperacute stage of SLE. We propose that the discrepancy between the decreased (99m)Tc-HMPAO uptake and increased rCBF might be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. The phenomenon of "hypoperfusion" on SPECT might be caused by cell dysfunction but not decreased rCBF. We suggest that SPECT can be complemented by angiography and TCCS in future studies to delineate the perfusion status of SLLs. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Gardner syndrome--parent alienation syndrome (PAS). Diagnosis or family reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namysłowska, Irena; Heitzman, Janusz; Siewierska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The authors present characteristics of Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) proposed by Gardner as well as data, which may help to differentiate that syndrome with real psychological, physical and sexual abuse. The consequences of Gardner Syndrome for legal decisions in the court cases of child custody and the critique of this syndrome in forensic and psychiatric literature are also discussed, and several questions posed. Authors propose to treat Gardner Syndrome not as as a child disorder but as a specific, dynamic family situation, which occurs sometimes, during divorce and fight about child custody.

  4. Family functioning in families with a child with Down syndrome: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povee, K; Roberts, L; Bourke, J; Leonard, H

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the factors that predict functioning in families with a child with Down syndrome using a mixed methods design. The quantitative component examined the effect of maladaptive and autism-spectrum behaviours on the functioning of the family while the qualitative component explored the impact of having a child with Down syndrome on family holidays, family activities and general family functioning. Participants in this study were 224 primary caregivers of children with Down syndrome aged 4-25 years (57.1% male; 42.9% female) currently residing in Western Australia (74.0% in metropolitan Perth and 26.0% in rural Western Australia). Maladaptive and autism-spectrum behaviour were associated with poorer family functioning. Mean total scores on the measures of family functioning and marital adjustment were comparable to that of families of typically developing children. Consistent with the quantitative findings, normality was the most common theme to emerge in the qualitative data. Child problem behaviours were also identified by parents/carers as having a negative impact on the family. This study has implications for the development of programs to support families with a child with Down syndrome and may dispel some of the myths surrounding the impact of intellectual disability on the family. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  6. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age...

  7. Late onset MELAS with m.3243A > G mutation and its association with aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Li, Shuang; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yao; Yu, Miao; Wang, Hongyan; Zhao, Weijie; Cao, Yunpeng

    2017-08-01

    We reported a 53-year-old with late-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) accompanied by aneurysm and large vessel dilations. Most studies have focused on microangiopathy causing stroke-like episodes. We report a case to describe large vessel involvement in clinical considerations, and possible mechanisms of aneurysm formation. We recommended regular angiographic examination for patients with MELAS.

  8. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  9. Cervecería Artesanal, Mela`s Craft Beer : trabajo de Grado en emprendimiento

    OpenAIRE

    Manotas, Eduardo Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    En Colombia, el consumo de cerveza viene creciendo a pasos agigantados, nada más en los últimos 4 años pasamos de ser el octavo país en consumo per cápita de cerveza en Latinoamérica con 45 Litros a ser el tercero con un consumo de 58Lt. Al año. EL crecimiento de Bavaria se ha sostenido alrededor de los 18 puntos porcentuales y el de la cerveza artesanal esta aproximadamente en un 40% año a año. Mela´s Craft Beer nace bajo la necesidad de traer al país cerveza de calidad mundial como no ex...

  10. Validating tyrosinase homologue MelA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert; Zemp, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic drug resistance is a major worldwide issue. Development of new therapies against pathogenic bacteria requires appropriate research tools for replicating and characterizing infections. Previously fluorescence and bioluminescence modalities have been used to image infectious burden in animal models but scattering significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. We hypothesize that photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-toresolution ratio, could be useful for visualizing MelA-expressing bacteria since MelA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue involved in melanin production. Using an inducible expression system, E. coli expressing MelA were visibly black in liquid culture. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), MelA-expressing bacteria (at different dilutions in PBS), and chicken embryo blood were injected in plastic tubes which were imaged using a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system. Photoacoustic imaging at 6 different wavelengths (680, 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900nm) enabled spectral de-mixing to distinguish melanin signals from blood. The signal to noise ratio of 9x diluted MelA bacteria was 55, suggesting that ~20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. When MelA bacteria were injected as a 100 μL bolus into a chicken embryo, photoacoustic signals from deoxy- and oxy- hemoglobin as well as MelA-expressing bacteria could be separated and overlaid on an ultrasound image, allowing visualization of the bacterial location. Photoacoustic imaging may be a useful tool for visualizing bacterial infections and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  11. A new familial intrauterine growth retardation syndrome the "3-M syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, J; Opitz, J M; Nourmand, A

    1976-09-01

    Two pairs of siblings are described with proportionate dwarfism due to skeletal hypoplasia of prenatal onset. The head size was normal for age and disproportionately large for height. The patients had a characteristic face different from that seen in the Silver-Russell syndrome. The family data are in accordance with autosomal recessive inheritance. In spite of some similarities, the bulk of clinical and genetic evidence suggests that the described intrauterine growth retardation syndrome is different from the Silver-Russell syndrome and presents an apparently "new" entity which has been designated 3-M syndrome.

  12. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  13. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram [AB Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  14. Radiological features of familial Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Shruthi; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and skeletal anomalies. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by dentist because keratocystic odontogenic tumors are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment are of utmost importance in reducing the severity of long term sequelae of this syndrome. This report presents a rare event of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome occurring in a 39-year-old male and his 8-year-old daughter. The clinical and investigative features of this familial disorder has been described in detail.

  15. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  16. Fragile X Syndrome in a Colombian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saldarriaga Gil, Wilmar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed on a family from Cali, Colombia in which nine patients were evaluated, three of which presented with intellectual disability with no previous etiological diagnosis. The proband was diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome by DNA molecular testing and, cascade testing, performed on all available family members, identifying two additional individuals with the full mutation and four carriers of a premutation allele. With this report we seek to contribute to Colombian epidemiology of the syndrome and emphasize the importance of diagnosis to provide a comprehensive and specific treatment to those affected. Further we seek to identify premutation carriers in their families or women with a full mutation without the classic phenotype for genetic counseling and education about potential associated pathologies.

  17. Two pedigrees of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohtoku; Mishima, Kazuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2003-06-15

    To determine whether a known missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2 (a human homolog of the Drosophila period gene) for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in a Caucasian family is involved in Japanese familial advanced sleep phase syndrome pedigrees. We identified 2 new Japanese families with advanced sleep phase syndrome, and a systematic survey was carried out in 28 relatives of theses 2 families. A total of 9 affected subjects were identified. The affected members showed significantly strong morningness tendencies compared with the unaffected members in various circadian parameters including the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire score (77.3 +/- 4.8 vs 57.5 +/- 7.6, p sleep-onset time (20:45 +/- 75 min vs 23:16 +/- 64 min, p DNA samples were obtained from 7 affected and 7 unaffected subjects. None of the tested subjects possessed the missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2. Furthermore, there is no significant linkage between affected subjects with hPer2 region by 2-point mapping and by direct sequencing of 23 exons of hPer2. These findings support the notion of genetic heterogeneity of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases in humans. The search for more familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases and for loci other than hPer2 are necessary to further examine the roles of circadian-related genes in genetically determined human circadian rhythm disorders.

  18. Interspecific Hybridization in Pilot Whales and Asymmetric Genetic Introgression in Northern Globicephala melas under the Scenario of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Laura; Oremus, Marc; Silva, Mónica A; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Pilot whales are two cetacean species (Globicephala melas and G. macrorhynchus) whose distributions are correlated with water temperature and partially overlap in some areas like the North Atlantic Ocean. In the context of global warming, distribution range shifts are expected to occur in species affected by temperature. Consequently, a northward displacement of the tropical pilot whale G. macrorynchus is expected, eventually leading to increased secondary contact areas and opportunities for interspecific hybridization. Here, we describe genetic evidences of recurrent hybridization between pilot whales in northeast Atlantic Ocean. Based on mitochondrial DNA sequences and microsatellite loci, asymmetric introgression of G. macrorhynchus genes into G. melas was observed. For the latter species, a significant correlation was found between historical population growth rate estimates and paleotemperature oscillations. Introgressive hybridization, current temperature increases and lower genetic variation in G. melas suggest that this species could be at risk in its northern range. Under increasing environmental and human-mediated stressors in the North Atlantic Ocean, it seems recommendable to develop a conservation program for G. melas.

  19. Familial Brugada syndrome uncovered by hyperkalaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Pieter G.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Tan, Hanno L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic ketoacidosis with concomitant hyperkalaemia that uncovered a typical Brugada syndrome electrocardiogram (ECG). Further provocation testing in the patient and his son confirmed familial Brugada syndrome. Diabetic ketoacidosis with hyperkalaemia may uncover an

  20. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  1. A Danish family with dominant deafness-onychodystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Torring, Pernille M

    2013-01-01

    The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown. We present here three male family members in three generations with sensori-neural deafness, onychodystrophy and brachydactyly inherited via autosomal dominant transmission. The family members presented with absent fingernails on the first and fifth digits. As to the feet, there were absent nails on second to fifth toes in two family members, whereas the third family member only had absent nails on the fifth toe. The proband had late dentition and his father a history of late dentition, but otherwise the teeth appeared normal. Comparative genomic hybridization array analysis (Agilent 400k oligoarray) of the proband did not detect any copy number variation. This Danish family fits within the spectrum of dominant deafness and onychodystrophy syndrome and further characterises this rare disorder.

  2. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit; Waters, Karen; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nair, Rashmi

    2011-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition that usually presents soon after birth and is potentially life-shortening if not treated. The defining abnormality is hypoventilation during sleep which requires life-long treatment with artificial ventilation. This syndrome may also be associated with generalised dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and a sub-group with associated Hirschsprung's disease. The genetic basis of CCHS has been identified as mutations in the PHOX2B gene. We present four families, three with autosomal dominant inheritance and familial clustering, and one with a de novo mutation resulting in CCHS. We demonstrate that nasal mask ventilation from birth can provide adequate treatment and improved quality of life for these children. Phenotypic variability in expression of disease is seen in families with the same mutations in PHOX2B gene. The psychosocial costs of the disease and the unrecognised 'morbidity barter' that is part of current management needs to be factored into in all stages of management from childhood to adolescence to adulthood.

  3. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadin, Michael Okoeguale; Ademola, Ade Adeyekun; Ofovwe, Gabriel Egberue

    2012-03-01

    A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the management are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  4. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  5. Investigation of two families with nail-patella syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Alzen, G.; Ittel, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological and clinical features of two families with a nail-patella syndrome are described. Our findings emphasize the varying expressivity of the syndrome, which has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and a penetrance of 100%. It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the syndrome's stigmata so that renal failure can be detected as early as possible after the diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia. (orig.) [de

  6. Munchausen syndrome by proxy: a family anthology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickford, E; Buchanan, N; McLaughlan, S

    1988-06-20

    While the Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome is well recognized, the story of one family has been related to describe some remarkable features. These include the psychopathology of the mother, the involvement of both children in the family, the great difficulty in obtaining proof of child abuse and, finally, the prosecution of the mother in the criminal court.

  7. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  8. Familial prune belly syndrome in a Nigerian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Okoeguale Ibadin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Prune Belly Syndrome in an infant, the second in a middle class family with both parents in their late thirties, is presented because of its rarity. Constraints in the manage-ment are discussed and relevant literature reviewed. This is intended to awaken interest and sharpen indices of suspicion that would facilitate early diagnosis, enhance management, and mitigate prejudices.

  9. Bartsocas-Papas Syndrome: Unusual Findings in the First Reported Egyptian Family

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, E. M.; Morsy, H.

    2011-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessive syndrome with severe craniofacial, limb, and genital abnormalities. As of 2011, 24 published cases and families were registered in the Orphanet Report Series. Compared to other disorders characterized by pterygia, the condition is usually more severe and often lethal: most affected patients die in utero or shortly after birth. We report the first Egyptian family with Bartsocas-Papas syndrome comprising three cases; our proband who was ...

  10. Case Report : A Relieved Family with the Diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

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    Ahmet Kokurcan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS is a diagnosis formed from Wernicke ensephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome together. WKS is usually a chronic syndrome beginning acutely. Wernicke%u2019s encephalopathy is an acute syndrome composed of the triad of oculomotor signs; ataxia and confusion. B vitamines especially tiamine are considered to cause the syndrome. Korsakoff syndrome is a syndrome presenting with amnesia and amnesia is permanent in many cases. While Korsakoff syndrome is a continuation form of Wernicke; the syndromes are admitted as the acute and chronic conditions of the same pathophysiology. WKS syndrome means despair for many psychiatrists and the family unless treatment is initiated in the acute phase and irreversible cognitive impairment is prevented. We will discuss a case of WKS pleasing his family as nervousness has improved with cognitive impairment.

  11. MT-ND5 Mutation Exhibits Highly Variable Neurological Manifestations at Low Mutant Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shiau Ng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the m.13094T>C MT-ND5 gene have been previously described in three cases of Leigh Syndrome (LS. In this retrospective, international cohort study we identified 20 clinically affected individuals (13 families and four asymptomatic carriers. Ten patients were deceased at the time of analysis (median age of death was 10 years (range: 5·4 months−37 years, IQR = 17·9 years. Nine patients manifested with LS, one with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, and one with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. The remaining nine patients presented with either overlapping syndromes or isolated neurological symptoms. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity analysis was normal in five out of ten muscle biopsies. We confirmed maternal inheritance in six families, and demonstrated marked variability in tissue segregation, and phenotypic expression at relatively low blood mutant loads. Neuropathological studies of two patients manifesting with LS/MELAS showed prominent capillary proliferation, microvacuolation and severe neuronal cell loss in the brainstem and cerebellum, with conspicuous absence of basal ganglia involvement. These findings suggest that whole mtDNA genome sequencing should be considered in patients with suspected mitochondrial disease presenting with complex neurological manifestations, which would identify over 300 known pathogenic variants including the m.13094T>C. Keywords: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, Lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, Leigh syndrome (LS, Mitochondrial DNA, Heteroplasmy, Neuropathology

  12. Mutation of Mitochondrial DNA G13513A Presenting with Leigh Syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA G13513A, encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS and Leigh syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome and optic atrophy were reported in a high proportion of patients with this mutation. We report an 18-month-old girl, with an 11-month history of psychomotor regression who was diagnosed with WPW syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, in association with Leigh syndrome. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10, thiamine and carnitine prevented further regression in gross motor function but the patient's heart function deteriorated and dilated cardiomyopathy developed 11 months later. She was found to have a mutation of mtDNA G13513A. We suggest that mtDNA G13513A mutation is an important factor in patients with Leigh syndrome associated with WPW syndrome and/or optic atrophy, and serial heart function monitoring by echocardiography is recommended in this group of patients.

  13. Stickler syndrome: an underdiagnosed disease. Report of a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyzer, T H W; De Veuster, I; Smets, R-M E

    2011-01-01

    To report a family diagnosed with Stickler syndrome. To emphasize that early recognition of patients with Stickler syndrome could improve the visual outcome. Case report. A 14 year old girl of Mahgrebian origin presented with a longstanding subtotal RRD in the right eye. Subsequently 6 family members in 3 generations have been identified with the same COL2A1 mutation. 4 eyes lost perception of light and 1 eye was enucleated. Stickler syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). These tend to be complex and to occur at young age, frequently affecting both eyes. Other ocular features consist of high myopia, optically empty vitreous cavity, posterior radial paravascular lattice-type degeneration, cataract and glaucoma. Non-ocular findings include midface hypoplasia, musculoskeletal changes and hearing loss. In severe cases the disorder will readily be suspected. In mildly affected patients, clinical diagnosis can be quite difficult. Therefore, all family members of a Stickler patient should be offered molecular genetic testing. Stickler patients benefit from a multidisciplinary approach, including audiologic examination. They should be informed about the symptoms associated with retinal tears and retinal detachment and have priviliged access to the ophthalmic care unit. In case of RRD, vitrectomy is the preferred surgery. Prophylaxis of RRD in Stickler syndrome patients consisting of a 360 degrees peripheral cryotherapy or photocoagulation has been proposed. Practical guidelines for follow up or thresholds for initiating treatment have not been formulated. Stickler syndrome remains under-diagnosed. Hightened awareness of Stickler syndrome could improve visual outcome in affected individuals and makes genetic counseling possible

  14. Clinical analysis of three children patients with MELAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jun LIU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging features, pathological and genetic testing, diagnosis and treatment in 3 children patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS. Focal refractory epileptic seizures were the main clinical manifestations of 3 children, at the same time with stroke-like episodes, exercise intolerance, short stature, paroxysmal headache, vomiting, cognitive impairment, visual impairment, increased blood lactic acid (LA level and metabolic acidosis. Head MRI showed the lesions were located in temporo-parieto-occipital lobes, and EEG showed slow-wave background, bilateral asymmetry and interictal epileptiform discharges of occiput. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA A3243G mutation was found in the peripheral blood samples of 2 cases. The mutation was not detected in the other case, however, the muscle biopsy revealed pathological changes of mitochondrial myopathy. All 3 cases were treated by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs including topiramate, levetiracetam and oxcarbazepine, and cocktail therapy. One case died of status epilepticus (SE after 46 months of follow-up, one case had stroke-like episodes for 2-3 times per year during the follow-up of 40 months, and one case was lost. The clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging characteristics, pathological and genetic testing in children of MELAS have certain features, which will be helpful for early identification and definite diagnosis, and thus may reduce misdiagnosis and mistreatment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.05.009

  15. Divorce in families of children with Down syndrome: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Richard C; Hodapp, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we examined the nature, timing, and correlates of divorce in families of children with Down syndrome (647), other birth defects (10,283) and no identified disability (361,154). Divorce rates among families of children with Down syndrome were lower than in the other two groups. When divorce did occur in the Down syndrome group, however, a higher proportion occurred within the first 2 years after the child's birth. Mothers and fathers of children with Down syndrome were much more likely to divorce if they were younger, had not graduated from high school, and if fathers were less educated and lived in a rural area. Few effects on divorce were noted for a variety of family structure variables.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammatory response. Monarch-1 is involved in the inhibition of the inflammatory response. Mutations in the NLRP12 ... cold autoinflammatory syndrome Orphanet: Familial cold urticaria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National ...

  17. Macular pattern dystrophy and homonymous hemianopia in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel; Grana-Pérez, María Del Mar; García-Campos, Jose Manuel

    2015-03-12

    We report an unusual association of a pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and homonymous hemianopia in a woman diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. A Korean family with the Muenke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae Eun; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2010-07-01

    The Muenke syndrome (MS) is characterized by unicoronal or bicoronal craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, and a variety of minor abnormalities associated with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. The birth prevalence is approximately one in 10,000 live births, accounting for 8-10% of patients with coronal synostosis. Although MS is a relatively common diagnosis in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes, with autosomal dominant inheritance, there has been no report of MS, in an affected Korean family with typical cephalo-facial morphology that has been confirmed by molecular studies. Here, we report a familial case of MS in a female patient with a Pro250Arg mutation in exon 7 (IgII-IGIII linker domain) of the FGFR3 gene. This patient had mild midfacial hypoplasia, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a beak shaped nose, plagio-brachycephaly, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. The same mutation was confirmed in the patient's mother, two of the mother's sisters and the maternal grandfather. The severity of the cephalo-facial anomalies was variable among these family members.

  19. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  20. A novel mutation in the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) in a patient with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuele, Valentina; Sotiriou, Evangelia; Rios, Purificación Gutierrez; Ganesh, Jaya; Ichord, Rebecca; Foley, A Reghan; Akman, H Orhan; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) have been commonly associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy and exercise intolerance, rarely with multisystem disorders, and only once with a parkinsonism/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) overlap syndrome. Here, we describe a novel mutation (m.14864 T>C) in MTCYB in a 15-year-old girl with a clinical history of migraines, epilepsy, sensorimotor neuropathy, and strokelike episodes, a clinical picture reminiscent of MELAS.  The mutation, which changes a highly conserved cysteine to arginine at amino acid position 40 of cytochrome b, was heteroplasmic in muscle, blood, fibroblasts, and urinary sediment from the patient but absent in accessible tissues from her asymptomatic mother. This case demonstrates that MTCYB must be included in the already long list of mitochondrial DNA genes that have been associated with the MELAS phenotype.

  1. Recognizing Family Dynamics in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an increasingly common chronic medical condition that affects not only patients but also their families. Because family dynamics, particularly the family life cycle, can and does influence the disease process, those providing counseling to CFS patients and their families would do well to recognize these dynamics.…

  2. [Family medicine and functional somatic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nago, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Between psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry, FSS (functional somatic syndromes) patients are often visiting a family doctor. For FSS, the role of family physicians is large, but the family physicians are not required for the role of diagnosis and treatment of FSS. Rather, appropriate referral to a specialist to exclude organic disease is important and a role as the coordinator is large to the patient to refuse a psychiatric consultation. To serve as a role for such coordination, a family physician has to response the patient's emotional side and focus on the construction of the doctor-patient relationship and response. I also think of structuralism medicine approach to describe disease from the meta-level as a new procedure to the patient. This approach consists of 4 components, 'entity', 'phenomenon', 'words', and 'I'. This may be a useful approach to family physicians who coordinate the overall for FSS patients' management.

  3. a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Maria Banaś

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Material and methods. The study group comprised 325 children and adolescents (177♀, 148♂ aged 7, 13 and 16 years. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference were made, along with the determination of blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid levels. Overweight states and obesity were assessed according to the IOTF criteria. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were evaluated using growth charts appropriate for the age, gender and height of the children of Lodz. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the NCEP/AT P III criteria. Results . Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 6.5% of the subjects. In children aged 13 and 16 years – 7.6% (p > 0.05 vs. 7 years, aged 7 years – 3.9% (p > 0.05 vs. 13, 16 years, boys (8.8%; p > 0.05, girls (4.5%; p > 0.05. Among children with excessive body weight, metabolic syndrome was observed in every fourth child (25.4%, more often in those with obesity (44.1% than with abdominal obesity (32% and those who were overweight (19.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. metabolic syndrome. The number of components of metabolic syndrome elevated with increasing body weight (p < 0.001. Abdominal obesity was observed in 17.5% of the subjects. Children with abdominal obesity had higher levels of triglycerides (p < 0.05 and lower HDL cholesterol (p 110 mg/dl in 85 (26.1% and excessive body weight in 71 subjects (21.8%. Conclusions . The presence of metabolic syndrome correlated with overweight state, obesity and abdominal obesity

  4. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    OpenAIRE

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S.; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, ha...

  5. Unusual association of turner syndrome and hypopituitarism in a Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougacha-Elleuch, N; Elleuch, M; Charfi, N; Mnif, F; Belghith, N; Abdelhedi, F; Kammoun, H; Hachicha, M; Mnif, M; Abid, M

    2016-01-01

    Familial occurrence of either Turner syndrome or hypopituitarism is very rare. Particularly, their association is an uncommon finding. In this context, we describe for the first time 4 sisters with Turner syndrome, hypopituitarism was reported in three among them. Our cohort consists of four Tunisian adult sisters belonging to a consanguineous family. Biochemical analysis, resonance magnetic imaging and cytogenetic analyses were performed. Turner syndrome was diagnosed at the ages of 14, 17, 31 and 43 years in cases 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. They suffered from short stature, dysmorphic syndrome and/or delayed puberty. Interestingly, 3 among them showed also hypopituitarism, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and central hypothyroidism. Somatotropic insufficiency was proven in one case. Pituitary MRI has shown an empty sella turcica with hypoplastic pituitary gland in three cases. Their karyotypes were compatible with 45X in one case, 45X/46XX in the second and 45X/46XX/47XXY with x label in two cases. Hence, the presence of these familial cases of TS must evoke new etiopathogenetic arguments. Coincidence of hypopituitarism in this family, might suggest common genetic background for the two diseases. This particular family would be a precious tool for an extensive molecular analysis. More attention should be given to other family's members mainly in the presence of delayed puberty and sterility in other members. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R) and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86). The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1 and MSH6 are

  7. Nonorganic Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome and the Family System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderette, Paula; deGraffenried, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that nonorganic failure-to-thrive syndrome (NFTT) in infants is the result of family disengagement--the family system's maladaptive style of interaction. Proposes a systems-based approach to diagnosis and to treatment, focusing on the process of disengagement and other interaction factors. (Author/ABB)

  8. Family perspectives about Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotko, Brian G; Levine, Susan P; Macklin, Eric A; Goldstein, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    National medical organizations recommend that during prenatal counseling sessions, healthcare providers discuss how having a child with Down syndrome (DS) might impact the family unit. Few studies, to date, have surveyed families about their life experiences. For this investigation, we examined 41 family attitudes, which were obtained from mailed questionnaires completed by 1,961 parents/guardians, 761 brothers/sisters, and 283 people with DS who were members of six DS non-profit organizations, chosen for their size, ethnic/racial diversities, and geographic distribution throughout the United States. About 83% of families reported to all being proud of the family member with DS, and 87% reported to all feeling love for the member with DS. Younger siblings (ages 9-11) were more likely to feel embarrassed by their sibling with DS if their parents/guardians also did. If one or more parents/guardians felt that their children without DS did have a good relationship with their child with DS, siblings were more likely to report that they loved and liked their brother/sister with DS. Overall, our data demonstrate that positive themes tend to dominate within modern-day families who have members with DS, although challenges were not insignificant for some. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) Register is a national resource that registers families with hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC is the most common type of hereditary colorectal cancer and carries an increased risk of other tumor types. Genetic diagnostics has...... identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  10. Bartsocas-papas syndrome: unusual findings in the first reported egyptian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, E M; Morsy, H

    2011-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessive syndrome with severe craniofacial, limb, and genital abnormalities. As of 2011, 24 published cases and families were registered in the Orphanet Report Series. Compared to other disorders characterized by pterygia, the condition is usually more severe and often lethal: most affected patients die in utero or shortly after birth. We report the first Egyptian family with Bartsocas-Papas syndrome comprising three cases; our proband who was a female infant with severe craniofacial and limb anomalies typical of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, a similarly affected female fetus which died in utero at the 7th gestational month, and a 16-year-old mentally retarded uncle who presented with some of the typical features of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, including syndactyly, thumb hypoplasia, and microphthalmia. This male patient actually did not present with pterygia, however, we find his clinical description noteworthy.

  11. The Coffin-Siris syndrome: report of a family and further delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspeslagh, M; Fryns, J P; van den Berghe, H

    1984-10-01

    The familial occurrence of the Coffin-Siris syndrome, combining a typical facial appearance with hypoplastic or absent fifth finger- or toenails, is reported. The full expression of the syndrome was present in two sisters, and partial clinical manifestations were present in their mentally borderline father. The relevant literature is reviewed, and the relation and confusion with other mental retardation syndromes, mainly the Coffin-Lowry syndrome, is discussed.

  12. Increased accumulation of N-isopropyl-p-(123I)-iodoamphetamine in two cases with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Ono, S.; Fukunaga, M.; Morita, R.; Yasuda, T.; Higashi, Y.; Terao, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present two cases with mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS), which showed both increased and decreased accumulation of N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP) in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The increased accumulation of the tracer occurred before low density appeared on conventional computed tomography, suggesting that 123 I-IMP SPECT may be useful in pathophysiological study of MELAS. (orig.)

  13. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  14. Quantitative measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction fraction using MRI in patients with MELAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the cerebral OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS by using MRI. METHODS: We recruited 32 patients with MELAS confirmed by gene analysis. Conventional MRI scanning, as well as functional MRI including arterial spin labeling and oxygen extraction fraction imaging, was undertaken to obtain the pathological and metabolic information of the brains at different stages of stroke-like episodes in patients. A total of 16 MRI examinations at the acute and subacute phase and 19 examinations at the interictal phase were performed. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited for control subjects. Six regions of interest were placed in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the bilateral hemispheres to measure the OEF of the brain or the lesions. RESULTS: OEF was reduced significantly in brains of patients at both the acute and subacute phase (0.266 ± 0.026 and at the interictal phase (0.295 ± 0.009, compared with normal controls (0.316 ± 0.025. In the brains at the acute and subacute phase of the episode, 13 ROIs were prescribed on the stroke-like lesions, which showed decreased OEF compared with the contralateral spared brain regions. Increased blood flow was revealed in the stroke-like lesions at the acute and subacute phase, which was confined to the lesions. CONCLUSION: MRI can quantitatively show changes in OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes. The utilization of oxygen in the brain seems to be reduced more severely after the onset of episodes in MELAS, especially for those brain tissues involved in the episodes.

  15. Modeling Family Dynamics in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S.; Burns, David D.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of children with genetic disorders and their unaffected siblings on family functioning. In this study, the reciprocal causal links between problem behaviors and maternal distress were investigated in 150 families containing a child with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and an unaffected sibling. Both children's…

  16. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  17. Brachiola gambiae sp n. the microsporidian parasite of Anopheles gambiae and A-melas in Liberia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiser, Jaroslav; Žižka, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2004), s. 73-80 ISSN 0065-1583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Anopheles gambiae * Anopheles melas * Brachiola gambiae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.986, year: 2004

  18. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  19. A familial study of Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epée E

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available E Epée,1 D Beleho,2 AT Bitang,3 VA Njami,4 C Bengondo,5 Côme Ebana Mvogo1 1Ophthalmology Department, Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 2Ophthalmology Department, Okola District Hospital, Okola, Cameroon; 3Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 4Higher Institute of Health Sciences, Université des Montagnes, Bangangté, Cameroon; 5Stomatology Department, Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon Abstract: Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome is a rare sporadic genetic pathology characterized by a phenotype consisting of growth retardation, ocular abnormalities, and a “bird-like head”. We hereby report a case of this syndrome found in three generations of the same family – father, daughter, and grand-daughter – who presented with a short stature and facial dysmorphic features, nystagmus, cataract, and bilateral microphthalmia. The discussion is based on the clinical and genetic aspects, and the challenges in management of this oculo-mandibulo-facial syndrome. The association of congenital cataract, facial dysmorphic features, and microphthalmia, should guide the diagnosis of dysmorphic syndromes such as Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome. Keywords: Hallermann–Streiff–François syndrome, familial cataract, dysmorphic features, rare, Cameroon

  20. Adaptation in families of children with Down syndrome in East Asian countries: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunkyung; Van Riper, Marcia

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this integrative literature review was to understand the experiences of East Asian families of children with Down syndrome and identify factors affecting their adaptation in the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation. Socio-cultural factors influence how well families adapt following the birth of a child with Down syndrome. Existing literature in this area has focused primarily on families from Western cultures. This is problematic because nurses care for families from all over the world. Therefore, the focus of this review is on families of children with Down syndrome living in East Asia, where Confucianism is dominant. Integrative literature review. Online databases (i.e. PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO) and a public search engine (i.e. Google Scholar) were used along with manual searches of reference lists and major journals. Studies were limited to original publications written in English and published between 1990-2014. Two authors independently performed integrative review processes proposed by Whittemore and Knafl and a quality assessment using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Like families in Western cultures, some East Asian families of children with Down syndrome adapted well and even thrived while others struggled. Various socio-cultural factors, including some associated with Confucianism, played a role in how individuals, dyads and families adapted. An understanding of socio-cultural influences can help nurses implement culturally sensitive family-centred interventions with families of children with Down syndrome. It may also facilitate policy changes concerning resources for these families. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Two families from New England with usher syndrome type IC with distinct haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, M M; McGee, T L; Keats, B J; Slim, R; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    2001-03-01

    To search for patients with Usher syndrome type IC among those with Usher syndrome type I who reside in New England. Genotype analysis of microsatellite markers closely linked to the USH1C locus was done using the polymerase chain reaction. We compared the haplotype of our patients who were homozygous in the USH1C region with the haplotypes found in previously reported USH1C Acadian families who reside in southwestern Louisiana and from a single family residing in Lebanon. Of 46 unrelated cases of Usher syndrome type I residing in New England, two were homozygous at genetic markers in the USH1C region. Of these, one carried the Acadian USH1C haplotype and had Acadian ancestors (that is, from Nova Scotia) who did not participate in the 1755 migration of Acadians to Louisiana. The second family had a haplotype that proved to be the same as that of a family with USH1C residing in Lebanon. Each of the two families had haplotypes distinct from the other. This is the first report that some patients residing in New England have Usher syndrome type IC. Patients with Usher syndrome type IC can have the Acadian haplotype or the Lebanese haplotype compatible with the idea that at least two independently arising pathogenic mutations have occurred in the yet-to-be identified USH1C gene.

  2. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: A Family Affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy in which chronic illicit insulin was administered to a one-year-old child by her mother. Factitious illnesses continued despite psychiatric intervention. Retrospective review of medical records suggested 30 previous episodes of factitious illness within the family. (DB)

  3. Familial aggregation and linkage analysis with covariates for metabolic syndrome risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Parisa; Khodakarim, Soheila; Guity, Kamran; Daneshpour, Maryam S

    2018-06-15

    Mechanisms of metabolic syndrome (MetS) causation are complex, genetic and environmental factors are important factors for the pathogenesis of MetS In this study, we aimed to evaluate familial and genetic influences on metabolic syndrome risk factor and also assess association between FTO (rs1558902 and rs7202116) and CETP(rs1864163) genes' single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with low HDL_C in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). The design was a cross-sectional study of 1776 members of 227 randomly-ascertained families. Selected families contained at least one affected metabolic syndrome and at least two members of the family had suffered a loss of HDL_C according to ATP III criteria. In this study, after confirming the familial aggregation with intra-trait correlation coefficients (ICC) of Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the quantitative lipid traits, the genetic linkage analysis of HDL_C was performed using conditional logistic method with adjusted sex and age. The results of the aggregation analysis revealed a higher correlation between siblings than between parent-offspring pairs representing the role of genetic factors in MetS. In addition, the conditional logistic model with covariates showed that the linkage results between HDL_C and three marker, rs1558902, rs7202116 and rs1864163 were significant. In summary, a high risk of MetS was found in siblings confirming the genetic influences of metabolic syndrome risk factor. Moreover, the power to detect linkage increases in the one parameter conditional logistic model regarding the use of age and sex as covariates. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Families of 30-35-Year Olds with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Background: The families of a population sample of people with Down's syndrome (DS), and of their non-disabled controls, have been followed since early childhood, and the families have now been seen again as their sons and daughters reached age 30 and 35 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview schedule was used, including items from the…

  5. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  6. Familial concordance of metabolic syndrome in Korean population--Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Ha; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Thomas, G Neil; Ahn, Song Vogue; Hur, Nam Wook; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the familial concordance of metabolic syndrome and its components in a nationally representative survey in Korean. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationwide survey examining the general health and nutritional status of the Korean people. We enrolled 1641 married couples and 1527 parents-1342 offspring. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 17.1% for husbands, 11.7% for wives, 14.3% for parents, and 7.2% for offspring. After adjustment for age, there were strong positive correlations between family members for the metabolic variables. Compared with husbands whose wives did not have metabolic syndrome, adjusted odds ratio in husbands whose wives had metabolic syndrome was 1.43 (95% CI: 1.10-1.87) for the risk of having metabolic syndrome. Similarly, wives whose husbands had metabolic syndrome had 1.41 (95% CI: 1.08-1.84) times higher risk of having metabolic syndrome. Compared with children whose parents did not have metabolic syndrome, adjusted odds ratio in children with at least one parent with the metabolic syndrome was 2.56 (95% CI: 1.09-5.98) for the metabolic syndrome. Our study revealed that there is significant familial concordance for metabolic syndrome and its components in Korean families. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome Affecting 3 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kileny, Paul R; Ahmed, Sameer; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Melendez, Tori L; Basura, Gregory J; Lesperance, Marci M

    2017-07-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is an increasingly recognized cause of hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, but the etiology of this condition remains unknown. To describe 7 cases of SCDS across 3 families. This retrospective case series included 7 patients from 3 different families treated at a neurotology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were referred by other otolaryngologists or were self-referred. Each patient demonstrated unilateral or bilateral SCDS or near dehiscence. Clinical evaluation involved body mass index calculation, audiometry, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, electrocochleography, and multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) scan of the temporal bones. Zygosity testing was performed on twin siblings. The diagnosis of SCDS was made if bone was absent over the superior semicircular canal on 2 consecutive CT images, in addition to 1 physiologic sign consistent with labyrinthine dehiscence. Near dehiscence was defined as absent bone on only 1 CT image but with symptoms and at least 1 physiologic sign of labyrinthine dehiscence. A total of 7 patients (5 female and 2 male; age range, 8-49 years) from 3 families underwent evaluation. Family A consisted of 3 adult first-degree relatives, of whom 2 were diagnosed with SCDS and 1 with near dehiscence. Family B included a mother and her child, both of whom were diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. Family C consisted of adult monozygotic twins, each of whom was diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. For all cases, dehiscence was located at the arcuate eminence. Obesity alone did not explain the occurrence of SCDS because 5 of the 7 cases had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than 30.0. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome is a rare, often unrecognized condition. This report of 3 multiplex families with SCDS provides evidence in support of a potential genetic contribution to the etiology

  8. Levels of Heavy Metals in Adolescents Living in the Industrialised Area of Milazzo-Valle del Mela (Northern Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Interdonato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Milazzo-Valle del Mela area, the presence of industrial plants and the oil refinery make local residents concerned for their health. For this reason, we evaluated the levels of heavy metals in 226 children aged 12–14 years, living in the 7 municipalities of the area. A control age-matched population (n=29 living 45 km far from the industrial site was also enrolled. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, mercury, nickel, and vanadium were analysed in 24 h urine samples, while lead concentration was evaluated in blood samples. A questionnaire regarding life style and risk perception was also administered. Adolescents from Milazzo-Valle del Mela had cadmium levels significantly higher compared to either controls  (P<0.0001 or the reference values of the European Germany Environmental Survey (GerES-IV and the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. Furthermore, children had higher perception of living in a high-risk environment. The present data, for the first time, clearly indicate that adolescents living in Milazzo-Valle del Mela have increased body concentration of cadmium, which may be harmful to human health. These results deserve particular attention by the local and regional government to initiate prevention programmes in this susceptible population.

  9. PRKAR1A-negative familial Cushing's syndrome: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Ling; Kitan, Normayah; Paramasivam, Sharmila Sunita; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Ibrahim, Luqman; Chan, Siew Pheng; Tan, Alexander Tong Boon; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-12-01

    Determining the etiology of Cushing's syndrome is very challenging to endocrinologists, with most of the difficulty arising from subtype differentiation of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome. We present the pitfalls of evaluating a rare cause of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome in the transition period between adolescence and adulthood. A sibling pair with familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is described. The index case, a 20-year-old Chinese woman, presented with premenopausal osteoporosis with T12 compression fracture and young hypertension. Biochemical analysis confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome (elevated 0800 h plasma cortisol 808 nmol/L with suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone level Cushing's syndrome at age 18 years, with typical cushingoid habitus, but no osteoporosis or hypertension. His adrenal computed tomographic scans showed micronodularities over bilateral adrenal glands. He was successfully treated with bilateral adrenalectomy. Screening for Carney's complex and PRKAR1A gene mutation was negative. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome resolved after bilateral adrenalectomy for both patients. They were placed on lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and long-term surveillance for Carney's complex. The cases of these two patients illustrate the difficulties involved in diagnosing primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, a variant of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome that is managed with bilateral adrenalectomy. A high index of suspicion for this disease is needed, especially in adolescents with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome who have a significant family history, features of Carney's complex, and no resolution of Cushing's syndrome after unilateral adrenalectomy. Patients with primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease can either have

  10. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  11. Video e comunicazione scientifica. Il laboratorio MELA dell’Università di Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Corazza

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Al Media Education e-learning LAboratorio del Dipartimento di Scienze dell’educazione e della Facoltà di Scienze della formazione, Università di Bologna, un gruppo di esperti e di tecnici svolge attività di supporto alla didattica e alla ricerca, lavorando con i docenti per produrre audiovisivi e materiali multimediali. I prodotti MELA sono video per l’approfondimento culturale, per la produzione scientifica, per la documentazione.

  12. [Dementias: impact on the family and prevention of caregivers' syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater Mateu, M P; López Cortacans, G

    1998-11-01

    This article deals with the impact dementia can cause in a family in our modern society, an impact which often leads to a crisis or a rupture in a family. Due to the evolution in family structure in Spain over the last few decades, as evidenced by separations, divorces, reconstructed families, a descent in birth rate, and especially by women joining the work force, the possibilities for traditional family care of the elderly have become complicated and have been reduced, which leads to a tremendous physical and psychological wear on the person who takes on the largest part of this care, the so-called main caretaker, usually a woman. In consequence to this situation, dysfunctional behaviors may develop in this caretaker which, if not treated, may early or later on develop into the caretaker syndrome. The effects of this syndrome include subjective ones such as emotional suffering and objective ones such as a loss of health. This article presents a proposal for action by nurses acting out of primary health care centers which leads to a series of measures providing containing methods and formal support structures, in other words prevention, for the family and especially for the main caretaker of patients suffering from dementia.

  13. The Importance of the Family History in Caring for Families With Long QT Syndrome and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, J.S.; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, K.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Dijk, R.; Middel, B.; van Tintelen, J.P.

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We

  14. Leisure time of families with children suffering from Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumarova M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asperger' s syndrome is one of the pervasive developmental disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases (tenth revision. Problems of this type of disability are found in many areas, for example – the system of care, diagnosis, education, the number of organizations that deal with this condition and provide these services. Recent research has shown an increase in autism spectrum disorders (every hundredth child is born with this diagnosis. Children with Asperger syndrome are intrinsically “blind” in public and seem rude, and these situations are not easy for their parents. The most difficult area for parents is free time. Children cannot organize their leisure time, plus the ability to meaningfully spend their time is very limited. Incidence of organizations offering leisure activities for people with autism is usually larger in big cities, because the concentration of these children is greater. The aim of this paper is to characterize the basic theoretical background and find out what leisure time possibilities exist for a family having a child with Asperger's syndrome. How can a family with a child with Asperger's syndrome spend leisure time?

  15. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha Elias

    2017-12-01

    In this study we identified three families with Lynch syndrome from a rural cancer center in western India (KCHRC, Goraj, Gujarat, where 70-75 CRC patients are seen annually. DNA isolated from the blood of consented family members of all three families (8-10 members/family was subjected to NGS sequencing methods on an Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform. We identified unique mutations in the MLH1 gene in all three HNPCC family members. Two of the three unrelated families shared a common mutation (154delA and 156delA. Total 8 members of a family were identified as carriers for 156delA mutation of which 5 members were unaffected while 3 were affected (age of onset: 1 member <30yrs & 2 were>40yr. The family with 154delA mutation showed 2 affected members (>40yr carrying the mutations.LYS618DEL mutation found in 8 members of the third family showed that both affected and unaffected carried the mutation. Thus the common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in two unrelated families had a high risk for lynch syndrome especially above the age of 40.

  16. Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome or Syndromic Diarrhea—Report of Three Members in a Family, First Report from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intractable diarrhea of infancy (IDI includes several types of early onset diarrhea; one of the rare etiologies is trichohepatoenteric (THE syndrome, also known as syndromic diarrhea (SD which was primarily described by Stankler et al. Hereby we report a family with several affected members which to our knowledge is the first case report from Iran. Report of Cases. A three-year-old boy referred with short stature, poor weight gain, and intermittent steatotic diarrhea to our center. He was born to healthy, relative parents (cousins. He did not gain any weight after four months of age and began having intermittent steatotic diarrhea, abdominal distension, and fever. He was hospitalized several times. Two other children in the family also showed somewhat similar symptoms. Two sweat tests were negative for cystic fibrosis. Workup for Celiac disease was performed several times which was negative; however, gluten-free diet was tried several times which was not effective. Workup for Hirschsprung’s disease was performed but colon was ganglionic. Evidence of liver involvement was approved by elevated liver enzymes and coarse echo of liver on sonography. Discussion. Trichoenterohepatic syndrome should be put in mind in cases of intractable diarrhea presenting in a family with several affected members. Early diagnosis would save patients from unnecessary workups.

  17. Berry syndrome in association with familial limb malformation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    We describe a newborn boy diagnosed with Berry syndrome consisting of a distal aortopulmonary septal defect, aortic origin of the right pulmonary artery, and interruption of the aorta. The child was noted to have reduplication of the right thumb. The child\\'s mother had a claw malformation of her left hand but a normal cardiovascular status. Genetic analysis for TBX5 and SALL4 mutations were negative in both the patient and his mother. This case describes the first ever report of Berry syndrome in an infant with reduplication of the right thumb and familial limb malformation.

  18. The mitochondrial 13513G > A mutation is most frequent in Leigh syndrome combined with reduced complex I activity, optic atrophy and/or Wolff-Parkinson-White.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, E.M.; Siers, M.H.; Elzen, C. van der; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Hol, F.A.

    2007-01-01

    The m.13513G > A transition in the mitochondrial gene encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and has been reported to be a frequent cause of Leigh syndrome (LS). We determined the

  19. Infantile Pain Episodes Associated with Novel Nav1.9 Mutations in Familial Episodic Pain Syndrome in Japanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Hiroko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Kondo, Daiki; Harada, Kouji H; Youssefian, Shohab; Shioi, Hirotomo; Kabata, Risako; Domon, Yuki; Kubota, Kazufumi; Kitano, Yutaka; Takayama, Yasunori; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kousaku; Saito, Yoshiaki; Asano, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy has been correlated with various voltage-gated sodium channel mutations in sensory neurons. Recently Nav1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel subtype, has been established as a genetic influence for certain peripheral pain syndromes. In this study, we performed a genetic study in six unrelated multigenerational Japanese families with episodic pain syndrome. Affected participants (n = 23) were characterized by infantile recurrent pain episodes with spontaneous mitigation around adolescence. This unique phenotype was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode. Linkage analysis was performed for two families with 12 affected and nine unaffected members, and a single locus was identified on 3p22 (LOD score 4.32). Exome analysis (n = 14) was performed for affected and unaffected members in these two families and an additional family. Two missense variants were identified: R222H and R222S in SCN11A. Next, we generated a knock-in mouse model harboring one of the mutations (R222S). Behavioral tests (Hargreaves test and cold plate test) using R222S and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice, young (8-9 weeks old; n = 10-12 for each group) and mature (36-38 weeks old; n = 5-6 for each group), showed that R222S mice were significantly (p pain. The mouse model developed here will be useful for drug screening for familial episodic pain syndrome associated with SCN11A mutations.

  20. Familial Recurrence of 3MC Syndrome in Consanguineous Families: A Clinical and Molecular Diagnostic Approach With Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Olivia K; Haynes, Karla; Schweitzer, Daniela; Johns, Alexis; Magee, William P; Urata, Mark M; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A

    2017-11-01

    We report four individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families with 3MC syndrome. In the first family, chromosome microarray data revealed that the two affected sisters, born to first-cousin parents, shared a unique homozygous C-terminal deletion in the COLEC11 gene. Two affected brothers from a second family, also born to first-cousin parents, shared a region of homozygosity that included the second gene known to cause the 3MC syndrome, MASP1. We discuss the diagnostic approach of craniofacial disorders born to consanguineous parents and highlight a literature search and reference a helpful dysmorphology solution powered by FDNA (Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis) technology.

  1. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Parental burden, coping, and family functioning in primary caregivers of children with Joubert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luescher, J L; Dede, D E; Gitten, J C; Fennell, E; Maria, B L

    1999-10-01

    Children with Joubert syndrome have physical and intellectual disabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of Joubert syndrome on parental burden, coping, and family functioning. Forty-nine primary caregivers were surveyed. Forty-three primary caregivers were mothers and six were fathers; their mean age was 34 years. The following measures were used: Beck Depression Inventory, Child Development Inventory, Caregiver Strain Index, Family Assessment Device, and Ways of Coping Checklist-Revised. The data show that caregiver burden is not related to the severity of the child's illness, but that caregivers report significant burden. Higher burden was associated with the use of palliative coping methods, and family functioning was problematic. The results of this study suggest that for parents of children with Joubert syndrome, degree of parental burden depends more on the parents' coping skills and the level of family functioning rather than on the degree of the child's impairment. These findings highlight the importance of assessing caregiver burden, as well as decreased family functioning or coping abilities, since these problems often can be managed with psychologic intervention.

  3. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  4. Epidemiologia da mela e produtividade do feijoeiro-comum tratado com fungicidas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesimária Ribeiro Costa-Coelho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O efeito dos fungicidas azoxistrobina, carbendazim, mancozebe, tebuconazole, hidróxido de fenilestanho, piraclostrobina, trifloxistrobina + ciproconazol, trifloxistrobina + propiconazol e clorotalonil no progresso da mela e na produtividade do feijoeiro foi avaliado em campo e casa de vegetação. No campo, três experimentos foram conduzidos nas estações chuvosas de 2004/05, 2005/06 e 2006/07, em blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições.Na safra 2004/05 foi realizada apenas uma aplicação, aos 45 dias após o plantio (DAP; em 2005/06 foram realizadas duas aplicações aos 30 e 45 DAP e em 2006/07 foram realizadas três aplicações, aos 30, 45 e 60 DAP. A avaliação da severidade da doença foi feita semanalmente, atribuindo-se notas de 1 (sem sintomas a 9 (acima de 90% da área foliar destruída e taxas de progresso da doença foram calculadas após o ajuste das curvas de progresso ao modelo logístico. Os resultados mostraram que uma única aplicação de qualquer dos produtos, aos 45 DAP, foi ineficiente para o controle da taxa de progresso da mela (taxa média, r = 0,2348. A eficiência do controle aumentou com o incremento do número de aplicações e aplicações mais precoces, iniciando-se aos 30 DAP (médias de r = 0,1988 e 0,1671 em 2005/06 e 2006/07, respectivamente. Com três aplicações,as menores severidades de doença foram observadas com hydróxido de fenil estanho, trifloxistrobina + propiconazol e trifloxistrobina + cyproconazol. Em casa de vegetação, o efeito protetor e curativo dos fungicidas foi estudado com aplicação dos produtos em pré ou pós-inoculação de folíolos, através da avaliação do diâmetro das lesões. Todos os fungicidas apresentaram tanto efeito protetor quanto curativo, mas os melhores resultados foram observados em aplicação preventiva.Foi encontrada alta correlação negativa entre intensidade da mela e a produção do feijoeiro e o ganho em produtividade com uso de fungicidas chegou a 304 %.

  5. GDNF gene is associated with tourette syndrome in a family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Heiman, Gary A; Mir, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10(-4) ). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  7. A preliminary report on settlement layout and gold melting at Thula Mela, a Late Iron Age site in the Kruger National Park

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    M.M. Kusel

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological investigations at a Late Iron Age stone-walled hill site, Thula Mela, near the Luvuvhu River in the Pafuri area of the Kruger National Park, have produced evidence of gold melting. The recovery of two fragments of pottery crucibles with the remains of slag and gold globules and three gold beads from a test trench in a midden at Thula Mela represents the first direct evidence of indigenous gold melting in South Africa. From radiocarbon dates it was established that this site was occupied between the fifteenth and early seventeenth century AD.

  8. Crystallisation of mela-aillikites of the Narsaq region, Gardar alkaline province, south Greenland and relationships to other aillikitic carbonatitic associations in the province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, B. G. J.; Craven, J. A.; Kirstein, L. A.

    2006-11-01

    Aillikites (carbonated, melilite-free ultramafic lamprophyres grading to carbonatites) are minor components of the Gardar alkaline igneous province. They occur principally as minor intrusions and as clasts in diatremes, but more voluminous aillikitic intrusions crop out near the Ilímaussaq Complex, which they predate by a few million years. These larger intrusions were emplaced at 1160 ± 5 Ma. They are essentially carbonate-free and, consisting almost wholly of ferromagnesian silicate and oxide minerals, are mela-aillikites. Typically the mela-aillikites are fine-grained rocks composed largely of olivine, clinopyroxene, phlogopite and magnetite that crystallised in open systems, permitting loss of volatile-rich residues. The petrography is highly complex, involving at least 28 mineral species. Pyroxenitic veins were emplaced while the host-rocks were still at high temperatures and represent channels through which fluorinated silico-carbonatitic residual melts escaped, with exsolving CO 2 as propellant. Precipitation of Ca-rich minerals including monticellite, perovskite, vesuvianite, wollastonite and cuspidine was a result of dissociation of the calcium carbonate in the residual melts. Late-stage crystallisation was in a highly oxidising environment in which the 'common minerals' attain extreme compositions (almost pure forsterite, ferrian-diopside, highly magnesian ilmenite, Ba-Ti-rich phlogopite and Sr-rich kaersutite). Spatially associated diatremes may be vents through which CO 2-rich gases erupted. The whole-rock compositions are considered to be well removed from those of co-existing melts: compaction and expulsion of highly mobile residual melts is inferred to have left the mela-aillikites as aberrant cumulates. The mela-aillikites are a late-Gardar manifestation of the aillikitic magmatism that occurred intermittently in the province for over 120 Ma. Repetitive formation of metasomite vein systems in the deep lithospheric mantle is postulated. These

  9. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize...... the sporadic MSI-H counterpart. Recent studies have, however, challenged such simple one-pathway models, inviting the consideration of alternative, unexpected pathways. Here, the issue as to the possible role of SSP, primarily in the context of Lynch syndrome, but also in subjects from familial CRC families...... (FCF) is addressed. Polyps coded as hyperplastic polyps (HP) from subjects with Lynch syndrome and FCF enrolled in the HNPCC-register at the Hvidovre University Hospital as well as adenomas from this population were retrieved and reviewed for features of SSP. Ninety-eight polyps coded as HP and 41...

  10. Identification of MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 in clinical evaluation of families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; Rodriguez, Andrea; Taggart, Melissa W; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bannon, Sarah A; You, Y Nancy; Vilar, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Traditional germline sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis does not detect Lynch syndrome-causing mutations in all individuals whose colorectal or endometrial tumors demonstrate mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Unique inversions and other rearrangements of the MMR genes have been reported in families with Lynch syndrome. In 2014, a recurrent inversion of MSH2 exons 1-7 was identified in five families suspected to have Lynch syndrome. We aimed to describe our clinical experience in identifying families with this specific inversion. Four probands whose Lynch syndrome-associated tumors demonstrated absence of MSH2/MSH6 staining and who had negative MMR germline testing were evaluated for the MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7, offered during initial genetic workup or upon routine clinical follow-up. All four probands tested positive for the MSH2 inversion. Proband cancer diagnoses included colon and endometrial adenocarcinoma and sebaceous adenoma. A variety of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were reported in the family histories, although only one family met Amsterdam II criteria. Thirteen at-risk relatives underwent predictive testing. MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 was found in four probands previously suspected to have Lynch syndrome based on family history and tumor testing. This testing should be offered routinely to patients with tumors demonstrating loss of MSH2/MSH6 staining.

  11. Fatal Asphyxiation in Two Long-Finned Pilot Wahles (Globicephala melas) Caused by Common Soles (Solea solea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsseldijk, L.; Leopold, M.F.; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa; Deaville, R.; Haelters, Jan; IJzer, J.; Jepson, P.D.; Gröne, A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are rare visitors to the southern North Sea, but recently two individual strandings occurred on the Dutch coast. Both animals shared the same, unusual cause of death: asphyxiation from a common sole (Solea solea) stuck in their nasal cavity. This is a

  12. Fatal Asphyxiation in Two Long-Finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala melas) Caused by Common Soles (Solea solea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsseldijk, Lonneke L; Leopold, Mardik F; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L; Deaville, Rob; Haelters, Jan; IJzer, Jooske; Jepson, Paul D; Gröne, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are rare visitors to the southern North Sea, but recently two individual strandings occurred on the Dutch coast. Both animals shared the same, unusual cause of death: asphyxiation from a common sole (Solea solea) stuck in their nasal cavity. This is a

  13. Proliferative vasculopathy and hydranencephaly-hydrocephaly syndrome or Fowler syndrome: Report of a family and insight into the disease's mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radio, Francesca Clementina; Di Meglio, Lavinia; Agolini, Emanuele; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Rinelli, Martina; Toscano, Paolo; Boldrini, Renata; Novelli, Antonio; Di Meglio, Aniello; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2018-03-03

    Fowler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hydranencephaly-hydrocephaly and multiple pterygium due to fetal akinesia. To date, around 45 cases from 27 families have been reported, and the pathogenic bi-allelic mutations in FLVCR2 gene described in 15 families. The pathogenesis of this condition has not been fully elucidated so far. We report on an additional family with two affected fetuses carrying a novel homozygous mutation in FLVCR2 gene, and describe the impact of known mutants on the protein structural and functional impairment. The present report confirms the genetic homogeneity of Fowler syndrome and describes a new FLVCR2 mutation affecting the protein function. The structural analysis of the present and previously published FLVCR2 mutations supports the hypothesis of a reduced heme import as the underlying disease's mechanism due to the stabilization of the occluded conformation or a protein misfolding. Our data suggest the hypothesis of heme deficiency as the major pathogenic mechanism of Fowler syndrome. © 2018 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows potential moisturizing activity toward cultured human skin cells: the recovery effect of MEL-A on the SDS-damaged human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Suzuki, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced in large amounts from renewable vegetable oils by Pseudozyma antarctica, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, the skin care property of MEL-A, the major component of MELs, was investigated using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution of 1 wt%, and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were then evaluated on the basis of the cell viability. The viability of the damaged cells was markedly recovered by the addition of MEL-A in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control, MEL-A solutions of 5 wt% and 10 wt% gave the recovery rate of 73% and 91%, respectively, while ceramide solution of 1 wt% gave the rate of over 100%. This revealed that MEL-A shows a ceramide-like moisturizing activity toward the skin cells. Considering the drawbacks of natural ceramides, namely limited amount and high production cost, the yeast biosurfactants should have a great potential as a novel moisturizer for treating the damaged skin.

  15. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  16. Marfan Syndrome in an Iranian Family: A Case Series

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    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a genetic disorder which is inherited by autosomal dominant traits. In MFS, lens displacement and cardiovascular involvement are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the clinical course of the disease. In this case study, the ocular involvement in a family with severe penetration of MFS is reported. Twelve members of a family (father, two daughters, three sons, and six grandchildren had MFS. Lens ectopia was the most common ophthalmic involvement among the family (100%. Other ocular involvements were as follows; Hypoplastic iris or ciliary’s muscle hypoplasia (50%, on gated eyeball (42%, flat cornea (30%, glaucoma and cataract (25%, retinal detachment (16%. Three members of the family underwent eye surgery including lens extraction, glaucoma surgery and retinal surgery.

  17. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

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    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  18. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  19. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  20. Progresso e controle da mela-das-sementes (Claviceps maximensis de Brachiaria brizantha Progress and control of honeydew (Claviceps maximensis of Brachiaria brizantha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Marchi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Verificou-se a eficiência de uma ou duas aplicações de Piraclostrobin + Epoxiconazole, Mancozeb, Triadimenol, Azoxistrobin + Ciproconazole, Trifloxistrobin + Ciproconazole ou Tebuconazole no controle da mela-das-sementes de Brachiaria brizantha cvs. Marandu e Xaraés, durante a safra 2004-05. Também foram avaliados os indutores de resistência Acibenzolar-S-Metil e Silicato de Potássio (via aérea ou solo. Triadimenol, com uma ou duas aplicações, Piraclostrobin + Epoxiconazole, Azoxistrobin + Ciproconazole, Trifloxistrobin + Ciproconazole ou Tebuconazole, com duas aplicações, foram promissores no controle da mela-das-sementes do capim-marandu. Já para a cv. Xaraés, melhor controle foi alcançado com o Piraclostrobin + Epoxiconazole, independente do número de aplicações, Triadimenol, Trifloxistrobin + Ciproconazole ou Tebuconazole, com duas aplicações. Não houve correlação entre os dados de produção de sementes puras e a intensidade da mela. Com relação ao progresso da mela-das-sementes de B. brizantha cvs. Marandu e Xaraés, constatou-se que a doença manifestou-se em períodos frios associados à umidade relativa alta. Na cv. Marandu a doença ocorreu na fase final da cultura, enquanto que na cv. Xaraés, a mela foi detectada na fase de intenso florescimento. Foram constatados aumentos na intensidade da doença em ambas as cultivares. A mela-das-sementes ocorreu em 64% das panículas da cv. Marandu e em 81% das panículas da cv. Xaraés; cerca de 20% e 18% das flores/sementes, respectivamente, foram afetadas. Os resultados demonstraram existir correlação positiva entre os valores de incidência e severidade da mela.The efficiency of one or two applications of Pyraclostrobin + Epoxyconazole, Mancozeb, Triadimenol, Azoxystrobin + Cyproconazole, Trifloxystrobin + Cyproconazole or Tebuconazole in the control of honeydew in seeds of Brachiaria brizantha cvs. Marandu and Xaraes was verified during crop 2004-05. The inductors

  1. Familial occurrence of cerebral gigantism, Sotos' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, F J; Friis, B

    1976-05-01

    Since the original description of cerebral gigantism, about 85 cases have been reported. Four papers comment on familial occurrence but never in parents and their children. This paper describes the syndrome in a mother and her child, which, together with facts pointing towards prenatal etiology, such as excessive birthweight, striking mutual resemblance and abnormal dermatoglyphics, points to a genetic defect. Previous endocrine studies are enlarged by the findings of normal serum somatomedin and serum prolactin.

  2. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kristen M; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-03-27

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells from NHS patients and family members. The NHS gene coding region and its splice site donor and acceptor regions were amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, and the amplicons were sequenced directly. We identified three unique NHS coding region mutations in these NHS families. This report extends the number of unique identified NHS mutations to 14.

  3. Familial Kleine-Levin Syndrome: A Specific Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang Tuan Remy; Groos, Elisabeth; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Monaca-Charley, Christelle; Rico, Tom; Farber, Neal; Mignot, Emmanuel; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare, mostly sporadic disorder, characterized by intermittent episodes of hypersomnia plus cognitive and behavior disorders. Although its cause is unknown, multiplex families have been described. We contrasted the clinical and biological features of familial versus sporadic KLS. Two samples of patients with KLS from the United States and France (n = 260) were studied using clinical interviews and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping. A multiplex family contained two or more first- or second-degree affected relatives (familial cases). Twenty-one patients from 10 multiplex families (siblings: n = 12, including two pairs of monozygotic twins; parent-child: n = 4; cousins: n = 2; uncle-nephews: n = 3) and 239 patients with sporadic KLS were identified, yielding to 4% multiplex families and 8% familial cases. The simplex and multiplex families did not differ for autoimmune, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Age, sex ratio, ethnicity, HLA typing, karyotyping, disease course, frequency, and duration of KLS episodes did not differ between groups. Episodes were less frequent in familial versus sporadic KLS (2.3 ± 1.8/y versus 3.8 ± 3.7/y, P = 0.004). Menses triggered more frequently KLS onset in the nine girls with familial KLS (relative risk, RR = 4.12, P = 0.03), but not subsequent episodes. Familial cases had less disinhibited speech (RR = 3.44, P = 0.049), less combined hypophagia/hyperphagia (RR = 4.38, P = 0.006), more abrupt termination of episodes (RR = 1.45, P = 0.04) and less postepisode insomnia (RR = 2.16, P = 0.008). There was similar HLA DQB1 distribution in familial versus sporadic cases and no abnormal karyotypes. Familial KLS is mostly present in the same generation, and is clinically similar to but slightly less severe than sporadic KLS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  5. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel M V; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Diego, Vincent P; Souza, Michele C; Chaves, Raquel N; Blangero, John; Maia, José A R

    2013-01-01

    Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (pmetabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  6. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  7. Usher syndrome with psychotic symptoms: two cases in the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Ying; Chiu, Chih-Chiang

    2006-10-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and visual sensory impairment. Retinitis pigmentosa is essential for its diagnosis. There are only a few reports describing patients with Usher syndrome presenting with psychotic features and the etiology of its psychiatric manifestation is still unknown. Herein, the authors report variable congenital hearing impairment and progressive visual loss occurring in five of seven family members and two of them meeting the diagnostic criteria of Usher syndrome with psychotic features. Furthermore, the authors compare their psychiatric symptoms with other reports and the possible etiologies of psychotic symptoms are discussed.

  8. Association of Family Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults Aged over 45 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ju

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender in Korean adults aged 45 years and older. The sample consisted of 11,291 participants in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012. We used complex sample analyses, including strata, cluster, and sample weighting, to allow generalization to the Korean population. Complex samples crosstabs and chi-square tests were conducted to compare the percentage of sociodemographic characteristics to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components by gender and family composition. Next, a complex sample logistic regression was performed to examine the association between family composition and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by gender. The percentage of adults living alone was 5.6% for men and 13.9% for women. Slightly more women (14.0%) than men (10.1%) reported living with three generations. The percentage of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults aged 45 years and older was 53.2% for men and 35.7% for women. For women, we found that living with one or three generations was significantly associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome, blood pressure, and triglyceride abnormality after adjusting for age, education, household income, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index, when compared to living alone. No significant relationships were found for men. A national strategy, tailored on gender and family composition, needs to be developed in order to prevent the increase of metabolic syndrome in Korean women over middle age. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  10. Metabolic syndrome in family practice in Jordan: a study of high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Masa'd, D

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, and its components, as defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Jordanian patients attending a family practice clinic for management of cardiovascular risk factors. The sample was 730 randomly selected patients aged > or = 25 years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 37.4% (31.7% in men; 41.0% in women). The prevalence increased with age in the total sample and in both sexes. High waist circumference showed the highest prevalence in the total sample (61.6%). Among females it ranked as the first criterion (73.5%). High serum triglyceride level showed the highest prevalence in males (50.2%). Differences between the sexes were significant. Family practitioners should be alerted to the importance of multiple risk factors in the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Spectral and stratigraphic mapping of hydrated minerals associated with interior layered deposits near the southern wall of Melas Chasma, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Goudge, Timothy A.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Alian

    2018-03-01

    Orbital remote sensing data acquired from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), in conjunction with other datasets, are used to perform detailed spectral and stratigraphic analyses over a portion of south Melas Chasma, Mars. The Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) model is used to retrieve atmospherically corrected single scattering albedos from CRISM I/F data for mineral identification. A sequence of interbedded poly- and monohydrated sulfates associated with interior layered deposits (ILDs) is identified and mapped. Analyses from laboratory experiments and spectral unmixing of CRISM hyperspectral data support the hypothesis of precipitation and dehydration of multiple inputs of complex Mg-Ca-Fe-SO4-Cl brines. In this scenario, the early precipitated Mg sulfates could dehydrate into monohydrated sulfate due to catalytic effects, and the later-precipitated Mg sulfates from the late-stage "clean" brine could terminate their dehydration at mid-degree of hydration to form a polyhydrated sulfate layer due to depletion of the catalytic species (e.g., Ca, Fe, and Cl). Distinct jarosite-bearing units are identified stratigraphically above the hydrated sulfate deposits. These are hypothesized to have formed either by oxidation of a fluid containing Fe(II) and SO4, or by leaching of soluble phases from precursor intermixed jarosite-Mg sulfate units that may have formed during the later stages of deposition of the hydrated sulfate sequence. Results from stratigraphic analysis of the ILDs show that the layers have a consistent northward dip towards the interior of the Melas Chasma basin, a mean dip angle of ∼6°, and neighboring strata that are approximately parallel. These strata are interpreted as initially sub-horizontal layers of a subaqueous, sedimentary evaporite deposits that underwent post-depositional tilting from slumping into the Melas Chasma basin. The interbedded hydrated sulfate

  12. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  13. Behaviour Problems in the Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome: Associations with Family Responsibilities and Parental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica; Hayes, Alan; Chant, David

    1998-01-01

    Forty-five Australian families with children with Down syndrome and 88 comparison families provided information about their children's behavior problems and involvement in household tasks. For the brothers of children with Down syndrome, significant negative correlations between household tasks and behavior problems were found on fathers' reports.…

  14. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  15. [Genetic analysis of a family with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Sanchis, Aránzazu; Cuevas, José M; Alemany, Pilar; Cremades, Antonio; Zúñiga, Ángel

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated with mutations in the VHL tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25. VHL is characterized by the development of multiple malignant and benign tumours in the central nervous system and internal organs, including liver, pancreas and the adrenal gland. More than 823 different mutations of the VHL gene have currently been identified. In the present study we describe the case of a family affected by VHL treated at the University Hospital of La Ribera and the results of the genetic analysis of three relatives, identifying the mutation R167G in exon 3 of VHL gene as the cause of VHL syndrome in this family. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A FBN1 mutation association with different phenotypes of Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Binbin; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Yanzhou

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with different FBN1 mutations often present more considerable phenotypic variation compared to different members of the related family carrying a same mutation. The purpose of our study was to identify pathogenic mutation and provide more information about genotype-phenotypic correlations in a large Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. 15 related family members from a Chinese 4-generation pedigree with Marfan syndrome underwent physical, ophthalmologic, radiological and cardiovascular examinations. The propositus has De Bakey III aortic dissection and didn't fulfill the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Nine family members have ectopia lentis and their echocardiogram was normal. Five other family members have no evidence of Marfan syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The exome sequencing was employed on the propositus, then the Sanger sequencing was conducted for mutation verification in other 14 participants of this family. The causative mutation in FBN1 discovered in the propositus was a known heterozygous missense mutation, c.1633T>G (p.R545C), in exon 14 (NM 000138). This same mutation was also identified in all 9 ectopia lentis patients and one unaffected 8-year-old girl. However, the same mutation was not discovered in other 4 unaffected family members. Our data enhance the information of genotype-phenotype correlation owing to FBN1 mutations. To our current knowledge, we firstly reported that the same FBN1 mutation, c. 1633C>T (Arg545Cys), was detected simultaneously in three different cardinal phenotypes (ectopia lentis, aortic dissection and unaffected) within one family. The unaffected girl with FBN1 mutation may presumably represent a rare case of nonpenetrance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel 5-bp deletion in Clarin 1 in a family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoury, Elie; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Mégarbané, André; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2011-11-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Lebanese family with two sibs diagnosed with Usher Syndrome. Exome capture and sequencing were performed on DNA from one affected member using Agilent in solution bead capture, followed by Illumina sequencing. This analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous 5-bp deletion, in Clarin 1 (CLRN1), a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III. The deletion is inherited from both parents and segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. The 5-bp deletion, c.301_305delGTCAT, p.Val101SerfsX27, is predicted to result in a frameshift and protein truncation after 27 amino acids. Sequencing all the coding regions of the CLRN1 gene in the proband did not reveal any other mutation or variant. Here we describe a novel deletion in CLRN1. Our data support previously reported intra familial variability in the clinical features of Usher syndrome type I and III.

  18. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. THE PREVALENCE OF STRESS AND BURNOUT SYNDROME IN HOSPITAL DOCTORS AND FAMILY PHYSICIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanetic, Kosana D; Savic, Suzana M; Racic, Maja

    2016-11-01

    Introducti on. Burnout syndrome is the result of chronic emotional stress. It is characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and reduced level of personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the level of stress and risk ror burnout syndrome in doctors employed in health centers and hospitals, and to investigate the impact of socio-derrdgraphic characteristics on the level of stress and the o ccurrence of burnout syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the period from October I to December 31, 2015 in three health centers and in the University Clinical Center of the Republic of Srpska. The survey was anonymous. A socio-demographic questionnaire and a questionnaire for self-assessment of the level of stress and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used as research instruments. Out of 151 doctors included in the study, 49% were family physicians, and 51% were hospital doctors. The analysis of responses to questionnaires for self-assessment of stress level revealed that 51.7% of participants had high levels of stress (52.7% of family physicians, 50.6% of doctors working in hospital). A high degree of emotional exhaustion was found in 27.2% of participants (29.7% of fam ily physicians, 24.6% of doctors working in hospital), high depersonalization was found in 23.8% of participants (25.7% of family physicians, 22. 1% of doctors working in hospital), a low level of personal accomplishment was found in 39.7% of participants (37.8% of family physicians. 41.6% of doctors working in hospital). No statistically significant difference regarding stress degree, emotional exhaustion and depersonalizaion and personal accomplishment was found between hospital doctors and family physicians. The physicians aged over 45 years had a significantly (p = 0.030) higher level of emotional exhaustion than their younger colleagues. This study found that there was a high risk of burnout syndrome in physicians in the Republic of Srpska

  20. MODELO DE PONTO CRÍTICO PARA ESTIMAR DANOS CAUSADOS PELA MELA NA CULTURA DO FEIJOEIRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Rafael Garcés Fiallos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available No Equador, o feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L. é consumido quase pela totalidade da população, sendo também fonte de renda para pequenos e médios produtores. Uma das doenças mais importantes é a mela, ou podridão radicular de rizoctonia, causada pelo fungo necrotrófico Rhizoctonia solani Khun (teleomorfo Thanatephorus cucumeris Frank. Objetivou-se determinar a redução no rendimento de grãos causados pela infecção natural da mela, em diferentes cultivares de feijão, na safra agrícola 2010, no município de Quevedo, Equador. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com sete tratamentos e quatro repetições. O gradiente da intensidade da doença foi gerado pela variabilidade genética entre cultivares de feijoeiro. A avaliação de severidade (% de área foliar necrosada da doença foi determinada no estádio fenológico R7 (desenvolvimento de legume. A colheita foi realizada em aos 124 dias pós-semeadura, para quantificação do rendimento. A equação da função de dano obtida foi R = 4,257.50 – 33.16 S, onde R é o rendimento de grãos e S a severidade (% da doença, com R2 = 0.82 e p<0.0001. A equação resultante foi normalizada para 1,000 kg, sendo esta R = 1,000.0 – 7.79 S. Concluiu-se que a equação gerada da função de dano pode ser utilizada no cálculo do limiar de dano econômico (LDE, uma alternativa racional indicadora do momento para a aplicação de controle químico da mela em cultivares suscetíveis, mantendo a rentabilidade do agricultor e ser amigável com o meio ambiente.

  1. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Prader Willi Syndrome: A Family's Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Walker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic research has offered, and continues to offer, a medical explanation of chromosomal disorders such as Down Syndrome and Asberger Syndrome and more recently the rare chromosomal disorder Prader Willi Syndrome. This research gives a pathogenic explanation of disorders which includes historical background, genetic defects and clinical features. This study set out to offer an insight into the effects of PWS on the child and his/her family. It also aimed to highlight what support systems are in place in the Co. Louth area of Ireland for individuals with PWS. Unfortunately, PWS is not curable at this time. Between 1995-2003 there were 39 diagnosed cases of PWS in Ireland, an average of 4.3 per year. On average there are four infants or children diagnosed in Ireland with PWS per year (Turner, 2004, National Centre for Medical Genetics. This study is an exploratory and descriptive case study. This case study drew on multiple sources of evidence to construct a valid and unique illustration of PWS. The primary source of data was derived from in-depth interviews with the parents of a 3-year-old girl who has PWS. She was diagnosed during the third week of life. The evidence of this study suggests that non-specialist medical staff are not generally familiar with PWS. Training in relation to diagnostic criteria for chromosomal disorders would be extremely beneficial to them and to familes that are affected by the syndrome. This study highlights the need for parents to be their own child's advocate in obtaining desired support services for their area. Support services in the North East region have been greatly increased due to the setting up of the North Eastern Health Board (now known as Health Service Executive, North East Region Early Intervention Services (EIS in 2000.

  3. Small bowel endoscopy in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan Jacob

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and patients with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing small intestinal neoplasia. In both conditions, the lifetime risk to develop small bowel cancer is estimated to be around 5%. In FAP, this risk is associated with the degree of

  4. Johnson-McMillin microtia syndrome: New additional family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa Abdel-Meguid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation supporting an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We observed that the mother was very sad and suffered from feelings of guilt. We found that she had isolated herself from family and community out of fear of being stigmatized and hurt. We concluded that the occurrence of microtia is of public health importance, adhering to traditional marriage customs in Egypt increases women′s risk of giving birth to a disabled child, yet the mothers are blamed and shamed for their children′s birth defects by their husbands, families, and communities, while the fathers are not stigmatized.

  5. Unsupportive parenting moderates the effects of family psychosocial intervention on metabolic syndrome in African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E; Miller, G E; Yu, T; Brody, G H

    2018-04-01

    Family relationships have been linked to obesity and related disorders in youth, but few studies have provided causal evidence of this association. This study tested the impact of a family psychosocial intervention on components of metabolic syndrome-a condition driven largely by abdominal obesity-in African American youth. In particular, the study tested whether effects were strongest among those who started at highest risk, that is, with high levels of unsupportive parenting at baseline. Randomized clinical trial of a community sample of 391 African American youth (mean age=11.2 years) conducted in 2001-2002, with follow-up metabolic syndrome assessment in 2014-2015. Participants were assigned either to receive a weekly family intervention or to a control group. The primary study outcome was the number of components of metabolic syndrome that were clinically elevated at age 25, including central adiposity, blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and low high-density lipoproteins. Unsupportive parenting was measured by questionnaires at baseline. Significant interaction effects were found between group assignment and baseline unsupportive parenting on counts of metabolic syndrome components in youth (beta=-0.17, P=0.03). Among those who started with higher levels of unsupportive parenting at age 11, participation in the family intervention reduced the number of clinically elevated components of the metabolic syndrome at age 25 relative to the control group. No such effect was seen among those who started with good parenting. Mediation analyses suggested that changes in the psychosocial targets of the parenting intervention partially accounted for the effects amongst those high in unsupportive parenting at baseline (effect size=-0.350, s.e.=0.178). These findings suggest that efforts to improve family relationships may be able to ameliorate the detrimental effects that harsh and unsupportive parenting have on obesity-related outcomes such as metabolic syndrome in

  6. Device for positioning and generation of an element of track model and slice of the MELAS automatic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryutchenko, E.V.; Fedotov, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and organization of the device for positioning and generation of element of track model and slice of the MELAS automatic equipment which is developed for measuring films from big bubble chambers, is described. Main features of the device are studied and characteristics are given as well

  7. Disease-causing mitochondrial heteroplasmy segregated within induced pluripotent stem cell clones derived from a patient with MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Li, Xing; McDonald, Amber; Oglesbee, Devin; Hrstka, Sybil C; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondrial diseases display pathological phenotypes according to the mixture of mutant versus wild-type mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), known as heteroplasmy. We herein examined the impact of nuclear reprogramming and clonal isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) on mitochondrial heteroplasmy. Patient-derived dermal fibroblasts with a prototypical mitochondrial deficiency diagnosed as mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) demonstrated mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced oxidative reserve due to heteroplasmy at position G13513A in the ND5 subunit of complex I. Bioengineered iPSC clones acquired pluripotency with multilineage differentiation capacity and demonstrated reduction in mitochondrial density and oxygen consumption distinguishing them from the somatic source. Consistent with the cellular mosaicism of the original patient-derived fibroblasts, the MELAS-iPSC clones contained a similar range of mtDNA heteroplasmy of the disease-causing mutation with identical profiles in the remaining mtDNA. High-heteroplasmy iPSC clones were used to demonstrate that extended stem cell passaging was sufficient to purge mutant mtDNA, resulting in isogenic iPSC subclones with various degrees of disease-causing genotypes. On comparative differentiation of iPSC clones, improved cardiogenic yield was associated with iPSC clones containing lower heteroplasmy compared with isogenic clones with high heteroplasmy. Thus, mtDNA heteroplasmic segregation within patient-derived stem cell lines enables direct comparison of genotype/phenotype relationships in progenitor cells and lineage-restricted progeny, and indicates that cell fate decisions are regulated as a function of mtDNA mutation load. The novel nuclear reprogramming-based model system introduces a disease-in-a-dish tool to examine the impact of mutant genotypes for MELAS patients in bioengineered tissues and a cellular probe for molecular features of individual

  8. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension attending a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Ahmad, M; Matrook, F; Nasir, L; Froelicher, E S

    2010-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is being reported more frequently in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Patients with hypertension attending family practice clinics in the University of Jordan Hospital between February and July 2006 were assessed for the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its individual components. Of 345 patients studied, 65% had metabolic syndrome. Females were more likely to meet Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria for the diagnosis. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent component of metabolic syndrome in males, while low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high waist circumference ranked first and second in females. Primary care providers should be alert to the importance of screening patients with hypertension for metabolic syndrome to prevent and manage these combined conditions.

  9. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  10. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Topaloglu, Serkan; Aras, Dursun

    2008-01-01

    Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:18379660

  11. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  12. Geologic context of recurring slope lineae in Melas and Coprates Chasmata, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; McEwen, Alfred; Dundas, Colin M.; Ojha, Lujendra; Urso, Anna; Sutton, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    One of the major Mars discoveries of recent years is the existence of recurring slope lineae (RSL), which suggests that liquid water occurs on or near the surface of Mars today. These dark and narrow features emerge from steep, rocky exposures and incrementally grow, fade, and reform on a seasonal basis and are detected in images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. RSL are known to occur at scattered midlatitude and equatorial sites with little spatial connection to one another. One major exception is the steep, low-albedo slopes of Melas and Coprates Chasmata, in Valles Marineris where RSL are detected among diverse geologic surfaces (e.g., bedrock and talus) and landforms (e.g., inselbergs and landslides). New images show topographic changes including sediment deposition on active RSL slopes. Midwall locations in Coprates and Melas appear to have more areally extensively abundant RSL and related fans as compared with other RSL sites found on Mars. Water budget estimates for regional RSL are on the order of 105 to 106 m3 of fluid, for depths of 10 to 100mm, and suggest that a significant amount of near-surface watermight be present. Many RSL are concentrated near local topographic highs, such as ridge crests or peaks, which is challenging to explain via groundwater or ice without a recharge mechanism. Collectively, results provide additional support for the notion that significant amounts of near-surface water can be found on Mars today and suggest that a widespread mechanism, possibly related to the atmosphere, is recharging RSL sources.

  13. Fatty acid composition of cane molasses and yeasts Composição em ácidos graxos de melaço de cana-de-açúcar e de leveduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Gutierrez

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipid extract and fatty acid composition of cane molasses and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae M-300-A and Saccharomyces uvarum IZ-1904 grown in molasses medium were determined. In molasses, linoleic acid was found in higher levels (around 42% and was followed by palmitic, oleic and linolenic acids. The lipid extract varied from 1.02 to 3.13 gkg-1. In yeasts, the level of lipid extract varied from 16.65 to 31.12 g.kg-1 (dry matter basis depending on the molasses type and yeast species. Both yeasts were able to incorporate fatty acids from molasses' and therefore linoleic and palmitic acids were the major fatty acids found in them.Foram determinados o extrato lipídico e a composição em ácidos graxos de melaço de cana-de-açúcar e das leveduras (Saccharomyces cerevisiae M-300-A e Saccharomyces uvarum Iz-1904 multiplicadas em meio fermentativo de melaço. Nos melaços, o ácido linoleico foi encontrado em maiores quantidades (cerca de 42% do total e foi seguido pelos ácidos palmitic o, oleico e linolênico. O extrato lipídico variou de 1,02 até 3,13 g.Kg-1. Em leveduras, o nível do extrato lipídico variou de 16,65 até 31,12 g.kg-1(com base na matéria seca e foi afetado pelo tipo de melaço e da espécie de levedura. Ambas as leveduras foram capazes de incorporar ácidos graxos presentes no melaço e portanto os ácidos linoleico e palmítico foram os principais ácidos graxos encontrados nessas leveduras.

  14. Population-based family case-control proband study on familial aggregation of metabolic syndrome: finding from Taiwanese people involved in Keelung community-based integrated screening (KCIS no. 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Po-En; Chen, Yao-Der; Wang, Ting-Ting; Warwick, Jane; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2007-03-01

    A population-based case-control proband study was undertaken to elucidate familial aggregation, independent environmental factors, and the interaction between them. A total of 7308 metabolic syndrome (MET-S) cases were identified from the Keelung community-based integrated screening programme between 1999 and 2002. The study has a case-control/family sampling design. A total of 1417 case probands were randomly selected from 3225 metabolic syndrome cases and the corresponding 2458 controls selected from 16,519 subjects without metabolic syndrome by matching on sex, age (+/-3 years) and place of residence. The generalized estimation equation model was used to estimate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The risk for having metabolic syndrome among family members for cases versus control probands was 1.56-fold (1.29-1.89) after controlling for significant environmental factors. Higher risk of metabolic syndrome was found in parents than spouse. Low education against high education had 2.06-fold (1.36-3.13) risk for metabolic syndrome. Betel quid chewing was positively associated with the risk of MET-S, with 1.99-fold (1.13-3.53) risk for 1-9 pieces and 1.76-fold (0.96-3.23) risk for >or=10 pieces compared with non-chewer. Moderate and high intensity of non-occupational exercise led to 21.0% (OR=0.79 (0.63-0.98)) and 26.0% (OR=0.74 (0.59-0.94)) reduction in the risk for metabolic syndrome, respectively. The frequent consumption of vegetable reduced 24.0% (OR=0.76 (0.62-0.92)) risk for MET-S. The frequent consumption of coffee was associated the increased risk for metabolic syndrome (OR=1.32 (1.07-1.64)). The present study confirmed the risk of metabolic syndrome not only has the tendency towards familial aggregation but is affected by independent effect of environmental or individual correlates.

  15. Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness syndrome: first affected family reported in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Fahaad H

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamad Al FahaadDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Najran University, Najran, Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder affecting certain tissues of ectodermal origin such as epidermis, cochlea, and cornea, leading mainly to palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, ichthyosiform scaling, deafness, and blindness. The author reports for the first time in the Middle East three family members suffering from KID syndrome in the southwestern part of Saudi Arabia.Case presentation: Three patients from one family (ages 26, 16, and 14 years of apparently normal parents, with the two eldest being females and the youngest being male. All three patients were referred from a peripheral hospital to our dermatology clinic due to recurrent cutaneous fungal infections on their trunk, forearms, legs, and nails. On full assessment, they also found to have nearly similar cutaneous problems manifested by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, generalized ichthyosiform scaling, subungual hyperkeratosis, and nail dystrophies. All patients suffered from total hearing loss in both ears since childhood as confirmed by pure tune audiometry. However, there was no blindness in any case; blepharitis with marked photophobia was the only ocular complaint. All these features are classically suggestive of KID syndrome.Keywords: connexin 26, GJB2, ichthyosis, KID syndrome, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis

  16. Progress in Diagnosing Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like Episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: MELAS involves multiple systems with variable clinical symptoms and recurrent episodes. The prognosis of MELAS patients depends on timely diagnosis. Therefore, overall diagnosis of MELAS should be based on the maternal inheritance family history, clinical manifestation, and findings from serial MRI, muscle biopsy, and genetics.

  17. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Cay

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation.

  18. Family-based cardiac screening in relatives of victims of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGorrian, Catherine

    2013-02-03

    AIMS: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) occurs when a person suffers a sudden, unexpected death, with no cause found at postmortem examination. We aimed to describe the cardiac screening outcomes in a population of relatives of SADS victimsMETHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective cohort study of consecutive families attending the Family Heart Screening clinic at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, from January 2007 to September 2011. Family members of SADS victims underwent a standard screening protocol. Adjunct clinical and postmortem information was sought on the proband. Families who had an existing diagnosis, or where the proband had epilepsy, were excluded. Of 115 families identified, 73 were found to fit inclusion criteria and were retained for analysis, with data available on 262 relatives. Over half of the screened family members were female, and the mean age was 38.6 years (standard deviation 15.6). In 22 of 73 families (30%), and 36 of 262 family members (13.7%), a potentially inheritable cause of SADS was detected. Of the population screened, 32 patients (12.2%) were treated with medication, and 5 (1.9%) have received implantable cardiac defibrillators. Of the five families with long QT syndrome (LQTS) who had a pathogenic gene mutation identified, three carried two such mutations.CONCLUSION: In keeping with international estimates, 30% of families of SADS victims were found to have a potentially inherited cardiac disease. The most common positive finding was LQTS. Advances in postmortem standards and genetic studies may assist in achieving more diagnoses in these families.

  19. Parental perceptions of the impact of Down syndrome in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura SERRANO FERNÁNDEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenting a child with Down syndrome is a challenge, not only for parents, but also for the whole family system. The present research aims to analyse, from a qualitative point of view, the vision that the parents themselves have of the impact, both positive and negative, that the presence of a child with DS causes in the family. To this end, interviews with 10 participants (3 parents, 3 mothers and 4 professionals in the field of special education have been analysed. The results reveal that, although the diagnosis of SD in a child is an unexpected and stressful event for the family, the general perception of the family impact is positive.

  20. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Other Polyposis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rodney J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There have been significant advances in our knowledge about the molecular changes that precede and accompany the development of inherited predispositions to colorectal cancer. In this review the clinical relationship to the molecular changes associated with the polyposis syndromes is presented. The aim is to put into context the diverse findings that have been shown to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer in persons who harbor a predisposition to develop disease at unusually early ages. The main focus will be on familial adenomatous polyposis as it serves as a model disease and is the most extensively studied of all of the polyposis syndromes. In addition some information is provided that explains the relationship between a germline change in one gene and what consequences that can have for a particular cell and the development of disease.

  1. The impact of pediatric nephrotic syndrome on families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sulagna; Banerjee, Sushmita

    2011-08-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the psychologic and economic effects of pediatric nephrotic syndrome (NS) on caregivers. Caregivers of 50 children with NS were compared with a control group of 50 families of children with minor illnesses attending the same outpatient facility. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) IA was used to assess the mental status of the primary caregiver. The socioeconomic status of the family was assessed using the modified Kuppuswamy scale. Expenditure for the illness was calculated during parent interviews. The difference between groups was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test. BDI scores signified moderate to severe depression in 48% of NS caregivers compared with 12% controls. The mean BDI score was significantly higher in NS caregivers, correlating positively with disease severity and negatively with socioeconomic status. Expenditure for disease also was significantly higher in families with NS patients, varying between 30% and 60% of monthly income depending on disease severity compared with 6.9% in controls. In 10% of NS families, it was more than total income, forcing families to break into savings or go into debt. Although pediatric NS most commonly has an excellent long-term outcome, it causes significant mental and economic stress on families. Severe forms should be categorized as a chronic illness and be eligible for disability benefits and subsidized travel and medical care. Establishing support groups and supportive care at local levels would help reduce the burden on families of patients wtih NS.

  2. A family with Wagner syndrome with uveitis and a new versican mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, Pierre-Rapha?l; Br?zin, Antoine P.; Nedelec, Brigitte; des Roziers, Cyril Burin; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Orhant, Lucie; Boimard, Mathieu; Valleix, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical and molecular findings of a kindred with Wagner syndrome (WS) revealed by intraocular inflammatory features. Methods Eight available family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including laser flare cell meter measurements. Collagen, type II, alpha 1, versican (VCAN), frizzled family receptor 4, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, tetraspanin 12, and Norrie disease (pseudoglioma) genes were screened with direct sequencing. Resul...

  3. Familial cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome in a father and a son with a novel MEK2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaer, Kadri; Lissewski, Christina; Zenker, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder belonging to the group of RASopathies. It is typically characterized by congenital heart defects, short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features, intellectual disability, failure to thrive, and ectodermal abnormalities such as hyperkeratosis and sparse, brittle, curly hair. CFC syndrome is caused by dominant mutations in one of the four genes BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, and KRAS. Only three familial cases of CFC syndrome have been reported to date, whereas the vast majorities are sporadic cases due to de novo mutations. We report on a fourth familial case with transmission of CFC syndrome from father to son due to a novel heterozygous sequence change c.376A>G (p.N126D) in exon 3 of MEK2 gene. This observation further documents the possibility of vertical transmission of CFC syndrome, which appears to be associated with rare mutations and relatively mild intellectual disability in affected individual. The hypomorphic effect of specific mutations particularly regarding neurocognitive issues may be related to the variable fertility of affected individuals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kristen M.; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells f...

  5. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jisha Elias; Coral Karunakaran; Snigdha Majumder; Malini Manoharan; Rakshit Shah; Yogesh Mistry; Rajesh Ramanuj; Niraj Bhatt; Arati Khanna- Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Cancer, HNPCC) is one of the most common hereditary familial colorectal cancers (CRC) with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. It accounts for 2-5% of the total CRCs reported worldwide. Although a lower incidence for CRCs have been observed in India, the last decade has shown a remarkable increase of CRC incidences (2-4 %). Features of Lynch syndrome associated colorectal cancer include early age of cancer onset, accelerated car...

  6. Heritability of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in a Dutch Twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; Sadrzadeh, S.; Lambalk, C.B.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age. There is evidence for a genetic component in PCOS based on familial clustering of cases. Objective: In the present study, the heritability of PCOS was estimated.

  7. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  8. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L. [Univsita di Ancona (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  9. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Arts syndrome, and prelingual non-syndromic deafness form a disease continuum: evidence from a family with a novel PRPS1 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Haack, Tobias B.; Wilhelm, Christian; Lindig, Tobias; Beck-Wödl, Stefanie; Nabuurs, Sander B.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; de Brouwer, Arjan P. M.; Schöls, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 5 (CMTX5), Arts syndrome, and non-syndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN2) are allelic syndromes, caused by reduced activity of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRS-I) due to loss-of-function mutations in PRPS1. As only few families have been

  12. A report of a probable case of familial Guillain Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Barzegar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a sporadic disease, few studies have reported cases of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS in families which postulate a genetic susceptibility. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing is an area of discussion in GBS though none of them are considered definitive. In recent years, more studies have evaluated HLA typing in sporadic cases while rarely it has been assessed in familial ones. We report a woman and her daughter experiencing GBS and their HLA typing in a 2-year interval.

  13. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; ten Brink, J.; Schuurman, E. J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses

  14. Nevoid Basal-Cell Syndrome: literature review and case report in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available The Nevoid Basal-Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCC, or as it is also referred to, basal-cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is characterized by multiple early-appearing basal cell carcinomas, keratocytosis of the mandible, and anomalies of the ocular, skeletal reproductive system. We describe four patients in the same family, all of them possessing a large number of skin tumors associated with other typical clinical and X-Ray anomalies of NBCC. The definitive treatment of NBCC has yet to be established, however, early diagnosis is very important as well as the periodical follow-up examination of ten patients, mainly due to the transformations in the skin lesions that may occur.

  15. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the family members of women with polycystic ovary syndrome from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabir, Iram; Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Zargar, Mohd Afzal; Bhat, Dilafroz; Mir, Mohd Muzzafar; Jan, Aleem; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Jan, Vicar; Rasool, Riyaz; Naqati, Andleeb

    2014-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most complex and common endocrine disorder of women in reproductive years. In addition to irregular menstrual cycles, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, it has many metabolic manifestations such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease or possibly endometrial cancer. Familial clustering of PCOS in consistence with the genetic susceptibility has been described. The present study assessed the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters including prevalence of metabolic syndrome by two different criteria in the first- degree relatives of patients with PCOS. The average age of 37 index patients was 23 ± 3.6 years, with the mean age of menarche as 13.3 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and age of menarche in mothers (n = 22) was 48.8 ± 5.1 and 13 ± 1.3 years, respectively, whereas as it was 23.5 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 1.2 years in sisters (n = 22), respectively. Metabolic syndrome (MS) defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria was present in 10 index patients, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 17 mothers and 15 fathers while as by Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) it was in 8 index patients, 5 sisters, 16 mothers and 11 fathers. The presence of MS or related metabolic derangements is high in the family members of women with PCOS.

  16. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in a patient with MELAS and presumed cytotoxic oedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.Y.; Noguchi, K.; Ogawa, S.; Seto, H.; Takashima, S.; Hayashi, N.

    2003-01-01

    A patient with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was studied with serial diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) after stroke-like episodes and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in an infarct-like lesion. In the acute and subacute stages, the affected area gave high signal on DWI and its ADC was much lower than that in a normal control region. In the chronic stage, the ADC became higher than that in normal brain. We therefore suggest that the stroke-like episodes did not cause vasogenic oedema but were related to energy failure and cytotoxic oedema. (orig.)

  17. Histomorphologic spectrum of BAP1 negative melanocytic neoplasms in a family with BAP1-associated cancer susceptibility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Zlatko; Buljan, Marija; Busam, Klaus J

    2015-06-01

    Multiple BAP1 negative melanocytic neoplasms are a hallmark of familial cancer susceptibility syndrome caused by BAP1 germline mutation. The syndrome is characterized by increased incidence of renal cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, cholangiocarcinoma, cutaneous and uveal melanoma and some other neoplasms. We report histomorphologic characteristics of six cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms with loss of BAP1 expression in two members of a family with BAP1-associated cancer susceptibility syndrome. The neoplasms were dermal melanocytic nevi characterized by a proliferation of large epithelioid (spitzoid) melanocytes, and adipocytic metaplasia. Nuclear pseudoinclusions and multinucleated melanocytes were present in most neoplasms. In two of the cases, a nodular melanoma was found associated with a dermal nevus. None of the melanomas recurred or metastasized after 6 and 3 years of follow up. We report two new cases of melanoma arising in a BAP1-deficient melanocytic nevus in the setting of familial tumor predisposition syndrome. Adipocytic metaplasia and nuclear pseudoinclusions may be additional morphologic clues to a BAP1-deficient nevus. It remains to be seen whether these features are more common in familial than sporadic lesions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Case report: Here, we are reporting two children from an Arab family with a novel frameshift ... Senior-Loken (S-L) is an autosomal recessive syndrome and a ..... diseases, which are scattered in the Arab world and Middle.

  19. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies. 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Giovanni; Martini-Neri, Maria Enrica; Katz, Ben E; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    The ensuing paper by Professor Giovanni Neri and colleagues was originally published in 1984, American Journal of Medical Genetics 19:195–207. The original article described a new family with a condition that the authors designated as the Perlman syndrome. This disorder, while uncommon, is an important multiple congenital anomaly and dysplasia syndrome; the causative gene was recently identified. This paper is a seminal work and is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al. [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  1. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  2. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M V Santos

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (p<0.001 for waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides. For waist circumference, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides, the significant GxEE interaction was due to rejection of the variance homogeneity hypothesis. For waist circumference and glucose, GxEE was also significant by the rejection of the genetic correlation hypothesis. The results showed that metabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  3. The importance of older family members in providing social resources and promoting cancer screening in families with a hereditary cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W; Goergen, Andrea F; Skapinsky, Kaley F; Devlin, Hillary C; Koehly, Laura M

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome.  Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network members were invited to participate in a onetime telephone interview about family communication. A total of 206 respondents from 33 families identified 2,051 social relationships (dyads). Nineteen percent of the respondents and 25% of the network members were older (≥60 years). Younger respondents (≤59 years) were more likely to nominate older network members as providers of social resources than younger members: instrumental support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.68), emotional support (OR = 1.71), help in crisis situation (OR = 2.04), and dependability when needed (OR = 2.15). Compared with younger network members, older members were more likely to be listed as encouragers of colon cancer screening by both younger (OR = 3.40) and older respondents (OR = 1.90) independent of whether support exchange occurred in the relationship. Engaging older network members in health interventions to facilitate screening behaviors and emotional well-being of younger members within families affected by inherited conditions may be beneficial. Findings can be used to empower older individuals about their important social roles in enhancing the well-being of their family members and to inform younger individuals about their older relatives' resourcefulness to facilitate positive social interactions.

  4. Constitutional SAMD9L mutations cause familial myelodysplastic syndrome and transient monosomy 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Victor B; Sahoo, Sushree S; Boklan, Jessica; Schwabe, Georg C; Saribeyoglu, Ebru; Strahm, Brigitte; Lebrecht, Dirk; Voss, Matthias; Bryceson, Yenan T; Erlacher, Miriam; Ehninger, Gerhard; Niewisch, Marena; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Achermann, John C; Shimamura, Akiko; Hochrein, Jochen; Tedgård, Ulf; Nilsson, Lars; Hasle, Henrik; Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Wlodarski, Marcin W

    2018-03-01

    Familial myelodysplastic syndromes arise from haploinsufficiency of genes involved in hematopoiesis and are primarily associated with early-onset disease. Here we describe a familial syndrome in seven patients from four unrelated pedigrees presenting with myelodysplastic syndrome and loss of chromosome 7/7q. Their median age at diagnosis was 2.1 years (range, 1-42). All patients presented with thrombocytopenia with or without additional cytopenias and a hypocellular marrow without an increase of blasts. Genomic studies identified constitutional mutations (p.H880Q, p.R986H, p.R986C and p.V1512M) in the SAMD9L gene on 7q21, with decreased allele frequency in hematopoiesis. The non-random loss of mutated SAMD9L alleles was attained via monosomy 7, deletion 7q, UPD7q, or acquired truncating SAMD9L variants p.R1188X and p.S1317RfsX21. Incomplete penetrance was noted in 30% (3/10) of mutation carriers. Long-term observation revealed divergent outcomes with either progression to leukemia and/or accumulation of driver mutations (n=2), persistent monosomy 7 (n=4), and transient monosomy 7 followed by spontaneous recovery with SAMD9L -wildtype UPD7q (n=2). Dysmorphic features or neurological symptoms were absent in our patients, pointing to the notion that myelodysplasia with monosomy 7 can be a sole manifestation of SAMD9L disease. Collectively, our results define a new subtype of familial myelodysplastic syndrome and provide an explanation for the phenomenon of transient monosomy 7. Registered at: www.clinicaltrials.gov; #NCT00047268 . Copyright© 2018 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Antonio Costa, La mela di Cézanne e l’accendino di Hitchcock. Il senso delle cose nei film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Seligardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available «Sono diecimila persone, forse, che non hanno dimenticato la mela di Cézanne ma sono un miliardo gli spettatori che si ricorderanno dell’accendino di Delitto per delitto» (5. Così Godard recitava all’interno delle Histoire(s du cinéma, e così si apre il saggio di Antonio Costa, prendendone spunto anche per il titolo.

  6. [Considerations on family dynamics and the malnutrition syndrome in Mexican children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; González-Rico, José Luis; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Sánchez-Talamantes, Eva; Navarro-Lozano, María Eugenia; Nápoles-Rodríguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 1990s we noted that family dysfunction was more common in children with severe primary malnutrition than in children admitted to the hospital without malnutrition. Defects on feeding habits during the first year of life, especially early weaning and inadequate complementary feeding were more common in dysfunctional families. We also observed that chronic malnutrition in preschool children, and overweight and obesity in schoolchildren were more common in children from dysfunctional families. Once the association between dysfunctional family dynamics and obesity in schoolchildren was demonstrated, it was observed that low education of fathers and mothers increased twofold the possibility of family dysfunction: OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.37-3.10 and OR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.57-3.89, respectively. In addition, the low-income and the lower purchasing power of foods were associated to family dysfunction (pdysfunction in composite, extended, single-parent families where there exist other persons vulnerable to the different entities of malnutrition syndrome and indeed depend on adults for their care, food and nutrition.

  7. [Clinical and genetic investigation of families with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Liao, X B; Liu, Y L; He, C F; Zhang, H; Jiang, L; Feng, Y; Mei, L Y

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical chacteration and molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in seven families, and provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Method: Clinical data of seven families with WS2(14 patients)were collected. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10(SOX10), snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) and endothelin receptor type B(EDNRB)were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Then the raw data was analyzed. Result: The most common manifestations of WS2 are sensorineural hearing loss(10/14,71.4%), freckle(7/14, 50.0%),heterochromia iridis(6/14, 42.9%) and premature greying(5/14,35.7%). All the deafness phenotype is congenital, bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. Freckles phenotype is different from cutaneous pigment abnormalities of WS in Westerners. The heterozygous mutation, c.328C>T in exon 3 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 2. However, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (SOX10,SNAI2 and EDNRB) was detected in other pedigrees. Conclusion: There are obvious variations in clinical features of WS, while freckles may be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances. The MITF gene mutation, R110X,is therefore considered the disease causing mutation in pedigree WS02.However, there are novel disease causing genes or copy number variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2, which require further research. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  8. Chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome : Another family with autosomal dominant inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, R; VandeLogt, F; Houtman, WA; VanEssen, AJ

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy and his father with the chorioretinal dysplasia-microcephaly-mental retardation syndrome (CDMMS). Our report extends the phenotypic spectrum of autosomal dominant CDMMS by describing microphthalmia for the first time in an autosomal dominant family. The boy was also severely

  9. Muckle-Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muckle - Wells syndrome (MWS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population.

  10. Association between the Eating Family Meal and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Woo-Chul; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Shim, Jae-Yong

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have shown that family meals promote a well-balanced and healthier diet and weight status. Metabolic syndrome is related to eating behavior. This study investigated the association between eating family meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study included 4,529 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007-2012). A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess dietary status. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of the modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We compared the overall quality of dietary intake in family meal. Nutritional adequacy ratios for energy, protein, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin B 1 , vitamin B 2 , vitamin C, niacin, and potassium, and the mean adequacy ratio were significantly higher in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome was lower in the family meal group (Pfamily meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This study demonstrated that eating family meals appeared to be associated with nutrient adequacy. However, we observed no significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the 2 groups.

  11. Usher syndrome in four siblings from a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trop, I; Schloss, M D; Polomeno, R; Der Kaloustian, V

    1995-04-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of disorders of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Two types are accepted clinically: type I is associated with profound congenital deafness with progressive pigmentary retinopathy and total loss of vestibular function. Type II is a milder form, with moderate-to-profound hearing loss and a milder form of retinitis pigmentosa. Vestibular function is preserved. A total of five loci have been identified as accounting for the two distinct phenotypic presentations. We describe a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin whose four children all are affected with Usher syndrome type I. DNA analysis showed non-linkage to any of the loci already identified as tightly linked to the Usher syndrome type I.

  12. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Ventricular Hypertrophy in a Brazilian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steld, Lenises de Paula; Campuzano, Oscar; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Moura de Barros Zamorano, Mabel; Sousa Matos, Selma; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-07-10

    BACKGROUND PRKAG2 syndrome diagnosis is already well-defined as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), ventricular hypertrophy (VH) due to glycogen accumulation, and conduction system disease (CSD). Because of its rarity, there is a lack of literature focused on the treatment. The present study aimed to describe appropriate strategies for the treatment of affected family members with PRKAG2 syndrome with a long follow-up period. CASE REPORT We studied 60 selected individuals from 84 family members (32 males, 53.3%) (mean age 27±16 years). Patients with WPW and/or VH were placed in a group of 18 individuals, in which 11 (61.1%) had VH and WPW, 6 (33.3%) had isolated WPW, and 1 (5.6%) had isolated VH. Palpitations occurred in 16 patients (88.9%), chest pain in 11 (61.1%), dizziness in 13 (72.2%), syncope in 15 (83.3%), and dyspnea in 13 (72%). Sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurred in 2 (11.1%), and 2 patients with cardiac arrest (CA) had asystole and pre-excited atrial flutter-fibrillation (AFL and AF) as the documented mechanism. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and learning/language disabilities with delayed development were observed. Genetic analysis identified a new missense pathogenic variant (p.K290I) in the PRKAG2 gene. Cardiac histopathology demonstrated the predominance of vacuoles containing glycogen derivative and fibrosis. The treatment was based on hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) control, antiarrhythmic drugs (AD), anticoagulation, and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RCA). Six patients (33.3%) underwent pacemaker implantation (PM). CONCLUSIONS The present study describes the clinical treatment for a rare cardiac syndrome caused by a PRKAG2 mutation.

  13. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Siddique, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Kleefstra, T.; Zweier, C.; Leeuw, N. de; Qamar, R.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2014-01-01

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy

  14. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  15. Target Transformation Constrained Sparse Unmixing (ttcsu) Algorithm for Retrieving Hydrous Minerals on Mars: Application to Southwest Melas Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, X.; Tarnas, J. D.; Mustard, J. F.

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of hydrated minerals from hyperspectral remote sensing data is fundamental for understanding Martian geologic process. Because of the difficulties for selecting endmembers from hyperspectral images, a sparse unmixing algorithm has been proposed to be applied to CRISM data on Mars. However, it's challenge when the endmember library increases dramatically. Here, we proposed a new methodology termed Target Transformation Constrained Sparse Unmixing (TTCSU) to accurately detect hydrous minerals on Mars. A new version of target transformation technique proposed in our recent work was used to obtain the potential detections from CRISM data. Sparse unmixing constrained with these detections as prior information was applied to CRISM single-scattering albedo images, which were calculated using a Hapke radiative transfer model. This methodology increases success rate of the automatic endmember selection of sparse unmixing and could get more accurate abundances. CRISM images with well analyzed in Southwest Melas Chasma was used to validate our methodology in this study. The sulfates jarosite was detected from Southwest Melas Chasma, the distribution is consistent with previous work and the abundance is comparable. More validations will be done in our future work.

  16. Family caregiver distress with children having rare genetic disorders: a qualitative study involving Russell-Silver Syndrome in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hsin-Ju; Niu, Dau-Ming; Turale, Sue; Tsao, Lee-Ing; Shih, Fu-Jong; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Chang, Chun-Chi; Shih, Fu-Jin

    2012-01-01

    To extend nursing knowledge of distress experienced by family caregivers of children with rare genetic disorders, by exploring the perspectives of caregivers of children with Russell-Silver Syndrome in Taiwan. Caring for a child with a rare genetic disorder often has profound effects on families, especially when diagnosis and treatment is complex or not yet well developed, such as that in Russell-Silver Syndrome (or Silver-Russell syndrome). This disorder causes dwarfism and developmental difficulties, requiring long-term care planning. Previous research has focused mostly on medical care, but little is known about families' perspectives of caring difficulties, the help they need and nursing care required. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to inform this study. Family caregivers, whose children were undergoing medical care in a leading Taiwan medical centre, were invited to participate in face-to-face, in-depth interviews. Data were analysed by content analysis. Fifteen caregivers including 11 mothers, two fathers and two grandmothers participated. Five major themes and 13 sub-themes of care-giving distress were identified: endless psychological worries; the lengthy process to confirm a medical diagnosis; adjustment efforts in modifying family roles; dilemmas in deciding between Western or Chinese traditional medicine; and negative responses to society's concerns. Their primary sources of support were spouses, parents and health professionals, accordingly. Complex physio-psycho-social and decision-making distress in caring for children with a rare genetic disorder were systematically revealed from the perspectives of ethnic-Chinese family caregivers. Long-term care plans for children with a rare genetic disorder such as Russell-Silver Syndrome need to focus on positive dynamic family interactions, life-stage development and family caregiver support. Research on care-giving in rare genetic disorders is also warranted across cultures and countries to

  17. Genetic Heterogeneity of Usher Syndrome: Analysis of 151 Families with Usher Type I

    OpenAIRE

    Astuto, Lisa M.; Weston, Michael D.; Carney, Carol A.; Hoover, Denise M.; Cremers, Cor W.R.J.; Wagenaar, Mariette; Moller, Claes; Smith, Richard J.H.; Pieke-Dahl, Sandra; Greenberg, Jacquie; Ramesar, Raj; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Ayuso, Carmen; Heckenlively, John R.; Tamayo, Marta

    2000-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six Usher I genetic subtypes at loci USH1A–USH1F have been reported. The MYO7A gene is responsible for USH1B, the most common subtype. In our analysis, 151 families with Usher I were screened by linkage and mutation analysis. MYO7A mutations were identified in 64 families with Usher I. Of the remaining 87 families, who were negative for MYO7A mutations, 54 were info...

  18. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  19. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the family members of women with polycystic ovary syndrome from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Shabir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most complex and common endocrine disorder of women in reproductive years. In addition to irregular menstrual cycles, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, it has many metabolic manifestations such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease or possibly endometrial cancer. Familial clustering of PCOS in consistence with the genetic susceptibility has been described. Materials and Methods: The present study assessed the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters including prevalence of metabolic syndrome by two different criteria in the first- degree relatives of patients with PCOS. Results: The average age of 37 index patients was 23 ± 3.6 years, with the mean age of menarche as 13.3 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and age of menarche in mothers (n = 22 was 48.8 ± 5.1 and 13 ± 1.3 years, respectively, whereas as it was 23.5 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 1.2 years in sisters (n = 22, respectively. Metabolic syndrome (MS defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria was present in 10 index patients, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 17 mothers and 15 fathers while as by Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III it was in 8 index patients, 5 sisters, 16 mothers and 11 fathers. Conclusion: The presence of MS or related metabolic derangements is high in the family members of women with PCOS.

  20. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Reginster, Marie-Annick; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe; Piérard, Gérald E.; Manicourt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH) and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH. PMID:23091361

  1. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh Hermanns-Lê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH.

  2. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  3. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  4. CDH23 mutation and phenotype heterogeneity: a profile of 107 diverse families with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L M; Bork, J M; Weston, M D; Askew, J W; Fields, R R; Orten, D J; Ohliger, S J; Riazuddin, S; Morell, R J; Khan, S; Riazuddin, S; Kremer, H; van Hauwe, P; Moller, C G; Cremers, C W R J; Ayuso, C; Heckenlively, J R; Rohrschneider, K; Spandau, U; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R; Reardon, W; Bitoun, P; Millan, J; Legge, R; Friedman, T B; Kimberling, W J

    2002-08-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP-like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia.

  5. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  6. 3M Syndrome: A Report of Four Cases in Two Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Ayşe Nurcan

    2011-01-01

    3M syndrome is a rare entity characterized by severe growth retardation, dysmorphic features and skeletal changes as its major components. It is differentiated from other types of dwarfism by its clinical features and by the typical slender long bones and foreshortened vertebral bodies that can be visualized radiographically. 3M syndrome has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. An early diagnosis is important for genetic counseling. In this report, we present four children (3 males, 1 female) from two families who were aged between 411/12 and 1011/12 years and had clinical findings of 3M syndrome. One of these patients had received growth hormone (GH) treatment which was discontinued due to an inadequate height gain. Physicians should be aware of this entity in the differential diagnosis of children with severe short stature and mild skeletal changes. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21911330

  7. Episodic weakness due to mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auré, Karine; Dubourg, Odile; Jardel, Claude; Clarysse, Lucie; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Laforêt, Pascal; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Petiot, Philippe; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Vial, Christophe; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Vandier, Christophe; Fontaine, Bertrand; Lombès, Anne

    2013-11-19

    To report that homoplasmic deleterious mutations in the mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 genes may be responsible for acute episodes of limb weakness mimicking periodic paralysis due to channelopathies and dramatically responding to acetazolamide. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing and restriction PCR, oxidative phosphorylation functional assays, reactive oxygen species metabolism, and patch-clamp technique in cultured skin fibroblasts. Occurrence of a typical MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) syndrome in a single member of a large pedigree with episodic weakness associated with a later-onset distal motor neuropathy led to the disclosure of 2 deleterious mitochondrial DNA mutations. The MT-ATP6 m.9185T>C p.Leu220Pro mutation, previously associated with Leigh syndrome, was present in all family members, while the MT-TL1 m.3271T>C mutation, a known cause of MELAS syndrome, was observed in the sole patient with MELAS presentation. Significant defect of complexes V and I as well as oxidative stress were observed in both primary fibroblasts and cybrid cells with 100% m.9185T>C mutation. Permanent plasma membrane depolarization and altered permeability to K(+) in fibroblasts provided a link with the paralysis episodes. Screening of 9 patients, based on their clinical phenotype, identified 4 patients with similar deleterious MT-ATP6 mutations (twice m.9185T>C and once m.9176T>C or m.8893T>C). A fifth patient presented with an original potentially deleterious MT-ATP8 mutation (m.8403T>C). All mutations were associated with almost-normal complex V activity but significant oxidative stress and permanent plasma membrane depolarization. Homoplasmic mutations in the MT-ATP6/8 genes may cause episodic weakness responding to acetazolamide treatment.

  8. Bartsocas-Papas syndrome with variable expressivity in an Egyptian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M S; Kamel, A K; Effat, L K; El-Ruby, M O

    2012-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessively inherited sublethal popliteal pterygium condition characterized by intrauterine or neonatal death, severe popliteal webbing, oligosyndactyly, ankyloblepharon, orofacial clefts, intraoral filiform bands and genital anomalies. Internal organ involvement has seldom been identified. We report on a 3 years old female patient of healthy first cousin parents with BPS. She presented with orofacial clefting, severe popliteal webs, club feet, oligosyndactyly of the toes, hypogenitalism and normal hands and internal organs. Ankyloblepharon and filiform bands between the alveolar ridges were evident at birth. Pedigree analysis revealed a more severely affected female sib, who died a few minutes after birth with additional manifestations including near complete lip fusion without oral cleft, complete syndactyly in both hands and an omphalocele. Linkage was excluded to the IRF6 gene; a candidate gene implicated in the Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes, with overlapping features with BPS. To our knowledge, this is the 5th surviving patient with this syndrome in the literature. In this report, we also discuss the proposed pathogenetic mechanisms for BPS and compare our patients with similarly described cases as well as overlapping spectrum of other popliteal pterygium syndromes. Our findings provide further evidence of intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity in families with BPS.

  9. Type III Bartter-like syndrome in an infant boy with Gitelman syndrome and autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Milena; Gaudino, Rossella; Tedeschi, Silvana; Syrèn, Marie-Louise; Perrotta, Silverio; Maines, Evelina; Zaffanello, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of an infant boy with polyuria and a familial history of central diabetes insipidus. Laboratory blood tests disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism. Plasma magnesium concentration was slightly low. Urine analysis showed hypercalciuria, hyposthenuria, and high excretion of potassium. Such findings oriented toward type III Bartter syndrome (BSIII). Direct sequencing of the CLCNKB gene revealed no disease-causing mutations. The water deprivation test was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lack of posterior pituitary hyperintensity. Finally, direct sequencing of the AVP-NPII gene showed a point mutation (c.1884G>A) in a heterozygous state, confirming an autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI). This condition did not explain the patient's phenotype; thus, we investigated for Gitelman syndrome (GS). A direct sequencing of the SLC12A3 gene showed c.269A>C and c.1205C>A new mutations. In conclusion, the patient had a genetic combination of GS and adFNDI with a BSIII-like phenotype.

  10. A family of a Child with Down Syndrome in Terms of Interpersonal Relationships Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazgun T.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of interpersonal relationships of families with disabled children. The birth of a baby with a disability can be a traumatic event for parents and can have profound effects on the entire family. In this regard, it is especially important to provide the specialist with the opportunity to identify the characteristics of intra-family relations in order to create an effective program for correcting disharmonious patterns of behavior in the family. The authors present the program of studies of the interpersonal relationships and the case of relationships research of the family who is parenting a child with Down syndrome.

  11. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, G; Martini-Neri, M E; Katz, B E; Opitz, J M

    1984-09-01

    We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed.

  12. Controlled family study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence of shared liability and transmission of partial syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, M; Freeman, R; Lampert, C; Diamond, J; Kaye, W

    2000-03-01

    Lifetime rates of full and partial anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were determined in first-degree relatives of diagnostically pure proband groups and relatives of matched, never-ill comparison subjects. Rates of each eating disorder were obtained for 1,831 relatives of 504 probands on the basis of personal structured clinical interviews and family history. Best-estimate diagnoses based on all available information were rendered without knowledge of proband status and pedigree identity. Only definite and probable diagnoses were considered. Whereas anorexia nervosa was rare in families of the comparison subjects, full and partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa aggregated in female relatives of both anorexic and bulimic probands. For the full syndrome of anorexia nervosa, the relative risks were 11.3 and 12.3 in female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. Bulimia nervosa was more common than anorexia nervosa in female relatives of comparison subjects, but it, too, aggregated in the families of ill probands; the corresponding relative risks for bulimia nervosa were 4.2 and 4.4 for female relatives of anorexic and bulimic probands, respectively. When partial syndromes of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were considered, relative risks fell by one-half in each group of ill probands. Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are familial. Their cross-transmission in families suggests a common, or shared, familial diathesis. The additional observation that familial aggregation and cross-transmission extend to milder phenotypes suggests the validity of their inclusion in a continuum of familial liability.

  13. Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome or with Learning Disabilities: Family Environment and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Tali; Berger, Ornit

    2008-01-01

    The study examined the family environment and perceived social support of 33 parents with a child diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and 43 parents with a child with learning disability, which were compared to 45 parents of children without disabilities as a control group. Parents completed the Family Environment Scale and Social Support Scale…

  14. Association between the Eating Family Meal and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Woo-Chul; Kwon, Yu-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that family meals promote a well-balanced and healthier diet and weight status. Metabolic syndrome is related to eating behavior. This study investigated the association between eating family meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Methods This cross-sectional study included 4,529 subjects who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007–2012). A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess dietary status. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of the modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We compared the overall quality of dietary intake in family meal. Results Nutritional adequacy ratios for energy, protein, calcium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin C, niacin, and potassium, and the mean adequacy ratio were significantly higher in the family meal group (Pmetabolic syndrome was lower in the family meal group (Pfamily meals and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion This study demonstrated that eating family meals appeared to be associated with nutrient adequacy. However, we observed no significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the 2 groups. PMID:28572888

  15. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  16. Neonatal familial Evans syndrome associated with joint hypermobility and mitral valve regurgitation in three siblings in a Saudi Arab family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Fathelrahman E.; AlBakrah, Mohameed S.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia in the absence of a known underlying cause led to the diagnosis of Evans syndrome in a 9 month old male. Subsequently, a similar diagnosis was made in two siblings (a 3 year old boy and a 1 day old girl). The 9 month old had a chronic course with exacerbations. He was treated with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and colchiccine with a variable response. He died of congestive heart failure at the age of 8 years. The brother's disease course was one of remission and exacerbation. With time, remissions were prolonged and paralleled an improvement in joint hypermobility. The sister died of sepsis after a chronic course with severe exacerbattions. Only two families with Evans syndrome have been reported in the English medical literature. In one report (in a Saudi Arab family), the disease was associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia. (author)

  17. Gardner's syndrome: a ten year follow up survey of 12 subjects in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Kaimin; Si Liya; Wu Zhiqiang; Lu Xuan; Meng Liancheng

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the development of Gardner's syndrome by following up 12 subjects in a family for ten years. Methods: 12 subjects with Gardner's syndrome of 4 generations in a family were studied. Six were male and six female. The age of the patients was from 9 to 74 years, with average of 38 years. The examinations consisted of air-barium double contrast radiography of colon, fiber-optic colonoscopy, plain X-ray and body photography. Results: Triology was present in 8 cases (66.7%) and the double signs in 4 cases (33.3%). 4 patients (33.3%) died of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp in 10 years, all occurring in rectum and sigmoid colon, the oldest one was 74 years and the youngest 35 years. Conclusion: The incidence of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp is very high in patients with Gardner's syndrome and may occur in patients older than 30 years, with the peak incidence in the sixth decade. Preventive resection of colonic polyp is still the best treatment

  18. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Marfan syndrome and cardiovascular complications: results of a family investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Simon Antoine; Djibrilla, Siddikatou; Aw, Fatou; Bodian, Malick; Babaka, Kana; Ngaidé, Aliou Alassane; Dioum, Momar; Ba, Serigne Abdou

    2017-07-19

    Cardiovascular complications in Marfan syndrome (MFS) make all its seriousness. Taking as a basis the Ghent criteria, we conducted a family screening from an index case. The objective was to describe the clinical characteristics of MFS anomalies and to detect cardiovascular complications in our patients. Six subjects were evaluated. Patients had to be in the same uterine siblings of the index case or be a descendant. The objective was to search for MFS based on the diagnostic criteria of Ghent and, subsequently, detecting cardiovascular damage. The average age was 24 years. The examination revealed three cases of sudden death in a context of chest pain. Five subjects had systemic involvement with a score ≥ 7 that allowed to the diagnosis of MFS. Two patients had simultaneously ectopia lentis and myopia. In terms of cardiovascular damage, there were three cases of dilatation of the aortic root, two cases of aortic dissection of Stanford's type A with severe aortic regurgitation in one case and moderate in the other. There were three patients with moderate mitral regurgitation with a case by valve prolapse. The family screening is crucial in Marfan syndrome. It revealed serious cardiovascular complications including sudden death and aortic dissection.

  20. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family from Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Marafie, Makia J; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rare autosomal recessive disorders of variable severity are segregating in many highly consanguineous families from the Arab population. One of these deleterious diseases is Senior-Loken syndrome, a hereditary heterogeneous multiorgan disorder, which combines nephronophthisis with retinal dystrophy, leading to blindness and eventually end stage renal failure. This disorder has been reported in many cases worldwide, including two unrelated families from Arabian Gulf countries, whic...

  1. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Jane F; Hagenkord, Jill; Boland, C Richard; Rhees, Jennifer; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Boardman, Lisa A; Davies, Janine; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2011-10-01

    The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some families were found to show a LS phenotype without an identified MMR mutation, although there was microsatellite instability and absence of MSH2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Studies of a subset of these families found a deletion at the 3' end of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) gene, causing transcription read-through resulting in silencing of MSH2 through hypermethylation of its promoter. The tumor spectrum of such families appears to differ from classical LS. Our study of two large families (USA Family R and Dutch Family A) with an EPCAM deletion was carried out using each institution's standard family study protocol. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and EPCAM deletion analysis was performed. Both families were found to harbor the same deletion at the 3' end of EPCAM. Analysis showed that the deletion originated from a common ancestor. Family R and Family A members showed segregation of CRC with the presence of this EPCAM mutation. Compared with classic LS, there were almost no extracolonic cancers. Members of Family R and Family A, all with the same EPCAM deletion, predominantly presented with CRC but no LS-associated endometrial cancer, confirming findings seen in other, smaller, LS families with EPCAM mutations. In these EPCAM mutation carriers, cancer surveillance should be focused on CRC.

  2. The importance of the family history in caring for families with long QT syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Jolien S; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, Karin; van den Berg, Maarten P; van Dijk, Rene; Middel, Berrie; van Tintelen, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We performed retrospective cross-sectional analyses of adult index patients with DCM or LQTS in a general hospital (GH) or a University Medical Center (UMC). We identified 82 index patients with DCM (34 GH; 48 UMC) and 20 with LQTS (all UMC) between 1996 and 2005. Mean follow-up was 58 months. A family history was recorded in 90% of both LQTS and DCM patients most of the cases restricted to first-degree family members. The genetic aspects, counseling and screening of family members was discussed significantly more often with LQTS than DCM patients (all P family members, DNA analysis and referral) was performed significantly more often in LQTS than DCM patients. Cardiologists in the UMC referred DCM index patients for genetic counseling more often than those in the GH (25% vs. 6%; P familial. Since early recognition and treatment may reduce morbidity and mortality we recommend cardiologists take a more thorough family history and always consider referring to a clinical genetics department in such index patients. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Developmental expression of Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Rosales-Nieves, Alicia E.; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WASP) family proteins participate in many cellular processes involving rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. To the date, four WASP subfamily members have been described in Drosophila: Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy. Wash, WASp, and SCAR are essential during early Drosophila development where they function in orchestrating cytoplasmic events including membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. A mutant for Whamy has not yet been reported. Results We generated monoclonal antibodies that are specific to Drosophila Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy, and use these to describe their spatial and temporal localization patterns. Consistent with the importance of WASP family proteins in flies, we find that Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy are dynamically expressed throughout oogenesis and embryogenesis. For example, we find that Wash accumulates at the oocyte cortex. WASp is highly expressed in the PNS, while SCAR is the most abundantly expressed in the CNS. Whamy exhibits an asymmetric subcellular localization that overlaps with mitochondria and is highly expressed in muscle. Conclusion All four WASP family members show specific expression patterns, some of which reflect their previously known roles and others revealing new potential functions. The monoclonal antibodies developed offer valuable new tools to investigate how WASP family proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:22275148

  4. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  5. Apoplejía, Convulsiones, Epilepsia, Heteroplasmia, MELAS, Migraña, Mutación, mtDNA Comportamiento de la mutación mtDNA A3243G en dos familias antioqueñas de pacientes diagnosticados con el síndrome MELAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Bedoya Berrío

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    family: ";Times New Roman";,";serif";; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-US">Mitochondrial DNA mutations cause mitochondrial cytopathies. Among them Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes

    family: ";Times New Roman";,";serif";; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-US">(MELA is the commonest. The transition 3243A>G in the Leucine tRNA is present in 80% of the patients.

    family: ";Times New Roman";,";serif";; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-US">Heteroplasmy is observed in mitochondrial cytopathies, characterized by the coexistence of mutant and wild type molecules in a cell. Depending on the level of heteroplasmy, function and clinical manifestations might result affected.

    family: ";Times New Roman";,";serif";; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-US">Objectivefamily: ";Times New Roman";,";serif";; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-US">: To test the degree of heteroplasmy of the mutation 3243G on its expression (syntoms and nuclear-variants dependence.

    family: ";Times New Roman

  6.  Familial Ectrodactyly Syndrome in a Nigerian Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Adegboye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available  Ectrodactyly, also known as Split-Hand/Split-Foot Malformation (SHFM is a rare genetic condition characterized by defects of the central elements of the autopod. It has a prevalence of 1:10,000-1:90,000 worldwide. The X-linked and autosomal dominant types have been described. It can occur as an isolated malformation or in combination with other anomalies, such as tibial aplasia, craniofacial defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC is an example of ectrodactyly syndrome accompanied by multiple organ defects. Ectrodactyly has been reported in Africa, especially in several families in remote areas of central Africa but there has not been any published work on ectrodactyly in Nigeria. A baby was born in Ilorin, North Central Zone of Nigeria, with an uneventful prenatal and delivery history but was noticed to have malformation of the two hands and the two lower limbs at birth which are replica of the father’s malformation. We present this case to highlight familial ectrodactyly in Nigeria and prepare us to improve upon simple prenatal diagnosis and management of the challenges associated with patients with congenital malformation in Nigeria and other developing countries.

  7. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  8. Adams Oliver syndrome: Description of a new phenotype with cerebellar abnormalities in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Amico, Alessandra; Melis, Daniela; D’Arco, Felice; Di Paolo, Nilde; Carotenuto, Barbara; D’Anna, Gennaro; Russo, Carmela; Boemio, Pasquale; Brunetti, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    To describe cerebellar abnormalities in a family composed by a father and two affected sibs with Adams Oliver syndrome (AOS) (OMIM 100300). Brain MRI and MR angiography were performed at 1.5T. The siblings presented cerebellar cortex dysplasia characterized by the presence of cysts. Abnormalities of CNS are an unusual manifestation of AOS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical dysplasia in a family with AOS

  9. Autosomal dominant syndrome resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen A; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2006-06-15

    Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome with phenotypic variability [OMIM 135900]. The diagnosis is based solely on clinical findings, as there is currently no molecular, biochemical, or cytogenetic analysis available to confirm a diagnosis. Although typically described as an autosomal recessive disorder, autosomal dominant inheritance has also been infrequently reported. We describe a mother and her two daughters who all have features that resemble Coffin-Siris syndrome. However, this is not a completely convincing diagnosis given that hypertelorism is not a feature of Coffin-Siris syndrome and the family is relatively mildly affected. Yet, this family provides further evidence of an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for a likely variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome (at least in some families). In addition, Sibling 1 had premature thelarche. She is the second reported individual within the spectrum of Coffin-Siris syndrome to have premature thelarche, indicating that it may be a rare clinical feature. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. [Constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D) - a case report of a family with biallelic MSH6 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilenčíková, D

    2012-01-01

    This work gives comprehensive information about new recessively inherited syndrome characterized by development of childhood malignancies. Behind this new described syndrome, called Constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D), there are biallelic mutations in genes, which cause adult cancer syndrom termed Lynch syndrom (Hereditary non-polyposis cancer syndrom-HNPCC) if they are heterozygous mutations. Biallelic germline mutations of genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 in CMMR-D are characterized by increased risk of hematological malignancies, atypical brain tumors and early onset of colorectal cancers. An accompanying manifestation of the disease are skin spots with diffuse margins and irregular pigmentation reminiscent of Café au lait spots of NF1. This paper reports a case of a family with CMMR-D caused by novel homozygous MSH6 mutations leading to gliomatosis cerebri, T-ALL in an 11-year-old female and glioblastoma multiforme in her 10-year-old brother, both with rapid progression of the diseases. A literature review of brain tumors in CMMR-D families shows that they are treatment-resistant and lead to early death. Therefore, this work highlights the importance of early identification of patients with CMMR-D syndrome - in terms of initiation of a screening program for early detection of malignancies as well as early surgical intervention.

  11. Heterogeneous response to X-ray and ultraviolet light irradiations of cultured skin fibroblasts in two families with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Li, F.P.; Meyer, R.J.; Marchetto, D.J.; Patterson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A heterogeneous response to X-ray and far UV (254 nm) light irradiations was found in cultured skin fibroblast lines from 2 separate families with Gardner's syndrome. When compared to 2 normal control cultures and cultures from 2 patients with nonfamilial colon cancer, cultures from 4 clinically affected members of family 1 showed increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of both X-ray and UV light irradiations. These cells also showed a delayed pattern of X-ray potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and absent UV PLDR. In contrast, cultures from 3 members of family 2 (2 of whom were clinically affected) showed a normal response of survival and PLDR to both X-ray and UV light irradiations. Thus increased sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts to X-ray and UV light irradiations was not a consistent in vitro finding in patients with Gardner's syndrome. However, in families with Gardner's syndrome who demonstrate in vitro radiosensitivity, additional studies are needed to assess the usefulness of these techniques in detecting affected individuals prior to the development of colon carcinoma and other manifestations

  12. Peeling skin syndrome in eight cases of four different families from India and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling skin syndrome (PSS is a rare recessively inherited ichthyosiform genodermatoses characterized by superficial skin peeling. This has 2 subtypes, acral (APSS; OMIM 609796 and generalized form (OMIM 270300. The later has been subdivided into type A (non-inflammatory and type B (inflammatory. Eight cases of peeling skin syndrome in 4 families were recorded over a period of 5 years. They were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically. Disease onset ranged from birth to childhood age (mean 5.25 ± 4.528 years and age at presentation ranged from 7-35 years (mean 23.25 ± 10.471 years. Males outnumbered females (M:F - 5:3. All had non-inflammatory generalized disease of type-A PSS variety, except one who had type-B PSS. Two Muslim families (1 st and 2 nd family, total 5 patients came from nearby country Bangladesh, and the 2 Hindu families were Indian. Higher severity over acral areas in generalized type, possible autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and improvement with age as found in this series were new manifestations and possibly unreported previously. The disease was found to be poorly responsive to oral retinoids. Prevalence of the disease may be higher than expected. Importance of mutational analysis was also highlighted.

  13. Peeling skin syndrome in eight cases of four different families from India and Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nilendu; Boler, Anup Kumar; Bhanja, Dulal Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare recessively inherited ichthyosiform genodermatoses characterized by superficial skin peeling. This has 2 subtypes, acral (APSS; OMIM 609796) and generalized form (OMIM 270300). The later has been subdivided into type A (non-inflammatory) and type B (inflammatory). Eight cases of peeling skin syndrome in 4 families were recorded over a period of 5 years. They were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically. Disease onset ranged from birth to childhood age (mean 5.25 ± 4.528 years) and age at presentation ranged from 7-35 years (mean 23.25 ± 10.471 years). Males outnumbered females (M:F - 5:3). All had non-inflammatory generalized disease of type-A PSS variety, except one who had type-B PSS. Two Muslim families (1 st and 2 nd family, total 5 patients) came from nearby country Bangladesh, and the 2 Hindu families were Indian. Higher severity over acral areas in generalized type, possible autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and improvement with age as found in this series were new manifestations and possibly unreported previously. The disease was found to be poorly responsive to oral retinoids. Prevalence of the disease may be higher than expected. Importance of mutational analysis was also highlighted.

  14. Heterozygous Mutations in TREX1 Cause Familial Chilblain Lupus and Dominant Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Newman, William G.; Dean, John; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Flintoff, Kim; Robins, Peter; Harvey, Scott; Hollis, Thomas; O’Hara, Ann; Herrick, Ariane L.; Bowden, Andrew P.; Perrino, Fred W.; Lindahl, Tomas; Barnes, Deborah E.; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    TREX1 constitutes the major 3′→5′ DNA exonuclease activity measured in mammalian cells. Recently, biallelic mutations in TREX1 have been shown to cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome at the AGS1 locus. Interestingly, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome shows overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus at both clinical and pathological levels. Here, we report a heterozygous TREX1 mutation causing familial chilblain lupus. Additionally, we describe a de novo heterozygous mutation, affecting a critical catalytic residue in TREX1, that results in typical Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. PMID:17357087

  15. Germ line p53 mutations in a familial syndrome of breast cancer, sarcomas, and other neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, D; Li, F P; Strong, L C; Fraumeni, J F; Nelson, C E; Kim, D H; Kassel, J; Gryka, M A; Bischoff, F Z; Tainsky, M A

    1990-11-30

    Familial cancer syndromes have helped to define the role of tumor suppressor genes in the development of cancer. The dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is of particular interest because of the diversity of childhood and adult tumors that occur in affected individuals. The rarity and high mortality of LFS precluded formal linkage analysis. The alternative approach was to select the most plausible candidate gene. The tumor suppressor gene, p53, was studied because of previous indications that this gene is inactivated in the sporadic (nonfamilial) forms of most cancers that are associated with LFS. Germ line p53 mutations have been detected in all five LFS families analyzed. These mutations do not produce amounts of mutant p53 protein expected to exert a trans-dominant loss of function effect on wild-type p53 protein. The frequency of germ line p53 mutations can now be examined in additional families with LFS, and in other cancer patients and families with clinical features that might be attributed to the mutation.

  16. Novel association of neurofibromatosis type 1-causing mutations in families with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Sara; Sjörs, Kerstin; Jonzon, Anders; Vihinen, Mauno; Annerén, Göran; Bondeson, Marie-Louise

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS) is a rare condition with clinical features of both neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome (NS). All three syndromes belong to the RASopathies, which are caused by dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway. The major gene involved in NFNS is NF1, but co-occurring NF1 and PTPN11 mutations in NFNS have been reported. Knowledge about possible involvement of additional RASopathy-associated genes in NFNS is, however, very limited. We present a comprehensive clinical and molecular analysis of eight affected individuals from three unrelated families displaying features of NF1 and NFNS. The genetic etiology of the clinical phenotypes was investigated by mutation analysis, including NF1, PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RAF1, SHOC2, SPRED1, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and CBL. All three families harbored a heterozygous NF1 variant, where the first family had a missense variant, c.5425C>T;p.R1809C, the second family a recurrent 4bp-deletion, c.6789_6792delTTAC;p.Y2264Tfs*6, and the third family a splice-site variant, c.2991-1G>A, resulting in skipping of exon 18 and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. These NF1 variants have all previously been reported in NF1 patients. Surprisingly, both c.6789_6792delTTAC and c.2991-1G>A are frequently associated with NF1, but association to NFNS has, to our knowledge, not previously been reported. Our results support the notion that NFNS represents a variant of NF1, genetically distinct from NS, and is caused by mutations in NF1, some of which also cause classical NF1. Due to phenotypic overlap between NFNS and NS, we propose screening for NF1 mutations in NS patients, preferentially when café-au-lait spots are present. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  18. Serum vitamin D and the metabolic syndrome among osteoporotic postmenopausal female patients of a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, Nada; Shroukh, Wejdan; Hijjawi, Razan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome are two common health issues worldwide. The association between these two health problems is subject to debate. This study aims to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome in a sample of osteoporotic postmenopausal women attending a family practice clinic in Amman-Jordan. This was an observational cross sectional study. It was carried out in the family practice clinic in Jordan University Hospital. The study included all postmenopausal osteoporotic women attending the clinic between June 2011 and May 2012, yielding a total of 326 subjects. The association between metabolic syndrome and serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Waist circumference, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting blood sugar were significantly higher among postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome, but HDL cholesterol was significantly lower (pmetabolic syndrome among all study participants was 42.9%. Triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among women deficiency or insufficiency (pmetabolic syndrome, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was 50.7%. Findings of the current study suggest a lack of relationship between serum vitamin D and metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between serum vitamin D levels and both serum triglycerides and LDL levels.

  19. Reverse-namaskar: A new sign in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A family pedigree study of four generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a rare group of inheritable connective tissue disorder of defective collagen. Skin, joints and blood vessels are most commonly affected. Clinical signs such as Gorlin sign and Metenier sign have been described in this syndrome. We report another new clinical sign called ′Reverse-Namaskar′ sign as an important clinical finding in EDS, based on the family pedigree study of the proband.

  20. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  1. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; McPhillips, Mary; Groombridge, Claire; Spigelman, Allan; Scott, Rodney J

    2010-05-21

    Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. A total of 78 participants (from 29 families) with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families) with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females) and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  2. A Mitochondrial Disorder in a Middle Age Iranian Patient: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Almasi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Though more commonly diagnosed during childhood, some cases of adult-onset MELAS syndrome are reported. This syndrome should be considered in patients with stroke-like events in adults without cerebrovascular risk factors and difficult-to-treat seizures.

  3. Comparison of clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients with colorectal cancer: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsubara, Nagahide; Ishikawa, Hideki; Arai, Masami; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of familial colorectal cancer type X are poorly defined. Here we aimed to clarify the differences in clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients. We performed germline mutation analyses of mismatch repair genes in 125 patients. Patients who met the Amsterdam Criteria I but lacked mismatch repair gene mutations were diagnosed with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. We identified 69 patients with Lynch syndrome and 25 with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. The frequencies of gastric and extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The number of organs with Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The cumulative incidence of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. We estimated that the median cancer risk in 60-year-old patients with Lynch syndrome was 89, 36 and 24% for colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancers, respectively. Analyses of family members, including probands, revealed that the median age at diagnosis of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly older with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The frequency of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. A significant difference in extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was evident between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations segregating Usher syndrome type 2 in a Han family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ling; Chen, Kaitian; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-11-01

    Identification of rare deafness genes for inherited congenital sensorineural hearing impairment remains difficult, because a large variety of genes are implicated. In this study we applied targeted capture and next-generation sequencing to uncover the underlying gene in a three-generation Han family segregating recessive inherited hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. After excluding mutations in common deafness genes GJB2, SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial gene, genomic DNA of the proband of a Han family was subjected to targeted next-generation sequencing. The candidate mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and subsequently analyzed with in silico tools. An unreported splice site mutation c.3924+1G > C compound with c.6028G > A in the MYO7A gene were detected to cosegregate with the phenotype in this pedigree. Both mutations, located in the evolutionarily conserved FERM domain in myosin VIIA, were predicted to be pathogenic. In this family, profound sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa without vestibular disorder, constituted the typical Usher syndrome type 2. Identification of novel mutation in compound heterozygosity in MYO7A gene revealed the genetic origin of Usher syndrome type 2 in this Han family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Two truncating USH3A mutations, including one novel, in a German family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Wilke, Robert; Lauhoff, Thomas; Lübben, Dirk; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2007-08-30

    To identify the genetic defect in a German family with Usher syndrome (USH) and linkage to the USH3A locus. DNA samples of five family members (both parents and the three patients) were genotyped with polymorphic microsatellite markers specific for eight USH genes. Three affected family members underwent detailed ocular and audiologic characterization. Symptoms in the patients were compatible with Usher syndrome and show intrafamilial variation, for both hearing loss (ranging from severe to profound with non-linear progression) and vision. Genotyping of microsatellite markers for the different USH loci was in line with a defect in the USH3A gene on chromosome 3q25. Sequence analysis of the USH3A gene revealed two truncating mutations; c.149_152delCAGGinsTGTCCAAT, which has been described previously, and a novel mutation, c.502_503insA, segregating with the phenotype. To date, only 11 USH3A mutations have been described. This is the first description of a German family with USH due to USH3A mutations, including one novel. Our findings indicate that also in the Central European population, USH3A mutations should be considered in cases of USH.

  6. A family with unusual Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to PAX 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpont, J W; St Jacques, D; Seaver, L H; Erickson, R P

    1995-03-01

    An unusual family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to the PAX 3 gene since there is an obligate crossover which has occurred between PAX 3 DNA markers and the disorder in this family. This family may also have anticipation of the WSI traits as the proband's grandmother is nonpenetrant, his mother has dystopia canthorum, and severe cleft lip (palate), while the proband has dystopia canthorum, severe cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease. Thus, a locus other than PAX 3 is implicated in this Waardenburg-like syndrome with Hirschsprung disease and cleft lip (palate).

  7. Evaluation of DNA Repair Function as a Predictor of Response in a Clinical Trial of PARP Inhibitor Monotherapy for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    tumors that occur in families with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, including pancreatic cancer, mela - noma, and prostate cancer, have also been reported.20...temozolomide in mela - noma, BC, glioblastoma, and acute leukemia, as well as with signal transduction inhibitors (eg, gefitinib in EGFR-mutant non–small

  8. Family factors, emotional functioning, and functional impairment in juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Lynch, Anne M; Slater, Shalonda; Graham, T Brent; Swain, Nicole F; Noll, Robert B

    2008-10-15

    Family factors and emotional functioning can play an important role in the ability of adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) to cope with their condition and function in their everyday lives. The primary objectives of this study were to determine 1) whether adolescents with JPFS and their caregivers differed from healthy age-matched comparison peers and their caregivers in terms of emotional distress and functional impairment; 2) whether there were any differences in the family environment of adolescents with JPFS compared with healthy comparison peers; and 3) which individual-, caregiver-, and family-level variables were associated with functional impairment in adolescents with JPFS. Participants were 47 adolescents with JPFS recruited from a pediatric rheumatology clinic and 46 comparison peers without chronic illness matched for age, sex, and race. Participants and their caregivers (all mothers) completed a battery of standardized measures administered in their homes. Adolescents with JPFS had greater internalizing and externalizing symptoms than healthy comparison peers. Mothers of adolescents with JPFS reported twice as many pain conditions and significantly greater depressive symptoms than mothers of comparison peers. The JPFS group also had poorer overall family functioning and more conflicted family relationships. In adolescents with JPFS, maternal pain history was associated with significantly higher functional impairment. Increased distress and chronic pain are evident in families of adolescents with JPFS, and family relationships are also impacted. Implications for child functional impairment and the need for inclusion of caregivers in treatment are discussed.

  9. Clinical and oral findings in an Afro-Brazilian family with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pierro, Viviane Santos; Marins, Marcello Roter; Borges de Oliveira, Renata Cabral; Cortezzi, Wladimir; Janini, Maria Elisa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) seems to be unusual in black persons. The authors present an Afro-Brazilian family case report of GGS. The main complaint of the index case was a painless swelling of the left mandible, which was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst. Further classical features of the Syndrome were present in this patient. Other two family members were diagnosed as cases of GGS and one of them presented 11 clinical findings characteristic of the syndrome. From the three cases reported, two of them presented five major diagnostic criteria for the GGS, and the diagnosis was only made because of an oral complaint. This case series emphasizes the importance of carefully examining the patient and close relatives for signs of GGS, even if they belong to an ethnic group in which this diagnosis is unusual. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T; Jenkins, Mark A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Kupfer, Sonia S

    2015-11-01

    African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence of and mortality resulting from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States. Few data are available on genetic and nongenetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC condition, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch syndrome. We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk, studying members of the mutation-carrying families. We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual, and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at 80 years of age were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%-83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%-76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44-56.5). We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1, some of which were found in multiple individuals and some that have not been previously reported. Differences in mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in a family from The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, A A; ten Brink, J; Schuurman, E J; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E M

    1994-05-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a Dutch family with Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome. Close linkage without recombination between NH and the Xp loci DXS207, DXS43, and DXS365 (zmax = 3.23) was observed. Multipoint linkage analysis and the analysis of recombinations in multiple informative meioses suggest the genetic order Xcen-DMD (exon 49)-DXS451-(NH, DXS207, DXS365, DXS43)-(STS, DXF30)-Xpter. These data refine the localization of the NH locus on the distal Xp.

  12. Family members and health professionals' perspectives on future life planning of ageing people with Down syndrome: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelli, Venusia; Raggi, Alberto; Paganelli, Chiara; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-08

    To address the way in which primary caregivers of people over 45 with Down syndrome describe daily life activities and context and foresee their future. Thirteen family members and 15 health professionals participated to four focus groups. Meaningful concepts were identified and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health using established linking rules. A total of 258 relevant concepts were identified and linked to 75 categories of the classification: 38 were from activity and participation and 17 from environmental factors domains. The most commonly reported issues were mental functions (b117-intellectual functions and b152-emotional functions), community life activities (d910-community life and d920-recreation and leisure) and environmental factors (e310-support of immediate family, e355-support from health professionals and e555-associations and organizational services). Information on the daily life and health of ageing people with Down syndrome is important to plan social and health care interventions tailored to deal with problems that they may encounter in older age. Considering the interaction between health and environment and maintaining a continuity of daily routines were reported as the most relevant topics for managing daily lives of persons with Down syndrome in older ages. Implications for rehabilitation Pay more attention to the interaction between environmental factors and health condition in ageing people with Down syndrome. Information about the life contest are important in order to plan present and future social-health care interventions. Future planning for people with Down syndrome is a great concern for family members.

  13. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Danping; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Juying; Duan, Zhanqi

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS). A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers. Results We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, Pjob satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, Pburnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties. Conclusions In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome in medical workers of southwest China. PMID:28207821

  14. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talseth-Palmer Bente A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. Methods A total of 78 participants (from 29 families with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Conclusion Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  15. Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells (UCOCGC) of the pancreas associated with the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorstra, Jan-Bart M.; Maitra, Anirban; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Drillenburg, Paul; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, Johan A.

    2008-01-01

    The familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome is caused by a germline mutation of p16. More than 90% of the sporadic pancreatic carcinomas contain genetic alterations that inactivate p16. Patients with the FAMMM syndrome have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Ductal

  16. Bilateral familial vertical Duane Syndrome with synergistic convergence, aberrant trigeminal innervation, and facial hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old girl presented with bilateral familial vertical  Duane retraction syndrome with alternating esotropia, elevation deficit, Marcus gunn phenomenon, and facial hypoplasia. Abnormal adducting downshoots on attempting abduction suggestive of a synergistic convergence were noted. Hypothesis suggests aberrant innervations or peripheral anatomic connections between inferior and medial recti.

  17. A family with Parkinsonism, essential tremor, restless legs syndrome, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Stoessl, A J; Kuriakose, R; Lash, J L; Searcy, J A; Strongosky, A J; Vilariño-Güell, C; Farrer, M J; Ross, O A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2011-05-10

    Previous epidemiologic and genetic studies have suggested a link between Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). We describe the clinical, PET, and pathologic characteristics of an extensive kindred from Arkansas with hereditary PD, ET, and RLS. The pedigree contains 138 individuals. Sixty-five family members were examined neurologically up to 3 times from 2004 to 2010. Clinical data were collected from medical records and questionnaires. Genetic studies were performed. Five family members underwent multitracer PET. Two individuals with PD were examined postmortem. Eleven family members had PD with generally mild and slowly progressive symptoms. Age at onset was between 39 and 74 years (mean 59.1, SD 13.4). All individuals treated with l-dopa responded positively. Postural or action tremor was present in 6 individuals with PD, and in 19 additional family members. Fifteen persons reported symptoms of RLS. PET showed reduced presynaptic dopamine function typical of sporadic PD in a patient with PD and ET, but not in persons with ET or RLS. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant for PD and RLS. No known pathogenic mutation in PD-related genes was found. Fourteen of the family members with PD, ET, or RLS had depression. Neuropathologic examination revealed pallidonigral pigment spheroid degeneration with ubiquitin-positive axonal spheroids, TDP43-positive pathology in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and brainstem, and only sparse Lewy bodies. Familial forms of PD, ET, RLS, and depression occur in this family. The genetic cause remains to be elucidated.

  18. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives.

  19. Family-based risk reduction of obesity and metabolic syndrome: an overview and outcomes of the Idaho Partnership for Hispanic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rachel; Powell, Linda; Keifer, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Mexican American women have the highest incidence of metabolic syndrome among all U.S. demographic groups. This paper details an innovative approach to reducing the risks for metabolic syndrome among Hispanic families in rural Idaho. Compañeros en Salud (CeS) is a promotora-led wellness program and community-based participatory research project from the Idaho Partnership for Hispanic Health. As behavior change is the first line of prevention and treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome, the program aimed to improve nutrition and physical activity behaviors as well as increase community support and infrastructure for healthy living. CeS has demonstrated substantial improvement in health outcomes, with statistically significant reductions in weight, BMI, metabolic syndrome risk, A1c, glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol, from pre-intervention to post-intervention and/or pre-intervention to one-year follow-up. These outcomes suggest the CeS model as a promising best practice for effecting individual and family-level physiologic and behavioral outcomes for obesity prevention.

  20. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  1. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    done in all sampled individuals in the family. The nuclear central loop in the five generation family showed homozygosity for a 6-Mb telomeric region on 11p15, whereas all other linkage regions were excluded by calculation of logarithm of odds (LOD) for the SNP microarray data. A maximum LOD score of Z......Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...

  2. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exome Analysis of a Family with Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome Identifies a Novel Disease Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E.; Jou, Chuanchau J.; Arrington, Cammon B.; Kennedy, Brett J.; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L.; Etheridge, Susan P.; Saarel, Elizabeth V.; Bleyl, Steven B.; Yost, H. Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5’ -AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. PMID:26284702

  4. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  5. Employment Impact and Financial Burden for Families of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, L.; Grosse, S.; Raspa, M.; Bailey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Method: Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were…

  6. Metabolic syndrome-related composite factors over 5 years in the STANISLAS family study: genetic heritability and common environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeth, Bernard; Samara, Anastasia; Ndiaye, Coumba; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Berrahmoune, Hind; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2010-06-03

    We estimated genetic heritability and common environmental influences for various traits related to metabolic syndrome in young families from France. At entrance and after 5 years, nineteen traits related to metabolic syndrome were measured in a sample of families drawn from the STANISLAS study. In addition, 5 aggregates of these traits were identified using factor analysis. At entrance, genetic heritability was high (20 to 44%) for plasma lipids and lipoproteins, uric acid, fasting glucose, and the related clusters "risk lipids" and "protective lipids". Intermediate or low genetic heritability (less than 20%) was shown for triglycerides, adiposity indices, blood pressure, hepatic enzyme activity, inflammatory makers and the related clusters: "liver enzymes", "adiposity/blood pressure" and "inflammation". Moreover, common environmental influences were significant for all the parameters. With regard to 5-year changes, polygenic variance was low and not statistically significant for any of the individual variables or clusters whereas shared environment influence was significant. In these young families, genetic heritability of metabolic syndrome-related traits was generally lower than previously reported while the common environmental influences were greater. In addition, only shared environment contributed to short-term changes of these traits. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of a rare variant (c.2635-2A>G) of the MSH2 gene in a family with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariola, Filomena; Disciglio, Vittoria; Valentini, Anna M; Lotesoriere, Claudio; Fasano, Candida; Forte, Giovanna; Russo, Luciana; Di Carlo, Antonio; Guglielmi, Floranna; Manghisi, Andrea; Lolli, Ivan; Caruso, Maria L; Simone, Cristiano

    2018-04-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes ( MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) or in the EPCAM gene. Lynch syndrome is defined on the basis of clinical, pathological, and genetic findings. Accordingly, the identification of predisposing genes allows for accurate risk assessment and tailored screening protocols. Here, we report a family case with three family members manifesting the Lynch syndrome phenotype, all of which harbor the rare variant c.2635-2A>G affecting the splice site consensus sequence of intron 15 of the MSH2 gene. This mutation was previously described only in one family with Lynch syndrome, in which mismatch repair protein expression in tumor tissues was not assessed. In this study, we report for the first time the molecular characterization of the MSH2 c.2635-2A>G variant through in silico prediction analysis, microsatellite instability, and mismatch repair protein expression experiments on tumor tissues of Lynch syndrome patients. The potential effect of the splice site variant was revealed by three splicing prediction bioinformatics tools, which suggested the generation of a new cryptic splicing site. The potential pathogenic role of this variant was also revealed by the presence of microsatellite instability and the absence of MSH2/MSH6 heterodimer protein expression in the tumor cells of cancer tissues of the affected family members. We provide compelling evidence in favor of the pathogenic role of the MSH2 variant c.2635-2A>G, which could induce an alteration of the canonical splice site and consequently an aberrant form of the protein product (MSH2).

  8. Causes of Cancer Death Among First-Degree Relatives in Japanese Families with Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanakaya, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Hinoi, Takao; Furukawa, Yoichi; Hirata, Keiji; Saida, Yoshihisa; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Arai, Masami; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the causes of cancer death in Japanese families with Lynch syndrome (LS). The distributions of cancer deaths in 485 individuals from 67 families with LS (35, 30, and two families with MutL homologue 1 (MLH1), MSH2, and MSH6 gene mutations, respectively), obtained from the Registry of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum were analyzed. Among 98 cancer deaths of first-degree relatives of unknown mutation status, 53%, 19%, 13% (among females), 7% (among females) and 5% were due to colorectal, gastric, uterine, ovarian, and hepatobiliary cancer, respectively. The proportion of deaths from extra-colonic cancer was significantly higher in families with MSH2 mutation than in those with MLH1 mutation (p=0.003). In addition to colonic and uterine cancer, management and surveillance targeting gastric, ovarian and hepatobiliary cancer are considered important for Japanese families with LS. Extra-colonic cancer in families with MSH2 mutation might require for more intensive surveillance. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. A Mitochondrial Disorder in a Middle Age Iranian Patient: Report of a Rare Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Mostafa; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Mehrpour, Masoud; Haghi-Ashtiani, Bahram; Haji Akhondi, Fahimeh; Nilipour, Yalda; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) can involve multiple systems and cause stroke-like episodes and status epilepticus. Case Presentation: A 48-year-old female with history of early fatigability, migraine-type headaches, and bilateral sensory-neural hearing loss presented 3 episodes of serial seizures. On admission she was affected by Wernicke aphasia and, then, right hemiparesis. Investigations showed elevated arterial lactate and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. Conclusion: Though more commonly diagnosed during childhood, some cases of adult-onset MELAS syndrome are reported. This syndrome should be considered in patients with stroke-like events in adults without cerebrovascular risk factors and difficult-to-treat seizures. PMID:29158884

  10. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hi Cho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  11. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  12. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  13. A family with Wagner syndrome with uveitis and a new versican mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Brézin, Antoine P; Nedelec, Brigitte; Burin des Roziers, Cyril; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Orhant, Lucie; Boimard, Mathieu; Valleix, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    To report the clinical and molecular findings of a kindred with Wagner syndrome (WS) revealed by intraocular inflammatory features. Eight available family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including laser flare cell meter measurements. Collagen, type II, alpha 1, versican (VCAN), frizzled family receptor 4, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, tetraspanin 12, and Norrie disease (pseudoglioma) genes were screened with direct sequencing. The index case was initially referred for unexplained severe and chronic postoperative bilateral uveitis following a standard cataract surgery procedure. Clinical examination of the proband revealed an optically empty vitreous with avascular vitreous strands and veils, features highly suggestive of WS. The systematic familial ophthalmologic examination identified three additional unsuspected affected family members who also presented with the WS phenotype, including uveitis for one of them. We identified a novel c.4004-6T>A nucleotide substitution at the acceptor splice site of intron 7 of the VCAN gene that segregated with the disease phenotype. We present a family with WS with typical WS features and intraocular inflammatory manifestations associated with a novel splice site VCAN mutation. Beyond the structural role in the retinal-vitreous architecture, versican is also emerging as a pivotal mediator of the inflammatory response, supporting uveitis predisposition as a clinical manifestation of WS.

  14. Gain of chromosomal region 20q and loss of 18 discriminates between Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Jönsson, Göran; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X, FCCTX, represent the two predominant colorectal cancer syndromes. Whereas Lynch syndrome is clinically and genetically well defined, the genetic cause of FCCTX is unknown and genomic differences between Lynch syndrome and FCCTX tumours...... are largely unknown. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridisation to 23 colorectal cancers from FCCTX with comparison to 23 Lynch syndrome tumours and to 45 sporadic colorectal cancers. FCCTX tumours showed genomic complexity with frequent gains on chromosomes 20q, 19 and 17 and losses of 18, 8p...... and 15. Gain of genetic material in two separate regions encompassing, 20q12-13.12 and 20q13.2-13.32, was identified in 65% of the FCCTX tumours. Gain of material on chromosome 20q and loss on chromosome 18 significantly discriminated colorectal cancers associated with FCCTX from Lynch syndrome, which...

  15. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  16. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot); S.E. Korsse (Susanne); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); K. Vanheusden (Kathleen); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPeutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and

  17. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and family planning: the attitude towards prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, Margot G. F.; Korsse, Susanne E.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Vanheusden, Kathleen; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Wagner, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a hereditary disorder caused by LKB1 gene mutations, and is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy. This study was conducted to assess the attitude of PJS patients towards family planning, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and pregnancy

  18. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Yang

    Full Text Available Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China.This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS. A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers.We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, P<0.001, R2 = 0.054, and that work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, P<0.001, R2 = 0.080, 5.7% (F = 9.532, P<0.001, R2 = 0.137 and 17.8% (F = 21.608, P<0.001, R2 = 0.315 of the variance, respectively. In the fourth stage of analysis, female gender and a lower technical title correlated to a higher level of burnout syndrome, and medical workers without administrative duties had more serious burnout syndrome than those with administrative duties.In conclusion, the present study suggests that work-family conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome

  19. New autosomal recessive faciodigitogenital syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Teebi, A S; Naguib, K K; Al-Awadi, S; Al-Saleh, Q A

    1988-01-01

    Most pedigrees of Aarskog's faciodigitogenital syndrome have suggested X linked inheritance. However, sex influenced autosomal dominant inheritance is also a possibility in some families. We describe an Arab family of normal consanguineous parents with five children (three males and two females) with some features of Aarskog syndrome in addition to some unusual hair changes. The possibility that this family represents a distinct previously unrecognised faciodigitogenital syndrome with short s...

  20. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A Associated with Usher syndrome 1 in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Wang, Guo-Jian; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Xin, Feng; Han, Ming-Yu; Lu, Jing-Qiao; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Fei; Xu, Jin-Cao; Zhang, Mei-Guang; Dong, Jiang; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, age-dependent retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. The most severe form is Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1). Mutations in the MYO7A gene are responsible for USH1 and account for 29-55% of USH1 cases. Here, we characterized a Chinese family (no. 7162) with USH1. Combining the targeted capture of 131 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis, we identified two deleterious compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO7A gene: a reported missense mutation c.73G>A (p.G25R) and a novel nonsense mutation c.462C>A (p.C154X). The two compound variants are absent in 219 ethnicity-matched controls, co-segregates with the USH clinical phenotypes, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and age-dependent penetrance of progressive RP, in family 7162. Therefore, we concluded that the USH1 in this family was caused by compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A.

  1. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A Associated with Usher syndrome 1 in a Chinese family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, age-dependent retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. The most severe form is Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1. Mutations in the MYO7A gene are responsible for USH1 and account for 29-55% of USH1 cases. Here, we characterized a Chinese family (no. 7162 with USH1. Combining the targeted capture of 131 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis, we identified two deleterious compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO7A gene: a reported missense mutation c.73G>A (p.G25R and a novel nonsense mutation c.462C>A (p.C154X. The two compound variants are absent in 219 ethnicity-matched controls, co-segregates with the USH clinical phenotypes, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and age-dependent penetrance of progressive RP, in family 7162. Therefore, we concluded that the USH1 in this family was caused by compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A.

  2. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Segovia, I; Gallowitsch, H J; Kresnik, E; Kumnig, G; Mikosch, P; Lind, P [Dept.of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-09-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  3. Cushing's Syndrome caused by pigmented adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia - A familial case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Segovia, I.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Kumnig, G.; Mikosch, P.; Lind, P.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: We present a Case of Cushing's syndrome (CS) in a 16 year old male adolescent. Adrenocortical micro nodular dysplasia is a rare cause of CS. It mostly develops in the first two decades of life. In pathogenesis a stimulatory effect of circulating Immunoglobulins on adrenal steroidogenesis has been postulated. Familial cases have been reported in relation to Carney's Syndrome. We report the clinical case at first diagnosis and preoperative follow up of 1 year prior to treatment. The leading symptoms were severe bilateral (fibrotic) gynaecomastia, weight gain and growth retardation, without hypertension,but osteoporosis, secondary hypogonadism and glucose intolerance. Laboratory findings and the results of functional tests were diagnostic for CS. In addition LDH (I-131 Isotopes), CK, Lipoproteins, GPT, Androstendion, Prolactin were elevated. MRI abdomen revealed a slight enlargement of the adrenals, and suspected a bilateral micro nodular dysplasia. Iodo-cholesterol-scan under dexamethason suppression showed a diffuse bilateral Iodo-cholesterol uptake confirming the autonomous production of cortisol bilateral in the adrenals.Whole body bone scan showed a diffuse reduced diphosphonate uptake in the skeleton and the growth plates. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced.Radiologically osteoporosis was overt. The rapid increase of free urinary cortisol excretion/24h within one year of observation led to a total bilateral adrenalectomy. Postoperative 5 year follow up examinations. Documentation of the outcome and recovery of clinical signs,symptoms and laboratory findings, discussion about the most appropriate long-term substitution therapy. Familial anamnesis:affected family member was the father (micro nodular bilateral adrenocortical dysplasia), the aunt (pararenal incidentaloma, histologically lipoma) and a cousin (micro nodular adrenocortical dysplasia). Sequential analysis of the menin gene from the patient was negative.The detection of

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling in a case of spina bifida in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujat, Annegret; Veith, Veit-Peter; Faber, Renaldo; Froster, Ursula G

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS I) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with an incidence of 1:45,000 in Europe. Mutations within the PAX3 gene are responsible for the clinical phenotype ranging from mild facial features to severe malformations detectable in prenatal diagnosis. Here, we report a four-generation family with several affected members showing various symptoms of WS I. We diagnosed the syndrome first in a pregnant young woman; she was referred because of a spina bifida in prenatal diagnosis. We performed clinical genetic investigations and molecular genetic analysis in all available family members. The phenotype displays a wide intra-familial clinical variability of pigmentary disturbances, facial anomalies and developmental defects. Molecular studies identified a novel splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene in intron 5 in all affected family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives. This case demonstrates the prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida in a fetus which leads to the initial diagnosis of WS I. Further studies could identify a private splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene responsible for the phenotype in this family.

  5. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-11-01

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10 -7 ), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (P Trend =4.43×10 -6 ), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (P Trend ≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Work-family spillover and metabolic syndrome indicators: Findings from a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versey, H Shellae; Tan, Mingxuan

    2018-03-01

    This study examines the link between negative work-family spillover and metabolic risk factors over a 9-year period. Data from two waves of the Midlife in the United States Survey were used to explore relationships between negative work-family spillover and four indicators of metabolic syndrome-blood pressure, triglycerides, body mass index, and glucose levels. In a sample of full-time working men and women ( N = 630), increased negative spillover at baseline significantly predicted higher body mass index nearly a decade later, with a marginally significant effect for triglyceride levels. Increases in spillover also body mass index and glucose levels at follow-up. This study extends research tying work-life spillover to health and suggests that further investigation is needed to fully understand the long-term effects of work stress.

  7. Papillon-Lefévre Syndrome: Report of Two Cases in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents two cases of Papillon-Lefévre syndrome (PLS affecting two girls among five siblings belonging to a south Indian Muslim family. The patients were 12 and 14 years old. The patients presented with palmar-plantar hyperkeratosis which started around the age of two years. The elder patient was edentulous due to severe destructive periodontitis causing premature loss of teeth. The younger patient had severe destructive periodontitis with multiple periodontal abscess and loose teeth.

  8. GATA3 mutation in a family with hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zi-Yang; Zhou, Qiao-Li; Ni, Shi-Ning; Gu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by GATA3 gene mutation. We report here a case that both of a Chinese boy and his father had HDR syndrome which caused by a novel mutation of GATA3. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing was performed to detect the exons of the GATA3 gene for mutation analysis. Sequence analysis of GATA3 revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in this family: a mutation of GATA3 at exon 2 (c.515C >A) that resulted in a premature stop at codon 172 (p.S172X) with a loss of two zinc finger domains. We identified a novel nonsense mutation which will expand the spectrum of HDR-associated GATA3 mutations.

  9. Prenatal detection of congenital bilateral cataract leading to the diagnosis of Nance-Horan syndrome in the extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Adi; Yaron, Yuval; Burdon, Kathryn; Crystal-Shalit, Ornit; Kidron, Dvora; Malcov, Mira; Tepper, Ron

    2007-07-01

    To describe a family in which it was possible to perform prenatal diagnosis of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS). The fetus was evaluated by 2nd trimester ultrasound. The family underwent genetic counseling and ophthalmologic evaluation. The NHS gene was sequenced. Ultrasound demonstrated fetal bilateral congenital cataract. Clinical evaluation revealed other family members with cataract, leading to the diagnosis of NHS in the family. Sequencing confirmed a frameshift mutation (3908del11bp) in the NHS gene. Evaluation of prenatally diagnosed congenital cataract should include a multidisciplinary approach, combining experience and input from sonographer, clinical geneticist, ophthalmologist, and molecular geneticist.

  10. Stigma in Iranian Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahel Hemmati

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stigma is a negative value. Many behaviors are to ward Stigmatized people. Down syndrome is one of conditions with Stigma. The aim of this study is to determine the sources of labeling in iranian Down syndrome. Methods: The View of 105 Down syndrome families concerning stigma were conducted. All of Down syndrome was under 50 years. Results: A fair proportion of Down syndrome families perceived that stigma had a negative effect from social. Causes of stigma are different. Stigma due social interaction, Media and health professionals are significant than others. Discussion: The diagnostic label of Down syndrome may render the person and his family vulnerable to stigmatization. The most causes of stigma were determined therefore, in the destigmatization programs, they must be attended. Stigma must be detected, too.

  11. Identification of two novel compound heterozygous mutations of ADGRV1 in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type IIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Shuting; Liu, Mugen; Jiang, Fagang

    2018-06-08

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in a Chinese family with three sibs diagnosed with Usher syndrome type IIC. Four members received ophthalmic and otologic tests to ascertain the clinical characteristics. According to the clinical phenotype, we focused attention on a total of 658 genes associated with them. We screened the possible pathogenic mutation sites, used Sanger to exclude the false positive and verified whether there were co-segregated among the family members. Typical fundus features found in the proband supported the diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Audiometric test indicated moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment while the vestibular function was normal. Whole-exome sequencing identified the presence of two novel compound heterozygous mutations in ADGRV1, a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type IIC. Mutationc.15008delG/p.Gly5003AlafsTer13 was inherited from the mother while c.18383_18386dupACAG/p.His6130GlnfsTer84 was inherited from the father, and they were co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. The mutations found in our study not only broaden the mutation spectrum of ADGRV1, but also provide assistances for future genetic diagnosis and treatment for Usher syndrome patients.

  12. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson PA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Gibson Epilepsy Information Service, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives. Keywords: health-related quality of life, HRQL, epilepsy, relatives, siblings

  13. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-08-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  14. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-01-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  15. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  16. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  17. Peculiarities of family doctors' medical assistance for persons with 'Chernobyl syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margine, Le.; Tintiuc, D.; Grejdeanu, T.; Margine, Lu.; Badan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Medical and social protection and rehabilitation of patients with 'Chernobyl syndrome' is provided by legislation of the Republic of Moldova, which is reflected in a comprehensive action plan for rehabilitation and protection of this category of citizens. This plan includes such medical activities as detailed medical ambulatory and stationary examination, purchase prescription drugs, annual sanatorium treatment, annual compensation recovery in the value of 2 average monthly salaries for health improvement. The role of family doctors' medical assistance for persons suffered due to the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is very important in this plan implementation.

  18. Familial gigantism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  19. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  20. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Goldstein, Nurit; Shpirer, Zvi; van Bokhoven, Hans; Anikster, Yair

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish descent, in which the index patient presented with a persistent scalp skin lesion, dystrophic nails and light thin hair. Further evaluation revealed over 10 affected individuals in the kindred, over four generations, exhibiting varying degrees of ectodermal involvement. Analysis of the TP63 gene from four of the patients and from two healthy individuals of the same family was performed. Gene sequencing of the patients revealed a nonsense mutation leading to a premature termination codon (PTC) (p.Gln16X). The same mutation was found in all tested affected individuals in the family, but gave rise to marked phenotypic variability with minor clinical manifestations in some individuals, underscoring the clinical heterogeneity associated with the recently described PTC-causing mutations.

  1. Systems biological approach to investigate the lack of familial link between Down's Syndrome & Neural Tube Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragunath, Pk; Abhinand, Pa

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biology involves the study of the interactions of biological systems and ultimately their functions. Down's syndrome (DS) is one of the most common genetic disorders which are caused by complete, or occasionally partial, triplication of chromosome 21, characterized by cognitive and language dysfunction coupled with sensory and neuromotor deficits. Neural Tube Disorders (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system and neighboring structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy usually occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Several studies in the past have provided considerable evidence that abnormal folate and methyl metabolism are associated with onset of DS & NTDs. There is a possible common etiological pathway for both NTDs and Down's syndrome. But, various research studies over the years have indicated very little evidence for familial link between the two disorders. Our research aimed at the gene expression profiling of microarray datasets pertaining to the two disorders to identify genes whose expression levels are significantly altered in these conditions. The genes which were 1.5 fold unregulated and having a p-value disorders were recognized and over representation analysis was carried out for each of the constituent genes. The comprehensive manual analysis of these genes yields a hypothetical understanding of the lack of familial link between DS and NTDs. There were no genes involved with folic acid present in the dense cliques. Only - CBL, EGFR genes were commonly present, which makes the allelic variants of these genes - good candidates for future studies regarding the familial link between DS and NTDs. NTD - Neural Tube Disorders, DS - Down's Syndrome, MTHFR - Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, MTRR- 5 - methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase.

  2. A novel missense mutation of the paired box 3 gene in a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Filiz; Ozturk, A Taylan; Adibelli, Hamit; Unal, Nurettin; Tukun, Ajlan

    2013-01-01

    Screening of mutations in the paired box 3 (PAX3) gene in three generations of a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 13-month-old girl according to the WS Consortium criteria. Detailed family history of the proband revealed eight affected members in three generations. Routine clinical and audiological examination and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on eight affected and five healthy members of the study family. Dystopia canthorum was detected in all affected patients; however, a brilliant blue iris was present in five patients who also had mild retinal hypopigmentation. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of affected and unaffected individuals in the family as well as 50 unrelated healthy volunteers. All coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were sequenced directly. A novel missense heterozygous c.788T>G mutation was identified in eight patients. This nucleotide alteration was not found in unaffected members of the study family or in the 50 unrelated control subjects. The mutation causes V263G amino-acid substitution in the homeodomain of the PAX3 protein, which represents the 45(th) residue of helix 3. We identified a novel missense c.788T>G mutation in PAX3 in a family with Waardenburg syndrome with intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity.

  3. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  4. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis on imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieraerts, Christopher; Demaerel, Philippe; Van Damme, Philip; Wilms, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome mimicked the clinical and radiological signs of herpes simplex encephalitis. In a patient with subacute encephalopathy, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, lesions were present in both temporal lobes extending to both insular regions with sparing of the lentiform nuclei and in both posterior straight and cingulate gyri. Final diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome was based on biochemical investigations on cerebrospinal fluid, electromyogram, muscle biopsy, and genetic analysis. On diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion restriction was present in some parts of the lesions but not throughout the entire lesions. We suggest that this could be an important sign in the differential diagnosis with herpes simplex encephalitis.

  5. Waardenburg syndrome with familial unilateral renal agenesis: a new syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katie M; Smith, Alisha J; Dansby, Linda M; Diskin, Charles J

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old man with Waardenburg syndrome presented with anuria and was subsequently discovered by renal ultrasound to have unilateral renal agenesis. The patient is one of three generations with incidental finding of renal agenesis also marked by the presence of Waardenburg syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been no mention elsewhere in the scientific literature of a variant of Waardenburg syndrome with associated renal agenesis. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  6. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers and Siblings in Families of Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Hastings, Richard P.; Felce, David; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Few published studies have reported on the psychological well-being of family members of individuals with Rett syndrome (RTT). Eighty-seven mothers of girls and women with RTT completed a questionnaire survey about their daughters' behavioral phenotype, current health, and behavior problems, and their own and a sibling's well-being. Mothers…

  7. Two co-existing germline mutations P53 V157D and PMS2 R20Q promote tumorigenesis in a familial cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoyun; Sun, Yihua; Gao, Bin; Lu, Yi; Fang, Rong; Gao, Yijun; Xiao, Tian; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Pao, William; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Haiquan; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations are responsible for familial cancer syndromes which account for approximately 5-10% of all types of cancers. These mutations mainly occur at tumor suppressor genes or genome stability genes, such as DNA repair genes. Here we have identified a cancer predisposition family, in which eight members were inflicted with a wide spectrum of cancer including one diagnosed with lung cancer at 22years old. Sequencing analysis of tumor samples as well as histologically normal specimens identified two germline mutations co-existing in the familial cancer syndrome, the mutation of tumor suppressor gene P53 V157D and mismatch repair gene PMS2 R20Q. We further demonstrate that P53 V157D and/or PMS2 R20Q mutant promotes lung cancer cell proliferation. These two mutants are capable of promoting colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor formation in transgenic drosophila system. Collectively, these data have uncovered the important role of co-existing germline P53 and PMS2 mutations in the familial cancer syndrome development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cockayne syndrome: report of a Brazilian family with confirmation of impaired RNA synthesis after UV-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Simone M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dwarfism, growth deficiency, neurological deterioration, skin photosensitivity and a characteristic progressive facial appearance. In the present study we report the first Brazilian CS family in which diagnosis was confirmed by the demonstration of decreased RNA synthesis in cultured fibroblasts exposed to UV-C radiation. Despite the progressive course of the disease and the unavailability of an effective treatment, diagnosis may be very important for the benefits to be gained by the afflicted family from genetic counseling and/or prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support and job satisfaction to burnout syndrome among medical workers in southwest China: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Danping; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Juying; Duan, Zhanqi

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a psychosomatic syndrome widely observed in Chinese medical workers due to the increasing cost of medical treatment, excessive workload, and excessive prescribing behavior. No studies have evaluated the interrelationship among occupational burnout, work-family conflict, social support, and job satisfaction in medical workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate these relationships among medical workers in southwest China. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2013 and December 2013, and was based on the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS). A total of 1382 medical workers were enrolled in the study. Pearson correlation analysis and general linear model univariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship of work-family conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction with burnout syndrome in medical workers. We observed that five dimensions of job satisfaction and self-reported social support were negatively associated with burnout syndrome, whereas three dimensions of work-family conflict showed a positive correlation. In a four-stage general linear model analysis, we found that demographic factors accounted for 5.4% of individual variance in burnout syndrome (F = 4.720, Pfamily conflict, self-reported social support, and job satisfaction accounted for 2.6% (F = 5.93, Pfamily conflict and self-reported social support slightly affect the level of burnout syndrome, and that job satisfaction is a much stronger influence on burnout syndrome in medical workers of southwest China.

  10. [Triplet expansion cytosine-guanine-guanine: Three cases of OMIM syndrome in the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Jesús; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Fuertes-Rodrigo, Cristina; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; López-Pisón, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic increase in the number of triplet repeats of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) in the FMR1 gene mutation is responsible for three OMIM syndromes with a distinct clinical phenotype: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and two pathologies in adult carriers of the premutation (55-200 CGG repeats): Primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) associated with FXS. CGG mutation dynamics of the FMR1 gene were studied in DNA samples from peripheral blood from the index case and other relatives of first, second and third degree by TP-PCR, and the percentage methylation. Diagnosis of FXS was confirmed in three patients (21.4%), eight patients (57.1%) were confirmed in the premutation range transmitters, one male patient with full mutation/permutation mosaicism (7.1%) and two patients (14.3%) with normal study. Of the eight permutated patients, three had FXPOI and one male patient had FXTAS. Our study suggests the importance of making an early diagnosis of SXF in order to carry out a family study and genetic counselling, which allow the identification of new cases or premutated patients with FMR1 gene- associated syndromes (FXTAS, FXPOI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic counseling in Usher syndrome: linkage and mutational analysis of 10 Colombian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, M L; Lopez, G; Gelvez, N; Medina, D; Kimberling, W J; Rodríguez, V; Tamayo, G E; Bernal, J E

    2008-01-01

    Usher Syndrome (US), an autosomal recessive disease, is characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), vestibular dysfunction, and congenital sensorineural deafness. There are three recognized clinical types of the disorder. In order to improve genetic counseling for affected families, we conducted linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in 10 Colombian families with confirmed diagnosis of US (4 type I and 6 type II). Seventy-five percent of the US1 families showed linkage to locus USH1B, while the remaining 25% showed linkage to loci USH1B and USH1C. Among families showing linkage to USH1B we found two different mutations in the MYO7A gene: IVS42-26insTTGAG in exon 43 (heterozygous state) and R634X (CGA-TGA) in exon 16 (homozygous state). All six US2 families showed linkage to locus USH2A. Of them, 4 had c.2299delG mutation (1 homozygote state and 3 heterozygous); in the remaining 2 we did not identify any pathologic DNA variant. USH2A individuals with a 2299delG mutation presented a typical and homogeneous retinal phenotype with bilateral severe hearing loss, except for one individual with a heterozygous 2299delG mutation, whose hearing loss was asymmetric, but more profound than in the other cases. The study of these families adds to the genotype-phenotype characterization of the different types and subtypes of US and facilitates genetic counseling in these families. We would like to emphasize the need to perform DNA studies as a prerequisite for genetic counseling in affected families.

  12. Seven novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjun; Dai, Hanjun; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohui; Dong, Bing; Li, Yang

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in one Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and in three unrelated Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). One family (FR1) with arRP and three unrelated families (F6, F7, and F8) with Usher syndrome (USH), including eight affected members and seven unaffected family individuals were examined clinically. The study included 100 normal Chinese individuals as normal controls. After obtaining informed consent, peripheral blood samples from all participants were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genotyping and haplotyping analyses were performed on the known genetic loci for arRP with a panel of polymorphic markers in family FR1. In all four families, the coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of the USH2A (Usher syndrome type -2A protein) gene, was screened by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, or high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) was performed on all available family members and on the 100 normal controls. The affected individuals presented with typical fundus features of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), including narrowing of the vessels, bone-spicule pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The electroretinogram (ERG) wave amplitudes of the available probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests in the affected individuals in family FR1 were normal, while indicating moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment in the affected individuals in families F6, F7, and F8. Vestibular function was normal in all patients from all four families. The disease-causing gene in family FR1 was mapped to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Seven novel mutations (two missenses, one 7-bp deletion, two small deletions, and two nonsenses) were detected in the four families after sequencing analysis of

  13. A novel mutation of PAX3 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Shu, Anli; Qian, Xueqing; Gao, Jianjun; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Yonglan; Li, Xingwang; Li, Sheng; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin

    2006-08-28

    The molecular characterization of 34 members of a Chinese family, with 22 members in four generations, affected with Waardenburg syndrome (WS1). A detailed family history and clinical data were collected. A genome-wide scan by two-point linkage analysis using more than 400 microsatellite markers in combination with haplotype analysis was performed. Mutation screening was carried out in the candidate gene by sequencing of amplified products. A maximum two-point lod score of 6.53 at theta = 0.00 was obtained with marker D2S2248. Haplotype analysis placed the WS1 locus to a 45.74 cM region between D2S117 and D2S206, in close proximity to the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q35. Mutation screening in PAX3 identified a 701T > C mutation which converted a highly conserved Leu to Pro. This nucleotide alteration was neither seen in unaffected members of the family nor found in 50 unrelated control subjects. The present study identified a novel 701T > C mutation in PAX3. The mutation observed in this family highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder.

  14. Family history of type 2 diabetes and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adult Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mithun; Pal, Susil; Ghosh, Arnab

    2012-04-01

    Our objective was to test the association between familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in adult Asian Indians. A total of 448 adult (>30 years) individuals (257 males and 191 females) participated in the study. Familial risk of T2DM was classified into three groups viz., 1=both parents affected; 2=parent and/or siblings affected and 3=none or no family history for T2DM. Anthropometric measures, blood pressures, fasting blood glucose and metabolic profiles were studied using standard techniques. MS was defined accordingly. The prevalence of MS phenotypes was estimated and compared among the three familial risk strata. Individuals with a history of both parents affected from diabetes had significantly higher (Pfamily history of T2DM. Significant difference was also noticed between individuals with and without MS according to the family history of diabetes (Pfamily history of T2DM. Family history of T2DM had significant effect on individuals with MS as compared to their counterparts (individuals having no family history of T2DM). It therefore seems reasonable to argue that family history of T2DM could be useful as a predictive tool for early diagnosis and prevention of MS in Asian Indian population.

  15. Clinical, Cytogenetic, and Biochemical Analyses of a Family with a t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2: Further Delineation of 3q Duplication Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abreu-González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities that result in genomic imbalances are a major cause of congenital and developmental anomalies. Partial duplication of chromosome 3q syndrome is a well-described condition, and the phenotypic manifestations include a characteristic facies, microcephaly, hirsutism, synophrys, broad nasal bridge, congenital heart disease, genitourinary disorders, and mental retardation. Approximately 60%–75% of cases are derived from a balanced translocation. We describe a family with a pure typical partial trisomy 3q syndrome derived from a maternal balanced translocation t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2. As the chromosomal rearrangement involves the short arm of an acrocentric chromosome, the phenotype corresponds to a pure trisomy 3q26.2-qter syndrome. There are 4 affected individuals and several carriers among three generations. The report of this family is relevant because there are few cases of pure duplication 3q syndrome reported, and the cases described here contribute to define the phenotype associated with the syndrome. Furthermore, we confirmed that the survival until adulthood is possible. This report also identified the presence of glycosaminoglycans in urine in this family, not related to the chromosomal abnormality or the phenotype.

  16. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Rett Syndrome Handbook Called the “Rett Syndrome Bible”, all the information you need for your journey- available in PDF version. Purchase a hard copy Get 1:1 Support Connect with our Family Empowerment Team , join a special interest network More forms of support Find your Family Empowerment ...

  17. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M. [ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  18. Molekulargenetische Charakterisierung einer Familie mit Usher-Syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, AJ; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Birkenhäger, R

    2009-01-01

    Einleitung: Das Usher-Syndrom definiert eine genetisch und klinisch heterogene autosomal rezessiv vererbte Erkrankung mit dem gleichzeitigen Auftreten von Innenohrschwerhörigkeit bis hin zur Taubheit, teilweise Vestibularisausfall und Netzhautdegeneration (Retinitis Pigmentosa). Bisher wird das Usher-Syndrom in drei verschiedene Hauptgruppen (USH1-3) mit unterschiedlicher phänotypischer Ausprägung eingeteilt. Für das Usher-Syndrom sind 12 Genorte bekannt, für die bereits acht Gene identifizi...

  19. A possible new syndrome with growth-hormone secreting pituitary adenoma, colonic polyposis, lipomatosis, lentigines and renal carcinoma in association with familial testicular germ cell malignancy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Phuong L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ-cell testicular cancer has not been definitively linked to any known hereditary cancer susceptibility disorder. Familial testicular cancer in the presence of other findings in affected and unaffected family members might indicate a previously-unidentified hereditary cancer syndrome. Case presentation The patient was diagnosed with a left testicular seminoma at age 28, and treated with left orchiectomy followed by adjuvant cobalt radiation. His family history is significant for testicular seminoma in his son, bladder cancer in his sister, and lipomatosis in his father. His evaluation as part of an etiologic study of familial testicular cancer revealed multiple colon polyps (adenomatous, hyperplastic, and hamartomatous first found in his 50 s, multiple lipomas, multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions, left kidney cancer diagnosed at age 64, and a growth-hormone producing pituitary adenoma with associated acromegaly diagnosed at age 64. The patient underwent genetic testing for Cowden syndrome (PTEN gene, Carney complex (PRKAR1A gene, and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1 gene; no deleterious mutations were identified. Discussion The constellation of benign and malignant neoplasms in the context of this patient's familial testicular cancer raised the possibility that these might be manifestations of a known hereditary susceptibility cancer syndrome; however, genetic testing for the three syndromes that were most likely to explain these findings did not show any mutation. Alternatively, this family's phenotype might represent a novel neoplasm susceptibility disorder. This possibility cannot be evaluated definitively on the basis of a single case report; additional observations and studies are necessary to investigate this hypothesis further.

  20. Chromosomal fragility syndrome and family history of radiosensitivity as indicators for radiotherapy dose modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi; Story, Michael D.; Maor, Moshe H.; Geara, Fady B.; Brock, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Beside a few known radiosensitive syndromes, a patient's reaction to radiotherapy is difficult to predict. In this report we describe the management of a pediatric cancer patient presented with a family history of radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. Laboratory investigations revealed a chromosomal fragility syndrome and an increased cellular radiosensitivity in vitro. AT gene sequencing revealed no mutations. The patient was treated with reduced radiation doses to avoid the presumed increased risks of toxicity to normal tissues. The patient tolerated well the treatment with no significant acute or late radiation sequelae. Five years later, the patient remains both disease and complications free. While an accurate laboratory test for radiosensitivity is still lacking, assessments of chromosomal fragility, cell survival and clinical medicine will continue to be useful for a small number of patients

  1. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hearing impairment caused by mutations in two different genes responsible for nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss within a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepokój, Katarzyna; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Jurczak, Piotr; Kujko, Aleksandra A; Śniegórska, Dominika; Sawicka, Justyna; Grabarczyk, Alicja; Bal, Jerzy; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna

    2018-02-01

    Usher syndrome is rare genetic disorder impairing two human senses, hearing and vision, with the characteristic late onset of vision loss. This syndrome is divided into three types. In all cases, the vision loss is postlingual, while loss of hearing is usually prelingual. The vestibular functions may also be disturbed in Usher type 1 and sometimes in type 3. Vestibular areflexia is helpful in making a proper diagnosis of the syndrome, but, often, the syndrome is misdiagnosed as a nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, we present a Polish family with hearing loss, which was clinically classified as nonsyndromic. After excluding mutations in the DFNB1 locus, we implemented the next-generation sequencing method and revealed that hearing loss was syndromic and mutations in the USH2A gene indicate Usher syndrome. This research highlights the importance of molecular analysis in establishing a clinical diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

  3. The Impact of Tourette's Syndrome in the School and the Family: Perspectives from Three Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Cubo, Esther; Almazán, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the perceptions of Spanish health professionals, children with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and their parents about social, school and family problems related to the disorder. A qualitative research methodology was used involving Focus Groups (FGs) made up of children with TS (× 2 FGs), parents/caregivers of persons with TS (× 2…

  4. A novel heterozygous germline deletion in MSH2 gene in a five generation Chinese family with Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Bin; Ji, Wuyang; Liang, Shengran; Ling, Chao; You, Yan; Xu, Lai; Zhong, Min-Er; Xiao, Yi; Qiu, Hui-Zhong; Lu, Jun-Yang; Banerjee, Santasree

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is one of the most common familial forms of colorectal cancer predisposing syndrome with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. LS is caused by the germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes including MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2. Clinically, LS is characterized by high incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer as well as endometrial, small intestinal and urinary tract cancers, usually occur in the third to fourth decade of the life. Here we describe a five ge...

  5. Stress, Locus of Control, and Family Cohesion and Adaptability in Parents of Children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; Vianello, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also…

  6. Familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are different manifestations of the same disease: novel missense mutations in GALNT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Leo; Joseph, Selvanayagam; Hing, Sandra N.; Idowu, Bernadine D.; Delaney, David; Presneau, Nadege; O'Donnell, Paul; Diss, Tim; Flanagan, Adrienne Margaret

    2010-01-01

    To report on the biochemistry and clinical and genetic findings of two siblings, the younger sister presenting with recurrent bone pain of the radius and ulna, and medullary sclerosis, and the older brother with soft tissue calcific deposits (tumoral calcinosis) but who later developed bone pain. Both were found to be hyperphosphaturic. The index family comprised four individuals (father, mother, brother, sister). The affected siblings were the offspring of a non-consanguineous Indian family of Tamil origin. Bidirectional sequencing was performed on the DNA from the index family and on 160 alleles from a population of 80 unrelated unaffected control individuals of Tamil extraction and 72 alleles from individuals of non-Tamil origin. Two symptomatic siblings were found to harbour previously unreported compound heterozygous missense UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GalNAc-transferase; GALNT3) mutations in exon 4 c.842A>G and exon 5 c.1097T>G. This sequence variation was not detected in the control DNA. This is the first report of siblings exhibiting stigmata of familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome with documented evidence of autosomal recessive missense GALNT3 mutations. The findings from this family add further evidence to the literature that familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are manifestations of the same disease and highlight the importance of appropriate metabolic and genetic investigations. (orig.)

  7. Familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are different manifestations of the same disease: novel missense mutations in GALNT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Leo; Joseph, Selvanayagam [Vinodhagan Memorial Hospital and Dr. Joseph' s Ortho Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Thanjavur (India); Hing, Sandra N.; Idowu, Bernadine D.; Delaney, David [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Presneau, Nadege [University College London (UCL), Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, Paul [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, London (United Kingdom); Diss, Tim [University College London Hospital (UCLH) NHS Trust, Rockefeller Building, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Flanagan, Adrienne Margaret [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital (UCLH) NHS Trust, Rockefeller Building, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); University College London (UCL), Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    To report on the biochemistry and clinical and genetic findings of two siblings, the younger sister presenting with recurrent bone pain of the radius and ulna, and medullary sclerosis, and the older brother with soft tissue calcific deposits (tumoral calcinosis) but who later developed bone pain. Both were found to be hyperphosphaturic. The index family comprised four individuals (father, mother, brother, sister). The affected siblings were the offspring of a non-consanguineous Indian family of Tamil origin. Bidirectional sequencing was performed on the DNA from the index family and on 160 alleles from a population of 80 unrelated unaffected control individuals of Tamil extraction and 72 alleles from individuals of non-Tamil origin. Two symptomatic siblings were found to harbour previously unreported compound heterozygous missense UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GalNAc-transferase; GALNT3) mutations in exon 4 c.842A>G and exon 5 c.1097T>G. This sequence variation was not detected in the control DNA. This is the first report of siblings exhibiting stigmata of familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome with documented evidence of autosomal recessive missense GALNT3 mutations. The findings from this family add further evidence to the literature that familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis-hyperphosphataemia syndrome are manifestations of the same disease and highlight the importance of appropriate metabolic and genetic investigations. (orig.)

  8. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sólia-Nasser, L; de Aquino, S-N; Paranaíba, L-M R; Gomes, A; Dos-Santos-Neto, P; Coletta, R-D; Cardoso, A-F; Frota, A-C; Martelli-Júnior, H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1.

  9. [Gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Na; Li, Xiu-Rong; Gong, Fei; DU, Juan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mutation of related genes and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome (BS). The high-throughput capture sequencing technique and PCR-Sanger sequencing were used to detect pathogenic genes in the proband of this family and analyze the whole family at the genomic level. After the genetic cause was clarified, the amniotic fluid was collected from the proband's mother who was pregnant for 5 months for prenatal diagnosis. The proband carried compound heterozygous mutations of c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene; c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) had been reported as a pathogenic mutation, and c.968+2T>A was a new mutation. Pedigree analysis showed that the two mutations were inherited from the mother and father, respectively. Prenatal diagnosis showed that the fetus did not inherit the mutations from parents and had no mutations at the two loci. The follow-up visit confirmed that the infant was in a healthy state, which proved the accuracy of genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis. The compound heterozygous mutations c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene are the cause of BS in the proband, and prenatal diagnosis can prevent the risk of recurrence of BS in this family.

  10. A Severe Case of Pigmentary Glaucoma in a Child With a Family History of Pigment Dispersion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragno, Vittoria; Zeboulon, Pierre; Baudouin, Christophe; Labbé, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    To report a case of severe pigmentary glaucoma (PG) in a 13-year-old boy of a family affected by pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS). A 13-year-old child was referred to our hospital for severe bilateral glaucoma. A complete ophthalmologic evaluation including refraction, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, fundus examination, and ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed. Family members were also examined and a family pedigree was obtained. Ophthalmologic examination revealed a severe bilateral PG with Krukenberg spindle and a widely open heavily pigmented iridocorneal angle. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed a deep anterior chamber with pronounced iris concavity in both eyes. Within his family, his 15-year-old sister and 7-year-old brother were both affected by PDS diagnosed on gonioscopy findings. We report for the first time a severe case of pediatric PG with a family history of PDS. This case demonstrates that accurate screening is necessary in cases of familial PDS and PG, even in the pediatric population.

  11. Maternal perceptions of sibling adaptation in Korean families of children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H; Van Riper, M

    2014-10-01

    It is estimated that more than 500 infants with Down syndrome (DS) are born each year in Korea. DS affects not only these individuals, but family members as well. Some siblings deal successfully with the challenges of living with a child with DS and adapt well while others struggle or fail to adapt. The aims of this descriptive study were to explore how Korean mothers of children with DS perceive the adaptation of their typically developing (TD) children aged 4 to 19 and how family variables contribute to sibling adaptation. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 105 Korean mothers. Most mothers indicated that their TD children were not experiencing psychological or behavioural problems; however, many described problems in the sibling relationship. It was found that family factors (i.e. condition management effort, condition management ability, child's daily life, parental mutuality, family hardiness and social support) were strong predictors of sibling psychological, behavioural and relational adaptation. Demographic characteristics of the child with DS, the mother and the family appeared to significantly influence sibling adaptation. These findings highlight the importance of familial contexts in understanding sibling adaptation. Knowledge of family factors associated with better adaptation in Korean siblings of child with DS will facilitate the development of culturally appropriate interventions for these children and their families. In addition, an awareness of demographic characteristics associated with sibling adaptation will help health care professionals identify siblings who are at increased risk of experiencing difficulties in adapting. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES and cleft lip and palate. Report of two Brazilian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Kokitsu-Nakata

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated a girl and a boy with the blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES. The girl presented cleft palate and the boy showed cleft lip and palate as additional clinical signs. Both showed familial recurrence in fourth and third generations, respectively. The other family members also presented blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus, but without lip and palatal involvement. There were no additional clinical signs nor infertility in these patients. To our knowledge this is the first instance of cleft lip and palate reported as additional signs of the BPES syndrome.Os autores descrevem uma menina e um menino com a síndrome de blefarofimose, ptose e epicanto inverso (BPES. A menina apresentou fissura de palato e o menino mostrou fissura de lábio e palato como sinais clínicos adicionais. Ambos mostraram recorrência familial em quatro e três gerações, respectivamente. Outros membros de ambas as famílias apresentaram também blefarofimose, ptose e epicanto inverso, mas sem envolvimento de lábio e palato. Não existem sinais clínicos adicionais nem infertilidade nestes pacientes. De acordo com o nosso conhecimento, este é o primeiro relato de fissura de lábio e palato registrada como sinal adicional na síndrome BPES.

  13. Síndrome de Alport: estudo de uma família Alport's syndrome: a family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio de Macedo Leal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A síndrome de Alport caracteriza-se por nefropatia hereditária, geralmente associada à surdez neurossensorial (Alport, 1927 e alterações oculares (Sohar, 1954. Estudaram-se as manifestações da síndrome em membros de uma mesma família, considerando aspectos clínicos e genéticos. Pacientes e Método: Foram submetidos a exame oftalmológico quinze indivíduos de uma família, dos quais quatro apresentavam síndrome de Alport. Os exames foram realizados na Clínica Oftalmológica do Hospital Getúlio Vargas - Universidade Federal do Piauí (HGV/UFPI. Resultados: Revelaram-se quatro indivíduos afetados pela síndrome de Alport, dos quais três apresentavam surdez moderada, lenticone anterior bilateral e nefropatia crônica, e um tinha manifestação renal isolada. Todos os pacientes eram brancos, do sexo masculino, com idade entre 12 e 25 anos. A acuidade visual dos olhos com lenticone variou de 20/50 a 20/100. Conclusões: A análise da família identificou três casos confirmados e um suspeito, sugerindo padrão de herança recessiva ligada ao X, não sendo possível afastar a herança autossômica dominante com penetrância incompleta.Purpose: Alport's Syndrome is characterized by hereditary nephritis, usually associated with neurosensitve deafness (Alport, 1927 and ocular disease (Sohar, 1954. Thus we intended to analize manifestations of the syndrome in a family, regarding clinical and genetical aspects. Patients and method: Fifteen patients of the same family of which four had Alport´s syndrome were submitted to ophthalmologic examination. The examinations were performed at the Ophthalmologic Clinic of HGV/UFPI. Results: Four patients with Alport´s syndrome were revealed, of which three had moderate deafness, anterior lenticonus and chronic nephropathy, and one of them had renal disease alone. All the patients were white, male aged 12 to 25 years. The visual acuity of eyes with lenticonus varied between 20/50 and 20

  14. Kimberlite emplacement time and duration of kimberlite magmatism in the Zimnii Bereg diamond-diferrous district, Arkhangelsk Region: Rb-Sr age of kimberlite sills, Mela River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervov, V.A.; Larchenko, V.A.; Minchenko, G.V.; Stepanov, V.P.; Bogomolov, E.S.; Levskij, L.K.; Sergeev, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Rb-Sr isotope data for kimberlites and carbonate-rich sills of the Mela River were obtained for identifying the age and duration of magmatism in the Zimnii Bereg district of the Archangelsk region. It is shown that estimated age of the kimberlite (366.4 mln. years) falls in the age range corresponding to the main phase of alkaline magmatism in the Kola Peninsula (410-362 mln. years) [ru

  15. Lynch syndrome: still not a familiar picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Frederik J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ line mutations in mismatch repair genes underlie Lynch syndrome and predispose carriers for colorectal carcinoma and malignancies in many other organ systems. Case presentation A large Lynch syndrome family with 15 affected family members and involvement in 7 organs is reported. It illustrates a lack of awareness and knowledge about this hereditary tumor syndrome among doctors as well as patients. None of the described family members underwent presymptomatic screening on the basis of the family history. Conclusion Hereditary features, like young age at diagnosis, multiple tumors in multiple organs and a positive family history, should lead to timely referral of suspected cases for genetic counseling and diagnostics. For Lynch syndrome, these features can be found in the Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria. Subsequently, early identification of mutation carriers might have diminished, at least in part, the high and early morbidity and mortality observed in this family.

  16. A possible new syndrome with double endocrine tumors in association with an unprecedented type of familial heart-hand syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamagishi Masakazu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The combination of a pituitary prolactinoma and an aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, double endocrine tumors in association with heart-hand syndrome have not previously been reported. Case presentation A 21-year-old Japanese woman presented with galactorrhea and decreased visual acuity. A large pituitary adenoma with an increased level of serum prolactin was apparent by computed tomography. She additionally showed mild hypertension (136/90 mmHg accompanied by hypokalemia. The plasma aldosterone concentration was increased. Computed tomography showed a mass in the right adrenal gland. No other tumors were found despite extensive imaging studies. Physical and radiographic examinations showed skeletal malformations of the hands and feet, including hypoplasia of the first digit in all four limbs. An atrial septal defect was demonstrated by echocardiography. Similar digital and cardiac abnormalities were detected in our patient's father, and a clinical diagnosis of hereditary heart-hand syndrome was made. Conclusion No established heart-hand syndrome was wholly compatible with the family's phenotype. Her father had no obvious endocrine tumors, implying that the parent of transmission determined variable phenotypic expression of the disease: heart-hand syndrome with multiple endocrine tumors from the paternal transmission or no endocrine tumor from the maternal transmission. This suggests that the gene or genes responsible for the disease may be under tissue-specific imprinting control.

  17. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C. [Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Toutain, A. [CHU Bretonneau, Tours (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  18. Fragile X syndrome in females - a familial case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stembalska, Agnieszka; Łaczmańska, Izabela; Gil, Justyna; Pesz, Karolina A

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), one of the manifestations of FMR1-related disorders, is one of the most frequent genetic causes of intellectual disability. In over 99% of all cases it results from the expansion of CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene and presents in males and in about 50% of the females with an FMR1 full mutation, usually with a milder phenotype. Although the morphologic and behavioral phenotype in males is a well-recognized entity, the presentation in females is variable and not as specific. The objective of this paper is to present a family with quite a severe expression of the disorder in two sisters with a full mutation. We report on a two-generation family where both males and females were found to be affected by FXS. We also present the diagnostic pathway and methods that led to the diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in the two sisters, as well as the method that explained the normal phenotype in their mother. The CGG repeats analysis in the FMR1 gene showed one normal allele and one allele with a full mutation in both sisters (probands) and their mother. A full mutation was also found in three male cousins of the probands. The analysis of the X-chromosome methylation status has shown a random X inactivation in proband 1 and 2 and a non-random one in the proband's mother, with the normal allele predominantly active. The reasons for different clinical presentations are discussed; moreover a review of the literature on females with FXS is presented. We hope that this paper will facilitate the future diagnosis of fragile X syndromes in females.

  19. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Wei; Jin, Xin; Gong, Yan; Qu, Ling-Hui; Zhao, Chen; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2).METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate...

  20. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other...... than MMR proteins. METHODS: We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. RESULTS: Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch...... syndrome (p Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors (p = 0.001,

  1. Familial pulmonary arterial hypertension, leucopenia, and atrial septal defect: a probable new familial syndrome with multisystem involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Ali; Ozgul, R Koksal; Soydas, Asli; Tugrul, Tugba; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Celiker, Alpay; Barst, Robyn J; Knowles, James A; Mahesh, Mansukhani; Morse, Jane H

    2009-01-01

    We present two siblings with identical clinical findings that seem to represent a previously unreported familial syndrome. Major findings involve three systems: pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac abnormalities including secundum-type atrial septal defect, and the hematopoietic system with intermittent neutropenia, lymphopenia, monocytosis, and anemia. The siblings also shared several minor abnormalities: pectus carinatum, long fingers, proximally placed thumb, broad nasal bridge, and high-arched palate. The male proband also had bilateral inguinal hernias and undescended testes. The same findings in two siblings suggest a genetic cause--either an autosomal recessive disorder or germline mosaicism in one parent for a dominant mutation. Investigations revealed a bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 polymorphism in intron 4 in only one sibling, which was also present in unaffected maternal relatives.

  2. Caracterização espectral de áreas de gramíneas forrageiras infectadas com a doença "mela-das-sementes da braquiária" por meio de imagens CCD/CBERS-2 Spectral characterization of forage grasses infected with the disease "mela-das-sementes da braquiária" through CCD/CDBERS -2 images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Rosatti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Imagens CCD/CBERS-2, nas bandas espectrais CCD2, CCD3 e CCD4, dos anos de 2004 e 2005, de Mirante do Paranapanema - SP, foram transformadas em reflectância de superfície usando o modelo 5S de correção atmosférica e normalizadas radiometricamente. O objetivo principal foi caracterizar espectralmente áreas de pastagens de Brachiaria brizantha em fase de florescimento, isentas e infectadas com a doença "mela-das-sementes da braquiária", possibilitando a sua detecção por meio da comparação entre os valores de reflectância de superfície denominada de Fator de Reflectância Bidirecional de Superfície (FRBS. Teve-se, também, o objetivo de avaliar a eficácia das imagens CCD/CBERS-2 para a obtenção de respostas espectrais de pastagens. Os dosséis sadios e doentes da Brachiaria brizantha foram identificados por meio da análise dos valores de reflectância e dos dados observados no Índice de Estresse Hídrico Acumulativo Relativo da Cultura (ACWSI obtidos na área de estudo. Os resultados indicaram que as principais diferenças foram a diminuição da reflectância na banda CCD3 e o aumento da reflectância na banda CCD4 nas áreas doentes. A metodologia empregada com o uso de dados do sensor CCD/CBERS-2, associados ao ACWSI, mostrou-se eficaz para discriminar dosséis infectados com a "mela-das-sementes da braquiária".CCD/CBERS-2 images in the spectral bands of CCD2, CCD3 and CCD4 of the years 2004 and 2005, from Mirante do Paranapanema - SP (Brazil, were transformed into surface reflectance images using the 5S atmospheric correction model and radiometrically normalized. The main objective was to spectrally characterize pastures of Brachiaria brizantha in the flowering phase, exempt and infected with the disease "mela-das-sementes da braquiária" making it possible its detection through the comparison among the SBRF - Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor values. At the same time, it was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the

  3. Association of adiponectin promoter variants with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome in Arabs: family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadjali, F; Al-Yahyaee, S; Hassan, M O; Albarwani, S; Bayoumi, R A

    2013-09-25

    Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Our aim was to use a family-based analysis to identify the genetic variants of the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene that are associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, among Arabs. We screened 328 Arabs in one large extended family for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the ADIPOQ gene. Two common SNPs were detected: rs17300539 and rs266729. Evidences of association between traits related to the metabolic syndrome and the SNPs were studied by implementing quantitative genetic association analysis. Results showed that SNP rs266729 was significantly associated with body weight (p-value=0.001), waist circumference (p-value=0.037), BMI (p-value=0.015) and percentage of total body fat (p-value=0.003). Up to 4.1% of heritability of obesity traits was explained by the rs266729 locus. Further cross-sectional analysis showed that carriers of the G allele had significantly higher values of waist circumference, BMI and percentage of total body fat (p-values 0.014, 0.004 and 0.032, respectively). No association was detected between SNP rs266729 and other clusters of metabolic syndrome or their traits except for HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels, p-values 0.035 and 0.004, respectively. In contrast, both measured genotype and cross-sectional analysis failed to detect an association between the SNP rs17300539 with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, we showed family-based evidence of association of SNP rs266729 at ADIPOQ gene with traits defining obesity in Arab population. This is important for future prediction and prevention of obesity in population where obesity is in an increasing trend. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A large deletion in GPR98 causes type IIC Usher syndrome in male and female members of an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgert, N; Kahrizi, K; Dieltjens, N; Bazazzadegan, N; Najmabadi, H; Smith, R J H; Van Camp, G

    2009-04-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The three recognised clinical phenotypes (types I, II and III; USH1, USH2 and USH3) are caused by mutations in nine different genes. USH2C is characterised by moderate to severe hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and normal vestibular function. One earlier report describes mutations in GPR98 (VLGR1) in four families segregating this phenotype. To detect the disease-causing mutation in an Iranian family segregating USH2C. In this family, five members had a phenotype compatible with Usher syndrome, and two others had nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mutation analysis of all 90 coding exons of GPR98. Consistent with these clinical findings, the five subjects with USH carried a haplotype linked to the USH2C locus, whereas the two subjects with nonsyndromic hearing loss did not. We identified a new mutation in GPR98 segregating with USH2C in this family. The mutation is a large deletion g.371657_507673del of exons 84 and 85, presumably leading to a frameshift. A large GPR98 deletion of 136 017 bp segregates with USH2C in an Iranian family. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of a GPR98 mutation, and the first report on male subjects with USH2C and a GPR98 mutation.

  5. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    -syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non......-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24–0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families...

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome). Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, G; Belli, E; Mici, E; Virciglio, P; Moricca, L M; D'Itri, L; Leonardi, A; Malavenda, M S; Krizzuk, D; Merola, R; Maturo, A; Pasta, V

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies, calcifications of the falx cerebri etc. The diagnosis is made according to clinical criteria (Kimonis Criteria) and genetic ones. We studied one family where father and then his sun resulted affected by each syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare disease diagnosed according to clinical criteria sometimes difficult to integrate. The family case we presented shows how you can get diagnosis even in older age and after numerous surgeries. Patients should be given special attention and therefore should be monitorized and need multidisciplinary treatments continued in time, even a trivial change of signs and symptoms may be an important indicator of a precipitating event which puts the patient's life under threat.

  7. Mass-gathering Events: The Public Health Challenge of the Kumbh Mela 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Suresh; Cariappa, Mudera P

    2015-12-01

    Mass-gathering (MG) events pose challenges to the most adept of public health practitioners in ensuring the health safety of the population. These MGs can be for sporting events, musical festivals, or more commonly, have religious undertones. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India may have been the largest gathering of humanity in history with nearly 120 million pilgrims having thronged the venue. The scale of the event posed a challenge to the maintenance of public health security and safety. A snapshot of the experience of managing the hygiene and sanitation aspects of this mega event is presented herein, highlighting the importance of proactive public health planning and preparedness. There having been no outbreaks of disease is vindication of the steps undertaken in planning and preparedness, notwithstanding obvious limitations of unsanitary behaviors and traditional beliefs of those attending the festival. The evident flaw on post-event analyses was the failure to cater adequately for environmental mopping-up operations after the festival. Besides, a system of real-time monitoring of disease and morbidity patterns, harnessing low cost technology alternatives, should be planned for at all such future events.

  8. Heritability and genetic correlation between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammation markers in families living in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding-Bernal, Arturo; Sánchez-Pedraza, Valentin; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Sobrino-Cossio, Sergio; Tejero-Barrera, María Elizabeth; Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; León-Hernández, Mireya; Serratos-Canales, María Fabiola; Duggirala, Ravindranath; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability (h2) and genetic correlation (ρG) between GERD symptoms severity, metabolic syndrome components, and inflammation markers in Mexican families. Methods Cross-sectional study which included 32 extended families resident in Mexico City. GERD symptoms severity was assessed by the ReQuest in Practice questionnaire. Heritability and genetic correlation were determined using the Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software. Results 585 subjects were included, the mean age was 42 (±16.7) years, 57% were women. The heritability of the severity of some GERD symptoms was h2 = 0.27, 0.27, 0.37, and 0.34 (p-value metabolic syndrome components ranged from 0.40 for fasting plasma glucose to 0.61 for body mass index and diabetes mellitus. The heritability for fibrinogen and C-reactive protein was 0.64 and 0.38, respectively. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found between acidity complaints and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.40); sleep disturbances and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.36); acidity complaints and diabetes mellitus (ρG = 0.49) and between total ReQuest score and fasting plasma glucose (ρG = 0.43). The rest of metabolic syndrome components did not correlate with GERD symptoms. Conclusion Genetic factors substantially explain the phenotypic variance of the severity of some GERD symptoms, metabolic syndrome components and inflammation markers. Observed genetic correlations suggest that these phenotypes share common genes. These findings suggest conducting further investigation, as the determination of a linkage analysis in order to identify regions of susceptibility for developing of GERD and metabolic syndrome. PMID:28582452

  9. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (pmetabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (pmetabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiolabeled Cu-ATSM as a novel indicator of overreduced intracellular state due to mitochondrial dysfunction: studies with mitochondrial DNA-less ρ0 cells and cybrids carrying MELAS mitochondrial DNA mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yukie; Yoneda, Makoto; Ikawa, Masamichi; Furukawa, Takako; Kiyono, Yasushi; Mori, Tetsuya; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Saga, Tsuneo; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Radiolabeled Cu-diacetyl-bis (N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( ⁎ Cu-ATSM), including 60/62/64 Cu-ATSM, is a potential imaging agent of hypoxic tumors for positron emission tomography (PET). We have reported that ⁎ Cu-ATSM is trapped in tumor cells under intracellular overreduced states, e.g., hypoxia. Here we evaluated ⁎ Cu-ATSM as an indicator of intracellular overreduced states in mitochondrial disorders using cell lines with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: Mitochondrial DNA-less ρ 0 206 cells; the parental 143B human osteosarcoma cells; the cybrids carrying mutated mitochondria from a patient of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) (2SD); and that carrying wild-type one (2SA) were used. Cells were treated under normoxia or hypoxia, and 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was examined to compare it with levels of biological reductant NADH and NADPH. Results: ρ 0 206 cells showed higher 64 Cu-ATSM uptake than control 143B cells under normoxia, whereas 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was not significantly increased under hypoxia in ρ 0 206 cells. Additionally, 64 Cu-ATSM uptake showed correlate change to the NADH and NADPH levels, but not oxygenic conditions. 2SD cells showed increased 64 Cu-ATSM uptake under normoxia as compared with the control 2SA, and 64 Cu-ATSM uptake followed NADH and NADPH levels, but not oxygenic conditions. Conclusions: 64 Cu-ATSM accumulated in cells with overreduced states due to mitochondrial dysfunction, even under normoxia. We recently reported that 62 Cu-ATSM-PET can visualize stroke-like episodes maintaining oxygen supply in MELAS patients. Taken together, our data indicate that ⁎ Cu-ATSM uptake reflects overreduced intracellular states, despite oxygenic conditions; thus, ⁎ Cu-ATSM would be a promising marker of intracellular overreduced states for disorders with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as MELAS, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management. PMID:26309352

  12. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-08-21

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management.

  13. LEOPARD-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Risby, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 12-year-old boy with a typical phenotype of the LEOPARD syndrome (LS). The diagnosis was confirmed in the boy and his mother, who both had a mutation in the PTPN11 gene at Thr468Met (c.1403C > T). Several other members of the maternal family are suspected also to have the LEOPARD sy...... syndrome. We discuss the clinical characteristics of LS, the need for follow-up and genetic counselling, and the molecular-genetic background as well as the relationship to the allelic disease Noonan syndrome. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jan-26......We describe a 12-year-old boy with a typical phenotype of the LEOPARD syndrome (LS). The diagnosis was confirmed in the boy and his mother, who both had a mutation in the PTPN11 gene at Thr468Met (c.1403C > T). Several other members of the maternal family are suspected also to have the LEOPARD...

  14. Poland's Syndrome: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    The Poland's anomaly was first described in 1841 by Sir Alfred Poland as a syndrome presenting with absence or underdevelopment of pectoralis ... He was the second child in a family of four. There was no familial history of similar .... hypoplasia: a middle degree of Poland syndrome. Acta Radiologica 1996; 37: 759-762. 8.

  15. Anakinra induces complete remission of nephrotic syndrome in a patient with familial mediterranean fever and amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Ángel M; Hernandez, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Esther; Mateo, Isabel; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Praga, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Renal amyloidosis is one of the most severe complications of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Colchicine has reduced the incidence of this complication, which now only appears in untreated, under-treated and resistant patients, but it is usually ineffective in patients with advanced amyloidosis. Here we report a patient with FMF and biopsy-proven amyloidosis who presented with nephrotic syndrome despite colchicine treatment. Anakinra (an interleukin-1β inhibitor) was started and a dramatic complete remission of nephrotic syndrome was observed in the following months. Anakinra can be an effective treatment for FMF patients with severe secondary amyloidosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef; Bernstein, Inge; Bonde, Jesper; Holck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other than MMR proteins. We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch syndrome ( p  Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors ( p  = 0.001, Lynch syndrome with a more sporadic-like profile in the former group and a more distinct profile with frequent MUC6 positivity in the latter group.

  17. Ala397Asp mutation of myosin VIIA gene segregating in a Spanish family with type-Ib Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, C; Millán, J M; Sánchez, F; Beneyto, M; Nájera, C

    1998-06-01

    In the current study, 12 Spanish families affected by type-I Usher syndrome, that was previously linked to chromosome 11q, were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of the myosin VIIA gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the first 14 exons. A mutation (Ala397Asp) segregating with the disease was identified, and several polymorphisms were also detected. It is presumed that the other USHIB mutations in these families could be located in the unscreened regions of the gene.

  18. A Wide Range of 3243A>G/tRNALeu(UUR) (MELAS) Mutation Loads May Segregate in Offspring through the Female Germline Bottleneck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotti, Francesco; Binelli, Giorgio; Fabbri, Raffaella; Valentino, Maria L.; Vicenti, Rossella; Macciocca, Maria; Cevoli, Sabina; Baruzzi, Agostino; DiMauro, Salvatore; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of mutant mtDNA in human tissues and through the germline is debated, with no consensus about the nature and size of the bottleneck hypothesized to explain rapid generational shifts in mutant loads. We investigated two maternal lineages with an apparently different inheritance pattern of the same pathogenic mtDNA 3243A>G/tRNALeu(UUR) (MELAS) mutation. We collected blood cells, muscle biopsies, urinary epithelium and hair follicles from 20 individuals, as well as oocytes and an ovarian biopsy from one female mutation carrier, all belonging to the two maternal lineages to assess mutant mtDNA load, and calculated the theoretical germline bottleneck size (number of segregating units). We also evaluated “mother-to-offspring” segregations from the literature, for which heteroplasmy assessment was available in at least three siblings besides the proband. Our results showed that mutation load was prevalent in skeletal muscle and urinary epithelium, whereas in blood cells there was an inverse correlation with age, as previously reported. The histoenzymatic staining of the ovarian biopsy failed to show any cytochrome-c-oxidase defective oocyte. Analysis of four oocytes and one offspring from the same unaffected mother of the first family showed intermediate heteroplasmic mutant loads (10% to 75%), whereas very skewed loads of mutant mtDNA (0% or 81%) were detected in five offspring of another unaffected mother from the second family. Bottleneck size was 89 segregating units for the first mother and 84 for the second. This was remarkably close to 88, the number of “segregating units” in the “mother-to-offspring” segregations retrieved from literature. In conclusion, a wide range of mutant loads may be found in offspring tissues and oocytes, resulting from a similar theoretical bottleneck size. PMID:24805791

  19. Families with children with Down syndrome in a situation of economic crisis and social and moralchange [Rodziny z dzieckiem z zespołem Downa w sytuacji kryzysu ekonomicznego, przemian społecznych i obyczajowych

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Maria MINCZAKIEWICZ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of this comparison is an attempt to present the life situation and the quality of the functioning of families with a child with Down syndrome against the background of the statistical situation of Polish families raising a child with normal development of a comparable age. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: — Are there impacts and, if so, to what extent of the coming into the world and the existence of a family of a child with Down syndrome on the organization and the standard of living and in the family ties and cohesion among its members? — Whether and to what extent the situation of families with a child with Down syndrome is different from that of ordinary, contemporary Polish families? As a basis for these studies the diagnostic survey method was used, which was subordinated to the techniques of observation, targeted interviews and intelligence. The empirical material was collected using several tools (mostly drawn from the planned research program. The study included 186 families, including 86 (46.2% of families with a child with Down’s syndrome (primary group – P and 100 (53.8% of families statistical reference (control group – K. The results were empirical and statistical verification in order to develop on the basis of their importance to the practice of generalizations and conclusions.

  20. Founder Fukutin mutation causes Walker-Warburg syndrome in four Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wendy; Winder, Thomas L; LeDuc, Charles A; Simpson, Lynn L; Millar, William S; Dungan, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Norman; Plaga, Stacey; Moore, Steven A; Chung, Wendy K

    2009-06-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous congenital muscular dystrophy caused by abnormal glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) that is associated with brain malformations and eye anomalies. The Fukutin (FKTN) gene, which causes autosomal recessively inherited WWS is most often associated with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in Japan. We describe the clinical features of four nonconsanguinous Ashkenazi Jewish families with WWS and identify the underlying genetic basis for WWS. We screened for mutations in POMGnT1, POMT1, POMT2, and FKTN, genes causing WWS, by dideoxy sequence analysis. We identified an identical homozygous c.1167insA mutation in the FKTN gene on a common haplotype in all four families and identified 2/299 (0.7%) carriers for the c.1167insA mutation among normal American Ashkenazi Jewish adults. These data suggest that the c.1167insA FKTN mutation described by us is a founder mutation that can be used to target diagnostic testing and carrier screening in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome in a Chinese family with distinct skin lesions refractory to vitamin B12.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, S H; Sourial, N A; Lu, K C; Hsueh, E J

    1994-01-01

    Two brothers in a Chinese family with selective malabsorption of vitamin B12 associated with proteinuria (Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome) presented with widespread mottled skin pigmentation, termed poikiloderma. In contrast to anaemia, this pigmentary disturbance remained unresponsive to vitamin B12 replacement. This is different from the reported hyperpigmentation sometimes seen in vitamin B12 deficiency which is reversible following treatment. As far as is known, an irreversible and persistent...

  2. Genetic spectrum of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss in Pakistani families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Shafique

    Full Text Available The frequency of inherited bilateral autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in Pakistan is 1.6/1000 individuals. More than 50% of the families carry mutations in GJB2 while mutations in MYO15A account for about 5% of recessive deafness. In the present study a cohort of 30 ARNSHL families was initially screened for mutations in GJB2 and MYO15A. Homozygosity mapping was performed by employing whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping in the families that did not carry mutations in GJB2 or MYO15A. Mutation analysis was performed for the known ARNSHL genes present in the homozygous regions to determine the causative mutations. This allowed the identification of a causative mutation in all the 30 families including 9 novel mutations, which were identified in 9 different families (GJB2 (c.598G>A, p.Gly200Arg; MYO15A (c.9948G>A, p.Gln3316Gln; c.3866+1G>A; c.8767C>T, p.Arg2923* and c.8222T>C, p.Phe2741Ser, TMC1 (c.362+18A>G, BSND (c.97G>C, p.Val33Leu, TMPRSS3 (c.726C>G, p.Cys242Trp and MSRB3 (c.20T>G, p.Leu7Arg. Furthermore, 12 recurrent mutations were detected in 21 other families. The 21 identified mutations included 10 (48% missense changes, 4 (19% nonsense mutations, 3 (14% intronic mutations, 2 (9% splice site mutations and 2 (9% frameshift mutations. GJB2 accounted for 53% of the families, while mutations in MYO15A were the second most frequent (13% cause of ARNSHL in these 30 families. The identification of novel as well as recurrent mutations in the present study increases the spectrum of mutations in known deafness genes which could lead to the identification of novel founder mutations and population specific mutated deafness genes causative of ARNSHL. These results provide detailed genetic information that has potential diagnostic implication in the establishment of cost-efficient allele-specific analysis of frequently occurring variants in combination with other reported mutations in Pakistani populations.

  3. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Grati, Mhamed; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient's early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management.

  4. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  5. The Lynch syndrome: a management dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Amatucci, Chiara; Perotti, Bruno; Dezzi, Claudia; Girolami, Marco; Illuminati, Giulio; Angelici, Alberto M

    2013-05-01

    The case of a familial Lynch syndrome is reported. The criteria for early diagnosis, management and surveillance are briefly reviewed. A germline mutation of genes responsible for mismatch repair is at the basis of the Lynch syndrome. Carriers are predisposed to colorectal cancer and other tumors. Two members of the presently reported family developed colorectal cancer, whereas two others developed other neoplasms. The syndrome was confirmed in members of the same family with appropriate genetic workup. Clinical examination and endoscopy were consequently scheduled once-a-year. Given the high risk of neoplastic disease, such yearly controls can be proposed as the standard follow-up of this condition.

  6. DOORS syndrome: phenotype, genotype and comparison with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Philippe M; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-09-01

    DOORS syndrome (Deafness, Onychodystrophy, Osteodystrophy, mental Retardation, Seizures) is characterized mainly by sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small nails of hands and feet, intellectual deficiency, and seizures. Half of the patients with all clinical features have mutations in TBC1D24. We review here the manifestations of patients clinically diagnosed with DOORS syndrome. In this cohort of 32 families (36 patients) we detected 13 individuals from 10 families with TBC1D24 mutations. Subsequent whole exome sequencing in the cohort showed the same de novoSMARCB1 mutation (c.1130G>A), known to cause Coffin-Siris syndrome, in two patients. Distinguishing features include retinal anomalies, Dandy-Walker malformation, scoliosis, rocker bottom feet, respiratory difficulties and absence of seizures, and 2-oxoglutaric aciduria in the patients with the SMARCB1 mutation. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of the DOORS syndrome phenotype and the differential diagnosis of this condition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  8. Subclinical nephritic syndrome in children cohabiting with pediatric patients, Presenting acute nephritic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Tinoco Gustavo Adolfo; Julio-Barrios Emil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: subclinical nephritic syndrome is the presence of hematuria, hypocomplementemiaand/or proteinuria without the presence of signs and/or symptoms.Objective: to determine the incidence of subclinical nephritic syndrome in childrenliving with pediatric patients diagnosed with acute nephritic syndrome.Methods: family visit to identify children living together in the two previous months, with pediatric patients hospitalized with acute nephritic syndrome, at Hospital InfantilNapoleon F...

  9. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  10. Familial benign nonprogressive myoclonic epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Falco, Fabrizio A; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Work on the classification of epileptic syndromes is ongoing, and many syndromes are still under discussion. In particular, special difficulty still persists in correctly classifying epilepsies with myoclonic seizures. The existence of special familial epileptic syndromes primarily showing myoclonic features has been recently suggested on the basis of a clear pattern of inheritance or on the identification of new chromosomal genetic loci linked to the disease. These forms in development include familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME), benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME), or autosomal dominant cortical myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME), and, maybe, adult-onset myoclonic epilepsy (AME). In the future, the identification of responsible genes and the protein products will contribute to our understanding of the molecular pathways of epileptogenesis and provide neurobiologic criteria for the classification of epilepsies, beyond the different phenotypic expression.

  11. Tietz syndrome (hypopigmentation/deafness) caused by mutation of MITF

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S.; Kelley, P.; Kenyon, J.; Hoover, D.

    2000-01-01

    Patients with Tietz syndrome have congenital profound deafness and generalised hypopigmentation, inherited in a fully penetrant autosomal dominant fashion. The pigmentary features and complete penetrance make this syndrome distinct among syndromes with pigmentary anomalies and deafness, which characteristically have patchy depigmentation and variable penetrance. Only one family has been reported with the exact features described in the original report of this syndrome. This family was reascer...

  12. The feeling of family success and the professional burnout syndrome among penitentiary staff (a draft of a research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Barczykowska

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutual relations between family and professional life have been for many years one of the most important fields of research in economics, sociology and, more and more often, pedagogy, which focuses on searching for factors protecting from the development of burnout syndrome and aims at increasing the effectiveness of pedagogic efforts. Due to the above, this article, being a draft of a research project, is dedicated to the facilitating effect of family life on professional life of the penitentiary staff. The authors take a stance that the feeling of satisfaction from family life can not only significantly neutralize the feeling of failure but, primarily, contribute to the search for more and more innovative forms of work.

  13. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a father and daughter from a large highly inbred family: a 16-year follow-up of 59 living members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shyamal Kumar; Kaul, Kanwar K; Hussein, Akhtar; Wilroy, Robert S; Agarwal, Kisan; Sohel, Saira

    2013-08-01

    To report the autosomal dominant inheritance of the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a highly inbred family, the initiation of Torsades de Pointes, and the natural history of the syndrome based on a 16-year follow-up of the kindred. A family tree was constructed that included 66 blood relatives from three successive generations. Electrocardiograms were obtained from 59 living members including the proband, four members from a nuclear family, and 54 from the extended family. Evoked response audiometry was recorded for the proband and the nuclear family. All 59 family members were followed up regularly for 16 years. A total of 24 living members were affected--QTc: 480-680 ms. The proband had long QTc, bilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness, recurrent syncope, and Torsades de Pointes. The asymptomatic father had long QTc and unilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness that involved specifically the left ear. One asymptomatic sibling of the proband had long QTc and normal hearing. The mother and another sibling were asymptomatic; QTc and hearing were normal in both. A total of 21 affected members from the extended family had only long QTc, and all were asymptomatic. There were three congenitally deaf first cousins who had recurrent syncope and adrenergic-triggered sudden death. In all, seven of 10 parents had consanguineous marriage to a first cousin. Each affected offspring had at least one affected parent. The severely symptomatic proband who received only β-blocker therapy and the 23 affected members without antiadrenergic therapy, all remained asymptomatic throughout the 16-year follow-up period. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome was inherited as autosomal dominant in this kindred. The majority of the affected members had a mild phenotype. The severity of auditory and cardiac phenotypes corresponded.

  14. Congenital hypoventilation syndrome and Hirschsprung's disease - Haddad syndrome: A neonatal case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiyeola, P; El-Metwally, D; Viscardi, R; Greene, C; Woo, H

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is an uncommon cause of apnea in the newborn characterized by the occurrence of apnea predominantly during sleep. Haddad syndrome is CCHS with Hirschsprung's disease. We report a newborn with Haddad syndrome that had a family history of spinal muscular atrophy and discuss aspects of CCHS and important considerations in the evaluation of apnea in the term newborn.

  15. A nonsense mutation in the COL4A5 collagen gene in a family with X-linked juvenile Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1995-01-01

    diagnosis on chorionic villi tissue, obtained from one of the female carriers in the family, revealed a male fetus hemizygous for the mutated allele. A subsequent prenatal test in her next pregnancy revealed a normal male fetus. Prenatal diagnosis of Alport syndrome has not previously been reported....

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever, Inflammation and Nephrotic Syndrome: Fibrillary Glomerulopathy and the M680I Missense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semerdjian Ronald J

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by inflammatory serositis (fever, peritonitis, synovitis and pleuritis. The gene locus responsible for FMF was identified in 1992 and localized to the short arm of chromosome 16. In 1997, a specific FMF gene locus, MEFV, was discovered to encode for a protein, pyrin that mediates inflammation. To date, more than forty missense mutations are known to exist. The diversity of mutations identified has provided insight into the variability of clinical presentation and disease progression. Case Report We report an individual heterozygous for the M680I gene mutation with a clinical diagnosis of FMF using the Tel-Hashomer criteria. Subsequently, the patient developed nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-confirmed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN. Further diagnostic studies were unremarkable with clinical workup negative for amyloidosis or other secondary causes of nephrotic syndrome. Discussion Individuals with FMF are at greater risk for developing nephrotic syndrome. The most serious etiology is amyloidosis (AA variant with renal involvement, ultimately progressing to end-stage renal disease. Other known renal diseases in the FMF population include IgA nephropathy, IgM nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein purpura as well as polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first association between FMF and the M680I mutation later complicated by nephrotic syndrome and fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

  17. Waardenburg's Syndrome in a Nigerian Family | Onabolu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both girls presented with white forelock, heterochromia irides and sensorineural deafness. WS is inherited as an ... Deafness, which is the most disabling feature of this syndrome should be identified early to prepare the child for proper education. KEY WORDS: Waardenburg's Syndrome, genetic mutation, deafness. [Nig.

  18. Psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Moaiedy, Farah; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Askani, Hamid; Haghighat, Mahmood; Dehbozorgi, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2008-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder. There is a heightened risk when conducting potentially dangerous and unnecessary medical investigations and procedures in children with FAPS. The aim of this study was to survey the rate of the psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with FAPS. The subjects were a consecutive new sample of 45 children and adolescents with FAPS, 45 with an organic abdominal pain, and 45 pain-free comparison subjects aged 5-18 years that were interviewed using the Farsi version of K-SADS. Family functioning and the severity of pain were also studied. About 51.1% of patients with FAPS suffered from at least one psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric disorders in the FAPS patients studied included general anxiety disorder (8.9%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (11.1%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (15.6%), separation anxiety disorder (24.4%), and major depressive disorder (15.6%). Except for generalized anxiety disorder and tic disorder, the other disorders were significantly more common in the FAPS group than in the two other control groups. Family functioning scores were not significantly different between groups. There is a high rate of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with FAPS in Iran, but our study found fewer incidences of disorders than previous reports have indicated. Family dysfunction difficulties in FAPS children are not more common than those in the control groups.

  19. A PAX3 polymorphism (T315K) in a family exhibiting Waardenburg Syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kim, E; Attaie, A; Smith, T N; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1998-02-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder phenotypically characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. Presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1 and results from defects in the PAX3 gene, whereas normally located medial canthi is characteristic of type 2 WS (WS2) and is associated with defects in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MIFT) gene. Here a neutral polymorphism is reported in the PAX3 gene (T315K) in a family with WS2. Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  20. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY-box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice-site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in-frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling. PMID:29115496

  1. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  2. LEOPARD syndrome is not linked to the Marfan syndrome and the Watson syndrome loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rass-Rothchild, A.: Abeliovitch, D.; Kornstein, A. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)]|[Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    1994-09-01

    The acronym LEOPARD stands for a syndromic association of Lentigines, Eletrocardiographic changes, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth and sensorineural Deafness. Inheritance is autosomal dominant with high penetrance and variable expressivity. In 1990 Torok et al. reported on the association of LEOPARD and Marfan syndrome. In addition a clinical similarity (cardiac and cutaneous involvement) exists with the Watson syndrome (neurofibromatosis and pulmonic stenosis) which is linked to the marker D17S33 on chromosome 17. We studied possible linkage of LEOPARD syndrome to the Marfan syndrome locus on chromosome 15 (D15S1, MF13, and (TAAAA)n repeats) and to the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 in a family with 9 cases of LEOPARD syndrome. Close linkage between LEOPARD syndrome and both the Marfan locus on chromosome 15 and the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 was excluded (lod score <-2.0 through {theta} = 0.1).

  3. The Association of Arsenic Exposure and Arsenic Metabolism with the Metabolic Syndrome and its Individual Components: Prospective Evidence from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlen, Miranda J; Grau-Perez, Maria; Best, Lyle G; Yracheta, Joseph; Lazo, Mariana; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Gamble, Mary V; Francesconi, Kevin A; Goessler, Walter; Cole, Shelley A; Umans, Jason G; Howard, Barbara V; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2018-03-15

    Inorganic arsenic exposure is ubiquitous and both exposure and inter-individual differences in its metabolism have been associated with cardiometabolic risk. The association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic syndrome and its individual components, however, is relatively unknown. We used poisson regression with robust variance to evaluate the association between baseline arsenic exposure (urine arsenic levels) and metabolism (relative percentage of arsenic species over their sum) with incident metabolic syndrome and its individual components (elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose) in 1,047 participants from the Strong Heart Family Study, a prospective family-based cohort in American Indian communities (baseline visits in 1998-1999 and 2001-2003, follow-up visits in 2001-2003 and 2006-2009). 32% of participants developed metabolic syndrome over follow-up. An IQR increase in arsenic exposure was associated with 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.41) greater risk for elevated fasting plasma glucose but not with other individual components or overall metabolic syndrome. Arsenic metabolism, specifically lower MMA% and higher DMA% was associated with higher risk of overall metabolic syndrome and elevated waist circumference, but not with any other component. These findings support there is a contrasting and independent association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic outcomes which may contribute to overall diabetes risk.

  4. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention....

  5. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  6. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  7. Rhabdomyosarcoma in patients with constitutional mismatch-repair-deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, C P; Holter, S; Etzler, J; Lauten, M; Pollett, A; Niemeyer, C M; Gallinger, S; Wimmer, K

    2009-06-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 cause a recessive childhood cancer syndrome characterised by early-onset malignancies and signs reminiscent of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Alluding to the underlying genetic defect, we refer to this syndrome as constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome. The tumour spectrum of CMMR-D syndrome includes haematological neoplasias, brain tumours and Lynch syndrome-associated tumours. Other tumours, such as neuroblastoma, Wilm tumour, ovarian neuroectodermal tumour or infantile myofibromatosis, have so far been found only in individual cases. We analysed two consanguineous families that had members with suspected CMMR-D syndrome who developed rhabdomyosarcoma among other neoplasias. In the first family, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation for which the affected patient was homozygous. In family 2, immunohistochemistry analysis showed isolated loss of PMS2 expression in all tumours in the affected patients, including rhabdomyosarcoma itself and the surrounding normal tissue. Together with the family history and microsatellite instability observed in one tumour this strongly suggests an underlying PMS2 alteration in family 2 also. Together, these two new cases show that rhabdomyosarcoma and possibly other embryonic tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilm tumour, belong to the tumour spectrum of CMMR-D syndrome. Given the clinical overlap of CMMR-D syndrome with NF1, we suggest careful examination of the family history in patients with embryonic tumours and signs of NF1 as well as analysis of the tumours for loss of one of the mismatch repair genes and microsatellite instability. Subsequent mutation analysis will lead to a definitive diagnosis of the underlying disorder.

  8. Three cases of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in a Korean family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joong Hyuk; Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Ki Hwang; Lew, Ho Min; Chang, Yoon-Hee

    2004-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances of the skin, hair, and iris, and other developmental defects such as lateral displacement of both medial canthi and lacrimal puncta called dystopia canthorum. While mutations of the PAX3 (paired box) gene have been identified in about 99% of WS type 1 cases, WS type 2 is a heterogeneous group, with about 15% of cases caused by mutations in microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). We have experienced three cases of typical WS type 2 in a Korean family, for whom full ocular examination and genetic studies were performed. The genetic studies revealed no mutation in either PAX3 or MITF genes. The genetic basis, as yet unknown for most cases of WS type 2, might be found with further investigation.

  9. Support of positive association in family-based genetic analysis between COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguo; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Quanchen; Cui, Jiajia; Yi, Mingji; Zhang, Xinhua; Ge, Yinlin; Ma, Xu

    2015-08-03

    Recently, a genome-wide association study has indicated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Collagen Type XXVII Alpha 1 gene (COL27A1) and Tourette syndrome in several ethnic populations. To clarify the global relevance of the previously identified SNPs in the development of Tourette syndrome, the associations between polymorphisms in COL27A1 and Tourette syndrome were assessed in Chinese trios. PCR-directed sequencing was used to evaluate the genetic contributions of three SNPs in COL27A1(rs4979356, rs4979357 and rs7868992) using haplotype relative risk (HRR) and transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT) with a total of 260 Tourette syndrome trios. The family-based association was significant between Tourette syndrome and rs4979356 (TDT: χ2 = 4.804, P = 0.033; HRR = 1.75, P = 0.002; HHRR = 1.32, P = 0.027), and transmission disequilibrium was suspected for rs4979357 (TDT: χ2 = 3.969, P = 0.053; HRR = 1.84, P = 0.001; HHRR = 1.29, P = 0.044). No statistically significant allele transfer was found for rs7868992 (TDT: χ2 = 2.177, P = 0.158). Although the TDT results did not remain significant after applying the conservative Bonferroni correction (p = 0.005), the significant positive HRR analysis confirmed the possibility of showing transmission disequilibrium, which provides evidence for an involvement of COL27A1in the development of TS. However, these results need to be verified with larger datasets from different populations.

  10. How much do family physicians involve pregnant women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Susie; Labrecque, Michel; Njoya, Merlin; Rousseau, François; St-Jacques, Sylvie; Légaré, France

    2010-02-01

    To assess the extent to which family physicians (FPs) involve women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome. Based on transcripts of consultations between 41 FPs and 128 women, two raters independently assessed clinician's efforts to involve women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome using the French-language version of OPTION. Descriptive statistics of OPTION scores were calculated. Construct validity was assessed by performing a principal factor analysis and by measuring association with consultation duration and FPs sociodemograhics. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha and inter-rater reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient. The overall mean OPTION score was low: 19 +/- 7 (range = 0 [no involvement] to 100 [high involvement]). One factor accounted for 80% of the variance. Both internal consistency and inter-rater reliability were very good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.73; ICC = 0.76). OPTION scores were lower for residents than for licensed FPs (17 +/- 5 vs 21 +/- 4; p = 0.02) and were positively associated with duration of consultation (r = 0.56; p women in decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS. METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%. Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%; multiparous mothers (92.6%; vaginal delivery (77%; preterm birth (34.6%; birth weight <2500g (33.3%, and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75% and in the 5th minute (42.9%. About half of them (53% died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients.

  12. Produção de carvão ativado a partir de bagaço e melaço de canade- açúcar = Production of granular activated carbons from sugar cane bagasse and molasses

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    Gilberto da Cunha Gonçalves

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carvões ativados foram preparados a partir de diferentes misturas de bagaço e melaço de cana-de-açúcar. A relação mássica bagaço:melaço variou de 1:0 a 1:2. Cada mistura foi prensada, formando pellets, os quais foram submetidos a uma pirólise sob fluxo de 150 mL·min-1 de N2, a 850°C, por 1 hora. Os carvões pirolisados foram ativados comCO2, sob fluxo de 75 mL·min-1, a 850°C, durante 30 min. A caracterização dos carvões ativados foi realizada pela análise de isotermas de adsorção física de N2 (77 K, pH e descoloração de soluções de melaço de cana (1% p/v. O rendimento médio dos carvõesativados foi de 23% em relação aos pellets iniciais. A área superficial específica dos carvões variou de 272 a 455 m2·g-1 com predominância de micro e mesoporos. Os carvões ativados preparados com pequena adição de melaço apresentaram-se tão eficientes na descoloração quanto um carvão ativado comercial, utilizado como referência.Activated carbons were prepared from mixtures of sugar cane bagasse and molasses in bagasse:molasses mass ratios from 1:0 to 1:2. The mixture was pressed to form pellets, and pyrolyzed under N2 flow of 150 mL·min-1, at 850°C, for 1 hour. The pyrolyzed carbons were activated with CO2, under the flow of 75 mL·min-1 at 850°C for 30 min. The activated carbons were characterized by an analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms (77 K, pH, and solutions decolorization of sugar cane molasses (1% w/v. Results showed that the activated carbons presented yield of 23% in relation to the initial pellets, surface areas from 272 to 455 m2·g-1, and that micro and mesopores were predominant in the pore size distribution. Activated carbons made with a smaller amount of molasses in the mixture were as efficient in the decolorization as a commercial reference carbon.

  13. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

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    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

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    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type, Is Linked to Chromosome 8p22-8p21.1 in an Extended Belgian Family

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    Delfien Syx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility is a common, mostly benign, finding in the general population. In a subset of individuals, however, it causes a range of clinical problems, mainly affecting the musculoskeletal system. Joint hypermobility often appears as a familial trait and is shared by several heritable connective tissue disorders, including the hypermobility subtype of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT or benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS. These hereditary conditions provide unique models for the study of the genetic basis of joint hypermobility. Nevertheless, these studies are largely hampered by the great variability in clinical presentation and the often vague mode of inheritance in many families. Here, we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a unique three-generation family with an autosomal dominant EDS-HT phenotype and identified a linkage interval on chromosome 8p22-8p21.1, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.73. Subsequent whole exome sequencing revealed the presence of a unique missense variant in the LZTS1 gene, located within the candidate region. Subsequent analysis of 230 EDS-HT/BJHS patients resulted in the identification of three additional rare variants. This is the first reported genome-wide linkage analysis in an EDS-HT family, thereby providing an opportunity to identify a new disease gene for this condition.

  16. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

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    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  17. The Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome in 2 Italian Families

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    Katia Perruccio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two 8- and 9-year-old brothers were referred to the Pediatric Oncology Unit, Perugia General Hospital, because of hyperferritinemia. Both had a history of bilateral cataract and epilepsy. Genetic investigation revealed two distinct mutations in iron haemostasis genes; homozygosity for the HFE gene H63D mutation in the younger and heterozygosity in the elder. Both displayed heterozygosity for C33T mutation in the ferritin light chain iron response element. A 7-year-old boy from another family was referred to our unit because of hyperferritinemia. Genetic analyses did not reveal HFE gene mutations. Family history showed that his mother was also affected by hyperferritinemia without HFE gene mutations. Magnetic resonance imaging in the mother was positive for iron overload in the spleen. Cataract was diagnosed in mother and child. Further genetic investigation revealed the C29G mutation of the ferritin light chain iron response element. C33T and C29G mutations in the ferritin light chain iron response element underlie the Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome (HHCS. The HFE gene H63D mutation underlies Hereditary Haemochromatosis (HH, which needs treatment to prevent organ damages by iron overload. HHCS was definitively diagnosed in all three children. HHCS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased L-ferritin production. L-Ferritin aggregates accumulate preferentially in the lens, provoking bilateral cataract since childhood, as unique known organ damage. Epilepsy in one case and the spleen iron overload in another could suggest the misleading diagnosis of HH. Consequently, the differential diagnosis between alterations of iron storage system was essential, particularly in children, and required further genetic investigation.

  18. Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.

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    Ponti, G; Ponz de Leon, M; Maffei, S; Pedroni, M; Losi, L; Di Gregorio, C; Gismondi, V; Scarselli, A; Benatti, P; Roncari, B; Seidenari, S; Pellacani, G; Varotti, C; Prete, E; Varesco, L; Roncucci, L

    2005-11-01

    Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.Peculiar dermatologic manifestations are present in several heritable gastrointestinal disorders. Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a genodermatosis whose peculiar feature is the presence of sebaceous gland tumors associated with visceral malignancies. We describe one patient in whom multiple sebaceous gland tumors were associated with early onset colon and thyroid cancers and attenuated polyposis coli. Her family history was positive for colonic adenomas. She had a daughter presenting with yellow papules in the forehead region developed in the late infancy. Skin and visceral neoplasms were tested for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical status of mismatch repair (MMR), APC and MYH proteins. The proband colon and skin tumors were microsatellite stable and showed normal expression of MMR proteins. Cytoplasmic expression of MYH protein was revealed in colonic cancer cells. Compound heterozygosity due to biallelic mutations in MYH, R168H and 379delC, was identified in the proband. The 11-year-old daughter was carrier of the monoallelic constitutional mutation 379delC in the MYH gene; in the sister, the R168H MYH gene mutation was detected. This report presents an interesting case of association between MYH-associated polyposis and sebaceous gland tumors. These findings suggest that patients with MTS phenotype that include colonic polyposis should be screened for MYH gene mutations.

  19. Familial Gastric Cancers.

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    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W; Duda, Dan G; Hong, Theodore S; Kwak, Eunice L; Mullen, John T; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-12-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%-3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. [Reaven's metabolic syndrome X in the families of individuals with premature cerebrovascular attacks].

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    Vaverková, H; Ficker, L; Vlachová, I; Chudácková, J; Novotný, D; Budíková, M

    1993-08-01

    In families of subjects with premature ischaemic cerebrovascular attacks (a total of 45 families with 190 members) the authors detected a high incidence of dyslipidaemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, frequently with striking cumulation. The authors investigated therefore the relationship of the insulin level as an indirect reflection of insulin resistance with these risk factors. The fasting insulin levels correlated significantly positively with triglyceride levels, apolipoprotein B, atherogenic indices and negatively with HDL-cholesterol. The probands and siblings with arterial hypertension had significantly higher fasting insulin levels, as compared with subjects without hypertension which was due to a more frequent incidence of overweight. Patients with an impaired glucose tolerance and NIDDM had significantly higher fasting insulin levels and insulin levels after two hours (the latter value was not assessed in diabetes) and unfavourable "atherogenic" lipid and lipoprotein values, as compared with subjects without glucose intolerance and the control group. Overweight (BMI > 26) had an adverse impact on all investigated indicators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism whereby a W/H ratio > 0.85 as a manifestation of central obesity further accentuated this adverse effect. The authors draw from these results therapeutic conclusions as regards the mentioned risk factors in these families. They emphasize the importance of non-pharmacological intervention of the metabolic X syndrome by weight reduction and more physical activity not only in families of subjects with early atherosclerosis but in the entire population which has a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases.