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Sample records for melanerpes carolinus sphyrapicus

  1. Assessment of genotoxicity and depuration of anthracene in the juvenile coastal fish Trachinotus carolinus using the comet assay

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    Fabio Matsu Hasue

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, anthracene is characterized as being persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic to aquatic organisms. Biotransformation of xenobiotic substances, such as anthracene, produces reactive oxygen species that may induce DNA strand breaks. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the DNA damage in juvenile T. carolinus exposed to different concentrations (8, 16 and 32 µg.L-1 of anthracene for 24 h in the dark then subsequently allowed to depurate in clean water for different periods of time (48, 96 or 144 h using the comet assay. Our results show that anthracene is genotoxic to T. carolinus and that DNA damage was dose- and depuration/time- dependent. Anthracenegenotoxicity was observed in all experimental concentrations. Depuration seemed to be more efficient in fish exposed to thelowest anthracene concentration and maintained in clean water for 96 h.

  2. Metazoan parasite infracommunities of Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) from the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

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    Sánchez-Ramírez, Claudia; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M

    2002-12-01

    Metazoan parasite infracommunities of the Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) were studied in terms of species composition, species richness, diversity, numerical dominance, and similarity. Seventy-five fishes were collected from 4 localities along the Yucatan Peninsula coast and 24 parasite species recovered. Most were digeneans (8 species) and nematodes (7). Other species were monogeneans (3). aspidogastreans (2), cestodes (1), acanthocephalans (1), and crustaceans (2). Only 4 species were common in at least I locality. Mean values for species richness, abundance, diversity, numerical dominance, and similarity in total (all species in the individual fish), gastrointestinal, and ectoparasite infracommunities were within ranges observed for most helminth infracommunities of marine fishes from temperate and tropical latitudes. These infracommunities had low species richness, abundance, diversity, and predictability (except ectoparasite infracommunities) and high dominance. Within the predictable element (common species), the specialist monogenean Pseudobicotylophora atlantica was the main reason for the increase in predictability because it was the only common species at all 4 localities. Host feeding habits, the distribution of intermediate hosts and infective stages, the local species pool, and a phylogenetic component seem to be determining the characteristics of these metazoan parasite infracommunities.

  3. Genotoxicity, potential cytotoxicity and cell uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus (Linnaeus, 1766)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignardi, Caroline P., E-mail: carolpatvig@usp.br [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Hasue, Fabio M., E-mail: humbigutis@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Sartório, Priscila V., E-mail: pri.sartorio@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Cardoso, Caroline M., E-mail: camargonato@gmail.com [Department of Biological Oceanography, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Praça do Oceanogáfico 191, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508900 (Brazil); Machado, Alex S.D., E-mail: mamiferomarinho@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Integrated College North of Minas Osmane Barbosa Avenue, 11111, JK, Montes Claros, MG 39404006 (Brazil); and others

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}–NP cytogenotoxicity and cell uptake in marine fish was studied. • TiO{sub 2}–NP suspension was in primary particle, agglomerated and aggregated form. • TiO{sub 2}–NP genotoxicity was time/dose dependent and may induce cell uptake. • Methodology proved to be efficient for evaluating the toxic effect of TiO{sub 2}–NP. - Abstract: Nanoparticles have physicochemical characteristics that make them useful in areas such as science, technology, medicine and in products of everyday use. Recently the manufacture and variety of these products has grown rapidly, raising concerns about their impact on human health and the environment. Adverse effects of exposure to nanoparticles have been reported for both terrestrial and aquatic organisms, but the toxic effects of the substances on marine organisms remain poorly understood. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of TiO{sub 2}–NP in the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus, through cytogenotoxic methods. The fish received two different doses of 1.5 μg and 3.0 μg–TiO{sub 2}–NP g{sup −1} by intraperitoneal injection. Blood samples were collected to analyze erythrocyte viability using the Trypan Blue exclusion test, comet assay (pH > 13), micronucleus (MN) and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities (ENA) 24, 48 and 72 h after injection. The possible cell uptake of TiO{sub 2}–NP in fish injected with the higher dose was investigated after 72 h using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that TiO{sub 2}–NP is genotoxic and potentially cytotoxic for this species, causing DNA damage, inducing the formation of MN and other ENA, and decreasing erythrocyte viability. TEM examination revealed that cell uptake of TiO{sub 2}–NP was mainly in the kidney, liver, gills and to a lesser degree in muscle. To the extent of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first in vivo study of genotoxicity and other effects of TiO{sub 2}–NP in a marine fish.

  4. Densidad de sitios para anidar y su uso por dos especies de pájaro carpintero (Melanerpes rubricapillus y M. chrysauchen (Piciformes: Picidae en un gradiente urbano de Costa Rica

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    Luis Sandoval

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Examiné la densidad de sustratos potencialmente utilizables para anidar por parte de dos especies de pájaros carpinteros (Melanerpes rubricapillus y M. chrysauchen, a lo largo de un gradiente urbano, así como la densidad de sus nidos, haciendo una búsqueda exhaustiva en tres sitios en Golfito, Costa Rica. El área urbana y semi-urbana tuvo la menor densidad de sustratos naturales. La densidad de nidos fue mayor en el área semi-urbana que en los otros dos sitios, posiblemente debido a una mayor abundancia de carpinteros. Los nidos se distribuyeron de forma agrupada, indicando a una mayor preferencia de los carpinteros por anidar en sustratos naturales. Una remoción de los sustratos artificiales podría causar una disminución de la población de ambas especies de carpinteros.Density of nesting sites and their use by two woodpecker species (Melanerpes rubricapillus y M. chrysauchen (Piciformes: Picidae along an urban gradient, Costa Rica. I examined the density of nesting substrates potentially used by two woodpeckers (Melanerpes rubricapillus and M. chrysauchen along an urban gradient, and their nest density in three sites with different human intervention in Golfito, Costa Rica. The urban and semi-urban sites had the lowest abundance of natural substrates for nesting, as expected by the effect of urban development. Nest abundance was greater in the semiurban site than in other sites, possibly in relation with a greater abundance of woodpeckers. Nests had a grouping distribution, which might reflect the preference of woodpeckers for nesting in natural substrates. The reduction of artificial and natural substrates in urban areas could decrease density population of these two woodpecker species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1: 351-355 Epub 2009 November 30.

  5. Assessment of trophic transfer of benzo(a)pyrene genotoxicity from the post-larval pink shrimp F. brasiliensis to the juvenile Florida pompano T. carolinus.

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    Rocha, Arthur José da Silva; Santos, Thaís Cruz Alves; Gomes, Vicente; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Barbosa, Ana Cecília Rizzatti de Albergaria; Passos, Maria José de Arruda Campos Rocha; Hasue, Fabio Matsu; Van Ngan, Phan

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) genotoxicity was investigated in a one-step predator-prey relationship with the trophic-related marine species. Florida pompanos were fed for 5 and 10 days with pink shrimp post larvae previously exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentrations. Parent BaP body burden was measured in samples of Farfantepenaeus brasiliensis. BaP metabolites were determined in bile samples of Trachinotus carolinus and DNA damage was assessed through the comet and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities (ENAs) assays in fish erythrocytes. BaP body burden increased significantly with the PAH concentration in pink shrimp PLs as well as the fish bile BaP metabolites. Both, comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increase on erythrocyte DNA damage of Florida pompanos fed with BaP-exposed pink shrimp on both feeding periods. The trophic route of BaP genotoxicity is discussed as well as the PAH biotransformation as the inducing mechanism for the DNA damages observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecomorphology and food habits of teleost fishes Trachinotus carolinus (Teleostei: Carangidae and Menticirrhus littoralis (Teleostei: Sciaenidae, inhabiting the surf zone off Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Luana Prestrelo Palmeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecomorphology and food habits of juvenile Trachinotus carolinus and Menticirrhus littoralis caught in the surf zone of sandy beaches in Niterói, RJ, were investigated between July 2006 and May 2007. These fish species differ morphologically, but present similarities in their diet composition suggest some slight overlapping in their diet. The importance of food items was assessed using Kawakami and Vazzoler's feeding index. Morphometric variables were recorded to correlate with the diet composition of the different size classes for each species. A total of 210 fishes (Trachinotus carolinus - 122, Menticirrhus littoralis - 88, ranging between 24.2 mm and 112 mm total length, were analyzed, but the stomachs of only 84.8% of them contained food. Trachinotus carolinus presented mysids, Polychaetes and Emerita spp. as the predominant items in their diet. Formicidae and Isopoda were the most important items for class I individuals, whereas mysids and Emerita spp. were important for classes II and III. Class I individuals also showed smaller sized prey (amphipods and isopods and clupeid fish larvae in their diet. Emerita spp. dominated the food items of Menticirrhus littoralis regardless of the size class. Polychaetes, the second most important item was better represented in class sizes II and III. The main morphometric variable correlated with such differences included mouth position and diameter of the eye.A ecomorfologia e os hábitos alimentares de juvenis de Trachinotus carolinus e Menticirrhus littoralis capturados na zona de arrebentação de praias arenosas em Niterói, RJ, foram investigados entre julho de 2006 e Maio de 2007. Ambas as espécies diferem morfologicamente, mas apresentam semelhanças em sua dieta, sugerindo uma possível sobreposição alimentar. A importância dos itens alimentares foi avaliada utilizando o índice alimentar de Kawakami e Vazzoler. Variáveis morfométricas foram correlacionadas à dieta observada para

  7. Densidad de sitios para anidar y su uso por dos especies de pájaro carpintero (Melanerpes rubricapillus y M. chrysauchen (Piciformes: Picidae en un gradiente urbano de Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sandoval

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Examiné la densidad de sustratos potencialmente utilizables para anidar por parte de dos especies de pájaros carpinteros (Melanerpes rubricapillus y M. chrysauchen, a lo largo de un gradiente urbano, así como la densidad de sus nidos, haciendo una búsqueda exhaustiva en tres sitios en Golfito, Costa Rica. El área urbana y semi-urbana tuvo la menor densidad de sustratos naturales. La densidad de nidos fue mayor en el área semi-urbana que en los otros dos sitios, posiblemente debido a una mayor abundancia de carpinteros. Los nidos se distribuyeron de forma agrupada, indicando a una mayor preferencia de los carpinteros por anidar en sustratos naturales. Una remoción de los sustratos artificiales podría causar una disminución de la población de ambas especies de carpinteros.

  8. Complex biogeographic scenarios revealed in the diversification of the largest woodpecker radiation in the New World.

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    Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Vázquez-Miranda, Hernán; Hernández-Alonso, Germán; García-Trejo, Erick A; Sánchez-González, Luis A

    2017-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and patterns of evolution within Melanerpes, one of the most diverse groups of New World woodpeckers (22-23 lineages), have been complicated due to complex plumages and morphological adaptations. In an attempt to resolve these issues, we obtained sequence data from four nuclear introns and two mitochondrial protein-coding genes for 22 of the 24 currently recognized species in the genus. We performed phylogenetic analyses involving Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, species-tree divergence dating, and biogeographic reconstructions. Tree topologies from the concatenated and species-tree analyses of the mtDNA and nDNA showed broadly similar patterns, with three relatively well-supported groups apparent: (a) the Sphyrapicus clade (four species); (b) the typical Melanerpes clade, which includes temperate and subtropical dry forest black-backed species; and (c) the mostly barred-backed species, here referred to as the "Centurus" clade. The phylogenetic position of Melanerpes superciliaris regarding the rest of Melanerpes is ambiguous as it is recovered as sister to the rest of Melanerpes or as sister to a group including Sphyrapicus+Melanerpes. Our species tree estimations recovered the same well-delimited highly-supported clades. Geographic range evolution (estimated in BioGeoBEARS) was best explained by a DIVALIKE+j model, which includes vicariance, founder effect speciation, and anagenetic dispersal (range expansion) as important processes involved in the diversification of the largest radiation of woodpeckers in the New World. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Common, but Commonly Overlooked: Red-bellied Woodpeckers as Songbird Nest Predators

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    Kirsten R. Hazler; Dawn E.W. Drumtra; Matthew R. Marshall; Robert J. Cooper; Paul B. Hamel

    2004-01-01

    Woodpeckers in North America are not widely recognized as nest predators. In this paper, we describe several eyewitness accounts of songbird nest predation by Red-bellied Woodpeckers (Melanerpes carolinus), document evidence that songbirds recognize woodpeckers as nest predators, and show that our observations are consistent with previously published...

  10. Plant Products Affect Growth and Digestive Efficiency of Cultured Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) Fed Compounded Diets

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    Lech, Gregory P.; Reigh, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Costs of compounded diets containing fish meal as a primary protein source can be expected to rise as fish meal prices increase in response to static supply and growing demand. Alternatives to fish meal are needed to reduce production costs in many aquaculture enterprises. Some plant proteins are potential replacements for fish meal because of their amino acid composition, lower cost and wide availability. In this study, we measured utilization of soybean meal (SBM) and soy protein concentrate (SPC) by Florida pompano fed compounded diets, to determine the efficacy of these products as fish meal replacements. We also calculated apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) for canola meal (CM), corn gluten meal (CGM), and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), following typical methods for digestibility trials. Juvenile Florida pompano were fed fish-meal-free diets containing graded levels of SBM and SPC, and weight gain was compared to a control diet that contained SBM, SPC, and fish meal. Fish fed diets that contained 25–30 percent SBM in combination with 43–39 percent SPC had weight gain equivalent to fish fed the control diet with fish meal, while weight gain of fish fed other soy combinations was significantly less than that of the control group. Apparent crude protein digestibility of CGM was significantly higher than that of DDGS but not significantly different from CM. Apparent energy digestibility of DDGS was significantly lower than CGM but significantly higher than CM. Findings suggested that composition of the reference diet used in a digestibility trial affects the values of calculated ADCs, in addition to the chemical and physical attributes of the test ingredient. PMID:22536344

  11. Amino acid availability from select feed ingredients in the euryhaline Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus adapted to seawater and low salinity

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    As with most marine carnivores, Florida pompano require relatively high crude protein diets to obtain optimal growth. Precision formulations to match the dietary indispensable amino acid pattern to a species' requirements can be used to increase protein efficiency and lower overall dietary protein...

  12. Dynamics of Woodpecker – Common Starling interactions: a comparison of Old World and New World species and populations

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    Jackson Jerome A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Woodpecker species whose cavities are most usurped by Common Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris are widespread and generalists in their use of habitats. These include primarily woodpeckers that are similar in size to or slightly larger than the starling - such as the Great-spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major of Eurasia and the Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus and Red-bellied (Melanerpes carolinus and Red-headed (M. erythrocephalus Woodpeckers of North America. Usurpation occurs primarily in human-dominated urban, suburban and exurban habitats with pastures, sports fields and other open areas that serve as prime feeding habitats for starlings. Starlings prefer high, more exposed cavities with a minimal entrance diameter relative to their body size. Usurpation success depends on timing - optimally just as a cavity is completed and before egg-laying by the woodpeckers. Starlings likely reduce woodpecker populations in more open, human-dominated habitats. Woodpecker habitat losses and fragmentation are more serious problems that enhance habitat quality for starlings and reduce habitat quality for most woodpeckers. The only woodpeckers that might become in danger of extinction as a primary result of starling cavity usurpation are likely island species with small populations. Conservation of rare species limited to islands, such as Fernandina’s Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae of Cuba, may depend on our ability to prevent the establishment of the Common Starling or other aggressive cavity competitors on their island.

  13. Apparent digestible protein, energy, and amino acid availability of three plant proteins in Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus L. in seawater and low-salinity

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    There is interest in rearing the marine euryhaline Florida pompano in low-salinity. However, insufficient nutrient availability data to formulate well-balanced low-cost diets presents an obstacle to large-scale commercial production. Evidence also suggests salinity affects nutrient availability in ...

  14. Resource partitioning among woodpeckers in northeastern Oregon.

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    Bull Evelyn L.; Steven R. Peterson; Jack Ward. Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Eight species of woodpeckers coexist in conifer forests in northeastern Oregon: northern flicker (Colaptes auratus); yellow-bellied (Sphyrapicus varius) and Williamson's (S. thyroideus) sapsuckers; and pileated (Dryocopus pileatus), hairy (Picoides villosus),...

  15. Laboratory experiment, the number of clams consumed by the fish of FLORIDA POMPANO in experimental tanks feeding on coquina clams individually and in groups from 2013-11-26 to 2013-12-03 (NCEI Accession 0127553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset includes the results from a laboratory experiment assessing whether juvenile Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) foraging success is greater when in...

  16. HOW to Identify and Control Sapsucker Injury on Trees

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    Michael E. Ostry; Thomas H. Nicholls

    1976-01-01

    The yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), a member of the woodpecker family, is a migratory bird whose summer breeding range includes the Lakes States region. The identifying field markings of adult birds are a black crescent on the breast, pale yellow belly, white wing stripe, and a crimson crown. The male also has a crimson chin and throat, distinguishing...

  17. Geographic and seasonal variation in mercury exposure of the declining Rusty Blackbird

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    Samuel T. Edmonds; David C. Evers; Daniel A. Cristol; Claudia Mettke-Hofmann; Luke L. Powell

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that mercury exposure has negative effects on the health of songbirds, and species that forage in wetlands may be at a greater risk of bioaccumulation of mercury than are those of other habitats. We examined mercury concentrations in blood and feathers from the wetland obligate and rapidly declining Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) from...

  18. Revision of the Genus Hybosorus Macleay (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Hybosorinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijten, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the scarabaeoid genus Hybosorus is given, including descriptions, nomenclatorial notes, figures of genital apparatus and other relevant parts, a key, and notes on distribution and bionomics. Lectotypes are designated for Hybosorus carolinus LeConte, H. crassus Klug, H.

  19. Historical trends in rusty blackbird nonbreeding habitat in forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul B. Hamel; Diane De Steven; Ted Leininger; Randy. Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) populations have declined perhaps 95% in the recent past, creating legitimate concern that the species may become endangered. During the nonbreeding period the species occurs predominantly in southern U.S. forested wetland habitats, with concentrations in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and in the southeastern...

  20. Evaluation of a low-head recirculating aquaculture system used for rearing Florida pompano to market size

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    A low-head recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was evaluated for the production Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus from juvenile to market size. The RAS consisted of three dual-drain, 3-m diameter culture tanks of 7.8 m3 volume each, two 0.7-m3 moving bed bioreactors filled 67% with K1 kaldnes...

  1. Pompano reared to market size in RAS: Low salinity culture successful

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    Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus, are found in coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts, USA, to Brazil and throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Due to pompano’s superior market value, interest in its culture developed in the US during the 1960s and 1970s. Research conducted during ...

  2. Recovery of market size Florida pompano, grown at 3 ppt salinity, from the effects of severe osmotic stress after increasing salinity to 12 ppt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturing a saltwater fish, such as Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus, in near freshwater can lead to physiological changes that lead to slow growth, organ damage, and reduced survival. During a study to examine growth of pompano at different daily feed rates in low salinity (3 ppt) recirculati...

  3. Garrison Project - Lake Sakakawea Oil and Gas Management Plan, North Dakota

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    2012-11-01

    origin and specification of the sand, gravel, or stone that will be used for road construction must be included in this section. No construction...Haliaeetus leucocephalus Bald eagle Lanius ludovicianus Loggerhead shrike Limosa fedoa Marbled godwit Melanerpes...materials, such as sand, gravel, stone , and soil. BLM will approve use of construction materials on ac- quired lands for use off the installation

  4. Nest-site selection and nest survival of Lewis's woodpecker in aspen riparian woodlands

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    Karen R. Newlon; Victoria A. Saab

    2011-01-01

    Riparian woodlands of aspen (Populus tremuloides) provide valuable breeding habitat for several cavity-nesting birds. Although anecdotal information for this habitat is available for Lewis's Woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), no study has previously examined the importance of aspen woodlands to this species' breeding biology. From 2002 to 2004, we monitored 76...

  5. Nest densities of cavity-nesting birds in relation to postfire salvage logging and time since wildfire

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    Victoria A. Saab; Robin E. Russell; Jonathan G. Dudley

    2007-01-01

    We monitored the nest densities and nest survival of seven cavity-nesting bird species, including four open-space foragers (American Kestrel [Falco sparverius], Lewis's Woodpecker [Melanerpes lewis], Western Bluebird [Sialia mexicana], and Mountain Bluebird [S. currucoides]) and three wood...

  6. Finding of No Significant Impact & Tiered Environmental Assessment: Public Law 84-99 Rehabilitation Program Levee Unit 624-627 - Mosquito Creek Pottawattamie County, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    spp.), northern flicker (Colaptes auratus), red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus), wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), eastern kingbird...aquatic environment. Some commenters asked that compensatory mitigation be required for all activities authorized by this NWP. A few commenters...remarked that compensatory mitigation should be required for adverse effects on high quality riparian areas. Another commenter said that mitigation should

  7. Notes on breeding sharp-shinned hawks and cooper’s hawks in Barnwell County, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Vukovich; John C. Kilgo

    2009-01-01

    Breeding records of Accipiter striatus (Sharp-shinned Hawks) in the southeastern US are scattered and isolated. We documented a Sharp-shinned Hawk and Accipiter cooperii (Cooper’s Hawk) nest while conducting a telemetry study on Melanerpes erythrocephalus (Red-headed Woodpeckers) in Barnwell County, SC in 2006 and 2007. We report the first known nest of a Sharp-shinned...

  8. Nestling diets and provisioning rates of sympatric Golden-fronted and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Evonne L.; Boal, Clint W.; Glasscock, Selma N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined comparative food use and provisioning of Golden-fronted (Melanerpes aurifrons) and Ladder-backed (Picoides scalaris) woodpeckers at the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge, in San Patricio County, Texas. We combined video surveillance and direct observations to monitor provisioning rates and identify items delivered by adult woodpeckers to nestlings. We collected 328 hours of data at Ladder-backed Woodpecker nest cavities and 230 hours of data at Golden-fronted Woodpecker nest cavities. Ladder-backed Woodpecker nestling diets consisted of 100% animal matter, comprised of invertebrate larvae (99%) and invertebrate adults (nestlings were also high in animal matter (77%) with more invertebrate adults (55%) and fewer invertebrate larvae (27%), but also included vegetable matter (16%). Morisita's measure of overlap suggested a relatively low dietary overlap of 31% between nestlings of these two sympatric woodpecker species. Foraging methods used by these species may explain their low dietary overlap and facilitate their coexistence.

  9. Notes on breeding sharp-shinned hawks and Cooper’s hawks in Barnwell County, South Carolina.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovich, Mark; Kilgo, John, C.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract - Breeding records of Accipiter striatus (Sharp-shinned Hawks) in the southeastern US are scattered and isolated. We documented a Sharp-shinned Hawk and Accipiter cooperii (Cooper’s Hawk) nest while conducting a telemetry study on Melanerpes erythrocephalus (Red-headed Woodpeckers) in Barnwell County, SC in 2006 and 2007. We report the first known nest of a Sharp-shinned Hawk in Barnwell County, SC and the first report of Sharp-shinned Hawks preying upon Red-headed Woodpeckers. Thirteen of 93 (13.9 %) woodpeckers were killed by accipiters in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Large, contiguous forests managed for Picoides borealis (Red-cockaded Woodpeckers) may be used by breeding Sharp-shinned Hawks. The bright plumage, loud calls, and behavior of Red-headed Woodpeckers, particularly during the nestling stage, may make them conspicuous prey for accipiters.

  10. Competition and habitat quality influence age and sex distribution in wintering rusty blackbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Hamel, Paul B; Hofmann, Gerhard; Zenzal, Theodore J; Pellegrini, Anne; Malpass, Jennifer; Garfinkel, Megan; Schiff, Nathan; Greenberg, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes.

  11. Competition and habitat quality influence age and sex distribution in wintering rusty blackbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mettke-Hofmann

    Full Text Available Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes.

  12. A Comparison of Growth and Survival of Aquacultured Juvenile Florida Pompano fed Fishmeal and Plant-Based Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the growth and survival of aquacultured juvenile Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) fed two different diets. Pompano (initial weight 7.7 g /fish) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments: Zeigler pellets (fishmeal; 35% protein, 5% lipid) and a plant-based Repashy Soilent Green algae gel (plant-based; 35% protein, 6% lipid). Fish were fed rations of 5% body weight twice daily for eight weeks. Despite nearly equivalent proximate compositions for the two feeds, survival rates were significantly affected by diet. All fish fed the Zeigler diet survived; however, mortality was observed in 92% of the fish fed the Repashy diet. At the end of the trial, mean weight gain of surviving pompano was highest in fish fed Zeigler pellets. Mean specific growth rate (SGR) for fish fed the Zeigler diet (0.24% per day) was higher than for fish fed Repashy (-2.44%).While plant-based feeds have been successfully used with the species, these results suggest that the plant-based Repashy diet is not suitable for survival or growth of aquacultured Florida pompano.

  13. Habitat-mediated variation in the importance of ecosystem engineers for secondary cavity nesters in a nest web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Hugo; Martin, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Through physical state changes in biotic or abiotic materials, ecosystem engineers modulate resource availability to other organisms and are major drivers of evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Understanding whether and how ecosystem engineers are interchangeable for resource users in different habitats is a largely neglected topic in ecosystem engineering research that can improve our understanding of the structure of communities. We addressed this issue in a cavity-nest web (1999-2011). In aspen groves, the presence of mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolour) nests was positively related to the density of cavities supplied by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), which provided the most abundant cavities (1.61 cavities/ha). Flickers in aspen groves provided numerous nesting cavities to bluebirds (66%) and swallows (46%), despite previous research showing that flicker cavities are avoided by swallows. In continuous mixed forests, however, the presence of nesting swallows was mainly related to cavity density of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis), which provided the most abundant cavities (0.52 cavities/ha), and to cavity density of hairy woodpeckers (Picoides villosus), which provided few (0.14 cavities/ha) but high-quality cavities. Overall, sapsuckers and hairy woodpeckers provided 86% of nesting cavities to swallows in continuous forests. In contrast, the presence of nesting bluebirds in continuous forests was associated with the density of cavities supplied by all the ecosystem engineers. These results suggest that (i) habitat type may mediate the associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users, and (ii) different ecosystem engineers may be interchangeable for resource users depending on the quantity and quality of resources that each engineer supplies in each habitat type. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of the variation in the quantity and quality of resources provided by ecosystem engineers

  14. Using Field Data and GIS-Derived Variables to Model Occurrence of Williamson's Sapsucker Nesting Habitat at Multiple Spatial Scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Drever

    Full Text Available Williamson's sapsucker (Sphyrapicus thyroideus is a migratory woodpecker that breeds in mixed coniferous forests in western North America. In Canada, the range of this woodpecker is restricted to three small populations in southern British Columbia, precipitating a national listing as 'Endangered' in 2005, and the need to characterize critical habitat for its survival and recovery. We compared habitat attributes between Williamson's sapsucker nest territories and random points without nests or detections of this sapsucker as part of a resource selection analysis to identify the habitat features that best explain the probability of nest occurrence in two separate geographic regions in British Columbia. We compared the relative explanatory power of generalized linear models based on field-derived and Geographic Information System (GIS data within both a 225 m and 800 m radius of a nest or random point. The model based on field-derived variables explained the most variation in nest occurrence in the Okanagan-East Kootenay Region, whereas nest occurrence was best explained by GIS information at the 800 m scale in the Western Region. Probability of nest occurrence was strongly tied to densities of potential nest trees, which included open forests with very large (diameter at breast height, DBH, ≥57.5 cm western larch (Larix occidentalis trees in the Okanagan-East Kootenay Region, and very large ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa and large (DBH 17.5-57.5 cm trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides trees in the Western Region. Our results have the potential to guide identification and protection of critical habitat as required by the Species at Risk Act in Canada, and to better manage Williamson's sapsucker habitat overall in North America. In particular, management should focus on the maintenance and recruitment of very large western larch and ponderosa pine trees.

  15. Using Field Data and GIS-Derived Variables to Model Occurrence of Williamson's Sapsucker Nesting Habitat at Multiple Spatial Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drever, Mark C; Gyug, Les W; Nielsen, Jennifer; Stuart-Smith, A Kari; Ohanjanian, I Penny; Martin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Williamson's sapsucker (Sphyrapicus thyroideus) is a migratory woodpecker that breeds in mixed coniferous forests in western North America. In Canada, the range of this woodpecker is restricted to three small populations in southern British Columbia, precipitating a national listing as 'Endangered' in 2005, and the need to characterize critical habitat for its survival and recovery. We compared habitat attributes between Williamson's sapsucker nest territories and random points without nests or detections of this sapsucker as part of a resource selection analysis to identify the habitat features that best explain the probability of nest occurrence in two separate geographic regions in British Columbia. We compared the relative explanatory power of generalized linear models based on field-derived and Geographic Information System (GIS) data within both a 225 m and 800 m radius of a nest or random point. The model based on field-derived variables explained the most variation in nest occurrence in the Okanagan-East Kootenay Region, whereas nest occurrence was best explained by GIS information at the 800 m scale in the Western Region. Probability of nest occurrence was strongly tied to densities of potential nest trees, which included open forests with very large (diameter at breast height, DBH, ≥57.5 cm) western larch (Larix occidentalis) trees in the Okanagan-East Kootenay Region, and very large ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and large (DBH 17.5-57.5 cm) trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees in the Western Region. Our results have the potential to guide identification and protection of critical habitat as required by the Species at Risk Act in Canada, and to better manage Williamson's sapsucker habitat overall in North America. In particular, management should focus on the maintenance and recruitment of very large western larch and ponderosa pine trees.

  16. Columbia River wildlife mitigation habitat evaluation procedures report: Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County pygmy rabbit projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, P.R.; Ratassepp, J.; Berger, M.; Judd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites

  17. Temporal variability and cooperative breeding: testing the bet-hedging hypothesis in the acorn woodpecker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Walter D; Walters, Eric L

    2015-10-07

    Cooperative breeding is generally considered an adaptation to ecological constraints on dispersal and independent breeding, usually due to limited breeding opportunities. Although benefits of cooperative breeding are typically thought of in terms of increased mean reproductive success, it has recently been proposed that this phenomenon may be a bet-hedging strategy that reduces variance in reproductive success (fecundity variance) in populations living in highly variable environments. We tested this hypothesis using long-term data on the polygynandrous acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus). In general, fecundity variance decreased with increasing sociality, at least when controlling for annual variation in ecological conditions. Nonetheless, decreased fecundity variance was insufficient to compensate for reduced per capita reproductive success of larger, more social groups, which typically suffered lower estimated mean fitness. We did, however, find evidence that sociality in the form of larger group size resulted in increased fitness in years following a small acorn crop due to reduced fecundity variance. Bet-hedging, although not the factor driving sociality in general, may play a role in driving acorn woodpecker group living when acorns are scarce and ecological conditions are poor. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  19. Effects of radio transmitters on the behavior of Red-headed Woodpeckers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovich, Mark; Kilgo, John, C.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Previous studies have revealed that radio-transmitters may affect bird behaviors, including feeding rates, foraging behavior, vigilance, and preening behavior. In addition, depending on the method of attachment, transmitters can potentially affect the ability of cavity-nesting birds to use cavities. Our objective was to evaluate effects of transmitters on the behavior of and use of cavities byRed-headedWoodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus). Using backpack harnesses, we attached 2.1-g transmitter packages that averaged 3.1% of body weight (range = 2.5–3.6%) to Red-headed Woodpeckers. We observed both radio-tagged (N = 23) and nonradio-tagged (N = 28) woodpeckers and determined the percentage of time spent engaged in each of five behaviors: flight, foraging, perching, preening, and territorial behavior. We found no difference between the two groups in the percentage of time engaged in each behavior. In addition, we found that transmitters had no apparent effect on use of cavities for roosting by radio-tagged woodpeckers (N = 25).We conclude that backpack transmitters weighing less than 3.6% of body weight had no impact on either their behavior or their ability to use cavities.

  20. Use of Occupancy Models to Evaluate Expert Knowledge-based Species-Habitat Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica N. Iglecia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Expert knowledge-based species-habitat relationships are used extensively to guide conservation planning, particularly when data are scarce. Purported relationships describe the initial state of knowledge, but are rarely tested. We assessed support in the data for suitability rankings of vegetation types based on expert knowledge for three terrestrial avian species in the South Atlantic Coastal Plain of the United States. Experts used published studies, natural history, survey data, and field experience to rank vegetation types as optimal, suitable, and marginal. We used single-season occupancy models, coupled with land cover and Breeding Bird Survey data, to examine the hypothesis that patterns of occupancy conformed to species-habitat suitability rankings purported by experts. Purported habitat suitability was validated for two of three species. As predicted for the Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens and Brown-headed Nuthatch (Sitta pusilla, occupancy was strongly influenced by vegetation types classified as "optimal habitat" by the species suitability rankings for nuthatches and wood-pewees. Contrary to predictions, Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus models that included vegetation types as covariates received similar support by the data as models without vegetation types. For all three species, occupancy was also related to sampling latitude. Our results suggest that covariates representing other habitat requirements might be necessary to model occurrence of generalist species like the woodpecker. The modeling approach described herein provides a means to test expert knowledge-based species-habitat relationships, and hence, help guide conservation planning.

  1. Isopods (Isopoda: Aegidae, Cymothoidae, Gnathiidae associated with Venezuelan marine fishes (Elasmobranchii, Actinopterygii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Bunkley-Williams

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic isopod fauna of fishes in the southern Caribbean is poorly known. In examinations of 12 639 specimens of 187 species of Venezuelan fishes, the authors found 10 species in three families of isopods (Gnathiids, Gnathia spp. from Diplectrum radiale *, Heteropriacanthus cruentatus *, Orthopristis ruber * and Trachinotus carolinus *; two aegids, Rocinela signata from Dasyatis guttata *, H. cruentatus *, Haemulon aurolineatum *, H. steindachneri * and O. ruber ; and Rocinela sp. from Epinephelus flavolimbatus *; five cymothoids: Anilocra haemuli from Haemulon boschmae *, H. flavolineatum * and H. steindachneri *; Anilocra cf haemuli from Heteropriacanthus cruentatus *; Haemulon bonariense*, O. ruber*, Cymothoa excisa in H. cruentatus *; Cymothoa oestrum in Chloroscombrus chrysurus, H. cruentatus* and Priacanthus arenatus ; Cymothoa sp. in O. ruber; Livoneca sp. from H. cruentatus *; and Nerocila fluviatilis from H. cruentatus * and P. arenatus *. The Rocinela sp. and A. cf haemuli in the southern Caribbean could represent new species. The abundance of A. cf haemuli appears to have drastically reduced from 1994 to 1999 in the Gulf of Cariaco. The Cymothoa sp. represents an undescribed species that is apparently host specific to O. ruber . It does not occur in the Gulf of Cariaco, but is relatively abundant on the Caribbean coast of Sucre State, Venezuela. The Livoneca sp. is an undescribed species host specific to Diapterus rhombeus, Cymothoa excisa and C. oestrum were thought to have distinct host preferences, but both infected the Heteropriacanthus cruentatus in the present study.Gnathia spp. are reported from Venezuelan waters for the first time. Twenty new host records* are noted. The fish-associated isopod fauna is much more extensive and important than has previously been suspected. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 175-188. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.Se conoce muy poco acerca de la fauna de isópodos parásitos de peces en el Caribe Sur. Tras

  2. Diel variation of fish community in sandy beaches of southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ricardo Gaelzer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish living in coastal waters present behavior patterns ruled by environmental light levels. Diel variations in fish community structure were investigated at Arraial do Cabo surf zone (22º58'S, 42º01'W. From September/2001 to August/2002 monthly sampling consisted of 12 hauls of a beach seine during the day and at night at Praia dos Anjos, Praia Grande and Prainha beaches. Different temporal distribution patterns of the ichthyc community were recorded. At Praia dos Anjos, total richness was higher at night while the average number of species, CPUE, Margalef's richness and Shannon diversity were generally higher during the day. We believe that this pattern was caused by the displacement of some species such as Harengula clupeola,Trachinotus carolinus and Umbrina coroides at night to deeper areas searching for food or for predator avoidance. At Praia Grande and Prainha the average number of species, CPUE, richness and diversity indexes were generally higher at night with the dominant species H. clupeola, Pomatomus saltatrix and Sardinella brasiliensis. It is suggested that the main factor to diel variation is the protection against predators due to darkness, making visualization of the prey difficult, besides the presence of seasonal macroalgae beds at Prainha, which might function as a food area for piscivorous fishes due to the proximity of larger individuals in shallower water especially at night.Peixes que vivem em águas costeiras marinhas exibem modelos de comportamento que são regulados pelos níveis de luz do ambiente. A variação nictemeral na estrutura da comunidade de peixes de zona de arrebentação foi investigada na região de Arraial do Cabo (22º58'S, 42º01'W. Desetembro/2001 a agosto/2002 foram realizadas coletas mensais, sendo efetuadas 12 arrastos utilizando cerco de praia nos períodos diurnos e noturnos na Praia dos Anjos, Praia Grande e Prainha. Diferentes padrões de distribuição da comunidade ictíca foram

  3. A mechanical analysis of woodpecker drumming and its application to shock-absorbing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang-Hee; Park, Sungmin

    2011-01-01

    A woodpecker is known to drum the hard woody surface of a tree at a rate of 18 to 22 times per second with a deceleration of 1200 g, yet with no sign of blackout or brain damage. As a model in nature, a woodpecker is studied to find clues to develop a shock-absorbing system for micromachined devices. Its advanced shock-absorbing mechanism, which cannot be explained merely by allometric scaling, is analyzed in terms of endoskeletal structures. In this analysis, the head structures (beak, hyoid, spongy bone, and skull bone with cerebrospinal fluid) of the golden-fronted woodpecker, Melanerpes aurifrons, are explored with x-ray computed tomography images, and their shock-absorbing mechanism is analyzed with a mechanical vibration model and an empirical method. Based on these analyses, a new shock-absorbing system is designed to protect commercial micromachined devices from unwanted high-g and high-frequency mechanical excitations. The new shock-absorbing system consists of close-packed microglasses within two metal enclosures and a viscoelastic layer fastened by steel bolts, which are biologically inspired from a spongy bone contained within a skull bone encompassed with the hyoid of a woodpecker. In the experimental characterizations using a 60 mm smoothbore air-gun, this bio-inspired shock-absorbing system shows a failure rate of 0.7% for the commercial micromachined devices at 60 000 g, whereas a conventional hard-resin method yields a failure rate of 26.4%, thus verifying remarkable improvement in the g-force tolerance of the commercial micromachined devices.

  4. COEXISTENCIA TRÓFICA DE AVES CARPINTERAS (Picidae EN UN BOSQUE DE Pinus cembroides (Zucc. DEL ÁREA NATURAL PROTEGIDA PEÑA ALTA, SAN DIEGO DE LA UNIÓN, GUANAJUATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Ugalde-Lezama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudiar la coexistencia trófica en aves es relevante para su manejo y conservación. Para ello, de enero a octubre de 2008 se identificaron técnicas de cacería y componentes entomológicos de las dietas de aves piciformes. Para la observación de las aves se usó la técnica de búsqueda intensiva en puntos de radio fijo, y para su captura, redes de niebla. Melanerpes formicivorous y Picoides scalaris prefirieron las técnicas de cacería Perforar y Colectar. Dichas técnicas se explicaronpor cinco y cuatro variables (P<0.05, respectivamente. Los estratos más utilizados fueron Pinus cembroides y Quercus spp. Los órdenes de insectos más consumidos fueron Coleóptera y Hemíptera. Las principales familias registradas corresponden a Scolytidae, Curculionidae, Pentatomidae, Cicadellidae, Cleridae y Melyridae. Los insectos más consumidos fueron los tipo Plaga (P, No Plaga (NP y Predadores (PR. Se registró una proporción significativa de individuos (X2=9.19, X2 0.001(5=20.5 de insectos en las dietas. Sin embargo, no fue posible registrar todos los fragmentos (X2=56.33, X2 0.001(5=20.5. El número de individuos (a=0.05, P-value=0.2317 y fragmentos (a=0.05, P-value=0.2606 entre especies fue similar. Siete variables (P<0.05 determinaron la ocurrencia de grasa y el consumo de presas. Los Picidos bajo estudio, a pesar de poseer anatomías, fisiologías y etologías similares, coexistieron tróficamente segregados durante la procuración alimenticia, minimizando de esta manera la competencia interespecífica.

  5. Nest-site selection in the acorn woodpecker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooge, P.N.; Stanback, M.T.; Koenig, Walter D.

    1999-01-01

    Acorn Woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) at Hastings Reservation in central California prefer to nest in dead limbs in large, dead valley oaks (Quercus lobata) and California sycamores (Platanus racemosa) that are also frequently used as acorn storage trees. Based on 232 nest cavities used over an 18-year period, we tested whether preferred or modal nest-site characters were associated with increased reproductive success (the "nest-site quality" hypothesis). We also examined whether more successful nests were likely to experience more favorable microclimatic conditions or to be less accessible to terrestrial predators. We found only equivocal support for the nest-site quality hypothesis: only 1 of 5 preferred characters and 2 of 10 characters exhibiting a clear modality were correlated with higher reproductive success. All three characteristics of nests known or likely to be associated with a more favorable microclimate, and two of five characteristics likely to render nests less accessible to predators, were correlated with higher reproductive success. These results suggest that nest cavities in this population are built in part to take advantage of favorable microclimatic conditions and, to a lesser extent, to reduce access to predators. However, despite benefits of particular nest characteristics, birds frequently nested in apparently suboptimal cavities. We also found a significant relationship between mean group size and the history of occupancy of particular territories and the probability of nest cavities being built in microclimatically favorable live limbs, suggesting that larger groups residing on more stable territories were better able to construct nests with optimal characteristics. This indicates that there may be demographic, as well as ecological, constraints on nest-site selection in this primary cavity nester.

  6. Using Satellite and Airborne LiDAR to Model Woodpecker Habitat Occupancy at the Landscape Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, Lee A.; Vierling, Kerri T.; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2