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Sample records for melaleuca alternifolia cheel

  1. Óleo de melaleuca (Melaleuca alternifolia Maiden & Betche, Cheel no controle de cercosporiose em beterraba

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    A.D. SOUZA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O óleo volátil da melaleuca (Melaleuca alternifolia Maiden & Betche, Cheel possui atividade antimicrobiana podendo causar efeitos sobre as plantas. Avaliou-se a inibição do óleo em Cercospora beticolaSacc., e seu efeito no aumento da produção e qualidade de raízes de beterraba. As doses foram de 0,13; 0,67; 0,80 e 1,00% do óleo, além das testemunhas composta pelo meio de cultura Batata Dextrose Ágar (BDA no experimento in vitro, e água no experimento in vivo. As plantas foram pulverizadas duas vezes por semana. O delineamento foi inteiramente casualizado, com 4 repetições, e as médias foram comparadas pelo teste Tukey a 5% de probabilidade. O índice de infecção das folhas foi determinado por escala diagramática além do peso e diâmetro das raízes. Os resultados de inibição do crescimento micelial para as doses do óleo foram 0; 56; 87; 83 e 99%, e os índices de infecção: 77,08; 35,62; 21,04; 19,37 e 20,00%, respectivamente, para a testemunha e as doses 0,13; 0,67; 0,80 e 1,00% do óleo. Somente na concentração de 0,80% o óleo proporcionou relação positiva entre o ganho de peso e o diâmetro das raízes. O óleo de Melaleuca foi eficaz no controle de C. beticola e, como consequência, houve produção de raízes de beterraba com melhor desenvolvimento.

  2. Antimicrobial synergism and cytotoxic properties of Citrus limon L., Piper nigrum L. and Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betche) Cheel essential oils.

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    Nikolić, Miloš M; Jovanović, Katarina K; Marković, Tatjana Lj; Marković, Dejan Lj; Gligorijević, Nevenka N; Radulović, Siniša S; Kostić, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina M; Soković, Marina D

    2017-11-01

    The chemical composition, antimicrobial and synergistic effect, and cytotoxic activity of Citrus limon (lemon), Piper nigrum (green pepper) and Melaleuca alternifoila (tea tree) essential oils (EOs) were investigated. Chemical analyses of essential oils were tested by GC-FID and GC-MS spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity assay was conducted using microdilution method against several oral bacteria and Candida spp. originating from the humans with oral disorders. The synergistic antimicrobial activity was evaluated using checkerboard method. The cytotoxicity evaluation of EOs was assessed using MTT test. Limonene (37.5%) and β-pinene (17.9%) were the major compounds in C. limon oil, β-pinene (34.4%), δ-3-carene (19.7%), limonene (18.7%) and α-pinene (10.4%) in P. nigrum oil and terpinen-4-ol (38.6%) and γ-terpinene (21.7%) in M. alternifolia oil. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity was achieved by tested three EOs, with C. limon oil being the strongest against bacteria and M. alternifolia oil strongest against fungi. The EOs demonstrated synergism; their combined application revealed an increase in antimicrobial activity. All tested essential oils showed lower cytotoxic activity in comparison with the positive control, and the obtained results confirmed a dose-dependent activity. The results of this study encourage use of tested EOs in development of a novel agent intended for prevention or therapy of corresponding oral disorders. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE of Monoterpenes from the Leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree

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    Deidre Tronson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE was applied to various sample matrices under a range of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 densities and chamber temperatures. The purpose was to develop an effective extraction condition for the removal of eight target monoterpenes from Australian tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel leaves. The optimum conditions for extraction were found to be 0.25 g/mL scCO2 density at a chamber temperature of 110oC. These condition were most effective when applied to whole fresh and rehydrated whole dried leaves, where it yielded maximum recovery of target analytes with minimum change in oil composition for the extractor system employed. This study demonstrates the importance of the type of sample matrix used in SFE work, and that a different extraction protocol would need to be developed for each matrix.

  4. Pharmacognostic standardization of the leaf of Melaleuca alternifolia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae) is a well-known, commonly used, tall shrub plant in Ayurvedic medicine. Traditionally, it is used for its antimicrobial potential to treat cutaneous infections. No attempts have been made regarding pharmacognostic investigation of the plant till date. So, the present study was ...

  5. Chemical constituents from Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae); Constituintes quimicos de Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae)

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    Vieira, Tatiana R.; Barbosa, Luiz C.A.; Maltha, Celia R.A. [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: lcab@ufv.br; Paula, Vanderlucia F. [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Jequie, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Exatas; Nascimento, Evandro A. [Uberlandia Univ., MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2004-08-01

    The first chemical study of non-volatile constituents from the bark and stem of Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae) led to the isolation and identification of 3,3'-O-dimethylellagic acid (1) and five pentacyclic triterpenes: 2{alpha},3{beta},23-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (arjunolic acid, 2), 3{beta}-hydroxylup-20(29)-en-27,28-dioic acid (melaleucic acid, 3), betulinic acid (4), betuline (5), 3{beta}-O-acetylurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6), a mixture of fatty acids and esters, and several hydrocarbons. For 2{alpha},3{beta},23-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (2) and 3{beta}-O-acetylurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6) a first detailed assignment of {sup 1}H NMR is presented. (author)

  6. Constituintes químicos de Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae Chemical constituents from Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae

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    Tatiana R. Vieira

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The first chemical study of non-volatile constituents from the bark and stem of Melaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae led to the isolation and identification of 3,3'-O-dimethylellagic acid (1 and five pentacyclic triterpenes: 2alpha,3beta,23-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (arjunolic acid, 2, 3beta-hydroxylup-20(29-en-27,28-dioic acid (melaleucic acid, 3, betulinic acid (4, betuline (5, 3beta-O-acetylurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6, a mixture of fatty acids and esters, and several hydrocarbons. For 2alpha,3beta,23-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (2 and 3beta-O-acetylurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6 a first detailed assignment of ¹H NMR is presented.

  7. Ecotype Variation of Methyl Eugenol Content in Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia and Melaleuca linariifolia).

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    Shepherd, Mervyn; Savins, Dale; Dowell, Ashley; Morrow, Samantha; Allen, Gareth; Southwell, Ian

    2017-11-01

    Methyl eugenol is a natural phenylpropanoid compound found in a wide range of plants used for food, flavouring, cosmetics, and health-care. As a suspected rodent carcinogen, methyl eugenol may also be harmful to humans when present in significant concentrations. Consequently, its level has been restricted in some foodstuffs and cosmetics for some markets. In order to assess the potential to breed uniformly low methyl eugenol cultivars for an essential oil crop, tea tree, the source of 'Oil of Melaleuca, terpinene-4-ol type', we examine levels in individual trees (n = 30) from two geographic regions and six terpene chemotypes. Overall, methyl eugenol levels were low in this species (Mean [SD] 354 [239] ppm, n = 30), much lower than levels predicted to be of toxicological concern. Within each chemotype, there was a lack of evidence for correlations between terpenoid constituents and methyl eugenol levels. Further support for the independence of methyl eugenol and terpene biosynthesis was evident from similar mean levels in selected (Mean [SD] 586 [339] ppm, n = 12) and undomesticated Melaleuca alternifolia trees (Mean [SD] 480 [299] ppm, n = 5) with terpinen-4-ol type oils. By contrast, methyl eugenol level varied by geographic origin and chemotype. Trees from the upland region, where there is a prevalence of terpinolene type trees, had lower average methyl eugenol levels than trees from the coastal region, where there is a prevalence of terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole type trees. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  8. In vitro genotoxicity of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil in human lymphocytes.

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    Pereira, Tais Susane; de Sant'anna, Juliane Rocha; Silva, Expedito Leite; Pinheiro, Antônio Lelis; de Castro-Prado, Marialba A Alves

    2014-02-03

    The volatile essential oil derived from the plant Melaleuca alternifolia, also called tea tree oil (TTO), is largely employed for its antimicrobial properties against several human pathogens. It is used in many topical formulations to treat cutaneous infections. Since very few studies have been done on the safety and toxicity of the crude Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil, current investigation evaluates the possible genotoxic effects of TTO in human lymphocyte cultures. The composition of current TTO sample was determined by GC/MS and NMR. The level of cytotoxicity in TTO treated cultures was determined by decrease of mitotic index when compared to that in negative control. The genotoxic potential of TTO was assessed by the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus and the chromosome aberrations (CA) tests. Twenty-seven compounds were identified, accounting for 98.9% of the constituents. Terpinen-4-ol (42.8%), γ-terpinene (20.4%), p-cymene (9.6%), α-terpinene (7.9%), 1,8-cineole (3%), α-terpineol (2.8%) and α-pinene (2.4%) were the major compounds of the oil sample. None of the tested TTO concentrations (95μg/ml, 182μg/ml and 365μg/ml) caused a significant increase in the observed frequencies of micronuclei when compared to those in the untreated cultures (negative control). Additionally, no significant differences regarding the frequencies of CA were observed among the tested TTO concentrations and the negative control. Results demonstrate that TTO, in the tested concentrations, is not genotoxic in in vitro mammalian cells. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Effect of Essential Oils of Syzygium aromaticum and Melaleuca alternifolia on Isolates of Aspergillus sp.

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    A. Lima

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential  oils  have  antimicrobial  substances,  lower  cost  and  the  lower  resistance  of microorganism. This study aimed to evaluate the inhibition of mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus and  A.  niger  with  essential  oils  of  Syzygium  aromaticum  and  Melaleuca  alternifolia.  For  this, aliquots  (0.5,  5,  10  and  15μL  of  essential  oils  from  S.  aromaticum  and  M.  alternifolia   were distributed on the surface of the culture medium Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA with Drigaslsky. In the control treatment were used only plates containing PDA plus chloramphenicol (1%. After 2 hours, a disc (8mm diameter of the isolated mycelium, with 10 days of age on PDA, was peaked to the center of the plates, these plates were sealed and incubated at 282°C, in the dark. The essential  oil  of  S.  aromaticum  inhibited  the  mycelial  growth  of  A.  flavus  and  A.  niger,  in  all aliquots. When using the essential oil of M. alternifolia decreased the mycelial growth of A. flavus in all aliquots, however, showed a low efficiency in control of A. niger. It was concluded that the essential  oil  S.  aromaticum  is  effective  against  A.  flavus  and  A.  niger,  which  can  be  used  in control against these microorganisms, and M. alternifolia not show satisfactory results in relation to reducing the growth of pathogens evaluated.

  10. Melaleuca alternifolia concentrate inhibits in vitro entry of influenza virus into host cells.

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    Li, Xinghua; Duan, Songwei; Chu, Cordia; Xu, Jun; Zeng, Gucheng; Lam, Alfred King-Yin; Zhou, Junmei; Yin, Yue; Fang, Danyun; Reynolds, Maxwell John; Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Lifang

    2013-08-09

    Influenza virus causes high morbidity among the infected population annually and occasionally the spread of pandemics. Melaleuca alternifolia Concentrate (MAC) is an essential oil derived from a native Australian tea tree. Our aim was to investigate whether MAC has any in vitro inhibitory effect on influenza virus infection and what mechanism does the MAC use to fight the virus infection. In this study, the antiviral activity of MAC was examined by its inhibition of cytopathic effects. In silico prediction was performed to evaluate the interaction between MAC and the viral haemagglutinin. We found that when the influenza virus was incubated with 0.010% MAC for one hour, no cytopathic effect on MDCK cells was found after the virus infection and no immunofluorescence signal was detected in the host cells. Electron microscopy showed that the virus treated with MAC retained its structural integrity. By computational simulations, we found that terpinen-4-ol, which is the major bioactive component of MAC, could combine with the membrane fusion site of haemagglutinin. Thus, we proved that MAC could prevent influenza virus from entering the host cells by disturbing the normal viral membrane fusion procedure.

  11. Melaleuca alternifolia Concentrate Inhibits in Vitro Entry of Influenza Virus into Host Cells

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    Lifang Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus causes high morbidity among the infected population annually and occasionally the spread of pandemics. Melaleuca alternifolia Concentrate (MAC is an essential oil derived from a native Australian tea tree. Our aim was to investigate whether MAC has any in vitro inhibitory effect on influenza virus infection and what mechanism does the MAC use to fight the virus infection. In this study, the antiviral activity of MAC was examined by its inhibition of cytopathic effects. In silico prediction was performed to evaluate the interaction between MAC and the viral haemagglutinin. We found that when the influenza virus was incubated with 0.010% MAC for one hour, no cytopathic effect on MDCK cells was found after the virus infection and no immunofluorescence signal was detected in the host cells. Electron microscopy showed that the virus treated with MAC retained its structural integrity. By computational simulations, we found that terpinen-4-ol, which is the major bioactive component of MAC, could combine with the membrane fusion site of haemagglutinin. Thus, we proved that MAC could prevent influenza virus from entering the host cells by disturbing the normal viral membrane fusion procedure.

  12. Analysis of pH and release of calcium of association between melaleuca alternifolia oil and calcium hydroxide

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    Maiara GIONGO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of intracanal medications with antimicrobial properties is essential for decontaminating root canals during endodontic treatment. Calcium hydroxide is used for this because of its excellent properties. Melaleuca alternifolia oil has shown medicinal importance by demonstrating antifungal and bactericidal action against proven human pathogens. Objective To evaluate the physical and chemical aspects such as pH and calcium release, of Melaleuca alternifolia oil associated with calcium hydroxide, during different time intervals. Material and method Calcium hydroxide powder was added to vehicles to reach a concentration of 72mg / 0.1mL. Three groups were formed: Group I: Calcium Hydroxide + Distilled Water; Group II: Calcium hydroxide + Propylene Glycol; Group III: Calcium hydroxide + Melaleuca oil. The pH of each group was measured after time intervals of 10 minutes; 24 and 48 hours; 7, 15 and 30 days after tooling by a pH meter. Calcium release was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry equipped with a calcium hollow cathode lamp. Data were statistically analyzed by using the Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn test. Result Group II showed high pH, similar to group III that remained uniform at 15 and 30 days. Calcium release that began after 24 hours, was similar in Groups II and III, and showed a peak release in 48 hours. Conclusion The association of Melaleuca oil with calcium hydroxide showed good results in the pH and calcium release analyses, and showed action similar to that of propylene glycol + calcium hydroxide.

  13. GC-MS method validation and levels of methyl eugenol in a diverse range of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oils.

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    Raymond, Carolyn A; Davies, Noel W; Larkman, Tony

    2017-03-01

    Tea tree oil distilled from Melaleuca alternifolia has widespread use in the cosmetic industry as an antimicrobial as well as for other functions in topical products. Concerns were first raised by the European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Products in 2004 about the level of the potentially carcinogenic phenylpropanoid compound methyl eugenol in tea tree oil. Limits on oil content in different types of cosmetic products were set based on a reported upper level of 0.9% methyl eugenol in the oil. A previous publication indicated that these levels were based on oil from a Melaleuca species not used in the commercial production of oil. Even the highest recorded levels in Melaleuca alternifolia, the overwhelmingly most common species used, were ∼15 times less than this, meaning that more oil could be safely used in the products. The current study, including details on methodology and reproducibility, extends that work across a suite of 57 plantation-sourced oils from a range of geographical locations and production years, as well as many Australian and international commercial oils. Lower levels of methyl eugenol in oils of known provenance were confirmed, with a recorded range of 160-552 ppm and a mean of 337 ppm. Analysis of variance showed methyl eugenol levels in Australian plantation oils to be correlated to the geographical region but not to the year of production. Average methyl eugenol levels in commercial oils were significantly lower, and these samples were divided into an authentic group and a group that were suspected of being adulterated based on an independent test. Authentic commercial oils had similar levels of methyl eugenol to Australian provenance material, whilst the oils classed as suspect had significantly lower levels.

  14. Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil against the Lesser Mealworm (Alphitobius diaperinus and Its Possible Effect on the Soil Fauna

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    A Volpato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro bioactivity of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil against larvae and adult forms of lesser mealworms (Alphitobius diaperinus and its influence on the soil fauna. Tests were performed in triplicate using pure tea tree oil (TTO; 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100%, TTO nanoparticles (1, 3, and 7.5%, or terpinen-4-ol, the main compound of the tea tree oil, at the same concentrations of TTO. Larvae and adult mortality occurred at concentrations up to 10 and 50% of TTO, respectively. No larvicidal or insecticidal effect of TTO nanoparticles was observed. Terpinen-4-ol showed insecticidal and larvicidal effect at concentrations higher than 25%. The evaluation of TTO effect on soil organisms was performed by standard ecotoxicological tests (ISO with the springtail species Folsomia candida. Only TTO was used for ecotoxicological tests in doses of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg kg-1 of soil. TTO had no negative effects on F. candida survival or reproduction. Therefore, it was concluded that M. alternifolia oil may be a new alternative for control of the lesser mealworm.

  15. Inhibition of group A streptococcal infection by Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil concentrate in the murine model.

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    Tsao, N; Kuo, C-F; Lei, H-Y; Lu, S-L; Huang, K-J

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effect of a water-soluble Melaleuca alternifolia concentrate (MAC) on group A streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes)-induced necrotizing fasciitis. MAC pretreatment (1% and 2% v/v) was able to protect mice from GAS infection in an air pouch model. GAS-induced mouse death and skin injury were inhibited dose dependently by MAC. Administration of MAC at 6 h post-GAS infection partially delayed mouse death. Surveys of the exudates of the air pouch of MAC-treated mice revealed that the survival of infiltrating cells was prolonged, the bacteria were eliminated, and the production of inflammatory cytokines was inhibited. MAC could directly inhibit the growth of GAS in vitro, and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of MAC for GAS was determined as 0.05% v/v using the time-kill assay. Furthermore, a sub-MIC dose of MAC not only enhanced the bactericidal activity of RAW264.7 macrophage cells against GAS but also increased susceptibility of GAS for blood clearance. These results suggest that MAC may inhibit GAS-induced skin damage and mouse death by directly inhibiting GAS growth and enhancing the bactericidal activity of macrophages. Our results provide scientific data on the use of MAC for the treatment of GAS-induced necrotizing fasciitis in the murine model.

  16. Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation.

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    Liao, Min; Xiao, Jin-Jing; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Yang; Wu, Xiang-Wei; Hua, Ri-Mao; Wang, Gui-Rong; Cao, Hai-Qun

    2016-01-01

    The cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals worldwide. Frequent use of fumigants for managing stored-product insects has led to the development of resistance in insects. Essential oils from aromatic plants including the tea oil plant, Melaleuca alternifolia may provide environmentally friendly alternatives to currently used pest control agents. However, little is known about molecular events involved in stored-product insects in response to plant essential oil fumigation. M. alternifolia essential oil was shown to possess the fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais. The constituent, terpinen-4-ol was the most effective compound for fumigant toxicity. M. alternifolia essential oil significantly inhibited the activity of three enzymes in S. zeamais, including two detoxifying enzymes, glutathione S-transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CarE), as well as a nerve conduction enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Comparative transcriptome analysis of S. zeamais through RNA-Seq identified a total of 3,562 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), of which 2,836 and 726 were up-regulated and down-regulated in response to M. alternifolia essential oil fumigation, respectively. Based on gene ontology (GO) analysis, the majority of DEGs were involved in insecticide detoxification and mitochondrial function. Furthermore, an abundance of DEGs mapped into the metabolism pathway in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database were associated with respiration and metabolism of xenobiotics, including cytochrome P450s, CarEs, GSTs, and ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters). Some DEGs mapped into the proteasome and phagosome pathway were found to be significantly enriched. These results led us to propose a model of insecticide action that M. alternifolia essential oil likely directly affects the hydrogen carrier to block the electron flow and interfere energy synthesis in mitochondrial respiratory chain

  17. Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation.

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    Min Liao

    Full Text Available The cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals worldwide. Frequent use of fumigants for managing stored-product insects has led to the development of resistance in insects. Essential oils from aromatic plants including the tea oil plant, Melaleuca alternifolia may provide environmentally friendly alternatives to currently used pest control agents. However, little is known about molecular events involved in stored-product insects in response to plant essential oil fumigation.M. alternifolia essential oil was shown to possess the fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais. The constituent, terpinen-4-ol was the most effective compound for fumigant toxicity. M. alternifolia essential oil significantly inhibited the activity of three enzymes in S. zeamais, including two detoxifying enzymes, glutathione S-transferase (GST, and carboxylesterase (CarE, as well as a nerve conduction enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Comparative transcriptome analysis of S. zeamais through RNA-Seq identified a total of 3,562 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, of which 2,836 and 726 were up-regulated and down-regulated in response to M. alternifolia essential oil fumigation, respectively. Based on gene ontology (GO analysis, the majority of DEGs were involved in insecticide detoxification and mitochondrial function. Furthermore, an abundance of DEGs mapped into the metabolism pathway in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database were associated with respiration and metabolism of xenobiotics, including cytochrome P450s, CarEs, GSTs, and ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters. Some DEGs mapped into the proteasome and phagosome pathway were found to be significantly enriched. These results led us to propose a model of insecticide action that M. alternifolia essential oil likely directly affects the hydrogen carrier to block the electron flow and interfere energy synthesis in mitochondrial

  18. Antibacterial efficacy of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea tree oil, Curcuma longa (Turmeric, 2% chlorhexidine, and 5% sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis: An in vitro study

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    Dakshita Joy Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate and compare the antibacterial efficacy of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil, Curcumalonga (turmeric, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX, and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: Agar plates were prepared using tryptone soya agar. Cultures of E. faecalis were grown in tryptone soya broth. Agar well diffusion method was performed and the plates were incubated at 37΀C for 24 h. The zones of inhibition were recorded. The readings were subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test. P-value was considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: Maximum antibacterial efficacy was exhibited by 2% CHX, followed by 5% NaOCl and C. longa with no statistically significant difference between them. It was followed by M. alternifolia (Tea tree oil. Ethanol and saline showed the least antibacterial action. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, C. longa and M. alternifolia can be used as an alternative root canal irrigant, although long-term in vivo studies are warranted.

  19. Effect of the essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca quinquenervia and Backhousia citriodora on the synthesis of ochratoxin A by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius isolated from tropical wine grapes.

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    de Andrade Santiago, Juliana; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Batista, Luis Roberto; Santiago, Wilder Douglas; Passamani, Fabiana Reinis Franca; Rodrigues, Leonardo Milani Avelar; Nelson, David Lee

    2018-01-01

    The influence of essential oils (EOs) extracted from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia , Melaleuca quinquenervia and Backhousia citriodora on ochratoxin A (OTA) synthesis by fungi was studied. The extraction of EOs was performed by hydrodistillation (Clevenger apparatus) over a 2-h period and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS and GC-FID. The toxigenic activity of the essential oils (31.25; 15.62 and 7.81 µg mL -1 ) was evaluated by inhibiting the production of OTA by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius in Czapek agar medium culture. The quantification of the toxin was performed by HPLC. The production of OTA was dependent on the fungal species, incubation temperature (15 and 25 °C) and the presence of the essential oils. In tests carried out at 15 °C, the oils caused a reduction in OTA synthesis that ranged from 57.60 to 76.93% and from 54.78 to 98.68% for the fungal species A. carbonarius and A. niger , respectively. At 25 °C, reductions ranged from the 38.66 to 75.93% and from 17.94 to 71.79% for the respective fungi. The study concluded that natural products could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in food.

  20. Role of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in tolerance to tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol.

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    Papadopoulos, Chelsea J; Carson, Christine F; Chang, Barbara J; Riley, Thomas V

    2008-03-01

    Using a series of efflux mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the MexAB-OprM pump was identified as contributing to this organism's tolerance to the antimicrobial agent tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol. These data show that a multidrug efflux system of P. aeruginosa can extrude monoterpenes and related alcohols.

  1. Immunomodulatory activity of Melaleuca alternifolia concentrate (MAC): inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activation and cytokine production in myeloid cell lines.

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    Low, Pauline; Clark, Amanda M; Chou, Tz-Chong; Chang, Tsu-Chung; Reynolds, Maxwell; Ralph, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    Melaleuca alternifolia concentrate (MAC) is a mixture predominantly composed of monoterpenoids and sesquiterpenes, refined from the essential oil of the tea tree by removing up to 99% of the more toxic, hydrophobic monoterpenes. MAC was examined here for its immunomodulatory effects on the human THP1 and murine RAW264.7 myeloid leukemic cell lines as models for macrophage-like cells. Firstly, MAC levels were determined that did not affect either the survival or proliferation of these cell lines in vitro. Next, the levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of cytokines (IL-6, TNFα, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFNγ and IL-3) were examined from the myeloid cell lines using multiplex assays. Many of the LPS-inducible cytokines produced by either cell lines could be significantly inhibited by MAC. Closer examination of the mechanism of action of MAC showed that it inhibited the LPS-induced activation of IκB phosphorylation and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signalling and translocation, inhibiting iNOS protein expression and NO production. These results demonstrate that MAC exerts its immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB signalling activation and levels of cytokine production by macrophage-like cell lines. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plants of the Melaleuca Genus as Antimicrobial Agents: From Farm to Pharmacy.

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    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Salehi, Bahare; Varoni, Elena Maria; Sharopov, Farukh; Yousaf, Zubaida; Ayatollahi, Seyed Abdulmajid; Kobarfard, Farzad; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Afdjei, Mohammad Hossain; Sharifi-Rad, Majid; Iriti, Marcello

    2017-10-01

    Plants belonging to Melaleuca genus (Myrtaceae family) are native to Oceania, where they have been used for ages by Aborigine people in Australian traditional medicine, mainly because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Although, M. linariifolia, M. dissitiflora, and other species of Melaleuca can also be used, the tea tree oil, an essential oil obtained from M. alternifolia shows the longest history of medicinal uses. Tea tree oil contains for the 80-90% several monoterpenes (terpinen-4-ol, α-terpinene, 1,8-cineol, p-cymene, α-terpineol, α-pinene, terpinolene, limonene, and sabinene). Sesquiterpenes and aromatic compounds further compose this oil. The essential oil of Melaleuca spp. has been reported to possess effective antibacterial and antifungal properties in vitro. In particular, data show that 1,8-cineol, terpinen-4-ol and methyl eugenol play the key role in mediating this oil's antimicrobial activity. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil as a natural antimicrobial agent in lipophilic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantil, Elisabeth; Daly, Grace; Avis, Tyler J

    2015-01-01

    There has been increased interest surrounding the use of tea tree oil (TTO) as a natural antimicrobial. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of TTO and its components were investigated in vitro and in a predominantly lipid-based personal care formulation. In vitro, TTO showed minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.2% (for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pythium sulcatum), 0.4% (for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Rhizopus stolonifer), and 0.8% (for Botrytis cinerea). TTO at 0.08%-0.8% was often as efficient as parabens. Comparison of the antimicrobial activities of TTO components showed that terpinen-4-ol and γ-terpinene were generally most effective in inhibiting microbial growth. TTO activity in a personal care product was evaluated through air and water exposure, artificial inoculation, and shelf life studies. While TTO did not increase shelf life of unopened products, it decreased microbial load in products exposed to water and air. Results from this study support that antimicrobial activity of TTO can be attributed to varying levels of its components and that low levels of TTO were effective in reducing microbial growth during the use of the product. This study showed that TTO can act as a suitable preservative system within an oil-based formulation.

  4. In Vitro Activities of Ketoconazole, Econazole, Miconazole, and Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil against Malassezia Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, K. A.; Carson, C. F.; Riley, T. V.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ketoconazole, econazole, miconazole, and tea tree oil against 54 Malassezia isolates were determined by agar and broth dilution methods. Ketoconazole was more active than both econazole and miconazole, which showed very similar activities. M. furfur was the least susceptible species. M. sympodialis, M. slooffiae, M. globosa, and M. obtusa showed similar susceptibilities to the four agents. PMID:10639388

  5. Evaluation of in vitro leishmanicidal activity of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia

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    Moradali Fouladvand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania is a trypanosomatid protozoan which is transmitted by the female Phlebotomus sand fly. Leishmaniasis is prevalent in four continents and is considered to be endemic in 88 countries, 72 of which are developing countries. It is estimated that it’s global prevalence and incidence is 12 millions and 500 thousands respectively. The recommended drugs used for the treatment of this disease are mainly ineffective, toxic and exhibit many side effects. Based on some studies,tea tree oil that is a yellow color liquid with spicy odor exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activity, so, we evaluated it’s anti-leishmanial effect. Materials and Methods: Tea tree oil was purchased from Dr Jahangiri pharmaceutical company and it’s various concentrations (mg/ml800, mg/ml400, mg/ml200, mg/ml100 were prepared in 1ml volume of TSB solvent in 15ml test tubes, then 9 ml of RPMI-1640 medium and 1×106 promastigotes was added to each tube, as a final volume of 10 ml. These tubes were incubated at 23o c for 72 hours and number of parasites in the first 6 hours once every hour and after that every 24 hours were counted by hemocytometer. Results: Lethal dose of tea tree oil for 50% of promastigotes ( IC50 is 337 mg/ml, while the 800 mg/ml of this extract can killed 95% of the parasites after 24 hours of incubation, and it’s lower concentrations of this extract showed dose-dependent leishmanicidal activity. Glucantime as positive control drug at concentration of 300 mg/ml killed all the promastigotes, while the number of promastigotes in negative control tubes was increase during the incubation period. Conclusion: Anti-Leishmanial activity of tea tree oil with IC50 of 337 mg/ml and 95% lethality of 800 mg/ml is promising and further study for analyse the active ingredients of this oil and evaluation of it’s anti-leishmanial effect, particularly in laboratory animal is recommended.

  6. Melaleuca leucadendron (L): Potentials For Plantation Forestry In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Melaleuca leucadendron (L): Potentials For Plantation Forestry In The Coastal Mangrove Area Of Nigeria And The Prospects Of Its Successful Intergration Into Agroforestry Practices Like Aquaforestry And Apisiviculture.

  7. Spatial variation of Melaleuca cajuputi powell essential oils | Hanif ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cajuputi essential oil in Indonesia and Malaysia is extracted from the leaves of Melaleuca cajuputi Powell. This study identify the variation of Melaleuca cajuputi essential oil fingerprinting based on the essential oil. The leaves were collected from 10 different sites in Terengganu undergoes hydro distillation and detailed ...

  8. The Insecticidal Activity of Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Alternifolia Against the Common Pest in Mummies (Dermestes Maculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomaa ABDEL-MAKSOUD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Egyptian mummies show different signs of deterioration caused by insects, such as missing parts, gaps and accumulated dust. Dermestes maculatus is one of the serious pests that cause damage to Egyptian mummies. To assess the insecticidal activity of tea tree oil against the larvae of the museum insect pest Dermestes maculatus (isolated from Egyptian mummies we tested it under different concentration and treatment times by the bioassay methods. Our results showed that tea tree oil diluted in ethanol was highly toxic to Dermestes maculatus larvae. Insecticidal activity depended on both concentration and exposure time. By increasing the concentration level and the exposure time we obtained a higher mortality rate.

  9. Risk assessment: progress of quarantine biocontrol research on Chinese Tallow, Melaleuca, and Downy Rose Myrtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk assessments of two biocontrol candidates for Chinese tallow, Triadica sebifera (Euphoriales: Euphorbiaceae), and one for Melaleuca, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtales: Myrtaceae), were conducted during 2009 and continuing into 2010 by USDA scientists located at the Florida Department of Agricul...

  10. Optimization of Extraction Conditions for Maximal Phenolic, Flavonoid and Antioxidant Activity from Melaleuca bracteata Leaves Using the Response Surface Methodology.

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    Wencheng Hou

    Full Text Available Melaleuca bracteata is a yellow-leaved tree belonging to the Melaleuca genus. Species from this genus are known to be good sources of natural antioxidants, for example, the "tea tree oil" derived from M. alternifolia is used in food processing to extend the shelf life of products. In order to determine whether M. bracteata contains novel natural antioxidants, the components of M. bracteata ethanol extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were extracted and the antioxidant activities of the extracts evaluated. Single-factor experiments, central composite rotatable design (CCRD and response surface methodology (RSM were used to optimize the extraction conditions for total phenolic content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC. Ferric reducing power (FRP and 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH· scavenging capacity were used as the evaluation indices of antioxidant activity. The results showed that the main components of M. bracteata ethanol extracts are methyl eugenol (86.86% and trans-cinnamic acid methyl ester (6.41%. The single-factor experiments revealed that the ethanol concentration is the key factor determining the TPC, TFC, FRP and DPPH·scavenging capacity. RSM results indicated that the optimal condition of all four evaluation indices was achieved by extracting for 3.65 days at 53.26°C in 34.81% ethanol. Under these conditions, the TPC, TFC, FRP and DPPH·scavenging capacity reached values of 88.6 ± 1.3 mg GAE/g DW, 19.4 ± 0.2 mg RE/g DW, 2.37 ± 0.01 mM Fe2+/g DW and 86.0 ± 0.3%, respectively, which were higher than those of the positive control, methyl eugenol (FRP 0.97 ± 0.02 mM, DPPH·scavenging capacity 58.6 ± 0.7% at comparable concentrations. Therefore, the extracts of M. bracteata leaves have higher antioxidant activity, which did not only attributed to the methyl eugenol. Further research could lead to the development of a potent new natural antioxidant.

  11. Influence of Temperature, Humidity, and Plant Terpenoid Profiles on Life History Characteristics of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a Biological Control Agent of the Invasive Tree Melaleuca quinquenervia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the introduced weed biological control agent Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore is widely established among stands of its host Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (Myrtaceae) in south Florida, it’s population densities decline markedly during summer months. We investigated the hypothesis tha...

  12. An assessment of the carbon stocks and sodicity tolerance of disturbed Melaleuca forests in Southern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Da B; Hoang, Tho V; Dargusch, Paul

    2015-12-01

    In the lower Mekong Basin and coastal zones of Southern Vietnam, forests dominated by the genus Melaleuca have two notable features: most have been substantially disturbed by human activity and can now be considered as degraded forests; and most are subject to acute pressures from climate change, particularly in regards to changes in the hydrological and sodicity properties of forest soil. Data was collected and analyzed from five typical Melaleuca stands including: (1) primary Melaleuca forests on sandy soil (VS1); (2) regenerating Melaleuca forests on sandy soil (VS2); (3) degraded secondary Melaleuca forests on clay soil with peat (VS3); (4) regenerating Melaleuca forests on clay soil with peat (VS4); and (5) regenerating Melaleuca forests on clay soil without peat (VS5). Carbon densities of VS1, VS2, VS3, VS4, and VS5 were found to be 275.98, 159.36, 784.68, 544.28, and 246.96 tC/ha, respectively. The exchangeable sodium percentage of Melaleuca forests on sandy soil showed high sodicity, while those on clay soil varied from low to moderate sodicity. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the carbon stocks and sodicity tolerance of natural Melaleuca cajuputi communities in Southern Vietnam, in order to gather better information to support the improved management of forests in the region. The results provide important information for the future sustainable management of Melaleuca forests in Vietnam, particularly in regards to forest carbon conservation initiatives and the potential of Melaleuca species for reforestation initiatives on degraded sites with highly sodic soils.

  13. Differential response by Melaleuca quinquenervia trees to attack by the rust fungus Puccinia psidii in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaleuca quinquenervia (melaleuca, paperbark tree) is an exotic invasive tree in Florida, Hawaii, and some Caribbean islands. Puccinia psidii (guava rust-fungus) is a Neotropical rust fungus, reported to attack many species in the Myrtaceae and one genus in the Heteropyxidaceae, both members of the...

  14. EXTRAÇÃO E CARACTERIZAÇÃO DO ÓLEO ESSENCIAL DE MELALEUCA E DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UMA FORMULAÇÃO SEMI-SÓLIDA DE USO TÓPICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcielli Indiara de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As plantas medicinais são bastante conhecidas e muito utilizadas pela maioria da população, sendo empregada em diversas finalidades na culinária, perfumaria, aromaterapia, para tratar e prevenir doenças, bem como no desenvolvimento de novos produtos. A espécie Melaleuca alternifolia, é uma planta rica em um óleo essencial com uma poderosa ação antimicrobiana e antifúngica. O objetivo desse trabalho é realizar a extração do óleo essencial da melaleuca e avaliar sua composição química, bem como desenvolver uma formulação semi-sólida de uso tópico para a incorporação do óleo. O óleo foi extraído por arraste a vapor, utilizando-se de um aparelho do tipo Clevenger nos tempos de 4 e 6 horas e sua composição química foi avaliada por cromatografia gasosa acoplada ao espectrômetro de massas (CG/MS. Após obtenção do óleo, o mesmo foi incorporado na formulação e avaliada sua estabilidade preliminar e acelerada. O rendimento do óleo extraído foi de 0,82% para 4 horas e 1,59% para 6 horas. Através das análises cromatográficas foi possível obter um perfil do óleo extraído, encontrando os compostos α – terpineno, γ- terpineno, ρ – cimeno, terpinen-4-ol, 1,8 – cineol como majoritários. Após incorporação do óleo de melaleuca (4% na pomada, a formulação foi aprovada nos estudos conduzidos quanto aos critérios de cor, odor, aspecto e pH.

  15. Ultrastructure of Wax-Producing Structures on the Integument of the Melaleuca Psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, with Honeydew Excretion Behavior in Males and Females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Desouky Ammar

    Full Text Available The melaleuca psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, was introduced to Florida as a biological control agent against Melaleuca quinquenervia, an invasive evergreen tree that has invaded large areas of Florida Everglades. Colonies of B. melaleucae nymphs are normally covered by white waxy secretions, and nymphs of various instars produce long bundles of white waxy filaments extending laterally and posteriorly from their abdomen. Scanning electron microscopy of 'naturally waxed' and 'dewaxed' nymphs (cleaned from wax revealed two types of wax pore plates located dorsally and laterally on the integument of posterior abdominal segments starting with the 4th segment. Type-1 wax pore plates, with raised rim, peripheral groove, slits and pits, produce long ribbons and filaments of waxy secretions that are wound together forming long wax bundles, whereas type-2 wax pore plates, with slits only, produce shorter wax curls. Additionally, in both nymphs and adult females, the circumanal ring contained ornate rows of wax pores that produce wax filaments covering their honeydew excretions. Video recordings with stereomicroscopy showed that adult females produce whitish honeydew balls, powerfully propelled away from their body, probably to get these sticky excretions away from their eggs and newly hatched nymphs. Adult males, however, produce clear droplets of honeydew immediately behind them, simply by bending the posterior end of the abdomen downward. The possible role(s of waxy secretions by nymphs and adults of B. melaleucae in reducing contamination of their colonies with honeydew, among other possibilities, are discussed.

  16. Initial impacts and field validation of host range for Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore (Hemiptera: Psyllidae),a biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (Myrtales: Myrtaceae: Leptosp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasion of south Florida wetlands by the Australian paperbark tree (“melaleuca”), Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake (melaleuca) has caused adverse economic and environmental impacts. The tree’s biological attributes along with favorable ambient biophysical conditions combine to complicate ...

  17. Concordance between life history traits, invasion history, and allozyme diversity of the Everglades invader Melaleuca quinquenervia

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the century following its initial introduction in 1886, the Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia(Myrtaceae) dispersed from a few introduction points to occupy over 200,000 ha, primarily in historic Everglades wetlands of southern Florida. Cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis (CAGE) was us...

  18. Antioxidant, antibacterial activity, and phytochemical characterization of Melaleuca cajuputi extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abd, Nazeh M; Mohamed Nor, Zurainee; Mansor, Marzida; Azhar, Fadzly; Hasan, M S; Kassim, Mustafa

    2015-10-24

    The threat posed by drug-resistant pathogens has resulted in the increasing momentum in research and development for effective alternative medications. The antioxidant and antibacterial properties of phytochemical extracts makes them attractive alternative complementary medicines. Therefore, this study evaluated the phytochemical constituents of Melaleuca cajuputi flower and leaf (GF and GL, respectively) extracts and their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Radical scavenging capacity of the extracts was estimated using 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Fe(2+)-chelating activity. Total antioxidant activity was determined using ferric reducing antioxidant power assay. Well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration assays were used to determine antibacterial activity against eight pathogens, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumonia, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pasteurella multocida. We identified and quantified the phytochemical constituents in methanol extracts using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography (GC)/MS. This study reports the antioxidant and radical scavenging activity of M. cajuputi methanolic extracts. The GF extract showed better efficacy than that of the GL extract. The total phenolic contents were higher in the flower extract than they were in the leaf extract (0.55 ± 0.05 and 0.37 ± 0.05 gallic acid equivalent per mg extract dry weight, respectively). As expected, the percentage radical inhibition by GF was higher than that by the GL extract (81 and 75 %, respectively). A similar trend was observed in Fe(2+)-chelating activity and β-carotene bleaching tests. The antibacterial assay of the extracts revealed no inhibition zones with the Gram-negative bacteria tested. However, the extracts demonstrated activity against B. cereus, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis. In

  19. Antibacterial constituents of Eremophila alternifolia: An Australian aboriginal traditional medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biva, Israt J; Ndi, Chi P; Griesser, Hans J; Semple, Susan J

    2016-04-22

    For traditional medicinal purposes Aboriginal Australians have utilised numerous plant species, Eremophila alternifolia is among the most prominent. Traditionally, fresh leaves, leaf-infusions and handmade leaf-pastes have been used as both external and internal preparations to provide relief from a variety of conditions. Preparations of the species have been used to treat various infections of skin, eyes and throat including the treatment of septic wounds. These usages suggest that the plant contains antibacterial compounds; however, to date they have not been isolated and identified. The present study aimed to identify antibacterial compounds from this important traditionally recorded medicinal species. Bioassay-guided fractionation was used to isolate compounds from the crude leaf-extract. Antibacterial activity of pure compounds was assessed through broth microdilution method by determining both minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). Structure elucidation was performed using spectroscopic techniques such as 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. Four compounds have been isolated from the leaf-extract; they include previously known flavanones [pinobanksin (1), pinobanksin-3-acetate (2) and pinobanksin-3-cinnamate (3)] and a serrulatane diterpene, 8-hydroxyserrulat-14-en-19-oic acid (4). While compound 4 had been found in other Eremophilas, flavanones 2 and 3 are identified for the first time from the genus Eremophila. The flavanone 3 is the most promising antibacterial compound with significant activity (10-20µM) against strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant and biofilm forming strains. No activity was observed for any isolated compounds against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The antibacterial activity of the crude extract of E. alternifolia and of the isolated compounds against Gram

  20. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from Melaleuca leucadendra L.

    OpenAIRE

    Widya Ismanto Aviarina; Septya Kusuma Heri; Mahfud Mahfud

    2018-01-01

    Cajuput (Melaleuca leucadendra L.) oil is one of potential commodity that provides an important role for the country’s foreign exchange but the extraction of these essential oil is still using conventional method such as hydrodistillation which takes a long time to produce essential oil with good quality. Therefore it is necessary to optimize the extraction process using a more effective and efficient method. So in this study the extraction is done using solvent-free microwave extraction meth...

  1. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of the Essential Oils from Three Melaleuca Species Grown in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Amri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the essential oils of Melaleuca armillaris Sm., Melaleuca styphelioides Sm. and Melaleuca acuminata F. Muell., collected in Tunisia, was studied by means of GC and GC-MS analysis. In all, 46 compounds were identified, 38 for M. armillaris, 20 for M. acuminata and eight for M. styphelioides, respectively. The presence of a sesquiterpenic fraction (52.2% characterized the oil from M. armillaris; M. sthypheliodes oil was rich in methyl eugenol, a phenolic compound (91.1%, while M. acuminata oil is mainly constituted by oxygenated monoterpenoids (95.6%. The essential oils were evaluated for their in vitro potentially phytotoxic activity against germination and initial radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L., Lepidium sativum L., Sinapis arvensis L., Triticum durum L. and Phalaris canariensis L. seeds. The radicle elongation of five seeds was inhibited at the highest doses tested, while germination of all seeds was not affected. Moreover, the essential oils showed low antimicrobial activity against eight selected microorganisms.

  2. Pengaruh Cara Aplikasi Minyak Suling Melaleuca bracteata dan Metil Eugenol terhadap Daya Pikat Lalat Buah Bactrocera dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Kardinan

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted at farmer’s fruit garden in Cilebut area, Bogor during 1997–1998. The objective is to know the effect of some application techniques of oil distilled from Melaleuca bracteata leaves on trapping fruit fly. Research consisted of three activities, those were the effect of some techniques of application on trapping fruit flies (I weekly, (2 in two weeks and (3 the effects of some concentrations of methyl eugenol (ME on trapping fruit fly. All treatments were hung at the fruit trees as high as 1.5 m. Observations were done in the number and gender of fruit flies trapped weekly and two-weekly. Result revealed that melaleuca distilled oil can be applied either by dropping into water or into cotton ball. Melaleuca leaves distilled oil should be applied once in two weeks, since its effectiveness lasted for two weeks only. The minimum concentration of methyl eugenol which could fruit flies effectively was 57%. Key words: Melaleuca bracteata, Bactrocera dorsalis

  3. Chemical composition and anti-Acanthamoeba activity of Melaleuca styphelioides essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouchi, Ferdaous; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, Maria; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Abderrabba, Manef

    2017-12-01

    Acanthamoeba infections cause serious humans diseases, such as amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Melaleuca essential oil has been reported to be effective in treating bacterial and fungal infections. However, the anti-parasitic effects of this essential oil are not well studied. In the present study, we first characterized the composition of the essential oil, extracted from the Tunisian Melaleuca styphelioides leaves, and then tested its effect on the Acanthamoeba castellanii Neff. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that the major common compounds were Caryophyllene oxide (23.42%), Spathulenol (20.5%), Isoaromadendrene epoxide (7.45%), Ledol (5.98%), α-Pinene (3.82%), Isopinocarveol (2.18%). Our data also showed that M. styphelioides essential oil inhibited the growth of Acanthamoeba with an IC 50 value of 69.03 ± 9.17 μg/ml. This work suggests M. styphelioides essential oil as a potential anti amoeba drug. Nevertheless, further studies are still needed to further verify the cytotoxicity of the studied oil on human macrophages and check its applicability to treat Acanthamoeba infections in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of Microsatellite Loci for the Riparian Tree Species Melaleuca argentea (Myrtaceae Using 454 Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Nevill

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Melaleuca argentea (Myrtaceae to evaluate genetic diversity and population genetic structure of this broadly distributed northern Australian riparian tree species. Methods and Results: 454 GS-FLX shotgun sequencing was used to obtain 5860 sequences containing putative microsatellite motifs. Two multiplex PCRs were optimized to genotype 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci. These loci were screened for variation in individuals from two populations in the Pilbara region, northwestern Western Australia. Overall, observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.27 to 0.86 (mean: 0.52 and the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13 (average: 4.3. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci will be useful in future studies of the evolutionary history and population and spatial genetic structure in M. argentea, and inform the development of seed sourcing strategies for the species.

  5. DESCRIÇÃO ANATÔMICA DO LENHO DE Melaleuca leucadendron (L. L

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    Linéia Roberta Zen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed the anatomical description of Melaleuca leucadendron wooden. The study was conducted from an individual tree collecting three discs for confection of histological slides and macerated. Was used to mashing nitricacetic method and for histology was used simple staining with 1% safranin. The wood anatomy agrees in general aspects to the typical pattern of Myrtaceae Family: flocking diffuse porosity, solitary pores, simple perforation plates, besides paratracheal axial parenchyma linear aliforme, very numerous rays and heterocellular, pits-ray vascular parenchyma-vascular and fibrous tissue composed of prominent fibrotraqueoids, very short fibers, distinct growth rings of walls marked by the end of the fibers flattened latewood. Qualitatively and quantitatively the wood did not reveal expressive characteristic, thus can be characterized by presenting a relatively simple anatomical structure, agreeing in general lines to Myrtaceae family.

  6. Extraction and refining of essential oil from Australian tea tree, Melaleuca alterfornia, and the antimicrobial activity in cosmetic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, Q; Phan, T D; Thieu, V Q Q; Tran, S T; Do, S H

    2012-01-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) comes from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifornia that belongs to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). It is one of the most powerful immune system stimulants and sorts out most viral, bacterial and fungal infections in a snap, while it is great to heal wounds and acnes. In Vietnam, Melaleuca trees can grow on acid land that stretches in a large portion of lands in the Mekong Delta region. So, there are some Melaleuca plantations developed under the Vietnamese government plans of increasing plantation forests now. However, TTO contains various amounts of 1,8-cineole that causes skin irritant. So TTO purification is very necessary. In this study, the purification of TTO that meet International Standard ISO 4730 was carried out via two steps. The first step is steam distillation to obtain crude TTO (terpinen-4-ol 35% v/v) and the average productivity is among 2.37% (v/wet-wt) or 1.23% (v/dry-wt). In the second step, the cleaned TTO is collected by vacuum distillation column and extraction yield of the whole process is about 0.3% (w/w). Besides, high concentration essential oil was applied in the cosmetic products to increase its commercial value.

  7. Extraction and refining of essential oil from Australian tea tree, Melaleuca alterfornia, and the antimicrobial activity in cosmetic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Q.; Phan, T. D.; Thieu, V. Q. Q.; Tran, S. T.; Do, S. H.

    2012-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) comes from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifornia that belongs to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). It is one of the most powerful immune system stimulants and sorts out most viral, bacterial and fungal infections in a snap, while it is great to heal wounds and acnes. In Vietnam, Melaleuca trees can grow on acid land that stretches in a large portion of lands in the Mekong Delta region. So, there are some Melaleuca plantations developed under the Vietnamese government plans of increasing plantation forests now. However, TTO contains various amounts of 1,8-cineole that causes skin irritant. So TTO purification is very necessary. In this study, the purification of TTO that meet International Standard ISO 4730 was carried out via two steps. The first step is steam distillation to obtain crude TTO (terpinen-4-ol 35% v/v) and the average productivity is among 2.37% (v/wet-wt) or 1.23% (v/dry-wt). In the second step, the cleaned TTO is collected by vacuum distillation column and extraction yield of the whole process is about 0.3% (w/w). Besides, high concentration essential oil was applied in the cosmetic products to increase its commercial value.

  8. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from Melaleuca leucadendra L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widya Ismanto Aviarina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cajuput (Melaleuca leucadendra L. oil is one of potential commodity that provides an important role for the country’s foreign exchange but the extraction of these essential oil is still using conventional method such as hydrodistillation which takes a long time to produce essential oil with good quality. Therefore it is necessary to optimize the extraction process using a more effective and efficient method. So in this study the extraction is done using solvent-free microwave extraction method that are considered more effective and efficient than conventional methods. The optimum yield in the extraction of cajuput oil using solvent-free microwave extraction method is 1.0674%. The optimum yield is obtained on the feed to distiller (F/D ratio of 0.12 g/mL with microwave power of 400 W. In the extraction of cajuput oil using solvent-free microwave extraction method is performed first-order and second-order kinetics modelling. Based on kinetics modelling that has been done, it can be said that the second-order kinetic model (R2 = 0.9901 can be better represent experimental results of extraction of cajuput oil that using solvent-free microwave extraction method when compared with the first-order kinetic model (R2 = 0.9854.

  9. Comparison of microwave hydrodistillation and solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from Melaleuca leucadendra Linn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismanto, A. W.; Kusuma, H. S.; Mahfud, M.

    2017-12-01

    The comparison of solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) and microwave hydrodistillation (MHD) in the extraction of essential oil from Melaleuca leucadendra Linn. was examined. Dry cajuput leaves were used in this study. The purpose of this study is also to determine optimal condition (microwave power). The relative electric consumption of SFME and MHD methods are both showing 0,1627 kWh/g and 0,3279 kWh/g. The results showed that solvent-free microwave extraction methods able to reduce energy consumption and can be regarded as a green technique for extraction of cajuput oil.

  10. Physiological host range of a mutualistic pair: Fergusonina turneri and its obligate nematode Fergusobia quinquenerviae, potential biological control agents of Melaleuca quinquenervia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Australia, galls develop on Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) as a result of the mutualistic association between the fly Fergusonina turneri Taylor (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) and its obligate nematode Fergusobia quinquenerviae Davies & Giblin-Davis (Tylenchida: Sphaer...

  11. Establishment, population increase, spread, and ecological host range of Lophodiplosis trifida (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtales:Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake is an invasive weed in wetland systems of Florida, USA. A biological control program targeting M. quinquenervia has culminated in the release of the gall forming midge Lophodiplosis trifida Gagné (Cecidomyiidae). Populations of the introduced ...

  12. Molluscicidal and antischistosomal activities of methanol extracts and isolated compounds from Eucalyptus globulus and Melaleuca styphelioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Eman; Hamid, Hoda Abdel; Abu El Einin, Hanaa M

    2014-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that results in severe organ damage. Snail control is the best measure to control schistosomiasis. Plant-derived molluscicides have gained increasing attention for the control of schistosomiasis because they have low toxicity towards non-target organisms. Tannins are particularly suitable for snail control because they are less toxic than saponins to non-target organisms. To identify the most toxic components of two plants belonging to the family Myrtaceae, namely Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Melaleuca styphelioides Sm against the different developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni and its snail host. The 80% MeOH leaf extracts of the tested plants and their isolated compounds were screened for their molluscicidal activity (expressed as LC50 and LC90 after 24 h exposure) against the snail Biomphalaria alexandrina. The anti-schistosomal activity of the tested samples was determined at 20 ppm (after 1 or 2 h exposure) against the different developmental stages of S. mansoni, including the miracidia, cercariae and worms. Biochemical parameters were measured to determine the toxicity mechanisms of the treated snails. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated based on NMR, UV and HRESI-MS/MS data. Potent molluscicidal activity was observed for the ellagitannin dimer eucalbanin B (12), with an LC50 value of 55 ppm. Treatment of the snails with the LC25 of eucalbanin B (30.8 ppm) resulted in a significant decrease in the protein level by 22.7% and 25.8% in the snail tissues and hemolymph, respectively. The decreased protein content was attributed to destruction of the snail tissue and impairment in protein synthesis under stress conditions of intoxication with eucalbanin B. Alterations in the activities of the transaminases and phosphatases in the treated snails indicated destruction and intoxication of the snail tissues. A significant increase in the levels of the transaminases alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (57

  13. Genetic variation and evolution of secondary compounds in native and introduced populations of the invasive plant Melaleuca quinquenervia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Steven J; Wheeler, Gregory S; Goodnight, Charles

    2012-05-01

    We examined multivariate evolution of 20 leaf terpenoids in the invasive plant Melaleuca quinquenervia in a common garden experiment. Although most compounds, including 1,8-Cineole and Viridiflorol, were reduced in home compared with invaded range genotypes, consistent with an evolutionary decrease in defense, one compound (E-Nerolidol) was greater in invaded than home range genotypes. Nerolidol was negatively genetically correlated with Cineole and Viridiflorol, and the increase in this compound in the new range may have been driven by this negative correlation. There was positive selection on all three focal compounds, and a loss of genetic variation in introduced range genotypes. Selection skewers analysis predicted an increase in Cineole and Viridiflorol and a decrease or no change in Nerolidol, in direct contrast to the observed changes in the new range. This discrepancy could be due to differences in patterns of selection, genetic correlations, or the herbivore communities in the home versus introduced ranges. Although evolutionary changes in most compounds were consistent with the evolution of increased competitive ability hypothesis, changes in other compounds as well as selection patterns were not, indicating that it is important to understand selection and the nature of genetic correlations to predict evolutionary change in invasive species. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Germinação de sementes de Melaleuca quinquenervia em condições de estresse hídrico e salino Germination of Melaleuca quinquenervia seeds under water and salt stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Martins

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O comportamento invasivo de Melaleuca quinquenervia em áreas úmidas deve-se à sua estratégia de regeneração agressiva, que está alicerçada na produção de sementes em massa. O conhecimento da fisiologia da germinação de sementes de plantas daninhas pode contribuir significativamente para o desenvolvimento de estratégias de manejo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os possíveis efeitos dos estresses hídrico e salino na germinação de sementes de M. quinquenervia. A semeadura foi realizada com quatro repetições de 0,05 g de sementes em papel umedecido com soluções nos potenciais osmóticos de 0,0; -0,2; -0,4; e -0,8 MPa, induzidos com polietilenoglicol (PEG 6000 e NaCl. O teste de germinação foi conduzido a 25 ºC na presença de luz. Avaliou-se a primeira contagem do teste aos sete dias após a semeadura e, semanalmente, a germinação (plântulas normais até os 28 dias. Foi calculado o índice de velocidade de germinação. A análise dos resultados permitiu a conclusão de que o estresse hídrico acarreta maior redução na velocidade de germinação e na germinação acumulada de sementes de M. quinquenervia do que o estresse salino e, independentemente da substância utilizada para indução do estresse, o limite para germinação está entre -0,4 e -0,8MPa.The invasive behavior of Melaleuca quinquenervia in wetlands seems attributable to its inherently aggressive regeneration strategies associated to massive seed production. The knowledge of the germination physiology of weed seeds can contribute significantly to the development of strategies for their management. This work aimed to evaluate the possible effects of water and salt stress on the germination of M. quinquenervia seeds. Four replications with 0.05 g of seeds were sown in paper moistened with solutions with the potential of 0.0; -0.2; -0.4 and -0.8 MPa, induced with polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000 and NaCl. Germination test was carried out at 25 ºC in the

  15. Evaluation of Melaleuca cajuputi (Family: Myrtaceae Essential Oil in Aerosol Spray Cans against Dengue Vectors in Low Cost Housing Flats

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    A Abu Bakar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melaleuca cajuputi essential oil in aerosol spray was evaluated against the dengue vectors Aedes ae­gypti and Ae. albopictus at low cost housing flats in Section 10, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Methods: Essential oil in aerosol viz: 5% and 10% of concentrations were sprayed for 5 seconds each towards hung mos­quitoes in 5 cylindrical net cages. Aerosol weights were recorded before and after spraying to determine dis­charge rates. Knockdown and mortality number were observed and compared to MS standard aerosol which contain 0.07% prallethrin and 0.05% d-phenothrin as positive control and aerosol contain 40% kerosene and 60% LPG was used as negative control.Results: High knockdown and mortality was observed in both species of mosquitoes towards MS standard aerosol. There was a significant difference (P<0.05 of mortality and knockdown between 5% and 10% of essential oil aero­sol and 5% and 10% essential oil between MS standard. For 5% essential oil, mean percentage (% of knockdown and mortality of Ae. aegypti displayed slightly higher compared to Ae. albopictus. Spraying with 5% M. cajuputi essen­tial oil aerosol indicated a knockdown of Ae. aegypti 5.60±1.18 and mortality of 22.90±4.22 while Ae. albopic­tus showed 4.60±0.89 knockdown and 20.00±2.85 mortality. The 10% essential oil concentration gave 23.60±1.68 knock­down and 48.05±0.37 mortality for Ae. aegypti. Ae. albopictus gave 23.00±3.16 knockdown and 44.20 ± 2.10 mortal­ity respectively.Conclusions: Extracts of essential oils does possessed an adulticidal effects and could be considered and utilized for fu­ture dengue vectors control

  16. Quantifying errors and omissions in alien species lists: The introduction status of Melaleuca species in South Africa as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn Jacobs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduced species lists provide essential background information for biological invasions research and management. The compilation of these lists is, however, prone to a variety of errors. We highlight the frequency and consequences of such errors using introduced Melaleuca (sensu lato, including Callistemon species in South Africa as a case study. We examined 111 herbarium specimens from South Africa and noted the categories and sub-categories of errors that occurred in identification. We also used information from herbarium specimens and distribution data collected in the field to determine whether a species was introduced, naturalized and invasive. We found that 72% of the specimens were not named correctly. These were due to human error (70% (misidentification, and improved identifications and species identification problems (30% (synonyms arising from inclusion of Callistemon, and unresolved taxonomy. At least 36 Melaleuca species have been introduced to South Africa, and field observations indicate that ten of these have naturalized, including five that are invasive. While most of the errors likely have negligible impact on management, we highlight one case where incorrect identification lead to an inappropriate management approach and some instances of errors in published lists. Invasive species lists need to be carefully reviewed to minimise errors, and herbarium specimens supported by DNA identification are required where identification using morphological features is particularly challenging.

  17. The Analysis of Management and Timber Trade System of Gelam (Melaleuca cajuputi From Peat Swamp Forest in South Kalimantan

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    Yudi Firmanul Ariffin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Until now the raw material of wood especially Gelam (Melaleuca cajuputi available for supporting the construction of housing and other infrastructures is increasingly large in Indonesia. On the Island of Borneo that partly consists of swamps needs Gelam very large and continuous, particularly for residential development. However, areas of peat swamp forest habitat of this plant from year to year are degradation and shrinkage. This situation is a very big influence on the population of Gelam, while the management and timber trade systems are not well regulated. This study aims to analyze the management and timber trade systems of Gelam particularly in South Kalimantan to provide input to the policy holder in the preservation of Gelam. The method was used a field survey and interviews with traders and policy holders related regulations. The results showed in South Kalimantan the potency of Gelam is only 2,9-7,1 m3/ha and decreasing yearly. Normally Gelam with a diameter <4 cm have been cut down, as well as > 30 cm. These dimensions should not be cut because of <4 cm too young and > 30 cm can be used as seed sources. Gelam derived from peat swamp forest, which mostly comes from the Batola District and some came from Kapuas District of Central Kalimantan. Distributions of Gelam were starting gatherers logging in the forest then sold to small gatherers, next to the large gatherers and distributed to all districts/cities in South Kalimantan, wood processing industries, and some of them were sent to Java. The silviculture system of Gelam was using selective cutting. Classification of wood sizes traded by the diameter divided into 3-4cm, 5-6cm, 7-8cm, 9-10cm, 11-12cm, 13-14cm, 15-19cm and > 20cm to 4m long. Its use consists of a small diameter (3-10cm for foundry building and firewood, while the large diameter (10-20cm for the construction of houses in swampy areas, and waste as well as the stems are bent and deformed used for firewood. Until now Gelam

  18. In vitro anti-microbial activity of the Cuban medicinal plants Simarouba glauca DC, Melaleuca leucadendron L and Artemisia absinthium L

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    Aymé Fernández-Calienes Valdés

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an extensive in vitro antimicrobial profiling was performed for three medicinal plants grown in Cuba, namely Simarouba glauca, Melaleuca leucadendron and Artemisia absinthium. Ethanol extracts were tested for their antiprotozoal potential against Trypanosoma b. brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum and Plasmodium falciparum. Antifungal activities were evaluated against Microsporum canis and Candida albicans whereas Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were used as test organisms for antibacterial activity. Cytotoxicity was assessed against human MRC-5 cells. Only M. leucadendron extract showed selective activity against microorganisms tested. Although S. glauca exhibited strong activity against all protozoa, it must be considered non-specific. The value of integrated evaluation of extracts with particular reference to selectivity is discussed.

  19. AVALIAÇÃO DE COMPOSTOS PUROS E MISTO DE ÓLEO DE CRAVO E MELALEUCA, NA SEDAÇÃO DE TILÁPIA DO NILO (Oreochromis niloticus).

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Rafael Alves de

    2015-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar as alterações dos parâmetros hematológicos de tilápia do Nilo (Oreochromis niloticus ) em função da sedação com diferentes combinações de óleo de cravo e melaleuca. Foram utilizados 230 peixes com 66 g ± 18,56 g, submetidos a soluções de óleo de cravo com 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% e 100% de óleo de melaleuca, a uma concentração de 100 mg-L, totalizando 6 tratamentos e o grupo controle. Assim, foram utilizados 20 baldes plásticos transpare...

  20. Comparative in vivo antioxidant levels in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice treated with praziquantel or the essential oil of Melaleuca armillaris leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, M; Ibrahim, N; El-Rigal, N

    2012-10-15

    Plant extracts are continuously investigated for their extensive inclusion of biologically active constituents that exert therapeutic activities against many diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant/anti-schistosomal activities of the essential oil of the fresh leaves of Melaleuca armillaris (M. armillaris) compared to Praziquantel (PZQ) on normal and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. The oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The oil was rich in 1,8-cineole (33.93%), terpinen-4-ol (18.79%), limonene (10.37%) and B-pinene (6.59%). M. armillaris oil (150 mg kg(-1), orally) was administered from the second week post infection twice per week for six weeks. PZQ (500 mg kg(-1), orally) was administered for two successive days 8 weeks post infection and mice sacrificed one week later. Total protein, Malondialdehyde (MDA), Glutathione (GSH), vitamins C and E, the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, as well as liver weights and liver/body weight were determined in the liver tissues. Results showed that, both treatments significantly ameliorated the disturbed levels ofGSH and MDA in infected mice. Both vitamins were significantly elevated after treatment with the oil while a significant increase in catalase accompanied by a pronounced decrease in SOD were obtained after treatment with PZQ. Both treatments markedly improved liver and body weights in infected mice compared to the infected-untreated ones. In conclusion, natural plant sources may be used as promising alternative agents to chemical drugs for schistosomiasis treatment, since the latter may result in drug-induced resistance arising from repeated use.

  1. In chemico evaluation of tea tree essential oils as skin sensitizers: Impact of the chemical composition on aging and generation of reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is a popular skin remedy obtained from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia, M. linariifolia or M dissitiflora. Due to the commercial importance ofTTO, substitution or adulteration with other tea tree species (such as cajeput, niaouli, manuka and kanuka oils) is common and may p...

  2. Optimization of Steam Distillation of Essential Oil of Eucalyptus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steam distillation of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture,. 58: 49 – 53. Khajeh, M. (2011).Optimization of process variables for essential oil components from Satureja hortensis by supercritical fluid extraction using Box-Behnken experimental design. Journal of Supercritical.

  3. Melaleuca quinquenervia essential oil inhibits α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced melanin production and oxidative stress in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wen-Wan; Su, Chia-Chi; Peng, Hsin-Yi; Chou, Su-Tze

    2017-10-15

    Essential oils are odorous, volatile products of plant secondary metabolism, which are found in many leaves and stems. They show important biological activities, which account for the development of aromatherapy used in complementary and alternative medicine. The essential oil extracted from Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake (paperbark) (MQ-EO) has various functional properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the chemical composition of MQ-EO by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and evaluate its tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics was used to identify 18 components in MQ-EO. The main components identified were 1,8-cineole (21.60%), α-pinene (15.93%), viridiflorol (14.55%), and α-terpineol (13.73%). B16 melanoma cells were treated with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in the presence of various concentrations of MQ-EO or its major compounds. Cell viability was accessed by MTT assay and cellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content were determined by using spectrophotographic methods. The antioxidant mechanism of MQ-EO in α-MSH stimulated B16 cells was also investigated. In α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-stimulated murine B16 melanoma cells, MQ-EO, 1,8-cineole, α-pinene, and α-terpineol significantly reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity. Moreover, MQ-EO, 1,8-cineole, α-pinene, and α-terpineol decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. In addition, restored glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase activities were increased in α-MSH-stimulated B16 cells. MQ-EO not only decreased apoptosis but also reduced DNA damage in α-MSH stimulated B16 cells. These results showed that MQ-EO and its main components, 1,8-cineole, α-pinene, and α-terpineol, possessed potent anti-tyrosinase and anti-melanogenic activities besides the antioxidant properties. The active functional components of MQ

  4. PREPARAÇÃO DE NOVOS FILMES POLIMÉRICOS CONTENDO NANOEMULSÕES DO ÓLEO DE MELALEUCA, COPAÍBA E LIMÃO PARA APLICAÇÃO COMO BIOMATERIAL

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    Viviane G. A. Pires

    Full Text Available The sodium alginate is a linear polymer used in industry and in medicine for many applications such as dressings for wounds, due to low toxicity and maintains a proper moist environment. The essential oils are materials that have antimicrobial activity and are active materials, which may be incorporated in polymeric films. This study has as objective the produce alginate films incorporated with nanoemulsions of melaleuca, copaiba and lemon oil and investigate water vapor permeability (WVP analysis of the films, particle size and ζ-potential of nanoemulsions. Particle size analyzes showed formation of large and small particles nanoemulsion depending on the agitation speed used during production of nanoemulsions. Results of the WVP analyzes showed that the film with alginate 3 % w/v and nanoemulsions with little particle prepared with agitation speed of 15000 rpm showed better WVP. Produced films show good quality for a future application as dressings because it has good WVP. This is very interesting because the skin needs to breathe.

  5. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop ad...

  6. Estudo de analgesia tópica pós-peeling facial profundo utilizando máscara a base de água, gel e óleo de melaleuca em comparação com o uso de máscara umedecida em soro fisiológico no Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Aleardo Gonella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O peeling químico profundo é um procedimento que proporciona a esfoliação controlada da epiderme e derme com posterior renovação celular. Promove a normalização da pigmentação da pele, atenua cicatrizes, manchas, além de minimizar rugas finas. OBJETIVOS: Nosso objetivo foi observar se ocorre uma melhora da dor pós procedimento do peeling ao utilizar uma máscara a base de água deionizada, deionizada, gel alimentar e óleo de melaleuca, o Water Jel® , um material que já é utilizado em ferimentos por queimadura com relatos de parar a progressão da queimadura, alívio da dor e prevenção de injúrias ao ao resfriar a lesão e atuar como inibidor da resposta inflamatória local. JUSTIFICATIVA: Muitos pacientes deixam de propiciar melhoramento da aparecia da pele danificada por fatores extrínsecos e intrínsecos devido ao estigma da algia pós-peeling. Dessa forma, com a analgesia adequada os benefícios do peeling serão sentidos e apreciados pelo paciente com maior aceitação. METODOLOGIA: A seleção para as candidatas à realização do procedimento foi feita através da Classificação de Fitzpatrick (apenas fototipo tipo I e II selecionadas. As pacientes passavam por preparação da pele com uma aplicação prévia de hidroquinona (pelo menos 3 semanas antes do procedimento. Após o peeling, a algia foi avaliada por uma escala numérica e facial a partir de uma comparação entre hemifaces direita e esquerda, uma coberta com a mascara de Water Jel®, outra com a mesma mascara umedecida em soro, sem os princípios ativos do produto estudado,logo após a realização do peeling de Acido Tricloroacético. A paciente não sabia em qual hemiface cada máscara foi manipulada. O estudo foi realizado em 17 pacientes. RESULTADOS: A análise estatística pelo Teste de Wilcoxon não identificou diferença significativa entre as hemifaces esquerda e direita, uma vez que as médias das notas foram similares em ambas escalas.

  7. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Saxena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides.

  8. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Seema; Uniyal, Veena; Bhatt, R P

    2012-10-01

    Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides.

  9. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Seema; Uniyal, Veena; Bhatt, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides. PMID:24031963

  10. sate dans le contrôle de Melaleuca quinquenervia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 juin 2014 ... towards the protected area. Only chemical control may be con- sidered for this species, given its resilience to cutting and fire. This study aims at identifying the best protocol for the use of glyphosate in controlling the invasion of M. quinquenervia in the Analalava forest in Foulpointe. Five solutions of different.

  11. In vitro effect of essential oils and isolated mono- and sesquiterpenes on Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikus, J; Harkenthal, M; Steverding, D; Reichling, J

    2000-05-01

    The effect of different essential oils as well as of isolated mono- and sesquiterpenes on the viability of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, promastigotes of Leishmania major and human HL-60 cells was evaluated using the Almar Blue assay. Of the 12 essential oils and 8 terpenes investigated, only three essential oils, Melissa officinalis (balmmint) oil, Thymus vulgaris (thyme) oil, and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil were about 50-fold and 80-fold more toxic to bloodstream forms of T. brucei than to HL-60 cells, respectively. Terpinen-4-ol, the main compound of the Australian tea tree oil, was even 1000-fold more toxic to trypanosomes than to the human cells. On the other hand, none of the essential oils and terpenes tested were more toxic to promastigotes of L. major than to HL-60 cells.

  12. Phytochemical composition and in vitro screening of the antimicrobial activity of essential oils on oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardugno, Roberta; Pellati, Federica; Iseppi, Ramona; Bondi, Moreno; Bruzzesi, Giacomo; Benvenuti, Stefania

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the activity of essential oils (EOs) against microorganisms involved in oral diseases was evaluated. Fourteen EOs were selected and subjected to gas chromatographic analysis, including Illicium verum, Eucaliptus globulus, Eugenia caryophyllata, Leptospermum scoparium, Mentha arvensis, Mentha piperita, Myrtus communis, Salvia officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula x intermedia, Thymus capitatus and Thymus vulgaris. These EOs were tested for their antimicrobial activity on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species clinically isolated from dental surgery patients. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by means of the disc diffusion and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Five EOs, having shown an interesting antimicrobial activity, were selected for a second screening in combination between them and with chlorhexidine. From the second assays, two EO-EO and three EO-chlorhexidine associations gave interesting results as potential constituents of mouthwashes, especially for the contribution of oxygenated monoterpenes, including menthol, thymol and carvacrol.

  13. Effects of Iodine Doping on Optoelectronic and Chemical Properties of Polyterpenol Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Bazaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their amorphous, highly cross-liked nature, most plasma polymers display dielectric properties. This study investigates iodine doping as the means to tune optoelectronic properties of plasma polymer derived from a low-cost, renewable resource, i.e., Melaleuca alternifolia oil. In situ exposure of polyterpenol to vapors of electron-accepting dopant reduced the optical band gap to 1.5 eV and increased the conductivity from 5.05 × 10−8 S/cm to 1.20 × 10−6 S/cm. The increased conductivity may, in part, be attributed to the formation of charge-transfer complexes between the polymer chain and halogen, which act as a cation and anion, respectively. Higher levels of doping notably increased the refractive index, from 1.54 to 1.70 (at 500 nm, and significantly reduced the transparency of films.

  14. Comparison of oil recovered from tea tree leaf by ethanol extraction and steam distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G R; Lowe, R F; Southwell, I A

    2000-09-01

    Two methods for the determination of oil and oil major components from tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) leaf are quantitatively compared. A microwave assisted ethanol extraction and a 2-h hydrodistillation technique were used on both dry and fresh leaf from a low and a high oil concentration tree. There was no significant difference between dry and fresh leaf. The distillation technique recovered 88% and 82% of the extractable oil for the low and high concentration material, respectively. For both samples this distilled oil was composed of lower absolute amounts of sesquiterpenoids and marginally lower amounts of monoterpenoids. Extending the distillation to 6 h increased the sesquiterpenoid recovery but this resulted in a reduction in both the absolute and relative amounts of the oxygenated monoterpenoids, terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole.

  15. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils.

  16. Contact allergy to essential oils cannot always be predicted from allergy to fragrance markers in the baseline series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabroe, Ruth A; Holden, Catherine R; Gawkrodger, David J

    2016-04-01

    Essential oils are fragrance substances that are labelled on cosmetic products by their INCI names, potentially confusing consumers. To establish whether contact allergy to essential oils might be missed if not specifically tested for. We tested 471 patients with 14 essential oils and 2104 patients with Melaleuca alternifolia oil between January 2008 and June 2014. All patients were tested with fragrance mix I, fragrance mix II, hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde, and Myroxylon pereirae. Three hundred and twenty-six patients were tested with hydroperoxides of limonene and linalool. Thirty-four patients had a +/++/+++ reaction to at least one essential oil. Eleven had no reaction to any of the six marker fragrance substances. Thus, 4 of 11 positive reactions to M. alternifolia oil, 2 of 7 reactions to Cymbopogon flexuosus oil, 1 of 5 reactions to Cananga odorata oil, 3 of 4 reactions to Santalum album oil and 2 of 3 reactions to Mentha piperita oil would have been missed without individual testing. A small number of patients who are allergic to essential oils could be missed if these are not specifically tested. Labelling by INCI names means that exposure may not be obvious. Careful inspection of so-called 'natural' products and targeted testing is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The antimicrobial activity of four commercial essential oils in combination with conventional antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, S F; Suliman, S; Viljoen, A M

    2009-04-01

    Due to the emergence of multi-drug resistance, alternatives to conventional antimicrobial therapy are needed. This study aims to investigate the in vitro pharmacological interactions between essential oils (considered valuable as natural therapeutic treatments) and conventional antimicrobials (ciprofloxacin/amphotericin B) when used in combination. Interactions of the essential oils (Melaleuca alternifolia, Thymus vulgaris, Mentha piperita and Rosmarinus officinalis) when combined with ciprofloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus indicate mainly antagonistic profiles. When tested against Klebsiella pneumoniae the isobolograms show antagonistic, synergistic and additive interactions depending on the combined ratio. The R. officinalis/ciprofloxacin combination against K. pneumoniae displayed the most favourable synergistic pattern. The interactions of M. alternifolia (tea tree), T. vulgaris (thyme), M. piperita (peppermint) and R. officinalis (rosemary) essential oils with amphotericin B indicate mainly antagonistic profiles when tested against Candida albicans. While a number of interactions show complete antagonism, others show varied (synergistic, additive and/or antagonistic) interactions, thus the efficacy is dependent on the ratio in which the two components co-exist. The predominant antagonistic interactions noted here, suggests that some natural therapies containing essential oils should be used with caution when combined with antibiotics.

  18. ACTIVITY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AGAINST SOME PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, A; Caradonia, F; Gianferro, M; Molinu, M G; Battaglia, V

    2014-01-01

    The requirement of environmental protection and food safety is perceived with always major interest by public opinion and it is consistent with European Union legislation on the sustainable use of pesticides (Directive 2009/128/EC). This directive requires member states to promote low pesticide-input, giving priority to non-chemical methods and low risk plant protection products. In order to contribute to the achievement of these objectives antifungal activity of natural substances, characterized by a good toxicological and ecotoxicological profile, was tested. Essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, essential oil of Syzygium aromaticum and extract from Mimosa tenuiflora were tested against Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (races 1 and 2). In vitro tests involved determination of radial growth of the colonies of fungi in the presence of varying concentrations of tested products in agar media and determination of germination percentage in the presence of tested product at various concentrations. The products based on essential oil of M. alternifolia were also tested in vivo on tomato fruits wounded and artificially inoculated with A. alternata or with B. cinerea. The in vitro tests showed the antifungal activity of both essential oils instead the extract from M. tenuiflora exhibited poor antifungal activity and only against A. alternata and B. cinerea. The results on tomato fruits showed inhibition of grey mould and black mould by essential oil of M. alternifolia. The antifungal activity increased with increasing concentrations. In conclusion, the obtained results in the present study showed promising prospects for the utilisation of investigated products to reduce the using of antifungal chemicals and to achieve a more sustainable use of pesticides.

  19. In vitro antibacterial effect of exotic plants essential oils on the honeybee pathogen Paenibacillus larvae, causal agent of American foul brood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuselli, S. R.; Garcia de la Rosa, S. B.; Eguaras, M. J.; Fritz, R.

    2010-07-01

    Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of exotic plants essential oils to potentially control Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foul brood disease (AFB) were determined. AFB represents one of the main plagues that affect the colonies of honeybees Apis mellifera L. with high negative impact on beekeepers worldwide. Essential oils tested were niaouli (Melaleuca viridiflora) and tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) from Myrtaceae, and citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii) from Gramineae. The components of the essential oils were identified by SPME-GC/MS analysis. The antimicrobial activity of the oils against P. larvae was determined by the broth micro dilution method. In vitro assays of M. viridiflora and C. nardus oils showed the inhibition of the bacterial strains at the lowest concentrations tested, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) mean value about 320 mg L{sup -}1 for both oils, respectively. This property could be attributed to the kind and percentage of the components of the oils. Terpinen-4-ol (29.09%), {alpha}-pinene (21.63%) and limonene (17.4%) were predominant in M. viridiflora, while limonene (24.74%), citronelal (24.61%) and geraniol (15.79%) were the bulk of C. nardus. The use of these essential oils contributes to the screening of alternative natural compounds to control AFB in the apiaries; toxicological risks and other undesirable effects would be avoided as resistance factors, developed by the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. (Author) 40 refs.

  20. MIXTURE OF CHARCOAL KAYU GALAM (Melaleuca leucadendron LINN AND SHELL CANDLENUT (Aleurites moluceana WILD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUSYIANI LUSYIANI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT.  The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mixture composition Galam wood with walnut shells to the quality of the resulting charcoal briquettes. The results and analysis of variance showed that the treatment given very real effect on the moisture content, ash content, the levels of substances fly, carbon residue, and the calorific value and significantly affect the density. The addition of hazelnut shell causes an increase in moisture content, ash content, and levels of substances that reduce the amount of carbon fly and the rest of the calorific value generated. The addition of hazelnut shells up to 50% (treatment A3 results in a briquette charcoal briquettes are still compliant imports (Japanese standard. Based on the results of the test, the charcoal briquettes produced have physical and chemical properties as follows: the average water content of 7.949%, the average ash content of 2.855%, the average levels of substance flew 29.510%, the average carbon remaining 67.652%, average the average density of 0.779 gram/cm3, and the average calorific value of 6202.6594 cal / gram. Keywords: moisture content, ash content, carbon residue, ABSTRAK.  Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh komposisi campuran kayu galam dengan tempurung kemiri terhadap kualitas briket arang yang dihasilkan. Hasil penelitian dan analisis sidik ragam menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan yang diberikan berpengaruh sangat nyata terhadap kadar air, kadar abu, kadar zat terbang, karbon sisa, dan nilai kalor serta berpengaruh nyata terhadap kerapatan. Penambahan tempurung kemiri menyebabkan kenaikan kadar air, kadar abu, dan kadar zat terbang sehingga mengurangi jumlah karbon sisa dan nilai kalor yang dihasilkan. Penambahan tempurung kemiri sampai 50% (perlakuan A3 menghasilkan briket arang yang masih memenuhi standar briket impor (standar Jepang. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian, briket arang yang dihasilkan mempunyai sifat fisik dan kimia sebagai berikut : rata-rata kadar air 7,949%, rata-rata kadarabu 2,855%, rata-rata kadar zat terbang 29,510%, rata-rata karbon sisa 67,652%, rata-rata kerapatan 0,779 gram/cm3, dan rata-rata nilai kalor 6202,6594 cal/gram. Kata Kunci : kadar air, kadar abu, karbon sisa

  1. Compare the influence of several methods dehydrate of cajuput (Melaleuca cajuputi) honey from Bac Lieu - Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Nguyen Xuan; Phuc, Nguyen Chi; Oanh, Huynh Ngoc; Hien, Phan Phuoc

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this research was exhaustive to valuate the effects of 5 methods used to dehydrate of cajuput honey from Bac Lieu - Vietnam include thermal, microwave, ultrasonic wave, silicagel, vacuum processing on water content of honey. Beside that, comparing the effects on honey quality with the industrial-scale processing. The main honey quality paramenters (reducing sugar (RS), hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), diastase number (DN), water and colour) of cajuput honey were analyzed. RS content were analyzed by DNS method, HMF under AOAC 980.23, diastase activity based on AOAC 958.09, water content according to AOAC 969.38B and colour parameters (L*, a*, b*) were established in the CIE system. The physico-chemical characteristics of fresh honey was as follows: water content 23.18%, RS 717.42 mg/g, HMF 4.24 mg/kg, DN 4.85 mg/kg, colour parameters L*a*b* 39.51-10.51-31.81. The results of the analysis showed that excepts ultrasonic wave processing (22.93%), the other methods allowed to dehydrate of cajuput honey (thermal - 18.73%, microwave - 16.87%, silicagel - 17.86%, vacuum - 17.35% and industrial-scale processing - 16.85%).

  2. Chemical and biological evaluation of the essential oils of different Melaleuca species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, R S; Shalaby, A S; El-Baroty, G A; Ibrahim, N A; Ali, M A; Hassan, E M

    2004-01-01

    The essential oils of the fresh leaves of M. ericifolia, M. leucadendron, M. armillaris and M. styphelioides were isolated by a hydrodistillation method and analysed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. The essential oil of M. ericifolia contained methyl eugenol (96.84%) as a major constituent, whereas M. leucadendron was rich in 1,8-cineole (64.30%). The essential oil of M. armillaris was rich in 1,8-cineole (33.93%) followed by terpinen-4-ol (18.79%), whereas M. styphelioides was rich in caryophyllene oxide (43.78%) and (-) spathulenol (9.65%). The essential oils of these species possessed antimicrobial and antifungal activities. M. ericifolia exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against Bacillus subtiles and Aspergillus niger. The antiviral activities of the essential oils against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were studied in African green monkey kidney cells (Vero) by a plaque reduction assay. The volatile oil of M. armillaris was more effective as a virucidal (up to 99%) than that of M. leucadendron (92%) and M. ericifolia (91.5%). The effects of the essential oils on the antioxidant system status in carbon tetrachloride treated animals were studied. The essential oil of M. armillaris exhibited a marked antioxidant effect, it improved vitamin E, vitamin C and superoxide dismutase parameters so it can be used as a free radical suppressor. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Exploring the Anti-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Activity of Essential Oils: A Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Isabel; Lo Nostro, Antonella; Pesavento, Giovanna; Barnabei, Martina; Calonico, Carmela; Perrin, Elena; Chiellini, Carolina; Fondi, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Maggini, Valentina; Vannacci, Alfredo; Gallo, Eugenia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Flamini, Guido; Gori, Luigi; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    In this work we have checked the ability of the essential oils extracted from six different medicinal plants (Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, and Thymus vulgaris) to inhibit the growth of 18 bacterial type strains belonging to the 18 known species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). These bacteria are opportunistic human pathogens that can cause severe infection in immunocompromised patients, especially those affected by cystic fibrosis (CF), and are often resistant to multiple antibiotics. The analysis of the aromatograms produced by the six oils revealed that, in spite of their different chemical composition, all of them were able to contrast the growth of Bcc members. However, three of them (i.e., Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, and Thymus vulgaris) were particularly active versus the Bcc strains, including those exhibiting a high degree or resistance to ciprofloxacin, one of the most used antibiotics to treat Bcc infections. These three oils are also active toward both environmental and clinical strains (isolated from CF patients), suggesting that they might be used in the future to fight B. cepacia complex infections.

  4. Exploring the Anti-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Activity of Essential Oils: A Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Maida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have checked the ability of the essential oils extracted from six different medicinal plants (Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, and Thymus vulgaris to inhibit the growth of 18 bacterial type strains belonging to the 18 known species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc. These bacteria are opportunistic human pathogens that can cause severe infection in immunocompromised patients, especially those affected by cystic fibrosis (CF, and are often resistant to multiple antibiotics. The analysis of the aromatograms produced by the six oils revealed that, in spite of their different chemical composition, all of them were able to contrast the growth of Bcc members. However, three of them (i.e., Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, and Thymus vulgaris were particularly active versus the Bcc strains, including those exhibiting a high degree or resistance to ciprofloxacin, one of the most used antibiotics to treat Bcc infections. These three oils are also active toward both environmental and clinical strains (isolated from CF patients, suggesting that they might be used in the future to fight B. cepacia complex infections.

  5. Medicinal plant treatments for fleas and ear problems of cats and dogs in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya

    2008-09-01

    Research conducted in 2003/2004 documented and validated (in a non-experimental way) ethnoveterinary medicines used by small-scale, organic livestock farmers in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Interviews were conducted with 60 participants who were organic farmers or holistic medicinal/veterinary practitioners. A workshop was held with selected participants to discuss the plant-based treatments. This paper reports on the medicinal plants used for fleas in cats and dogs. Fleas and flies are treated with Artemisia vulgaris L. (Asteraceae), Citrus x limon (L.), Juniperus communis L. var. depressa Pursh. (Cupressaceae), Lavandula officinalis L. (Labiatae), Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae), and Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (Cupressaceae). All of the plants used have insecticidal activity. Ear problems are treated with Achillea millefolium L., Calendula officinalis L., and Helichrysum angustifolium (Roth.) G. Don. (Asteraceae), Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Berberis aquifolium Pursh./Mahonia aquifolium (Berberidaceae), Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Fabaceae), Lobelia inflata L. (Campanulaceae), Matricaria recutita L., Melaleuca alternifolia L. (Myrtaceae), Origanum vulgare L. (Labiatae), Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae), Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry (Myrtaceae), Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae), and Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae).

  6. Use of biocontrol agents and botanicals in integrated management of Botrytis cinerea in table grape vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Caterina; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M; Dongiovanni, Crescenza; Pollastro, Stefania; Fumarola, Giulio; Di Carolo, Michele; Perrelli, Donato; Natale, Patrizia; Faretra, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of biological control agents (BCAs) and botanicals (BOTs) due to increasing awareness of the environmental and human health risks associated with synthetic plant protection products. The BCAs Bacillus subtilis strain QST713, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain D747 and Aureobasidium pullulans strains DSM14940 and DSM14941, and the BOTs Melaleuca alternifolia and terpenic extracts are proposed for the control of grey mould in vineyards. This study was aimed at evaluating their effectiveness in integrated crop management strategies and their outcomes in terms of the management of fungicide resistance and residues. In field trials carried out on table grapes in southern Italy, use of BCAs or BOTs alternately or mixtures of BCAs or BOTs with the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor fungicide fluopyram showed efficacy of up to 96% against grey mould on bunches, comparable with the chemical reference strategy (up to 87%). By contrast, use of BCAs or BOTs (up to 11 sprays) alone was not effective (integrated use of BCAs or BOTs reduced the spread of succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor-resistant conidia, as well as fungicide residues in grapes. Spray schedules based on integration of BCAs or BOTs with fungicides are effective against grey mould and reduce the risk of fungicide resistance in B. cinerea and fungicide residues in grapes. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. α-Terpineol induces fatty liver in mice mediated by the AMP-activated kinase and sterol response element binding protein pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, You-Jin; Sim, Woo-Cheol; Choi, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2013-05-01

    The use of herbal medicines in disease prevention and treatment is growing rapidly worldwide, without careful consideration of safety issues. α-Terpineol is a monoterpene alcoholic component of Melaleuca alternifolia, Salvia officinalis and Carthamus tinctorius that is used widely as a flavor and essential oil in food. The present study showed that α-terpineol induces fatty liver via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR-sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) pathway. α-Terpineol-treated hepatocytes had significantly increased neutral lipid accumulation. α-Terpineol suppressed AMPK phosphorylation, and increased p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) phosphorylation and SREBP-1 activation. It also increased luciferase activity in cells transfected with LXRE-tk-Luc and SRE-tk-Luc. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by co-treatment with rapamycin or co-transfection with dominant negative p70S6K blocked completely the effects of α-terpineol. α-Terpineol oral administration to mice for 2weeks led to decreased AMPK phosphorylation and increased SREBP-1 activation in the liver, followed by hepatic lipid accumulation. Conversely, rapamycin co-treatment reversed α-terpineol-induced SREBP-1 activation and fatty liver in mice. These data provide evidence that α-terpineol causes fatty liver, an effect mediated by the AMPK/mTOR/SREBP-1 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppression of inflammatory reactions by terpinen-4-ol, a main constituent of tea tree oil, in a murine model of oral candidiasis and its suppressive activity to cytokine production of macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kentaro; Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae A; Maruyama, Naho; Irie, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The onset of oral candidiasis is accompanied by inflammatory symptoms such as pain in the tongue, edema or tissue damage and lowers the quality of life (QOL) of the patient. In a murine oral candidiasis model, the effects were studied of terpinen-4-ol (T-4-ol), one of the main constituents of tea tree oil, Melaleuca alternifolia, on inflammatory reactions. When immunosuppressed mice were orally infected with Candida albicans, their tongues showed inflammatory symptoms within 24 h after the infection, which was monitored by an increase of myeloperoxidase activity and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in their tongue homogenates. Oral treatment with 50 µL of 40 mg/mL terpinen-4-ol 3h after the Candida infection clearly suppressed the increase of these inflammatory parameters. In vitro analysis of the effects of terpinen-4-ol on cytokine secretion of macrophages indicated that 800 µg/mL of this substance significantly inhibited the cytokine production of the macrophages cultured in the presence of heat-killed C. albicans cells. Based on these findings, the role of the anti-inflammatory action of T-4-ol in its therapeutic activity against oral candidiasis was discussed.

  9. Rhamnolipids as emulsifying agents for essential oil formulations: antimicrobial effect against Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Ester; Bouhdid, Samira; Torrego-Solana, Noelia; Marqués, A M; Espuny, M José; García-Celma, M José; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-10

    This work examines the influence of essential oil composition on emulsification with rhamnolipids and their use as therapeutic antimicrobial agents against two opportunistic pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans. Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with waste frying oil as the carbon source, were composed of eight rhamnolipid homologues. The rhamnolipid mixture was used to produce emulsions containing essential oils (EOs) of Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum verum, Origanum compactum and Lavandula angustifolia using the titration method. Ternary phase diagrams were designed to evaluate emulsion stability, which differed depending on the essential oil. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs alone and the emulsions was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity presented by the essential oils alone increased with emulsification. The surface properties of rhamnolipids contribute to the positive dispersion of EOs and thus increase their availability and antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and S. aureus. Therefore, rhamnolipid-based emulsions represent a promising approach to the development of EO delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal modes of action of tea tree oil and its two characteristic components against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Wang, J; Shao, X; Xu, F; Wang, H

    2015-11-01

    The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) has been evaluated as a potential eco-friendly antifungal agent against Botrytis cinerea. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mode of action of tea tree oil (TTO) and its components against B. cinerea. Of the components we tested in contact phase, terpinen-4-ol had the highest antifungal activity, followed by TTO, α-terpineol, terpinolene, then 1,8-cineole. As one of characteristic components of TTO, terpinen-4-ol treatment led to pronounced alterations in mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, membrane permeability under scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and fluorescent microscope, and also reduced the ergosterol content of fungi. As another characteristic component, 1,8-cineole caused serious intracellular damage but only slightly affected B. cinerea otherwise. When terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole were used together, the synergistic antifungal activity was significantly higher than either component by itself. The results of our study confirmed that terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole act mainly on the cell membranes and organelles of B. cinerea, respectively, and when combined are similar to TTO in antifungal activity due to their differences. Understanding the mechanism of terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole antifungal action to B. cinerea is helpful for investigation on their synergistic effect and explaining antifungal action modes of TTO. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Linalool Affects the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Essential Oils.

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    Herman, Anna; Tambor, Krzysztof; Herman, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The high concentrations of essential oils are generally required to receive microbial purity of the products (cosmetics, medicine). On the other hand, their application due to the high concentration of essential oils may be limited by changes in organoleptic and textural quality of the products, as well as they cause irritation and allergies in users. Addition of linalool to essential oil may significantly enhance its antimicrobial effectiveness and reduce their concentrations in products, taking advantage of their synergistic and additive effects. The aim of the study was to compare antimicrobial activity of essential oil alone and in combination with linalool. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris, Juniperus communis, Pelargonium graveolens, Citrus bergamia, Citrus grandis, Lavandula angustifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia, Syzygium aromaticum, linalool and their combination was investigated against bacteria and fungi using the disc diffusion method. The addition of linalool to S. aromaticum oil in a synergistic manner enhanced its antimicrobial efficacy against P. aeruginosa and A. brasiliensis. Moreover, the additive interaction between this oil and linalool was observed against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans. It was also found that linalool in an additive manner increased the antimicrobial effectiveness of T. vulgaris oil against P. aeruginosa. The antimicrobial properties of mixture of essential oils with their active constituents may be used for creating new strategies to maintain microbiological purity of products.

  12. Screening of some essential oils against Trichosporon species.

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    Uniyal, Veena; Saxena, Seema; Bhatt, R P

    2013-01-01

    White Piedra is a superficial mycoses characterized by nodules on the hair shaft, caused by the basidiomycetous yeast Trichosporon species. In this study 25 essential oils were extracted and screened against two Trichosporon species i.e. Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon cutaneum. Both these fungi procured from MTCC Chandigarh were maintained on yeast malt agar plates and tubes at 25 degrees C. Two screening methods viz., agar well diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentration were adopted for the study. The results showed that the maximum anti-yeast activity against T. asahii and T. cutaneum was demonstrated by oil of Mentha piperita showing full inhibition of both the fungi, Melaleuca alternifolia with an inhibition zone of 45 and 40 mm, Cymbopogon winterians with inhibition zone of 45 and 45 mm and Cymbopogon flexuosus with 35 and 30 mm inhibition zones. The oil of Trachyspermum ammi exhibited 10 and 20 mm, Abelmoschus moschatus exhibited 30 and 20 mm, Salvia sclarea showed 20 and 18 mm and Jasminum officinale exhibited 25 and 15 mm inhibition zones showing moderate activity. The oil of Cyperus scariosus, Pogostemon patchouli and Rosa damascene showed no inhibition zone against both the fungi while Vetiveria zizanoides exhibited no inhibition in case of T. asahii and inhibition zone of 10 mm in case of T. cutaneum demonstrating comparatively low activity against both the fungi. These results support that the essential oils can be used to cure superficial mycoses and these oils may have significant role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

  13. The in vitro and in vivo antiviral properties of combined monoterpene alcohols against West Nile virus infection.

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    Pliego Zamora, Adriana; Edmonds, Judith H; Reynolds, Maxwell J; Khromykh, Alexander A; Ralph, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that can cause neuroinvasive disease in humans and animals for which no therapies are currently available. We studied an established combination of monoterpene alcohols (CMA) derived from Melaleuca alternifolia, against WNV infection. The in vitro results show that CMA exhibits virucidal activity, as well as reduces the viral titres and percentage of infected cells. The antiviral mechanism of action of CMA was studied. We found that CMA did not alter the intracellular pH, neither induced apoptosis, but did induce cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase although that was not the antiviral mechanism. Furthermore, we tested CMA in vivo using IRF 3(-)(/)(-)/7(-/-)mice and it was found that CMA treatment significantly delayed morbidity due to WNV infection, reduced the loss of body weight and reduced the viral titres in brain. These findings suggest that CMA could be a therapeutic agent against WNV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The in vitro antibiofilm activity of selected culinary herbs and medicinal plants against Listeria monocytogenes.

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    Sandasi, M; Leonard, C M; Viljoen, A M

    2010-01-01

    The antibiofilm activity of extracts obtained from selected herbs, spices, beverages and commercially important medicinal plants was investigated on Listeria monocytogenes. The growth and development of the biofilm was assessed using the crystal violet (CV) assay. The respiratory activity was assessed using the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay. The majority of extracts tested prevented cell adhesion to the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surface. Seven of the 15 extracts reduced biofilm adhesion of both the clinical and the type strains by at least 50%. In contrast, inhibition of a preformed biofilm was more difficult to achieve, with only three extracts (Rosmarinus officinalis, Mentha piperita and Melaleuca alternifolia) inhibiting the growth of both strains by at least 50%. Although most extracts were able to reduce initial cell attachment, inhibition of growth in a preformed biofilm was more difficult to achieve. The ability to reduce biofilm biomass as shown by several plant extracts warrants further investigation to explore the use of natural products in antibiofilm adhesion.

  15. Effects of Different Plant Products against Pig Mange Mites

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    E. Mägi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the antiparasitic efficiency of herbal-based products. Four medicinal plant species extracts in 10% ethanol solutions (hogweed Heracleum sosnowskyi Manden, mugwort Artemisia vulgaris L., tansy Tanacetum vulgare L., wormwood Artemisia absinthium L., and seven essential medicinal ethereal oils used in 1% emulsions (garlic Allium sativum L., black pepper Piper nigrum L., juniper Juniperus communis L., citronella grass Cymbopogon nardus Rendle, pennyroyal Mentha pulegium L., eucalyptus Eucalyptus globulus Labill., tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia Gheel were tested a on pig farm in Estonia to control swine sarcoptic mange mites (Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis (L. 1758 Latreille, 1802. Trial groups (6 pigs each were treated over the whole body twice, with one week interval in between; one group was left as untreated control. All the preparations used inhibited the development of and were more or less lethal to mange mites. Tea tree and citronella volatile oil preparations proved to be the most effective (viability of mites < 5% in 4 weeks. The most active extract of tested ethanol solutions was obtained from hogweed seeds: after two treatments of pigs, 57-93% of parasites died in 2-4 weeks. The extracts of local plants tansy and wormwood diminished the number of mites up to 44% within the first week after treatments. The results indicate that plant extracts may be further tested in practice as alternatives to drugs of synthetic origin.

  16. Positive Patch-Test Reactions to Essential Oils in Consecutive Patients From North America and Central Europe.

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    Warshaw, Erin M; Zug, Kathryn A; Belsito, Donald V; Fowler, Joseph F; DeKoven, Joel G; Sasseville, Denis; Maibach, Howard I; Mathias, C G Toby; DeLeo, Vincent A; Taylor, James S; Fransway, Anthony F; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Zirwas, Matthew J; Geier, Johannes; Uter, Wolfgang

    Synthetic fragrances and natural essential oils (EOs) are used in perfumery and found in various cosmetics. Essential oils are also increasingly used to promote wellness. In previous studies, the sensitization potential of some EOs has been identified; however, the current prevalence of sensitivity is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of positive patch-test reactions to EOs tested in the baseline series, along with 3 fragrance markers (FMs) (fragrance mix I, fragrance mix II, and Myroxylon pereirae), in consecutive patients in the US/Canadian North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) (2009-2014) and the central European, trinational Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) (2010-2014). This study used a retrospective analysis of patch-test results and relevant demographic/clinical data collected electronically by the networks, obtained with Santalum album 10% petrolatum (pet) (IVDK only); Cananga odorata 2% (NACDG) and 10% (IVDK) pet; Jasminum species 2% (NACDG) and 5% (IVDK) pet; Mentha piperita 2% pet; Melaleuca alternifolia, oxidized (tea tree oil), 5% pet; and Lavandula angustifolia 2% pet (latter 3 NACDG only). Overall, 62,354 patients were tested to 3 FMs and EOs (NACDG, 13,398; IVDK, 48,956); 11,568 (18.6%) reacted to at least 1 FM or EO, whereas 857 (1.4%) reacted to 1 or more EOs but none of the 3 FMs. For both the NACDG and IVDK populations, individuals who were positive to 1 or more of the 9 study allergens were significantly less likely to be male, have occupational skin disease, or have hand involvement and significantly more likely to have leg dermatitis and be 40 years and older (P's ≤ 0.005). Prevalence rates for EOs were as follows: S. album, 1.4% IVDK; C. odorata, 1.1% NACDG and 2.4% IVDK; Jasminum species, 0.7% NACDG and 1.4% IVDK; M. piperita, 0.9% NACDG; L. angustifolia, 0.3% NACDG; and M. alternifolia, 0.3% NACDG. Of the 140 NACDG patients who reacted to 1 or more of the 5 NACDG EOs but

  17. Chemical characterization of essential oil from the leaves of Callistemon viminalis (D.R. and Melaleuca leucadendron (Linn.

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    Rokhaya Fall

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Considering properties of the identified major compounds, essential oils of both studied myrtaceae could be used in the medicine field including the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry.

  18. Antifungal activity and ultrastructural alterations in Pseudocercospora griseola treated with essential oils Atividade antifúngica e alterações ultraestruturais em Pseudocercospora griseola tratado com óleos essenciais

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    Julián Mauricio Ágredo Hoyos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudocercospora griseola, the etiologic agent of angular leaf spot of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, is an important disease in all bean-producing regions worldwide and may cause extremely high yield losses. The control of this disease is made more difficult by the pathogen's genetic variability and the inefficiency of fungicides. In this study, of 26 essential oils tested at different concentrations, 25 demonstrated efficiency in affecting the germination of strains 63-31 and 63-63 of the pathogen, reaching inhibition levels of between 80% and 100%. Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon martinii inhibited conidia germination at all concentrations; Eugenia caryophyllata, Cinnamomum sp., Thymus vulgaris, Matricaria recutita, Cordia verbenacea, Origanum vulgare, Cymbopogon nardus, at 0.1 and 0.5%; and Zingiber officinale, Mentha arvensis, Chamaecyparis pisifera, Lavandula officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Pimpinella anisum, Ocimum selloi, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Laurus nobilis, Citrus sinensis, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus, at 0.5%. The main constituents identified were cinnamaldehyde in Cinnamomum sp.; eugenol in E. caryophyllata; trans-β-farnesene in M. recutita; pulegone in C. verbenacea; thymol in T. vulgaris; geranial and neral in C. citratus, and geraniol in C. martini. Through transmission electron microscopy (TEM, it was verified that C. citratus, C. martini and E. caryophyllata presented direct fungitoxic action on P. griseola, causing severe damage to the cellular ultrastructure of the conidia, invalidating germination. These results indicated that essential oils are a promising alternative strategy for the control of angular leaf spot in bean, representing less risk to human health and the environment.Pseudocercospora griseola, agente etiológico da mancha angular do feijoeiro comum (Phaseolus vulgaris, é uma doença importante nas regiões produtoras de feijão em todo o mundo e pode causar perdas de produtividade

  19. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and carvacrol, and synergy of carvacrol and erythromycin, against clinical, erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococci.

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    Gloria eMagi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils from Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, and Melaleuca alternifolia against 32 erythromycin-resistant [MIC ≥1 µg/mL; inducible, constitutive, and efflux-mediated resistance phenotype; erm(TR, erm(B, and mef(A genes] and cell-invasive Group A streptococci (GAS isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis in Italy. Over the past decades erythromycin resistance in GAS has emerged in several countries; strains combining erythromycin resistance and cell invasiveness may escape β-lactams because of intracellular location and macrolides because of resistance, resulting in difficulty of eradication and recurrent pharyngitis. Thyme and origanum essential oils demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity with MICs ranging from 256 to 512 µg/mL. The phenolic monoterpene carvacrol [2-Methyl-5-(1-methylethyl phenol] is a major component of the essential oils of Origanum and Thymus plants. MICs of carvacrol ranged from 64 to 256 µg/mL. In the live/dead assay several dead cells were detected as early as 1 h after incubation with carvacrol at the MIC. In single-step resistance selection studies no resistant mutants were obtained. A synergistic action of carvacrol and erythromycin was detected by the checkerboard assay and calculation of the FIC Index. A 2- to 2048-fold reduction of the erythromycin MIC was documented in checkerboard assays. Synergy (FIC Index ≤0.5 was found in 21/32 strains and was highly significant (p <0.01 in strains where resistance is expressed only in presence of erythromycin. Synergy was confirmed in 17/23 strains using 24-h time-kill curves in presence of carvacrol and erythromycin. Our findings demonstrated that carvacrol acts either alone or in combination with erythromycin against erythromycin-resistant GAS and could potentially serve as a novel therapeutic tool.

  20. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses.

  1. In vitro activity of some essential oils alone and in combination against the fish pathogen Nocardia seriolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, T F; Yoshida, T

    2017-09-26

    Microplate resazurin assay was applied to investigate the in vitro activity of four essential oils (EOs); cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) and tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oils against 80 clinical isolates of the fish pathogen Nocardia seriolae. The checkerboard test was then used to determine the possible synergistic effect of EOs combination against reference type strains of fish nocardiosis. All tested EOs had antibacterial activity against N. seriolae isolates. Among the tested EOs, cinnamon and thyme oils both exhibited the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) with 5-160 and 10-160 μg/ml, respectively. The activities of lemongrass and tea tree EOs were noted to be less effective with MICs of 20-640 and 160->5120 μg/ml, respectively. The checkerboard panel of cinnamon-thyme EOs combination against N. seriolae ATCC43993 demonstrated a synergistic effect with a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index of 0.75. For N. salmonicida ATCC27463, the combination panel showed an additive effect with an FIC index of 1.0. For N. asteroides ATCC19247, the combination panel demonstrated an indifference effect with an FIC index of 1.125. These results indicate that thyme and cinnamon oils alone or the combination of them at a given ratio has a promising potent clinical significance in the treatment of fish nocardiosis. Despite the promising results given by our in vitro studies, the clinical benefits of these EOs combinations can only be determined through carefully designed in vivo experimental studies.

  2. Evaluation of tea tree oil for controlling Rhipicephalus microplus in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazinatto Boito, Jhonatan; Santos, Roberto C; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Raffin, Renata; Machado, Gustavo; Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-07-30

    Our research aimed to test the effects of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (pure and in nanocapsules) in the control of Rhipicephalus microplus in dairy cattle. For this purpose, the in vivo studies used 15 cows distributed in three different groups with the same number of animals. Five cows remained untreated (Group A), representing the control group; other five cows were sprayed with TTO (at 5%) in its pure form (Group B); and five cows were sprayed with nanocapsules of TTO (at 0.75%) (Group C). On days 1 and 4 post-treatments (PT), all cows had their ticks counted. On day 1 PT, two ticks from each cow were collected to evaluate the effect of the treatment on ticḱs reproduction (in vitro assays). The pure form of TTO caused a significant reduction (Pticks from the Group B compared to the Group A on day 4 PT. However, there was no significant difference in the number of ticks on cows from Groups A and C after treatment (P>0.05). Treatment with TTO in nanocapsules (Group C) interfered with R. microplus reproduction, leading to lower oviposition by female ticks and hatchability (34.5% of efficacy). On the other hand, TTO oil (Group B) did not interfere on ticḱs reproduction, i.e. showed higher hatchability than the control group. Therefore, it is possible to conclude that pure TTO has an acaricidal effect in dairy cows, in addition to an effect on ticḱs reproduction when used its nanocapsulated form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of fast enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography methods for monoterpenic compounds: Authenticity control of Australian tea tree oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yong Foo; West, Rachel N; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-08-07

    This work demonstrates the potential of fast multiple heart-cut enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography (GC-eGC) and enantioselective comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC), to perform the stereoisomeric analysis of three key chiral monoterpenes (limonene, terpinen-4-ol and α-terpineol) present in tea tree oil (TTO). In GC-eGC, separation was conducted using a combination of mid-polar first dimension ((1)D) column and a chiral second dimension ((2)D) column, providing interference-free enantioresolution of the individual antipodes of each optically active component. A combination of (1)D chiral column and (2)D polar columns (ionic liquid and wax phases) were tested for the eGC×GC study. Quantification was proposed based on summation of two major modulated peaks for each antipode, displaying comparable results with those derived from GC-eGC. Fast chiral separations were achieved within 25min for GC-eGC andauthentic TTOs was proposed by analysing a representative number of pure TTOs sourced directly from plantations of known provenance in Australia. Consistent enantiomeric fractions of 61.6±1.5% (+):38.4±1.5% (-) for limonene, 61.7±1.6% (+):38.3±1.6% (-) for terpinen-4-ol and 79.6±1.4% (+):20.4±1.4% (-) for α-terpineol were obtained for the 57 authentic Australian TTOs. The results were compared (using principle component analysis) with commercial TTOs (declared as derived from Melaleuca alternifolia) obtained from different continents. Assessing these data to determine adulteration, or additives that affect the enantiomeric ratios, in commercially sourced TTOs is discussed. The proposed method offers distinct advantages over eGC, especially in terms of analysis times and selectivity which can serve as a reliable platform for authenticity control of TTO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Basil, tea tree and clove essential oils as analgesics and anaesthetics in Amphiprion clarkii (Bennett, 1830

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    A. M. Correia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study were evaluated the anaesthesia and analgesic effects of clove Eugenia caryophyllata, tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia and basil Ocimum basilicum essential oils (EO during handling of yellowtail clownfish Amphiprion clarkii. Juveniles (3.70 ± 0.75 cm and 1.03 ± 0.50 g; mean ± standard deviation were submitted to concentrations of 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 µl L-1 of clove, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 350 µl L-1 of basil and 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 µl L-1 of tea tree oils (n=10/concentration, previously defined in pilot tests. Individually and only once, fish from each treatment were placed in a glass recipient containing 1 L of seawater at a temperature of 25 °C, salinity of 35 g L-1 and the specific concentration of diluted EO (stock solution. Control (only seawater and blank (seawater and ethanol at the highest concentration used to dilute the oils treatments were also conducted. After reaching the stage of surgical anaesthesia, fish were submitted to biometry and a sensibility test. After that, they were transferred to clean seawater for anaesthesia recovery. The times of induction needed to reach each anaesthesia stage and anaesthesia recovery were recorded. Animals were observed for 72 hours after the procedures. All the EO provoked anaesthesia and analgesic effects in A. clarkii, but basil oil is not recommended because it caused involuntary muscle contractions and mortality in 100% and 12% of fish, respectively. The lower concentrations that promote suitable induction and recovery times are 50 µl L-1 of clove oil and 500 µl L-1 of tea tree oil. However, due to its complementary high analgesic efficiency, clove oil is recommended as the ideal anaesthetic for A. clarkii.

  5. Modeling the long-term effects of introduced herbivores on the spread of an invasive tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; DeAngelis, Don; Rayamajhi, Min B.; Botkin, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    ContextMelaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (hereafter melaleuca) is an invasive tree from Australia that has spread over the freshwater ecosystems of southern Florida, displacing native vegetation, thus threatening native biodiversity. Suppression of melaleuca appears to be progressing through the introduction of insect species, the weevil, Oxiops vitiosa, and the psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae.ObjectiveTo improve understanding of the possible effects of herbivory on the landscape dynamics of melaleuca in native southern Florida plant communities.MethodsWe projected likely future changes in plant communities using the individual based modeling platform, JABOWA-II, by simulating successional processes occurring in two types of southern Florida habitat, cypress swamp and bay swamp, occupied by native species and melaleuca, with the impact of insect herbivores.ResultsComputer simulations show melaleuca invasion leads to decreases in density and basal area of native species, but herbivory would effectively control melaleuca to low levels, resulting in a recovery of native species. When herbivory was modeled on pure melaleuca stands, it was more effective in stands with initially larger-sized melaleuca. Although the simulated herbivory did not eliminate melaleuca, it decreased its presence dramatically in all cases, supporting the long-term effectiveness of herbivory in controlling melaleuca invasion.ConclusionsThe results provide three conclusions relevant to management: (1) The introduction of insect herbivory that has been applied to melaleuca appears sufficient to suppress melaleuca over the long term, (2) dominant native species may recover in about 50 years, and (3) regrowth of native species will further suppress melaleuca through competition.

  6. 25 Years of Natural Product R&D with New South Wales Agriculture

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    I. Southwell

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Following recent NSW Government restructuring, the Department of Agriculture now exists in a composite form along with Forestry, Fisheries and Minerals in the new NSW Department of Primary Industries. This paper outlines some of the highlights of secondary metabolite R&D accomplished in the 25 years since the essential oil research unit was transferred from the Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Sydney to NSW Agriculture’s Wollongbar Agricultural Institute on the NSW north coast. The essential oil survey was continued, typing the Australian flora as a suitable source of isolates such as myrtenal (Astartea, myrtenol (Agonis, methyl chavicol (Ochrosperma, α-phellandren-8-ol (Prostanthera, methyl myrtenate (Darwinia, methyl geranate (Darwinia, kessane (Acacia, cis-dihydroagarofuran (Prosthanthera, protoanemonin (Clematis, isoamyl isovalerate (Micromyrtus, methyl cinnamate (Eucalyptus and bornyl acetate (Boronia. Many of these components are used, or have potential use in the fragrance, flavour, medicinal plant or insect attraction fields. Two weeds toxic to livestock in the Central West of the State are also harvested commercially as medicinal plants. Measurement of hypericin concentrations in the various plant parts of St John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum over two seasons has shown that the weed can be effectively managed by grazing sheep during the winter months when toxin levels are low. Syntheses of β-carbolines tribulusterine and perlolyrine have shown that the former alkaloid was misidentified in the literature and hence not the toxic principle responsible for Tribulus staggers in sheep. Poor quality (high 1,8-cineole – low terpinen-4-ol oil bearing tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia plantations have been established to the detriment of many a tea tree farmer. Analytical methods developed to check leaf quality at an early age indicated precursor sabinene constituents that convert to the

  7. Potencjał olejków eterycznych w profilaktyce i terapii grzybic

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    Monika Sienkiewicz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Silne właściwości antyseptyczne olejków eterycznych znane są od wielu wieków. Są one produktami metabolizmu wtórnego roślin. Olejki eteryczne i ich składniki wykazują działanie hamujące wzrost wobec bakterii, grzybów, wirusów i pierwotniaków. Ich aktywność przeciwdrobnoustrojowa jest ściśle związana ze składem chemicznym. Do tej pory nie odnotowano doniesień o rosnącej oporności szczepów bakterii i grzybów na składniki olejków. Olejki eteryczne wykazują m.in. właściwości przeciwzapalne, przeciwbólowe i antyoksydacyjne. Do najbardziej skutecznych olejków o najsilniejszych właściwościach przeciwgrzybiczych należą olejki pozyskiwane z drzewa herbacianego, tymianku, oregano, cząbru, bazylii, szałwi, goździkowca i cynamonowca. Największą aktywnością charakteryzują się olejki zawierające fenole – tymol, karwakrol i eugenol. Olejki tymiankowy, oreganowy i cząbrowy zawierają tymol i karwakrol, natomiast pozyskiwane z goździkowca i z liści cynamonowca zawierają eugenol. Jeden z najbardziej efektywnych olejków jest pozyskiwany z drzewa herbacianego (Melaleuca alternifolia. Olejek ten wykazuje wysoką aktywność wobec Candida sp., Trichophyton sp. i Microsporum sp. Olejki tymiankowy, oreganowy i rozmarynowy ze względu na szerokie spektrum aktywności mogą być polecane w leczeniu zakażeń wywoływanych przez Candida albicans, Trichophyton sp., Epidermophyton floccosum i Microsporum canis. Olejek goździkowy i cynamonowy z liści wykazują znaczące działanie hamujące wobec Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Candida albicans i Cryptococcus neoformans. Olejki eteryczne oraz ich składniki mogą posiadać silne działanie immunostymulujące, zaliczamy do nich: olejek sosnowy, cytrynowy, geraniowy, a-pinen. Olejki eteryczne znalazły zastosowanie w leczeniu infekcji dermatologicznych pochodzenia grzybiczego. Dobre wyniki przynosi również stosowanie olejków w ginekologii i w terapii

  8. 7 CFR 1434.5 - Eligible honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... not been scorched, burned, or subjected to excessive heat resulting in objectionable flavor, color..., bitterweed, broomweed, cajeput (melaleuca), carrot, chinquapin, dog fennel, desert hollyhock, gumweed, mescal...

  9. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated from Melaleuca cajuput on human myeloid leukemia (HL-60) cell line. ... The cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid (BA), isolated from Melaleuca cajuput a Malaysian plant and its four synthetic derivatives were tested for their cytotoxicity in various cell line or ...

  10. Fungal Planet description sheets: 469-557.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Burgess, T I; Hardy, G E St J; Crane, C; Barrett, S; Cano-Lira, J F; Le Roux, J J; Thangavel, R; Guarro, J; Stchigel, A M; Martín, M P; Alfredo, D S; Barber, P A; Barreto, R W; Baseia, I G; Cano-Canals, J; Cheewangkoon, R; Ferreira, R J; Gené, J; Lechat, C; Moreno, G; Roets, F; Shivas, R G; Sousa, J O; Tan, Y P; Wiederhold, N P; Abell, S E; Accioly, T; Albizu, J L; Alves, J L; Antoniolli, Z I; Aplin, N; Araújo, J; Arzanlou, M; Bezerra, J D P; Bouchara, J-P; Carlavilla, J R; Castillo, A; Castroagudín, V L; Ceresini, P C; Claridge, G F; Coelho, G; Coimbra, V R M; Costa, L A; da Cunha, K C; da Silva, S S; Daniel, R; de Beer, Z W; Dueñas, M; Edwards, J; Enwistle, P; Fiuza, P O; Fournier, J; García, D; Gibertoni, T B; Giraud, S; Guevara-Suarez, M; Gusmão, L F P; Haituk, S; Heykoop, M; Hirooka, Y; Hofmann, T A; Houbraken, J; Hughes, D P; Kautmanová, I; Koppel, O; Koukol, O; Larsson, E; Latha, K P D; Lee, D H; Lisboa, D O; Lisboa, W S; López-Villalba, Á; Maciel, J L N; Manimohan, P; Manjón, J L; Marincowitz, S; Marney, T S; Meijer, M; Miller, A N; Olariaga, I; Paiva, L M; Piepenbring, M; Poveda-Molero, J C; Raj, K N A; Raja, H A; Rougeron, A; Salcedo, I; Samadi, R; Santos, T A B; Scarlett, K; Seifert, K A; Shuttleworth, L A; Silva, G A; Silva, M; Siqueira, J P Z; Souza-Motta, C M; Stephenson, S L; Sutton, D A; Tamakeaw, N; Telleria, M T; Valenzuela-Lopez, N; Viljoen, A; Visagie, C M; Vizzini, A; Wartchow, F; Wingfield, B D; Yurchenko, E; Zamora, J C; Groenewald, J Z

    2016-12-01

    Novel species of fungi described in this study include those from various countries as follows: Australia : Apiognomonia lasiopetali on Lasiopetalum sp., Blastacervulus eucalyptorum on Eucalyptus adesmophloia , Bullanockia australis (incl. Bullanockia gen. nov.) on Kingia australis , Caliciopsis eucalypti on Eucalyptus marginata , Celerioriella petrophiles on Petrophile teretifolia , Coleophoma xanthosiae on Xanthosia rotundifolia , Coniothyrium hakeae on Hakea sp., Diatrypella banksiae on Banksia formosa , Disculoides corymbiae on Corymbia calophylla , Elsinoë eelemani on Melaleuca alternifolia , Elsinoë eucalyptigena on Eucalyptus kingsmillii , Elsinoë preissianae on Eucalyptus preissiana , Eucasphaeria rustici on Eucalyptus creta , Hyweljonesia queenslandica (incl. Hyweljonesia gen. nov.) on the cocoon of an unidentified microlepidoptera, Mycodiella eucalypti (incl. Mycodiella gen. nov.) on Eucalyptus diversicolor , Myrtapenidiella sporadicae on Eucalyptus sporadica , Neocrinula xanthorrhoeae (incl. Neocrinula gen. nov.) on Xanthorrhoea sp., Ophiocordyceps nooreniae on dead ant, Phaeosphaeriopsis agavacearum on Agave sp., Phlogicylindrium mokarei on Eucalyptus sp., Phyllosticta acaciigena on Acacia suaveolens , Pleurophoma acaciae on Acacia glaucoptera , Pyrenochaeta hakeae on Hakea sp., Readeriella lehmannii on Eucalyptus lehmannii , Saccharata banksiae on Banksia grandis , Saccharata daviesiae on Daviesia pachyphylla , Saccharata eucalyptorum on Eucalyptus bigalerita , Saccharata hakeae on Hakea baxteri , Saccharata hakeicola on Hakea victoria , Saccharata lambertiae on Lambertia ericifolia , Saccharata petrophiles on Petrophile sp., Saccharata petrophilicola on Petrophile fastigiata , Sphaerellopsis hakeae on Hakea sp., and Teichospora kingiae on Kingia australis. Brazil : Adautomilanezia caesalpiniae (incl . Adautomilanezia gen. nov.) on Caesalpina echinata , Arthrophiala arthrospora (incl. Arthrophiala gen. nov.) on Sagittaria montevidensis , Diaporthe

  11. On a new species of the family Cicindelidae from Argentinia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, Walther

    1895-01-01

    E tribu C. melaleucae Dej., Drakei m., Reedi m., Gormazi Reed, chiliensis Brll. sed ab omnibus differt magnitudine minore, forma graciliore, elytris angustioribus, signaturis albis longitudinaliter juxta marginem confluentibus: laterali lunulae medianae parte marginem ipsum non attingente. — Long.

  12. Modeling the compensatory response of an invasive tree to specialist insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xin; DeAngelis, Don; Zhai, Lu; Rayamajhi, Min B.; Ju, Shu

    2018-01-01

    The severity of the effects of herbivory on plant fitness can be moderated by the ability of plants to compensate for biomass loss. Compensation is an important component of the ecological fitness in many plants, and has been shown to reduce the effects of pests on agricultural plant yields. It can also reduce the effectiveness of biocontrol through introduced herbivores in controlling weedy invasive plants. This study used a modeling approach to predict the effect of different levels of foliage herbivory by biological control agents introduced to control the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquennervia (melaleuca) in Florida. It is assumed in the model that melaleuca can optimally change its carbon and nitrogen allocation strategies in order to compensate for the effects of herbivory. The model includes reallocation of more resources to production and maintenance of photosynthetic tissues at the expense of roots. This compensation is shown to buffer the severity of the defoliation effect, but the model predicts a limit on the maximum herbivory that melaleuca can tolerate and survive. The model also shows that the level of available limiting nutrient (e.g., soil nitrogen) may play an important role in a melaleuca’s ability to compensate for herbivory. This study has management implications for the best ways to maximize the level of damage using biological control or other means of defoliation.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 156 ... ... No 1 (2014), Approche expérimentale de l'utilisation de glyphosate dans le contrôle de Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae), une espèce envahissante dans la réserve communautaire de la forêt d'Analalava-Foulpointe (Madagascar), Abstract PDF. C Miandrimanana, N Solovavy, R Marinjakasandrata ...

  14. Approche expérimentale de l'utilisation de glyphosate dans le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approche expérimentale de l'utilisation de glyphosate dans le contrôle de Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae), une espèce envahissante dans la réserve communautaire de la forêt d'Analalava-Foulpointe (Madagascar)

  15. Madagascar Conservation & Development - Vol 9, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approche expérimentale de l'utilisation de glyphosate dans le contrôle de Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae), une espèce envahissante dans la réserve communautaire de la forêt d'Analalava-Foulpointe (Madagascar) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  16. Status of exotic woody species in big cypress national preserve. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    The current status of exotic woody plants in Big Cypress National Preserve is documented. A map of the distribution of principal pest species, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Schinus terebinthifolius, and Casuarina sp., is presented. Prognoses of population increases of these problem species are determined utilizing the current distributions and assessing environmental conditions. Some potential problem species are also identified.

  17. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-15

    Jan 15, 2018 ... ABSTRACT. Cajuputi essential oil in Indonesia and M cajuputi Powell. This study fingerprinting based on the essential oil. Terengganu undergoes hydro distillation. ATR-FTIR result of Melaleuca cajuputi between different sites and also gave variation in relation to their adaptation t correlation between ...

  18. Larvicidal activity of Neem oil and three plant essential oils from Senegal against Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper, 1789

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliou Ngom

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the insecticide, larvicidal and repellent activity of the essential oils from Callistemon viminalis, Melaleuca leucadendron, and Hyptis suaveolens against Chrysodeixis chalcites and to compare it with neem oil (Azadirachta indica. Methods: The essential oils of the leaves of these aromatiques plants were extracted by steam distillation and contacts tests were carried out. Results: Essential oils in ethanol from Callistemon viminalis showed a higher biological activity than the neem with 100% larval mortality at the concentration of 2 μg/mL for 6 h, 100% and 90% in ethanol from Melaleuca leucadendron and Hyptis suaveolens, respectively at the concentration of 4 μg/mL for 24 h. By inhalation, the essential oils from Melaleuca leucadendron and of Hyptis suaveolens were more effective with mortality rates of larvae 100% and 50% respectively at 2 μg/L air applied after 24 h. Nevertheless, the neem has shown to be a repulsive plant and anti-nutritional plant. A significant difference in the percentages of consumption between leaves treated with neem oil and the control samples was observed (Newman-Keuls test except for Melaleuca leucadendron. Conclusions: The results of the study highlight remarkable biocide, properties of tested extracts, which provides important opportunities for the development of biopesticides.

  19. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azemin, A. Vol 9, No 2S (2017): Special Issue - Articles Application of metabolite profiling and antioxidant activity in assessing the quality of processed and unprocessed stingless bee's propolis. Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 1S (2018): Special Issue - Articles Spatial variation of Melaleuca cajuputi powell essential oils

  20. NEW AND RARE PLANTS FOR THE FLORA OF CENTRAL SIBERIА

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kurbatsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species (Ceratophyllum submersum L., Astragalus glycyphyllos L., Centaurea apiculata Ledeb. are reported for the first time for the flora of Central Siberia and two species (Amoria hybrida (L. C. Presl, Thyselium palustre (L. Rafin. for the flora of Khakassia. New localities of four rare species (Hackelia thymifolia (DC. Johnston, Chaenorhinum minus (L. Willk. et Lange, Orobanche uralensis G. Beck, Valeriana alternifolia Ledeb. of the flora of the Republic of Khakassia are also given.

  1. Repellency effect of forty-one essential oils against Aedes, Anopheles, and Culex mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Abdelkrim; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2006-09-01

    Since ancient times, plant products were used in various aspects. However, their use against pests decreased when chemical products became developed. Recently, concerns increased with respect to public health and environmental security requiring detection of natural products that may be used against insect pests. In this study, 41 plant extracts and 11 oil mixtures were evaluated against the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus), the malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (Liston), and the filariasis and encephalitis vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) using the skin of human volunteers to find out the protection time and repellency. The five most effective oils were those of Litsea (Litsea cubeba), Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendron), Niaouli (Melaleuca quinquenervia), Violet (Viola odorata), and Catnip (Nepeta cataria), which induced a protection time of 8 h at the maximum and a 100% repellency against all three species. This effect needs, however, a peculiar formulation to fix them on the human skin.

  2. Aero-allergens in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia based on 1000 intradermal skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Bettenay, S V; Tideman, L

    2000-06-01

    To determine the most relevant aero-allergens involved in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia and provide information about these aero-allergens to the general practitioner. Dogs presented to the Animal Skin & Allergy Clinic with history and clinical signs of atopic dermatitis were injected intradermally with 38 different allergens and negative and positive control. Intradermal skin tests in 1000 dogs were retrospectively evaluated. One third of all patients reacted to the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. Allergens reacting in more than 15% of the patients were wheat (Triticum aestivum), sweet vernal (Anthoxanthum odoratum), English couch (Agropyron repens), yellow dock (Rumex crispus), Mexican tea (Chenopodium ambrosioides), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), melaleuca (Melaleuca quinquenervia) and peppercorn (Schimus spp). House dust mites are the most common allergens in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia and D farinae is involved most frequently. However, a number of grass, weed and tree pollens also are involved regularly.

  3. Komponen minyak atsiri dari daun tiga jenis tumbuhan famili Myrtaceae asal Desa Soa dan Desa Sota Merauke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliasri Jamal

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available An isolation of the leaves of Asteromyrtus sp., Melaleuca leucaleucadendron, M.angustifolia and M.leucadendon Var. latifolia by steam distillation yielded 1.36, 1.02, 1.32 and 0.97 % essential oils respectively. Their constituents were analyzed using two combination techniques, gas chromathography and mass spectroscophy (GCMS. Based on their compositin, the essensial oils of Asteromyrtus sp., Melaleuca leucaleucadendron, M.angustifolia were considered acceptable for commercial essential oil production because of their potential source of cineole (65.11, 60.03. 82.43 % respectively, while M.leucadendon Var. latifolia was vey interesting source of methyleugenol (97.03% which attractant activity.

  4. Larvicidal activity of Myrtaceae essential oils and their components against Aedes aegypti, acute toxicity on Daphnia magna, and aqueous residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Mi; Kim, Junheon; Chang, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Byung-Seok; Yang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Gil-Hah; Shin, Sang-Chul; Park, Il-Kwon

    2011-03-01

    The larvicidal activity of 11 Myrtaceae essential oils and their constituents was evaluated against Aedes aegypti L. Of the 11, Melaleuca linariifolia Sm., Melaleuca dissitiflora F. Muell., Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S. T. Blake, and Eucalyptus globulus Labill oils at 0.1 mg/ml exhibited > or = 80% larval mortality. At this same concentration, the individual constituents tested, allyl isothiocyanate, alpha-terpinene, p-cymene, (+)-limonene, (-)-limonene, gamma-terpinene, and (E)-nerolidol, resulted in > or = 95% mortality. We also tested the acute toxicity of these four active oils earlier mentioned and their constituents against Daphnia magna Straus. M. linariifolia and allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic to D. magna. Twodays after treatment, residues of M. dissitiflora, M. linariifolia, M. quinquenervia, and E. globulus oils in water were 55.4, 46.6, 32.4, and 14.8%, respectively. Less than 10% of allyl isothiocyanate, alpha-terpinene, p-cymene, (-)-limonene, (+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene was detected in the water at 2 d after treatment. Our results indicated that oils and their constituents could easily volatilize in water within a few days after application, thus minimizing their effect on the aqueous ecosystem. Therefore, Myrtaceae essential oils and their constituents could be developed as control agents against mosquito larvae.

  5. Burning in Banksia Woodlands: How Does the Fire-Free Period Influence Reptile Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Leonie E.; Reaveley, Alice; Johnson, Brent; Fisher, Rebecca; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Fire is an important management tool for both hazard reduction burning and maintenance of biodiversity. The impact of time since last fire on fauna is an important factor to understand as land managers often aim for prescribed burning regimes with specific fire-free intervals. However, our current understanding of the impact of time since last fire on fauna is largely unknown and likely dependent on vegetation type. We examined the responses of reptiles to fire age in banksia woodlands, and the interspersed melaleuca damplands among them, north of Perth, Western Australia, where the current prescribed burning regime is targeting a fire-free period of 8–12 years. The response of reptiles to fire was dependent on vegetation type. Reptiles were generally more abundant (e.g. Lerista elegans and Ctenophorus adelaidensis) and specious in banksia sites. Several species (e.g. Menetia greyii, Cryptoblepharus buchananii) preferred long unburnt melaleuca sites (>16 years since last fire, YSLF) compared to recently burnt sites (16 YSLF). The terrestrial dragon C. adelaidensis and the skink Morethia obscura displayed a strong response to fire in banksia woodlands only. Highest abundances of the dragon were detected in the recently burnt (35 YSLF) banksia woodlands, while the skink was more abundant in older sites. Habitats from a range of fire ages are required to support the reptiles we detected, especially the longer unburnt (>16 YSLF) melaleuca habitat. Current burning prescriptions are reducing the availability of these older habitats. PMID:22496806

  6. Burning in banksia woodlands: how does the fire-free period influence reptile communities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie E Valentine

    Full Text Available Fire is an important management tool for both hazard reduction burning and maintenance of biodiversity. The impact of time since last fire on fauna is an important factor to understand as land managers often aim for prescribed burning regimes with specific fire-free intervals. However, our current understanding of the impact of time since last fire on fauna is largely unknown and likely dependent on vegetation type. We examined the responses of reptiles to fire age in banksia woodlands, and the interspersed melaleuca damplands among them, north of Perth, Western Australia, where the current prescribed burning regime is targeting a fire-free period of 8-12 years. The response of reptiles to fire was dependent on vegetation type. Reptiles were generally more abundant (e.g. Lerista elegans and Ctenophorus adelaidensis and specious in banksia sites. Several species (e.g. Menetia greyii, Cryptoblepharus buchananii preferred long unburnt melaleuca sites (>16 years since last fire, YSLF compared to recently burnt sites (16 YSLF. The terrestrial dragon C. adelaidensis and the skink Morethia obscura displayed a strong response to fire in banksia woodlands only. Highest abundances of the dragon were detected in the recently burnt (35 YSLF banksia woodlands, while the skink was more abundant in older sites. Habitats from a range of fire ages are required to support the reptiles we detected, especially the longer unburnt (>16 YSLF melaleuca habitat. Current burning prescriptions are reducing the availability of these older habitats.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships and evolution in Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) based on matK sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, D E; Tago-Nakazawa, M; Xiang, Q Y; Kawano, S; Murata, J; Wakabayashi, M; Hibsch-Jetter, C

    2001-05-01

    Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) consists of 57 species widely distributed in temperate and arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with two species restricted to the southern part of South America. Species relationships within the genus are highly problematic. The genus has traditionally been divided into two groups, sometimes recognized as sections (Oppositifolia and Alternifolia), based on leaf arrangement, or, alternatively, into 17 series. Based on morphological features, Hara suggested that the genus originated in South America and then subsequently migrated to the Northern Hemisphere. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast gene matK for species of Chrysosplenium to elucidate relationships, test Hara's biogeographic hypothesis for the genus, and examine chromosomal and gynoecial diversification. These analyses revealed that both sections Oppositifolia and Alternifolia are monophyletic and form two large sister clades. Hence, leaf arrangement is a good indicator of relationships within this genus. Hara's series Pilosa and Macrostemon are each also monophyletic; however, series Oppositifolia, Alternifolia, and Nepalensia are clearly not monophyletic. MacClade reconstructions suggest that the genus arose in Eastern Asia, rather than in South America, with several independent migration events from Asia to the New World. In one well-defined subclade, species from eastern and western North America form a discrete clade, with Old World species as their sister group, suggesting that the eastern and western North American taxa diverged following migration to that continent. The South American species forms a clade with species from eastern Asia; this disjunction may be the result of ancient long-distance dispersal. Character mapping demonstrated that gynoecial diversification is dynamic, with reversals from inferior to half-inferior ovaries, as well as to ovaries that appear superior. Chromosomal evolution also appears to be labile

  8. Response pattern of amino compounds in phloem and xylem of trees to soil drought depends on drought intensity and root symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X-P; Gong, C-M; Fan, Y-Y; Eiblmeier, M; Zhao, Z; Han, G; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify drought-mediated differences in amino nitrogen (N) composition and content of xylem and phloem in trees having different symbiotic N(2)-fixing bacteria. Under controlled water availability, 1-year-old seedlings of Robinia pseudoacacia (nodules with Rhizobium), Hippophae rhamnoides (symbiosis with Frankia) and Buddleja alternifolia (no such root symbiosis) were exposed to control, medium drought and severe drought, corresponding soil water content of 70-75%, 45-50% and 30-35% of field capacity, respectively. Composition and content of amino compounds in xylem sap and phloem exudates were analysed as a measure of N nutrition. Drought strongly reduced biomass accumulation in all species, but amino N content in xylem and phloem remained unaffected only in R. pseudoacacia. In H. rhamnoides and B. alternifolia, amino N in phloem remained constant, but increased in xylem of both species in response to drought. There were differences in composition of amino compounds in xylem and phloem of the three species in response to drought. Proline concentrations in long-distance transport pathways of all three species were very low, below the limit of detection in phloem of H. rhamnoides and in phloem and xylem of B. alternifolia. Apparently, drought-mediated changes in N composition were much more connected with species-specific changes in C:N ratios. Irrespective of soil water content, the two species with root symbioses did not show similar features for the different types of symbiosis, neither in N composition nor in N content. There was no immediate correlation between symbiotic N fixation and drought-mediated changes in amino N in the transport pathways. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Inhibitory effects of Indonesian medicinal plants on the infection of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawawi, A; Nakamura, N; Hattori, M; Kurokawa, M; Shiraki, K

    1999-02-01

    Water and methanol extracts of 30 traditional medicinal plants, collected in Indonesia, were tested for their anti HSV-1 activity. The extracts of eight plant species showed potent activity on the plaque assay at a concentration of 100 micrograms/mL. The therapeutic efficacy of seven selected plants was demonstrated by using a mouse HSV-1 infection assay, both the methanol extracts of the fruit of Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) and the pericarp of Nephelium lappaceum (Sapindaceae) significantly prolonged the development of skin lesions and reduced the mortality.

  10. Bird habitat mapping in the Kakadu National Park, Australia, using synthetic aperture radar (NASA/JPL AIRSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, William T.; Imhoff, Marc L.; Sisk, Thomas D.; Stutzer, David

    2003-06-01

    The seasonally flooded forest and upland sites in the Kakadu National Park, near Jabiru, Northern Territories, Australia were the site of extensive field measurements, bird community observations and airborne remote sensing during an initial NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab AIRSAR campaign in 1993, a field visit in 1994 and combined remote sensing and field activities during the PACRIM I Project in fall 1996. The overarching purpose of these studies was to use remote sensing technology as a way to extend intensive avian biodiversity and census field observations, as well as structural vegetation measurements from a limited survey area to the regional scale. During these two visits to the Kakadu area, field measurements were made within the dominant forest types in this region, primarily mixed Eucalyptus sp. woodlands, and open- and closed-forest sites dominated by Melaleuca sp. across a range of dry to perennially-flooded sites. Bird community measurements showed vegetation structure is needed to understand habitat relationships. A major vegetation difference between the two years was an increase of 2-3 times in leaf area index at comparison sites from 1994 to 1996. The greatest LAI at any site was 2.52 in the wet Melaleuca site near Munmalary in 1994.

  11. Histological observation of Gelam (Melaleucacajuputi Powell) in different ecosystems of Terengganu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Masitah; Razak, Shamsul Bahri Abd; Salim, Jamilah Mohd.; Ismail, Salwani

    2015-07-01

    A histological and anatomical comparative analysis of Gelam, Melaleuca cajuputi Powell was conducted to determine the adaptability Gelam (Melaleuca cajuputi Powell, Family = Myrtaceae) in two different micro-ecosystems of Terengganu. The sites sampling chosen were Jambu Bongkok Amenity Forest (Formerly known as Rantau Abang Amenity Forest), a large swamp forests and prominent flooding site in the District of Marang, Terengganu and Taman Penyelidikan Alam, Bukit Kor - a hard top soil area of Marang, Terengganu. The objective of this study is to compare the anatomy and histology features of gelam in these two areas. Results show that gelam from both ecosystems exhibits morphological differences and variations in some tissues (in leaf, petiole, bark, and root anatomy such as in type of epicuticular waxes, bark anatomy, leaf anatomy, vascular bundle, bark fibre pits, vessel, phloem, xylem, cortex, epidermal cells and mesophyll cells). This initial observation may suggest that gelam can adapt well in different micro-ecosystems of Terengganu. Its ability to response well toward Terengganu's different climates and coastal environmental changes could make gelam a viable tree for conservation and landscape program.

  12. Método para avaliação e pesquisa da atividade antimicrobiana de produtos de origem natural

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    Janaina F. Packer

    Full Text Available As exigências do mercado consumidor induzem a indústria cosmética a formular produtos seguros cada vez menos agressivos e naturais. Durante a formulação para tais apelos a dificuldade maior encontra-se em conservar o produto final. Com este objetivo avaliamos os óleos: de copaíba, alecrim, melaleuca, alho, andiroba; própolis, e dois ingredientes de origem natural: um ingrediente multifuncional extraído de folhas de oliva e o farnesol que estão disponíveis e são fornecidos à indústria cosmética, com a finalidade de comprovar a ação dos mesmos. O método de escolha foi o de ágar em placa com orifício modificado. As cepas selecionadas foram Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538, Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 9027 e Candida albicans (ATCC 10231. Dentre as amostras analisadas os melhores resultados foram obtidos com os óleos de melaleuca e alecrim que apresentaram atividade bacteriostática e fungistática para as quatro cepas em questão.

  13. The sensilla of Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes and their importance in repellency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Abdelkrim; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the role of some mosquito organs in their sensation of repellent materials. A total of 250 females (15 days old) of the target species Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi were prepared and divided into five groups: group 1, without antenna; group 2, without maxillary bulbs; group 3, without proboscis; group 4, without frontal tarsus; and group 5, normal females as control. A mixture of five oils containing Litsea cubeba 1%, Melaleuca leucadendron 1%, Melaleuca quinquenervia 1%, Viola odorata 1%, and Nepeta cataria 1% was included in a complex solvent containing 20% genapol, 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% ethanol, and 50% water. Furthermore, Bayrepel was used in this experiment at a 20% concentration in the same solvent. Pure water was used as control in this study. The test was carried out by spreading 100 microl of the repellent material or water on a 30-cm2 exposure area of a human volunteer's arm. In A. aegypti, the biting and landing percentages increased significantly in those mosquito groups that lacked some organs (especially maxillary bulbs), while in A. stephensi, it became not clear which organ is responsible for perception of repellents.

  14. Records of Wenchengia (Lamiaceae) from Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, Peter B; Suddee, Somran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The monotypic genus Wenchengia (Lamiaceae) has been thought to be endemic to Hainan, China. This paper reports on historic records of Wenchengia alternifolia collected from Vietnam. The recent recuration and modernisation of the Paris herbarium greatly facilitated this discovery. New information During preparatory work supporting the account for the Lamiaceae of the Flora of Thailand, three specimens of Wenchengia from central Vietnam were found in the Herbarium of the Musuem National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris (P), and subsequently two duplicates were found in the Herbarium at Kew (K, abbreviations following Thiers 2016). The specimens were collected in and before 1927 and it is not known if the species is still extant in Vietnam. Searches for extant populations should focus in the Ba Na Hills or Bach Ma National Park, central Vietnam. PMID:27660535

  15. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in Metrosideros and cross-amplification in Myrtaceae1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Yohan; Johansen, Jennifer; Sakishima, Tomoko; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Stacy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Primers were developed to amplify low-copy nuclear genes in Hawaiian Metrosideros (Myrtaceae). • Methods and Results: Data from a pooled 454 Titanium run of the partial transcriptomes of four Metrosideros taxa were used to identify the loci of interest. Ten exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) markers were amplified and sequenced directly with success in Metrosideros, as well as in a representative selection of Myrtaceae, including Syzygium, Psidium, and Melaleuca for most of the markers. The loci amplified ranged between 500 and 1100 bp, and up to 117 polymorphic sites were observed within an individual gene alignment. Two introns contained microsatellites in some of the species. • Conclusions: These novel primer pairs should be useful for phylogenetic analysis and population genetics of a broad range of Myrtaceae, particularly the diverse fleshy-fruited tribes Syzygieae and Myrteae. PMID:25309837

  16. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in Metrosideros and cross-amplification in Myrtaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Yohan; Johansen, Jennifer; Sakishima, Tomoko; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W Brad; Stacy, Elizabeth A

    2014-10-01

    Primers were developed to amplify low-copy nuclear genes in Hawaiian Metrosideros (Myrtaceae). • Data from a pooled 454 Titanium run of the partial transcriptomes of four Metrosideros taxa were used to identify the loci of interest. Ten exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) markers were amplified and sequenced directly with success in Metrosideros, as well as in a representative selection of Myrtaceae, including Syzygium, Psidium, and Melaleuca for most of the markers. The loci amplified ranged between 500 and 1100 bp, and up to 117 polymorphic sites were observed within an individual gene alignment. Two introns contained microsatellites in some of the species. • These novel primer pairs should be useful for phylogenetic analysis and population genetics of a broad range of Myrtaceae, particularly the diverse fleshy-fruited tribes Syzygieae and Myrteae.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

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    Yu-Rim Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit.

  18. Fumigant activity of plant essential oils and components from garlic (Allium sativum) and clove bud (Eugenia caryophyllata) oils against the Japanese termite (Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Kwon; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2005-06-01

    Plant essential oils from 29 plant species were tested for their insecticidal activities against the Japanese termite, Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe, using a fumigation bioassay. Responses varied with plant material, exposure time, and concentration. Good insecticidal activity against the Japanese termite was achived with essential oils of Melaleuca dissitiflora, Melaleuca uncinata, Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus radiata, Eucalyptus dives, Eucalyptus globulus, Orixa japonica, Cinnamomum cassia, Allium cepa, Illicium verum, Evodia officinalis, Schizonepeta tenuifolia, Cacalia roborowskii, Juniperus chinensis var. horizontalis, Juniperus chinensis var. kaizuka, clove bud, and garlic applied at 7.6 microL/L of air. Over 90% mortality after 3 days was achieved with O. japonica essential oil at 3.5 microL/L of air. E. citriodora, C. cassia, A. cepa, I. verum, S. tenuifolia, C. roborowskii, clove bud, and garlic oils at 3.5 microL/L of air were highly toxic 1 day after treatment. At 2.0 microL/L of air concentration, essential oils of I. verum, C. roborowskik, S. tenuifolia, A. cepa, clove bud, and garlic gave 100% mortality within 2 days of treatment. Clove bud and garlic oils showed the most potent antitermitic activity among the plant essential oils. Garlic and clove bud oils produced 100% mortality at 0.5 microL/L of air, but this decreased to 42 and 67% after 3 days of treatment at 0.25 microL/L of air, respectively. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of three major compounds from garlic oil and two from clove bud oils. These five compounds from two essential oils were tested individually for their insecticidal activities against Japanese termites. Responses varied with compound and dose. Diallyl trisulfide was the most toxic, followed by diallyl disulfide, eugenol, diallyl sulfide, and beta-caryophyllene. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential fumigants for termite

  19. Temperate mangrove and salt marsh sediments are a small methane and nitrous oxide source but important carbon store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, Stephen J.; Andrusiak, Sascha M.

    2012-01-01

    Tidal saline wetlands (TSW), such as mangrove and salt marsh systems, provide many valuable ecosystem services, but continue to suffer disturbance, degradation and deforestation. Tropical mangroves perform a critical role in the exchange and storage of terrestrial-marine carbon but can function as a source of methane (CH 4) and nitrous oxide (N 2O). However, little is known of biogeochemical processes in temperate mangrove and salt marsh systems in the southern hemisphere. In this study, the soil/sediment exchange of CO 2, CH 4 and N 2O was measured seasonally along a natural transition from melaleuca woodland, salt marsh and into mangroves along the Mornington Peninsula edge of Westernport Bay, Victoria, Australia. Soil/sediment physiochemical properties and sediment C density were measured concurrently. The melaleuca woodland soil was a constant CH 4 sink of approximately -25 μg C m -2 h -1 but along the transect this rapidly switched to a weak CH 4 source (salinity, pneumatophore number and the redox potential of sediment water at depth. All three ecosystems were a small N 2O source of Soil-atmosphere exchange was dominated by CO 2 which showed a significant response according to ecosystem and season along with soil temperature and salinity. Sediment C density was significantly greater in the salt marsh than the mangrove. Salt marsh sediment C density was 168 Mg C ha -1 which is comparable with that measured globally, whereas the mangrove sediment C density of 145 Mg C ha -1 is among the lowest reported. Contrary to global patterns in terrestrial soil C content and salt marsh sediment C content, data from our study indicate that mangrove sediments from a cooler, drier temperate latitude may store less C than mangroves in warmer and wetter tropical latitudes. Understanding both C storage and the greenhouse gas balance of TSWs will help us to better value these vulnerable ecosystems and manage them accordingly.

  20. Atividade inseticida de óleos essenciais e fixos sobre Callosobruchus maculatus (FABR., 1775 (Coleoptera: Bruchidae em grãos de caupi [Vigna unguiculata (L. WALP.] Insecticide activity of essential and fixed oils in Callosobruchus maculatus (FABR., 1775 (Coleoptera: Bruchidae in cowpea grains [Vigna unguiculata (L. WALP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carla Ribeiro Lopes Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O caruncho, Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabr., é considerado a praga mais importante do caupi, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., armazenado em regiões tropicais e subtropicais. Visando minimizar os efeitos indesejáveis dos inseticidas químicos sintéticos, o controle dessa praga com óleos de origem vegetal vem se constituindo numa alternativa promissora, de baixo custo e segura para os aplicadores e consumidores. Foram testados os óleos essenciais [(Cymbopogon martini (Roxb. J.F. Watson], Piper aduncum L., Piper hispidinervum C.DC., Melaleuca sp., Lippia gracillis Shauer e fixos (Helianthus annuus L, Sesamum indicum L, Gossypium hirsutum L., Glycine max (L. Merr. e Caryocar brasiliense Camb., em grãos de caupi, cv. Sempre Verde. Os óleos foram utilizados nas concentrações 10, 20, 30, 40 e 50mL/20g, correspondendo a 0,5, 1,0, 1,5, 2,0 e 2,5 L/t e impregnados aos grãos no interior de recipientes de plástico, com auxílio de pipetador automático e agitados manualmente durante dois minutos. Parcelas de 20g de caupi foram infestadas com oito fêmeas de C. maculatus, com 0 a 48 h de idade. Cada óleo foi testado, separadamente, em delineamento inteiramente casualisado com seis repetições. Os óleos essenciais de C. martini, P. aduncum e L. gracillis causaram 100% de mortalidade em todas as concentrações, P. hispidinervum a partir de 1,5 L/t e Melaleuca sp. nas concentrações de 2,0 e 2,5 L/t. A redução do número de ovos viáveis e de insetos emergidos foi de 100% para todos os óleos essenciais, exceto Melaleuca sp. Por outro lado, os óleos fixos, apesar de apresentarem baixa mortalidade em todas as concentrações testadas, reduziram em praticamente 100% o número de ovos viáveis e de insetos emergidos.The weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabr. is considered the most important pest of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., stored in tropical and subtropical regions. Focusing to minimize the undesired effects of synthetic chemical

  1. Comparison of bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity of 13 essential oils against strains with varying sensitivity to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, L; Carricajo, A; Zhiri, A; Aubert, G

    2008-09-01

    To compare the bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity of 13 chemotyped essential oils (EO) on 65 bacteria with varying sensitivity to antibiotics. Fifty-five bacterial strains were tested with two methods used for evaluation of antimicrobial activity (CLSI recommendations): the agar dilution method and the time-killing curve method. EO containing aldehydes (Cinnamomum verum bark and Cymbopogon citratus), phenols (Origanum compactum, Trachyspermum ammi, Thymus satureioides, Eugenia caryophyllus and Cinnamomum verum leaf) showed the highest antimicrobial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) or = 10% (v/v). Against P. aeruginosa, only C. verum bark and O. compactum presented MIC < or =2% (v/v). Cinnamomum verum bark, O. compactum, T. satureioides, C. verum leaf and M. alternifolia were bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli at concentrations ranging from to 0.31% to 10% (v/v) after 1 h of contact. Cinnamomum verum bark and O. compactum were bactericidal against P. aeruginosa within 5 min at concentrations <2% (v/v). Cinnamomum verum bark had the highest antimicrobial activity, particularly against resistant strains. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity of EO on nosocomial antibiotic-resistant strains.

  2. Eucalyptus pollen allergy and asthma in children: a cross-sectional study in South-East Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E M Gibbs

    Full Text Available To investigate Eucalyptus (gum tree pollen allergy in children in relation to geography, particularly vegetation, and its relationship to asthma.Males (n = 180 and females (n = 200 aged 9 to 14 participated. Some were healthy (asymptomatic, some had asthma, and some had other symptoms associated with atopy. School students were from three urban coastal schools and one school from a nearby semi-rural elevated area (range near Brisbane, Australia. Coastal and range locations featured different distributions of Myrtaceae family vegetation (including Eucalyptus, Melaleuca, Leptospermum species. Skin prick test (SPT responses to 15 commercial allergens were compared. As well, responses from coast versus range groups, and 'asthma' (n = 97 versus 'healthy' status (n = 107 groups, were compared.SPT responses (≥3mm wheal diameter indicate that children with asthma are 31.1 times more likely to be allergic to Eucalyptus pollen extract (OR: 31.1; 95%CI 4.1- 235.7 compared to healthy children. Dust mite (p = .018, Eucalyptus (p = .046 and cockroach (p = .047 allergen SPT responses (wheals ≥3mm were significantly greater in participants located on the coast versus range as determined by Fisher's Exact Test (α .05. For each location, percentage of positive responses (wheals ≥3mm was greatest for 'dust mite' (30.9%-46%, 'cockroach' (18.1% -35% and 'Bermuda grass' (10.6%-19.4%.The results support the hypothesis that proximity to Myrtaceae vegetation is related to positive SPT response and that Eucalyptus is an important allergen for children with asthma. Substantial response to olive allergen, in the absence of olive trees, suggests that the response may be driven by substances in other plants, perhaps Melaleuca quinquenervia, which abounds in coastal areas.Response to Eucalyptus allergen indicates that changes in gardening practice in schools and public areas may be appropriate. The findings pose validity questions regarding the use of some commercial

  3. FUNGITOXICITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON PLASMOPARA VITICOLA,CAUSAL AGENT OF GRAPEVINE DOWNY MILDEW

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    RÉGIS DE OLIVEIRA FIALHO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the fungitoxic (antifungal effect of seven essential oils on Plasmopara viticola, the causal agent of grapevine downy mildew. The cinnamon, eucalyptus globulus, marjoram, melaleuca, peppermint, oregano and white thyme essential oils were compared with the mancozeb + metalaxyl-M fungicide. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of essential oils on spore germination. The first experiment evaluated the effect of direct contact of essential oils on the pathogen; the second evaluated the effect of volatile compounds on the pathogen and the third assessed the behavior of essential oils, when applied to vine leaves in field conditions, on the pathogen. All essential oils inhibited the spores’ germination, but in varying degrees, in addition, presenting fungistatic activity. All the essential oils showed chemical instability when the incubation time or the interval between products application where increased, all oils decrease antifungal activity percentage. Noteworthy, the cinnamon and the eucalyptus globulus essential oils were the most fungitoxic (antifungal on P. viticola.

  4. Biological activity of Myrtaceae plant essential oils and their major components against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Miyeon; Kim, Junheon; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew; Lee, Si Hyeock; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2017-02-01

    The spotted-wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), is a globally invasive and serious pest of numerous soft-skinned fruit crops. Assessments were made of fumigant and contact toxicities of 12 Myrtaceae plant essential oils (EOs) and their components. For determining the mode of action of major components of active EOs, their activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) were also assessed. Strong fumigant and contact toxicities were observed from EOs of Eucalyptus citriodora and Melaleuca teretifolia. The main components of E. citriodora were citronellal and isopulegol, whereas those of M. teretifolia were neral and geranial. Geranial showed the strongest fumigant activity, followed by citronellal or neral, M. teretifolia EO, isopulegol and E. citriodora EO. In contact toxicity assays, geranial also exhibited the strongest insecticidal activity, followed by neral or M. teretifolia EO, citronellol, citronellal, isopulegol and E. citriodora EO. Among the major components, all compounds showed low AChE inhibitory activity, while neral and geranial showed GST inhibitory activity against SWD. Myrtaceae plant EOs and their components have an excellent potential for being used in the control of SWD adults and could be useful in the development of more effective natural compounds as alternatives to synthetic pesticides. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Chemical Composition and Behavioral Effects of Five Plant Essential Oils on the Green Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Abir; Hammami, Majdi; Raoelison, Emmanuel G; Abderrabba, Manef; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ducamp, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Schinus molle, Helichrysum gymnocephalum, Cedrelopsis grevei and Melaleuca viridiflora, four aromatic and medicinal plants, are commonly used in folk medicine. EOs were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID); then evaluated for their behavioral effects on adults of the green pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) using a Perspex four-armed olfactometer in order to test the compatibility of their use as phytoinsecticides to control this insect pest. Our results showed that the EOs from the leaves of S. molle, M. viridiflora and C. grevei did not change aphids' behavior. However, S. molle fruits EO seemed to be attractive while H. gymnocephalum leaves EO exhibited repellency towards aphids at a dose of 10 μl. The major compounds in S. molle fruits EO were 6-epi-shyobunol (16.22%) and d-limonene (15.35%). While, in H. gymnocephalum leaves EO, 1,8-cineole was the main compound (47.4%). The difference in aphids' responses to these two EOs could be attributed to the differences in their compositions. Our findings suggest that these two EOs have potential applications for the integrated pest management of A. pisum (Harris). © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  6. An investigation into the effectiveness of sand media amended with biochar to remove BOD5, suspended solids and coliforms using wetland mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rozari, P; Greenway, M; El Hanandeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Constructed wetland ecotechnologies (CWEs) are a promising solution to effectively treat domestic wastewater in developing countries at low cost. This paper reports the findings of the effectiveness of sand media amended with woody biochar and two plants species (Melaleuca quinquenervia and Cymbopogon citratus) in removing biological oxygen demand (BOD5), suspended solids and coliforms. The experimental design consisted of 21 vertical flow (VF) mesocosms. There were seven media treatments using sand amended with varying proportions of biochar. During the first 8 months, the mesocosms were loaded with secondary clarified wastewater (SCW) then septage. The influent had a 4-day hydraulic retention time. Samples were monitored for BOD5, total suspended solids (TSS), total volatile solids (TVS), total coliforms and faecal coliforms. In the first 8 months, there were no significant performance differences between media treatments in the outflow concentrations of BOD5, TSS and TVS. The significant differences occurred during the last 3 months; using septage with biochar additions performed better than pure sand. For coliforms, the significant differences occurred after 6 months. In conclusion, the addition of biochar was not effective for SCW. The VF mesocosms system proved to be more effective in removing BOD5, TSS, TVS and coliforms when septage was loaded into the media.

  7. Combined effect of gamma radiation and some plant extracts on spodoptera littoralis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, R.S.H.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effects of exposure of male full-grown pupae of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis to sub sterilizing doses of gamma radiation (100,150 or 300 Gy), treating larval diet with different concentrations of Terminalia arjuna , Erythrine caffra, Taxodium distichum or Melaleuca cajuputi plant extracts on certain biological aspects of the parental (P 1 ),F 1 generation and combined effect of Taxodium distichum(1.25 ethanol , 2.5% water extracts) and 100 Gy of gamma radiation on also, the certain biological aspects of the parental (P 1 ) and first filial (F 1 ) generations. The biological aspects included the effect on fecundity, egg hatchability, mating ability, and malformation, beside larval survival until adult emergence and sex ratio of the produced adult at different mating crosses between treated and untreated or treated other sex. Special attention was given to inherited sterility of treated male. In addition, the studies also explained the effect of gamma radiation and different concentration of plant extracts of Taxodium disticum and combined effect of both on three tested enzymes (TOC,TAC and Cytochrom p 450 ) . In addition the effect of them on the free testosterone .Using radiation in combination with Taxodium disticum gave synergistic effect by decreasing the activity of these enzymes among F 1 adult male.This means that these treatments also interfered in the functions of these enzymes and hormone.

  8. Gelam Honey Scavenges Peroxynitrite During the Immune Response

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    Kamaruddin Mohd Yusoff

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages are part of the first-line defense against bacterial, fungal, and viral infections during host immune responses; they express high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and their reaction product peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a short-lived oxidant and a potent inducer of cell death. Honey, in addition to its well-known sweetening properties, is a natural antioxidant that has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine. We examined the ability of Gelam honey, derived from the Gelam tree (Melaleuca spp., to scavenge peroxynitrite during immune responses mounted in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide/interferon-γ (LPS/IFN-γ and in LPS-treated rats. Gelam honey significantly improved the viability of LPS/IFN-γ-treated RAW 264.7 cells and inhibited nitric oxide production—similar to the effects observed with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (1400W. Furthermore, honey, but not 1400W, inhibited peroxynitrite production from the synthetic substrate 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1 and prevented the peroxynitrite-mediated conversion of dihydrorhodamine 123 to its fluorescent oxidation product rhodamine 123. Honey inhibited peroxynitrite synthesis in LPS-treated rats. Thus, honey may attenuate inflammatory responses that lead to cell damage and death, suggesting its therapeutic uses for several inflammatory disorders.

  9. Water management can reinforce plant competition in salt-affected semi-arid wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Janaine Z.; Vogwill, Ryan; Hipsey, Matthew R.

    2017-09-01

    The diversity of vegetation in semi-arid, ephemeral wetlands is determined by niche availability and species competition, both of which are influenced by changes in water availability and salinity. Here, we hypothesise that ignoring physiological differences and competition between species when managing wetland hydrologic regimes can lead to a decrease in vegetation diversity, even when the overall wetland carrying capacity is improved. Using an ecohydrological model capable of resolving water-vegetation-salt feedbacks, we investigate why water surface and groundwater management interventions to combat vegetation decline have been more beneficial to Casuarina obesa than to Melaleuca strobophylla, the co-dominant tree species in Lake Toolibin, a salt-affected wetland in Western Australia. The simulations reveal that in trying to reduce the negative effect of salinity, the management interventions have created an environment favouring C. obesa by intensifying the climate-induced trend that the wetland has been experiencing of lower water availability and higher root-zone salinity. By testing alternative scenarios, we show that interventions that improve M. strobophylla biomass are possible by promoting hydrologic conditions that are less specific to the niche requirements of C. obesa. Modelling uncertainties were explored via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. Overall, the study demonstrates the importance of including species differentiation and competition in ecohydrological models that form the basis for wetland management.

  10. Drivers of coastal shoreline change: case study of hon dat coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  11. Drivers of Coastal Shoreline Change: Case Study of Hon Dat Coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  12. Efficacy of commercially available products against Gyrodactylus turnbulli infections on guppies Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkle, Bettina; Snellgrove, Donna; Jones, Lewis L; Cable, Jo

    2015-07-23

    The demand for ornamental fish has led to a steep rise in aquaculture for the hobbyist trade, promoting the emergence, persistence and spread of various infectious diseases. Complete control of disease outbreaks with antibiotics and chemical-based medicines is rare, but plant compounds may herald potential alternatives effective against a range of pathogens. Melafix® and Pimafix® are formulated with the essential oils cajuput (Melaleuca cajuputi) and West Indian bay (Pimenta racemosa) and are marketed against bacterial and fungal infections, respectively. Previous experiments showed high efficacy of emulsified cajuput oil against gyrodactylids; the current study tested Melafix® and Pimafix® and their individual compounds against Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting the guppies Poecilia reticulata. In particular, a combination treatment of Melafix® and Pimafix® was highly effective at reducing in vitro survival of parasites from 15 to 2 h and eradicating 95% of gyrodactylids in vivo. The unexpected high efficacy of this combination treatment is likely explained by the high content of terpenes and phenol propanoids in the cajuput and West Indian bay oils, as well as the anti-helminthic properties of the emulsifier Crovol PK 70. Hence, Melafix® and Pimafix® effectively reduce gyrodactylid burdens on fish, increasing the chances of efficient disease control in ornamental fish.

  13. Influência do período de armazenamento do caupi [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.], tratado com óleos essenciais e fixos, no controle de Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius, 1775 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae Influence of the storage period of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] treated with essential and fixed oils, for the control of Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius, 1775 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carla Ribeiro Lopes Pereira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Compostos secundários obtidos de plantas podem ser utilizados no controle de Callosobruchus maculatus, como uma tática alternativa potencial aos inseticidas sintéticos. Foram testados óleos essenciais (Cymbopogon martini Roxb., Piper aduncum L., Piper hispidinervum C.DC., Melaleuca sp., Lippia gracillis Shau e fixos (Helianthus annus L., Sesamum indicum L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Glycine max L. e Caryocar brasiliense Camb., na concentração de 50µl/20g, de acordo com estudos anteriores. Grãos de caupi, cv. Sempre Verde, foram impregnados com os óleos, em recipientes de vidro e submetidos à agitação manual por dois minutos. Cada parcela de 20g foi infestada com oito fêmeas de C. maculatus com 0 a 48h de idade, durante quatro dias. Os óleos foram avaliados logo após a impregnação e aos 30, 60, 90 e 120 dias de armazenamento. Na primeira avaliação, todos os óleos essenciais provocaram 100% de mortalidade e para os óleos fixos, a mortalidade variou entre 35% (G. hirsutum e 67,5% (G. max. Com o prolongamento do período de armazenamento, houve um aumento do número de ovos viáveis e de insetos emergidos, exceto para P. aduncum. Em relação aos óleos fixos, S. indicum, G. max, G. hirsutum e C. brasiliense foram os mais eficientes até os 30 dias de armazenamento. Os resultados indicam que os óleos testados na concentração de 50µl/20g apresentam baixo efeito residual, com exceção de P. aduncum, que foi efetivo durante todo o período de armazenamento.The secondary compounds extracted from plants are considered potential alternative to synthetic insecticides in the control of agricultural pests. Essential oils (Cymbopogon martini Roxb., Piper aduncum L., P. hispidinervum C.DC., Melaleuca sp. and Lippia gracillis Shau and fixed oils (Helianthus annus L., Sesamum indicum L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Glycine max L. and Caryocar brasiliense Camb. at the concentration of 50µl/20g were tested according to previous studies. Samples

  14. Persistência de óleos essenciais em milho armazenado, submetido à infestação de gorgulho do milho Persistence of essential oils in stored maize submitted to infestation of maize weevil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Leandro Braga de Castro Coitinho

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Os óleos essenciais e os compostos constituintes têm sido pesquisados quanto a sua atividade inseticida contra pragas de grãos armazenados. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a persistência de óleos essenciais em milho armazenado, submetido à infestação do gorgulho do milho, Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. A persistência dos óleos e do eugenol foi avaliada no período inicial (logo após a impregnação e aos 30, 60, 90 e 120 dias de armazenamento. As mortalidades de S. zeamais, no período inicial, variaram entre 93,8 (Piper hispidinervum, Melaleuca leucadendron e eugenol e 100% (Eugenia uniflora, frutos verdes de Schinus terebinthifolius e Piper marginatum. A partir dos 30 dias, as mortalidades, de modo geral, decresceram, com exceção de P. marginatum (92,2%, que alcançou 53,1% de mortalidade aos 120 dias de armazenamento. De acordo com as equações de regressão ajustadas para o número de S. zeamais emergidos em todo o período de armazenamento, apenas não houve significância para os óleos de S. terebinthifolius, P. marginatum e testemunha. Em relação à média geral, o óleo de P. marginatum foi o mais persistente, proporcionando emergência de apenas 0,30 insetos, diferindo dos óleos restantes, do eugenol e da testemunha. Os demais tratamentos só diferiram em relação à testemunha.The essential oils and constituent compounds have been studied for their insecticidal activity against stored grain pests. In this research, persistence of the essential oils in stored maize subject to infestation by maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae were evaluated. Persistence of oils and eugenol were evaluated in the initial period (after impregnation and at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days of storage. Mortalities of S. zeamais in the initial period ranged between 93.8 (Piper hispidinervum, Melaleuca leucadendron and eugenol to 100% (Eugenia uniflora, green fruits of Schinus terebinthifolius and Piper

  15. Aerial Mapping of Forests Affected by Pathogens Using UAVs, Hyperspectral Sensors, and Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandino, Juan; Pegg, Geoff; Gonzalez, Felipe; Smith, Grant

    2018-03-22

    The environmental and economic impacts of exotic fungal species on natural and plantation forests have been historically catastrophic. Recorded surveillance and control actions are challenging because they are costly, time-consuming, and hazardous in remote areas. Prolonged periods of testing and observation of site-based tests have limitations in verifying the rapid proliferation of exotic pathogens and deterioration rates in hosts. Recent remote sensing approaches have offered fast, broad-scale, and affordable surveys as well as additional indicators that can complement on-ground tests. This paper proposes a framework that consolidates site-based insights and remote sensing capabilities to detect and segment deteriorations by fungal pathogens in natural and plantation forests. This approach is illustrated with an experimentation case of myrtle rust ( Austropuccinia psidii ) on paperbark tea trees ( Melaleuca quinquenervia ) in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The method integrates unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), hyperspectral image sensors, and data processing algorithms using machine learning. Imagery is acquired using a Headwall Nano-Hyperspec ® camera, orthorectified in Headwall SpectralView ® , and processed in Python programming language using eXtreme Gradient Boosting (XGBoost), Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), and Scikit-learn third-party libraries. In total, 11,385 samples were extracted and labelled into five classes: two classes for deterioration status and three classes for background objects. Insights reveal individual detection rates of 95% for healthy trees, 97% for deteriorated trees, and a global multiclass detection rate of 97%. The methodology is versatile to be applied to additional datasets taken with different image sensors, and the processing of large datasets with freeware tools.

  16. Investigating the host-range of the rust fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato across tribes of the family Myrtaceae present in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Louise; Aveyard, Ruth; Lidbetter, Jonathan R; Wilson, Peter G

    2012-01-01

    The exotic rust fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato was first detected in Australia in April 2010. This study aimed to determine the host-range potential of this accession of the rust by testing its pathogenicity on plants of 122 taxa, representative of the 15 tribes of the subfamily Myrtoideae in the family Myrtaceae. Each taxon was tested in two separate trials (unless indicated otherwise) that comprised up to five replicates per taxon and six replicates of a positive control (Syzygium jambos). No visible symptoms were observed on the following four taxa in either trial: Eucalyptus grandis×camaldulensis, E. moluccana, Lophostemon confertus and Sannantha angusta. Only small chlorotic or necrotic flecks without any uredinia (rust fruiting bodies) were observed on inoculated leaves of seven other taxa (Acca sellowiana, Corymbia calophylla 'Rosea', Lophostemon suaveolens, Psidium cattleyanum, P. guajava 'Hawaiian' and 'Indian', Syzygium unipunctatum). Fully-developed uredinia were observed on all replicates across both trials of 28 taxa from 8 tribes belonging to the following 17 genera: Agonis, Austromyrtus, Beaufortia, Callistemon, Calothamnus, Chamelaucium, Darwinia, Eucalyptus, Gossia, Kunzea, Leptospermum, Melaleuca, Metrosideros, Syzygium, Thryptomene, Tristania, Verticordia. In contrast, the remaining 83 taxa inoculated, including the majority of Corymbia and Eucalyptus species, developed a broad range of symptoms, often across the full spectrum, from fully-developed uredinia to no visible symptoms. These results were encouraging as they indicate that some levels of genetic resistance to the rust possibly exist in these taxa. Overall, our results indicated no apparent association between the presence or absence of disease symptoms and the phylogenetic relatedness of taxa. It is most likely that the majority of the thousands of Myrtaceae species found in Australia have the potential to become infected to some degree by the rust, although this wide host range may

  17. Fumigant toxicity of plant essential oils against Camptomyia corticalis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Ran; Haribalan, Perumalsamy; Son, Bong-Ki; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of 98 plant essential oils against third instars of cecidomyiid gall midge Camptomyia corticalis (Loew) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) was examined using a vapor-phase mortality bioassay. Results were compared with that of a conventional insecticide dichlorvos. Based on 24-h LC50 values, all essential oils were less toxic than dichlorvos (LC50, 0.027 mg/cm3). The LC50 of caraway (Carum carvi L.) seed, armoise (Artemisia vulgaris L.), clary sage (Salvia sclarea L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf], niaouli (Melaleuca viridiflora Gaertner), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), cassia especial (Cinnamomum cassia Nees ex Blume), Dalmatian sage (Salvia offcinalis L.), red thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), bay [Pimenta racemosa (P. Mill.) J.W. Moore], garlic (Allium sativum L.), and pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.) oils is between 0.55 and 0.60 mg/cm3. The LC50 of cassia (C. cassia, pure and redistilled), white thyme (T. vulgaris), star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f.), peppermint (Mentha X piperita L.), wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens L.), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) bark, sweet marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), Roman chamomile [Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All.], eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.),Virginian cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana L.), pimento berry [Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr.], summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.), and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) oils is between 0.61 and 0.99 mg/cm3. All other essential oils tested exhibited low toxicity to the cecidomyiid larvae (LC50, >0.99 mg/cm3). Global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on the active essential oils as potential larvicides for the control of C. corticalis populations as fumigants with contact action.

  18. Óleos essenciais e vegetais no controle in vitro de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

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    K. RAMOS

    Full Text Available RESUMO O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a atividade antifúngica de óleos essenciais e vegetais no controle in vitro de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, agente causal da antracnose em pós-colheita de frutíferas. Treze óleos essenciais foram utilizados em concentrações de 0,00%, 0,40%, 0,80%, 1,70%, 3,20%, 6,25%, 12,50%, 25,00%, 50,00% e 100,00%, e uma linhagem padrão de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Foram avaliadas a concentração inibitória mínima e a concentração mínima fungicida a fim de caracterizar o potencial de cada um dos óleos essenciais avaliados. Verificou-se que os óleos utilizados apresentaram atividade fungicida em diferentes concentrações, as quais variaram de 0,80% (melaleuca, 3,20%, (eucalipto, 6,25% (limão, capim limão, cravo da índia, canela e nim, 12,5% (hortelã e citronela, 25% (copaíba, 50% (coco e gengibre e 100% (manjericão. O óleo de nim apresentou maior redução da carga microbiana em função do tempo de exposição, sendo necessários 30 minutos para anulação da contagem microbiana. O efeito antifúngico dos óleos essenciais, para controle de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, depende da planta e da concentração empregada.

  19. Investigating the host-range of the rust fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato across tribes of the family Myrtaceae present in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Morin

    Full Text Available The exotic rust fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato was first detected in Australia in April 2010. This study aimed to determine the host-range potential of this accession of the rust by testing its pathogenicity on plants of 122 taxa, representative of the 15 tribes of the subfamily Myrtoideae in the family Myrtaceae. Each taxon was tested in two separate trials (unless indicated otherwise that comprised up to five replicates per taxon and six replicates of a positive control (Syzygium jambos. No visible symptoms were observed on the following four taxa in either trial: Eucalyptus grandis×camaldulensis, E. moluccana, Lophostemon confertus and Sannantha angusta. Only small chlorotic or necrotic flecks without any uredinia (rust fruiting bodies were observed on inoculated leaves of seven other taxa (Acca sellowiana, Corymbia calophylla 'Rosea', Lophostemon suaveolens, Psidium cattleyanum, P. guajava 'Hawaiian' and 'Indian', Syzygium unipunctatum. Fully-developed uredinia were observed on all replicates across both trials of 28 taxa from 8 tribes belonging to the following 17 genera: Agonis, Austromyrtus, Beaufortia, Callistemon, Calothamnus, Chamelaucium, Darwinia, Eucalyptus, Gossia, Kunzea, Leptospermum, Melaleuca, Metrosideros, Syzygium, Thryptomene, Tristania, Verticordia. In contrast, the remaining 83 taxa inoculated, including the majority of Corymbia and Eucalyptus species, developed a broad range of symptoms, often across the full spectrum, from fully-developed uredinia to no visible symptoms. These results were encouraging as they indicate that some levels of genetic resistance to the rust possibly exist in these taxa. Overall, our results indicated no apparent association between the presence or absence of disease symptoms and the phylogenetic relatedness of taxa. It is most likely that the majority of the thousands of Myrtaceae species found in Australia have the potential to become infected to some degree by the rust, although this

  20. Feeding and development of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, on Australian native plant species and implications for Australian biosecurity.

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    Anna A Rathé

    Full Text Available In any insect invasion the presence or absence of suitable food and oviposition hosts in the invaded range is a key factor determining establishment success. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important insect vector of the xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, which causes disease in numerous host plants including food and feedstock crops, ornamentals and weeds. Both the pathogen and the vector are native to the Americas and are considered to be highly invasive. Neither has been detected in Australia. Twelve Australian native plant species present in the USA were observed over two years for suitability as H. vitripennis feeding, oviposition and nymph development hosts. Hosts providing evidence of adult or nymph presence were Leptospermum laevigatum, Acacia cowleana, Eremophila divaricata, Eucalyptus wandoo, Hakea laurina, Melaleuca laterita and Swainsona galegifolia. An oviposition-suitability field study was conducted with citrus, a favoured oviposition host, as a positive control. Citrus and L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, B. ericifolia×B. spinulosa, C. pulchella, E. divaricata, E. wandoo, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia were found to be oviposition hosts. Egg parasitism by the mymarid parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi was observed on all Australian plants. A number of Australian plants that may facilitate H. vitripennis invasion have been identified and categorised as 'high risk' due to their ability to support all three life stages (egg, nymph and adult of the insect in the field (L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, E. divaricata, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia. The implications of these host status and natural enemy research findings are discussed and placed in an Australian invasion context.

  1. Developing a savanna burning emissions abatement methodology for tussock grasslands in high rainfall regions of northern Australia

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    Jeremy Russell-Smith

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fire-prone tropical savanna and grassland systems are a significant source of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases.  In recent years, substantial research has been directed towards developing accounting methodologies for savanna burning emissions to be applied in Australia’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, as well as for commercial carbon trading purposes.  That work has focused on woody savanna systems.  Here, we extend the methodological approach to include tussock grasslands and associated Melaleuca-dominated open woodlands (<10% foliage cover in higher rainfall (>1,000 mm/annum regions of northern Australia.  Field assessments under dry season conditions focused on deriving fuel accumulation, fire patchiness and combustion relationships for key fuel types: fine fuels − grass and litter; coarse woody fuels − twigs <6 mm diameter; heavy woody fuels − >6 mm diameter; and shrubs.  In contrast with previous savanna burning assessments, fire treatments undertaken under early dry season burning conditions resulted in negligible patchiness and very substantial consumption of fine fuels.  In effect, burning in the early dry season provides no benefits in greenhouse gas emissions and emissions reductions in tussock grasslands can be achieved only through reducing the extent of burning.  The practical implications of reduced burning in higher rainfall northern Australian grassland systems are discussed, indicating that there are significant constraints, including infrastructural, cultural and woody thickening issues.  Similar opportunities and constraints are observed in other international contexts, but especially project implementation challenges associated with legislative, political and governance issues.

  2. Design and pharmacophore modeling of biaryl methyl eugenol analogs as breast cancer invasion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Bar, Fatma M; Khanfar, Mohammad A; Elnagar, Ahmed Y; Badria, Farid A; Zaghloul, Ahmed M; Ahmad, Kadria F; Sylvester, Paul W; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2010-01-15

    Cell invasion and migration are required for the parent solid tumor cells to metastasize to distant organs. Microtubules form a polarized network, enabling organelle and protein movement throughout the cell. Cytoskeletal elements coordinately regulate cell's motility, adhesion, migration, exocytosis, endocytosis, and division. Thus, microtubule disruption can be a useful target to control cancer cell invasion and metastasis. The phenolic ether methyl eugenol (1), the major component of the essential oil of the leaves of Melaleuca ericifolia Sm. (Myrtaceae), was used as a starting scaffold to design eleven new and three known anti-tubulin agents 2-15 using carbon-carbon coupling reactions. A computer-assisted approach was used to design these new biaryl derivatives using colchicine-binding site of tubulin as the molecular target and colchicine as an active ligand. Several derivatives showed potent inhibitory activity against MDA-MB-231 cell migration at the 1-4microM dose range. The Z isomers, 4 and 15 were more active as invasion inhibitors compared to their structurally related E isomers, 2 and 14. The cytotoxic activities of compounds 2-15 against two breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 were evaluated. Anti-invasive activity of the semisynthetic derivatives is not due to a direct cytotoxic effect on MDA-MB-231. Analogs 2-15 may promote their anti-invasive activity through the induction of changes in cell morphology. A pharmacophore model was generated involving seven essential features for activity, which was consistent with a previously generated colchicine site inhibitors model. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioatividade de óleos essenciais no controle de Botrytis cinerea isolado de morangueiro Essential oils bioactivity in strawberry grey mould control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Lorenzetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o uso de óleos essenciais sobre isolados de Botrytis cinerea, causador do mofo cinzento em morangueiro. Foram testados óleos essenciais de capim-limão, palmarosa, citronela, cravo, canela, menta, lavanda, tangerina, eucalipto, melaleuca, alecrim e laranja, todos estes analisados em cromatógrafo a gás acoplado a detector de massas, para identificação dos principais componentes dos óleos. Foram avaliados o crescimento micelial, produção e germinação de conídios de B. cinerea, com a incorporação do óleo no meio de cultura. Realizou-se ainda uma avaliação de voláteis e a eficiência de óleos em isolado resistente a fungicida. Para cada teste, diferentes óleos apresentaram eficiência, contudo capim limão, palmarosa, canela e menta demonstraram os melhores efeitos em todos os testes realizados. Todos os tratamentos a base de óleos demonstraram efeito semelhante a um fungicida recomendado para a cultura, a base de tiofanato metílico. Dois tratamentos mostraram-se efetivos no caso de isolado resistente (óleo de capim limão e de canela. Óleos essenciais mostram-se como opção promissora para o desenvolvimento de possíveis produtos fitossanitários para o manejo de doenças em plantas.This study aimed evaluates essential oils in Botrytis cinerea isolates growth, which causes gray mould on strawberry. Were tested essential oils of lemon grass, palmrose, citronella, clove, cinnamon, mint, lavender, tangerine, eucalyptus, tea tree, rosemary and orange. The oils were analyzed in gas chromatograph attached to mass detector for identifying the mainly oils components. Were evaluated mycelial growth, conidia production and conidia germination of B. cinerea, with oil incorporation in culture medium. Were conducted an evaluation of oils volatile components and the efficiency of oils in fungicide-resistant isolate. For each test, different oils showed efficiency, however lemongrass, palmarosa, cinnamon and mint

  4. PENENTUAN KEMURNIAN MINYAK KAYU PUTIH DENGAN TEKNIK ANALISIS PERUBAHAN SUDUT PUTAR POLARISASI CAHAYA AKIBAT MEDAN LISTRIK LUAR

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    Emmilia Agustina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Kayu putih (Melaleuca leucadendron L merupakan tumbuhan perdu yang  mempunyai batang pohon kecil dengan banyak anak cabang yang menggantung ke bawah. Daun kayu putih ini mengandung  senyawa  kimia,  antara  lain:  sineol,  melaleucin,   minyak  atsiri  yang  terdiri  dari terpineol, cineol dan lignin. Alkohol merupakan  senyawa organik yang memiliki  gugus hidroksil (R-OH  yang  terikat  pada  atom  karbon, yang  atom  karbon  itu sendiri  terikat  pada  atom  hidrogen dan/atau atom  karbon lain. Berdasarkan latar belakang, penelitian dilakukan dengan tujuan  untuk: (1 Mengetahui pengaruh medan listrik luar terhadap sudut putar polarisasi cahaya pada alkohol dan minyak kayu putih, (2 Mengetahui pengaruh perubahan konsentrasi terhadap sudut putar polarisasi cahaya  pada  alkohol  dan  minyak  kayu  putih,  (3  Mengetahui  pengaruh  medan  listrik  luar  dan perubahan konsentrasi terhadap sudut putar polarisasi cahaya pada alkohol dan minyak kayu putih. Penelitian ini mengkaji sifat optis non linear dari alkohol dan minyak kayu putih dengan berbagai konsentrasi dalam medan listrik luar. Perilaku optis yang dikaji adalah pemutaran arah getar medan listrik dari berkas cahaya  yang ditransmisikan karena pengaruh medan listrik luar dengan nilai 1,6 KV/m, 3,1 KV/m, 4,5 KV/m, 4,9 KV/m, 9,2 KV/m, 10,2 KV/m, 13,8 KV/m, 16,4 KV/m, dan 19,7 KV/m  pada  alkohol  dan  minyak  kayu  putih.  Data  yang  diperoleh  dari  penelitian  ini  dianalisis dengan cara memplot ke dalam grafik. Dari hasil eksperimen diperoleh hasil bahwa perubahan sudut putar  polarisasi  cahaya  berbanding  lurus  dengan  perubahan  konsentrasi  dan  medan  listrik  yang mengenai bahan. Perubahan sudut putar polarisasi cahaya pada  alkohol lebih besar dibandingkan dengan minyak kayu putih. Semakin besar sudut putarnya, maka semakin murni bahan tersebut. Kata Kunci: Medan Listrik, Polarisasi, Minyak Kayu Putih, Kemurnian

  5. Bioavailability, Composition and Fate of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Swan-Canning Catchment, South-Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, K. C.; Hughes, C. S.; Norris, J. R.; Grierson, P. F.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) comprises the bulk of the total nitrogen load to the N-limited Swan-Canning river and estuary that bisects Perth, WA, yet its ecological role is largely unknown. Our objective was to assess the bioavailability and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), particularly its DON component, and the potential of DOM to supply dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to the estuary during the summer months when algal blooms are common. We compared water samples from 10 sub-catchments of the Swan-Canning that vary in land-use: eucalypt forests on the Darling Scarp most distant from the estuary, mixed (agriculture/ residential) catchments on the metropolitan perimeter, and urban catchments on the Swan Coastal Plain near Perth CBD. We inoculated water samples with a common bacterial inoculum and measured changes in DOC, DON and DIN over time. We found that 2 to 17 per cent of DOC and 18 to 44 per cent of the DON was consumed during the experiment and DIN was produced in 8 of 10 catchments. DOC and DON consumption were linearly related to concentration across sites and were greatest in the urban catchments. However, DOC and DON consumption were not significantly related, suggesting that C and N are concentrated in different fractions of DOM. Using resin fractionation techniques, we found that DOC was concentrated in the hydrophobic fraction, followed by transphilics, and lesser amounts of charged and neutral hydrophilics. Ongoing analyses will examine the N content of resin fractions and the amino acid composition of streams to determine how N composition relates to DOM decomposition. We are currently examining organic matter leached from native plants (Corymbia, Melaleuca) in coastal plain wetlands in order to characterize allochthonous DOM. Further examination of algal- derived DOM and point sources will enable us to determine the bioavailability and composition of in-stream and anthropogenic sources. These studies provide much needed

  6. Acaricidal and Insecticidal Activities of Essential Oils against a Stored-Food Mite and Stored-Grain Insects.

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    Song, Ja-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Moon; Lee, Na-Hyun; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Twenty plant-derived oils were evaluated for their acaricidal and insecticidal activities against Sitotroga cerealella, Sitophilus oryzae, Sitophilus zeamais, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae adults, by using the fumigant and filter paper diffusion methods. Responses varied with bioassay systems, insect or mite species, plant oils, and exposure time. Based on the 50% lethal dose (LD50) values against S. oryzae and S. zeamais in the fumigant bioassay, Anethum graveolens oil (4.12 and 1.12 μg/cm(3), respectively) induced the highest mortality, followed by Achillea millefolium (21.92 and 14.91 μg/cm(3)) and Eucalyptus dives (28.02 and 24.02 μg/cm(3)) oils, respectively. The most toxic oil based on the 50% lethal concentration values against T. putrescentiae was E. dives (3.13 μg/cm(3)), followed by Melaleuca leucadendron (3.93 μg/cm(3)) and Leptospermum pertersonii (4.41 μg/cm(3)). Neroli birgard oil (1.70 μg/cm(3)) was the most toxic based on the LD50 values against S. cerealella, followed by Citrus aurantium (1.80 μg/cm(3)) and Artemisia vulgaris (1.81 μg/cm(3)). The insecticidal and acaricidal activities of the plant oils in the filter paper diffusion bioassay were similar to those in the fumigant bioassay. In comparison, A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils were more effective against S. oryzae and S. zeamais in the fumigant bioassay than in the contact bioassay. These results indicate that the insecticidal activity of the three plant oils against S. oryzae and S. zeamais may be due to their fumigant action. Acaricidal activities of the A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils against T. putrescentiae were 2.62, 1.11, and 122 times higher than that of benzyl benzoate in the contact bioassay. These results indicate that A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils have potential for development as agents to control stored-grain insects and mites.

  7. Evaluación de la actividad antimalárica de algunas plantas utilizadas en la medicina tradicional cubana

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    M. RODRíGUEZ-PéREZ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La búsqueda de nuevas alternativas terapéuticas es una alta prioridad en la lucha por el control de la malaria. El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar extractos preparados a partir de plantas seleccionadas en base a información etnobotánica obtenida de la Medicina Tradicional Cubana. Extractos de seis plantas (Bambusa vulgaris, Parthenium hysterophorus, Melaleuca leucadendron, Indigofera suffruticosa, Artemisia absinthium, Simarouba glauca, fueron evaluados in vitro frente a la cepa F32/Tanzania de Plasmodium falciparum, S. glauca, P. hysterophorus, M. leucadendron y A. absinthium mostraron valores de Concentración Mínima Inhibitoria en el rango de 3,1 a 50 µg/mL, mientras B. vulgaris e I. suffruticosa presentaron valores negativos contra esta cepa. Al evaluar estas cuatro especies in vivo frente a Plasmodium berghei NK65, mostraron mayor actividad inhibidora A. absinthium con un 65,9% de reducción de la parasitemia a la dosis de 500 mg/kg, M. leucadendron con un 50% de reducción a la dosis de 250 mg/kg y S. glauca con una reducción del 43,2% a la dosis de 100 mg/kg. Los extractos que mostraron menor toxicidad fueron A. absinthium, y M. leucadendron. Estos resultados muestran las potencialidades antimaláricas de algunas plantas medicinales utilizadas en Cuba y trazan el camino para estudios posteriores de sus constituyentes químicos activos. Palabras-claves: Plasmodium falciparum; Plasmodium berghei; plantas antimaláricas; etnobotánico.

  8. Diversity and composition of sediment bacteria in subtropical coastal wetlands of North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Sampayo, Eugenia; Welti, Nina; Hayes, Matthew; Lu, Yang; Lovelock, Catherine; Lockington, David

    2013-04-01

    Coastal wetlands provide a wide variety of important ecosystem services but continue to suffer disturbance, degradation and deforestation. Sediment bacteria are responsible for major nutrient transformation and recycling in these ecosystems. Insight into microbial community composition and the factors that determine them may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes, food web dynamics, biodegradation processes and, thus, help to develop the management strategies for preserving the ecosystem health and services. Characterizing shifts in community taxa along environmental gradients has been shown to provide a useful tool for determining the major drivers affecting community structure and function. North Stradbroke Island (NSI) in Southern Queensland presents considerable habitat diversity including variety of groundwater dependent ecosystems such as lakes, swamps, sedge-like salt marshes and mangroves. Ecological responses of continuous groundwater extraction for municipal purposes and sand mining operations on NSI are still need to be assessed in order to protect its unique environment. Changes in coastal hydrology due to either climate change or human activity may directly affect microbial populations and, thus, biogeochemical cycles of nutrients. These may result in altering/losing some ecosystem services provided by coastal wetlands. In this study we examine microbial diversity and determine environmental controls on bacterial community structure along a natural transition from freshwater forested wetland (melaleuca woodland), sedge-like salt marsh and into mangroves located at NSI. The study area is characterized by significant groundwater flow, nutrient limitation and sharp transition from one ecosystem type to another. Sediment cores (0-5 cm and 20-25 cm depth) were collected from three representative sites of each zone (mangroves - salt marsh - freshwater wetland) along the salinity gradient in August 2012. Subsamples were set aside for use in

  9. Pemilihan Jenis Hasil Hutan Bukan Kayu Potensial dalam Rangka Rehabilitasi Hutan Lindung (Studi Kasus Kawasan Hutan Lindung KPHL Rinjani Barat, Nusa Tenggara Barat

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    Ogi Setiawan

    2016-03-01

    Unit, West Nusa Tenggara Province Abstract One of the strategies in protected forest rehabilitation is selecting proper Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs species. The selected NTFPs species should have an ecological function to maintain the sustainability of protected forest services. The research aimed to conduct an analysis of NTFPs selection in protected forest rehabilitation framework. The study was located in Rinjani Barat Forest Management Unit (FMU, West Nusa Tenggara Province. The research consisted of three steps, which were preparation (collecting supported data and desk study, field observation (biophysics and root characteristics of NTFPs, and data analysis (species suitability, Index Root Anchoring, and Index Root Binding. The result of the research showed that selection of NTFPs potentials could be based on suitability level in rehabilitation site and roots system prospects, especially in landslide and erosion control. The selected NTFPs species, which were suitable for protected forest rehabilitation in Rinjani Barat FMU, were fruit species such as Durio zibethinus, Mangifera indica, Garcinia mangostana, Arthocarpus altilis, Persea americana, Achras zapota, and Aleuritas moluccana; source of biofuel species such as Callophylum inophylum; and source of essential oil species such as Melaleuca leucadendron. There were some constrain factors in the utilization of the NTFPs species for protected forest rehabilitation, including steep slope, soil texture dominated by sand fraction, low soil nutrients, and long period of dry month. These constrain factors could be minimized by implementing soil conservation techniques and utilizing of organic fertilizer and mychorriza.

  10. Vegetation-induced soil water repellency as a strategy in arid ecosystems. A geochemical approach in Banksia woodlands (SW Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Pérez, Jose Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; Stevens, Jason; Jordan, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Banksia woodlands (BW) are iconic ecosystems of Western Australia (WA) composed by an overstorey dominated by Proteaceae, e.g. Banksia menziesii and Banksia attenuata, in combination with other species, such as Eucalyptus spp., Verticordia spp. or Melaleuca spp. Although located in very poor dune soils, BW provide numerous ecosystem services and sustain a high biodiversity. In this area, annual rainfall is relatively high (about 800 mm) but permeability of the sandy substrate leads to a functionally arid ecosystem. Currently, BW are threatened by sand mining activities and urban expansion; therefore conservation and restoration of these woodlands are critical. Despite numerous efforts, the success of restoration plans is usually poor mostly due to the high sensitivity to drought stress and poor seedling survival rates (5-30%) (Benigno et al., 2014). A characteristic feature of BW is their root architecture, formed by a proteoid (cluster) system that spreads to form thick mats below the soil surface, favouring the uptake of nutrients (especially, P), and preventing soil erosion. Root exudates are related to numerous plant functions, as they facilitate penetration of roots in soil and enhance the extraction of scarce mineral nutrients and its further assimilation. Exudates may also interact directly with soil or indirectly through microbial mediated events being also related to soil water repellency (SWR; Lozano et al, 2014). Knowledge about the specific compounds able to induce SWR is limited (Doerr et al., 2000), but it is generally accepted that is caused by organic molecules coating the surface of soil mineral particles and aggregates (Jordán et al., 2013). Proteaceae release short-chained organic acids to enhance phosphate acquisition, which have been also reported to be related with SWR (Jiménez-Morillo et al., 2014). It is hypothesized that disruption of water dynamics in mature BW soils is underlying the failure of restoration plans. This