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Sample records for meg

  1. High precision anatomy for MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bradbury, David; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    Precise MEG estimates of neuronal current flow are undermined by uncertain knowledge of the head location with respect to the MEG sensors. This is either due to head movements within the scanning session or systematic errors in co-registration to anatomy. Here we show how such errors can be minimized using subject-specific head-casts produced using 3D printing technology. The casts fit the scalp of the subject internally and the inside of the MEG dewar externally, reducing within session and between session head movements. Systematic errors in matching to MRI coordinate system are also reduced through the use of MRI-visible fiducial markers placed on the same cast. Bootstrap estimates of absolute co-registration error were of the order of 1mm. Estimates of relative co-registration error were <1.5mm between sessions. We corroborated these scalp based estimates by looking at the MEG data recorded over a 6month period. We found that the between session sensor variability of the subject's evoked response was of the order of the within session noise, showing no appreciable noise due to between-session movement. Simulations suggest that the between-session sensor level amplitude SNR improved by a factor of 5 over conventional strategies. We show that at this level of coregistration accuracy there is strong evidence for anatomical models based on the individual rather than canonical anatomy; but that this advantage disappears for errors of greater than 5mm. This work paves the way for source reconstruction methods which can exploit very high SNR signals and accurate anatomical models; and also significantly increases the sensitivity of longitudinal studies with MEG. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Papa, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Sergiampietri, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  3. [MEG]PLS: A pipeline for MEG data analysis and partial least squares statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michael J; Kovačević, Natasa; Fatima, Zainab; Mišić, Bratislav; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    The emphasis of modern neurobiological theories has recently shifted from the independent function of brain areas to their interactions in the context of whole-brain networks. As a result, neuroimaging methods and analyses have also increasingly focused on network discovery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a neuroimaging modality that captures neural activity with a high degree of temporal specificity, providing detailed, time varying maps of neural activity. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis is a multivariate framework that can be used to isolate distributed spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity that differentiate groups or cognitive tasks, to relate neural activity to behavior, and to capture large-scale network interactions. Here we introduce [MEG]PLS, a MATLAB-based platform that streamlines MEG data preprocessing, source reconstruction and PLS analysis in a single unified framework. [MEG]PLS facilitates MRI preprocessing, including segmentation and coregistration, MEG preprocessing, including filtering, epoching, and artifact correction, MEG sensor analysis, in both time and frequency domains, MEG source analysis, including multiple head models and beamforming algorithms, and combines these with a suite of PLS analyses. The pipeline is open-source and modular, utilizing functions from FieldTrip (Donders, NL), AFNI (NIMH, USA), SPM8 (UCL, UK) and PLScmd (Baycrest, CAN), which are extensively supported and continually developed by their respective communities. [MEG]PLS is flexible, providing both a graphical user interface and command-line options, depending on the needs of the user. A visualization suite allows multiple types of data and analyses to be displayed and includes 4-D montage functionality. [MEG]PLS is freely available under the GNU public license (http://meg-pls.weebly.com). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  5. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age

  6. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) predicts focal epileptogenicity in cavernomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, H; Scheler, G; Hummel, C; Walter, J; Romstock, J; Buchfelder, M; Blumcke, I

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the irritative epileptic zone in patients with cavernomas by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Method: Among 82 patients operated for epilepsy, whose presurgical evaluation had included MEG, histological assessment of the tissue removed had confirmed cavernomas in eight. These eight patients had epilepsy since 18.6 (SD 12.7) years on average. The monitoring lasted about 2.1 (SD 1.3) hours and a median 20.9 (SD 14.3) spikes per hour were recorded. Spontaneous brain activity was recorded by means of a 74 channel dual unit MEG system (Magnes II, 4-D Neuroimaging) with simultaneous EEG recording (31 scalp electrodes). Spike analysis was performed using different source (moving dipole, current density reconstruction) and head models (spherical shells, BEM). Co-registration of neurophysiological and imaging data (MRI) was based upon anatomical landmarks. Results: In 6/8 patients co-localisation from the cavernoma and epileptic zone was found. In two patients the focus was localised in the parieto-occipital lobe, in three patients in the frontal lobe and in three patients in the temporal lobe. In one case of temporal and one case of frontal lobe focus localisation there was no spatial relationship to the cavernoma. Conclusion: In cases of focal seizures due to a single cavernoma, MEG may precisely delineate the epileptogenic tissue bordering the lesion. In patients with multiple cavernomas or dual pathology, MSI may reveal the complexity of the case, and contribute to the decision about further invasive diagnostics and more sophisticated therapeutic measures. MEG is a promising method for prediction of the epileptic zone in cavernoma related epilepsies, and thus it can contribute to decision making about and planning of epilepsy surgery. PMID:15314122

  7. Latest News from the MEG Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Within the Standard Model (SM), in spite of neutrino oscillations, the flavor of charged leptons is conserved in very good approximation, and therefore charged Lepton Flavor Violation (cLFV) is expected to be unobservable. On the other hand, most new physics models predict cLFV at a level within the experimental reach, and processes like the mu to e gamma decay became standard probes for physics beyond the SM. The MEG experiment, at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland), searches for the mu to e gamma decay, down to a Branching Ratio of about 5 10^-13, exploiting the most intense continuous muon beam in the word and innovative detectors. In this seminar, I will present the most recent results from MEG, and the plan for an upgrade of the experiment, aiming at an improvement of the sensitivity by one order of magnitude within this decade.

  8. Functional Mapping with Simultaneous MEG and EEG

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven; Ahlfors, Seppo; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) to locate and determine the temporal evolution in brain areas involved in the processing of simple sensory stimuli. We will use somatosensory stimuli to locate the hand somatosensory areas, auditory stimuli to locate the auditory cortices, visual stimuli in four quadrants of the visual field to locate the early visual areas. These type of experiments are used for functional mapping in epileptic and brain tumor patients to lo...

  9. Advanced electronics for the CTF MEG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, J; Vrba, J; Spear, P; McKenzie, D; Willis, R; Loewen, R; Robinson, S E; Fife, A A

    2004-11-30

    Development of the CTF MEG system has been advanced with the introduction of a computer processing cluster between the data acquisition electronics and the host computer. The advent of fast processors, memory, and network interfaces has made this innovation feasible for large data streams at high sampling rates. We have implemented tasks including anti-alias filter, sample rate decimation, higher gradient balancing, crosstalk correction, and optional filters with a cluster consisting of 4 dual Intel Xeon processors operating on up to 275 channel MEG systems at 12 kHz sample rate. The architecture is expandable with additional processors to implement advanced processing tasks which may include e.g., continuous head localization/motion correction, optional display filters, coherence calculations, or real time synthetic channels (via beamformer). We also describe an electronics configuration upgrade to provide operator console access to the peripheral interface features such as analog signal and trigger I/O. This allows remote location of the acoustically noisy electronics cabinet and fitting of the cabinet with doors for improved EMI shielding. Finally, we present the latest performance results available for the CTF 275 channel MEG system including an unshielded SEF (median nerve electrical stimulation) measurement enhanced by application of an adaptive beamformer technique (SAM) which allows recognition of the nominal 20-ms response in the unaveraged signal.

  10. Music and the brain - design of an MEG compatible piano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Castano, Julian; Rathbone, Daniel R; Hoffman, Rachel; Heng Yang; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Yang, Jason; Hornberger, Erik; Hanumara, Nevan C

    2017-07-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) neuroimaging has been used to study subjects' responses when listening to music, but research into the effects of playing music has been limited by the lack of MEG compatible instruments that can operate in a magnetically shielded environment without creating electromagnetic interference. This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of an MEG compatible piano keyboard with 25 full size keys that employs a novel 3-state optical encoder design and electronics to provide realistic velocity-controlled volume modulation. This instrument will allow researchers to study musical performance on a finer timescale than fMRI and enable a range of MEG studies.

  11. Error bounds in MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipole localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerbi, K. (Karim); Mosher, J. C. (John C.); Baillet, S. (Sylvain); Leahy, R. M. (Richard M.)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive method that enables the measurement of the magnetic field produced by neural current sources within the human brain. Unfortunately, MEG source estimation is a severely ill-posed inverse problem. The two major approaches used to tackle this problem are 'imaging' and 'model-based' methods. The first class of methods relies on a tessellation of the cortex, assigning an elemental current source to each area element and solving the linear inverse problem. Accurate tessellations lead to a highly underdetermined problem, and regularized linear methods lead to very smooth current distributions. An alternative approach widely used is a parametric representation of the neural source. Such model-based methods include the classic equivalent current dipole (ECD) and its multiple current dipole extension [1]. The definition of such models has been based on the assumption that the underlying sources are focal and small in number. An alternative approach reviewed in [4], [5] is to extend the parametric source representations within the model-based framework to allow for distributed sources. The multipolar expansion of the magnetic field about the centroid of a distributed source readily offers an elegant parametric model, which collapses to a dipole model in the limiting case and includes higher order terms in the case of a spatially extended source. While multipolar expansions have been applied to magnetocardiography (MCG) source modeling [2], their use in MEG has been restricted to simplified models [7]. The physiological interpretation of these higher-order components in non-intuitive, therefore limiting their application in this community (cf. [8]). In this study we investigate both the applicability of dipolar and multipolar models to cortical patches, and the accuracy with which we can locate these sources. We use a combination of Monte Carlo analyses and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs), paralleling the work

  12. Impact of different registration methods in MEG source analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theiß Marie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For this study the impact of different co-registration procedures on MEG source localization of somatosensory evoked fields was evaluated. Two different co-registration procedures were used to calculate the transformation matrix which specifies how to align the MRI data to the MEG head coordinate system. In order to depict the differences, caused by the method, the Euclidian distance between the reconstructed sources was noted. It was shown that, erroneous MRI and MEG data co- registration effects source localization results. Most dipoles are located more posterior and superior when the more advanced registration procedure was applied. In conclusion the results show, that an iterative matching procedure allows an accurate knowledge of the MEG gradiometer sensor position relative to the head which is crucial to correctly reconstruct neuronal activity derived from MEG measurements.

  13. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  14. Functional Mapping with Simultaneous MEG and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven; Ahlfors, Seppo; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2010-06-14

    We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) to locate and determine the temporal evolution in brain areas involved in the processing of simple sensory stimuli. We will use somatosensory stimuli to locate the hand somatosensory areas, auditory stimuli to locate the auditory cortices, visual stimuli in four quadrants of the visual field to locate the early visual areas. These type of experiments are used for functional mapping in epileptic and brain tumor patients to locate eloquent cortices. In basic neuroscience similar experimental protocols are used to study the orchestration of cortical activity. The acquisition protocol includes quality assurance procedures, subject preparation for the combined MEG/EEG study, and acquisition of evoked-response data with somatosensory, auditory, and visual stimuli. We also demonstrate analysis of the data using the equivalent current dipole model and cortically-constrained minimum-norm estimates. Anatomical MRI data are employed in the analysis for visualization and for deriving boundaries of tissue boundaries for forward modeling and cortical location and orientation constraints for the minimum-norm estimates.

  15. Discrimination of cortical laminae using MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-11-15

    Typically MEG source reconstruction is used to estimate the distribution of current flow on a single anatomically derived cortical surface model. In this study we use two such models representing superficial and deep cortical laminae. We establish how well we can discriminate between these two different cortical layer models based on the same MEG data in the presence of different levels of co-registration noise, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cortical patch size. We demonstrate that it is possible to make a distinction between superficial and deep cortical laminae for levels of co-registration noise of less than 2mm translation and 2° rotation at SNR > 11 dB. We also show that an incorrect estimate of cortical patch size will tend to bias layer estimates. We then use a 3D printed head-cast (Troebinger et al., 2014) to achieve comparable levels of co-registration noise, in an auditory evoked response paradigm, and show that it is possible to discriminate between these cortical layer models in real data. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SDO-EVE multiple EUV grating spectrograph (MEGS) optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotser, David A.; Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Francis G.; Ucker, Greg; Kohnert, Richard A.; Berthiaume, Gregory D.; Weitz, David M.

    2004-10-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in 2008, incorporates a suite of instruments including the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE). The EVE instrument package contains grating spectrographs used to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance from 0.1 to 105 nm. The Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph (MEGS) channels use concave reflection gratings to image solar spectra onto CCDs that are operated at -100°C. MEGS provides 0.1nm spectral resolution between 5-105nm every 10 seconds with an absolute accuracy of better than 25% over the SDO 5-year mission. MEGS-A utilizes a unique grazing-incidence, off-Rowland circle (RC) design to minimize angle of incidence at the detector while meeting high resolution requirements. MEGS-B utilizes a double-pass, cross-dispersed double-Rowland circle design. MEGS-P, a Ly-α monitor, will provide a proxy model calibration in the 60-105 nm range. Finally, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) channel will provide continual pointing information for EVE as well as low-resolution X-ray images of the sun. In-flight calibrations for MEGS will be provided by the on-board EUV Spectrophotometer (ESP) in the 0.1-7nm and 17-37nm ranges, as well as from annual under-flight rocket experiments. We present the methodology used to develop the MEGS optical design.

  17. An MEG compatible system for measuring skin conductance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliadis, Charalampos; Papadelis, Christos; Konstantinidis, Evdokimos; Ioannides, Andreas A; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-15

    We present the design of a low-cost system for recording galvanic skin conductance responses (SCRs) from humans in a magnetically shielded room (MSR) simultaneously to magnetoencephalography (MEG). Such a system was so far not available to the MEG community. Its availability is of utmost importance for neuroscience, since it will allow the concurrent assessment of the autonomic and central nervous system activity. The overall system design optimizes high signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SCRs and achieves minimal distortion of the MEG signal. Its development was based on a fiber-optic transformer, with voltage to optical transduction inside the MSR and demodulation outside the MSR. The system was calibrated and tested inside the MEG environment by using a 151-channel CTF whole head system (VSM MedTech Ltd.). MEG measurements were recorded simultaneously to SCRs from five healthy participants to test whether the developed system does not generate artifacts in the MEG data. Two measurements were performed for each participant; one without the system in the MSR, and one with the system in the MSR, connected to the participant and in operation. The data were analyzed using the time and frequency domains in separate statistical analysis. No significant differences were observed between the two sessions for any statistic index. Our results show that the system allows high quality simultaneous recordings of SCRs and MEG signals in the MSR, and can therefore be used as routine addendum to neuroscience experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ageing tests for the MEG II drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M., E-mail: marco.venturini@pi.infn.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, University of Tokyo 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Signorelli, G.; Tenchini, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Zermini, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The MEG II drift chamber will track positrons from μ{sup +} decays in a very harsh environment. For testing the robustness of the chamber to ageing effects an irradiation facility was set up at INFN Pisa. - Highlights: • We built up an X-ray facility for ageing studies of particle detectors. • Stable irradiation conditions were obtained over one-month timescale. • A moderate gain loss is expected for the MEG II drift chamber.

  19. Automatic detection and visualisation of MEG ripple oscillations in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole van Klink

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80–500 Hz in invasive EEG are a biomarker for the epileptic focus. Ripples (80–250 Hz have also been identified in non-invasive MEG, yet detection is impeded by noise, their low occurrence rates, and the workload of visual analysis. We propose a method that identifies ripples in MEG through noise reduction, beamforming and automatic detection with minimal user effort. We analysed 15 min of presurgical resting-state interictal MEG data of 25 patients with epilepsy. The MEG signal-to-noise was improved by using a cross-validation signal space separation method, and by calculating ~2400 beamformer-based virtual sensors in the grey matter. Ripples in these sensors were automatically detected by an algorithm optimized for MEG. A small subset of the identified ripples was visually checked. Ripple locations were compared with MEG spike dipole locations and the resection area if available. Running the automatic detection algorithm resulted in on average 905 ripples per patient, of which on average 148 ripples were visually reviewed. Reviewing took approximately 5 min per patient, and identified ripples in 16 out of 25 patients. In 14 patients the ripple locations showed good or moderate concordance with the MEG spikes. For six out of eight patients who had surgery, the ripple locations showed concordance with the resection area: 4/5 with good outcome and 2/3 with poor outcome. Automatic ripple detection in beamformer-based virtual sensors is a feasible non-invasive tool for the identification of ripples in MEG. Our method requires minimal user effort and is easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  20. Predicting language: MEG evidence for lexical preactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikker, Suzanne; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2013-10-01

    It is widely assumed that prediction plays a substantial role in language processing. However, despite numerous studies demonstrating that contextual information facilitates both syntactic and lexical-semantic processing, there exists no direct evidence pertaining to the neural correlates of the prediction process itself. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), this study found that brain activity was modulated by whether or not a specific noun could be predicted, given a picture prime. Specifically, before the noun was presented, predictive contexts triggered enhanced activation in left mid-temporal cortex (implicated in lexical access), ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (previously associated with top-down processing), and visual cortex (hypothesized to index the preactivation of predicted form features), successively. This finding suggests that predictive language processing recruits a top-down network where predicted words are activated at different levels of representation, from more 'abstract' lexical-semantic representations in temporal cortex, all the way down to visual word form features. The same brain regions that exhibited enhanced activation for predictive contexts before the onset of the noun showed effects of congruence during the target word. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to directly investigate the anticipatory stage of predictive language processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A two-way regularization method for MEG source reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2012-09-01

    The MEG inverse problem refers to the reconstruction of the neural activity of the brain from magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements. We propose a two-way regularization (TWR) method to solve the MEG inverse problem under the assumptions that only a small number of locations in space are responsible for the measured signals (focality), and each source time course is smooth in time (smoothness). The focality and smoothness of the reconstructed signals are ensured respectively by imposing a sparsity-inducing penalty and a roughness penalty in the data fitting criterion. A two-stage algorithm is developed for fast computation, where a raw estimate of the source time course is obtained in the first stage and then refined in the second stage by the two-way regularization. The proposed method is shown to be effective on both synthetic and real-world examples. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2012.

  2. Source-space ICA for MEG source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Jones, Richard D

    2016-02-01

    One of the most widely used approaches in electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (MEG) source imaging is application of an inverse technique (such as dipole modelling or sLORETA) on the component extracted by independent component analysis (ICA) (sensor-space ICA + inverse technique). The advantage of this approach over an inverse technique alone is that it can identify and localize multiple concurrent sources. Among inverse techniques, the minimum-variance beamformers offer a high spatial resolution. However, in order to have both high spatial resolution of beamformer and be able to take on multiple concurrent sources, sensor-space ICA + beamformer is not an ideal combination. We propose source-space ICA for MEG as a powerful alternative approach which can provide the high spatial resolution of the beamformer and handle multiple concurrent sources. The concept of source-space ICA for MEG is to apply the beamformer first and then singular value decomposition + ICA. In this paper we have compared source-space ICA with sensor-space ICA both in simulation and real MEG. The simulations included two challenging scenarios of correlated/concurrent cluster sources. Source-space ICA provided superior performance in spatial reconstruction of source maps, even though both techniques performed equally from a temporal perspective. Real MEG from two healthy subjects with visual stimuli were also used to compare performance of sensor-space ICA and source-space ICA. We have also proposed a new variant of minimum-variance beamformer called weight-normalized linearly-constrained minimum-variance with orthonormal lead-field. As sensor-space ICA-based source reconstruction is popular in EEG and MEG imaging, and given that source-space ICA has superior spatial performance, it is expected that source-space ICA will supersede its predecessor in many applications.

  3. A three domain covariance framework for EEG/MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roś, Beata P; Bijma, Fetsje; de Gunst, Mathisca C M; de Munck, Jan C

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a covariance framework for the analysis of single subject EEG and MEG data that takes into account observed temporal stationarity on small time scales and trial-to-trial variations. We formulate a model for the covariance matrix, which is a Kronecker product of three components that correspond to space, time and epochs/trials, and consider maximum likelihood estimation of the unknown parameter values. An iterative algorithm that finds approximations of the maximum likelihood estimates is proposed. Our covariance model is applicable in a variety of cases where spontaneous EEG or MEG acts as source of noise and realistic noise covariance estimates are needed, such as in evoked activity studies, or where the properties of spontaneous EEG or MEG are themselves the topic of interest, like in combined EEG-fMRI experiments in which the correlation between EEG and fMRI signals is investigated. We use a simulation study to assess the performance of the estimator and investigate the influence of different assumptions about the covariance factors on the estimated covariance matrix and on its components. We apply our method to real EEG and MEG data sets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A three domain covariance framework for EEG/MEG data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, B.P.; Bijma, F.; de Gunst, M.C.M.; de Munck, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a covariance framework for the analysis of single subject EEG and MEG data that takes into account observed temporal stationarity on small time scales and trial-to-trial variations. We formulate a model for the covariance matrix, which is a Kronecker product of three

  5. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla Piastra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In Electro- (EEG and Magnetoencephalography (MEG, one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017. It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages, be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM% of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG% of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented

  6. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Maria Carla; Nüßing, Andreas; Vorwerk, Johannes; Bornfleth, Harald; Oostenveld, Robert; Engwer, Christian; Wolters, Carsten H

    2018-01-01

    In Electro- (EEG) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG), one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM) has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM) EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017). It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages , be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM%) of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG%) of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented conservative DG

  7. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1 sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2 still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes or MEG (275-gradiometers and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG (167-contacts and low-density EEG (ldEEG (21-electrodes. To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset, i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  8. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Küpper, Philipp; Kugel, Harald; Heers, Marcel; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Haueisen, Jens; Rampp, Stefan; Stefan, Hermann; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1) sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2) still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes) or MEG (275-gradiometers) and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG) (167-contacts) and low-density EEG (ldEEG) (21-electrodes). To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset), i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  9. Quantification of the benefit from integrating MEG and EEG data in minimum l2-norm estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, A; Stufflebeam, S M; Brown, E N; Hämäläinen, M S

    2008-09-01

    Source current estimation from electromagnetic (MEG and EEG) signals is an ill-posed problem that often produces blurry or inaccurately positioned estimates. The two modalities have distinct factors limiting the resolution, e.g., MEG cannot detect radially oriented sources, while EEG is sensitive to accuracy of the head model. This makes combined EEG+MEG estimation techniques desirable, but different acquisition noise statistics, complexity of the head models, and lack of pertinent metrics all complicate the assessment of the resulting improvements. We investigated analytically the effect of including EEG recordings in MEG studies versus the addition of new MEG channels when computing noise-normalized minimum l(2)-norm estimates. Three-compartment boundary-element forward models were constructed using structural MRI scans for four subjects. Singular value analysis of the resulting forward models predicted better performance of the EEG+MEG case in the form of higher matrix rank. MNE inverse operators for EEG, MEG and EEG+MEG were constructed using the sensor noise covariance estimated from data. Metrics derived from the resolution matrices predicted higher spatial resolution in EEG+MEG as compared to MEG due to decreased spread (lower spatial dispersion, higher resolution index) with no reduction in dipole localization error. The effect was apparent in all source locations, with increased magnitude for deep areas such as the cingulate cortex. We were also able to corroborate the results for the somatosensory cortex using median nerve responses.

  10. Long noncoding RNA-MEG3 is involved in diabetes mellitus-related microvascular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Gui-Zhen [Department of Health, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Tian, Wei [Department of Nursing, Linyi Oncosurgical Hospital, Shandong (China); Fu, Hai-Tao [Department of Ophthalmology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Li, Chao-Peng, E-mail: lcpcn@163.com [Eye Institute of Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Ban, E-mail: liuban@126.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Microvascular dysfunction is an important characteristic of diabetic retinopathy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA-MEG3 in diabetes-related microvascular dysfunction. We show that MEG3 expression level is significantly down-regulated in the retinas of STZ-induced diabetic mice, and endothelial cells upon high glucose and oxidative stress. MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vessel dysfunction in vivo, as shown by serious capillary degeneration, and increased microvascular leakage and inflammation. MEG3 knockdown also regulates retinal endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro. The role of MEG3 in endothelial cell function is mainly mediated by the activation of PI3k/Akt signaling. MEG3 up-regulation may serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating diabetes-related microvascular complications. - Highlights: • LncRNA-MEG3 level is down-regulated upon diabetic stress. • MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vascular dysfunction in vivo. • MEG3 regulates retinal endothelial cell function in vitro. • MEG3 regulates endothelial cell function through PI3k/Akt signaling.

  11. pH and electric conductivity study of H{sub 2}O/MEG/salt systems on monoethyleneglycol (MEG) reclamation units in gas processing; Estudo de pH e condutividade eletrica em sistemas H{sub 2}O/MEG/sal, em unidades de recuperacao de monoetilenoglicol (MEG), no processamento de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senna, Camila; Carrijo, Darley; Nascimento, Jailton; Grava, Wilson [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Lemos, Alessandro A.; Andrade, Wander V.; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo; Amorim, Josinira Antunes de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The monoethylene glycol (MEG) is injected in natural gas production wells in order to combine with the free water, altering the thermodynamic conditions for the formation of hydrates. The presence of MEG in aqueous solutions containing salts provokes the decrease of the solubility of the same ones. Information of properties as the pH and the conductivity are important for the control of the process. Before this, the present work has as objective determines the behavior of the aqueous solutions with MEG and NaCl in pH and conductivity terms, in different temperatures, with views to the stage of recovery of MEG and the salt precipitation beginning. The experimental methodology consisted of the elaboration of synthetic solutions of the mixtures in study, covering every MEG concentration range and temperature between 5 and 90 deg C. The conductivity results for the system H{sub 2}O+MEG showed that the conductivity decreases with the concentration of MEG and it increases with the temperature. A conductivity increase was observed for diluted concentrations of MEG, due to the most pronounced effect of protonation of MEG. For pH measures, it was necessary to develop a calibration procedure due to the fact that this property varies with the solvent media. The pH values decrease as it increases the concentration of MEG, reaching a value practically constant around 40%. (author)

  12. Localization precision of the superconducting imaging-surface MEG system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N. (Andrei N.); Espy, M. A. (Michelle A.); Maharajh, K. (Keeran); Volegov, P. (Petr)

    2001-01-01

    A unique whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) system incorporating a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) has been designed and built at Los Alamos with the goal of dramatically improving source localization accuracy while mitigating limitations of current systems (e.g. low signal-to-noise, cost, bulk). Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures the weak magnetic fields emanating from the brain as a direct consequence of the neuronal currents resulting from brain function[1]. The extraordinarily weak magnetic fields are measured by an array of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) sensors. The position and vector characteristics of these neuronal sources can be estimated from the inverse solution of the field distribution at the surface of the head. In addition, MEG temporal resolution is unsurpassed by any other method currently used for brain imaging. Although MEG source reconstruction is limited by solutions of the electromagnetic inverse problem, constraints used for source localization produce reliable results. The Los Alamos SIS-MEG system[2] is based on the principal that fields from nearby sources measured by a SQUID sensor array while the SIS shields the sensor array from distant noise fields. In general, Meissner currents flow in the surface of superconductors, preventing any significant penetration of magnetic fields. A hemispherical SIS with a brim, or helmet, surrounds the SQUID sensor array largely sheilding the SQUIDs from sources outside the helmet while measuring fields from nearby sources within the helmet. We have implemented a finite element model (FEM) description of the SIS using the exact as-built geometry to accurately describe how the SIS impacts the forward physics of source models. The FEM is used to calculate the distribution of Meissner currents in the complicated surface geometry of the SIS such that B{perpendicular} = 0 at the surface. This model of the forward physics is described elsewhere in these proceedings [3]. In

  13. MEG-based imaging of focal neuronal current sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.W.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We describe a new approach to imaging neuronal current sources from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram (MEG) associated with sensory, motor, or cognitive brain activation. Previous approaches to this problem have concentrated on the use of weighted minimum norm inverse methods. While these methods ensure a unique solution, they do not introduce information specific to the MEG inverse problem, often producing overly smoothed solutions and exhibiting severe sensitivity to noise. We describe a Bayesian formulation of the inverse problem in which a Gibbs prior is constructed to reflect the sparse focal nature of neuronal current sources associated with evoked response data. The prior involves a binary process indicating active sources and a continuous Gaussian process designating associated amplitudes. An estimate of the primary current source distribution for a specific data set is formed by maximizing over the posterior probability with respect to the binary and continuous variables.

  14. Feasibility study of an active target for the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papa, A., E-mail: angela.papa@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ripiccini, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università degli studi di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    We consider the possibility to have an active target for the upgrade of the MEG experiment (MEG II). The active target should work as (1) a beam monitoring, to continuously measure the muon stopping rate and therefore provide a direct evaluation of the detector acceptance (or an absolute normalization of the stopped muon); and as (2) an auxiliary device for the spectrometer, to improve the determination of the muon decay vertex and consequently to achieve a better positron momentum and angular resolutions, detecting the positron from the muon decay. In this work we studied the feasibility of detecting minimum ionizing particle with a single layer of 250 μm fiber and the capability to discriminate between the signal induced by either a muon or a positron.

  15. MEG source localization using invariance of noise space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junpeng; Raij, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Matti; Yao, Dezhong

    2013-01-01

    We propose INvariance of Noise (INN) space as a novel method for source localization of magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. The method is based on the fact that modulations of source strengths across time change the energy in signal subspace but leave the noise subspace invariant. We compare INN with classical MUSIC, RAP-MUSIC, and beamformer approaches using simulated data while varying signal-to-noise ratios as well as distance and temporal correlation between two sources. We also demonstrate the utility of INN with actual auditory evoked MEG responses in eight subjects. In all cases, INN performed well, especially when the sources were closely spaced, highly correlated, or one source was considerably stronger than the other.

  16. MEG source localization using invariance of noise space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Zhang

    Full Text Available We propose INvariance of Noise (INN space as a novel method for source localization of magnetoencephalography (MEG data. The method is based on the fact that modulations of source strengths across time change the energy in signal subspace but leave the noise subspace invariant. We compare INN with classical MUSIC, RAP-MUSIC, and beamformer approaches using simulated data while varying signal-to-noise ratios as well as distance and temporal correlation between two sources. We also demonstrate the utility of INN with actual auditory evoked MEG responses in eight subjects. In all cases, INN performed well, especially when the sources were closely spaced, highly correlated, or one source was considerably stronger than the other.

  17. Spatiotemporal Bayesian inference dipole analysis for MEG neuroimaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sung C; George, John S; Paré-Blagoev, Juliana; Plis, Sergey M; Ranken, Doug M; Schmidt, David M; Wood, C C

    2005-10-15

    Recently, we described a Bayesian inference approach to the MEG/EEG inverse problem that used numerical techniques to estimate the full posterior probability distributions of likely solutions upon which all inferences were based [Schmidt, D.M., George, J.S., Wood, C.C., 1999. Bayesian inference applied to the electromagnetic inverse problem. Human Brain Mapping 7, 195; Schmidt, D.M., George, J.S., Ranken, D.M., Wood, C.C., 2001. Spatial-temporal bayesian inference for MEG/EEG. In: Nenonen, J., Ilmoniemi, R. J., Katila, T. (Eds.), Biomag 2000: 12th International Conference on Biomagnetism. Espoo, Norway, p. 671]. Schmidt et al. (1999) focused on the analysis of data at a single point in time employing an extended region source model. They subsequently extended their work to a spatiotemporal Bayesian inference analysis of the full spatiotemporal MEG/EEG data set. Here, we formulate spatiotemporal Bayesian inference analysis using a multi-dipole model of neural activity. This approach is faster than the extended region model, does not require use of the subject's anatomical information, does not require prior determination of the number of dipoles, and yields quantitative probabilistic inferences. In addition, we have incorporated the ability to handle much more complex and realistic estimates of the background noise, which may be represented as a sum of Kronecker products of temporal and spatial noise covariance components. This reduces the effects of undermodeling noise. In order to reduce the rigidity of the multi-dipole formulation which commonly causes problems due to multiple local minima, we treat the given covariance of the background as uncertain and marginalize over it in the analysis. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) was used to sample the many possible likely solutions. The spatiotemporal Bayesian dipole analysis is demonstrated using simulated and empirical whole-head MEG data.

  18. Status of the MEG Experiment: Timing Counter Experimental Results

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, R; Dussoni, S; Cecchet, G; Rossella, M; Zanello, D

    2005-01-01

    The Timing Counter (TC) of the MEG experiment must achieve a time resolution equal or better than 100 ps FWHM (σ = 42.5 ps). The results obtained, at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati/Italy, on two TC prototypes elements, permitted the selection of the scintillator, providing the best timing resolution, achieving an average resolution of 92 ps FWHM (σ = 39.2 ps) with a plastic scintillator.

  19. Real-Time MEG Source Localization Using Regional Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2015-11-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject's reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and off-line analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements.

  20. Long Non-Coding RNA MEG3 Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Luo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs play important roles in diverse biological processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis and migration. Although downregulation of lncRNA maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3 has been identified in several cancers, little is known about its role in prostate cancer progression. The aim of this study was to detect MEG3 expression in clinical prostate cancer tissues, investigate its biological functions in the development of prostate cancer and the underlying mechanism. Methods: MEG3 expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR in both tumor tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 21 prostate cancer patients. The effects of MEG3 on PC3 and DU145 cells were assessed by MTT assay, colony formation assay, western blot and flow cytometry. Transfected PC3 cells were transplanted into nude mice, and the tumor growth curves were determined. Results: MEG3 decreased significantly in prostate cancer tissues relative to adjacent normal tissues. MEG3 inhibited intrinsic cell survival pathway in vitro and in vivo by reducing the protein expression of Bcl-2, enhancing Bax and activating caspase 3. We further demonstrated that MEG3 inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory protein Cyclin D1 and induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Conclusions: Our study presents an important role of MEG3 in the molecular etiology of prostate cancer and implicates the potential application of MEG3 in prostate cancer therapy.

  1. Localization of Broca's area using verb generation tasks in the MEG: validation against fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Wang, Frank; Malone, Marion; Kadis, Darren S; Donner, Elizabeth J

    2011-03-03

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is routinely used to non-invasively localize language areas. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is being explored as an alternative technique. MEG tasks to localize receptive language are well established although there are no standardized tasks to localize expressive language areas. We developed two expressive language tasks for MEG and validated their localizations against fMRI data. Ten right-handed adolescents (μ=17.5 years) were tested with fMRI and MEG on two tasks: verb generation to pictures and verb generation to words. MEG and fMRI data were normalized and overlaid. The number of overlapping voxels activated in fMRI and MEG were counted for each subject, for each task, at different thresholding levels. For picture verb generation, there was 100% concordance between MEG and fMRI lateralization, and for word verb generation, there was 75% concordance. A count showed 79.6% overlap of voxels activated by both MEG and fMRI for picture verb generation and 50.2% overlap for word verb generation. The percentage overlap decreased with increasingly stringent activation thresholds. Our novel MEG expressive language tasks successfully identified neural regions involved in language production and showed high concordance with fMRI laterality. Percentage overlap of activated voxels was also high when validated against fMRI, but showed task-specific and threshold-related effects. The high concordance and high percentage overlap between fMRI and MEG activations confirm the validity of our new MEG task. Furthermore, the higher concordance from the picture verb generation task suggests that this is a promising task for use in the young clinical population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Downregulation of long noncoding RNA MEG3 is associated with poor prognosis and promoter hypermethylation in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Lin, Zhongqiu; Gao, Yali; Yao, Tingting

    2017-01-05

    Our previous study reported that MEG3 is an important tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in cervical cancer. However, the diagnostic and prognostic values of MEG3, as well as the molecular mechanism of MEG3 inactivation in cervical cancer, remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to further elucidate the role and potential inactivation mechanism of MEG3 in cervical cancer. ROC curve and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of MEG3 in patients with cervical cancer. The methylation status of the MEG3 promoter in cervical cancer tissue samples was tested using methylation-specific PCR. Furthermore, we altered the methylation status of the MEG3 promoter in two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and CaSki) using a DNA methylation transfer enzyme inhibitor (5-Aza-CdR), to investigate whether promoter hypermethylation is a potential cause of MEG3 inactivation. Finally, we used CCK-8 and colony formation assays to evaluate the cell proliferation ability of HeLa and CaSki cells that had been treated with 5-aza-CdR, to investigate whether downregulation of MEG3 caused by promoter hypermethylation had biological effects. ROC curve analysis indicated that MEG3 status showed sufficient sensitivity and specificity for prediction of tumor size and lymph node metastasis in patients with cervical cancer. In addition, our follow-up data showed that low MEG3 expression was correlated with recurrence and short overall survival. Moreover, hypermethylation of the MEG3 promoter was observed in most cervical cancer tissue samples, and demethylation of the MEG3 promoter led to re-expression of MEG3 and inhibited proliferation of HeLa and CaSki cells. MEG3 is a powerful tool for diagnosis and prognosis of patients with cervical cancer, and low expression of MEG3 is likely to be related to promoter hypermethylation in cervical cancer.

  3. The value of multichannel MEG and EEG in the presurgical evaluation of 70 epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knake, S; Halgren, E; Shiraishi, H; Hara, K; Hamer, H M; Grant, P E; Carr, V A; Foxe, D; Camposano, S; Busa, E; Witzel, T; Hämäläinen, M S; Ahlfors, S P; Bromfield, E B; Black, P M; Bourgeois, B F; Cole, A J; Cosgrove, G R; Dworetzky, B A; Madsen, J R; Larsson, P G; Schomer, D L; Thiele, E A; Dale, A M; Rosen, B R; Stufflebeam, S M

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of a simultaneous whole-head 306-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG)/70-electrode EEG recording to detect interictal epileptiform activity (IED) in a prospective, consecutive cohort of patients with medically refractory epilepsy that were considered candidates for epilepsy surgery. Seventy patients were prospectively evaluated by simultaneously recorded MEG/EEG. All patients were surgical candidates or were considered for invasive EEG monitoring and had undergone an extensive presurgical evaluation at a tertiary epilepsy center. MEG and EEG raw traces were analysed individually by two independent reviewers. MEG data could not be evaluated due to excessive magnetic artefacts in three patients (4%). In the remaining 67 patients, the overall sensitivity to detect IED was 72% (48/67 patients) for MEG and 61% for EEG (41/67 patients) analysing the raw data. In 13% (9/67 patients), MEG-only IED were recorded, whereas in 3% (2/67 patients) EEG-only IED were recorded. The combined sensitivity was 75% (50/67 patients). Three hundred and six-channel MEG has a similarly high sensitivity to record IED as EEG and appears to be complementary. In one-third of the EEG-negative patients, MEG can be expected to record IED, especially in the case of lateral neocortical epilepsy and/or cortical dysplasia.

  4. Application of a Null-Beamformer to Source Localisation in MEG Data of Deep Brain Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohseni, Hamid R.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Smith, Penny Probert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals from a patient with whole-body chronic pain in order to investigate changes in neural activity induced by DBS. The patient is one of the few cases treated using DBS of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Using MEG...

  5. Localization of fast MEG waves in patients with brain tumors and epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, de A.; Munck, de J.C.; Baayen, J.C.; Puligheddu, M; Jonkman, E.J.; Stam, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    8 Hz) can be used to determine the location of the epileptic focus. Automatic dipole analysis was applied to MEG data of 25 patients with intracranial tumors and epilepsy. The frequency range of 8-50 Hz was divided into standard EEG bands. MEG results were overlaid on the MRI scans of the patients.

  6. Complexity Analysis of Resting-State MEG Activity in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez, C.; Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Stam, C.J.; Abasolo, D.; Berendse, H.W.; Hornero, R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze resting-state brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were recorded with a 151-channel whole-head radial gradiometer MEG system in 18 early-stage

  7. Rejecting deep brain stimulation artefacts from MEG data using ICA and mutual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Omid; Hirschmann, Jan; Schmitz, Georg; Schnitzler, Alfons; Butz, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Recording brain activity during deep brain stimulation (DBS) using magnetoencephalography (MEG) can potentially help clarifying the neurophysiological mechanism of DBS. The DBS artefact, however, distorts MEG data significantly. We present an artefact rejection approach to remove the DBS artefact from MEG data. We developed an approach consisting of four consecutive steps: (i) independent component analysis was used to decompose MEG data to independent components (ICs); (ii) mutual information (MI) between stimulation signal and all ICs was calculated; (iii) artefactual ICs were identified by means of an MI threshold; and (iv) the MEG signal was reconstructed using only non-artefactual ICs. This approach was applied to MEG data from five Parkinson's disease patients with implanted DBS stimulators. MEG was recorded with DBS ON (unilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus) and DBS OFF during two experimental conditions: a visual attention task and alternating right and left median nerve stimulation. With the presented approach most of the artefact could be removed. The signal of interest could be retrieved in both conditions. In contrast to existing artefact rejection methods for MEG-DBS data (tSSS and S(3)P), the proposed method uses the actual artefact source, i.e. the stimulation signal, as reference signal. Using the presented method, the DBS artefact can be significantly rejected and the physiological data can be restored. This will facilitate research addressing the impact of DBS on brain activity during rest and various tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous estimation and testing of sources in multiple MEG data sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mone-Bijma, F.; de Munck, J.C.; Huizenga, H.M.; Heethaar, R.M.; Nehorai, A.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed Extended Couple Dipole Model (ECDM) is a trilinear component model that can be used to analyze multiple, related MEG data sets simultaneously. Related MEG data sets are data sets that contain activity of the same sources or activity of sources that have proportional source amplitudes.

  9. Evidence for Morphological Recomposition in Compound Words using MEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teon Lamont Brooks

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psycholinguistic and electrophysiological studies of lexical processing show convergent evidence for morpheme-based lexical access for morphologically complex words that involves early decomposition into their constituent morphemes followed by some combinatorial operation. Considering that both semantically transparent (e.g., sailboat and semantically opaque (e.g., bootleg compounds undergo morphological decomposition during the earlier stages of lexical processing, subsequent combinatorial operations should account for the difference in the contribution of the constituent morphemes to the meaning of these different word types. In this study we use magnetoencephalography (MEG to pinpoint the neural bases of this combinatorial stage in English compound word recognition. MEG data were acquired while participants performed a word naming task in which three word types, transparent compounds (e.g., roadside, opaque compounds (e.g., butterfly, and morphologically simple words (e.g., brothel were contrasted in a partial-repetition priming paradigm where the word of interest was primed by one of its constituent morphemes. Analysis of onset latency revealed shorter latencies to name compound words than simplex words when primed, further supporting a stage of morphological decomposition in lexical access. An analysis of the associated MEG activity uncovered a region of interest implicated in morphological composition, the Left Anterior Temporal Lobe (LATL. Only transparent compounds showed increased activity in this area from 250 to 470 ms. Previous studies using sentences and phrases have highlighted the role of LATL in performing computations for basic combinatorial operations. Results are in tune with decomposition models for morpheme accessibility early in processing and suggest that semantics play a role in combining the meanings of morphemes when their composition is transparent to the overall word meaning.

  10. Uncovering cortical MEG responses to listened audiobook stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, M; Seppä, M

    2014-10-15

    Naturalistic stimuli, such as normal speech and narratives, are opening up intriguing prospects in neuroscience, especially when merging neuroimaging with machine learning methodology. Here we propose a task-optimized spatial filtering strategy for uncovering individual magnetoencephalographic (MEG) responses to audiobook stories. Ten subjects listened to 1-h-long recording once, as well as to 48 repetitions of a 1-min-long speech passage. Employing response replicability as statistical validity and utilizing unsupervised learning methods, we trained spatial filters that were able to generalize over datasets of an individual. For this blind-signal-separation (BSS) task, we derived a version of multi-set similarity-constrained canonical correlation analysis (SimCCA) that theoretically provides maximal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in this setting. Irrespective of significant noise in unaveraged MEG traces, the method successfully uncovered feasible time courses up to ~120 Hz, with the most prominent signals below 20 Hz. Individual trial-to-trial correlations of such time courses reached the level of 0.55 (median 0.33 in the group) at ~0.5 Hz, with considerable variation between subjects. By this filtering, the SNR increased up to 20 times. In comparison, independent component analysis (ICA) or principal component analysis (PCA) did not improve SNR notably. The validity of the extracted brain signals was further assessed by inspecting their associations with the stimulus, as well as by mapping the contributing cortical signal sources. The results indicate that the proposed methodology effectively reduces noise in MEG recordings to that extent that brain responses can be seen to nonrecurring audiobook stories. The study paves the way for applications aiming at accurately modeling the stimulus-response-relationship by tackling the response variability, as well as for real-time monitoring of brain signals of individuals in naturalistic experimental conditions. Copyright

  11. Investigations of dipole localization accuracy in MEG using the bootstrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvas, F; Rautiainen, M; Pantazis, D; Baillet, S; Benali, H; Mosher, J C; Garnero, L; Leahy, R M

    2005-04-01

    We describe the use of the nonparametric bootstrap to investigate the accuracy of current dipole localization from magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies of event-related neural activity. The bootstrap is well suited to the analysis of event-related MEG data since the experiments are repeated tens or even hundreds of times and averaged to achieve acceptable signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The set of repetitions or epochs can be viewed as a set of independent realizations of the brain's response to the experiment. Bootstrap resamples can be generated by sampling with replacement from these epochs and averaging. In this study, we applied the bootstrap resampling technique to MEG data from somatotopic experimental and simulated data. Four fingers of the right and left hand of a healthy subject were electrically stimulated, and about 400 trials per stimulation were recorded and averaged in order to measure the somatotopic mapping of the fingers in the S1 area of the brain. Based on single-trial recordings for each finger we performed 5000 bootstrap resamples. We reconstructed dipoles from these resampled averages using the Recursively Applied and Projected (RAP)-MUSIC source localization algorithm. We also performed a simulation for two dipolar sources with overlapping time courses embedded in realistic background brain activity generated using the prestimulus segments of the somatotopic data. To find correspondences between multiple sources in each bootstrap, sample dipoles with similar time series and forward fields were assumed to represent the same source. These dipoles were then clustered by a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) clustering algorithm using their combined normalized time series and topographies as feature vectors. The mean and standard deviation of the dipole position and the dipole time series in each cluster were computed to provide estimates of the accuracy of the reconstructed source locations and time series.

  12. Song Perception by Professional Singers and Actors: An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Knief, Arne; Ortmann, Magdalene; Deuster, Dirk; Schmidt, Claus-Michael; Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinetteam; Pantev, Christo; Dobel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The cortical correlates of speech and music perception are essentially overlapping, and the specific effects of different types of training on these networks remain unknown. We compared two groups of vocally trained professionals for music and speech, singers and actors, using recited and sung rhyme sequences from German art songs with semantic and/ or prosodic/melodic violations (i.e. violations of pitch) of the last word, in order to measure the evoked activation in a magnetoencephalographic (MEG) experiment. MEG data confirmed the existence of intertwined networks for the sung and spoken modality in an early time window after word violation. In essence for this early response, higher activity was measured after melodic/prosodic than semantic violations in predominantly right temporal areas. For singers as well as for actors, modality-specific effects were evident in predominantly left-temporal lateralized activity after semantic expectancy violations in the spoken modality, and right-dominant temporal activity in response to melodic violations in the sung modality. As an indication of a special group-dependent audiation process, higher neuronal activity for singers appeared in a late time window in right temporal and left parietal areas, both after the recited and the sung sequences. PMID:26863437

  13. Modeling versus accuracy in EEG and MEG data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Huang, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Spencer, M.E. [Signal Processing Solutions, Redondo Beach, CA (United States)

    1997-07-30

    The widespread availability of high-resolution anatomical information has placed a greater emphasis on accurate electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (collectively, E/MEG) modeling. A more accurate representation of the cortex, inner skull surface, outer skull surface, and scalp should lead to a more accurate forward model and hence improve inverse modeling efforts. The authors examine a few topics in this paper that highlight some of the problems of forward modeling, then discuss the impacts these results have on the inverse problem. The authors begin by assuming a perfect head model, that of the sphere, then show the lower bounds on localization accuracy of dipoles within this perfect forward model. For more realistic anatomy, the boundary element method (BEM) is a common numerical technique for solving the boundary integral equations. For a three-layer BEM, the computational requirements can be too intensive for many inverse techniques, so they examine a few simplifications. They quantify errors in generating this forward model by defining a regularized percentage error metric. The authors then apply this metric to a single layer boundary element solution, a multiple sphere approach, and the common single sphere model. They conclude with an MEG localization demonstration on a novel experimental human phantom, using both BEM and multiple spheres.

  14. Matrix kernels for MEG and EEG source localization and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The most widely used model for electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) assumes a quasi-static approximation of Maxwell`s equations and a piecewise homogeneous conductor model. Both models contain an incremental field element that linearly relates an incremental source element (current dipole) to the field or voltage at a distant point. The explicit form of the field element is dependent on the head modeling assumptions and sensor configuration. Proper characterization of this incremental element is crucial to the inverse problem. The field element can be partitioned into the product of a vector dependent on sensor characteristics and a matrix kernel dependent only on head modeling assumptions. We present here the matrix kernels for the general boundary element model (BEM) and for MEG spherical models. We show how these kernels are easily interchanged in a linear algebraic framework that includes sensor specifics such as orientation and gradiometer configuration. We then describe how this kernel is easily applied to ``gain`` or ``transfer`` matrices used in multiple dipole and source imaging models.

  15. Intersubject consistency of cortical MEG signals during movie viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankinen, K; Saari, J; Hari, R; Koskinen, M

    2014-05-15

    According to recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, spectators of a movie may share similar spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. We aimed to extend these findings of intersubject correlation to temporally accurate single-trial magnetoencephalography (MEG). A silent 15-min black-and-white movie was shown to eight subjects twice. We adopted a spatial filtering model and estimated its parameter values by using multi-set canonical correlation analysis (M-CCA) so that the intersubject correlation was maximized. The procedure resulted in multiple (mutually uncorrelated) time-courses with statistically significant intersubject correlations at frequencies below 10 Hz; the maximum correlation was 0.28 ± 0.075 in the ≤1 Hz band. Moreover, the 24-Hz frame rate elicited steady-state responses with statistically significant intersubject correlations up to 0.29 ± 0.12. To assess the brain origin of the across-subjects correlated signals, the time-courses were correlated with minimum-norm source current estimates (MNEs) projected to the cortex. The time series implied across-subjects synchronous activity in the early visual, posterior and inferior parietal, lateral temporo-occipital, and motor cortices, and in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) bilaterally. These findings demonstrate the capability of the proposed methodology to uncover cortical MEG signatures from single-trial signals that are consistent across spectators of a movie. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatial MEG laterality maps for language: clinical applications in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Ryan C N; Bardouille, Timothy; Newman, Aaron J; McWhinney, Sean R; Debay, Drew; Sadler, R Mark; Clarke, David B; Esser, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    Functional imaging is increasingly being used to provide a noninvasive alternative to intracarotid sodium amobarbitol testing (i.e., the Wada test). Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) has shown significant potential in this regard, the resultant output is often reduced to a simplified estimate of laterality. Such estimates belie the richness of functional imaging data and consequently limit the potential value. We present a novel approach that utilizes MEG data to compute "complex laterality vectors" and consequently "laterality maps" for a given function. Language function was examined in healthy controls and in people with epilepsy. When compared with traditional laterality index (LI) approaches, the resultant maps provided critical information about the magnitude and spatial characteristics of lateralized function. Specifically, it was possible to more clearly define low LI scores resulting from strong bilateral activation, high LI scores resulting from weak unilateral activation, and most importantly, the spatial distribution of lateralized activation. We argue that the laterality concept is better presented with the inherent spatial sensitivity of activation maps, rather than being collapsed into a one-dimensional index. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Matrix kernels for MEG and EEG source localization and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The most widely used model for electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) assumes a quasi-static approximation of Maxwell's equations and a piecewise homogeneous conductor model. Both models contain an incremental field element that linearly relates an incremental source element (current dipole) to the field or voltage at a distant point. The explicit form of the field element is dependent on the head modeling assumptions and sensor configuration. Proper characterization of this incremental element is crucial to the inverse problem. The field element can be partitioned into the product of a vector dependent on sensor characteristics and a matrix kernel dependent only on head modeling assumptions. We present here the matrix kernels for the general boundary element model (BEM) and for MEG spherical models. We show how these kernels are easily interchanged in a linear algebraic framework that includes sensor specifics such as orientation and gradiometer configuration. We then describe how this kernel is easily applied to ''gain'' or ''transfer'' matrices used in multiple dipole and source imaging models

  18. Argos 500: operation of a helmet vector-MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarelli, A; Rossi, R; De Melis, M; Marzetti, L; Trebeschi, A; Müller, H-P; Erné, S N

    2004-11-30

    We here describe the MEG system recently installed at the University of Ulm; it is specifically designed for clinical application and routine use, to allow investigation of a large number of patients per day. To reach this goal, the system design meets the requirements of reliability, high field sensitivity, minimal set-up time before each measurement and an easy-to-handle user interface. The sensor system consists of a 163 vector-magnetometers array oriented and located in a suitable way to cover the whole head of the patient. Four additional triplets are available as references to arrange software gradiometers. The helmet shaped sensor system is positioned to accommodate the patient in a supine position. Simultaneously to the MEG, there are 64 EEG channels. Other relevant patient information can be recorded up to a total number of 660 acquisition channels. Noise level of a single magnetometer is about 5 fT/square root of Hz. Maximum sampling rate is 4200 Hz.

  19. Quality assessment of MEG-to-MRI coregistrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Hermann; Haueisen, Jens; Maess, Burkhard

    2018-04-01

    For high precision in source reconstruction of magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography data, high accuracy of the coregistration of sources and sensors is mandatory. Usually, the source space is derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, however, no quality assessment is reported for sensor-to-MRI coregistrations. If any, typically root mean squares (RMS) of point residuals are provided. It has been shown, however, that RMS of residuals do not correlate with coregistration errors. We suggest using target registration error (TRE) as criterion for the quality of sensor-to-MRI coregistrations. TRE measures the effect of uncertainty in coregistrations at all points of interest. In total, 5544 data sets with sensor-to-head and 128 head-to-MRI coregistrations, from a single MEG laboratory, were analyzed. An adaptive Metropolis algorithm was used to estimate the optimal coregistration and to sample the coregistration parameters (rotation and translation). We found an average TRE between 1.3 and 2.3 mm at the head surface. Further, we observed a mean absolute difference in coregistration parameters between the Metropolis and iterative closest point algorithm of (1.9 +/- 15){\\hspace{0pt}}\\circ and (1.1 +/- 9) m. A paired sample t-test indicated a significant improvement in goal function minimization by using the Metropolis algorithm. The sampled parameters allowed computation of TRE on the entire grid of the MRI volume. Hence, we recommend the Metropolis algorithm for head-to-MRI coregistrations.

  20. Molecular characterization and expression of maternally expressed gene 3 (Meg3/Gtl2) RNA in the mouse inner ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manji, S.S.; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Klockars, T.

    2006-01-01

    noncoding RNA. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that Meg3/Gtl2 was highly expressed in the cochlea, brain, and eye. Molecular studies revealed the presence of several Meg3/Gtl2 RNA splice variants in the mouse cochlea, brain, and eye. In situ hybridizations showed intense Meg3/Gtl2 RNA staining...... in the nuclei of type I spiral ganglion cells and in cerebellum near the dorsal vestibular region of the cochlea. In embryonic mouse head sections, Meg3/Gtl2 RNA expression was observed in the otocyst, brain, eye, cartilage, connective tissue, and muscle. Meg3/Gtl2 RNA expression increased in the developing...

  1. Fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of LncRNA MEG3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Duanmin [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Su, Cunjin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Jiang, Min [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Yating [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shi, Aiming; Zhao, Fenglun [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Shen, Zhu [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Tang, Wen, E-mail: sztangwen@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China)

    2016-03-04

    There is still no suitable drug for pancreatic cancer treatment, which is one of the most aggressive human tumors. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a LncRNA, has been suggested as a tumor suppressor in a range of human tumors. Studies found fenofibrate exerted anti-tumor roles in various human cancer cell lines. However, its role in pancreatic cancer remains unknown. The present study aimed to explore the impacts of fenofibrate on pancreatic cancer cell lines, and to investigate MEG3 role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to determine cells proliferation, genome-wide LncRNA microarray analysis to identify differently expressed LncRNAs, siRNA or pCDNA-MEG3 transfection to interfere or upregulate MEG3 expression, western blot to detect protein levels, real-time PCR to determine MEG3 level. Fenofibrate significantly inhibited proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, increased MEG3 expression and p53 levels. Moreover, knockdown of MEG3 attenuated cytotoxicity induced by fenofibrate. Furthermore, overexpression of MEG3 induced cells death and increased p53 expression. Our results indicated fenofibrate inhibited pancreatic cancer cells proliferation via activation of p53 mediated by upregulation of MEG3. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. • We found fenofibrate increased LncRNA-MEG3 expression and p53 level in PANC-1 cells. • Inhibition of MEG3 expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate.

  2. Evaluation of realistic layouts for next generation on-scalp MEG: spatial information density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Bushra; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Schneiderman, Justin F

    2017-08-01

    While commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are the functional neuroimaging state-of-the-art in terms of spatio-temporal resolution, MEG sensors have not changed significantly since the 1990s. Interest in newer sensors that operate at less extreme temperatures, e.g., high critical temperature (high-T c ) SQUIDs, optically-pumped magnetometers, etc., is growing because they enable significant reductions in head-to-sensor standoff (on-scalp MEG). Various metrics quantify the advantages of on-scalp MEG, but a single straightforward one is lacking. Previous works have furthermore been limited to arbitrary and/or unrealistic sensor layouts. We introduce spatial information density (SID) maps for quantitative and qualitative evaluations of sensor arrays. SID-maps present the spatial distribution of information a sensor array extracts from a source space while accounting for relevant source and sensor parameters. We use it in a systematic comparison of three practical on-scalp MEG sensor array layouts (based on high-T c SQUIDs) and the standard Elekta Neuromag TRIUX magnetometer array. Results strengthen the case for on-scalp and specifically high-T c SQUID-based MEG while providing a path for the practical design of future MEG systems. SID-maps are furthermore general to arbitrary magnetic sensor technologies and source spaces and can thus be used for design and evaluation of sensor arrays for magnetocardiography, magnetic particle imaging, etc.

  3. Current clinical magnetoencephalography practice across Europe: Are we closer to use MEG as an established clinical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tiège, Xavier; Lundqvist, Daniel; Beniczky, Sándor; Seri, Stefano; Paetau, Ritva

    2017-08-01

    This comprehensive survey aims at characterizing the current clinical use of magnetoencephalography (MEG) across European MEG centres. Forty-four MEG centres across Europe were contacted in May 2015 via personalized e-mail to contribute to survey. The web-based survey was available on-line for 1 month and the MEG centres that did not respond were further contacted to maximize participation. Among the 57% of responders, 12 centres from 10 different countries reported to use MEG for clinical applications. A total of 524 MEG investigations were performed in 2014 for the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy, while in the same period 244 MEG investigations were performed for pre-surgical functional brain mapping. Seven MEG centres located in different European countries performed ≥50 MEG investigations for epilepsy mapping in 2014, both in children and adults. In those centres, time from patient preparation to MEG data reporting tends to be lower than those investigating a lower annual number of patients. This survey demonstrates that there is in Europe an increasing and widespread expertise in the field of clinical MEG. These findings should serve as a basis to harmonize clinical MEG procedures and promote the clinical added value of MEG across Europe. MEG should now be considered in Europe as a mature clinical neurophysiological technique that should be used routinely in two specific clinical indications, i.e, the pre-surgical evaluation of refractory focal epilepsy and functional brain mapping. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The priming of basic combinatory responses in MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Ferreira, Victor S; Del Prato, Paul; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2018-01-01

    Priming has been a powerful tool for the study of human memory and especially the memory representations relevant for language. However, although it is well established that lexical access can be primed, we do not know exactly what types of computations can be primed above the word level. This work took a neurobiological approach and assessed the ways in which the complex representation of a minimal combinatory phrase, such as red boat, can be primed, as evidenced by the spatiotemporal profiles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Specifically, we built upon recent progress on the neural signatures of phrasal composition and tested whether the brain activities implicated for the basic combination of two words could be primed. In two experiments, MEG was recorded during a picture naming task where the prime trials were designed to replicate previously reported combinatory effects and the target trials to test whether those combinatory effects could be primed. The manipulation of the primes was successful in eliciting larger activity for adjective-noun combinations than single nouns in left anterior temporal and ventromedial prefrontal cortices, replicating prior MEG studies on parallel contrasts. Priming of similarly timed activity was observed during target trials in anterior temporal cortex, but only when the prime and target shared an adjective. No priming in temporal cortex was observed for single word repetition and two control tasks showed that the priming effect was not elicited if the prime pictures were simply viewed but not named. In sum, this work provides evidence that very basic combinatory operations can be primed, with the necessity for some lexical overlap between prime and target suggesting combinatory conceptual, as opposed to syntactic processing. Both our combinatory and priming effects were early, onsetting between 100 and 150ms after picture onset and thus are likely to reflect the very earliest planning stages of a combinatory message

  5. Subspace angles: a metric for comparisons in EEG and MEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    In forward head modeling, various approximations are made in order to keep the problem tractable. Simplifications can yield models ranging from simple spherical models to multi-tessellated arbitrary surfaces in a boundary element model (BEM). Spherical head models differ in the number of shells and the assumed conductivities. Other assumptions in the BEM include the choice of basis sets, such as constant, linear, or quadratic variations of the voltages across the individual areal elements, or the selection of error-weighting method, such as collocation, Galerkin, or `direct` methods. Numerical versus analytic integration can also yield numerical differences. These differences in parameters and approximations can yield models whose external fields (EEG potentials or MEG magnetic fields) differ for the same internal source configuration. Quantitative measures are needed to determine if these differences are significant.

  6. EEG and MEG source localization using recursively applied (RAP) MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.

    1996-12-31

    The multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm locates multiple asynchronous dipolar sources from electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. A signal subspace is estimated from the data, then the algorithm scans a single dipole model through a three-dimensional head volume and computes projections onto this subspace. To locate the sources, the user must search the head volume for local peaks in the projection metric. Here we describe a novel extension of this approach which we refer to as RAP (Recursively APplied) MUSIC. This new procedure automatically extracts the locations of the sources through a recursive use of subspace projections, which uses the metric of principal correlations as a multidimensional form of correlation analysis between the model subspace and the data subspace. The dipolar orientations, a form of `diverse polarization,` are easily extracted using the associated principal vectors.

  7. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework

  8. Language-motor interference reflected in MEG beta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Anne; Niccolai, Valentina; Buccino, Giovanni; Schnitzler, Alfons; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2015-04-01

    The involvement of the brain's motor system in action-related language processing can lead to overt interference with simultaneous action execution. The aim of the current study was to find evidence for this behavioural interference effect and to investigate its neurophysiological correlates using oscillatory MEG analysis. Subjects performed a semantic decision task on single action verbs, describing actions executed with the hands or the feet, and abstract verbs. Right hand button press responses were given for concrete verbs only. Therefore, longer response latencies for hand compared to foot verbs should reflect interference. We found interference effects to depend on verb imageability: overall response latencies for hand verbs did not differ significantly from foot verbs. However, imageability interacted with effector: while response latencies to hand and foot verbs with low imageability were equally fast, those for highly imageable hand verbs were longer than for highly imageable foot verbs. The difference is reflected in motor-related MEG beta band power suppression, which was weaker for highly imageable hand verbs compared with highly imageable foot verbs. This provides a putative neuronal mechanism for language-motor interference where the involvement of cortical hand motor areas in hand verb processing interacts with the typical beta suppression seen before movements. We found that the facilitatory effect of higher imageability on action verb processing time is perturbed when verb and motor response relate to the same body part. Importantly, this effect is accompanied by neurophysiological effects in beta band oscillations. The attenuated power suppression around the time of movement, reflecting decreased cortical excitability, seems to result from motor simulation during action-related language processing. This is in line with embodied cognition theories. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. LncRNA MEG3 Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia via Targeting MiR-184.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingdong; Zi, Youmei; Wang, Wanling; Li, Yan

    2017-06-22

    Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a long non-coding RNA, has been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis ofmultiple malignancies. However, little is known regarding the role of MEG3 in leukemia. In this study, we found that the expression of MEG3 was decreased in leukemia patients and cell lines, and has potential to be considered as a biomarker for leukemia. In addition, overexpression of MEG3 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo . Moreover, a potential bonding site between miR-184 and MEG3 was predicted, and low expression of miR-184 was found in leukemia patients and cell lines. In vitro loss- and gain-of-function showed that overexpression of MEG3 significantly decreased the expression of miR-184 and MEG3 knockdown markedly increased it. Furthermore, our results showed that MEG3 interacted with miR-184 and subsequently mitigated the proliferation and invasion of leukemia cells by down-regulating related proteins. In conclusion, our study has identified a novel pathway through which MEG3 acts as a tumor suppressor in leukemia at the level of miRNAs, and provided a molecular basis for potential applications of MEG3 in the prognosis and treatment of leukemia.

  10. Towards brain-activity-controlled information retrieval: Decoding image relevance from MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kandemir, Melih; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Parkkonen, Lauri; Klami, Arto; Hari, Riitta; Kaski, Samuel

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesize that brain activity can be used to control future information retrieval systems. To this end, we conducted a feasibility study on predicting the relevance of visual objects from brain activity. We analyze both magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and gaze signals from nine subjects who were viewing image collages, a subset of which was relevant to a predetermined task. We report three findings: i) the relevance of an image a subject looks at can be decoded from MEG signals with performance significantly better than chance, ii) fusion of gaze-based and MEG-based classifiers significantly improves the prediction performance compared to using either signal alone, and iii) non-linear classification of the MEG signals using Gaussian process classifiers outperforms linear classification. These findings break new ground for building brain-activity-based interactive image retrieval systems, as well as for systems utilizing feedback both from brain activity and eye movements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brainstorm: A User-Friendly Application for MEG/EEG Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Tadel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brainstorm is a collaborative open-source application dedicated to magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG data visualization and processing, with an emphasis on cortical source estimation techniques and their integration with anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data. The primary objective of the software is to connect MEG/EEG neuroscience investigators with both the best-established and cutting-edge methods through a simple and intuitive graphical user interface (GUI.

  12. MEG-based identification of the epileptogenic zone in occult peri-insular epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heers, Marcel; Rampp, Stefan; Stefan, Hermann; Urbach, Horst; Elger, Christian E; von Lehe, Marec; Wellmer, Jörg

    2012-03-01

    Presurgical work-ups of patients with pharmacoresistant epileptic seizures can require multiple diagnostic methods if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with video-EEG monitoring fails to show an epileptogenic lesion. Yet, the added value of available methods is not clear. In particular, only a minority of epilepsy centres apply magnetoencephalography (MEG). This study explores the potential of MEG for patients whose previous sophisticated work-ups missed deep-seated, peri-insular epileptogenic lesions. Three patients with well documented, frequent, stereotypical hypermotor seizures without clear focus hypotheses after repeated presurgical work-ups including video-EEG-monitoring, 3Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), morphometric MRI analysis, PET and SPECT were referred to MEG source localisation. In two out of three patients, MEG source localisation identified very subtle morphological abnormalities formerly missed in MRI or classified as questionable pathology. In the third patient, MEG was not reliable due to insufficient detection of epileptic patterns. Here, a 1 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm 3T fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI revealed a potential epileptogenic lesion. A minimal invasive work-up via lesion-focused depth electrodes confirmed the intralesional seizure onset in all patients, and histology revealed dysplastic lesions. Seizure outcomes were Engel 1a in two patients, and Engel 1d in the third. MEG can contribute to the identification of epileptogenic lesions even when multiple previous methods failed, and when the lesions are located in deep anatomical structures such as peri-insular cortex. For epilepsy centres without MEG capability, referral of patients with cryptogenic focal epilepsies to centres with MEG systems may be indicated. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-MEG2 as an antagonist of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Charles Y; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Wang, Yan; Callaway, Scott; Hedrick, Susan; Mak, Puiying A; Orth, Anthony P; Peters, Eric C; Saez, Enrique; Montminy, Marc; Schultz, Peter G; Chanda, Sumit K

    2006-05-01

    Insulin resistance is a primary defect in type 2 diabetes characterized by impaired peripheral glucose uptake and insufficient suppression of hepatic glucose output. Insulin signaling inhibits liver glucose production by inducing nuclear exclusion of the gluconeogenic transcription factor FOXO1 in an Akt-dependent manner. Through the concomitant application of genome-scale functional screening and quantitative image analysis, we have identified PTP-MEG2 as a modulator of insulin-dependent FOXO1 subcellular localization. Ectopic expression of PTP-MEG2 in cells inhibited insulin-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, while RNAi-mediated reduction of PTP-MEG2 transcript levels enhanced insulin action. Additionally, adenoviral-mediated depletion of PTP-MEG2 in livers of diabetic (db/db) mice resulted in insulin sensitization and normalization of hyperglycemia. These data implicate PTP-MEG2 as a mediator of blood glucose homeostasis through antagonism of insulin signaling, and suggest that modulation of PTP-MEG2 activity may be an effective strategy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium data of binary MEG-reservoir fluid and ternary MEG-water-reservoir fluid systems at temperatures 275-326 K and at atmospheric pressure. The reservoir fluid consists of a natural gas condensate from a Statoil operated gas field in the North Sea...... fluid and polar compounds such as water and MEG. Satisfactory results are obtained for mutual solubility of MEG and gas condensate whereas some deviations are observed for the ternary system of MEG-water-gas condensate........ Prediction of mutual solubility of water, MEG and hydrocarbon fluids is important for the oil industry to ensure production and processing as well as to satisfy environmental regulations. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems containing associating...

  15. A Novel Integrated MEG and EEG Analysis Method for Dipolar Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Song, Tao; Hagler, Donald J.; Podgorny, Igor; Jousmaki, Veikko; Cui, Li; Gaa, Kathleen; Harrington, Deborah L.; Dale, Anders M.; Lee, Roland R.; Elman, Jeff; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The ability of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to accurately localize neuronal currents and obtain tangential components of the source is largely due to MEG’s insensitivity to the conductivity profile of the head tissues. However, MEG cannot reliably detect the radial component of the neuronal current. In contrast, the localization accuracy of electroencephalography (EEG) is not as good as MEG, but EEG can detect both the tangential and radial components of the source. In the present study, we investigated the conductivity dependence in a new approach that combines MEG and EEG to accurately obtain, not only the location and tangential components, but also the radial component of the source. In this approach, the source location and tangential components are obtained from MEG alone, and optimal conductivity values of the EEG model are estimated by best-fitting EEG signal, while precisely matching the tangential components of the source in EEG and MEG. Then, the radial components are obtained from EEG using the previously estimated optimal conductivity values. Computer simulations testing this integrated approach demonstrated two main findings. First, there are well-organized optimal combinations of the conductivity values that provide an accurate fit to the combined MEG and EEG data. Second, the radial component, in addition to the location and tangential components, can be obtained with high accuracy without needing to know the precise conductivity profile of the head. We then demonstrated that this new approach performed reliably in an analysis of the 20-ms component from human somatosensory responses elicited by electric median-nerve stimulation. PMID:17658272

  16. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, A.M.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D'Onofrio, A.; Nicolo, D.; Tenchini, F.; Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G.; Boca, G.; De Bari, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Rossella, M.; Cavoto, G.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Chiarello, G.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Tassielli, G.F.; De Gerone, M.; Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Graziosi, A.; Ripiccini, E.; Grigoriev, D.N.; Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V.; Kang, T.I.; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Venturini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ + → e + γ. We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P μ = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P μ =.0.86 ± 0.02 (stat) -0.06 +0.05 (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our μ + → e + γ search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ + → e + anti ν μ ν e γ. (orig.)

  17. Word and object recognition during reading acquisition: MEG evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarra, Sendy; Martin, Clara D; Lizarazu, Mikel; Lallier, Marie; Zarraga, Asier; Molinaro, Nicola; Carreiras, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Studies on adults suggest that reading-induced brain changes might not be limited to linguistic processes. It is still unclear whether these results can be generalized to reading development. The present study shows to which extent neural responses to verbal and nonverbal stimuli are reorganized while children learn to read. MEG data of thirty Basque children (4-8y) were collected while they were presented with written words, spoken words and visual objects. The evoked fields elicited by the experimental stimuli were compared to their scrambled counterparts. Visual words elicited left posterior (200-300ms) and temporal activations (400-800ms). The size of these effects increased as reading performance improved, suggesting a reorganization of children's visual word responses. Spoken words elicited greater left temporal responses relative to scrambles (300-700ms). No evidence for the influence of reading expertise was observed. Brain responses to objects were greater than to scrambles in bilateral posterior regions (200-500ms). There was a greater left hemisphere involvement as reading errors decreased, suggesting a strengthened verbal decoding of visual configurations with reading acquisition. The present results reveal that learning to read not only influences written word processing, but also affects visual object recognition, suggesting a non-language specific impact of reading on children's neural mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Word and object recognition during reading acquisition: MEG evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendy Caffarra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies on adults suggest that reading-induced brain changes might not be limited to linguistic processes. It is still unclear whether these results can be generalized to reading development. The present study shows to which extent neural responses to verbal and nonverbal stimuli are reorganized while children learn to read. MEG data of thirty Basque children (4–8y were collected while they were presented with written words, spoken words and visual objects. The evoked fields elicited by the experimental stimuli were compared to their scrambled counterparts. Visual words elicited left posterior (200–300 ms and temporal activations (400–800 ms. The size of these effects increased as reading performance improved, suggesting a reorganization of children’s visual word responses. Spoken words elicited greater left temporal responses relative to scrambles (300–700 ms. No evidence for the influence of reading expertise was observed. Brain responses to objects were greater than to scrambles in bilateral posterior regions (200–500 ms. There was a greater left hemisphere involvement as reading errors decreased, suggesting a strengthened verbal decoding of visual configurations with reading acquisition. The present results reveal that learning to read not only influences written word processing, but also affects visual object recognition, suggesting a non-language specific impact of reading on children’s neural mechanisms.

  19. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.M.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Nicolo, D.; Tenchini, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Pisa Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Genova Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); Boca, G.; De Bari, A. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Pavia Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Cattaneo, P.W.; Rossella, M. [Pavia Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C. [Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A. [INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Univ. del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Tassielli, G.F. [Univ. del Salento (Italy); INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); De Gerone, M. [Genova Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); Graziosi, A.; Ripiccini, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ieki, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kang, T.I.; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Venturini, M. [Pisa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Collaboration: The MEG Collaboration

    2016-04-15

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ. We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P{sub μ} = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P{sub μ} =.0.86 ± 0.02 (stat){sub -0.06}{sup +0.05} (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ{sup +} → e{sup +} anti ν{sub μ}ν{sub e}γ. (orig.)

  20. EEG and MEG Data Analysis in SPM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Litvak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available SPM is a free and open source software written in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.. In addition to standard M/EEG preprocessing, we presently offer three main analysis tools: (i statistical analysis of scalp-maps, time-frequency images, and volumetric 3D source reconstruction images based on the general linear model, with correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory; (ii Bayesian M/EEG source reconstruction, including support for group studies, simultaneous EEG and MEG, and fMRI priors; (iii dynamic causal modelling (DCM, an approach combining neural modelling with data analysis for which there are several variants dealing with evoked responses, steady state responses (power spectra and cross-spectra, induced responses, and phase coupling. SPM8 is integrated with the FieldTrip toolbox , making it possible for users to combine a variety of standard analysis methods with new schemes implemented in SPM and build custom analysis tools using powerful graphical user interface (GUI and batching tools.

  1. Bayesian mixture models for source separation in MEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvetti, Daniela; Homa, Laura; Somersalo, Erkki

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of imaging electromagnetic brain activity from measurements of the induced magnetic field outside the head. This imaging modality, magnetoencephalography (MEG), is known to be severely ill posed, and in order to obtain useful estimates for the activity map, complementary information needs to be used to regularize the problem. In this paper, a particular emphasis is on finding non-superficial focal sources that induce a magnetic field that may be confused with noise due to external sources and with distributed brain noise. The data are assumed to come from a mixture of a focal source and a spatially distributed possibly virtual source; hence, to differentiate between those two components, the problem is solved within a Bayesian framework, with a mixture model prior encoding the information that different sources may be concurrently active. The mixture model prior combines one density that favors strongly focal sources and another that favors spatially distributed sources, interpreted as clutter in the source estimation. Furthermore, to address the challenge of localizing deep focal sources, a novel depth sounding algorithm is suggested, and it is shown with simulated data that the method is able to distinguish between a signal arising from a deep focal source and a clutter signal. (paper)

  2. Comparison of the spatial resolution of source imaging techniques in high-density EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, T; Pellegrino, G; Kobayashi, E; Lina, J M; Grova, C

    2017-08-15

    The present study aims at evaluating and comparing electrical and magnetic distributed source imaging methods applied to high-density Electroencephalography (hdEEG) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. We used resolution matrices to characterize spatial resolution properties of Minimum Norm Estimate (MNE), dynamic Statistical Parametric Mapping (dSPM), standardized Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA) and coherent Maximum Entropy on the Mean (cMEM, an entropy-based technique). The resolution matrix provides information of the Point Spread Functions (PSF) and of the Crosstalk functions (CT), this latter being also called source leakage, as it reflects the influence of a source on its neighbors. The spatial resolution of the inverse operators was first evaluated theoretically and then with real data acquired using electrical median nerve stimulation on five healthy participants. We evaluated the Dipole Localization Error (DLE) and the Spatial Dispersion (SD) of each PSF and CT map. cMEM showed the smallest spatial spread (SD) for both PSF and CT maps, whereas localization errors (DLE) were similar for all methods. Whereas cMEM SD values were lower in MEG compared to hdEEG, the other methods slightly favored hdEEG over MEG. In real data, cMEM provided similar localization error and significantly less spatial spread than other methods for both MEG and hdEEG. Whereas both MEG and hdEEG provided very accurate localizations, all the source imaging methods actually performed better in MEG compared to hdEEG according to all evaluation metrics, probably due to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the data in MEG. Our overall results show that all investigated methods provide similar localization errors, suggesting very accurate localization for both MEG and hdEEG when similar number of sensors are considered for both modalities. Intrinsic properties of source imaging methods as well as their behavior for well-controlled tasks, suggest an overall better

  3. The Long Noncoding RNA MEG3 Is Downregulated and Inversely Associated with VEGF Levels in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is becoming a major public health problem in China, especially considering the increase in average life expectancy of the population. Thus, enhanced understanding of the molecular changes associated with OA is urgently needed to develop more effective strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating disease. LncRNAs play an important role in the processes of bone and cartilage development. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3 is a maternally expressed lncRNA and may function as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting angiogenesis. OA is closely associated with angiogenesis and the inhibition of angiogenesis presents a novel therapeutic approach to reduce inflammation and pain in OA. In this study, we detected the mRNA expression of MEG3 and VEGF in articular cartilage samples from 20 OA patients and 10 healthy volunteers by real-time RT-PCR. VEGF protein is detected by ELISA in cartilage samples. The results show that human MEG3 is significantly downregulated in OA patients compared to normal cartilage samples. However, higher levels of VEGF mRNA and protein are found in OA compared to the control. Moreover, MEG3 levels are inversely associated with VEGF levels, suggesting that MEG3 may be involved in OA development through the regulation of angiogenesis.

  4. Children with autism show reduced somatosensory response: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Elysa J; Khatibi, Kasra; Hill, Susanna S; Siegel, Bryna; Arroyo, Monica S; Dowling, Anne F; Neuhaus, John M; Sherr, Elliott H; Hinkley, Leighton N B; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-10-01

    The neural underpinnings of sensory processing differences in autism remain poorly understood. This prospective magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigates whether children with autism show atypical cortical activity in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in comparison with matched controls. Tactile stimuli were clearly detectable, and painless taps were applied to the distal phalanx of the second (D2) and third (D3) fingers of the right and left hands. Three tactile paradigms were administered: an oddball paradigm (standard taps to D3 at an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 0.33 and deviant taps to D2 with ISI ranging from 1.32 s to 1.64 s); a slow-rate paradigm (D2) with an ISI matching the deviant taps in the oddball paradigm; and a fast-rate paradigm (D2) with an ISI matching the standard taps in the oddball. Study subjects were boys (age 7-11 years) with and without autism disorder. Sensory behavior was quantified using the Sensory Profile questionnaire. Boys with autism exhibited smaller amplitude left hemisphere S1 response to slow and deviant stimuli during the right-hand paradigms. In post-hoc analysis, tactile behavior directly correlated with the amplitude of cortical response. Consequently, the children were re-categorized by degree of parent-report tactile sensitivity. This regrouping created a more robust distinction between the groups with amplitude diminution in the left and right hemispheres and latency prolongation in the right hemisphere in the deviant and slow-rate paradigms for the affected children. This study suggests that children with autism have early differences in somatosensory processing, which likely influence later stages of cortical activity from integration to motor response. © 2012 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A space-frequency analysis of MEG background processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijma, Fetsje; de Munck, Jan C

    2008-11-15

    In MEG source localization the estimated source parameters will be more reliable when the spatiotemporal covariance of the noise and background activity is taken into account. Since this covariance is in general too large to estimate based on the data and to invert efficiently, different parametrizations have been proposed in the literature. These models can be seen as special cases of the general decomposition of the covariance into a sum of Kronecker products of spatial matrices X(n) and temporal matrices T(n) (Van Loan, 2000). In this study we investigate the assumption of the matrices T(n) being Toeplitz. If so, the covariance matrix in the space-frequency domain will have an approximate block-diagonal structure, facilitating inversion, which is a prerequisite for source localization. In this study we address the question whether the Toeplitz approximation is valid for data sets obtained in visual evoked field, auditory evoked field, somatosensory evoked field experiments and data sets containing spontaneous activity. It turns out that on average 87% is in the block-diagonal of the sample covariance, which is close to the values obtained for real Toeplitz matrices T(n). This implies that the space-frequency domain is very interesting for source localization since the major part of the entire covariance can be incorporated in that domain straightforwardly. Finally, the two major processes in the background activity are characterized in terms of their spatial and frequency patterns, yielding a focal and a non-focal pattern in 8 of 10 data sets analyzed in this study. The focal pattern represents the alpha frequency at parieto-occipital areas, whereas the non-focal pattern is more widespread both in space and in frequency.

  6. Mindfulness-induced selflessness: A MEG neurophenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair eDor-Ziderman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary philosophical and neurocognitive studies of the self have dissociated two distinct types of self-awareness: a 'narrative' self-awareness (NS weaving together episodic memory, future planning and self-evaluation into a coherent self-narrative and identity, and a 'minimal' self-awareness (MS focused on present momentary experience and closely tied to the sense of agency and ownership. Long-term Buddhist meditation practice aims at realization of a 'selfless' mode of awareness (SL, where identification with a static sense of self is replaced by identification with the phenomenon of experiencing itself. NS-mediating mechanisms have been explored by neuroimaging, mainly fMRI, implicating prefrontal midline structures, but MS processes are not well characterized and SL even less so. To this end we tested 12 long-term mindfulness meditators using a neurophenomenological study design, incorporating both magnetoencephalogram (MEG recordings and first person descriptions. We found that (1 NS attenuation involves extensive frontal, and medial prefrontal gamma band (60-80 Hz power decreases, consistent with fMRI and intracranial EEG findings; (2 MS attenuation is related to beta-band (13-25 Hz power decreases in a network that includes ventral medial prefrontal, medial posterior and lateral parietal regions; and (3 the experience of selflessness is linked to attenuation of beta-band activity in the right inferior parietal lobule. These results highlight the role of dissociable frequency-dependent networks in supporting different modes of self-processing, and the utility of combining phenomenology, mindfulness training and electrophysiological neuroimaging for characterizing self-awareness.

  7. Epileptic MEG Spike Detection Using Statistical Features and Genetic Programming with KNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turky N. Alotaiby

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Monitoring the brain activities and identifying the seizure source which starts with spike detection are important steps for epilepsy treatment. Magnetoencephalography (MEG is an emerging epileptic diagnostic tool with high-density sensors; this makes manual analysis a challenging task due to the vast amount of MEG data. This paper explores the use of eight statistical features and genetic programing (GP with the K-nearest neighbor (KNN for interictal spike detection. The proposed method is comprised of three stages: preprocessing, genetic programming-based feature generation, and classification. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been evaluated using real MEG data obtained from 28 epileptic patients. It has achieved a 91.75% average sensitivity and 92.99% average specificity.

  8. Variance stabilization for computing and comparing grand mean waveforms in MEG and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Artur; Kordecki, Wojciech; Sielużycki, Cezary; Zacharias, Norman; Heil, Peter; König, Reinhard

    2013-07-01

    Grand means of time-varying signals (waveforms) across subjects in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are commonly computed as arithmetic averages and compared between conditions, for example, by subtraction. However, the prerequisite for these operations, homogeneity of the variance of the waveforms in time, and for most common parametric statistical tests also between conditions, is rarely met. We suggest that the heteroscedasticity observed instead results because waveforms may differ by factors and additive terms and follow a mixed model. We propose to apply the asinh-transformation to stabilize the variance in such cases. We demonstrate the homogeneous variance and the normal distributions of data achieved by this transformation using simulated waveforms, and we apply it to real MEG data and show its benefits. The asinh-transformation is thus an essential and useful processing step prior to computing and comparing grand mean waveforms in MEG and EEG. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. Exploring biochemical pathways for mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) synthesis from synthesis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Ahsanul; Hadadi, Noushin; Ataman, Meric; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) is an important petrochemical with widespread use in numerous consumer products. The current industrial MEG-production process relies on non-renewable fossil fuel-based feedstocks, such as petroleum, natural gas, and naphtha; hence, it is useful to explore alternative routes of MEG-synthesis from gases as they might provide a greener and more sustainable alternative to the current production methods. Technologies of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering of microorganisms can be deployed for the expression of new biochemical pathways for MEG-synthesis from gases, provided that such promising alternative routes are first identified. We used the BNICE.ch algorithm to develop novel and previously unknown biological pathways to MEG from synthesis gas by leveraging the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of carbon fixation of acetogenic bacteria. We developed a set of useful pathway pruning and analysis criteria to systematically assess thousands of pathways generated by BNICE.ch. Published genome-scale models of Moorella thermoacetica and Clostridium ljungdahlii were used to perform the pathway yield calculations and in-depth analyses of seven (7) newly developed biological MEG-producing pathways from gases, including CO 2 , CO, and H 2 . These analyses helped identify not only better candidate pathways, but also superior chassis organisms that can be used for metabolic engineering of the candidate pathways. The pathway generation, pruning, and detailed analysis procedures described in this study can also be used to develop biochemical pathways for other commodity chemicals from gaseous substrates. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dipole source analysis for readiness potential and field using simultaneously measured EEG and MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hellriegel, H; Hoogenboom, N; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2013-01-01

    Various source localization techniques have indicated the generators of each identifiable component of movement-related cortical potentials, since the discovery of the surface negative potential prior to self-paced movement by Kornhuber and Decke. Readiness potentials and fields preceding self-paced finger movements were recorded simultaneously using multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) from five healthy subjects. The cortical areas involved in this paradigm are the supplementary motor area (SMA) (bilateral), pre-SMA (bilateral), and contralateral motor area of the moving finger. This hypothesis is tested in this paper using the dipole source analysis independently for only EEG, only MEG, and both combined. To localize the sources, the forward problem is first solved by using the boundary-element method for realistic head models and by using a locally-fitted-sphere approach for spherical head models consisting of a set of connected volumes, typically representing the scalp, skull, and brain. In the source reconstruction it is to be expected that EEG predominantly localizes radially oriented sources while MEG localizes tangential sources at the desired region of the cortex. The effect of MEG on EEG is also observed when analyzing both combined data. When comparing the two head models, the spherical and the realistic head models showed similar results. The significant points for this study are comparing the source analysis between the two modalities (EEG and MEG) so as to assure that EEG is sensitive to mostly radially orientated sources while MEG is only sensitive to only tangential sources, and comparing the spherical and individual head models.

  11. A new wavelet transform to sparsely represent cortical current densities for EEG/MEG inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Zhu, Min; Ding, Lei

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the use of transform sparseness of cortical current density on human brain surface to improve electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) inverse solutions. Transform sparseness was assessed by evaluating compressibility of cortical current densities in transform domains. To do that, a structure compression method from computer graphics was first adopted to compress cortical surface structure, either regular or irregular, into hierarchical multi-resolution meshes. Then, a new face-based wavelet method based on generated multi-resolution meshes was proposed to compress current density functions defined on cortical surfaces. Twelve cortical surface models were built by three EEG/MEG softwares and their structural compressibility was evaluated and compared by the proposed method. Monte Carlo simulations were implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed wavelet method in compressing various cortical current density distributions as compared to other two available vertex-based wavelet methods. The present results indicate that the face-based wavelet method can achieve higher transform sparseness than vertex-based wavelet methods. Furthermore, basis functions from the face-based wavelet method have lower coherence against typical EEG and MEG measurement systems than vertex-based wavelet methods. Both high transform sparseness and low coherent measurements suggest that the proposed face-based wavelet method can improve the performance of L1-norm regularized EEG/MEG inverse solutions, which was further demonstrated in simulations and experimental setups using MEG data. Thus, this new transform on complicated cortical structure is promising to significantly advance EEG/MEG inverse source imaging technologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 900-L liquid xenon cryogenic system operation for the MEG experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Hisamatsu, Y; Iawamoto, W; Mori, T; Nishiguchi, H; Otani, W; Sawada, R; Uchiyama, Y; Nishitani, T

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the MEG (muon rare decay) experiment has started operation at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Zurich. The main part of the MEG detector is the 900-L liquid xenon calorimeter for gamma ray detection, equipped with 850 photo multipliers directly immersed in liquid xenon. A 200 W pulse tube cryocooler enabled LN2-free operation of this calorimeter. A liquid purification system; using a liquid pump and a zero boil-off 1000-L cryogenic buffer dewar is also included in the system. The first entire engineering run was carried out in November-December 2007 and satisfactory cryogenic performances were confirmed.

  13. Non-linear canonical correlation for joint analysis of MEG signals from two subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCampi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of analysing magnetoencephalography (MEG data measured from two persons undergoing the same experiment, and we propose a method that searches for sources with maximally correlated energies. Our method is based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA, which provides linear transformations, one for each subject, such that the correlation between the transformed MEG signals is maximized. Here, we present a nonlinear version of CCA which measures the correlation of energies. Furthermore, we introduce a delay parameter in the modelto analyse, e.g., leader-follower changes in experiments where the two subjects are engaged in social interaction.

  14. Two-way regularization for MEG source reconstruction via multilevel coordinate descent

    KAUST Repository

    Siva Tian, Tian

    2013-12-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) source reconstruction refers to the inverse problem of recovering the neural activity from the MEG time course measurements. A spatiotemporal two-way regularization (TWR) method was recently proposed by Tian et al. to solve this inverse problem and was shown to outperform several one-way regularization methods and spatiotemporal methods. This TWR method is a two-stage procedure that first obtains a raw estimate of the source signals and then refines the raw estimate to ensure spatial focality and temporal smoothness using spatiotemporal regularized matrix decomposition. Although proven to be effective, the performance of two-stage TWR depends on the quality of the raw estimate. In this paper we directly solve the MEG source reconstruction problem using a multivariate penalized regression where the number of variables is much larger than the number of cases. A special feature of this regression is that the regression coefficient matrix has a spatiotemporal two-way structure that naturally invites a two-way penalty. Making use of this structure, we develop a computationally efficient multilevel coordinate descent algorithm to implement the method. This new one-stage TWR method has shown its superiority to the two-stage TWR method in three simulation studies with different levels of complexity and a real-world MEG data analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. Sensory handedness is not reflected in cortical responses after basic nerve stimulation: a MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.C.N.; Theuvenet, P.J.; de Munck, J.C.; Peters, M.J.; van Ree, J.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.L.

    2012-01-01

    Motor dominance is well established, but sensory dominance is much less clear. We therefore studied the cortical evoked magnetic fields using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a group of 20 healthy right handed subjects in order to examine whether standard electrical stimulation of the median and

  16. Sensory Handedness is not Reflected in Cortical Responses After Basic Nerve Stimulation: A MEG Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.C.N.; Theuvenet, P.J.; de Munck, J.C.; Peters, M.J.L.; van Ree, J.M.; da Silva, F.L.L.

    2012-01-01

    Motor dominance is well established, but sensory dominance is much less clear. We therefore studied the cortical evoked magnetic fields using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a group of 20 healthy right handed subjects in order to examine whether standard electrical stimulation of the median and

  17. Effect of Skull Resistivity on the Relative Sensitivity Distributions of EEG and MEG Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    Applications of Bioelectric and Biomagnetic Fields. Oxford University Press, New York, 1995.. [2] J. Malmivuo and J. Puikkonen: "Sensitivity distribution of...multichannel MEG Detectors." 6th International Conference on Biomagnetism , Tokyo 27-30 August 1987, pp. 112-113. [3] J. Malmivuo, V. Suihko and H

  18. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Maris, E.G.G.; Schoffelen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow

  19. Effect of field spread on resting-state MEG functional network analysis: A computational modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva Pereira, S.; Hindriks, R.; Mühlberg, S.; Maris, E.G.G.; Ede, F.L. van; Griffa, A.; Hagmann, P.; Deco, G.

    2017-01-01

    A popular way to analyze resting-state EEG and MEG data is to treat them as a functional network in which sensors are identified with nodes and the interaction between channel time-series with the network connections. Although conceptually appealing, the network-theoretical approach to sensor-level

  20. MEG and fMRI fusion for nonlinear estimation of neural and BOLD signal changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M Plis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The combined analysis of MEG/EEG and functional MRI measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the BOLD response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater SNR, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly nonlinear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources.

  1. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboki, Takuo; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is ±3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  2. Versatile synchronized real-time MEG hardware controller for large-scale fast data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Limin; Han, Menglai; Pratt, Kevin; Paulson, Douglas; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2017-05-01

    Versatile controllers for accurate, fast, and real-time synchronized acquisition of large-scale data are useful in many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Here, we describe the development of a controller software based on a technique called queued state machine for controlling the data acquisition (DAQ) hardware, continuously acquiring a large amount of data synchronized across a large number of channels (>400) at a fast rate (up to 20 kHz/channel) in real time, and interfacing with applications for real-time data analysis and display of electrophysiological data. This DAQ controller was developed specifically for a 384-channel pediatric whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, but its architecture is useful for wide applications. This controller running in a LabVIEW environment interfaces with microprocessors in the MEG sensor electronics to control their real-time operation. It also interfaces with a real-time MEG analysis software via transmission control protocol/internet protocol, to control the synchronous acquisition and transfer of the data in real time from >400 channels to acquisition and analysis workstations. The successful implementation of this controller for an MEG system with a large number of channels demonstrates the feasibility of employing the present architecture in several other applications.

  3. Interpretation of the MEG-MUSIC scan in biomagnetic source localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.

    1993-09-01

    MEG-Music is a new approach to MEG source localization. MEG-Music is based on a spatio-temporal source model in which the observed biomagnetic fields are generated by a small number of current dipole sources with fixed positions/orientations and varying strengths. From the spatial covariance matrix of the observed fields, a signal subspace can be identified. The rank of this subspace is equal to the number of elemental sources present. This signal sub-space is used in a projection metric that scans the three dimensional head volume. Given a perfect signal subspace estimate and a perfect forward model, the metric will peak at unity at each dipole location. In practice, the signal subspace estimate is contaminated by noise, which in turn yields MUSIC peaks which are less than unity. Previously we examined the lower bounds on localization error, independent of the choice of localization procedure. In this paper, we analyzed the effects of noise and temporal coherence on the signal subspace estimate and the resulting effects on the MEG-MUSIC peaks.

  4. Resting-state oscillatory activity in children born small for gestational age: an MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, M.; de Bie, H.M.A.; Oostrom, K.J.; van Dijk, B.W.; Hillebrand, A.; van Wijk, B.C.M.; de Waal, H.; Stam, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Growth restriction in utero during a period that is critical for normal growth of the brain, has previously been associated with deviations in cognitive abilities and brain anatomical and functional changes. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 4- to 7-year-old children to test if children

  5. Decreased expression of MEG3 contributes to retinoblastoma progression and affects retinoblastoma cell growth by regulating the activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yali; Lu, Xiaohe

    2016-02-01

    The aberrant expression of MEG3 has been found in some types of cancers; however, little is known concerning the function of MEG3 in retinoblastoma. To elucidate the roles of MEG3 in retinoblastoma, MEG3 expression was quantified in 63 retinoblastoma samples and corresponding nontumor tissues in this work. Moreover, retinoblastoma cell lines were transfected with pcDNA3.1-MEG3 or si-MEG3, after which proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of β-catenin were assayed. TOP-Flash reporter assay was also used to investigate the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results showed that MEG3 was downregulated in retinoblastoma tissues, and the level of MEG3 was negatively associated with IIRC stages and nodal or distant metastasis. More importantly, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that patients with low MEG3 expression had poorer survival and multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that MEG3 was an independent prognostic factor in retinoblastoma patients. We also observed that MEG3 expression can be modulated by DNA methylation by using 5-aza-CdR treatment. In addition, overexpression of MEG3 suppressed proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and influences the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in retinoblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, we found that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator rescued the anticancer effect of MEG3 in retinoblastoma. In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrated that MEG3 was a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the progression of retinoblastoma and might serve as a prognostic biomarker and molecular therapeutic target.

  6. BabyMEG: A whole-head pediatric magnetoencephalography system for human brain development research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti; Pratt, Kevin; Mascarenas, Anthony; Miller, Paul; Han, Menglai; Robles, Jose; Cavallini, Anders; Power, Bill; Sieng, Kosal; Sun, Limin; Lew, Seok; Doshi, Chiran; Ahtam, Banu; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Grant, Ellen; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Paulson, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    We developed a 375-channel, whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system ("BabyMEG") for studying the electrophysiological development of human brain during the first years of life. The helmet accommodates heads up to 95% of 36-month old boys in the USA. The unique two-layer sensor array consists of: (1) 270 magnetometers (10 mm diameter, ˜15 mm coil-to-coil spacing) in the inner layer, (2) thirty-five three-axis magnetometers (20 mm × 20 mm) in the outer layer 4 cm away from the inner layer. Additionally, there are three three-axis reference magnetometers. With the help of a remotely operated position adjustment mechanism, the sensor array can be positioned to provide a uniform short spacing (mean 8.5 mm) between the sensor array and room temperature surface of the dewar. The sensors are connected to superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4.2 K with median sensitivity levels of 7.5 fT/√Hz for the inner and 4 fT/√Hz for the outer layer sensors. SQUID outputs are digitized by a 24-bit acquisition system. A closed-cycle helium recycler provides maintenance-free continuous operation, eliminating the need for helium, with no interruption needed during MEG measurements. BabyMEG with the recycler has been fully operational from March, 2015. Ongoing spontaneous brain activity can be monitored in real time without interference from external magnetic noise sources including the recycler, using a combination of a lightly shielded two-layer magnetically shielded room, an external active shielding, a signal-space projection method, and a synthetic gradiometer approach. Evoked responses in the cortex can be clearly detected without averaging. These new design features and capabilities represent several advances in MEG, increasing the utility of this technique in basic neuroscience as well as in clinical research and patient studies.

  7. Skp2 regulates non-small cell lung cancer cell growth by Meg3 and miR-3163.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Han, Dongrui; Wu, Jingwen; Huo, Xueyun

    2016-03-01

    Maternally expressed gene 3 (Meg3) encodes a long non-coding RNA that has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis. Skp2 is a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF that specifically promotes the ubiquitination-associated degradation of CDK inhibitor p27, and has been shown to promote cancer cell growth in different types of cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nevertheless, a regulatory relationship between Meg3 and Skp2 has not been acknowledged. Here, we showed that NSCLC specimens had significant higher levels of Skp2 and significantly lower levels of Meg3, compared to paired non-tumor lung tissue. The levels of Meg3 and Skp2 were inversely correlated in NSCLC specimens. Patients with low Meg3 levels had a poor survival. Overexpression of Meg3 decreased Skp2 protein and increased p27 protein, while depletion of Meg3 increased Skp2 protein and decreased p27 protein in NSCLC cells, without altering Skp2 mRNA. These data suggest that the Skp2 may be regulated by Meg3 at post-transcriptional level. Bioinformatics analyses showed that miR-3163 bound to 3'-UTR of Skp2 mRNA in NSCLC cells to inhibit its translation, which was supported by luciferase reporter assay. Meg3 augmented the effects of miR-3163 on Skp2 mRNA, possibly through binding-induced function enhancement, which was supported by the double fluorescent in situ hybridization showing co-localized intracellular Meg3 and miR-3163 signals in NSCLC cells. The miR-3163 levels in NSCLC were not different from in NT, suggesting that the regulation of Skp2 in NSCLC by miR-3163 may require coordination of Meg3. Thus, our data suggest that Meg3 and miR-3163 may coordinate suppression of translation of Skp2 mRNA in NSCLC cells to inhibit NSCLC cell growth.

  8. microRNA-22 can regulate expression of the long non-coding RNA MEG3 in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongxia; Sun, Pei; Duan, Mengling; Lin, Lie; Pan, Yanping; Wu, Congming; Fu, Xiangjun; Wang, Hua; Guo, Li; Jin, Tianbo; Ding, Yipeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common blood tumor with poor prognosis. At present, the research found that the pathogenesis of AML is related to many factors, such as recurrent somatic mutations and gene expression and epigenetic changes, however, the molecular mechanism of AML is still unclear. Long non-coding RNA MEG3 is a newly found tumor suppressor and plays a very important role in the regulation of a variety of tumor formation and progression. Studies found that the MEG3 expression was significantly decreased in AML. However, to date, it is not clear the cause of its abnormal expression. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of AML is urgently needed to study the molecular mechanism of AML. Methods The different expression level of MEG3, TET2, miR-22-3p, miR-22-5p in AML was detected by real-time quantification PCR. MEG3, TET2, miR-22-3p, miR-22-3p expression cell pools in K562 cells was used to interfering and TET2, MEG3 TET2, relations with miR-22-3p, miR-22-5p. The effect of AML cell on proliferation was evaluated by TET2 lower expression. Results 1. The lower expression of MEG3 and TET2 in AML cell lines was detected by RT-qPCR. 2. The stable MEG3, TET2 overexpression cell pools in K562 cells was successful established. 3. After transfection, MTT assay revealed that cell growth was significantly increased in AML cell lines transfected with TET2 compared with controls. Conclusions Our findings suggested that MEG3 is significantly down regulated in AML cell lines. PMID:29029424

  9. The advantage of combining MEG and EEG: comparison to fMRI in focally-stimulated visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dahlia; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Tootell, Roger BH; Halgren, Eric; Belliveau, John W

    2009-01-01

    To exploit the high (millisecond) temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) for measuring neuronal dynamics within well-defined brain regions, it is important to quantitatively assess their localizing ability. Previous modeling studies and empirical data suggest that a combination of MEG and EEG signals should yield the most accurate localization, due to their complementary sensitivities. However, these two modalities have rarely been explicitly combined for source estimation in studies of recorded brain activity, and a quantitative empirical assessment of their abilities, combined and separate, is currently lacking. Here we studied early visual responses to focal Gabor patches flashed during subject fixation. MEG and EEG data were collected simultaneously, and compared with the functional MRI (fMRI) localization produced by identical stimuli, in the same subjects. This allowed direct evaluation of the localization accuracy of separate and combined MEG/EEG inverse solutions. We found that the localization accuracy of the combined MEG+EEG solution was consistently better than that of either modality alone, using three different source estimation approaches. Further analysis suggests that this improved localization is due to the different properties of the two imaging modalities, rather than simply due to increased total channel number. Thus, combining MEG and EEG data is important for high-resolution spatiotemporal studies of the human brain. PMID:17532230

  10. Source analysis of median nerve stimulated somatosensory evoked potentials and fields using simultaneously measured EEG and MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hellriegel, H; Hoogenboom, N; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2012-01-01

    The sources of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and fields (SEFs), which is a standard paradigm, is investigated using multichannel EEG and MEG simultaneous recordings. The hypothesis that SEP & SEF sources are generated in the posterior bank of the central sulcus is tested, and analyses are compared based on EEG only, MEG only, bandpass filtered MEG, and both combined. To locate the sources, the forward problem is first solved by using the boundary-element method for realistic head models and by using a locally-fitted-sphere approach for averaged head models consisting of a set of connected volumes, typically representing the skull, scalp, and brain. The location of each dipole is then estimated using fixed MUSIC and current-density-reconstruction (CDR) algorithms. For both analyses, the results demonstrate that the band-pass filtered MEG can localize the sources accurately at the desired region as compared to only EEG and unfiltered MEG. For CDR analysis, it looks like MEG affects EEG during the combined analyses. The MUSIC algorithm gives better results than CDR, and when comparing the two head models, the averaged and the realistic head models showed the same result.

  11. Modeling of phase equilibrium of North Sea oils with water and MEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The complex phase equilibrium between reservoir fluids and associating compounds like water and glycols has become very important as the increasing global energy demand pushes the oil industry to use advanced methods to increase oil recovery, such as increasing the use of various chemicals......, such as water and ethylene glycol (MEG). Using these new correlations for prediction of all binary interactions, the CPA EoS satisfactorily describes the mutual solubility of the “binary systems” reservoir fluid and MEG and promising results are also obtained with CPA for ternary mixtures (reservoir fluid + water...... to ensure a constant and safe production. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems and gas condensates containing associating compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using modified correlations...

  12. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Nicolò, D.; Ritt, S.; Venturini, M.

    2016-01-01

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection. - Highlights: • A new, two-level trigger scheme for the phase-II of the MEG experiment is presented. • Improvements with respect to phase-I are underlined. • The role of detector upgrades and the use of a new generation of FPGA as well are emphasized.

  13. Differences in MEG gamma oscillatory power during performance of a prosaccade task in adolescents with FASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD is characterized by a broad range of behavioral and cognitive deficits that impact the long-term quality of life for affected individuals. However, the underlying changes in brain structure and function associated with these cognitive impairments are not well understood. Previous studies identified deficits in behavioral performance of prosaccade tasks in children with FASD. In this study, we investigated group differences in gamma oscillations in response to a prosaccade task. We collected MEG data from 15 adolescents with FASD and 20 age-matched healthy controls (HC with a mean age of 15.9 ± 0.4 years. During the prosaccade task, the participants began each trial by gazing at a centrally-placed fixation point. After a variable delay, a peripheral target appeared along the horizontal meridian in left or right visual field. The participants were instructed to saccade to the target as quickly and accurately as possible. Eye movement was recorded and synchronized to the MEG data using an MEG compatible eye-tracker. The MEG data were analyzed relative to the onset of the visual saccade. Time frequency analysis was performed using Fieldtrip with a focus on group differences in gamma-band oscillations. Following left target presentation, we identified 4 clusters over right frontal, right parietal and left temporal/occipital cortex, with significantly different gamma-band (30-50 Hz power between FASD and HC. Furthermore, visual M100 latencies described in Coffman et al. (2012 corresponded with increased gamma power over right central cortex in FASD only, which may represent compensatory activity in this group. Gamma-band differences were not identified for stimulus-averaged responses implying that these gamma-band differences were related to differences in saccade network functioning. These gamma-band differences in power may provide indicators of atypical development of cortical networks in individuals with FASD.

  14. Comparison of the constant and linear boundary element method for EEG and MEG forward modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chang, C.H.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We present a comparison of boundary element methods for solving the forward problem in EEG and MEG. We use the method of weighted residuals and focus on the collocation and Galerkin forms for constant and linear basis functions. We also examine the effect of the isolated skull approach for reducing numerical errors due to the low conductivity of the skull. We demonstrate the improvement that a linear Galerkin approach may yield in solving the forward problem.

  15. Hybrid MEG (Magnetoencephalography) source characterization by cortical remapping and imaging of parametric source models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillet, S. (Sylvain); Mosher, J. C. (John C.); Jerbi, K. (Karim); Leahy, R. M. (Richard M.)

    2001-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the local spatial extent of neural activity is a key to the quantitative analysis of MEG sources across subjects and conditions. In association with an understanding of the temporal dynamics among multiple areas, this would represent a major advance in electrophysiological source imaging. Parametric current dipole approaches to MEG (and EEG) source localization can rapidly generate a physical model of neural current generators using a limited number of parameters. However, physiological interpretation of these models is often difficult, especially in terms of the spatial extent of the true cortical activity. In new approaches using multipolar source models [3, 5], similar problems remain in the analysis of the higher-order source moments as parameters of cortical extent. Image-based approaches to the inverse problem provide a direct estimate of cortical current generators, but computationally expensive nonlinear methods are required to produce focal sources [1,4]. Recent efforts describe how a cortical patch can be grown until a best fit to the data is reached in the least-squares sense [6], but computational considerations necessitate that the growth be seeded in predefined regions of interest. In a previous study [2], a source obtained using a parametric model was remapped onto the cortex by growing a patch of cortical dipoles in the vicinity of the parametric source until the forward MEG or EEG fields of the parametric and cortical sources matched. The source models were dipoles and first-order multipoles. We propose to combine the parametric and imaging methods for MEG source characterization to take advantage of (i) the parsimonious and computationally efficient nature of parametric source localization methods and (ii) the anatomical and physiological consistency of imaging techniques that use relevant a priori information. By performing the cortical remapping imaging step by matching the multipole expansions of the original parametric

  16. MEG-compatible pneumatic stimulator to elicit passive finger and toe movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Harri; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Hari, Riitta; Jousmäki, Veikko

    2015-05-15

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals recorded from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) cortex are coherent with kinematics of both active and passive finger movements. The coherence mainly reflects movement-related proprioceptive afference to the cortex. Here we describe a novel MEG-compatible stimulator to generate computer-controlled passive finger and toe movements that can be used as stimuli in functional brain-imaging experiments. The movements are produced by pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM), elastic actuator that shortens with increasing air pressure. To test the applicability of the stimulator to functional brain-imaging, 4-min trains of passive repetitive 5-mm flexion-extension movements of the right and left index finger and the right hallux were produced at 3Hz while the subject's brain activity was measured with whole-scalp MEG and finger or toe kinematics with an accelerometer. In all ten subjects studied, statistically significant coherence (up to 0.78) occurred between the accelerometer and MEG signals at the movement frequency or its first harmonic. Sources of coherent activity were in the contralateral hand or foot SM1 cortices. Movement-evoked fields elicited with intermittent movements of the right index finger (once every 3.2-4.0s; mean±SD peak response latency 88±25ms) were co-located with the respective coherent sources. We further moved the right index finger at 3, 6, and 12Hz (movement ranges 5, 3, and 2mm, respectively), and analyzed the first 1, 2, and 4-min epochs of data. One minute of data was sufficient to locate the left hand area of the SM1 cortex at all movement frequencies. Sound-induced spurious coherence was reliably ruled out in a control experiment. Our novel movement stimulator thus provides a robust and reliable tool to track proprioceptive afference to the cortex and to locate the SM1 cortex. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aging-related changes in auditory and visual integration measured with MEG

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, Julia M.; Knoefel, Janice E.; Adair, John; Hart, Blaine; Aine, Cheryl J.

    2010-01-01

    As noted in the aging literature, processing delays often occur in the central nervous system with increasing age, which is often attributable in part to demyelination. In addition, differential slowing between sensory systems has been shown to be most discrepant between visual (up to 20 ms) and auditory systems (< 5 ms). Therefore, we used MEG to measure the multisensory integration response in auditory association cortex in young and elderly participants to better understand the effects of ...

  18. Influence of metallic artifact filtering on MEG signals for source localization during interictal epileptiform activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical intractable epilepsy is a common condition that affects 40% of epileptic patients that generally have to undergo resective surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been increasingly used to identify the epileptogenic foci through equivalent current dipole (ECD) modeling, one of the most accepted methods to obtain an accurate localization of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Modeling requires that MEG signals are adequately preprocessed to reduce interferences, a task that has been greatly improved by the use of blind source separation (BSS) methods. MEG recordings are highly sensitive to metallic interferences originated inside the head by implanted intracranial electrodes, dental prosthesis, etc and also coming from external sources such as pacemakers or vagal stimulators. To reduce these artifacts, a BSS-based fully automatic procedure was recently developed and validated, showing an effective reduction of metallic artifacts in simulated and real signals (Migliorelli et al 2015 J. Neural Eng. 12 046001). The main objective of this study was to evaluate its effects in the detection of IEDs and ECD modeling of patients with focal epilepsy and metallic interference. Approach. A comparison between the resulting positions of ECDs was performed: without removing metallic interference; rejecting only channels with large metallic artifacts; and after BSS-based reduction. Measures of dispersion and distance of ECDs were defined to analyze the results. Main results. The relationship between the artifact-to-signal ratio and ECD fitting showed that higher values of metallic interference produced highly scattered dipoles. Results revealed a significant reduction on dispersion using the BSS-based reduction procedure, yielding feasible locations of ECDs in contrast to the other two approaches. Significance. The automatic BSS-based method can be applied to MEG datasets affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step to improve the localization of

  19. Revealing time-unlocked brain activity from MEG measurements by common waveform estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takeda

    Full Text Available Brain activities related to cognitive functions, such as attention, occur with unknown and variable delays after stimulus onsets. Recently, we proposed a method (Common Waveform Estimation, CWE that could extract such brain activities from magnetoencephalography (MEG or electroencephalography (EEG measurements. CWE estimates spatiotemporal MEG/EEG patterns occurring with unknown and variable delays, referred to here as unlocked waveforms, without hypotheses about their shapes. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of CWE for cognitive neuroscience. For this purpose, we show procedures to estimate unlocked waveforms using CWE and to examine their role. We applied CWE to the MEG epochs during Go trials of a visual Go/NoGo task. This revealed unlocked waveforms with interesting properties, specifically large alpha oscillations around the temporal areas. To examine the role of the unlocked waveform, we attempted to estimate the strength of the brain activity of the unlocked waveform in various conditions. We made a spatial filter to extract the component reflecting the brain activity of the unlocked waveform, applied this spatial filter to MEG data under different conditions (a passive viewing, a simple reaction time, and Go/NoGo tasks, and calculated the powers of the extracted components. Comparing the powers across these conditions suggests that the unlocked waveforms may reflect the inhibition of the task-irrelevant activities in the temporal regions while the subject attends to the visual stimulus. Our results demonstrate that CWE is a potential tool for revealing new findings of cognitive brain functions without any hypothesis in advance.

  20. On the Use of EEG or MEG Brain Imaging Tools in Neuromarketing Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Vecchiato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present an overview of some published papers of interest for the marketing research employing electroencephalogram (EEG and magnetoencephalogram (MEG methods. The interest for these methodologies relies in their high-temporal resolution as opposed to the investigation of such problem with the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI methodology, also largely used in the marketing research. In addition, EEG and MEG technologies have greatly improved their spatial resolution in the last decades with the introduction of advanced signal processing methodologies. By presenting data gathered through MEG and high resolution EEG we will show which kind of information it is possible to gather with these methodologies while the persons are watching marketing relevant stimuli. Such information will be related to the memorization and pleasantness related to such stimuli. We noted that temporal and frequency patterns of brain signals are able to provide possible descriptors conveying information about the cognitive and emotional processes in subjects observing commercial advertisements. These information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. We also show an example of how an EEG methodology could be used to analyze cultural differences between fruition of video commercials of carbonated beverages in Western and Eastern countries.

  1. Head position in the MEG helmet affects the sensitivity to anterior sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, K; Cox, B; Reid, K; Halgren, E

    2004-11-30

    Current MEG instruments derive the whole-head coverage by utilizing a helmet-shaped opening at the bottom of the dewar. These helmets, however, are quite a bit larger than most people's heads so subjects commonly lean against the back wall of the helmet in order to maintain a steady position. In such cases the anterior brain sources may be too distant to be picked up by the sensors reliably. Potential "invisibility" of the frontal and anterior temporal sources may be particularly troublesome for the studies of cognition and language, as they are subserved significantly by these areas. We examined the sensitivity of the distributed anatomically-constrained MEG (aMEG) approach to the head position ("front" vs. "back") secured within a helmet with custom-tailored bite-bars during a lexical decision task. The anterior head position indeed resulted in much greater sensitivity to language-related activity in frontal and anterior temporal locations. These results emphasize the need to adjust the head position in the helmet in order to maximize the "visibility" of the sources in the anterior brain regions in cognitive and language tasks.

  2. On the use of EEG or MEG brain imaging tools in neuromarketing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Astolfi, Laura; De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Toppi, Jlenia; Aloise, Fabio; Bez, Francesco; Wei, Daming; Kong, Wanzeng; Dai, Jounging; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Babiloni, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Here we present an overview of some published papers of interest for the marketing research employing electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) methods. The interest for these methodologies relies in their high-temporal resolution as opposed to the investigation of such problem with the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) methodology, also largely used in the marketing research. In addition, EEG and MEG technologies have greatly improved their spatial resolution in the last decades with the introduction of advanced signal processing methodologies. By presenting data gathered through MEG and high resolution EEG we will show which kind of information it is possible to gather with these methodologies while the persons are watching marketing relevant stimuli. Such information will be related to the memorization and pleasantness related to such stimuli. We noted that temporal and frequency patterns of brain signals are able to provide possible descriptors conveying information about the cognitive and emotional processes in subjects observing commercial advertisements. These information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. We also show an example of how an EEG methodology could be used to analyze cultural differences between fruition of video commercials of carbonated beverages in Western and Eastern countries.

  3. The Iterative Reweighted Mixed-Norm Estimate for Spatio-Temporal MEG/EEG Source Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, Daniel; Bekhti, Yousra; Haueisen, Jens; Gramfort, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Source imaging based on magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) allows for the non-invasive analysis of brain activity with high temporal and good spatial resolution. As the bioelectromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed, constraints are required. For the analysis of evoked brain activity, spatial sparsity of the neuronal activation is a common assumption. It is often taken into account using convex constraints based on the l 1 -norm. The resulting source estimates are however biased in amplitude and often suboptimal in terms of source selection due to high correlations in the forward model. In this work, we demonstrate that an inverse solver based on a block-separable penalty with a Frobenius norm per block and a l 0.5 -quasinorm over blocks addresses both of these issues. For solving the resulting non-convex optimization problem, we propose the iterative reweighted Mixed Norm Estimate (irMxNE), an optimization scheme based on iterative reweighted convex surrogate optimization problems, which are solved efficiently using a block coordinate descent scheme and an active set strategy. We compare the proposed sparse imaging method to the dSPM and the RAP-MUSIC approach based on two MEG data sets. We provide empirical evidence based on simulations and analysis of MEG data that the proposed method improves on the standard Mixed Norm Estimate (MxNE) in terms of amplitude bias, support recovery, and stability.

  4. MEG Analysis of Neural Interactions in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Khadmaoui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore the interchannel relationships of resting-state brain activity in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, one of the most common mental disorders that develop in children. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG signals were recorded using a 148-channel whole-head magnetometer in 13 patients with ADHD (range: 8–12 years and 14 control subjects (range: 8–13 years. Three complementary measures (coherence, phase-locking value, and Euclidean distance were calculated in the conventional MEG frequency bands: delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma. Our results showed that the interactions among MEG channels are higher for ADHD patients than for control subjects in all frequency bands. Statistically significant differences were observed for short-distance values within right-anterior and central regions, especially at delta, beta, and gamma-frequency bands (p<0.05; Mann-Whitney U test with false discovery rate correction. These frequency bands also showed statistically significant differences in long-distance interactions, mainly among anterior and central regions, as well as among anterior, central, and other areas. These differences might reflect alterations during brain development in children with ADHD. Our results support the role of frontal abnormalities in ADHD pathophysiology, which may reflect a delay in cortical maturation in the frontal cortex.

  5. Truncated RAP-MUSIC (TRAP-MUSIC) for MEG and EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Niko; Stenroos, Matti; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2018-02-15

    Electrically active brain regions can be located applying MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) on magneto- or electroencephalographic (MEG; EEG) data. We introduce a new MUSIC method, called truncated recursively-applied-and-projected MUSIC (TRAP-MUSIC). It corrects a hidden deficiency of the conventional RAP-MUSIC algorithm, which prevents estimation of the true number of brain-signal sources accurately. The correction is done by applying a sequential dimension reduction to the signal-subspace projection. We show that TRAP-MUSIC significantly improves the performance of MUSIC-type localization; in particular, it successfully and robustly locates active brain regions and estimates their number. We compare TRAP-MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC in simulations with varying key parameters, e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, correlation between source time-courses, and initial estimate for the dimension of the signal space. In addition, we validate TRAP-MUSIC with measured MEG data. We suggest that with the proposed TRAP-MUSIC method, MUSIC-type localization could become more reliable and suitable for various online and offline MEG and EEG applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Maternally Expressed Gene 3 (MEG3) Enhances PC12 Cell Hypoxia Injury by Targeting MiR-147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lili; Dong, Zhiling; Liu, Ningning; Xie, Fei; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia often leads to breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and vasogenic edema. It remains to be established whether MEG3 is responsible for the hypoxic damage in neural cells. This study aimed to investigate the role of MEG3 in the hypoxia-induced injuries of PC12 cells. The PC12 cells were seeded and cultured under hypoxia and normoxia culture conditions. The cell viability determined by trypan blue exclusion, apoptosis using propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC)-conjugated Annexin V staining, cell-migration using a modified two-chamber migration assay with a pore size of 8 µM and invasion using 24-well Millicell Hanging Cell Culture inserts with 8 µM PET membranes. Cell viability, relative migration and relative invasion decreased significantly in PC12 cells injured due to hypoxia as compared to control cells. An increase in apoptosis was also observed. The expression of MEG3 was up-regulated in hypoxia-injured PC12 cells. MEG3 overexpression enhanced hypoxia injuries, while MEG3 suppression attenuated the injuries. Meanwhile, MEG3 negatively regulated miR-147 expression. In addition, we found that the expression of Sox2 was increased in PC12 cells after hypoxia and miR-147 negatively regulated Sox2 expression through targets its 3'-UTR. Interesting, Sox2 activated NF-κB pathway and Wnt/β-catenin pathway in PC12 cells. Considering the observations in our study, we can conclude that MEG3 aggravated the hypoxial injury in PC12 cells by down-regulating miR-147 gene and miR-147 further negatively regulated Sox2 expression. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Compact, ultra-low vibration, closed-cycle helium recycler for uninterrupted operation of MEG with SQUID magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Sun, Limin; Lichtenwalter, Ben; Zerkle, Brent; Okada, Yoshio

    2016-06-01

    A closed-cycle helium recycler was developed for continuous uninterrupted operation for magnetometer-based whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems. The recycler consists of a two stage 4 K pulse-tube cryocooler and is mounted on the roof of a magnetically shielded room (MSR). A flexible liquid helium (LHe) return line on the recycler is inserted into the fill port of the MEG system in the MSR through a slotted opening in the ceiling. The helium vapor is captured through a line that returns the gas to the top of the recycler assembly. A high-purity helium gas cylinder connected to the recycler assembly supplies the gas, which, after it is liquefied, increases the level of LHe in the MEG system during the start-up phase. No storage tank for evaporated helium gas nor a helium gas purifier is used. The recycler is capable of liquefying helium with a rate of ∼17 L/d after precooling the MEG system. It has provided a fully maintenance-free operation under computer control for 7 months without refill of helium. Although the recycler is used for single-orientation operation at this initial testing site, it is designed to operate at ±20° orientations, allowing the MEG system to be tilted for supine and reclining positions. Vibration of the recycler is dampened to an ultra-low level by using several vibration isolation methods, which enables uninterrupted operation during MEG measurements. Recyclers similar to this system may be quite useful even for MEG systems with 100% magnetometers.

  8. Downregulated long non-coding RNA MEG3 in breast cancer regulates proliferation, migration and invasion by depending on p53’s transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin [West Biostatistics and Cost-effectiveness Research Center, Medical Insurance Office, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Yang, Bangxiang, E-mail: b19933009@qq.coom [Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-09-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was found to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, hence, screen of tumor-related lncRNAs, identification of their biological roles is important for understanding the processes of tumorigenesis. In this study, we identified the expressing difference of several tumor-related lncRNAs in breast cancer samples and found that, MEG3, which is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues, is also downregulated in breast cancer samples compared with adjacent tissues. For figuring out the effect of MEG3 in breast cancer cells MCF7 and MB231, we overexpressed MEG3 in these cells, and found that it resulted the inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion capacities by enhancing p53’s transcriptional activity on its target genes, including p21, Maspin and KAI1. MEG3 presented similar effects in MB157, which is a p53-null breast cancer cell line, when functional p53 but not p53R273H mutant, which lacks transcriptional activity, was introduced. Surprisingly, overexpression of MEG3 activates p53’s transcriptional activity by decreasing MDM2’s transcription level, and thus stabilizes and accumulates P53. Taken together, our findings indicate that MEG3 is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and affects breast cancer cells’ malignant behaviors, which indicate MEG3 a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. - Highlights: • MEG3 RNA is widely downregulated in breast tumor tissue. • MEG3 regulates P53 indirectly through transcriptional regulation of MDM2. • Under unstressed condition, MEG3-related P53 accumulation transcriptionally activates p53’s target genes. • MEG3 expression level tightly regulates proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in breast tumor cells.

  9. Effect of DLK1 and RTL1 but not MEG3 or MEG8 on muscle gene expression in Callipyge lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolena N Fleming-Waddell

    Full Text Available Callipyge sheep exhibit extreme postnatal muscle hypertrophy in the loin and hindquarters as a result of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the imprinted DLK1-DIO3 domain on ovine chromosome 18. The callipyge SNP up-regulates the expression of surrounding transcripts when inherited in cis without altering their allele-specific imprinting status. The callipyge phenotype exhibits polar overdominant inheritance since only paternal heterozygous animals have muscle hypertrophy. Two studies were conducted profiling gene expression in lamb muscles to determine the down-stream effects of over-expression of paternal allele-specific DLK1 and RTL1 as well as maternal allele-specific MEG3, RTL1AS and MEG8, using Affymetrix bovine expression arrays. A total of 375 transcripts were differentially expressed in callipyge muscle and 25 transcripts were subsequently validated by quantitative PCR. The muscle-specific expression patterns of most genes were similar to DLK1 and included genes that are transcriptional repressors or affect feedback mechanisms in beta-adrenergic and growth factor signaling pathways. One gene, phosphodiesterase 7A had an expression pattern similar to RTL1 expression indicating a biological activity for RTL1 in muscle. Only transcripts that localize to the DLK1-DIO3 domain were affected by inheritance of a maternal callipyge allele. Callipyge sheep are a unique model to study over expression of both paternal allele-specific genes and maternal allele-specific non-coding RNA with an accessible and nonlethal phenotype. This study has identified a number of genes that are regulated by DLK1 and RTL1 expression and exert control on postnatal skeletal muscle growth. The genes identified in this model are primary candidates for naturally regulating postnatal muscle growth in all meat animal species, and may serve as targets to ameliorate muscle atrophy conditions including myopathic diseases and age-related sarcopenia.

  10. Locating the central sulcus using three dimensional image fusion system of helmet shaped whole head MEG and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Tsuyoshi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Seki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Satoru (Kohnan Hospital, Sendai (Japan)); Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1994-08-01

    We compared MR anatomy and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) functional methods in locating the central sulcus. In 20 normal volunteers and 58 patients with intracranial structural lesions, the short latency somatosensory evoked magnetic fields for median nerve and posterior tibial nerve stimuli were measured over the entire head, using a helmet shaped MEG system. The dipole positions estimated by a single current dipole model were projected onto the three dimensional MRI. In 94% of a total of 156 hemispheres, N20m dipole positions for median nerve stimuli coincided with the central sulcus difined by MR anatomical image only. For posterior tibial nerve stimuli, the P38m dipole positions were estimated as being near the medial end of the anatomical central sulcus. MRI and MEG are complementary in locating the central sulcus, even in cases of intracranial structural lesions. (author).

  11. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension...... of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online...... and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned...

  12. Automated Detection of Epileptic Biomarkers in Resting-State Interictal MEG Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel C. Soriano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain differences between brain networks of healthy and epilectic subjects have been reported even during the interictal activity, in which no epileptic seizures occur. Here, magnetoencephalography (MEG data recorded in the resting state is used to discriminate between healthy subjects and patients with either idiopathic generalized epilepsy or frontal focal epilepsy. Signal features extracted from interictal periods without any epileptiform activity are used to train a machine learning algorithm to draw a diagnosis. This is potentially relevant to patients without frequent or easily detectable spikes. To analyze the data, we use an up-to-date machine learning algorithm and explore the benefits of including different features obtained from the MEG data as inputs to the algorithm. We find that the relative power spectral density of the MEG time-series is sufficient to distinguish between healthy and epileptic subjects with a high prediction accuracy. We also find that a combination of features such as the phase-locked value and the relative power spectral density allow to discriminate generalized and focal epilepsy, when these features are calculated over a filtered version of the signals in certain frequency bands. Machine learning algorithms are currently being applied to the analysis and classification of brain signals. It is, however, less evident to identify the proper features of these signals that are prone to be used in such machine learning algorithms. Here, we evaluate the influence of the input feature selection on a clinical scenario to distinguish between healthy and epileptic subjects. Our results indicate that such distinction is possible with a high accuracy (86%, allowing the discrimination between idiopathic generalized and frontal focal epilepsy types.

  13. An Internet-Based Real-Time Audiovisual Link for Dual MEG Recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Zhdanov

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging studies of human social cognition have focused on brain activity of single subjects. More recently, "two-person neuroimaging" has been introduced, with simultaneous recordings of brain signals from two subjects involved in social interaction. These simultaneous "hyperscanning" recordings have already been carried out with a spectrum of neuroimaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, electroencephalography (EEG, and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS.We have recently developed a setup for simultaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings of two subjects that communicate in real time over an audio link between two geographically separated MEG laboratories. Here we present an extended version of the setup, where we have added a video connection and replaced the telephone-landline-based link with an Internet connection. Our setup enabled transmission of video and audio streams between the sites with a one-way communication latency of about 130 ms. Our software that allows reproducing the setup is publicly available.We demonstrate that the audiovisual Internet-based link can mediate real-time interaction between two subjects who try to mirror each others' hand movements that they can see via the video link. All the nine pairs were able to synchronize their behavior. In addition to the video, we captured the subjects' movements with accelerometers attached to their index fingers; we determined from these signals that the average synchronization accuracy was 215 ms. In one subject pair we demonstrate inter-subject coherence patterns of the MEG signals that peak over the sensorimotor areas contralateral to the hand used in the task.

  14. Male veterans with PTSD exhibit aberrant neural dynamics during working memory processing: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Timothy J; Badura-Brack, Amy S; Becker, Katherine M; Ryan, Tara J; Khanna, Maya M; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2016-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with executive functioning deficits, including disruptions in working memory. In this study, we examined the neural dynamics of working memory processing in veterans with PTSD and a matched healthy control sample using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Our sample of recent combat veterans with PTSD and demographically matched participants without PTSD completed a working memory task during a 306-sensor MEG recording. The MEG data were preprocessed and transformed into the time-frequency domain. Significant oscillatory brain responses were imaged using a beamforming approach to identify spatiotemporal dynamics. Fifty-one men were included in our analyses: 27 combat veterans with PTSD and 24 controls. Across all participants, a dynamic wave of neural activity spread from posterior visual cortices to left frontotemporal regions during encoding, consistent with a verbal working memory task, and was sustained throughout maintenance. Differences related to PTSD emerged during early encoding, with patients exhibiting stronger α oscillatory responses than controls in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Differences spread to the right supramarginal and temporal cortices during later encoding where, along with the right IFG, they persisted throughout the maintenance period. This study focused on men with combat-related PTSD using a verbal working memory task. Future studies should evaluate women and the impact of various traumatic experiences using diverse tasks. Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with neurophysiological abnormalities during working memory encoding and maintenance. Veterans with PTSD engaged a bilateral network, including the inferior prefrontal cortices and supramarginal gyri. Right hemispheric neural activity likely reflects compensatory processing, as veterans with PTSD work to maintain accurate performance despite known cognitive deficits associated with the disorder.

  15. MEG Source Localization of Spatially Extended Generators of Epileptic Activity: Comparing Entropic and Hierarchical Bayesian Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Lina, Jean Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG) or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG) signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i) brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii) brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP) method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM) and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm2 to 30 cm2, whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered. PMID:23418485

  16. MEG source localization of spatially extended generators of epileptic activity: comparing entropic and hierarchical bayesian approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheda Arman Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm(2 to 30 cm(2, whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered.

  17. Functional and structural connectivity in the brain from MEG and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, K. B.; Dale, A. M.; Stufflebeam, S. M.; Salat, D.; Witzel, T.; Bishop, A. R.; Halgren, E.

    2002-03-01

    Spectral coherence measures calculated from MEG(magnetoencephalography) suggest functional inter-relationship between cortical areas. Analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data suggests long range anatomical connections. Both techniques can be performed in normal humans, but both are indirect and in both the inverse problem is ill defined. We describe here efforts to combine them. Initially, each set of data is used for cross-validation. Then the complementary connectivity matrices are used to help select functional and anatomical signals that are more likely to indicate connectivity. Measures of coherent activity like phase coherence and mutual information are discussed and compared.

  18. PyEEG: an open source Python module for EEG/MEG feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG) is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  19. ElectroMagnetoEncephalography Software: Overview and Integration with Other EEG/MEG Toolboxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Peyk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available EMEGS (electromagnetic encephalography software is a MATLAB toolbox designed to provide novice as well as expert users in the field of neuroscience with a variety of functions to perform analysis of EEG and MEG data. The software consists of a set of graphical interfaces devoted to preprocessing, analysis, and visualization of electromagnetic data. Moreover, it can be extended using a plug-in interface. Here, an overview of the capabilities of the toolbox is provided, together with a simple tutorial for both a standard ERP analysis and a time-frequency analysis. Latest features and future directions of the software development are presented in the final section.

  20. Distribution of MEG and methanol in well-defined hydrocarbon and water systems: Experimental measurement and modeling using the CPA EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibria data for two binary and two ternary systems are reported in the temperature range of 303.15-323.15. K at atmospheric pressure. The binary systems measured are n-nonane + MEG and ethylbenzene + MEG and the ternary systems are n-nonane + MEG + water and ethylbenzene + MEG...... + water. These data are satisfactorily correlated (binaries) and predicted (ternaries) using Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS). CPA is also applied to binary LLE of aromatic hydrocarbon + water and VLE of methane + methanol. Finally the distribution of water and inhibitors (methanol...... and MEG) in various phases is modeled using CPA. The hydrocarbon phase consists of mixture-1 (methane, ethane, n-butane) or mixture-2 (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-heptane, toluene and n-decane). CPA can satisfactorily predict the water content in the gas phase of the multicomponent systems...

  1. Comparison of EEG and MEG in source localization of induced human gamma-band oscillations during visual stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2015-08-01

    High frequency gamma oscillations are indications of information processing in cortical neuronal networks. Recently, non-invasive detection of these oscillations have become one of the main research areas in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The aim of this study, which is a continuation of our previous MEG study, is to compare the capability of the two modalities (EEG and MEG) in localizing the source of the induced gamma activity due to a visual stimulus, using a spatial filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). To do this, the brain activity was recorded using simultaneous MEG and EEG measurement and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head modeling technique, such as, the three-shell concentric spheres and an overlapping sphere (local sphere) have been used as a forward model to calculate the external electromagnetic potentials and fields recorded by the EEG and MEG, respectively. Our results from the time-frequency analysis, at the sensor level, revealed that the parieto-occipital electrodes and sensors from both modalities showed a clear and sustained gamma-band activity throughout the post-stimulus duration and that both modalities showed similar strongest gamma-band peaks. It was difficult to interpret the spatial pattern of the gamma-band oscillatory response on the scalp, at the sensor level, for both modalities. However, the source analysis result revealed that MEG3 sensor type, which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed the source more focally and close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to that of the EEG.

  2. Reproducibility of EEG-MEG fusion source analysis of interictal spikes: Relevance in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Aydin, Ümit; Lina, Jean-Marc; Dubeau, François; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    Fusion of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data using maximum entropy on the mean method (MEM-fusion) takes advantage of the complementarities between EEG and MEG to improve localization accuracy. Simulation studies demonstrated MEM-fusion to be robust especially in noisy conditions such as single spike source localizations (SSSL). Our objective was to assess the reliability of SSSL using MEM-fusion on clinical data. We proposed to cluster SSSL results to find the most reliable and consistent source map from the reconstructed sources, the so-called consensus map. Thirty-four types of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) were analyzed from 26 patients with well-defined epileptogenic focus. SSSLs were performed on EEG, MEG, and fusion data and consensus maps were estimated using hierarchical clustering. Qualitative (spike-to-spike reproducibility rate, SSR) and quantitative (localization error and spatial dispersion) assessments were performed using the epileptogenic focus as clinical reference. Fusion SSSL provided significantly better results than EEG or MEG alone. Fusion found at least one cluster concordant with the clinical reference in all cases. This concordant cluster was always the one involving the highest number of spikes. Fusion yielded highest reproducibility (SSR EEG = 55%, MEG = 71%, fusion = 90%) and lowest localization error. Also, using only few channels from either modality (21EEG + 272MEG or 54EEG + 25MEG) was sufficient to reach accurate fusion. MEM-fusion with consensus map approach provides an objective way of finding the most reliable and concordant generators of IEDs. We, therefore, suggest the pertinence of SSSL using MEM-fusion as a valuable clinical tool for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. LncRNA MEG3 inhibited osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from postmenopausal osteoporosis by targeting miR-133a-3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiujun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yuanxia; Ma, Lan; Lin, Lin; Meng, Jia; Jiang, Lihong; Wang, Liping; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Yina

    2017-05-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) MEG3 has proven to be an important regulator involved in the pathogenesis and development of various human diseases. However, the functional involvement of MEG3 in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMOP) and its mechanism is still unclear. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured from mouse pathologic models and patients with PMOP, respectively. The expression of MEG3 and miR-133a-3p in BMSCs was detected using qRT-PCR. The recombinant expression vector was constructed and transfected into BMSCs to regulate the endogenous expression of MEG3 and miR-133a-3p. The mineralized nodules formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Runx2, OCN, OPN expressions were used as specific markers for the differentiation of osteoblasts. The expressions of MEG3 and miR-133a-3p in BMSCs from PMOP were increased, and there was a positive correlation between MEG3 and miR-133a-3p expression in BMSCs. In the differentiation process from BMSCs to osteoblasts, the expressions of MEG3 and miR-133a-3p were markedly decreased, and MEG3 overexpression reversed the osteogenic induction-mediated downregulation of miR-133a-3p, which was accompanied by significant decline in SLC39A1 expression. Furthermore, miR-133a-3p silencing or upregulation eliminated the effects of MEG3 on the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs through direct binding. The research indicated that MEG3 regulated the expression of miR-133a-3p, and inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs induced PMOP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. EEG/MEG Source Reconstruction with Spatial-Temporal Two-Way Regularized Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2013-07-11

    In this work, we propose a spatial-temporal two-way regularized regression method for reconstructing neural source signals from EEG/MEG time course measurements. The proposed method estimates the dipole locations and amplitudes simultaneously through minimizing a single penalized least squares criterion. The novelty of our methodology is the simultaneous consideration of three desirable properties of the reconstructed source signals, that is, spatial focality, spatial smoothness, and temporal smoothness. The desirable properties are achieved by using three separate penalty functions in the penalized regression framework. Specifically, we impose a roughness penalty in the temporal domain for temporal smoothness, and a sparsity-inducing penalty and a graph Laplacian penalty in the spatial domain for spatial focality and smoothness. We develop a computational efficient multilevel block coordinate descent algorithm to implement the method. Using a simulation study with several settings of different spatial complexity and two real MEG examples, we show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods that use only a subset of the three penalty functions. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  5. A skull-based multiple dipole phantom for EEG and MEG studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, M.E.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A versatile phantom for use in evaluating forward and inverse methods for MEG and EEG has been designed and is currently being constructed. The phantom consists of three major components: (i) a 32-element cur- rent dipole array, (ii) a PC-controlled dipole driver with 32 isolated channels allowing independent control of each dipole, (iii) spherical and human-skull mounts in which the dipole array is placed. Materials were selected throughout the phantom to produce minimal field distortions and artifacts to enable acquisition of high quality EEG and MEG data. The dipoles are made from a rigid narrow (0.84 mm) stainless steel coax cable. The dipole drivers can be configured as either current or voltage sources, are independently programmable and fully isolated, and are capable of producing arbitrary bipolar waveforms up to a 200 Hz bandwidth. The spherical mount is a single shell sphere filled with conductive gelatin. The human skull mount has three shells: ``brain`` (conducting gelatin), ``skull`` (the skull is impregnated with a low conductivity conducting gelatin), and ``scalp`` (a thin layer of rubber latex mixed with NaCl to achieve a conductivity matched to the brain). The conductivities will be adjusted to achieve approximately an 80:1:80 ratio. Data collected to date from the spherical phantom shows excellent agreement between measured surface potentials and that predicted from theory (27 of the 32 dipoles give better than 99.9% rms fit) and negligible leakage between dipoles. We are currently completing construction of the skull mount.

  6. Sensory handedness is not reflected in cortical responses after basic nerve stimulation: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C N; Theuvenet, Peter J; de Munck, Jan C; Peters, Maria J; van Ree, Jan M; Lopes da Silva, Fernando L

    2012-04-01

    Motor dominance is well established, but sensory dominance is much less clear. We therefore studied the cortical evoked magnetic fields using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a group of 20 healthy right handed subjects in order to examine whether standard electrical stimulation of the median and ulnar nerve demonstrated sensory lateralization. The global field power (GFP) curves, as an indication of cortical activation, did not depict sensory lateralization to the dominant left hemisphere. Comparison of the M20, M30, and M70 peak latencies and GFP values exhibited no statistical differences between the hemispheres, indicating no sensory hemispherical dominance at these latencies for each nerve. Field maps at these latencies presented a first and second polarity reversal for both median and ulnar stimulation. Spatial dipole position parameters did not reveal statistical left-right differences at the M20, M30 and M70 peaks for both nerves. Neither did the dipolar strengths at M20, M30 and M70 show a statistical left-right difference for both nerves. Finally, the Laterality Indices of the M20, M30 and M70 strengths did not indicate complete lateralization to one of the hemispheres. After electrical median and ulnar nerve stimulation no evidence was found for sensory hand dominance in brain responses of either hand, as measured by MEG. The results can provide a new assessment of patients with sensory dysfunctions or perceptual distortion when sensory dominance occurs way beyond the estimated norm.

  7. The construction technique of the high granularity and high transparency drift chamber of MEG II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Miccoli, A.; Panareo, M.; Pinto, C.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    The MEG experiment searches for the charged lepton flavor violating decay, μ +→ e+γ. MEG has already determined the world best upper limit on the branching ratio BRfeed-through technique as wire anchoring system could hardly be implemented and therefore it was necessary to develop new wiring strategies. The number of wires and the stringent requirements on the precision of their position and on the uniformity of the wire mechanical tension impose the use of an automatic system to operate the wiring procedures. This wiring robot, designed and built at the INFN Lecce and University of Salento laboratories, consists of: ṡ a semiautomatic wiring machine with a high precision on wire mechanical tensioning (better than 0.5 g) and on wire positioning (20 μ m) for simultaneous wiring of multiwire layers; ṡ a contact-less infrared laser soldering tool; ṡ an automatic handling system for storing and transporting the multi-wire layers. The drift chamber is currently under construction at INFN and should be completed by the end of summer 2017 to be then delivered to PSI for commissioning.

  8. Somatosensory system deficits in schizophrenia revealed by MEG during a median-nerve oddball task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Lee, Roland R; Gaa, Kathleen M; Song, Tao; Harrington, Deborah L; Loh, Cathy; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Edgar, J Christopher; Miller, Gregory A; Canive, Jose M; Granholm, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Although impairments related to somatosensory perception are common in schizophrenia, they have rarely been examined in functional imaging studies. In the present study, magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to identify neural networks that support attention to somatosensory stimuli in healthy adults and abnormalities in these networks in patient with schizophrenia. A median-nerve oddball task was used to probe attention to somatosensory stimuli, and an advanced, high-resolution MEG source-imaging method was applied to assess activity throughout the brain. In nineteen healthy subjects, attention-related activation was seen in a sensorimotor network involving primary somatosensory (S1), secondary somatosensory (S2), primary motor (M1), pre-motor (PMA), and paracentral lobule (PCL) areas. A frontal-parietal-temporal "attention network", containing dorsal- and ventral-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and VLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), superior parietal lobule (SPL), inferior parietal lobule (IPL)/supramarginal gyrus (SMG), and temporal lobe areas, was also activated. Seventeen individuals with schizophrenia showed early attention-related hyperactivations in S1 and M1 but hypo-activation in S1, S2, M1, and PMA at later latency in the sensorimotor network. Within this attention network, hypoactivation was found in SPL, DLPFC, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal aspect of ACC. Hyperactivation was seen in SMG/IPL, frontal pole, and the ventral aspect of ACC in patients. These findings link attention-related somatosensory deficits to dysfunction in both sensorimotor and frontal-parietal-temporal networks in schizophrenia.

  9. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.M.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Nicolo, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tenchini, F. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa Univ. (Italy); Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; De Bari, A.; Rossella, M. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Graziosi, A.; Piredda, G.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C. [INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Tassielli, G.F. [INFN, Sezione di Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Salento Univ. Lecce (Italy); Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ieki, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kang, Tae Im; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Renga, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Collaboration: The MEG Collaboration

    2016-03-15

    We studied the radiative muon decay μ{sup +} → e{sup +}νanti νγ by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (∝13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8 x 10{sup 14} positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009-2010 and measured the branching ratio B(μ{sup +} → eνanti νγ) = (6.03 ± 0.14(stat.) ± 0.53(sys.)) x 10{sup -8} for E{sub e} > 45 MeV and E{sub γ} > 40 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ process. (orig.)

  10. Paired MEG data set source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, J J; Mosher, J C; Huang, M; Leahy, R M

    2000-09-01

    An important class of experiments in functional brain mapping involves collecting pairs of data corresponding to separate "Task" and "Control" conditions. The data are then analyzed to determine what activity occurs during the Task experiment but not in the Control. Here we describe a new method for processing paired magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data sets using our recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. In this method the signal subspace of the Task data is projected against the orthogonal complement of the Control data signal subspace to obtain a subspace which describes spatial activity unique to the Task. A RAP-MUSIC localization search is then performed on this projected data to localize the sources which are active in the Task but not in the Control data. In addition to dipolar sources, effective blocking of more complex sources, e.g., multiple synchronously activated dipoles or synchronously activated distributed source activity, is possible since these topographies are well-described by the Control data signal subspace. Unlike previously published methods, the proposed method is shown to be effective in situations where the time series associated with Control and Task activity possess significant cross correlation. The method also allows for straightforward determination of the estimated time series of the localized target sources. A multiepoch MEG simulation and a phantom experiment are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully identify sources and their time series in the Task data.

  11. Inter-subject alignment of MEG datasets in a common representational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Borst, Jelmer P; Kass, Robert E; Anderson, John R

    2017-09-01

    Pooling neural imaging data across subjects requires aligning recordings from different subjects. In magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings, sensors across subjects are poorly correlated both because of differences in the exact location of the sensors, and structural and functional differences in the brains. It is possible to achieve alignment by assuming that the same regions of different brains correspond across subjects. However, this relies on both the assumption that brain anatomy and function are well correlated, and the strong assumptions that go into solving the under-determined inverse problem given the high-dimensional source space. In this article, we investigated an alternative method that bypasses source-localization. Instead, it analyzes the sensor recordings themselves and aligns their temporal signatures across subjects. We used a multivariate approach, multiset canonical correlation analysis (M-CCA), to transform individual subject data to a low-dimensional common representational space. We evaluated the robustness of this approach over a synthetic dataset, by examining the effect of different factors that add to the noise and individual differences in the data. On an MEG dataset, we demonstrated that M-CCA performs better than a method that assumes perfect sensor correspondence and a method that applies source localization. Last, we described how the standard M-CCA algorithm could be further improved with a regularization term that incorporates spatial sensor information. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4287-4301, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Recycling Monoethylene Glycol (MEG from the Recirculating Waste of an Ethylene Oxide Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayed Mohsen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the ethylene glycol generation unit of petrochemical plants, first a reaction of ethylene oxide takes place which is then followed by other side reactions. These reactions include water absorption with ethylene oxide, which leads to the generation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Over the lifetime of the alpha-alumina-based silver catalyst there is an increase in side reactions, increasing the amount of the formaldehyde and acetaldehyde generated by the ethylene oxide reactor which leads to reduced MEG product purity. Given the need of a petrochemical complex to further strip the aldehyde (formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to increase the quality of the MEG and increase the lifetime of the alpha-alumina-based silver catalyst, resin beds are designed and their surface absorption capacity is investigated to optimize aldehyde (formaldehyde and acetaldehyde removal in the recirculating water flow of the ethylene oxide unit. Experiments show that the ion exchange system based on strong anionic resin pre-treated with a sodium bisulfite solution can reduce the aldehyde level from about 300ppm to less than 5ppm. After the resin is saturated with aldehyde, the resin can be recycled using the sodium bisulfite solution which is a cheap chemical substance.

  13. MEG II drift chamber characterization with the silicon based cosmic ray tracker at INFN Pisa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M., E-mail: marco.venturini@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, dell' Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, dell' Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Signorelli, G. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    High energy physics experiments at the high intensity frontier place ever greater demands on detectors, and in particular on tracking devices. In order to compare the performance of small size tracking prototypes, a high resolution cosmic ray tracker has been assembled to provide an external track reference. It consists of four spare ladders of the external layers of the Silicon Vertex Tracker of the BaBar experiment. The test facility, operating at INFN Sezione di Pisa, provides the detector under test with an external track with an intrinsic resolution of 15–30 μm. The MEG II tracker is conceived as a unique volume wire drift chamber filled with He–isobutane 85–15%. The ionization density in this gas mixture is about 13 clusters/cm and this results in a non-negligible bias of the impact parameters for tracks crossing the cell close to the anode wire. We present the telescope performance in terms of tracking efficiency and resolution and the results of the characterization of a MEG II drift chamber prototype.

  14. Bayesian Inference for Neural Electromagnetic Source Localization: Analysis of MEG Visual Evoked Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a Bayesian approach to the analysis of neural electromagnetic (MEG/EEG) data that can incorporate or fuse information from other imaging modalities and addresses the ill-posed inverse problem by sarnpliig the many different solutions which could have produced the given data. From these samples one can draw probabilistic inferences about regions of activation. Our source model assumes a variable number of variable size cortical regions of stimulus-correlated activity. An active region consists of locations on the cortical surf ace, within a sphere centered on some location in cortex. The number and radi of active regions can vary to defined maximum values. The goal of the analysis is to determine the posterior probability distribution for the set of parameters that govern the number, location, and extent of active regions. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to generate a large sample of sets of parameters distributed according to the posterior distribution. This sample is representative of the many different source distributions that could account for given data, and allows identification of probable (i.e. consistent) features across solutions. Examples of the use of this analysis technique with both simulated and empirical MEG data are presented

  15. MEG source localization using an MLP with a distributed output representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sung Chan; Pearlmutter, Barak A; Nolte, Guido

    2003-06-01

    We present a system that takes realistic magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals and localizes a single dipole to reasonable accuracy in real time. At its heart is a multilayer perceptron (MLP) which takes the sensor measurements as inputs, uses one hidden layer, and generates as outputs the amplitudes of receptive fields holding a distributed representation of the dipole location. We trained this Soft-MLP on dipolar sources with real brain noise and converted the network's output into an explicit Cartesian coordinate representation of the dipole location using two different decoding strategies. The proposed Soft-MLPs are much more accurate than previous networks which output source locations in Cartesian coordinates. Hybrid Soft-MLP-start-LM systems, in which the Soft-MLP output initializes Levenberg-Marquardt, retained their accuracy of 0.28 cm with a decrease in computation time from 36 ms to 30 ms. We apply the Soft-MLP localizer to real MEG data separated by a blind source separation algorithm, and compare the Soft-MLP dipole locations to those of a conventional system.

  16. A beamformer analysis of MEG data reveals frontal generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available To localize the neural generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity with high temporal resolution we conducted a beamformer analysis (Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry, SAM on magnetoencephalography (MEG data from a previous musical mismatch study. The stimuli consisted of a six-tone melodic sequence comprising broken chords in C- and G-major. The musical sequence was presented within an oddball paradigm in which the last tone was lowered occasionally (20% by a minor third. The beamforming analysis revealed significant right hemispheric neural activation in the superior temporal (STC, inferior frontal (IFC, superior frontal (SFC and orbitofrontal (OFC cortices within a time window of 100-200 ms after the occurrence of a deviant tone. IFC and SFC activation was also observed in the left hemisphere. The pronounced early right inferior frontal activation of the auditory mismatch negativity has not been shown in MEG studies so far. The activation in STC and IFC is consistent with earlier electroencephalography (EEG, optical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies that reveal the auditory and inferior frontal cortices as main generators of the auditory MMN. The observed right hemispheric IFC is also in line with some previous music studies showing similar activation patterns after harmonic syntactic violations. The results demonstrate that a deviant tone within a musical sequence recruits immediately a distributed neural network in frontal and prefrontal areas suggesting that top-down processes are involved when expectation violation occurs within well-known stimuli.

  17. Tracking cognitive processing stages with MEG : A spatio-temporal model of associative recognition in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Jelmer P; Ghuman, Avniel S; Anderson, John R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cognitive processing stages underlying associative recognition using MEG. Over the last four decades, a model of associative recognition has been developed in the ACT-R cognitive architecture. This model was first exclusively based on behavior, but was later

  18. Automatic BSS-based filtering of metallic interference in MEG recordings: definition and validation using simulated signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Objective. One of the principal drawbacks of magnetoencephalography (MEG) is its high sensitivity to metallic artifacts, which come from implanted intracranial electrodes and dental ferromagnetic prosthesis and produce a high distortion that masks cerebral activity. The aim of this study was to develop an automatic algorithm based on blind source separation (BSS) techniques to remove metallic artifacts from MEG signals. Approach. Three methods were evaluated: AMUSE, a second-order technique; and INFOMAX and FastICA, both based on high-order statistics. Simulated signals consisting of real artifact-free data mixed with real metallic artifacts were generated to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of BSS and the subsequent interference reduction. A completely automatic detection of metallic-related components was proposed, exploiting the known characteristics of the metallic interference: regularity and low frequency content. Main results. The automatic procedure was applied to the simulated datasets and the three methods exhibited different performances. Results indicated that AMUSE preserved and consequently recovered more brain activity than INFOMAX and FastICA. Normalized mean squared error for AMUSE decomposition remained below 2%, allowing an effective removal of artifactual components. Significance. To date, the performance of automatic artifact reduction has not been evaluated in MEG recordings. The proposed methodology is based on an automatic algorithm that provides an effective interference removal. This approach can be applied to any MEG dataset affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step, allowing further analysis of unusable or poor quality data.

  19. Added diagnostic value of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in patients suspected for epilepsy, where previous, extensive EEG workup was unrevealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Beniczky, Sándor; Tankisi, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the possible additional diagnostic yield of MEG in the workup of patients with suspected epilepsy, where repeated EEGs, including sleep-recordings failed to identify abnormalities. METHODS: Fifty-two consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of epilepsy and at least thr...

  20. Analysis of simultaneous MEG and intracranial LFP recordings during Deep Brain Stimulation: a protocol and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Jha, Ashwani; Neal, Spencer; Reid, Alphonso; Bradbury, David; Aston, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for several neurological and psychiatric disorders. In order to gain insights into the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS and to advance future therapies a better understanding of the effects of DBS on large-scale brain networks is required. In this paper, we describe an experimental protocol and analysis pipeline for simultaneously performing DBS and intracranial local field potential (LFP) recordings at a target brain region during concurrent magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurement. Firstly we describe a phantom setup that allowed us to precisely characterise the MEG artefacts that occurred during DBS at clinical settings. Using the phantom recordings we demonstrate that with MEG beamforming it is possible to recover oscillatory activity synchronised to a reference channel, despite the presence of high amplitude artefacts evoked by DBS. Finally, we highlight the applicability of these methods by illustrating in a single patient with Parkinson's disease (PD), that changes in cortical-subthalamic nucleus coupling can be induced by DBS. To our knowledge this paper provides the first technical description of a recording and analysis pipeline for combining simultaneous cortical recordings using MEG, with intracranial LFP recordings of a target brain nucleus during DBS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitoring Crohn's disease during anti-TNF-α therapy: validation of the magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) against a combined clinical reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezzi, Davide; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Makanyanga, Jesica; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart Andrew; Vega, Roser

    2016-01-01

    To assess the ability of magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) to characterise Crohn's disease (CD) response to anti-TNF-α therapy. Thirty-six CD patients (median age 26 years, 20 males) commencing anti-TNF-α therapy with concomitant baseline MRI enterography (MRE) were identified retrospectively. Patients' clinical course was followed and correlated with subsequent MREs. Scan order was randomised and MEGS (a global activity score) was applied by two blinded radiologists. A physician's global assessment of the disease activity (remission, mild, moderate or severe) at the time of MRE was assigned. The cohort was divided into clinical responders and non-responders and MEGS compared according to activity status and treatment response. Interobserver agreement was assessed. Median MEGS decreased significantly between baseline and first follow-up in responders (28 versus 6, P < 0.001) but was unchanged in non-responders (26 versus 18, P = 0.28). The median MEGS was significantly lower in clinical remission (9) than in moderate (14) or severe (29) activity (P < 0.001). MEGS correlated significantly with clinical activity (r = 0.53; P < 0.001). Interobserver Bland-Altman limits of agreement (BA LoA) were -19.7 to 18.5. MEGS decreases significantly in clinical responders to anti-TNF-α therapy but not in non-responders, demonstrates good interobserver agreement and moderate correlation with clinical disease activity. (orig.)

  2. Measuring alterations in oscillatory brain networks in schizophrenia with resting-state MEG: State-of-the-art and methodological challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamian, Golnoush; Hincapié, Ana-Sofía; Pascarella, Annalisa; Thiery, Thomas; Combrisson, Etienne; Saive, Anne-Lise; Martel, Véronique; Althukov, Dmitrii; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies provide evidence of disturbed resting-state brain networks in Schizophrenia (SZ). However, untangling the neuronal mechanisms that subserve these baseline alterations requires measurement of their electrophysiological underpinnings. This systematic review specifically investigates the contributions of resting-state Magnetoencephalography (MEG) in elucidating abnormal neural organization in SZ patients. A systematic literature review of resting-state MEG studies in SZ was conducted. This literature is discussed in relation to findings from resting-state fMRI and EEG, as well as to task-based MEG research in SZ population. Importantly, methodological limitations are considered and recommendations to overcome current limitations are proposed. Resting-state MEG literature in SZ points towards altered local and long-range oscillatory network dynamics in various frequency bands. Critical methodological challenges with respect to experiment design, and data collection and analysis need to be taken into consideration. Spontaneous MEG data show that local and global neural organization is altered in SZ patients. MEG is a highly promising tool to fill in knowledge gaps about the neurophysiology of SZ. However, to reach its fullest potential, basic methodological challenges need to be overcome. MEG-based resting-state power and connectivity findings could be great assets to clinical and translational research in psychiatry, and SZ in particular. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effects of recombinant human alpha-2b and gamma interferons on bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Y; Dan, K; Kuriya, S; Nomura, T

    1989-10-01

    The effects of recombinant human interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and gamma on the bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) were compared between eight patients in the chronic phase of Ph1-positive chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and five hematologically normal patients. CFU-Meg was assayed in plasma clot culture added with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium as a source of colony stimulating activity. The average count of CFU-Meg colonies formed from the bone marrow of CML patients was 5.5 times that of normal controls. Spontaneous CFU-Meg colonies were grown in seven of eight CML patients, but in none of five controls. Colony formation by CFU-Meg in CML as well as normal bone marrow was suppressed by the two preparations of IFN in a dose dependent fashion. Their suppressive influence on colonies from CFU-Meg was comparable between CML and normal bone marrow at lower concentrations, but was less marked for CML than normal bone marrow at higher concentrations. The formation of CFU-Meg colonies from CML bone marrow was more severely suppressed by IFN-gamma than IFN-alpha-2b. Depletion of either T lymphocytes or adherent cells from the CML bone marrow cells diminished the suppressive effects of IFN-gamma, but had no influence on the effects of IFN-alpha-2b.

  4. Co-Registration of MEG and ULF MRI using a 7 channel low-Tc SQUID system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnelind, Per E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Jan H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In human brain imaging, e.g. pre-surgical mapping, it is highly desired to obtain images with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, no single imaging device is capable of producing both a high spatial resolution anatomical image and a high temporal resolution functional image. During the last couple of years significant efforts have been directed towards magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fields comparable to the Earth's field, i.e. microtesla fields, or lower fields. The fields in this range are called ultra-low fields (ULF). Interestingly, the idea of magnetic resonance at microtesla fields is more than 50 years old. In ULF MR it is essential to use pre-polarization to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal from the precessing spins, since the magnetization from the measurement field alone is very small. Even with the present level of prepolarization the ULF images are not as highly resolved as their high-field counterparts. By using a 7 channel system equipped with low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) to perform both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), it is possible to coregister a lower resolution ULF MR image and an MEG image obtained during one run. Thereby, the MEG data is aligned to the ULF MR image after performing a calibration run with a phantom. The ULF MR image can then be used to align the MEG data onto a high-field MR image. Recently, our group presented the first brain images obtained by ULF MRI. The MR imaging was combined with an MEG session performed a posteriori. The subject's head was moved in between the MRI run and the MEG run and no reference coils were used to quantify the translation. The main reason for the translation of the head was to improve the coverage of the auditory evoked response. In this paper, we report interleaved ULF MRI and MEG measurements co-registered in the same system.

  5. Prediction of mineral scale formation in wet gas condensate pipelines and in MEG (mono ethylene glycol) regeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandengen, Kristian

    2006-12-20

    Gas hydrate formation is a serious problem in the oil and gas industry, since its formation can plug wells and prevent production. The gas hydrate is a crystalline solid with a natural gas molecule surrounded by a cage of water molecules. It forms at high pressures and low temperatures. This is a problem for offshore gas wells, where the temperature is low in transport lines from well to the production facilities. Mono Ethylene Glycol (MEG) is commonly used as hydrate inhibitor. Classified as a thermodynamic inhibitor, this additive functions just as antifreeze in an automotive radiator. When producing oil and gas there will in most cases also be produced some water, which can contain dissolved salts. These salts may precipitate and they tend to deposit on surfaces. Deposition of inorganic minerals from brine is called scale. Generally MEG has the adverse effect of lowering the solubility of most salts. A common method to prevent corrosion in flow lines is to increase pH by adding basic agents (e.g. NaOH, NaHCO{sub 3}) to the MEG stream. In such cases, carbonate salts are particularly troublesome since an increase in pH by one unit, will reduce the solubility by two orders of magnitude. Thus there will be a trade off between good corrosion protection (high pH) and scale control (low pH). The aim of this work has been to develop a model that can predict mineral solubility in the presence of MEG. Experimental solubility data, together with thermodynamic data taken from literature, have been utilized to construct empirical functions for the influence of MEG on mineral scale formation. These functions enabled the expansion of an already existing aqueous scale model into a model valid for water+MEG mixed solutions. The aqueous scale model combines an equation of state (gas+oil phase) with the Pitzer ion interaction model (water phase) to describe the multiphase behaviour of gas-oil-water systems. This work summarizes the theoretical foundation and proposes how to work

  6. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and field (SEF data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  7. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Küpper, Philipp; Heers, Marcel; Kugel, Harald; Galka, Andreas; Hamid, Laith; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Rampp, Stefan; Wolters, Carsten Hermann

    2014-01-01

    To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and field (SEF) data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  8. Application of modern tests for stationarity to single-trial MEG data: transferring powerful statistical tools from econometrics to neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiński, Lech; König, Reinhard; Sielużycki, Cezary; Kordecki, Wojciech

    2011-10-01

    Stationarity is a crucial yet rarely questioned assumption in the analysis of time series of magneto- (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). One key drawback of the commonly used tests for stationarity of encephalographic time series is the fact that conclusions on stationarity are only indirectly inferred either from the Gaussianity (e.g. the Shapiro-Wilk test or Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) or the randomness of the time series and the absence of trend using very simple time-series models (e.g. the sign and trend tests by Bendat and Piersol). We present a novel approach to the analysis of the stationarity of MEG and EEG time series by applying modern statistical methods which were specifically developed in econometrics to verify the hypothesis that a time series is stationary. We report our findings of the application of three different tests of stationarity--the Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Schin (KPSS) test for trend or mean stationarity, the Phillips-Perron (PP) test for the presence of a unit root and the White test for homoscedasticity--on an illustrative set of MEG data. For five stimulation sessions, we found already for short epochs of duration of 250 and 500 ms that, although the majority of the studied epochs of single MEG trials were usually mean-stationary (KPSS test and PP test), they were classified as nonstationary due to their heteroscedasticity (White test). We also observed that the presence of external auditory stimulation did not significantly affect the findings regarding the stationarity of the data. We conclude that the combination of these tests allows a refined analysis of the stationarity of MEG and EEG time series.

  9. Is functional brain connectivity atypical in autism? A systematic review of EEG and MEG studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian O'Reilly

    Full Text Available Although it is well recognized that autism is associated with altered patterns of over- and under-connectivity, specifics are still a matter of debate. Little has been done so far to synthesize available literature using whole-brain electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings.1 To systematically review the literature on EEG/MEG functional and effective connectivity in autism spectrum disorder (ASD, 2 to synthesize and critically appraise findings related with the hypothesis that ASD is characterized by long-range underconnectivity and local overconnectivity, and 3 to provide, based on the literature, an analysis of tentative factors that are likely to mediate association between ASD and atypical connectivity (e.g., development, topography, lateralization.Literature reviews were done using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. Abstracts were screened, and only relevant articles were analyzed based on the objectives of this paper. Special attention was paid to the methodological characteristics that could have created variability in outcomes reported between studies.Our synthesis provides relatively strong support for long-range underconnectivity in ASD, whereas the status of local connectivity remains unclear. This observation was also mirrored by a similar relationship with lower frequencies being often associated with underconnectivity and higher frequencies being associated with both under- and over-connectivity. Putting together these observations, we propose that ASD is characterized by a general trend toward an under-expression of lower-band wide-spread integrative processes compensated by more focal, higher-frequency, locally specialized, and segregated processes. Further investigation is, however, needed to corroborate the conclusion and its generalizability across different tasks. Of note, abnormal lateralization in ASD, specifically an elevated left-over-right EEG and MEG functional connectivity ratio, has been also

  10. Assessing interactions of linear and nonlinear neuronal sources using MEG beamformers: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipapas, Avgis; Hillebrand, Arjan; Holliday, Ian E; Singh, Krish D; Barnes, Gareth R

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed to explore methods of assessing interactions between neuronal sources using MEG beamformers. However, beamformer methodology is based on the assumption of no linear long-term source interdependencies [VanVeen BD, vanDrongelen W, Yuchtman M, Suzuki A. Localization of brain electrical activity via linearly constrained minimum variance spatial filtering. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 1997;44:867-80; Robinson SE, Vrba J. Functional neuroimaging by synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). In: Recent advances in Biomagnetism. Sendai: Tohoku University Press; 1999. p. 302-5]. Although such long-term correlations are not efficient and should not be anticipated in a healthy brain [Friston KJ. The labile brain. I. Neuronal transients and nonlinear coupling. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 2000;355:215-36], transient correlations seem to underlie functional cortical coordination [Singer W. Neuronal synchrony: a versatile code for the definition of relations? Neuron 1999;49-65; Rodriguez E, George N, Lachaux J, Martinerie J, Renault B, Varela F. Perception's shadow: long-distance synchronization of human brain activity. Nature 1999;397:430-3; Bressler SL, Kelso J. Cortical coordination dynamics and cognition. Trends Cogn Sci 2001;5:26-36]. Two periodic sources were simulated and the effects of transient source correlation on the spatial and temporal performance of the MEG beamformer were examined. Subsequently, the interdependencies of the reconstructed sources were investigated using coherence and phase synchronization analysis based on Mutual Information. Finally, two interacting nonlinear systems served as neuronal sources and their phase interdependencies were studied under realistic measurement conditions. Both the spatial and the temporal beamformer source reconstructions were accurate as long as the transient source correlation did not exceed 30-40 percent of the duration of beamformer analysis. In addition, the interdependencies of periodic sources were

  11. The influence of methylphenidate on the power spectrum of ADHD children – an MEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Susanne

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was dedicated to investigate the influence of Methylphenidate (MPH on cortical processing of children who were diagnosed with different subtypes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. As all of the previous studies investigating power differences in different frequency bands have been using EEG, mostly with a relatively small number of electrodes our aim was to obtain new aspects using high density magnetoencephalography (MEG. Methods 35 children (6 female, 29 male participated in this study. Mean age was 11.7 years (± 1.92 years. 17 children were diagnosed of having an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder of the combined type (ADHDcom, DSM IV code 314.01; the other 18 were diagnosed for ADHD of the predominantly inattentive type (ADHDin, DSM IV code 314.0. We measured the MEG during a 5 minute resting period with a 148-channel magnetometer system (MAGNES™ 2500 WH, 4D Neuroimaging, San Diego, USA. Power values were averaged for 5 bands: Delta (D, 1.5–3.5 Hz, Theta (T, 3.5–7.5 Hz, Alpha (A, 7.5–12.5 Hz, Beta (B, 12.5–25 Hz and Global (GL, 1.5–25 Hz.. Additionally, attention was measured behaviourally using the D2 test of attention with and without medication. Results The global power of the frequency band from 1.5 to 25 Hz increased with MPH. Relative Theta was found to be higher in the left hemisphere after administration of MPH than before. A positive correlation was found between D2 test improvement and MPH-induced power changes in the Theta band over the left frontal region. A linear regression was computed and confirmed that the larger the improvement in D2 test performance, the larger the increase in Theta after MPH application. Conclusion Main effects induced by medication were found in frontal regions. Theta band activity increased over the left hemisphere after MPH application. This finding contradicts EEG results of several groups who found lower levels of Theta power

  12. MEG: search for the $\\mu$---$\\succ$ e $\\gamma$ decay at PSI

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The MEG Experiment explores the Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (SUSY GUTs) and the mystery of the tiny neutrino masses by searching for the lepton-flavor violating decay of a muon into an electron and a gamma-ray, down to an extremely small branching ratio which is expected by these theories.\\\\ \\\\This high sensitivity, higher than the previous experiment by two orders of magnitude, has been realized by: (1) the world's most intensive DC muon beam produced by the 590 MeV cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute, (2) the innovative liquid xenon scintillation gamma ray detector that has been shown to achieve unparalleled resolutions in energy, timing and position, and (3) the specially designed positron spectrometer with a graded magnetic field that enables fast discrimination of background particles.

  13. Sensorial effects of gamma radiation processing on cinnamon (Laurus cinnamomum) and nut meg (Myristica fragans)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salum, Debora C.; Sabundjian, Ingrid T.; Silva, Priscila V.; Furgeri, Camilo; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes. Lab. de Deteccao de Alimentos Irradiados]. E-mails: villavic@ipen.br; dcsalum@ipen.br; Purgatto, Eduardo [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental]. E-mail: epurgatt@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Food irradiation is the processing of food products by ionizing radiation in order, among other things, to control food borne pathogens, reduce microbial load and insect infestation, inhibit the germination of root crops, and extend the durable life of perishable products. Irradiation of dried food ingredients, particularly herbs and spices, has a great application potential, and has already been implemented in many countries. Spice irradiation is performed to increase the hygienic quality and used as decontamination processes instead of fumigation methods. European Community approves irradiation processing as an effective residue-free alternative. The present paper evaluates the effect of ionizing radiation on sensorial properties of cinnamon (Laurus cinnamomum) and nut meg (Myristica fragans). The samples have been irradiated in multipurpose irradiator of {sup 60}Co in the doses: 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 e 25 kGy. (author)

  14. A comparative study of minimum norm inverse methods for MEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C.; Phillips, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    The majority of MEG imaging techniques currently in use fall into the general class of (weighted) minimum norm methods. The minimization of a norm is used as the basis for choosing one from a generally infinite set of solutions that provide an equally good fit to the data. This ambiguity in the solution arises from the inherent non- uniqueness of the continuous inverse problem and is compounded by the imbalance between the relatively small number of measurements and the large number of source voxels. Here we present a unified view of the minimum norm methods and describe how we can use Tikhonov regularization to avoid instabilities in the solutions due to noise. We then compare the performance of regularized versions of three well known linear minimum norm methods with the non-linear iteratively reweighted minimum norm method and a Bayesian approach.

  15. FieldTrip: Open Source Software for Advanced Analysis of MEG, EEG, and Invasive Electrophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oostenveld

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow experimental neuroscientists to analyze experimental data. It includes algorithms for simple and advanced analysis, such as time-frequency analysis using multitapers, source reconstruction using dipoles, distributed sources and beamformers, connectivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical permutation tests at the channel and source level. The implementation as toolbox allows the user to perform elaborate and structured analyses of large data sets using the MATLAB command line and batch scripting. Furthermore, users and developers can easily extend the functionality and implement new algorithms. The modular design facilitates the reuse in other software packages.

  16. PyEEG: An Open Source Python Module for EEG/MEG Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrest Sheng Bao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  17. Matching pursuit and source deflation for sparse EEG/MEG dipole moment estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun Chi; Swindlehurst, A Lee

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose novel matching pursuit (MP)-based algorithms for EEG/MEG dipole source localization and parameter estimation for multiple measurement vectors with constant sparsity. The algorithms combine the ideas of MP for sparse signal recovery and source deflation, as employed in estimation via alternating projections. The source-deflated matching pursuit (SDMP) approach mitigates the problem of residual interference inherent in sequential MP-based methods or recursively applied (RAP)-MUSIC. Furthermore, unlike prior methods based on alternating projection, SDMP allows one to efficiently estimate the dipole orientation in addition to its location. Simulations show that the proposed algorithms outperform existing techniques under various conditions, including those with highly correlated sources. Results using real EEG data from auditory experiments are also presented to illustrate the performance of these algorithms.

  18. Performance of a Liquid Xenon Calorimeter Cryogenic System for the MEG Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Hisamitsu, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nishiguchi, H.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2008-03-01

    The μ-particle rare decay physics experiment, the MU-E-GAMMA (MEG) experiment, will soon be operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Zurich. To achieve the extremely high sensitivity required to detect gamma rays, 800 L of liquid xenon is used as the medium in the calorimeter, viewed by 830 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) immersed in it. The required liquid xenon purity is of the order of ppb of water, and is obtained by using a cryogenic centrifugal pump and cold molecular sieves. The heat load of the calorimeter at 165 K is to be approximately 120 W, which is removed by a pulse-tube cryocooler developed at KEK and built by Iwatani Industrial Gas Corp., with a cooling power of about 200 W at 165 K. The cryogenic system is also equipped with a 1000-L dewar. This paper describes the results of an initial performance test of each cryogenic component.

  19. Auditory M50 and M100 sensory gating deficits in bipolar disorder: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Feng, Yigang; Jia, Yanbin; Wang, Wensheng; Xie, Yanping; Guan, Yufang; Zhong, Shuming; Zhu, Dan; Huang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Auditory sensory gating deficits have been reported in subjects with bipolar disorder, but the hemispheric and neuronal origins of this deficit are not well understood. Moreover, gating of the auditory evoked components reflecting early attentive stage of information processing has not been investigated in bipolar disorder. The objectives of this study were to investigate the right and left hemispheric auditory sensory gating of the M50 (preattentive processing) and M100 (early attentive processing) in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder by utilizing magnetoencephalography (MEG). Whole-head MEG data were acquired during the standard paired-click paradigm in 20 bipolar I disorder patients and 20 healthy controls. The M50 and the M100 responses were investigated, and dipole source localizations were also investigated. Sensory gating were determined by measuring the strength of the M50 and the M100 response to the second click divided by that of the first click (S2/S1). In every subject, M50 and M100 dipolar sources localized to the left and right posterior portion of superior temporal gyrus (STG). Bipolar I disorder patients showed bilateral gating deficits in M50 and M100. The bilateral M50 S2 source strengths were significantly higher in the bipolar I disorder group compared to the control group. The sample size was relatively small. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted. Bipolar subjects were taking a wide range of medications that could not be readily controlled for. These findings suggest that bipolar I disorder patients have auditory gating deficits at both pre-attentive and early attentive levels, which might be related to STG structural abnormality. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MEG event-related desynchronization and synchronization deficits during basic somatosensory processing in individuals with ADHD

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    Wang Frank

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent, complex disorder which is characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Convergent evidence from neurobiological studies of ADHD identifies dysfunction in fronto-striatal-cerebellar circuitry as the source of behavioural deficits. Recent studies have shown that regions governing basic sensory processing, such as the somatosensory cortex, show abnormalities in those with ADHD suggesting that these processes may also be compromised. Methods We used event-related magnetoencephalography (MEG to examine patterns of cortical rhythms in the primary (SI and secondary (SII somatosensory cortices in response to median nerve stimulation, in 9 adults with ADHD and 10 healthy controls. Stimuli were brief (0.2 ms non-painful electrical pulses presented to the median nerve in two counterbalanced conditions: unpredictable and predictable stimulus presentation. We measured changes in strength, synchronicity, and frequency of cortical rhythms. Results Healthy comparison group showed strong event-related desynchrony and synchrony in SI and SII. By contrast, those with ADHD showed significantly weaker event-related desynchrony and event-related synchrony in the alpha (8–12 Hz and beta (15–30 Hz bands, respectively. This was most striking during random presentation of median nerve stimulation. Adults with ADHD showed significantly shorter duration of beta rebound in both SI and SII except for when the onset of the stimulus event could be predicted. In this case, the rhythmicity of SI (but not SII in the ADHD group did not differ from that of controls. Conclusion Our findings suggest that somatosensory processing is altered in individuals with ADHD. MEG constitutes a promising approach to profiling patterns of neural activity during the processing of sensory input (e.g., detection of a tactile stimulus, stimulus predictability and facilitating our

  1. MEG masked priming evidence for form-based decomposition of irregular verbs

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    Joseph eFruchter

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To what extent does morphological structure play a role in early processing of visually presented English past tense verbs? Previous masked priming studies have demonstrated effects of obligatory form-based decomposition for genuinely affixed words (teacher-TEACH and pseudo-affixed words (corner-CORN, but not for orthographic controls (brothel-BROTH. Additionally, MEG single word reading studies have demonstrated that the transition probability from stem to affix (in genuinely affixed words modulates an early evoked response known as the M170; parallel findings have been shown for the transition probability from stem to pseudo-affix (in pseudo-affixed words. Here, utilizing the M170 as a neural index of visual form-based morphological decomposition, we ask whether the M170 demonstrates masked morphological priming effects for irregular past tense verbs (following a previous study which obtained behavioral masked priming effects for irregulars. Dual mechanism theories of the English past tense predict a rule-based decomposition for regulars but not for irregulars, while certain single mechanism theories predict rule-based decomposition even for irregulars. MEG data was recorded for 16 subjects performing a visual masked priming lexical decision task. Using a functional region of interest (fROI defined on the basis of repetition priming and regular morphological priming effects within the left fusiform and inferior temporal regions, we found that activity in this fROI was modulated by the masked priming manipulation for irregular verbs, during the time window of the M170. We also found effects of the scores generated by the learning model of Albright & Hayes (2003 on the degree of priming for irregular verbs. The results favor a single mechanism account of the English past tense, in which even irregulars are decomposed into stems and affixes prior to lexical access, as opposed to a dual mechanism model, in which irregulars are recognized as whole

  2. Assessment of cortical dysfunction in human strabismic amblyopia using magnetoencephalography (MEG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.J.; Holliday, I.E.; Harding, G.F.A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the technique of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the effects of strabismic amblyopia on the processing of spatial information within the occipital cortex of humans. We recorded evoked magnetic responses to the onset of a chromatic (red/green) sinusoidal grating of periodicity 0.5-4.0 c deg -1 using a 19-channel SQUID-based neuromagnetometer. Evoked responses were recorded monocularly on six amblyopes and six normally-sighted controls, the stimuli being positioned near the fovea in the lower right visual field of each observer. For comparison, the spatial contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for the detection of chromatic gratings was measured for one amblyope and one control using a two alternate forced-choice psychophysical procedure. We chose red/green sinusoids as our stimuli because they evoke strong magnetic responses from the occipital cortex in adult humans (Fylan, Holliday, Singh, Anderson and Harding. (1997). Neuroimage, 6, 47-57). Magnetic field strength was plotted as a function of stimulus spatial frequency for each eye of each subject. Interocular differences were only evident within the amblyopic group: for stimuli of 1-2 c deg -1 , the evoked responses had significantly longer latencies and reduced amplitudes through the amblyopic eye (P<0.05). Importantly, the extent of the deficit was uncorrelated with either Snellen acuity or contrast sensitivity. Localization of the evoked responses was performed using a single equivalent current dipole model. Source localizations, for both normal and amblyopic subjects, were consistent with neural activity at the occipital pole near the V1/V2 border. We conclude that MEG is sensitive to the deficit in cortical processing associated with human amblyopia, and can be used to make quantitative neurophysiological measurements. The nature of the cortical deficit is discussed. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Early left-hemispheric dysfunction of face processing in congenital prosopagnosia: an MEG study.

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    Christian Dobel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital prosopagnosia is a severe face perception impairment which is not acquired by a brain lesion and is presumably present from birth. It manifests mostly by an inability to recognise familiar persons. Electrophysiological research has demonstrated the relevance to face processing of a negative deflection peaking around 170 ms, labelled accordingly as N170 in the electroencephalogram (EEG and M170 in magnetoencephalography (MEG. The M170 was shown to be sensitive to the inversion of faces and to familiarity--two factors that are assumed to be crucial for congenital prosopagnosia. In order to locate the cognitive dysfunction and its neural correlates, we investigated the time course of neural activity in response to these manipulations. METHODOLOGY: Seven individuals with congenital prosopagnosia and seven matched controls participated in the experiment. To explore brain activity with high accuracy in time, we recorded evoked magnetic fields (275 channel whole head MEG while participants were looking at faces differing in familiarity (famous vs. unknown and orientation (upright vs. inverted. The underlying neural sources were estimated by means of the least square minimum-norm-estimation (L2-MNE approach. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The behavioural data corroborate earlier findings on impaired configural processing in congenital prosopagnosia. For the M170, the overall results replicated earlier findings, with larger occipito-temporal brain responses to inverted than upright faces, and more right- than left-hemispheric activity. Compared to controls, participants with congenital prosopagnosia displayed a general decrease in brain activity, primarily over left occipitotemporal areas. This attenuation did not interact with familiarity or orientation. CONCLUSIONS: The study substantiates the finding of an early involvement of the left hemisphere in symptoms of prosopagnosia. This might be related to an efficient and overused featural

  4. MEG masked priming evidence for form-based decomposition of irregular verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchter, Joseph; Stockall, Linnaea; Marantz, Alec

    2013-01-01

    To what extent does morphological structure play a role in early processing of visually presented English past tense verbs? Previous masked priming studies have demonstrated effects of obligatory form-based decomposition for genuinely affixed words (teacher-TEACH) and pseudo-affixed words (corner-CORN), but not for orthographic controls (brothel-BROTH). Additionally, MEG single word reading studies have demonstrated that the transition probability from stem to affix (in genuinely affixed words) modulates an early evoked response known as the M170; parallel findings have been shown for the transition probability from stem to pseudo-affix (in pseudo-affixed words). Here, utilizing the M170 as a neural index of visual form-based morphological decomposition, we ask whether the M170 demonstrates masked morphological priming effects for irregular past tense verbs (following a previous study which obtained behavioral masked priming effects for irregulars). Dual mechanism theories of the English past tense predict a rule-based decomposition for regulars but not for irregulars, while certain single mechanism theories predict rule-based decomposition even for irregulars. MEG data was recorded for 16 subjects performing a visual masked priming lexical decision task. Using a functional region of interest (fROI) defined on the basis of repetition priming and regular morphological priming effects within the left fusiform and inferior temporal regions, we found that activity in this fROI was modulated by the masked priming manipulation for irregular verbs, during the time window of the M170. We also found effects of the scores generated by the learning model of Albright and Hayes (2003) on the degree of priming for irregular verbs. The results favor a single mechanism account of the English past tense, in which even irregulars are decomposed into stems and affixes prior to lexical access, as opposed to a dual mechanism model, in which irregulars are recognized as whole forms.

  5. Assessment of cortical dysfunction in human strabismic amblyopia using magnetoencephalography (MEG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.J. [Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey (United Kingdom); Holliday, I.E.; Harding, G.F.A. [Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Psychology, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use the technique of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the effects of strabismic amblyopia on the processing of spatial information within the occipital cortex of humans. We recorded evoked magnetic responses to the onset of a chromatic (red/green) sinusoidal grating of periodicity 0.5-4.0 c deg{sup -1} using a 19-channel SQUID-based neuromagnetometer. Evoked responses were recorded monocularly on six amblyopes and six normally-sighted controls, the stimuli being positioned near the fovea in the lower right visual field of each observer. For comparison, the spatial contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for the detection of chromatic gratings was measured for one amblyope and one control using a two alternate forced-choice psychophysical procedure. We chose red/green sinusoids as our stimuli because they evoke strong magnetic responses from the occipital cortex in adult humans (Fylan, Holliday, Singh, Anderson and Harding. (1997). Neuroimage, 6, 47-57). Magnetic field strength was plotted as a function of stimulus spatial frequency for each eye of each subject. Interocular differences were only evident within the amblyopic group: for stimuli of 1-2 c deg{sup -1}, the evoked responses had significantly longer latencies and reduced amplitudes through the amblyopic eye (P<0.05). Importantly, the extent of the deficit was uncorrelated with either Snellen acuity or contrast sensitivity. Localization of the evoked responses was performed using a single equivalent current dipole model. Source localizations, for both normal and amblyopic subjects, were consistent with neural activity at the occipital pole near the V1/V2 border. We conclude that MEG is sensitive to the deficit in cortical processing associated with human amblyopia, and can be used to make quantitative neurophysiological measurements. The nature of the cortical deficit is discussed. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Amygdala responses to Valence and its interaction by arousal revealed by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliadis, Charalampos; Ioannides, Andreas A; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Papadelis, Christos

    2014-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a crucial role in the processing of emotions. The precise nature of its involvement is however unclear. We hypothesized that ambivalent findings from neuroimaging studies that report amygdala's activity in emotions, are due to distinct functional specificity of amygdala's sub-divisions and specifically to differential reactivity to arousal and valence. The goal of the present study is to characterize the amygdala response to affective stimuli by disentangling the contributions of arousal and valence. Our hypothesis was prompted by recent reports claiming anatomical sub-divisions of amygdala based on cytoarchitecture and the functional maps obtained from diverse behavioral, emotional, and physiological stimulation. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings from 12 healthy individuals passively exposed to affective stimuli from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) collection using a 2 (Valence levels)× 2 (Arousal levels) design. Source power was estimated using a beamformer technique with the activations referring to the amygdala sub-divisions defined through probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps. Right laterobasal amygdala activity was found to mediate negative valence (elicited by unpleasant stimuli) while left centromedial activity was characterized by an interaction of valence by arousal (arousing pleasant stimuli). We did not find a main effect for amygdala activations in any of its sub-divisions for arousal modulation. To the best of our knowledge, our findings from non-invasive MEG data indicate for the first time, a distinct functional specificity of amygdala anatomical sub-divisions in the emotional processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing Sensor Noise in MEG and EEG Recordings Using Oversampled Temporal Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric; Taulu, Samu

    2018-05-01

    Here, we review the theory of suppression of spatially uncorrelated, sensor-specific noise in electro- and magentoencephalography (EEG and MEG) arrays, and introduce a novel method for suppression. Our method requires only that the signals of interest are spatially oversampled, which is a reasonable assumption for many EEG and MEG systems. Our method is based on a leave-one-out procedure using overlapping temporal windows in a mathematical framework to project spatially uncorrelated noise in the temporal domain. This method, termed "oversampled temporal projection" (OTP), has four advantages over existing methods. First, sparse channel-specific artifacts are suppressed while limiting mixing with other channels, whereas existing linear, time-invariant spatial operators can spread such artifacts to other channels with a spatial distribution which can be mistaken for one produced by an electrophysiological source. Second, OTP minimizes distortion of the spatial configuration of the data. During source localization (e.g., dipole fitting), many spatial methods require corresponding modification of the forward model to avoid bias, while OTP does not. Third, noise suppression factors at the sensor level are maintained during source localization, whereas bias compensation removes the denoising benefit for spatial methods that require such compensation. Fourth, OTP uses a time-window duration parameter to control the tradeoff between noise suppression and adaptation to time-varying sensor characteristics. OTP efficiently optimizes noise suppression performance while controlling for spatial bias of the signal of interest. This is important in applications where sensor noise significantly limits the signal-to-noise ratio, such as high-frequency brain oscillations.

  8. Unconsciously perceived fear in peripheral vision alerts the limbic system: a MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri J Bayle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In ecological situations, threatening stimuli often come out from the peripheral vision. Such aggressive messages must trigger rapid attention to the periphery to allow a fast and adapted motor reaction. Several clues converge to hypothesize that peripheral danger presentation can trigger off a fast arousal network potentially independent of the consciousness spot. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present MEG study, spatio-temporal dynamics of the neural processing of danger related stimuli were explored as a function of the stimuli position in the visual field. Fearful and neutral faces were briefly presented in the central or peripheral visual field, and were followed by target faces stimuli. An event-related beamformer source analysis model was applied in three time windows following the first face presentations: 80 to 130 ms, 140 to 190 ms, and 210 to 260 ms. The frontal lobe and the right internal temporal lobe part, including the amygdala, reacted as soon as 80 ms of latency to fear occurring in the peripheral vision. For central presentation, fearful faces evoked the classical neuronal activity along the occipito-temporal visual pathway between 140 and 190 ms. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the high spatio-temporal resolution of MEG allowed disclosing a fast response of a network involving medial temporal and frontal structures in the processing of fear related stimuli occurring unconsciously in the peripheral visual field. Whereas centrally presented stimuli are precisely processed by the ventral occipito-temporal cortex, the related-to-danger stimuli appearing in the peripheral visual field are more efficient to produce a fast automatic alert response possibly conveyed by subcortical structures.

  9. Climate change adaptation: What does it mean for me?; Klimatilpasning: hva betyr det for meg?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Karen; Mittet, Siri; Bakkeslett, Eva; Eriksen, Siri; Hansen-Bauer, Inger; Hovelsrud, Grete; Inderberg, Tor Haakon; Ruud, Cathrine; Saglie, Inger-Lise; Sygna, Inger Lise

    2012-11-01

    The book 'Climate Change Adaptation: What Does it Mean for Me?' is written as a collective endeavor in the PLAN project (link this to the webpage), an interdisciplinary research project that focuses on climate change adaptation in Norway. With contributions from multiple disciplines, including arts, the book introduces a variety of perspectives and interpretations on adaptation. Focusing on climate change adaptation as a social, cultural and human process, this book recognizes that adaptation is more than a technical problem that can be addressed through technology, management and expertise. It is also an adaptive challenge that calls for attention to the values, beliefs, habits, loyalties and interests that sustain behaviors, systems, structures, and institutions in a changing climate. Confronted with complex and non-linear risks associates with climate change, and the interactions by other processes of change, this book call for a more comprehensive interpretation of adaptation, where both subjective and objective aspects are considered. This book thus goes beyond most contemporary understandings of adaptation, by focusing on the personal dimensions of adaptation. Arguing that the greatest adaptation of all may be the realization that humanity is in fact changing the climate and that we as individuals can do something about it, that we can {sup c}hange the change{sup ,} the book discusses the role of the arts, engaged individuals and different forms of leadership in levering change towards a more sustainable future. Full reference to the book: Karen O'Brien, Siri Mittet, Eva Bakkeslett, Siri Eriksen, Inger Hansen-Bauer, Grete Hovelsrud, Tor-Haakon Inderberg, Cathrine Ruud, Inger-Lise Saglie, and Linda Sygna (2012) Klimatilpasning: Hva betyr det for meg/ Climate Change Adaptation: What Does it Mean for Me?, Unipub forlag, 108 pages (in Norwegian). Online. Available HTTP: < http://www.sv.uio.no/iss/forskning/prosjekter/plan/klimatilpasning--hva-betyr-det-for-meg.pdf>.(auth)

  10. Group-level spatial independent component analysis of Fourier envelopes of resting-state MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Pavan; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2014-02-01

    We developed a data-driven method to spatiotemporally and spectrally characterize the dynamics of brain oscillations in resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. The method, called envelope spatial Fourier independent component analysis (eSFICA), maximizes the spatial and spectral sparseness of Fourier energies of a cortically constrained source current estimate. We compared this method using a simulated data set against 5 other variants of independent component analysis and found that eSFICA performed on par with its temporal variant, eTFICA, and better than other ICA variants, in characterizing dynamics at time scales of the order of minutes. We then applied eSFICA to real MEG data obtained from 9 subjects during rest. The method identified several networks showing within- and cross-frequency inter-areal functional connectivity profiles which resemble previously reported resting-state networks, such as the bilateral sensorimotor network at ~20Hz, the lateral and medial parieto-occipital sources at ~10Hz, a subset of the default-mode network at ~8 and ~15Hz, and lateralized temporal lobe sources at ~8Hz. Finally, we interpreted the estimated networks as spatiospectral filters and applied the filters to obtain the dynamics during a natural stimulus sequence presented to the same 9 subjects. We observed occipital alpha modulation to visual stimuli, bilateral rolandic mu modulation to tactile stimuli and video clips of hands, and the temporal lobe network modulation to speech stimuli, but no modulation of the sources in the default-mode network. We conclude that (1) the proposed method robustly detects inter-areal cross-frequency networks at long time scales, (2) the functional relevance of the resting-state networks can be probed by applying the obtained spatiospectral filters to data from measurements with controlled external stimulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xiong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG. In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes, our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes, blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI.

  12. MEG Source Imaging Method using Fast L1 Minimum-norm and its Applications to Signals with Brain Noise and Human Resting-state Source Amplitude Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Huang, Charles W.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, AnneMarie; Nichols, Sharon L.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Song, Tao; Harrington, Deborah L.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Heister, David; Diwakar, Mithun; Canive, Jose M.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Chen, Yu-Han; Ji, Zhengwei; Shen, Max; El-Gabalawy, Fady; Levy, Michael; McLay, Robert; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer; Liu, Thomas T.; Drake, Angela; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study developed a fast MEG source imaging technique based on Fast Vector-based Spatio-Temporal Analysis using a L1-minimum-norm (Fast-VESTAL) and then used the method to obtain the source amplitude images of resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals for different frequency bands. The Fast-VESTAL technique consists of two steps. First, L1-minimum-norm MEG source images were obtained for the dominant spatial modes of sensor-waveform covariance matrix. Next, accurate source time-courses with millisecond temporal resolution were obtained using an inverse operator constructed from the spatial source images of Step 1. Using simulations, Fast-VESTAL’s performance of was assessed for its 1) ability to localize multiple correlated sources; 2) ability to faithfully recover source time-courses; 3) robustness to different SNR conditions including SNR with negative dB levels; 4) capability to handle correlated brain noise; and 5) statistical maps of MEG source images. An objective pre-whitening method was also developed and integrated with Fast-VESTAL to remove correlated brain noise. Fast-VESTAL’s performance was then examined in the analysis of human mediannerve MEG responses. The results demonstrated that this method easily distinguished sources in the entire somatosensory network. Next, Fast-VESTAL was applied to obtain the first whole-head MEG source-amplitude images from resting-state signals in 41 healthy control subjects, for all standard frequency bands. Comparisons between resting-state MEG sources images and known neurophysiology were provided. Additionally, in simulations and cases with MEG human responses, the results obtained from using conventional beamformer technique were compared with those from Fast-VESTAL, which highlighted the beamformer’s problems of signal leaking and distorted source time-courses. PMID:24055704

  13. Spatial relationship of source localizations in patients with focal epilepsy: Comparison of MEG and EEG with a three spherical shells and a boundary element volume conductor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriela; Fischer, Michael J M; Genow, Alexandra; Hummel, Cornelia; Rampp, Stefan; Paulini, Andrea; Hopfengärtner, Rüdiger; Kaltenhäuser, Martin; Stefan, Hermann

    2007-04-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an option for patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsies, but it requires a precise focus localization procedure. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) can be used for analysis of interictal activity. The aim of this prospective study was to compare clusters of source localization results with MEG and EEG using a three spherical shells (3SS) and a boundary element method (BEM) volume conductor model. The study was closed when 100 patients met the inclusion criteria. Simultaneous MEG and EEG were recorded during presurgical evaluation. Epileptiform signals were analyzed using an equivalent current dipole model. Centroids of source localizations from MEG, EEG, 3SS, and BEM in their respective combinations were compared. In a 3SS model, MEG source localizations were 5.6 mm inferior to those obtained by EEG, while in a BEM model MEG source localizations were 6.3 mm anterior and 4.8 mm superior. The mean scattering of source localizations between both volume conductor models was 19.5 mm for EEG and 9.6 mm for MEG. For MEG no systematic difference between BEM and 3SS source localizations was found. For EEG, source localizations with BEM were 5.9 mm posterior and 11.7 mm inferior to those determined using 3SS. No differences were found between the 46 temporal and the 54 extratemporal lobe epilepsy patients. The observed systematic differences of source localizations of epileptic spikes due to the applied source signal modality and volume conductor model should be considered in presurgical evaluation when only one source signal and volume conductor model is available. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A framework to reconcile frequency scaling measurements, from intracellular recordings, local-field potentials, up to EEG and MEG signals

    OpenAIRE

    Bedard, Claude; Gomes, Jean-Marie; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In this viewpoint article, we discuss the electric properties of the medium around neurons, which are important to correctly interpret extracellular potentials or electric field effects in neural tissue. We focus on how these electric properties shape the frequency scaling of brain signals at different scales, such as intracellular recordings, the local field potential (LFP), the electroencephalogram (EEG) or the magnetoencephalogram (MEG). These signals display frequency-scaling properties w...

  15. Cognitive inhibition of number/length interference in a Piaget-like task: evidence by combining ERP and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joliot, Marc; Leroux, Gaëlle; Dubal, Stéphanie; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Houdé, Olivier; Mazoyer, Bernard; Petit, Laurent

    2009-08-01

    We combined event-related potential (ERP) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) acquisition and analysis to investigate the electrophysiological markers of the inhibitory processes involved in the number/length interference in a Piaget-like numerical task. Eleven healthy subjects performed four gradually interfering conditions with the heuristic "length equals number" to be inhibited. Low resolution tomography reconstruction was performed on the combined grand averaged electromagnetic data at the early (N1, P1) and late (P2, N2, P3(early) and P3(late)) latencies. Every condition was analyzed at both scalp and regional brain levels. The inhibitory processes were visible on the late components of the electromagnetic brain activity. A right P2-related frontal orbital activation reflected the change of strategy in the inhibitory processes. N2-related SMA/cingulate activation revealed the first occurrence of the stimuli processing to be inhibited. Both P3 components revealed the working memory processes operating in a medial temporal complex and the mental imagery processes subtended by the precuneus. Simultaneous ERP and MEG signal acquisition and analysis allowed to describe the spatiotemporal patterns of neural networks involved in the inhibition of the "length equals number" interference. Combining ERP and MEG ensured a sensitivity which could be reached previously only through invasive intracortical recordings.

  16. A Parametric Empirical Bayesian framework for the EEG/MEG inverse problem: generative models for multisubject and multimodal integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Henson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent methodological developments within a Parametric Empirical Bayesian (PEB framework for reconstructing intracranial sources of extracranial electroencephalographic (EEG and magnetoencephalographic (MEG data under linear Gaussian assumptions. The PEB framework offers a natural way to integrate multiple constraints (spatial priors on this inverse problem, such as those derived from different modalities (e.g., from functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI or from multiple replications (e.g., subjects. Using variations of the same basic generative model, we illustrate the application of PEB to three cases: 1 symmetric integration (fusion of MEG and EEG; 2 asymmetric integration of MEG or EEG with fMRI, and 3 group-optimisation of spatial priors across subjects. We evaluate these applications on multimodal data acquired from 18 subjects, focusing on energy induced by face perception within a time-frequency window of 100-220ms, 8-18Hz. We show the benefits of multi-modal, multi-subject integration in terms of the model evidence and the reproducibility (over subjects of cortical responses to faces.

  17. Multi-modal causality analysis of eyes-open and eyes-closed data from simultaneously recorded EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideska, Kidist Gebremariam; Hellriegel, Helge; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Krause, Holger; Schnitzler, Alfons; Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan; Heute, Ulrich; Muthuraman, Muthuraman

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the recent advances in multi-modal data analysis, the aim of the present study was to analyze the functional network of the brain which remained the same during the eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) resting task. The simultaneously recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) were used for this study, recorded from five distinct cortical regions of the brain. We focused on the 'alpha' functional network, corresponding to the individual peak frequency in the alpha band. The total data set of 120 seconds was divided into three segments of 18 seconds each, taken from start, middle, and end of the recording. This segmentation allowed us to analyze the evolution of the underlying functional network. The method of time-resolved partial directed coherence (tPDC) was used to assess the causality. This method allowed us to focus on the individual peak frequency in the 'alpha' band (7-13 Hz). Because of the significantly higher power in the recorded EEG in comparison to MEG, at the individual peak frequency of the alpha band, results rely only on EEG. The MEG was used only for comparison. Our results show that different regions of the brain start to `disconnect' from one another over the course of time. The driving signals, along with the feedback signals between different cortical regions start to recede over time. This shows that, with the course of rest, brain regions reduce communication with each another.

  18. Fast accurate MEG source localization using a multilayer perceptron trained with real brain noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Sung Chan; Pearlmutter, Barak A.; Nolte, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Iterative gradient methods such as Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) are in widespread use for source localization from electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals. Unfortunately, LM depends sensitively on the initial guess, necessitating repeated runs. This, combined with LM's high per-step cost, makes its computational burden quite high. To reduce this burden, we trained a multilayer perceptron (MLP) as a real-time localizer. We used an analytical model of quasistatic electromagnetic propagation through a spherical head to map randomly chosen dipoles to sensor activities according to the sensor geometry of a 4D Neuroimaging Neuromag-122 MEG system, and trained a MLP to invert this mapping in the absence of noise or in the presence of various sorts of noise such as white Gaussian noise, correlated noise, or real brain noise. A MLP structure was chosen to trade off computation and accuracy. This MLP was trained four times, with each type of noise. We measured the effects of initial guesses on LM performance, which motivated a hybrid MLP-start-LM method, in which the trained MLP initializes LM. We also compared the localization performance of LM, MLPs, and hybrid MLP-start-LMs for realistic brain signals. Trained MLPs are much faster than other methods, while the hybrid MLP-start-LMs are faster and more accurate than fixed-4-start-LM. In particular, the hybrid MLP-start-LM initialized by a MLP trained with the real brain noise dataset is 60 times faster and is comparable in accuracy to random-20-start-LM, and this hybrid system (localization error: 0.28 cm, computation time: 36 ms) shows almost as good performance as optimal-1-start-LM (localization error: 0.23 cm, computation time: 22 ms), which initializes LM with the correct dipole location. MLPs trained with noise perform better than the MLP trained without noise, and the MLP trained with real brain noise is almost as good an initial guesser for LM as the correct dipole location. (author) )

  19. MEG Evidence for Dynamic Amygdala Modulations by Gaze and Facial Emotions

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    Dumas, Thibaud; Dubal, Stéphanie; Attal, Yohan; Chupin, Marie; Jouvent, Roland; Morel, Shasha; George, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Background Amygdala is a key brain region for face perception. While the role of amygdala in the perception of facial emotion and gaze has been extensively highlighted with fMRI, the unfolding in time of amydgala responses to emotional versus neutral faces with different gaze directions is scarcely known. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we addressed this question in healthy subjects using MEG combined with an original source imaging method based on individual amygdala volume segmentation and the localization of sources in the amygdala volume. We found an early peak of amygdala activity that was enhanced for fearful relative to neutral faces between 130 and 170 ms. The effect of emotion was again significant in a later time range (310–350 ms). Moreover, the amygdala response was greater for direct relative averted gaze between 190 and 350 ms, and this effect was selective of fearful faces in the right amygdala. Conclusion Altogether, our results show that the amygdala is involved in the processing and integration of emotion and gaze cues from faces in different time ranges, thus underlining its role in multiple stages of face perception. PMID:24040190

  20. Cognitive reserve is associated with the functional organization of brain in healthy aging: A MEG Study

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    Maria Eugenia eLopez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of elderly people in the population has increased rapidly in the last century and consequently healthy aging is expected to become a critical area of research in neuroscience. Evidence reveals how healthy aging depends on three main behavioral factors: social lifestyle, cognitive activity and physical activity. In this study, we focused on the role of cognitive activity, concentrating specifically on educational and occupational attainment factors, which were considered two of the main pillars of cognitive reserve.21 subjects with similar rates of social lifestyle, physical and cognitive activity were selected from a sample of 55 healthy adults. These subjects were divided into two groups according to their level of cognitive reserve; one group comprised subjects with high cognitive reserve (9 members and the other contained those with low cognitive reserve (12 members. To evaluate the cortical brain connectivity network, all participants were recorded by Magnetoencephalography (MEG while they performed a memory task (modified version of the Sternberg´s Task. We then applied two algorithms (Phase Locking Value & Phase-Lag Index to study the dynamics of functional connectivity. In response to the same task, the subjects with lower cognitive reserve presented higher functional connectivity than those with higher cognitive reserve.These results may indicate that participants with low cognitive reserve needed a greater 'effort' than those with high cognitive reserve to achieve the same level of cognitive performance. Therefore, we conclude that cognitive reserve contributes to the modulation of the functional connectivity patterns of the aging brain.

  1. Evidence for training-induced plasticity in multisensory brain structures: an MEG study.

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    Evangelos Paraskevopoulos

    Full Text Available Multisensory learning and resulting neural brain plasticity have recently become a topic of renewed interest in human cognitive neuroscience. Music notation reading is an ideal stimulus to study multisensory learning, as it allows studying the integration of visual, auditory and sensorimotor information processing. The present study aimed at answering whether multisensory learning alters uni-sensory structures, interconnections of uni-sensory structures or specific multisensory areas. In a short-term piano training procedure musically naive subjects were trained to play tone sequences from visually presented patterns in a music notation-like system [Auditory-Visual-Somatosensory group (AVS], while another group received audio-visual training only that involved viewing the patterns and attentively listening to the recordings of the AVS training sessions [Auditory-Visual group (AV]. Training-related changes in cortical networks were assessed by pre- and post-training magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings of an auditory, a visual and an integrated audio-visual mismatch negativity (MMN. The two groups (AVS and AV were differently affected by the training. The results suggest that multisensory training alters the function of multisensory structures, and not the uni-sensory ones along with their interconnections, and thus provide an answer to an important question presented by cognitive models of multisensory training.

  2. Localizing true brain interactions from EEG and MEG data with subspace methods and modified beamformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi Avarvand, Forooz; Ewald, Arne; Nolte, Guido

    2012-01-01

    To address the problem of mixing in EEG or MEG connectivity analysis we exploit that noninteracting brain sources do not contribute systematically to the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum. Firstly, we propose to apply the existing subspace method "RAP-MUSIC" to the subspace found from the dominant singular vectors of the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum rather than to the conventionally used covariance matrix. Secondly, to estimate the specific sources interacting with each other, we use a modified LCMV-beamformer approach in which the source direction for each voxel was determined by maximizing the imaginary coherence with respect to a given reference. These two methods are applicable in this form only if the number of interacting sources is even, because odd-dimensional subspaces collapse to even-dimensional ones. Simulations show that (a) RAP-MUSIC based on the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum accurately finds the correct source locations, that (b) conventional RAP-MUSIC fails to do so since it is highly influenced by noninteracting sources, and that (c) the second method correctly identifies those sources which are interacting with the reference. The methods are also applied to real data for a motor paradigm, resulting in the localization of four interacting sources presumably in sensory-motor areas.

  3. The neural basis of sublexical speech and corresponding nonspeech processing: a combined EEG-MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Soila; Nevalainen, Päivi; Sorokin, Alexander; Mittag, Maria; Partanen, Eino; Putkinen, Vesa; Seppänen, Miia; Kähkönen, Seppo; Kujala, Teija

    2014-03-01

    We addressed the neural organization of speech versus nonspeech sound processing by investigating preattentive cortical auditory processing of changes in five features of a consonant-vowel syllable (consonant, vowel, sound duration, frequency, and intensity) and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in a simultaneous EEG-MEG recording of mismatch negativity (MMN/MMNm). Overall, speech-sound processing was enhanced compared to nonspeech sound processing. This effect was strongest for changes which affect word meaning (consonant, vowel, and vowel duration) in the left and for the vowel identity change in the right hemisphere also. Furthermore, in the right hemisphere, speech-sound frequency and intensity changes were processed faster than their nonspeech counterparts, and there was a trend for speech-enhancement in frequency processing. In summary, the results support the proposed existence of long-term memory traces for speech sounds in the auditory cortices, and indicate at least partly distinct neural substrates for speech and nonspeech sound processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Localizing True Brain Interactions from EEG and MEG Data with Subspace Methods and Modified Beamformers

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    Forooz Shahbazi Avarvand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the problem of mixing in EEG or MEG connectivity analysis we exploit that noninteracting brain sources do not contribute systematically to the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum. Firstly, we propose to apply the existing subspace method “RAP-MUSIC” to the subspace found from the dominant singular vectors of the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum rather than to the conventionally used covariance matrix. Secondly, to estimate the specific sources interacting with each other, we use a modified LCMV-beamformer approach in which the source direction for each voxel was determined by maximizing the imaginary coherence with respect to a given reference. These two methods are applicable in this form only if the number of interacting sources is even, because odd-dimensional subspaces collapse to even-dimensional ones. Simulations show that (a RAP-MUSIC based on the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum accurately finds the correct source locations, that (b conventional RAP-MUSIC fails to do so since it is highly influenced by noninteracting sources, and that (c the second method correctly identifies those sources which are interacting with the reference. The methods are also applied to real data for a motor paradigm, resulting in the localization of four interacting sources presumably in sensory-motor areas.

  5. MEG evidence for dynamic amygdala modulations by gaze and facial emotions.

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    Thibaud Dumas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amygdala is a key brain region for face perception. While the role of amygdala in the perception of facial emotion and gaze has been extensively highlighted with fMRI, the unfolding in time of amydgala responses to emotional versus neutral faces with different gaze directions is scarcely known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we addressed this question in healthy subjects using MEG combined with an original source imaging method based on individual amygdala volume segmentation and the localization of sources in the amygdala volume. We found an early peak of amygdala activity that was enhanced for fearful relative to neutral faces between 130 and 170 ms. The effect of emotion was again significant in a later time range (310-350 ms. Moreover, the amygdala response was greater for direct relative averted gaze between 190 and 350 ms, and this effect was selective of fearful faces in the right amygdala. CONCLUSION: Altogether, our results show that the amygdala is involved in the processing and integration of emotion and gaze cues from faces in different time ranges, thus underlining its role in multiple stages of face perception.

  6. Temporal processing of audiovisual stimuli is enhanced in musicians: evidence from magnetoencephalography (MEG.

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    Yao Lu

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that the structural and functional differences between professional musicians and non-musicians are not only found within a single modality, but also with regard to multisensory integration. In this study we have combined psychophysical with neurophysiological measurements investigating the processing of non-musical, synchronous or various levels of asynchronous audiovisual events. We hypothesize that long-term multisensory experience alters temporal audiovisual processing already at a non-musical stage. Behaviorally, musicians scored significantly better than non-musicians in judging whether the auditory and visual stimuli were synchronous or asynchronous. At the neural level, the statistical analysis for the audiovisual asynchronous response revealed three clusters of activations including the ACC and the SFG and two bilaterally located activations in IFG and STG in both groups. Musicians, in comparison to the non-musicians, responded to synchronous audiovisual events with enhanced neuronal activity in a broad left posterior temporal region that covers the STG, the insula and the Postcentral Gyrus. Musicians also showed significantly greater activation in the left Cerebellum, when confronted with an audiovisual asynchrony. Taken together, our MEG results form a strong indication that long-term musical training alters the basic audiovisual temporal processing already in an early stage (direct after the auditory N1 wave, while the psychophysical results indicate that musical training may also provide behavioral benefits in the accuracy of the estimates regarding the timing of audiovisual events.

  7. Increased spontaneous MEG signal diversity for psychoactive doses of ketamine, LSD and psilocybin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartner, Michael M.; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Barrett, Adam B.; Seth, Anil K.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.

    2017-04-01

    What is the level of consciousness of the psychedelic state? Empirically, measures of neural signal diversity such as entropy and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity score higher for wakeful rest than for states with lower conscious level like propofol-induced anesthesia. Here we compute these measures for spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals from humans during altered states of consciousness induced by three psychedelic substances: psilocybin, ketamine and LSD. For all three, we find reliably higher spontaneous signal diversity, even when controlling for spectral changes. This increase is most pronounced for the single-channel LZ complexity measure, and hence for temporal, as opposed to spatial, signal diversity. We also uncover selective correlations between changes in signal diversity and phenomenological reports of the intensity of psychedelic experience. This is the first time that these measures have been applied to the psychedelic state and, crucially, that they have yielded values exceeding those of normal waking consciousness. These findings suggest that the sustained occurrence of psychedelic phenomenology constitutes an elevated level of consciousness - as measured by neural signal diversity.

  8. Sensitivity to auditory spectral width in the fetus and infant - a fMEG study

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    Jana eMuenssinger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Auditory change detection is crucial for the development of the auditory system and a prerequisite for language development. In neonates, stimuli with broad spectral width like white noise elicit the highest response compared to pure tone and combined tone stimuli. In the current study we addressed for the first time the question how fetuses react to white noise-(WN stimulation. Twenty-five fetuses (Mage = 34.59 weeks GA, SD ± 2.35 and 28 healthy neonates and infants (Mage = 37.18 days, SD ± 15.52 were tested with the 1st paradigm, wherein 500Hz tones, 750Hz tones and WN segments were randomly presented and auditory evoked responses (AERs were measured using fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG. In the 2nd paradigm, 10 fetuses (Mage = 25.7 weeks GA, SD ± 2.4 and 6 healthy neonates (Mage = 23 days and SD ± 6.2 were presented with two auditory oddball conditions: Condition 1 consisted of attenuated WN as standard and 500Hz tones and WN as deviants. In condition 2, standard 500Hz tones were intermixed with WN and attenuated WN. AERs to volume change and change in spectral width were evaluated.In both paradigms, significantly higher AER amplitudes to WN than to pure tones replicated prior findings in neonates and infants. In fetuses, no significant differences were found between the auditory evoked response amplitudes of WN segments and pure tones (both paradigms. A trend towards significance was reached when comparing the auditory evoked response amplitudes elicited by attenuated WN with those elicited by WN (loudness change, 2nd paradigm.As expected, we observed high sensibility to spectral width in newborns and infants. However, in the group of fetuses, no sensibility to spectral width was observed. This negative finding may be caused by different attenuation levels of the maternal tissue for different frequency components.

  9. A method for locating regions containing neural activation at a given confidence level from MEG data

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    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.

    1996-02-01

    The MEG inverse problem does not have a general, unique solution. Unless restrictive model assumptions are made, there are generally many more free parameters than measurements and there exist silent sources - current distributions which produce no external magnetic field. By weighting solutions according to how well each fits our prior notion about what properties good solutions should have, it may be possible to obtain a single current distribution that best fits the data and our expectations. However, in general there will still exist a number of different current distributions which fit both the data and our prior expectations sufficiently well. For example, a simulated data set based on a single or several dipoles can generally be fit equally well by a distributed current minimum-norm reconstruction. In experimental data it is often possible to find a relatively small number of dipoles which both fit the data and have a norm not much larger than that of the minimum-norm solution. Moreover, the few-dipole solutions often have currents in different regions than the corresponding minimum-norm solution. Because there exist well-fitting current distributions which may have current in significantly different locations, it can be misleading to infer locations of stimulus-correlated neural activity based on a single, best-fitting current distribution. we demonstrate here a method for inferring the location and number of regions containing neural activation by considering all possible current distributions within a given model (not just the most likely one) weighted according to how well each fits both the data and our prior expectations.

  10. MEG network differences between low- and high-grade glioma related to epilepsy and cognition.

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    Edwin van Dellen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal possible differences in whole brain topology of epileptic glioma patients, being low-grade glioma (LGG and high-grade glioma (HGG patients. We studied functional networks in these patients and compared them to those in epilepsy patients with non-glial lesions (NGL and healthy controls. Finally, we related network characteristics to seizure frequency and cognitive performance within patient groups. METHODS: We constructed functional networks from pre-surgical resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings of 13 LGG patients, 12 HGG patients, 10 NGL patients, and 36 healthy controls. Normalized clustering coefficient and average shortest path length as well as modular structure and network synchronizability were computed for each group. Cognitive performance was assessed in a subset of 11 LGG and 10 HGG patients. RESULTS: LGG patients showed decreased network synchronizability and decreased global integration compared to healthy controls in the theta frequency range (4-8 Hz, similar to NGL patients. HGG patients' networks did not significantly differ from those in controls. Network characteristics correlated with clinical presentation regarding seizure frequency in LGG patients, and with poorer cognitive performance in both LGG and HGG glioma patients. CONCLUSION: Lesion histology partly determines differences in functional networks in glioma patients suffering from epilepsy. We suggest that differences between LGG and HGG patients' networks are explained by differences in plasticity, guided by the particular lesional growth pattern. Interestingly, decreased synchronizability and decreased global integration in the theta band seem to make LGG and NGL patients more prone to the occurrence of seizures and cognitive decline.

  11. Distinguishable neural correlates of verbs and nouns: a MEG study on homonyms.

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    Tsigka, Styliani; Papadelis, Christos; Braun, Christoph; Miceli, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    The dissociability of nouns and verbs and of their morphosyntactic operations has been firmly established by lesion data. However, the hypothesis that they are processed by distinct neural substrates is inconsistently supported by neuroimaging studies. We tackled this issue in a silent reading experiment during MEG. Participants silently read noun/verb homonyms in minimal syntactic context: article-noun (NPs), pronoun-verb (VPs) (e.g., il ballo/i balli, the dance/the dances; io ballo/tu balli, I dance/you dance). Homonyms allow to rule out prelexical or postlexical nuisance factors-they are orthographically and phonologically identical, but serve different grammatical functions depending on context. Under these experimental conditions, different activity to nouns and verbs can be confidently attributed to representational/processing distinctions. At the sensor level, three components of event-related magnetic fields were observed for the function word and four for the content word, but Global Field Power (GFP) analysis only showed differences between VPs and NPs at several but very short time windows. By contrast, source level analysis based on Minimum Norm Estimates (MNE) yielded significantly greater activity for VPs in left frontal areas and in a left frontoparietal network at late time windows (380-397 and 393-409 ms). These results are fully consistent with lesion data, and show that verbs and nouns are processed differently in the brain. Frontal and parietal activation to verbs might correspond to morphosyntactic processes and to working memory recruitment (or thematic role assignment), respectively. Findings are consistent with the view that nouns and verbs and their morphosyntactic operations involve at least partially distinct neural substrates. However, they do not entirely rule out that nouns and verbs are processed in a shared neural substrate, and that differences result from greater complexity of verbal morphosyntax. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd

  12. Multistart algorithms for MEG empirical data analysis reliably characterize locations and time courses of multiple sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aine, C; Huang, M; Stephen, J; Christner, R

    2000-08-01

    We applied our newly developed Multistart algorithm (M. Huang et al., 1998, Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 108, 32-44) to high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) somatosensory responses and low SNR visual data to demonstrate the reliability of this analysis tool for determining source locations and time courses of empirical multisource neuromagnetic data. This algorithm performs a downhill simplex search hundreds to thousands of times with multiple, randomly selected initial starting parameters from within the head volume, in order to avoid problems of local minima. Two subjects participated in two studies: (1) somatosensory (left and right median nerves were stimulated using a square wave pulse of 0.2 ms duration) and (2) visual (small black and white bull's-eye patterns were presented to central and peripheral locations in four quadrants of the visual field). One subject participated in both of the studies mentioned above and in a third study (i.e., simultaneous somatosensory/visual stimulation). The best-fitting solutions were tightly clustered in high SNR somatosensory data and all dominant regions of activity could be identified in some instances by using a single model order (e.g., six dipoles) applied to a single interval of time (e.g., 15-250 ms) that captured the entire somatosensory response. In low SNR visual data, solutions were obtained from several different model orders and time intervals in order to capture the dominant activity across the entire visual response (e.g. , 60-300 ms). Our results demonstrate that Multistart MEG analysis procedures can localize multiple regions of activity and characterize their time courses in a reliable fashion. Sources for visual data were determined by comparing results across several different models, each of which was based on hundreds to thousands of different fits to the data.

  13. Neural discrimination of nonprototypical chords in music experts and laymen: an MEG study.

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    Brattico, Elvira; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Varyagina, Olga; Bailey, Christopher; Anourova, Irina; Järvenpää, Miika; Eerola, Tuomas; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2009-11-01

    At the level of the auditory cortex, musicians discriminate pitch changes more accurately than nonmusicians. However, it is not agreed upon how sound familiarity and musical expertise interact in the formation of pitch-change discrimination skills, that is, whether musicians possess musical pitch discrimination abilities that are generally more accurate than in nonmusicians or, alternatively, whether they may be distinguished from nonmusicians particularly with respect to the discrimination of nonprototypical sounds that do not play a reference role in Western tonal music. To resolve this, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure the change-related magnetic mismatch response (MMNm) in musicians and nonmusicians to two nonprototypical chords, a "dissonant" chord containing a highly unpleasant interval and a "mistuned" chord including a mistuned pitch, and a minor chord, all inserted in a context of major chords. Major and minor are the most frequently used chords in Western tonal music which both musicians and nonmusicians are most familiar with, whereas the other chords are more rarely encountered in tonal music. The MMNm was stronger in musicians than in nonmusicians in response to the dissonant and mistuned chords, whereas no group difference was found in the MMNm strength to minor chords. Correspondingly, the length of musical training correlated with the MMNm strength for the dissonant and mistuned chords only. Our findings provide evidence for superior automatic discrimination of nonprototypical chords in musicians. Most likely, this results from a highly sophisticated auditory system in musicians allowing a more efficient discrimination of chords deviating from the conventional categories of tonal music.

  14. The effect of conditional probability of chord progression on brain response: an MEG study.

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    Seung-Goo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have explored how and where musical syntax in Western music is processed in the human brain. An inappropriate chord progression elicits an event-related potential (ERP component called an early right anterior negativity (ERAN or simply an early anterior negativity (EAN in an early stage of processing the musical syntax. Though the possible underlying mechanism of the EAN is assumed to be probabilistic learning, the effect of the probability of chord progressions on the EAN response has not been previously explored explicitly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, the empirical conditional probabilities in a Western music corpus were employed as an approximation of the frequencies in previous exposure of participants. Three types of chord progression were presented to musicians and non-musicians in order to examine the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the neuromagnetic response using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Chord progressions were found to elicit early responses in a negatively correlating fashion with the conditional probability. Observed EANm (as a magnetic counterpart of the EAN component responses were consistent with the previously reported EAN responses in terms of latency and location. The effect of conditional probability interacted with the effect of musical training. In addition, the neural response also correlated with the behavioral measures in the non-musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to reveal the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the corresponding neuromagnetic response. The current results suggest that the physiological response is a reflection of the probabilistic representations of the musical syntax. Moreover, the results indicate that the probabilistic representation is related to the musical training as well as the sensitivity of an individual.

  15. Perceptual similarity of visual patterns predicts dynamic neural activation patterns measured with MEG.

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    Wardle, Susan G; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Grootswagers, Tijl; Khaligh-Razavi, Seyed-Mahdi; Carlson, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    Perceptual similarity is a cognitive judgment that represents the end-stage of a complex cascade of hierarchical processing throughout visual cortex. Previous studies have shown a correspondence between the similarity of coarse-scale fMRI activation patterns and the perceived similarity of visual stimuli, suggesting that visual objects that appear similar also share similar underlying patterns of neural activation. Here we explore the temporal relationship between the human brain's time-varying representation of visual patterns and behavioral judgments of perceptual similarity. The visual stimuli were abstract patterns constructed from identical perceptual units (oriented Gabor patches) so that each pattern had a unique global form or perceptual 'Gestalt'. The visual stimuli were decodable from evoked neural activation patterns measured with magnetoencephalography (MEG), however, stimuli differed in the similarity of their neural representation as estimated by differences in decodability. Early after stimulus onset (from 50ms), a model based on retinotopic organization predicted the representational similarity of the visual stimuli. Following the peak correlation between the retinotopic model and neural data at 80ms, the neural representations quickly evolved so that retinotopy no longer provided a sufficient account of the brain's time-varying representation of the stimuli. Overall the strongest predictor of the brain's representation was a model based on human judgments of perceptual similarity, which reached the limits of the maximum correlation with the neural data defined by the 'noise ceiling'. Our results show that large-scale brain activation patterns contain a neural signature for the perceptual Gestalt of composite visual features, and demonstrate a strong correspondence between perception and complex patterns of brain activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative analysis and biophysically realistic neural modeling of the MEG mu rhythm: rhythmogenesis and modulation of sensory-evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie R; Pritchett, Dominique L; Sikora, Michael A; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Hämäläinen, Matti; Moore, Christopher I

    2009-12-01

    Variations in cortical oscillations in the alpha (7-14 Hz) and beta (15-29 Hz) range have been correlated with attention, working memory, and stimulus detection. The mu rhythm recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a prominent oscillation generated by Rolandic cortex containing alpha and beta bands. Despite its prominence, the neural mechanisms regulating mu are unknown. We characterized the ongoing MEG mu rhythm from a localized source in the finger representation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. Subjects showed variation in the relative expression of mu-alpha or mu-beta, which were nonoverlapping for roughly 50% of their respective durations on single trials. To delineate the origins of this rhythm, a biophysically principled computational neural model of SI was developed, with distinct laminae, inhibitory and excitatory neurons, and feedforward (FF, representative of lemniscal thalamic drive) and feedback (FB, representative of higher-order cortical drive or input from nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei) inputs defined by the laminar location of their postsynaptic effects. The mu-alpha component was accurately modeled by rhythmic FF input at approximately 10-Hz. The mu-beta component was accurately modeled by the addition of approximately 10-Hz FB input that was nearly synchronous with the FF input. The relative dominance of these two frequencies depended on the delay between FF and FB drives, their relative input strengths, and stochastic changes in these variables. The model also reproduced key features of the impact of high prestimulus mu power on peaks in SI-evoked activity. For stimuli presented during high mu power, the model predicted enhancement in an initial evoked peak and decreased subsequent deflections. In agreement, the MEG-evoked responses showed an enhanced initial peak and a trend to smaller subsequent peaks. These data provide new information on the dynamics of the mu rhythm in humans and the model provides a novel mechanistic

  17. Early Prefrontal Brain Responses to the Hedonic Quality of Emotional Words – A Simultaneous EEG and MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A.; Eden, Annuschka S.; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80–120 ms), P2 (150–190 ms) and EPN component (200–300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an “emotional tagging” of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological. PMID:23940642

  18. Early prefrontal brain responses to the Hedonic quality of emotional words--a simultaneous EEG and MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A; Eden, Annuschka S; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80-120 ms), P2 (150-190 ms) and EPN component (200-300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an "emotional tagging" of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological.

  19. Calibration and monitoring of the MEG experiment by a proton beam from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Bai, X.; Baldini, A.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Cerri, C.; Corbo, M.; Curalli, N.; Bari, A. de; De Gerone, M.; Doke, T.; Dussoni, S.; Egger, J.

    2011-01-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI searches for the decay μ→eγ at a level of ∼10 -13 on the branching ratio BR(μ→eγ/μ→tot), well beyond the present experimental limit (BR≤1.2x10 -11 ) and is sensitive to the predictions of SUSY-GUT theories. To reach this goal the experiment uses one of the most intense continuous surface muon beams available (∼10 8 μ/s) and relies on advanced technology (LXe calorimetry, a gradient-field superconducting spectrometer as well as flexible and powerful trigger and acquisition systems). In order to maintain the highest possible energy, time and spatial resolutions for such detector, frequent calibration and monitoring, using a Cockcroft-Walton proton accelerator, are required. The proton beam is brought to the centre of MEG by a special bellows insertion system and travels in a direction opposite to the one of the normal μ-beam. Protons interact with a lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) nuclear target and produce one γ (17.6 MeV) from the reaction 7 3 Li(p,γ) 8 4 Be or two coincident γs (11.67 and 4.4 MeV) from the reaction 11 5 B(p,γ 1 ) 12 6 C * . The 17.6 MeV γ is used for calibrating and monitoring the LXe calorimeter (σ E γ /E γ =3.85±0.15% at 17.6 MeV) while the coincident 11.67 and 4.4 MeV γs are used to measure the relative timing of the calorimeter and the spectrometer timing counters (σ Δt =0.450±0.015ns). - Highlights: →Experiments that search for rare phenomena need to be constantly monitor and calibrated. →We show that proton induced nuclear reactions generate γ-rays useful for calibrating and monitoring the MEG experiment. →We describe the design, assembly and test of the calibration and monitoring accelerator for the MEG experiment.

  20. Can a metaphor of physics contribute to MEG neuroscience research? Intermittent turbulent eddies in brain magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    A common manifestation of nonlinear mathematical and experimental neurobiological dynamical systems in transition, intermittence, is currently being attended by concepts from physics such as turbulent eddy and the avalanche of critical systems. Do these concepts constitute an enticing poetry of dynamical universality or do these metaphors from physics generate more specific novel and relevant concepts and experiments in the neurosciences? Using six graphics and ten measures derived from the ergodic theory of dynamical systems, we study the magnetoencephalic, MEG, records of taskless, “resting” human subjects to find consistent evidence for turbulent (chaotic) dynamics marked by intermittent turbulent eddies. This brings up an apparent discrepancy via the juxtaposition of the superposition characteristics of magnetic fields and the non-superposition properties of turbulent flow. Treating this apparent inconsistency as an existent duality, we propose a physical model for how that might be the case. This leaves open the question: has the physical metaphor, turbulent eddy, contributed to a scientific understanding of the human resting MEG?

  1. Improvement of grasping after motor imagery in C6-C7 tetraplegia: A kinematic and MEG pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Sébastien; Di Rienzo, Franck; Reilly, Karen T; Revol, Patrice; Delpuech, Claude; Daligault, Sébastien; Guillot, Aymeric; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Luauté, Jacques; Rossetti, Yves; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Grasp recovery after C6-C7-spinal cord injury (SCI) requires learning "tenodesis grasp" whereby active wrist extension elicits passive thumb-to-forefinger and finger-to-palm flexion. Evidence that motor imagery (MI) promotes upper limb function after tetraplegia is growing, but whether MI potentiates grasp recovery in C6-C7-SCI individuals who have successfully learned the "tenodesis grasp" remains unknown. Six chronic stable C6-C7-SCI inpatients and six healthy control participants were included. C6-C7-SCI participants imagined grasping movements and controls visualized geometric forms for 45 minutes, three times a week for five weeks. Three separate measures taken over a five week period before the intervention formed the baseline. Intervention effects were assessed immediately after the intervention and eight weeks later. Each testing session consisted of kinematic recordings during reach-to-grasp and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings during wrist extension. During baseline, kinematic wrist extension angle during "tenodesis grasp" and MEG contralateral sensorimotor cortex (cSMC) activity during wrist extension were stable. Moreover, SCI participants exhibited a greater number of voxels within cSMC than controls. After MI sessions, wrist extension angle increased during "tenodesis grasp" and the number of voxels within cSMC during wrist extension decreased and became similar to controls. These findings provide further support for the use of MI to reinforce a compensatory grasping movement (tenodesis) and induce brain plasticity.

  2. TopoToolbox: Using Sensor Topography to Calculate Psychologically Meaningful Measures from Event-Related EEG/MEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Tian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The open-source toolbox “TopoToolbox” is a suite of functions that use sensor topography to calculate psychologically meaningful measures (similarity, magnitude, and timing from multisensor event-related EEG and MEG data. Using a GUI and data visualization, TopoToolbox can be used to calculate and test the topographic similarity between different conditions (Tian and Huber, 2008. This topographic similarity indicates whether different conditions involve a different distribution of underlying neural sources. Furthermore, this similarity calculation can be applied at different time points to discover when a response pattern emerges (Tian and Poeppel, 2010. Because the topographic patterns are obtained separately for each individual, these patterns are used to produce reliable measures of response magnitude that can be compared across individuals using conventional statistics (Davelaar et al. Submitted and Huber et al., 2008. TopoToolbox can be freely downloaded. It runs under MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc. and supports user-defined data structure as well as standard EEG/MEG data import using EEGLAB (Delorme and Makeig, 2004.

  3. State dependent properties of epileptic brain networks: comparative graph-theoretical analyses of simultaneously recorded EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Bialonski, Stephan; Noennig, Nina; Mai, Heinke; Prusseit, Jens; Wellmer, Jörg; Hinrichs, Hermann; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    To investigate whether functional brain networks of epilepsy patients treated with antiepileptic medication differ from networks of healthy controls even during the seizure-free interval. We applied different rules to construct binary and weighted networks from EEG and MEG data recorded under a resting-state eyes-open and eyes-closed condition from 21 epilepsy patients and 23 healthy controls. The average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient served as global statistical network characteristics. Independent on the behavioral condition, epileptic brains exhibited a more regular functional network structure. Similarly, the eyes-closed condition was characterized by a more regular functional network structure in both groups. The amount of network reorganization due to behavioral state changes was similar in both groups. Consistent findings could be achieved for networks derived from EEG but hardly from MEG recordings, and network construction rules had a rather strong impact on our findings. Despite the locality of the investigated processes epileptic brain networks differ in their global characteristics from non-epileptic brain networks. Further methodological developments are necessary to improve the characterization of disturbed and normal functional networks. An increased regularity and a diminished modulation capability appear characteristic of epileptic brain networks. Copyright (c) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping Critical Language Sites in Children Performing Verb Generation: Whole-Brain Connectivity and Graph Theoretical Analysis in MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Williamson, Brady J; Kadis, Darren S

    2017-01-01

    A classic left frontal-temporal brain network is known to support language processes. However, the level of participation of constituent regions, and the contribution of extra-canonical areas, is not fully understood; this is particularly true in children, and in individuals who have experienced early neurological insult. In the present work, we propose whole-brain connectivity and graph-theoretical analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) source estimates to provide robust maps of the pediatric expressive language network. We examined neuromagnetic data from a group of typically-developing young children ( n = 15, ages 4-6 years) and adolescents ( n = 14, 16-18 years) completing an auditory verb generation task in MEG. All source analyses were carried out using a linearly-constrained minimum-variance (LCMV) beamformer. Conventional differential analyses revealed significant ( p EVC) . Hub analysis revealed the importance of left perisylvian sites, i.e., Broca's and Wernicke's areas, across groups. The hemispheric distribution of frontal and temporal lobe EVC values was asymmetrical in most subjects; left dominant EVC was observed in 20% of young children, and 71% of adolescents. Interestingly, the adolescent group demonstrated increased critical sites in the right cerebellum, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left putamen. Here, we show that whole brain connectivity and network analysis can be used to map critical language sites in typical development; these methods may be useful for defining the margins of eloquent tissue in neurosurgical candidates.

  5. Processing of gaze direction within the N170/M170 time window: A combined EEG/MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Nicolas; Baker, Sara; George, Nathalie

    2017-06-01

    Gaze direction is an important social signal for human beings. Beside the role of gaze in attention orienting, direct gaze (that is, gaze directed toward an observer) is a highly relevant biological stimulus that elicits attention capture and increases face encoding. Brain imaging studies have emphasized the role of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the coding of gaze direction and in the integration of gaze and head cues of social attention. The dynamics of the processing and integration of these cues remains, however, unclear. In order to address this question, we used deviated and frontal faces with averted and direct gaze in a combined electro- and magneto- encephalography (EEG-MEG) study. We showed distinct effects of gaze direction on the N170 and M170 responses. There was an interaction between gaze direction and head orientation between 134 and 162ms in MEG and a main effect of gaze direction between 171 and 186ms in EEG. These effects involved the posterior and anterior regions of the STS respectively. Both effects also emphasized the sensitivity to direct gaze. These data highlight the central role of the STS in gaze processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Frontal midline theta rhythm and gamma power changes during focused attention on mental calculation: an MEG beamformer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Ryouhei; Canuet, Leonides; Ishihara, Tsutomu; Aoki, Yasunori; Ikeda, Shunichiro; Hata, Masahiro; Katsimichas, Themistoklis; Gunji, Atsuko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Iwase, Masao; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fmθ) appears widely distributed over medial prefrontal areas in EEG recordings, indicating focused attention. Although mental calculation is often used as an attention-demanding task, little has been reported on calculation-related activation in Fmθ experiments. In this study we used spatially filtered MEG and permutation analysis to precisely localize cortical generators of the magnetic counterpart of Fmθ, as well as other sources of oscillatory activity associated with mental calculation processing (i.e., arithmetic subtraction). Our results confirmed and extended earlier EEG/MEG studies indicating that Fmθ during mental calculation is generated in the dorsal anterior cingulate and adjacent medial prefrontal cortex. Mental subtraction was also associated with gamma event-related synchronization, as an index of activation, in right parietal regions subserving basic numerical processing and number-based spatial attention. Gamma event-related desynchronization appeared in the right lateral prefrontal cortex, likely representing a mechanism to interrupt neural activity that can interfere with the ongoing cognitive task. PMID:24966825

  7. Deficits in auditory processing contribute to impairments in vocal affect recognition in autism spectrum disorders: A MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Carly; Hopkins, Joyce; Kopald, Brandon E; Paulson, Kim; Doyle, Lauren; Andrews, Whitney E; Lewine, Jeffrey David

    2015-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between magnetoencephalography-based (MEG) indices of basic cortical auditory processing and vocal affect recognition (VAR) ability in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). MEG data were collected from 25 children/adolescents with ASD and 12 control participants using a paired-tone paradigm to measure quality of auditory physiology, sensory gating, and rapid auditory processing. Group differences were examined in auditory processing and vocal affect recognition ability. The relationship between differences in auditory processing and vocal affect recognition deficits was examined in the ASD group. Replicating prior studies, participants with ASD showed longer M1n latencies and impaired rapid processing compared with control participants. These variables were significantly related to VAR, with the linear combination of auditory processing variables accounting for approximately 30% of the variability after controlling for age and language skills in participants with ASD. VAR deficits in ASD are typically interpreted as part of a core, higher order dysfunction of the "social brain"; however, these results suggest they also may reflect basic deficits in auditory processing that compromise the extraction of socially relevant cues from the auditory environment. As such, they also suggest that therapeutic targeting of sensory dysfunction in ASD may have additional positive implications for other functional deficits. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Frontal midline theta rhythm and gamma power changes during focused attention on mental calculation: an MEG beamformer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryouhei eIshii

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fmθ appears widely distributed over medial prefrontal areas in EEG recordings, indicating focused attention. Although mental calculation is often used as an attention-demanding task, little has been reported on calculation-related activation in Fmθ experiments. In this study we used spatially filtered MEG and permutation analysis to precisely localize cortical generators of the magnetic counterpart of Fmθ, as well as other sources of oscillatory activity associated with mental calculation processing (i.e., arithmetic subtraction. Our results confirmed and extended earlier EEG/MEG studies indicating that Fmθ during mental calculation is generated in the dorsal anterior cingulate and adjacent medial prefrontal cortex. Mental subtraction was also associated with gamma event-related synchronization, as an index of activation, in right parietal regions subserving basic numerical processing and number-based spatial attention. Gamma event-related desynchronization appeared in the right lateral prefrontal cortex, likely representing a mechanism to interrupt neural activity that can interfere with the ongoing cognitive task.

  9. Localization of electrophysiological responses to semantic and syntactic anomalies in language comprehension with MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Aneta; Panamsky, Lilia; Links, Kira A; Meltzer, Jed A

    2015-01-15

    Syntactically and semantically anomalous words encountered during sentence comprehension are known to elicit dissociable electrophysiological responses, which are thought to reflect distinct aspects of language processing. However, the sources of these responses have not been well characterized. We used beamforming analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) data to map generators of electrophysiological responses to linguistic anomalies. Anomalous words occurred in the context of a sentence acceptability judgement task conducted in both visual and auditory modalities. Time-frequency analysis revealed that both kinds of violations elicited event-related synchronization (ERS) in the delta-theta frequency range (1-5 Hz), and desynchronization (ERD) in the alpha-beta range (8-30 Hz). In addition, these responses were differentially modulated by violation type and presentation modality. 1-5 Hz responses were consistently localized within medial prefrontal cortex and did not vary significantly across violation types, but were stronger for visual presentation. In contrast, 8-30 Hz ERD occurred in different regions for different violation types. For semantic violations the distribution was predominantly in the bilateral occipital cortex and left temporal and inferior frontal regions, and these effects did not differ for visual and auditory presentation. In contrast, syntactic responses were strongly affected by presentation modality. Under visual presentation, syntactic violations elicited bilateral 8-30 Hz ERD extending into dorsal parietal and frontal regions, whereas effects were much weaker and mostly statistically insignificant in the auditory modality. These results suggest that delta-theta ERS reflects generalized increases in working memory demands related to linguistic anomaly detection, while alpha-beta ERD reflects specific activation of cortical regions involved in distinct aspects of linguistic processing, such as semantic vs. phonological short-term memory

  10. Age Effect on Automatic Inhibitory Function of the Somatosensory and Motor Cortex: An MEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsiung Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related deficiency in the top-down modulation of cognitive inhibition has been extensively documented, whereas the effects of age on a bottom-up or automatic operation of inhibitory function were less investigated. It is unknown that whether the older adults (OA’ reduced behavioral performance and neural responses are due to the insufficient bottom-up processes. Compared to behavioral assessments which have been widely used to examine the top-down control of response inhibition, electrophysiological recordings are more suitable to probe the early-stage processes of automatic inhibitory function. Sensory gating (SG, a phenomenon of attenuated neural response to the second identical stimulus in a paired-pulse paradigm, is an indicator to assess automatic inhibitory function of the sensory cortex. On the other hand, electricity-induced beta rebound oscillation in a single-pulse paradigm reflects cortical inhibition of the motor cortex. From the neurophysiological perspective, SG and beta rebound oscillation are replicable indicators to examine the automatic inhibitory function of human sensorimotor cortices. Thus, the present study aimed to use a whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG to investigate the age-related alterations of SG function in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI and of beta rebound oscillation in the primary motor cortex (MI in 17 healthy younger and 15 older adults. The Stimulus 2/Stimulus 1 (S2/S1 amplitude ratio in response to the paired-pulse electrical stimulation to the left median nerve was used to evaluate the automatic inhibitory function of SI, and the beta rebound response in the single-pulse paradigm was used to evaluate the automatic inhibitory function of MI. Although there were no significant age-related differences found in the SI SG ratios, the MI beta rebound power was reduced and peak latency was prolonged in the OA. Furthermore, significant association between the SI SG ratio and the MI beta rebound

  11. Age Effect on Automatic Inhibitory Function of the Somatosensory and Motor Cortex: An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Lin, Mei-Yin; Yang, Shiou-Han

    2018-01-01

    Age-related deficiency in the top-down modulation of cognitive inhibition has been extensively documented, whereas the effects of age on a bottom-up or automatic operation of inhibitory function were less investigated. It is unknown that whether the older adults (OA)’ reduced behavioral performance and neural responses are due to the insufficient bottom-up processes. Compared to behavioral assessments which have been widely used to examine the top-down control of response inhibition, electrophysiological recordings are more suitable to probe the early-stage processes of automatic inhibitory function. Sensory gating (SG), a phenomenon of attenuated neural response to the second identical stimulus in a paired-pulse paradigm, is an indicator to assess automatic inhibitory function of the sensory cortex. On the other hand, electricity-induced beta rebound oscillation in a single-pulse paradigm reflects cortical inhibition of the motor cortex. From the neurophysiological perspective, SG and beta rebound oscillation are replicable indicators to examine the automatic inhibitory function of human sensorimotor cortices. Thus, the present study aimed to use a whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the age-related alterations of SG function in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and of beta rebound oscillation in the primary motor cortex (MI) in 17 healthy younger and 15 older adults. The Stimulus 2/Stimulus 1 (S2/S1) amplitude ratio in response to the paired-pulse electrical stimulation to the left median nerve was used to evaluate the automatic inhibitory function of SI, and the beta rebound response in the single-pulse paradigm was used to evaluate the automatic inhibitory function of MI. Although there were no significant age-related differences found in the SI SG ratios, the MI beta rebound power was reduced and peak latency was prolonged in the OA. Furthermore, significant association between the SI SG ratio and the MI beta rebound power, which was

  12. Advanced time-series analysis of MEG data as a method to explore olfactory function in healthy controls and Parikinson's disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesveldt, S.; Knol, D.L.; Verbunt, J.P.A.; Berendse, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether time-series analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a suitable method to study brain activity related to olfactory information processing, and to detect differences in odor-induced brain activity between patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and controls.

  13. The IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR at human chromosome 14q32.2: hierarchical interaction and distinct functional properties as imprinting control centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kagami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human chromosome 14q32.2 harbors the germline-derived primary DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR and the postfertilization-derived secondary MEG3-DMR, together with multiple imprinted genes. Although previous studies in cases with microdeletions and epimutations affecting both DMRs and paternal/maternal uniparental disomy 14-like phenotypes argue for a critical regulatory function of the two DMRs for the 14q32.2 imprinted region, the precise role of the individual DMR remains to be clarified. We studied an infant with upd(14pat body and placental phenotypes and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the IG-DMR alone (patient 1 and a neonate with upd(14pat body, but no placental phenotype and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the MEG3-DMR alone (patient 2. The results generated from the analysis of these two patients imply that the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR function as imprinting control centers in the placenta and the body, respectively, with a hierarchical interaction for the methylation pattern in the body governed by the IG-DMR. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an essential long-range imprinting regulatory function for the secondary DMR.

  14. A three dimensional anatomical view of oscillatory resting-state activity and functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease related dementia: An MEG study using atlas-based beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.M.; Stam, C.J.; Bosboom, J.L.W.; Berendse, H.W.; Hillebrand, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) related dementia (PDD) develops in up to 80% of PD patients. The present study was performed to further unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms by applying a new analysis approach that uses an atlas-based MEG beamformer to provide a detailed anatomical mapping

  15. [Magneto-encephalographic (MEG) brain recordings during traumatic memory recall in women with post-traumatic stress disorder: A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottraux, J; Lecaignard, F; Yao, S-N; De Mey-Guillard, C; Haour, F; Delpuech, C; Servan-Schreiber, D

    2015-06-01

    The experiment studied the effects of a short duration exposure to traumatic memories using magneto-encephalography (MEG). Nine right-handed DSM-4 PTSD patients were recruited from a unit for anxiety disorders and an organisation supporting victims of violence. In order to have a homogeneous sample, we included only women who suffered from civilian PTSD. Exclusion criteria were co-morbid major medical illness, metallic dental prostheses that would interfere in the magnetic measurement, and current drug treatment. All participants were free from neurological disease and had normal hearing. They signed a written informed consent form. An ethics committee accepted the study. A tape-recorded voice administered a script-driven imagery. The patients had to imagine, successively, a neutral image, a traumatic memory and rest, while MEG measured brain activities across delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Each condition lasted three minutes. Heart rate (HR), anxiety and the vividness of mental images were recorded at the end of each phase. MEG power analysis was carried out with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) 8. The signals were averaged for each of the three conditions of threeminutes duration. The dependent variable was a subtracted value: (trauma - rest) - (neutral - rest). The significance threshold was set at Psecondary visual cortex (BA 18-19) in the delta band, the insula (BA13) in the beta band, the insula (BA13), premotor cortex (BA 6), Broca area (BA 44), and BA 43, in the alpha band. The symptom provocation protocol was successful in eliciting subjective anxiety and HR response in relation to traumatic memories. Our MEG results are in keeping with previous neuro-imagery studies showing decreased activities in the insula and Broca area during PTSD symptom provocation. However, we did not replicate the activation in the amygdala and the cingulate and prefrontal cortex found in some studies. Moreover, the within-group design, the small sample, and the inclusion

  16. Abnormal MEG oscillatory activity during visual processing in the prefrontal cortices and frontal eye-fields of the aging HIV brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony W Wilson

    Full Text Available Shortly after infection, HIV enters the brain and causes widespread inflammation and neuronal damage, which ultimately leads to neuropsychological impairments. Despite a large body of neuroscience and imaging studies, the pathophysiology of these HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND remains unresolved. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown greater activation in HIV-infected patients during strenuous tasks in frontal and parietal cortices, and less activation in the primary sensory cortices during rest and sensory stimulation.High-density magnetoencephalography (MEG was utilized to evaluate the basic neurophysiology underlying attentive, visual processing in older HIV-infected adults and a matched non-infected control group. Unlike other neuroimaging methods, MEG is a direct measure of neural activity that is not tied to brain metabolism or hemodynamic responses. During MEG, participants fixated on a centrally-presented crosshair while intermittent visual stimulation appeared in their top-right visual-field quadrant. All MEG data was imaged in the time-frequency domain using beamforming.Uninfected controls had increased neuronal synchronization in the 6-12 Hz range within the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right frontal eye-fields, and the posterior cingulate. Conversely, HIV-infected patients exhibited decreased synchrony in these same neural regions, and the magnitude of these decreases was correlated with neuropsychological performance in several cortical association regions.MEG-based imaging holds potential as a noninvasive biomarker for HIV-related neuronal dysfunction, and may help identify patients who have or may develop HAND. Reduced synchronization of neural populations in the association cortices was strongly linked to cognitive dysfunction, and likely reflects the impact of HIV on neuronal and neuropsychological health.

  17. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. C. (John C.); Baillet, S. (Sylvain); Jerbi, K. (Karim); Leahy, R. M. (Richard M.)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  18. Movement priming of EEG/MEG brain responses for action-words characterizes the link between language and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Giovanna; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Hauk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Activation in sensorimotor areas of the brain following perception of linguistic stimuli referring to objects and actions has been interpreted as evidence for strong theories of embodied semantics. Although a large number of studies have demonstrated this "language-to-action" link, important questions about how activation in the sensorimotor system affects language performance ("action-to-language" link) are yet unanswered. As several authors have recently pointed out, the debate should move away from an "embodied or not" focus, and rather aim to characterize the functional contributions of sensorimotor systems to language processing in more detail. For this purpose, we here introduce a novel movement priming paradigm in combination with electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), which allows investigating effects of motor cortex pre-activation on the spatio-temporal dynamics of action-word evoked brain activation. Participants initiated experimental trials by either finger- or foot-movements before executing a two alternative forced choice task employing action-words. We found differential brain activation during the early stages of subsequent hand- and leg-related word processing, respectively, albeit in the absence of behavioral effects. Distributed source estimation based on combined EEG/MEG measurements revealed that congruency effects between effector type used for response initiation (hand or foot) and action-word category (hand- or foot-related) occurred not only in motor cortex, but also in a classical language comprehension area, posterior superior temporal cortex, already 150 msec after the visual presentation of the word stimulus. This suggests that pre-activation of hand- and leg-motor networks may differentially facilitate the ignition of semantic cell assemblies for hand- and leg-related words, respectively. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of movement priming in combination with neuroimaging to functionally characterize the link between

  19. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A Ioannides

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor (M1 cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45 to 70 Hz activity at latencies of 20 to 50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occured in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  20. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe; Saridis, George A; Gjedde, Albert; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI) revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occurred in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  1. LncRNA MEG3 downregulation mediated by DNMT3b contributes to nickel malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells via modulating PHLPP1 transcription and HIF-1α translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Huang, C; Wang, J; Huang, H; Li, J; Xie, Q; Liu, Y; Zhu, J; Li, Y; Zhang, D; Zhu, Q; Huang, C

    2017-07-06

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key factors in various fundamental cellular biological processes, and many of them are likely to have functional roles in tumorigenesis. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 that encodes a lncRNA, and the decreased MEG3 expression has been reported in multiple cancer tissues. However, nothing is known about the alteration and role of MEG3 in environmental carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Our present study, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, discovered that environmental carcinogen nickel exposure led to MEG3 downregulation, consequently initiating c-Jun-mediated PHLPP1 transcriptional inhibition and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein translation upregulation, in turn resulting in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. Mechanistically, MEG3 downregulation was attributed to nickel-induced promoter hypermethylation via elevating DNMT3b expression, whereas PHLPP1 transcriptional inhibition was due to the decreasing interaction of MEG3 with its inhibitory transcription factor c-Jun. Moreover, HIF-1α protein translation was upregulated via activating the Akt/p70S6K/S6 axis resultant from PHLPP1 inhibition in nickel responses. Collectively, we uncover that nickel exposure results in DNMT3b induction and MEG3 promoter hypermethylation and expression inhibition, further reduces its binding to c-Jun and in turn increasing c-Jun inhibition of PHLPP1 transcription, leading to the Akt/p70S6K/S6 axis activation, and HIF-1α protein translation, as well as malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. Our studies provide a significant insight into understanding the alteration and role of MEG3 in nickel-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  2. Mariana Gardella. Las críticas de los filósofos megáricos a la ontología platónica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Javier Barrionuevo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El libro Las críticas de los filósofos megáricos a la ontología platónica de Mariana Gardella emprende una tarea hermenéutica vacante en los estudios de filosofía antigua, rescatando el lugar de los filósofos megáricos en el contexto de la filosofía griega del siglo IV a.C. Para este propósito busca recuperar no sólo las teorías y argumentos filosóficos propuestos por los miembros de dicha escuela, sino también el ámbito intelectual en el cual se inscriben los discursos.

  3. Tracking the speech signal--time-locked MEG signals during perception of ultra-fast and moderately fast speech in blind and in sighted listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertrich, Ingo; Dietrich, Susanne; Ackermann, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Blind people can learn to understand speech at ultra-high syllable rates (ca. 20 syllables/s), a capability associated with hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. To further elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying this skill, magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements during listening to sentence utterances were cross-correlated with time courses derived from the speech signal (envelope, syllable onsets and pitch periodicity) to capture phase-locked MEG components (14 blind, 12 sighted subjects; speech rate=8 or 16 syllables/s, pre-defined source regions: auditory and visual cortex, inferior frontal gyrus). Blind individuals showed stronger phase locking in auditory cortex than sighted controls, and right-hemisphere visual cortex activity correlated with syllable onsets in case of ultra-fast speech. Furthermore, inferior-frontal MEG components time-locked to pitch periodicity displayed opposite lateralization effects in sighted (towards right hemisphere) and blind subjects (left). Thus, ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind individuals appears associated with changes in early signal-related processing mechanisms both within and outside the central-auditory terrain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multimodal Diffusion-MRI and MEG Assessment of Auditory and Language System Development in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey I Berman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory processing and language impairments are prominent in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The present study integrated diffusion MR measures of white-matter microstructure and magnetoencephalography (MEG measures of cortical dynamics to investigate associations between brain structure and function within auditory and language systems in ASD. Based on previous findings, abnormal structure-function relationships in auditory and language systems in ASD were hypothesized. Methods: Evaluable neuroimaging data was obtained from 44 typically developing (TD children (mean age 10.4±2.4years and 95 children with ASD (mean age 10.2±2.6years. Diffusion MR tractography was used to delineate and quantitatively assess the auditory radiation and arcuate fasciculus segments of the auditory and language systems. MEG was used to measure (1 superior temporal gyrus auditory evoked M100 latency in response to pure-tone stimuli as an indicator of auditory system conduction velocity, and (2 auditory vowel-contrast mismatch field (MMF latency as a passive probe of early linguistic processes. Results: Atypical development of white matter and cortical function, along with atypical lateralization, were present in ASD. In both auditory and language systems, white matter integrity and cortical electrophysiology were found to be coupled in typically developing children, with white matter microstructural features contributing significantly to electrophysiological response latencies. However, in ASD, we observed uncoupled structure-function relationships in both auditory and language systems. Regression analyses in ASD indicated that factors other than white-matter microstructure additionally contribute to the latency of neural evoked responses and ultimately behavior. Results also indicated that whereas delayed M100 is a marker for ASD severity, MMF delay is more associated with language impairment. Conclusion: Present findings suggest atypical

  5. Assessing and improving the spatial accuracy in MEG source localization by depth-weighted minimum-norm estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Belliveau, John W; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2006-05-15

    Cerebral currents responsible for the extra-cranially recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) data can be estimated by applying a suitable source model. A popular choice is the distributed minimum-norm estimate (MNE) which minimizes the l2-norm of the estimated current. Under the l2-norm constraint, the current estimate is related to the measurements by a linear inverse operator. However, the MNE has a bias towards superficial sources, which can be reduced by applying depth weighting. We studied the effect of depth weighting in MNE using a shift metric. We assessed the localization performance of the depth-weighted MNE as well as depth-weighted noise-normalized MNE solutions under different cortical orientation constraints, source space densities, and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in multiple subjects. We found that MNE with depth weighting parameter between 0.6 and 0.8 showed improved localization accuracy, reducing the mean displacement error from 12 mm to 7 mm. The noise-normalized MNE was insensitive to depth weighting. A similar investigation of EEG data indicated that depth weighting parameter between 2.0 and 5.0 resulted in an improved localization accuracy. The application of depth weighting to auditory and somatosensory experimental data illustrated the beneficial effect of depth weighting on the accuracy of spatiotemporal mapping of neuronal sources.

  6. An FPGA-based trigger system for the search of μ+→e++γ decay in the MEG experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, L; Cei, F; Galeotti, S; Magazzù, C; Morsani, F; Nicolò, D; Signorelli, G; Grassi, M

    2013-01-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI aims at investigating the μ + → e + + γ decay with improved sensitivity on the branching ratio (BR) by two orders of magnitude with respect to the previous experimental limit (BR(μ + → e + + γ) ≈ 10 −13 ). The use of the most intense continuous muon beam world wide ( ≈ 10 8 μ/s) to search for such a rare event must be accompanied by an efficient trigger system, able to suppress the huge beam-related background to sustainable rates while preserving the efficiency on signal close to unity. In order to accomplish both objectives, a digital approach was exploited by means of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), working as a real-time processors of detector signals to perform an accurate event reconstruction within a 450 ns latency. This approach eventually turned out to be flexible enough to allow us to record calibration events in parallel with the main data acquisition and monitor the detector behavior throughout the data taking. We describe here the hardware implementation of the trigger and its main features as well: signal digitization, online waveform processing, reconstruction algorithms. A detailed description is given of the system architecture, the feature of the boards and their use. The trigger algorithms will be described in details in a dedicated article to be published afterwards.

  7. Early Parallel Activation of Semantics and Phonology in Picture Naming: Evidence from a Multiple Linear Regression MEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miozzo, Michele; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Hauk, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The time course of brain activation during word production has become an area of increasingly intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. The predominant view has been that semantic and phonological processes are activated sequentially, at about 150 and 200-400 ms after picture onset. Although evidence from prior studies has been interpreted as supporting this view, these studies were arguably not ideally suited to detect early brain activation of semantic and phonological processes. We here used a multiple linear regression approach to magnetoencephalography (MEG) analysis of picture naming in order to investigate early effects of variables specifically related to visual, semantic, and phonological processing. This was combined with distributed minimum-norm source estimation and region-of-interest analysis. Brain activation associated with visual image complexity appeared in occipital cortex at about 100 ms after picture presentation onset. At about 150 ms, semantic variables became physiologically manifest in left frontotemporal regions. In the same latency range, we found an effect of phonological variables in the left middle temporal gyrus. Our results demonstrate that multiple linear regression analysis is sensitive to early effects of multiple psycholinguistic variables in picture naming. Crucially, our results suggest that access to phonological information might begin in parallel with semantic processing around 150 ms after picture onset. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Relationship between brain network pattern and cognitive performance of children revealed by MEG signals during free viewing of video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fang; Watanabe, Katsumi; Yoshimura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-04-01

    Application of graph theory to analysis of functional networks in the brain is an important research trend. Extensive research on the resting state has shown a "small-world" organization of the brain network as a whole. However, the small-worldness of children's brain networks in a working state has not yet been well characterized. In this paper, we used a custom-made, child-sized magnetoencephalography (MEG) device to collect data from children while they were watching cartoon videos. Network structures were analyzed and compared with scores on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC). The results of network analysis showed that (1) the small-world scalar showed a negative correlation with the simultaneous processing raw score, a measure of visual processing (Gv) ability, and (2) the children with higher simultaneous processing raw scores possessed network structures that can be more efficient for local information processing than children with lower scores. These results were compatible with previous studies on the adult working state. Additional results obtained from further analysis of the frontal and occipital lobes indicated that high cognitive performance could represent better local efficiency in task-related sub-networks. Under free viewing of cartoon videos, brain networks were no longer confined to their strongest small-world states; connections became clustered in local areas such as the frontal and occipital lobes, which might be a more useful configuration for handling visual processing tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional connectivity of the cortical network supporting statistical learning in musicians and non-musicians: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Chalas, Nikolas; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2017-11-24

    Statistical learning is a cognitive process of great importance for the detection and representation of environmental regularities. Complex cognitive processes such as statistical learning usually emerge as a result of the activation of widespread cortical areas functioning in dynamic networks. The present study investigated the cortical large-scale network supporting statistical learning of tone sequences in humans. The reorganization of this network related to musical expertise was assessed via a cross-sectional comparison of a group of musicians to a group of non-musicians. The cortical responses to a statistical learning paradigm incorporating an oddball approach were measured via Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings. Large-scale connectivity of the cortical activity was calculated via a statistical comparison of the estimated transfer entropy in the sources' activity. Results revealed the functional architecture of the network supporting the processing of statistical learning, highlighting the prominent role of informational processing pathways that bilaterally connect superior temporal and intraparietal sources with the left IFG. Musical expertise is related to extensive reorganization of this network, as the group of musicians showed a network comprising of more widespread and distributed cortical areas as well as enhanced global efficiency and increased contribution of additional temporal and frontal sources in the information processing pathway.

  10. Early sensory cortex is activated in the absence of explicit input during crossmodal item retrieval: evidence from MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Ajay S; Gilbert, Jessica R; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-02-01

    Crossmodal associations form a fundamental aspect of our daily lives. In this study we investigated the neural correlates of crossmodal association in early sensory cortices using magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a paired associate recognition paradigm in which subjects were tested after multiple training sessions over a span of four weeks. Subjects had to learn 12 abstract, nonlinguistic, pairs of auditory and visual objects that consisted of crossmodal (visual-auditory, VA; auditory-visual, AV) and unimodal (visual-visual, VV; auditory-auditory, AA) paired items. Visual objects included abstract, non-nameable, fractal-like images, and auditory objects included abstract tone sequences. During scanning, subjects were shown the first item of a pair (S1), followed by a delay, then the simultaneous presentation of a visual and auditory stimulus (S2). Subjects were instructed to indicate whether either of the S2 stimuli contained the correct paired associate of S1. Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAMspm), a minimum variance beamformer, was then used to assess source power differences between the crossmodal conditions and their corresponding unimodal conditions (i.e., AV-AA and VA-VV) in the beta (15-30 Hz) and low gamma frequencies (31-54 Hz) during the S1 period. We found greater power during S1 in the corresponding modality-specific association areas for crossmodal compared with unimodal stimuli. Thus, even in the absence of explicit sensory input, the retrieval of well-learned, crossmodal pairs activate sensory areas associated with the corresponding modality. These findings support theories which posit that modality-specific regions of cortex are involved in the storage and retrieval of sensory-specific items from long-term memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New perspectives in EEG/MEG brain mapping and PET/fMRI neuroimaging of human pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A C

    2001-10-01

    With the maturation of EEG/MEG brain mapping and PET/fMRI neuroimaging in the 1990s, greater understanding of pain processing in the brain now elucidates and may even challenge the classical theory of pain mechanisms. This review scans across the cultural diversity of pain expression and modulation in man. It outlines the difficulties in defining and studying human pain. It then focuses on methods of studying the brain in experimental and clinical pain, the cohesive results of brain mapping and neuroimaging of noxious perception, the implication of pain research in understanding human consciousness and the relevance to clinical care as well as to the basic science of human psychophysiology. Non-invasive brain studies in man start to unveil the age-old puzzles of pain-illusion, hypnosis and placebo in pain modulation. The neurophysiological and neurohemodynamic brain measures of experimental pain can now largely satisfy the psychophysiologist's dream, unimaginable only a few years ago, of modelling the body-brain, brain-mind, mind-matter duality in an inter-linking 3-P triad: physics (stimulus energy); physiology (brain activities); and psyche (perception). For neuropsychophysiology greater challenges lie ahead: (a) how to integrate a cohesive theory of human pain in the brain; (b) what levels of analyses are necessary and sufficient; (c) what constitutes the structural organisation of the pain matrix; (d) what are the modes of processing among and across the sites of these structures; and (e) how can neural computation of these processes in the brain be carried out? We may envision that modular identification and delineation of the arousal-attention, emotion-motivation and perception-cognition neural networks of pain processing in the brain will also lead to deeper understanding of the human mind. Two foreseeable impacts on clinical sciences and basic theories from brain mapping/neuroimaging are the plausible central origin in persistent pain and integration of

  12. Repetition suppression and repetition enhancement underlie auditory memory-trace formation in the human brain: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recasens, Marc; Leung, Sumie; Grimm, Sabine; Nowak, Rafal; Escera, Carles

    2015-03-01

    The formation of echoic memory traces has traditionally been inferred from the enhanced responses to its deviations. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory event-related potential (ERP) elicited between 100 and 250ms after sound deviation is an indirect index of regularity encoding that reflects a memory-based comparison process. Recently, repetition positivity (RP) has been described as a candidate ERP correlate of direct memory trace formation. RP consists of repetition suppression and enhancement effects occurring in different auditory components between 50 and 250ms after sound onset. However, the neuronal generators engaged in the encoding of repeated stimulus features have received little interest. This study intends to investigate the neuronal sources underlying the formation and strengthening of new memory traces by employing a roving-standard paradigm, where trains of different frequencies and different lengths are presented randomly. Source generators of repetition enhanced (RE) and suppressed (RS) activity were modeled using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy subjects. Our results show that, in line with RP findings, N1m (~95-150ms) activity is suppressed with stimulus repetition. In addition, we observed the emergence of a sustained field (~230-270ms) that showed RE. Source analysis revealed neuronal generators of RS and RE located in both auditory and non-auditory areas, like the medial parietal cortex and frontal areas. The different timing and location of neural generators involved in RS and RE points to the existence of functionally separated mechanisms devoted to acoustic memory-trace formation in different auditory processing stages of the human brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Processing of complex distracting sounds in school-aged children and adults: Evidence from EEG and MEG data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eRuhnau

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available When a perceiver performs a task, rarely occurring sounds often have a distracting effect on task performance. The neural mismatch responses in event-related potentials to such distracting stimuli depend on age. Adults commonly show a negative response, whereas in children a positive as well as a negative mismatch response has been reported. Using electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG, here we investigated the developmental changes of distraction processing in school-aged children (9–10 years and adults. Participants took part in an auditory-visual distraction paradigm comprising a visuo-spatial primary task and task-irrelevant environmental sounds distracting from this task. Behaviorally, distractors delayed reaction times in the primary task in both age groups, and this delay was of similar magnitude in both groups. The neurophysiological data revealed an early as well as a late mismatch response elicited by distracting stimuli in both age groups. Together with previous research, this indicates that deviance detection is accomplished in a hierarchical manner in the auditory system. Both mismatch responses were localized to auditory cortex areas. All mismatch responses were generally delayed in children, suggesting that not all neurophysiological aspects of deviance processing are mature in school-aged children. Furthermore, the P3a, reflecting involuntary attention capture, was present in both age groups in the EEG with comparable amplitudes and at similar latencies, but with a different topographical distribution. This suggests that involuntary attention shifts towards complex distractors operate comparably in school-aged children and adults, yet undergoing generator maturation.

  14. Dendrosomal curcumin increases expression of the long non-coding RNA gene MEG3 via up-regulation of epi-miRs in hepatocellular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mina; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-09-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. This gives novel cancer treatment methods an overwhelming significance. Epigenetic therapy of cancer is useful in reversing some of the cancer defects because of reversibility of the epigenetic alterations. Non-protein coding transcripts are the major part of our transcriptome. MEG3 is a tumor suppressor long non-coding RNA being expressed in many normal tissues. Methylation of MEG3 promoter region elicits the decrease in its expression in hepatocellular cancer cells. Bioactive nutrients including curcumin offer great potential in altering DNA methylation status which is catalyzed via DNMT1, DNMT3A and 3B. Herein, we aimed to study RNA-based epigenetic effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) on hepatocellular cancer (HCC). To this end miRNA-dependent regulation of MEG3 expression under treatment with DNC was studied by evaluating the modulatory involvement of miR-29a for DNMT3A and 3B and miR-185 for DNMT1. We evaluated DNC entrance to HCC cells with the use of fluorescent characteristics of curcumin. Next we performed the MTT assay to evaluate DNC and dendrosome effects on HCC cell viability. The coding and non-coding genes expression analyses were done using quantitative-PCR. In result we found that the DNC dependent overexpression of miR-29a and miR-185 (P DNC potentially can induce DNA hypomethylation and reexpression of silenced tumor suppressor genes in HCC. These data suggest that DNC could be an effective choice for epigenetic therapy of HCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Low maternal adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with increase in methylation at the MEG3-IG differentially methylated region in female infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Nahm, Sarah; Mendez, Michelle; Robinson, Whitney; Murphy, Susan K.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Hogan, Vijaya; Rowley, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Diet is dictated by the surrounding environment, as food access and availability may change depending on where one lives. Maternal diet during pregnancy is an important part of the in utero environment, and may affect the epigenome. Studies looking at overall diet pattern in relation to DNA methylation have been lacking. The Mediterranean diet is known for its health benefits, including decreased inflammation, weight loss, and management of chronic diseases. This study assesses the association between maternal adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern during pregnancy and infant DNA methylation at birth. Mediterranean diet adherence in early pregnancy was measured in 390 women enrolled in the Newborn Epigenetic Study, and DNA methylation was assessed in their infants at birth. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and infant methylation at the MEG3, MEG3-IG, pleiomorphic adenoma gene-like 1, insulin-like growth factor 2 gene, H19, mesoderm-specific transcript, neuronatin, paternally expressed gene 3, sarcoglycan and paternally expressed gene 10 regions, measured by pyrosequencing. Infants of mothers with a low adherence to a Mediterranean diet had a greater odds of hypo-methylation at the MEG3-IG differentially methylated region (DMR). Sex-stratified models showed that this association was present in girls only. This study provides early evidence on the association between overall diet pattern and methylation at the 9 DMRs included in this study, and suggests that maternal diet can have a sex-specific impact on infant DNA methylation at specific imprinted DMRs. PMID:29492309

  16. Mass test of AdvanSiD model ASD-NUV3S-P SiliconPMs for the Pixel Timing Counter of the MEG II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossella, M.; Bariani, S.; Barnaba, O.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cervi, T.; Menegolli, A.; Nardò, R.; Prata, M. C.; Romano, E.; Scagliotti, C.; Simonetta, M.; Vercellati, F.

    2017-02-01

    The MEG II Timing Counter will measure the positron time of arrival with a resolution of 30 ps relying on two arrays of scintillator pixels read out by 6144 Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) from AdvanSiD. They must be characterized, measuring their breakdown voltage, to assure that the gains of the SiPMs of each pixel are as uniform as possible, to maximize the pixel resolution. To do this an automatic test system that can measure sequentially the parameters of 32 devices has been developed.

  17. The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) data repository: Structural and functional MRI, MEG, and cognitive data from a cross-sectional adult lifespan sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jason R; Williams, Nitin; Cusack, Rhodri; Auer, Tibor; Shafto, Meredith A; Dixon, Marie; Tyler, Lorraine K; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the data repository for the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) initial study cohort. The Cam-CAN Stage 2 repository contains multi-modal (MRI, MEG, and cognitive-behavioural) data from a large (approximately N=700), cross-sectional adult lifespan (18-87years old) population-based sample. The study is designed to characterise age-related changes in cognition and brain structure and function, and to uncover the neurocognitive mechanisms that support healthy cognitive ageing. The database contains raw and preprocessed structural MRI, functional MRI (active tasks and resting state), and MEG data (active tasks and resting state), as well as derived scores from cognitive behavioural experiments spanning five broad domains (attention, emotion, action, language, and memory), and demographic and neuropsychological data. The dataset thus provides a depth of neurocognitive phenotyping that is currently unparalleled, enabling integrative analyses of age-related changes in brain structure, brain function, and cognition, and providing a testbed for novel analyses of multi-modal neuroimaging data. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Consistent MUSIC: An approach to the localization of true brain interactions from EEG/MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Forooz; Ewald, Arne; Nolte, Guido

    2015-05-15

    MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) is a standard localization method which is based on the idea of dividing the vector space of the data into two subspaces: signal subspace and noise subspace. The brain, divided into several grid points, is scanned entirely and the grid point with the maximum consistency with the signal subspace is considered as the source location. In one of the MUSIC variants called Recursively Applied and Projected MUSIC (RAP-MUSIC), multiple iterations are proposed in order to decrease the location estimation uncertainties introduced by subspace estimation errors. In this paper, we suggest a new method called Self-Consistent MUSIC (SC-MUSIC) which extends RAP-MUSIC to a self-consistent algorithm. This method, SC-MUSIC, is based on the idea that the presence of several sources has a bias on the localization of each source. This bias can be reduced by projecting out all other sources mutually rather than iteratively. While the new method is applicable in all situations when MUSIC is applicable we will study here the localization of interacting sources using the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum due to the robustness of this measure to the artifacts of volume conduction. For an odd number of sources this matrix is rank deficient similar to covariance matrices of fully correlated sources. In such cases MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC fail completely while the new method accurately localizes all sources. We present results of the method using simulations of odd and even number of interacting sources in the presence of different noise levels. We compare the method with three other source localization methods: RAP-MUSIC, dipole fit and MOCA (combined with minimum norm estimate) through simulations. SC-MUSIC shows substantial improvement in the localization accuracy compared to these methods. We also show results for real MEG data of a single subject in the resting state. Four sources are localized in the sensorimotor area at f=11Hz which is the expected

  19. Vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium of binary and multicomponent systems with MEG modeling with the CPA EoS and an EoS/G(E) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2006-01-01

    The cubic-plus-association (CPA) EoS is applied to multicomponent multiphase equilibria of systems containing MEG as a hydrate inhibitor. It is shown that the model provides very satisfactory prediction of the phase behavior for the systems tested. A more conventional engineering model for handli...

  20. José Manuel Lucía Megías, ed., Lope de Vega en la piel de Brugalla. La Colección Lope de Vega de la Biblioteca Histórica Municipal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gómez Canseco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of José Manuel Lucía Megías, ed., Lope de Vega en la piel de Brugalla. La Colección Lope de Vega de la Biblioteca Histórica Municipal, Ayuntamiento de Madrid, Madrid, 2013, 254 pp. ISBN: 9788478127627.

  1. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Marjolein M. A.; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using “virtual MEG electrodes”. We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19–28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the

  2. Collection methodology evaluation and solvents analysis/mixtures solvents in the air in work ambient: methanol in MEG mixture (methanol 33%, ethanol 60% and gasoline 7%); Avaliacao de metodologia de coleta e analise de solventes/misturas de solventes no ar em ambiente de trabalho: metanol em mistura MEG (metanol 33%, etanol 60% e gasolina 7%)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Luiza Maria Nunes

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a proposal for evaluation of collection and solvent/solvent mixtures analysis methodology for the air in the work environment by studying the following issues of present solvents: historical aspects; methanol - properties and toxicity; collection methodology evaluation, and gases and vapors analysis in the air; experimental data. The denominated mixture MEG - methanol, ethanol and gasoline is analyzed in terms of its chemical characteristics. The author concludes the work detaching that the methodology presented can only be used for short duration measurements in concentrations peaks studies.

  3. Search for the lepton flavour violating decay μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ with the full dataset of the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.M.; Cerri, C.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Pazzi, R.; Raffaelli, F.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bao, Y.; Egger, J.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedilishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Nicolo, D.; Tenchini, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Genoa Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Boca, G.; De Bari, A.; Nardo, R.; Simonetta, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Pavia Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Cascella, M. [INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Lecce (Italy); University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Cattaneo, P.W.; Rossella, M. [Pavia Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Piredda, G.; Voena, C. [Rome Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A. [INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Lecce (Italy); De Gerone, M. [Genoa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Doke, T. [Waseda University, Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Fujii, Y.; Ieki, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Orito, S.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Grancagnolo, F.; Tassielli, G.F. [Universita del Salento (Italy); INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Graziosi, A.; Ripiccini, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Rome Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Maki, A.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (JP); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (RU); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (RU); Kang, T.I.; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z.; Zanello, D. [University of California, Irvine, CA (US); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Mzavia, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (RU); Renga, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (CH); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (IT); Rome Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (IT); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pisa Univ., Scuola Normale Superiore (IT); Collaboration: MEG Collaboration

    2016-08-15

    The final results of the search for the lepton flavour violating decay μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ based on the full dataset collected by the MEG experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institut in the period 2009-2013 and totalling 7.5 x 10{sup 14} stopped muons on target are presented. No significant excess of events is observed in the dataset with respect to the expected background and a new upper limit on the branching ratio of this decay of B(μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ) < 4.2 x 10{sup -13} (90 % confidence level) is established, which represents the most stringent limit on the existence of this decay to date. (orig.)

  4. Ragu: A Free Tool for the Analysis of EEG and MEG Event-Related Scalp Field Data Using Global Randomization Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Koenig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a program (Ragu; Randomization Graphical User interface for statistical analyses of multichannel event-related EEG and MEG experiments. Based on measures of scalp field differences including all sensors, and using powerful, assumption-free randomization statistics, the program yields robust, physiologically meaningful conclusions based on the entire, untransformed, and unbiased set of measurements. Ragu accommodates up to two within-subject factors and one between-subject factor with multiple levels each. Significance is computed as function of time and can be controlled for type II errors with overall analyses. Results are displayed in an intuitive visual interface that allows further exploration of the findings. A sample analysis of an ERP experiment illustrates the different possibilities offered by Ragu. The aim of Ragu is to maximize statistical power while minimizing the need for a-priori choices of models and parameters (like inverse models or sensors of interest that interact with and bias statistics.

  5. Tones and numbers: a combined EEG-MEG study on the effects of musical expertise in magnitude comparisons of audiovisual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Pantev, Christo

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the cortical responses underlying magnitude comparisons of multisensory stimuli and examined the effect that musical expertise has in this process. The comparative judgments were based on a newly learned rule binding the auditory and visual stimuli within the context of magnitude comparisons: "the higher the pitch of the tone, the larger the number presented." The cortical responses were measured by simultaneous MEG\\EEG recordings and a combined source analysis with individualized realistic head models was performed. Musical expertise effects were investigated by comparing musicians to non-musicians. Congruent audiovisual stimuli, corresponding to the newly learned rule, elicited activity in frontotemporal and occipital areas. In contrast, incongruent stimuli activated temporal and parietal regions. Musicians when compared with nonmusicians showed increased differences between congruent and incongruent stimuli in a prefrontal region, thereby indicating that music expertise may affect multisensory comparative judgments within a generalized representation of analog magnitude. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ragu: a free tool for the analysis of EEG and MEG event-related scalp field data using global randomization statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Kottlow, Mara; Stein, Maria; Melie-García, Lester

    2011-01-01

    We present a program (Ragu; Randomization Graphical User interface) for statistical analyses of multichannel event-related EEG and MEG experiments. Based on measures of scalp field differences including all sensors, and using powerful, assumption-free randomization statistics, the program yields robust, physiologically meaningful conclusions based on the entire, untransformed, and unbiased set of measurements. Ragu accommodates up to two within-subject factors and one between-subject factor with multiple levels each. Significance is computed as function of time and can be controlled for type II errors with overall analyses. Results are displayed in an intuitive visual interface that allows further exploration of the findings. A sample analysis of an ERP experiment illustrates the different possibilities offered by Ragu. The aim of Ragu is to maximize statistical power while minimizing the need for a-priori choices of models and parameters (like inverse models or sensors of interest) that interact with and bias statistics.

  7. Lexical mediation of phonotactic frequency effects on spoken word recognition: A Granger causality analysis of MRI-constrained MEG/EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, David W; Olson, Bruna B

    2015-07-01

    Phonotactic frequency effects play a crucial role in a number of debates over language processing and representation. It is unclear however, whether these effects reflect prelexical sensitivity to phonotactic frequency, or lexical "gang effects" in speech perception. In this paper, we use Granger causality analysis of MR-constrained MEG/EEG data to understand how phonotactic frequency influences neural processing dynamics during auditory lexical decision. Effective connectivity analysis showed weaker feedforward influence from brain regions involved in acoustic-phonetic processing (superior temporal gyrus) to lexical areas (supramarginal gyrus) for high phonotactic frequency words, but stronger top-down lexical influence for the same items. Low entropy nonwords (nonwords judged to closely resemble real words) showed a similar pattern of interactions between brain regions involved in lexical and acoustic-phonetic processing. These results contradict the predictions of a feedforward model of phonotactic frequency facilitation, but support the predictions of a lexically mediated account.

  8. Altered Rich-Club and Frequency-Dependent Subnetwork Organization in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A MEG Resting-State Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Antonakakis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain connectivity networks exhibit “small-world” characteristics and some of these networks follow a “rich-club” organization, whereby a few nodes of high connectivity (hubs tend to connect more densely among themselves than to nodes of lower connectivity. The Current study followed an “attack strategy” to compare the rich-club and small-world network organization models using Magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients and neurologically healthy controls to identify the topology that describes the underlying intrinsic brain network organization. We hypothesized that the reduction in global efficiency caused by an attack targeting a model's hubs would reveal the “true” underlying topological organization. Connectivity networks were estimated using mutual information as the basis for cross-frequency coupling. Our results revealed a prominent rich-club network organization for both groups. In particular, mTBI patients demonstrated hyper-synchronization among rich-club hubs compared to controls in the δ band and the δ-γ1, θ-γ1, and β-γ2 frequency pairs. Moreover, rich-club hubs in mTBI patients were overrepresented in right frontal brain areas, from θ to γ1 frequencies, and underrepresented in left occipital regions in the δ-β, δ-γ1, θ-β, and β-γ2 frequency pairs. These findings indicate that the rich-club organization of resting-state MEG, considering its role in information integration and its vulnerability to various disorders like mTBI, may have a significant predictive value in the development of reliable biomarkers to help the validation of the recovery from mTBI. Furthermore, the proposed approach might be used as a validation tool to assess patient recovery.

  9. GALA: group analysis leads to accuracy, a novel approach for solving the inverse problem in exploratory analysis of group MEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozunov, Vladimir V; Ossadtchi, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Although MEG/EEG signals are highly variable between subjects, they allow characterizing systematic changes of cortical activity in both space and time. Traditionally a two-step procedure is used. The first step is a transition from sensor to source space by the means of solving an ill-posed inverse problem for each subject individually. The second is mapping of cortical regions consistently active across subjects. In practice the first step often leads to a set of active cortical regions whose location and timecourses display a great amount of interindividual variability hindering the subsequent group analysis. We propose Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy (GALA)-a solution that combines the two steps into one. GALA takes advantage of individual variations of cortical geometry and sensor locations. It exploits the ensuing variability in electromagnetic forward model as a source of additional information. We assume that for different subjects functionally identical cortical regions are located in close proximity and partially overlap and their timecourses are correlated. This relaxed similarity constraint on the inverse solution can be expressed within a probabilistic framework, allowing for an iterative algorithm solving the inverse problem jointly for all subjects. A systematic simulation study showed that GALA, as compared with the standard min-norm approach, improves accuracy of true activity recovery, when accuracy is assessed both in terms of spatial proximity of the estimated and true activations and correct specification of spatial extent of the activated regions. This improvement obtained without using any noise normalization techniques for both solutions, preserved for a wide range of between-subject variations in both spatial and temporal features of regional activation. The corresponding activation timecourses exhibit significantly higher similarity across subjects. Similar results were obtained for a real MEG dataset of face-specific evoked responses.

  10. Alterations in the sense of time, space and body in the Mindfulness-trained brain: A neurophenomenologically-guided MEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviva eBerkovich-Ohana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Meditation practice can lead to what have been referred to as 'altered states of consciousness'. One of the phenomenological characteristics of these states is a joint alteration in the sense of time, space and body. Here, we set out to study the unique experiences of alteration in the sense of time and space by collaborating with a select group of 12 long-term Mindfulness meditation practitioners in a neurophenomenological setup, utilizing first-person data to guide the neural analyses. We hypothesized that the underlying neural activity accompanying alterations in the sense of time and space would be related to alterations in bodily processing.The participants were asked to volitionally bring about distinct states of 'Timelessness' (outside time and 'Spacelessness' (outside space while their brain activity was recorded by MEG. In order to rule out the involvement of attention, memory or imagination, we used control states of 'Then' (past and 'There' (another place. MEG sensors evidencing alterations in power values were identified, and the brain regions underlying these changes were estimated via spatial filtering (beamforming. Particularly, we searched for similar neural activity hypothesized to underlie both the state of 'Timelessness' and 'Spacelessness'. The results were mostly confined to the theta band, and showed that: 1 the 'Then' / 'There' overlap yielded activity in regions related to autobiographic memory and imagery (right posterior parietal lobule, right precentral / middle frontal gyrus, bilateral precuneus; 2 'Timelessness' / 'Spacelessness' conditions overlapped in a different network, related to alterations in the sense of the body (posterior cingulate, right temporoparietal junction, cerebellum; and 3 phenomenologically-guided neural analyses enabled us to dissociate different levels of alterations in the sense of the body. This study illustrates the utility of employing experienced contemplative practitioners within a

  11. Interpretability of Multivariate Brain Maps in Linear Brain Decoding: Definition, and Heuristic Quantification in Multivariate Analysis of MEG Time-Locked Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Seyed Mostafa; Vega Pons, Sandro; Weisz, Nathan; Passerini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Brain decoding is a popular multivariate approach for hypothesis testing in neuroimaging. Linear classifiers are widely employed in the brain decoding paradigm to discriminate among experimental conditions. Then, the derived linear weights are visualized in the form of multivariate brain maps to further study spatio-temporal patterns of underlying neural activities. It is well known that the brain maps derived from weights of linear classifiers are hard to interpret because of high correlations between predictors, low signal to noise ratios, and the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data. Therefore, improving the interpretability of brain decoding approaches is of primary interest in many neuroimaging studies. Despite extensive studies of this type, at present, there is no formal definition for interpretability of multivariate brain maps. As a consequence, there is no quantitative measure for evaluating the interpretability of different brain decoding methods. In this paper, first, we present a theoretical definition of interpretability in brain decoding; we show that the interpretability of multivariate brain maps can be decomposed into their reproducibility and representativeness. Second, as an application of the proposed definition, we exemplify a heuristic for approximating the interpretability in multivariate analysis of evoked magnetoencephalography (MEG) responses. Third, we propose to combine the approximated interpretability and the generalization performance of the brain decoding into a new multi-objective criterion for model selection. Our results, for the simulated and real MEG data, show that optimizing the hyper-parameters of the regularized linear classifier based on the proposed criterion results in more informative multivariate brain maps. More importantly, the presented definition provides the theoretical background for quantitative evaluation of interpretability, and hence, facilitates the development of more effective brain decoding algorithms

  12. GALA: Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy, a novel approach for solving the inverse problem in exploratory analysis of group MEG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eKozunov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although MEG/EEG signals are highly variable between subjects, they allow characterizing systematic changes of cortical activity in both space and time. Traditionally a two-step procedure is used. The first step is a transition from sensor to source space by the means of solving an ill-posed inverse problem for each subject individually. The second is mapping of cortical regions consistently active across subjects. In practice the first step often leads to a set of active cortical regions whose location and timecourses display a great amount of interindividual variability hindering the subsequent group analysis.We propose Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy (GALA - a solution that combines the two steps into one. GALA takes advantage of individual variations of cortical geometry and sensor locations. It exploits the ensuing variability in electromagnetic forward model as a source of additional information. We assume that for different subjects functionally identical cortical regions are located in close proximity and partially overlap and their timecourses are correlated. This relaxed similarity constraint on the inverse solution can be expressed within a probabilistic framework, allowing for an iterative algorithm solving the inverse problem jointly for all subjects.A systematic simulation study showed that GALA, as compared with the standard min-norm approach, improves accuracy of true activity recovery, when accuracy is assessed both in terms of spatial proximity of the estimated and true activations and correct specification of spatial extent of the activated regions. This improvement obtained without using any noise normalization techniques for both solutions, preserved for a wide range of between-subject variations in both spatial and temporal features of regional activation. The corresponding activation timecourses exhibit significantly higher similarity across subjects. Similar results were obtained for a real MEG dataset of face

  13. Long-term effects of cranial irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy in treatment of childhood leukemia: a MEG study of power spectrum and correlated cognitive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylaxis to prevent relapses in the central nervous system after childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) used to consist of both intrathecal chemotherapy (CT) and cranial irradiation (CRT). CRT was mostly abolished in the eighties because of its neurotoxicity, and replaced with more intensive intrathecal CT. In this study, a group of survivors treated with CRT before 1983 and another group treated without CRT thereafter are investigated 20–25 years later, giving a much stronger perspective on long-term quality of life than previous studies. The outcomes will help to better understand these groups’ current needs and will aid in anticipating late effects of prophylactic CRT that is currently applied for other diseases. This study evaluates oscillatory neuronal activity in these long-term survivors. Power spectrum deviations are hypothesized to correlate with cognitive dysfunction. Methods Resting state eyes-closed magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings were obtained from 14 ALL survivors treated with CT + CRT, 18 treated with CT alone and 35 controls. Relative spectral power was calculated in the δ, θ, α1, α2, β and γ frequency bands. The Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT) program was used to assess cognition in the executive functions domain. MEG data and ANT scores were correlated. Results In the CT + CRT group, relative θ power was slightly increased (p = 0.069) and α2 power was significantly decreased (p = 0.006). The CT + CRT group performed worse on various cognitive tests. A deficiency in visuomotor accuracy, especially of the right hand, could be clearly associated with the deviating regional θ and α2 powers (0.471 < r < 0.697). A significant association between decreased regional α2 power and less attentional fluctuations was found for CT + CRT patients as well as controls (0.078 < r < 0.666). Patients treated with CT alone displayed a power spectrum similar to controls, except

  14. The Processing of Somatosensory Information Shifts from an Early Parallel into a Serial Processing Mode: A Combined fMRI/MEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W

    2016-01-01

    The question regarding whether somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel or in series has not been clearly answered. Several studies that have applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to fMRI data have arrived at seemingly divergent conclusions. However, these divergent results could be explained by the hypothesis that the processing route of somatosensory information changes with time. Specifically, we suggest that somatosensory stimuli are processed in parallel only during the early stage, whereas the processing is later dominated by serial processing. This hypothesis was revisited in the present study based on fMRI analyses of tactile stimuli and the application of DCM to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data collected during sustained (260 ms) tactile stimulation. Bayesian model comparisons were used to infer the processing stream. We demonstrated that the favored processing stream changes over time. We found that the neural activity elicited in the first 100 ms following somatosensory stimuli is best explained by models that support a parallel processing route, whereas a serial processing route is subsequently favored. These results suggest that the secondary somatosensory area (SII) receives information regarding a new stimulus in parallel with the primary somatosensory area (SI), whereas later processing in the SII is dominated by the preprocessed input from the SI.

  15. The Processing of Somatosensory Information Shifts from an Early Parallel into a Serial Processing Mode: A Combined fMRI/MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M.; Brodoehl, Stefan; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W.

    2016-01-01

    The question regarding whether somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel or in series has not been clearly answered. Several studies that have applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to fMRI data have arrived at seemingly divergent conclusions. However, these divergent results could be explained by the hypothesis that the processing route of somatosensory information changes with time. Specifically, we suggest that somatosensory stimuli are processed in parallel only during the early stage, whereas the processing is later dominated by serial processing. This hypothesis was revisited in the present study based on fMRI analyses of tactile stimuli and the application of DCM to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data collected during sustained (260 ms) tactile stimulation. Bayesian model comparisons were used to infer the processing stream. We demonstrated that the favored processing stream changes over time. We found that the neural activity elicited in the first 100 ms following somatosensory stimuli is best explained by models that support a parallel processing route, whereas a serial processing route is subsequently favored. These results suggest that the secondary somatosensory area (SII) receives information regarding a new stimulus in parallel with the primary somatosensory area (SI), whereas later processing in the SII is dominated by the preprocessed input from the SI. PMID:28066197

  16. Single-trial detection of event-related fields in MEG from the presentation of happy faces: Results of the Biomag 2016 data challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, H; Barachant, A; King, J R; Sanchez Bornot, J; Prasad, G

    2017-07-01

    The recognition of brain evoked responses at the single-trial level is a challenging task. Typical non-invasive brain-computer interfaces based on event-related brain responses use eletroencephalograhy. In this study, we consider brain signals recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG), and we expect to take advantage of the high spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of targets in a series of images. This study was used for the data analysis competition held in the 20th International Conference on Biomagnetism (Biomag) 2016, wherein the goal was to provide a method for single-trial detection of even-related fields corresponding to the presentation of happy faces during the rapid presentation of images of faces with six different facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, neutrality, sadness, and happiness). The datasets correspond to 204 gradiometers signals obtained from four participants. The best method is based on the combination of several approaches, and mainly based on Riemannian geometry, and it provided an area under the ROC curve of 0.956±0.043. The results show that a high recognition rate of facial expressions can be obtained at the signal-trial level using advanced signal processing and machine learning methodologies.

  17. The Processing of Somatosensory Information shifts from an early parallel into a serial processing mode: a combined fMRI/MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Michael Klingner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question regarding whether somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel or in series has not been clearly answered. Several studies that have applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM to fMRI data have arrived at seemingly divergent conclusions. However, these divergent results could be explained by the hypothesis that the processing route of somatosensory information changes with time. Specifically, we suggest that somatosensory stimuli are processed in parallel only during the early stage, whereas the processing is later dominated by serial processing. This hypothesis was revisited in the present study based on fMRI analyses of tactile stimuli and the application of DCM to magnetoencephalographic (MEG data collected during sustained (260 ms tactile stimulation. Bayesian model comparisons were used to infer the processing stream. We demonstrated that the favored processing stream changes over time. We found that the neural activity elicited in the first 100 ms following somatosensory stimuli is best explained by models that support a parallel processing route, whereas a serial processing route is subsequently favored. These results suggest that the secondary somatosensory area (SII receives information regarding a new stimulus in parallel with the primary somatosensory area (SI, whereas later processing in the SII is dominated by the preprocessed input from the SI.

  18. Context-dependent lexical ambiguity resolution: MEG evidence for the time-course of activity in left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Giovanna; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Cornelissen, Piers; Gennari, Silvia P

    An MEG study investigated the role of context in semantic interpretation by examining the comprehension of ambiguous words in contexts leading to different interpretations. We compared high-ambiguity words in minimally different contexts (to bowl, the bowl) to low-ambiguity counterparts (the tray, to flog). Whole brain beamforming revealed the engagement of left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMTG). Points of interest analyses showed that both these sites showed a stronger response to verb-contexts by 200 ms post-stimulus and displayed overlapping ambiguity effects that were sustained from 300 ms onwards. The effect of context was stronger for high-ambiguity words than for low-ambiguity words at several different time points, including within the first 100 ms post-stimulus. Unlike LIFG, LPMTG also showed stronger responses to verb than noun contexts in low-ambiguity trials. We argue that different functional roles previously attributed to LIFG and LPMTG are in fact played out at different periods during processing. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectral power and functional connectivity changes during mindfulness meditation with eyes open: A magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in long-term meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W P; Camfield, D A; Woods, W; Sarris, J; Pipingas, A

    2015-10-01

    Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5 years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Two-stage processing of sounds explains behavioral performance variations due to changes in stimulus contrast and selective attention: an MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaakko Kauramäki

    Full Text Available Selectively attending to task-relevant sounds whilst ignoring background noise is one of the most amazing feats performed by the human brain. Here, we studied the underlying neural mechanisms by recording magnetoencephalographic (MEG responses of 14 healthy human subjects while they performed a near-threshold auditory discrimination task vs. a visual control task of similar difficulty. The auditory stimuli consisted of notch-filtered continuous noise masker sounds, and of 1020-Hz target tones occasionally (p = 0.1 replacing 1000-Hz standard tones of 300-ms duration that were embedded at the center of the notches, the widths of which were parametrically varied. As a control for masker effects, tone-evoked responses were additionally recorded without masker sound. Selective attention to tones significantly increased the amplitude of the onset M100 response at ~100 ms to the standard tones during presence of the masker sounds especially with notches narrower than the critical band. Further, attention modulated sustained response most clearly at 300-400 ms time range from sound onset, with narrower notches than in case of the M100, thus selectively reducing the masker-induced suppression of the tone-evoked response. Our results show evidence of a multiple-stage filtering mechanism of sensory input in the human auditory cortex: 1 one at early (~100 ms latencies bilaterally in posterior parts of the secondary auditory areas, and 2 adaptive filtering of attended sounds from task-irrelevant background masker at longer latency (~300 ms in more medial auditory cortical regions, predominantly in the left hemisphere, enhancing processing of near-threshold sounds.

  1. Modality-specific spectral dynamics in response to visual and tactile sequential shape information processing tasks: An MEG study using multivariate pattern classification analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, Bakul; Lee, Peter; Jeong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Brain regions that respond to more than one sensory modality are characterized as multisensory regions. Studies on the processing of shape or object information have revealed recruitment of the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and other regions regardless of input sensory modalities. However, it remains unknown whether such regions show similar (modality-invariant) or different (modality-specific) neural oscillatory dynamics, as recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG), in response to identical shape information processing tasks delivered to different sensory modalities. Modality-invariant or modality-specific neural oscillatory dynamics indirectly suggest modality-independent or modality-dependent participation of particular brain regions, respectively. Therefore, this study investigated the modality-specificity of neural oscillatory dynamics in the form of spectral power modulation patterns in response to visual and tactile sequential shape-processing tasks that are well-matched in terms of speed and content between the sensory modalities. Task-related changes in spectral power modulation and differences in spectral power modulation between sensory modalities were investigated at source-space (voxel) level, using a multivariate pattern classification (MVPC) approach. Additionally, whole analyses were extended from the voxel level to the independent-component level to take account of signal leakage effects caused by inverse solution. The modality-specific spectral dynamics in multisensory and higher-order brain regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, and other brain regions, showed task-related modulation in response to both sensory modalities. This suggests modality-dependency of such brain regions on the input sensory modality for sequential shape-information processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 Regulates the Permeability of the Blood-Tumor Barrier via the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyuan Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The blood-tumor barrier (BTB restricts the efficient delivery of anti-glioma drugs to cranial glioma tissues. Increased BTB permeability may allow greater delivery of the therapeutic agents. Increasing evidence has revealed that PIWI proteins and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs play an important role in tumor progression. However, whether PIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate BTB permeability remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 (piR-DQ593109 complex was the predominant regulator of BTB permeability. Briefly, PIWIL1 was upregulated in glioma endothelial cells (GECs. Furthermore, piR-DQ593109 was also overexpressed in GECs, as revealed via a piRNA microarray. Downregulation of PIWIL1 or piR-DQ593109 increased the permeability of the BTB. Moreover, PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109, which formed a piRNA-induced silencing complex, degraded the long non-coding RNA maternally expressed 3 (MEG3 in a sequenced-dependent manner. Furthermore, restoring MEG3 released post-transcriptional inhibition of Runt related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 by sponging miR-330-5p. In addition, RUNX3 bounded to the promoter regions and reduced the promoter activities of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5, which significantly impaired the expression levels of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. In conclusion, downregulating PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109 increased BTB permeability through the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 axis. These data may provide insight into glioma treatment.

  3. Zoomed MRI Guided by Combined EEG/MEG Source Analysis: A Multimodal Approach for Optimizing Presurgical Epilepsy Work-up and its Application in a Multi-focal Epilepsy Patient Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ü; Rampp, S; Wollbrink, A; Kugel, H; Cho, J -H; Knösche, T R; Grova, C; Wellmer, J; Wolters, C H

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of source analysis based on electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) has gained considerable attention in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. However, in many cases the source analysis alone is not used to tailor surgery unless the findings are confirmed by lesions, such as, e.g., cortical malformations in MRI. For many patients, the histology of tissue resected from MRI negative epilepsy shows small lesions, which indicates the need for more sensitive MR sequences. In this paper, we describe a technique to maximize the synergy between combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis and high resolution MRI. The procedure has three main steps: (1) construction of a detailed and calibrated finite element head model that considers the variation of individual skull conductivities and white matter anisotropy, (2) EMEG source analysis performed on averaged interictal epileptic discharges (IED), (3) high resolution (0.5 mm) zoomed MR imaging, limited to small areas centered at the EMEG source locations. The proposed new diagnosis procedure was then applied in a particularly challenging case of an epilepsy patient: EMEG analysis at the peak of the IED coincided with a right frontal focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), which had been detected at standard 1 mm resolution MRI. Of higher interest, zoomed MR imaging (applying parallel transmission, 'ZOOMit') guided by EMEG at the spike onset revealed a second, fairly subtle, FCD in the left fronto-central region. The evaluation revealed that this second FCD, which had not been detectable with standard 1 mm resolution, was the trigger of the seizures.

  4. Effects of 2,4-D on the germination of megaspores and initial development of Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Monilophyta, Marsileaceae Efeitos do 2,4-D sobre a germinação de megásporos e o desenvolvimento inicial de Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Monilophyta, Marsileaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MBB Cassanego

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Regnellidium diphyllum is considered as endangered, occurring in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and a few adjoining localities in Uruguay, Argentina and the State of Santa Catarina. It grows in wetlands frequently altered for agricultural activities. Herbicides based on 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D are widely used in these fields. The effects of 2,4-D on the germination of megaspores and initial sporophytic development of R. diphyllum were investigated. Six concentrations of 2,4-D (0.32; 0.64; 1.92; 4.80; 9.60 and 19.20 mg.L-1, and the control (0.00 mg.L-1, were tested in vitro, using Meyer's medium. Cultures were maintained in a growth chamber at 24 ± 1 °C, under artificial light with nominal irradiance of 110 µmol.m-2/s and 16 hours photoperiod. Megaspore germination was lower at 9.60 and 19.20 mg.L-1 of 2,4-D (56 and 48%, respectively, compared with the control (68%. Herbicide concentrations of up to 1.92 mg.L-1 did not significantly decrease the number of sporophytes formed. At 19.20 mg.L-1, no sporophytes were formed. The lengths of the primary root, primary and secondary leaves were greater at concentrations of 0.32 and 0.64 mg.L-1 of 2,4-D. Low concentrations of 2,4-D do not affect germination rates and initial development of R. diphyllum in a significant way. However, higher concentrations (9.60 and 19.20 mg.L-1 affect substantially the germination of the megaspores and interfere with the establishment of the species.Regnellidium diphyllum é considerada ameaçada, ocorrendo no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, e em algumas localidades vizinhas no Uruguai, na Argentina e no Estado de Santa Catarina. Cresce em áreas alagáveis, frequentemente alteradas para atividades agrícolas. Herbicidas baseados em ácido 2,4-diclorofenoxiacético (2,4-D são largamente utilizados nestas plantações. Os efeitos do 2,4-D sobre a germinação de megásporos e o desenvolvimento esporofítico inicial de R. diphyllum foram

  5. Source reconstruction accuracy of MEG and EEG Bayesian inversion approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Belardinelli

    Full Text Available Electro- and magnetoencephalography allow for non-invasive investigation of human brain activation and corresponding networks with high temporal resolution. Still, no correct network detection is possible without reliable source localization. In this paper, we examine four different source localization schemes under a common Variational Bayesian framework. A Bayesian approach to the Minimum Norm Model (MNM, an Empirical Bayesian Beamformer (EBB and two iterative Bayesian schemes (Automatic Relevance Determination (ARD and Greedy Search (GS are quantitatively compared. While EBB and MNM each use a single empirical prior, ARD and GS employ a library of anatomical priors that define possible source configurations. The localization performance was investigated as a function of (i the number of sources (one vs. two vs. three, (ii the signal to noise ratio (SNR; 5 levels and (iii the temporal correlation of source time courses (for the cases of two or three sources. We also tested whether the use of additional bilateral priors specifying source covariance for ARD and GS algorithms improved performance. Our results show that MNM proves effective only with single source configurations. EBB shows a spatial accuracy of few millimeters with high SNRs and low correlation between sources. In contrast, ARD and GS are more robust to noise and less affected by temporal correlations between sources. However, the spatial accuracy of ARD and GS is generally limited to the order of one centimeter. We found that the use of correlated covariance priors made no difference to ARD/GS performance.

  6. Blind Source Separation of Event-Related EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsomaa, Johanna; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto Juhani

    2017-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) can be used to decompose complex electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography data into simpler components based on statistical assumptions without using a physical model. Applications include brain-computer interfaces, artifact removal, and identifying parallel neural processes. We wish to address the issue of applying BSS to event-related responses, which is challenging because of nonstationary data. We introduce a new BSS approach called momentary-uncorrelated component analysis (MUCA), which is tailored for event-related multitrial data. The method is based on approximate joint diagonalization of multiple covariance matrices estimated from the data at separate latencies. We further show how to extend the methodology for autocovariance matrices and how to apply BSS methods suitable for piecewise stationary data to event-related responses. We compared several BSS approaches by using simulated EEG as well as measured somatosensory and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked EEG. Among the compared methods, MUCA was the most tolerant one to noise, TMS artifacts, and other challenges in the data. With measured somatosensory data, over half of the estimated components were found to be similar by MUCA and independent component analysis. MUCA was also stable when tested with several input datasets. MUCA is based on simple assumptions, and the results suggest that MUCA is robust with nonideal data. Event-related responses and BSS are valuable and popular tools in neuroscience. Correctly designed BSS is an efficient way of identifying artifactual and neural processes from nonstationary event-related data.

  7. Gamma-Ray and Multiwavelength Emission from Blazars Meg Urry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aperture Research Telescope System, located in Cerro Tololo, Chile, which is a set of five telescopes, each with unique optical and/or near-infrared instrumentation. (ANDICAM; Depoy et al. 2003). We used the SMARTS 1.3 m + ANDICAM to obtain simultaneous 0.4–2.2 m images of 3C454.3 and other southern blazars in.

  8. Ocular dominance affects magnitude of dipole moment: An MEG study

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Nomura, Motohiro; Yamashita, Junkoh; Ozaki, Yuzo; Kawai, Jun; Higuchi, Masanori; Kado, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether the ocular dominance affects laterality in the activity of the primary visual cortex, we examined the relationship between the ocular dominance and latency or dipole moment measured by checkerboard-pattern and magnetoencephalography in 11 right-handed healthy male participants. Participants with left-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of 21.5±6.1 nAm with left-eye stimulation and 16.1±3.6 nAm with right, whereas those with right-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of...

  9. Ocular dominance affects magnitude of dipole moment: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Nomura, Motohiro; Yamashita, Junkoh; Ozaki, Yuzo; Kawai, Jun; Higuchi, Masanori; Kado, Hisashi

    2010-08-23

    To investigate whether the ocular dominance affects laterality in the activity of the primary visual cortex, we examined the relationship between the ocular dominance and latency or dipole moment measured by checkerboard-pattern and magnetoencephalography in 11 right-handed healthy male participants. Participants with left-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of 21.5+/-6.1 nAm with left-eye stimulation and 16.1+/-3.6 nAm with right, whereas those with right-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of 18.0+/-5.2 and 21.5+/-2.7 nAm with left-eye and right-eye stimulation of the infero-medial quadrant visual field, respectively. Thus, the dipole moment was higher when the dominant eye was stimulated, which implies that ocular dominance is regulated by the ipsilateral occipital lobe.

  10. How the Brain Responds to "Any": An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesan, Graciela; Johnson, Blake W.; Crain, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The word "any" may appear in some sentences, but not in others. For example, "any" is permitted in sentences that contain the word "nobody", as in "Nobody ate any fruit". However, in a minimally different context "any" seems strikingly anomalous: *"Everybody ate any fruit". The aim of the present study was to investigate how the brain responds to…

  11. MEG and EEG data analysis with MNE-Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Luessi, Martin; Larson, Eric; Engemann, Denis A.; Strohmeier, Daniel; Brodbeck, Christian; Goj, Roman; Jas, Mainak; Brooks, Teon; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the weak electromagnetic signals generated by neuronal activity in the brain. Using these signals to characterize and locate neural activation in the brain is a challenge that requires expertise in physics, signal processing, statistics, and numerical methods. As part of the MNE software suite, MNE-Python is an open-source software package that addresses this challenge by providing state-of-the-art algorithms implemented in Python that cover multiple methods of data preprocessing, source localization, statistical analysis, and estimation of functional connectivity between distributed brain regions. All algorithms and utility functions are implemented in a consistent manner with well-documented interfaces, enabling users to create M/EEG data analysis pipelines by writing Python scripts. Moreover, MNE-Python is tightly integrated with the core Python libraries for scientific comptutation (NumPy, SciPy) and visualization (matplotlib and Mayavi), as well as the greater neuroimaging ecosystem in Python via the Nibabel package. The code is provided under the new BSD license allowing code reuse, even in commercial products. Although MNE-Python has only been under heavy development for a couple of years, it has rapidly evolved with expanded analysis capabilities and pedagogical tutorials because multiple labs have collaborated during code development to help share best practices. MNE-Python also gives easy access to preprocessed datasets, helping users to get started quickly and facilitating reproducibility of methods by other researchers. Full documentation, including dozens of examples, is available at http://martinos.org/mne. PMID:24431986

  12. Gamma-Ray and Multiwavelength Emission from Blazars Meg Urry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Blazars are now well understood as approaching relativistic jets aligned with the line of sight. The long-time uncertainty about the demographics of blazars is starting to become clearer: since the Fermi blazar sample includes a larger fraction of high-frequency peaked blazars. (like the typical X-ray-selected blazars ...

  13. Context affects L1 but not L2 during bilingual word recognition: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellikka, Janne; Helenius, Päivi; Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Lehtonen, Minna

    2015-03-01

    How do bilinguals manage the activation levels of the two languages and prevent interference from the irrelevant language? Using magnetoencephalography, we studied the effect of context on the activation levels of languages by manipulating the composition of word lists (the probability of the languages) presented auditorily to late Finnish-English bilinguals. We first determined the upper limit time-window for semantic access, and then focused on the preceding responses during which the actual word recognition processes were assumedly ongoing. Between 300 and 500 ms in the temporal cortices (in the N400 m response) we found an asymmetric language switching effect: the responses to L1 Finnish words were affected by the presentation context unlike the responses to L2 English words. This finding suggests that the stronger language is suppressed in an L2 context, supporting models that allow auditory word recognition to be affected by contextual factors and the language system to be subject to inhibitory influence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reading front to back: MEG evidence for early feedback effects during word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Z V J; Barnes, G R; Penny, W; Moran, R; Teki, S; Price, C J; Leff, A P

    2014-03-01

    Magnetoencephalography studies in humans have shown word-selective activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) approximately 130 ms after word presentation ( Pammer et al. 2004; Cornelissen et al. 2009; Wheat et al. 2010). The role of this early frontal response is currently not known. We tested the hypothesis that the IFG provides top-down constraints on word recognition using dynamic causal modeling of magnetoencephalography data collected, while subjects viewed written words and false font stimuli. Subject-specific dipoles in left and right occipital, ventral occipitotemporal and frontal cortices were identified using Variational Bayesian Equivalent Current Dipole source reconstruction. A connectivity analysis tested how words and false font stimuli differentially modulated activity between these regions within the first 300 ms after stimulus presentation. We found that left inferior frontal activity showed stronger sensitivity to words than false font and a stronger feedback connection onto the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOT) in the first 200 ms. Subsequently, the effect of words relative to false font was observed on feedforward connections from left occipital to ventral occipitotemporal and frontal regions. These findings demonstrate that left inferior frontal activity modulates vOT in the early stages of word processing and provides a mechanistic account of top-down effects during word recognition.

  15. En bok for meg? Litteraturvalg med knyttneveprøven som metode.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyhus, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sammendrag Denne masteroppgaven har følgende problemstilling: Kan elever gjennom en strukturert metode klare å finne egnet litteratur på biblioteket på egenhånd? Studien oppgaven bygger på har til hensikt å undersøke om elever klarer å finne seg egnet litteratur på skolebiblioteket på egenhånd. Forskning viser at elever som leser på egenhånd for å utvikle lesingen sin, trenger tekster på et umiddelbart lesenivå. Det vil si at elevene skal forstå og kunne avkode 94% av ordene de leser. (Frost ...

  16. Origin of human motor readiness field linked to left middle frontal gyrus by MEG and PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jane Rygaard; Johannsen, P; Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1998-01-01

    Combined magnetoencephalography and positron emission tomography identified a prior source of activity in the left middle frontal gyrus duping uncued movements of the right index finger Voluntary movements gave rise to a change in the cortical electrical potential known as the Bereitschaftspotent...

  17. Neural correlates of the effects of morphological family frequency and family size: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkkänen, Liina; Feintuch, Sophie; Hopkins, Emily; Marantz, Alec

    2004-04-01

    Schreuder and Baayen (Schreuder. R., & Baayen, R. H. (1997). How complex simplex words can be. Journal of Memory and Language 37, 118-139) report that lexical decision times to nouns are not sensitive to the cumulative frequency of the noun's morphological derivatives in its "morphological family", even though such a cumulative frequency effect is obtained in the domain of inflection. Under a decomposition view of derivational morphology, this constitutes a puzzling exception to the robust finding that lexical frequency is one of the major determinants of behavioral response latencies. If morphologically complex words are decomposed, each occurrence of a member of a noun's morphological family should add to its root-frequency. We investigated the effects of morphological family frequency on the magnetoencephalographic response component M350, which shows sensitivity to factors affecting early stages of lexical processing, including lexical frequency. We hypothesized that high morphological family frequency should have a facilitory effect on the M350, even though no such effect can be seen in response time, presumably due to competition among possible root-affix combinations. Contrary to this hypothesis, we found that high family frequency elicits an M350 inhibition, suggesting that competition among morphological family members occurs at the M350. The result is significant, since there is evidence that competition among phonologically similar words occurs after, not at, the M350. Thus, our results suggest that competition within a morphological family precedes competition within a phonological similarity neighborhood.

  18. Biomagnetic Measurement System on Mice-Evaluation of System Performance by MCG and Application to MEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T [Department of electrical engineering and bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Shirai, K [Department of electrical engineering and bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Ono, Y [Department of electrical engineering and bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kasai, N [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Odawara, A [SII Nano Technology Inc. 1-8 Nakase, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8507 (Japan); Ishiyama, A [Department of electrical engineering and bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    We developed a biomagnetic measurement system on mice. Our initial model of the system has the magnetic field sensitivity of 1.3 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} in the white-noise region (10 Hz-10 kHz). And using the system, we succeeded to obtain magnetically the heart activity on mice. However, in its application to measure the brain activity on mice, it was necessary to improve the magnetic field sensitivity of the system. Therefore, we changed the material of the window cap, which holds a sapphire glass window on the dewar tail, to ceramic. The system noise was decreased and the magnetic field sensitivity of the system was improved to 0.75 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} in the white-noise region. For an initial measurement of the brain activity, we also developed a whisker stimulation system using a piezoelectric element to evoke somatosensory responses.

  19. Characteristics of Superconductive Pb shield for a Whole Head MEG System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K. K.; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; Lee, Y. H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of a superconductive Pb shield for hemispherical shape and plate to improving signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) of biomagnetism. We measured the shielding factor for the position of helmet shape Pb and for changing the distance from Pb surface. To make a uniform magnetic field, a 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm set of the helmholtz coils activated at several frequencies. The shielding factor of hemispherical shape Pb was from 20 to 57 dB and of Pb plate was about 6-25 dB as a function of distance from the lead surface. The shielding factor was rapidly reduced as increasing the distance from Pb surface. The white noise of superconductive quantum interference device(SQUID) with a superconductive shield was about 12 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 1 Hz, 7 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 100 Hz. The white noise was more increased about two times than conventional SQUID system without Pb shielding. An auditory signal was measured by first order gradiometer and magnetometer with Pb superconductive shield and compared the SNR. The SQUID system with Pb shield had better performance at low frequency noise level.

  20. Multi-source localization in MEG using simulated annealing: model order determination and parameter accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.; Supek, S.; Aine, C.

    1996-06-01

    Empirical neuromagnetic studies have reported that multiple brain regions are active at single instants in time as well as across time intervals of interest. Determining the number of active regions, however, required a systematic search across increasing model orders using reduced chi-square measure of goodness-of-fit and multiple starting points within each model order assumed. Simulated annealing was recently proposed for noiseless biomagnetic data as an effective global minimizer. A modified cost function was also proposed to effectively deal with an unknown number of dipoles for noiseless, multi-source biomagnetic data. Numerical simulation studies were conducted using simulated annealing to examine effects of a systematic increase in model order using both reduced chi-square as a cost function as well as a modified cost function, and effects of overmodeling on parameter estimation accuracy. Effects of different choices of weighting factors are also discussed. Simulated annealing was also applied to visually evoked neuromagnetic data and the effectiveness of both cost functions in determining the number of active regions was demonstrated.

  1. Ciudad de México: una megápolis emergente. El capital vs la capital

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Barradas, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    ResumenEl presente trabajo es una versión abreviada de la tesis doctoral presentada dentro del Programa Conjunto de Doctorado la ETSAM-UPM y la Universidad Veracruzana (DAU-1) (Xalapa-Veracruz; México); incluye modificaciones que el autor incorpora de la defensa expuesta el 4 de marzo del 2003, principalmente los aspectos teóricos y metodológicos que no se detallan en la tesis original. La investigación doctoral fue dirigida por el Dr. Arq. José Fariña Tojo. El marco conceptual y teórico es u...

  2. Attention to language: novel MEG paradigm for registering involuntary language processing in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyrov, Yury; Smith, Marie L; Horner, Aidan J; Henson, Richard; Nathan, Pradeep J; Bullmore, Edward T; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2012-09-01

    Previous research indicates that, under explicit instructions to listen to spoken stimuli or in speech-oriented behavioural tasks, the brain's responses to senseless pseudowords are larger than those to meaningful words; the reverse is true in non-attended conditions. These differential responses could be used as a tool to trace linguistic processes in the brain and their interaction with attention. However, as previous studies relied on explicit instructions to attend or ignore the stimuli, a technique for automatic attention modulation (i.e., not dependent on explicit instruction) would be more advantageous, especially when cooperation with instructions may not be guaranteed (e.g., neurological patients, children etc). Here we present a novel paradigm in which the stimulus context automatically draws attention to speech. In a non-attend passive auditory oddball sequence, rare words and pseudowords were presented among frequent non-speech tones of variable frequency and length. The low percentage of spoken stimuli guarantees an involuntary attention switch to them. The speech stimuli, in turn, could be disambiguated as words or pseudowords only in their end, at the last phoneme, after the attention switch would have already occurred. Our results confirmed that this paradigm can indeed be used to induce automatic shifts of attention to spoken input. At ~250ms after the stimulus onset, a P3a-like neuromagnetic deflection was registered to spoken (but not tone) stimuli indicating an involuntary attention shift. Later, after the word-pseudoword divergence point, we found a larger oddball response to pseudowords than words, best explained by neural processes of lexical search facilitated through increased attention. Furthermore, we demonstrate a breakdown of this orderly pattern of neurocognitive processes as a result of sleep deprivation. The new paradigm may thus be an efficient way to assess language comprehension processes and their dynamic interaction with those of attention allocation. It does it in an automatic and task-free fashion, indicating its potential benefit for assessing uncooperative clinical populations. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Importance of the left auditory areas in chord discrimination in music experts as demonstrated by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Sannemann, Christian; Noyranen, Maiju; Salonen, Johanna; Pihko, Elina

    2011-08-01

    The brain basis behind musical competence in its various forms is not yet known. To determine the pattern of hemispheric lateralization during sound-change discrimination, we recorded the magnetic counterpart of the electrical mismatch negativity (MMNm) responses in professional musicians, musical participants (with high scores in the musicality tests but without professional training in music) and non-musicians. While watching a silenced video, they were presented with short sounds with frequency and duration deviants and C major chords with C minor chords as deviants. MMNm to chord deviants was stronger in both musicians and musical participants than in non-musicians, particularly in their left hemisphere. No group differences were obtained in the MMNm strength in the right hemisphere in any of the conditions or in the left hemisphere in the case of frequency or duration deviants. Thus, in addition to professional training in music, musical aptitude (combined with lower-level musical training) is also reflected in brain functioning related to sound discrimination. The present magnetoencephalographic evidence therefore indicates that the sound discrimination abilities may be differentially distributed in the brain in musically competent and naïve participants, especially in a musical context established by chord stimuli: the higher forms of musical competence engage both auditory cortices in an integrative manner. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Gamma and Beta Oscillations in Human MEG Encode the Contents of Vibrotactile Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. von Lautz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence suggests that oscillations in the beta band represent quantitative information about somatosensory features during stimulus retention. Visual and auditory working memory (WM research, on the other hand, has indicated a predominant role of gamma oscillations for active WM processing. Here we reconciled these findings by recording whole-head magnetoencephalography during a vibrotactile frequency comparison task. A Braille stimulator presented healthy subjects with a vibration to the left fingertip that was retained in WM for comparison with a second stimulus presented after a short delay. During this retention interval spectral power in the beta band from the right intraparietal sulcus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG monotonically increased with the to-be-remembered vibrotactile frequency. In contrast, induced gamma power showed the inverse of this pattern and decreased with higher stimulus frequency in the right IFG. Together, these results expand the previously established role of beta oscillations for somatosensory WM to the gamma band and give further evidence that quantitative information may be processed in a fronto-parietal network.

  5. Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Emily B. J.; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Chepesiuk, Alexander M. P.; Baillet, Sylvain; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The auditory frequency-following response (FFR) to complex periodic sounds is used to study the subcortical auditory system, and has been proposed as a biomarker for disorders that feature abnormal sound processing. Despite its value in fundamental and clinical research, the neural origins of the FFR are unclear. Using magnetoencephalography, we observe a strong, right-asymmetric contribution to the FFR from the human auditory cortex at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus, in addition to signal from cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and medial geniculate. This finding is highly relevant for our understanding of plasticity and pathology in the auditory system, as well as higher-level cognition such as speech and music processing. It suggests that previous interpretations of the FFR may need re-examination using methods that allow for source separation. PMID:27009409

  6. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  7. Ciudad de México: una megápolis emergente. El capital vs la capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carrillo Barradas

    2004-11-01

    This work is an abstract of the doctoral thesis presented in the Combined Program of PhD. ETSA-UPM and Universidad Veracruzana (DAU-1 (Xalapa-Veracruz; Mexico; it includes modifications that the author adds to the defence made on March 4th 2003, about theoretical and methodological aspects mainly, that are not detailed in the original thesis. The doctoral research was supervised by the PhD. Architect José Fariña Tojo. The conceptual and theoretical frame is a phenomenological approximation in the search of the dialectic influences: City-Architecture-Urbanism-Territory-Economical Politics; using Mexico City and its urban phenomenon as the field of analysis. From the methodological point of view, the universal concept used is that of the Influences, subordinating concepts such as: models, paradigms, projects, utopias, processes, modes, dynamics, phenomena, relations, facts and tendencies; always related to Urban Pieces and to the Architecture of Mexico City (MC in a period circumscribed between 1940 and 2000; unimpaired of the historical references of the beginnings of the urban modernity in the Mexican Capital City at the very beginning of the 20th century. Through the diffusion and adaptation of the urban models of the French and North American schools, the Mexican State looking for the utopia of modernity, privileges the spatial sphere of Mexico City and its phenomenology of the emerging megalopolis. In the configuration the metropolitan phenomenon of MC which tendencies leads to the appearance of a megalopolitan dimension, the Mexican State with its theoretical support in the economy of market has done formal interventions, which have determined privilege urban shapes in the national capital. Conditions produced by the big public works of collective consumption. The State has also institutionalized models of urbanism and planning that involves the ideology of the economical benefit of real state in all the social and cultural strata facing the logic of the Capital with the role of National Capital in the megapolitan expansion of Mexico City. The analysis go through the logical frame of the Capital of the binomial City-Economy, the dynamics, the urbanization and the logic of expansion of this last, the reproduction of the urbanization and the practices of the appropriation of the urban space of MC. The evolutions of the influences that were identified in the analogical structure itself Architecture-State-City-Economics are ordered in graphical diagrams named sexenal and configurational outlines; identifying specially those in the periods distinguished by the presidents of Mexico; establishing the historical references to the evolution of the capitalist mode of production, in relation to the political and economical projects that corresponds the urban pieces more representative, as well as the main architects jointly with other social agents in the urban configuration of MC from the first "porfirian" modernity to the present-day emerging megalopolis. In the section: The Practice, are detailed urban pieces or unities of analysis, in analogical structures and basic diagrams, the dialectic influences; conflicts and contradictions as well as possible arguments of the historical complexity of the process of the megalopolitan configuration of MC.

  8. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  9. Enhanced Awareness Followed Reversible Inhibition of Human Visual Cortex: A Combined TMS, MRS and MEG Study

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Christopher P. G.; Dunkley, Benjamin T.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Edden, Richard; Evans, C. John; Sumner, Petroc; Singh, Krish D.; Chambers, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    This series of experiments investigated the neural basis of conscious vision in humans using a form of transcranial magnetic\\ud stimulation (TMS) known as continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS). Previous studies have shown that occipital TMS,\\ud when time-locked to the onset of visual stimuli, can induce a phenomenon analogous to blindsight in which conscious\\ud detection is impaired while the ability to discriminate ‘unseen’ stimuli is preserved above chance. Here we sought to\\ud reproduc...

  10. Recurrence of task set-related MEG signal patterns during auditory working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin; Bledowski, Christoph; Rieder, Maria; Kaiser, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    Processing of auditory spatial and non-spatial information in working memory has been shown to rely on separate cortical systems. While previous studies have demonstrated differences in spatial versus non-spatial processing from the encoding of to-be-remembered stimuli onwards, here we investigated whether such differences would be detectable already prior to presentation of the sample stimulus. We analyzed broad-band magnetoencephalography data from 15 healthy adults during an auditory working memory paradigm starting with a visual cue indicating the task-relevant stimulus feature for a given trial (lateralization or pitch) and a subsequent 1.5-s pre-encoding phase. This was followed by a sample sound (0.2s), the delay phase (0.8s) and a test stimulus (0.2s) after which participants made a match/non-match decision. Linear discriminant functions were trained to decode task-specific signal patterns throughout the task, and temporal generalization was used to assess whether the neural codes discriminating between the tasks during the pre-encoding phase would recur during later task periods. The spatial versus non-spatial tasks could indeed be discriminated after the onset of the cue onwards, and decoders trained during the pre-encoding phase successfully discriminated the tasks during both sample stimulus encoding and during the delay phase. This demonstrates that task-specific neural codes are established already before the memorandum is presented and that the same patterns are reestablished during stimulus encoding and maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatiotemporal mapping of interictal epileptiform discharges in human absence epilepsy: A MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, Y.J.W.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Ossenblok, P.P.W.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although absence epilepsy is considered to be a prototypic type of generalized epilepsy, it is still under debate whether generalized 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) might have a cortical focal origin. Here it is investigated whether focal interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs),

  12. Acupuncture induces divergent alterations of functional connectivity within conventional frequency bands: evidence from MEG recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youbo You

    Full Text Available As an ancient Chinese healing modality which has gained increasing popularity in modern society, acupuncture involves stimulation with fine needles inserted into acupoints. Both traditional literature and clinical data indicated that modulation effects largely depend on specific designated acupoints. However, scientific representations of acupoint specificity remain controversial. In the present study, considering the new findings on the sustained effects of acupuncture and its time-varied temporal characteristics, we employed an electrophysiological imaging modality namely magnetoencephalography with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Taken into account the differential band-limited signal modulations induced by acupuncture, we sought to explore whether or not stimulation at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36 and a nearby non-meridian point (NAP would evoke divergent functional connectivity alterations within delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Whole-head scanning was performed on 28 healthy participants during an eyes-closed no-task condition both preceding and following acupuncture. Data analysis involved calculation of band-limited power (BLP followed by pair-wise BLP correlations. Further averaging was conducted to obtain local and remote connectivity. Statistical analyses revealed the increased connection degree of the left temporal cortex within delta (0.5-4 Hz, beta (13-30 Hz and gamma (30-48 Hz bands following verum acupuncture. Moreover, we not only validated the closer linkage of the left temporal cortex with the prefrontal and frontal cortices, but further pinpointed that such patterns were more extensively distributed in the ST36 group in the delta and beta bands compared to the restriction only to the delta band for NAP. Psychophysical results for significant pain threshold elevation further confirmed the analgesic effect of acupuncture at ST36. In conclusion, our findings may provide a new perspective to lend support for the specificity of neural expression underlying acupuncture.

  13. Altered retrieval of melodic information in congenital amusia: insights from dynamic causal modeling of MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, Philippe; Mattout, Jérémie; Sanchez, Gaëtan; Tillmann, Barbara; Caclin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a neuro-developmental disorder that primarily manifests as a difficulty in the perception and memory of pitch-based materials, including music. Recent findings have shown that the amusic brain exhibits altered functioning of a fronto-temporal network during pitch perception and short-term memory. Within this network, during the encoding of melodies, a decreased right backward frontal-to-temporal connectivity was reported in amusia, along with an abnormal connectivity within and between auditory cortices. The present study investigated whether connectivity patterns between these regions were affected during the short-term memory retrieval of melodies. Amusics and controls had to indicate whether sequences of six tones that were presented in pairs were the same or different. When melodies were different only one tone changed in the second melody. Brain responses to the changed tone in "Different" trials and to its equivalent (original) tone in "Same" trials were compared between groups using Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM). DCM results confirmed that congenital amusia is characterized by an altered effective connectivity within and between the two auditory cortices during sound processing. Furthermore, right temporal-to-frontal message passing was altered in comparison to controls, with notably an increase in "Same" trials. An additional analysis in control participants emphasized that the detection of an unexpected event in the typically functioning brain is supported by right fronto-temporal connections. The results can be interpreted in a predictive coding framework as reflecting an abnormal prediction error sent by temporal auditory regions towards frontal areas in the amusic brain.

  14. Altered retrieval of melodic information in congenital amusia: Insights from Dynamic Causal Modeling of MEG data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eAlbouy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is a neuro-developmental disorder that primarily manifests as a difficulty in the perception and memory of pitch-based materials, including music. Recent findings have shown that the amusic brain exhibits altered functioning of a fronto-temporal network during pitch perception and memory. Within this network, during the encoding of melodies, a decreased right backward frontal-to-temporal connectivity was reported in amusia, along with an abnormal connectivity within and between auditory cortices. The present study investigated whether connectivity patterns between these regions were affected during the retrieval of melodies. Amusics and controls had to indicate whether sequences of six tones that were presented in pairs were the same or different. When melodies were different only one tone changed in the second melody. Brain responses to the changed tone in Different trials and to its equivalent (original tone in Same trials were compared between groups using Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM. DCM results confirmed that congenital amusia is characterized by an altered effective connectivity within and between the two auditory cortices during sound processing. Furthermore, right temporal-to-frontal message passing was altered in comparison to controls, with an increase in Same trials and a decrease in Different trials. An additional analysis in control participants emphasized that the detection of an unexpected event in the typically functioning brain is supported by right fronto-temporal connections. The results can be interpreted in a predictive coding framework as reflecting an abnormal prediction error sent by temporal auditory regions towards frontal areas in the amusic brain.

  15. Waves of regret: A MEG study of emotion and decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetta, C.; Grecucci, A.; Bonini, N.; Coricelli, G.; Demarchi, G.; Braun, C.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent fMRI studies have investigated brain activity involved in the feeling of regret and disappointment by manipulating the feedback participants saw after making a decision to play certain gambles: full-feedback (regret: participant sees the outcomes from both the chosen and unchosen gamble) vs.

  16. Timing of early activity in the visual cortex as revealed by simultaneous MEG and ERG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Koji; Sannan, Hiromi; Miki, Kensaku; Kaneoke, Yoshiki; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2006-03-01

    To clarify the latency of the earliest cortical activity in visual processing, electroretinograms (ERGs) and visual evoked magnetic fields (VEFs) following flash stimulation were recorded simultaneously in six human subjects. Flash stimuli were applied to the right eye and ERGs were recorded from a skin electrode placed on the lower lid. ERGs showed two major deflections in all subjects: an eyelid-negativity around 20 ms and a positivity around 60 ms corresponding to an a- and b-waves, respectively. The mean onset and peak latency of the earliest component of VEFs (37 M) was 30.2 and 36.9 ms, respectively. There was a linear correlation between the peak latency of the a-wave and the onset latency of the 37 M (r=0.90, P=0.011). When a single equivalent current dipole analysis was applied to the 37 M, four out of six subjects showed highly reliable results. The generator of the 37 M was estimated to be located in the striate cortex in all four subjects. Since post-receptoral activities in the retina are expected to start around the peak of the a-wave (20 ms), the early cortical activity, which appears 10 ms later than the a-wave peak, is considered to be the earliest cortical activity following flash stimulation.

  17. Phonemic versus allophonic status modulates early brain responses to language sounds: an MEG/ERF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Gebauer, Line; Mcgregor, William

    ] thus as deviants, respectively. Data were preprocessed using Elekta’s MaxFilter software and SPM8, all statistical analyses were conducted in sensor-space using SPM8. Results: Focusing on the 150-300 ms time period after stimulus onset (typical MMNm time range for language sound contrasts), only...

  18. Children and adolescents with autism exhibit reduced MEG steady-state gamma responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tony W; Rojas, Donald C; Reite, Martin L; Teale, Peter D; Rogers, Sally J

    2007-08-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies of autism have indicated reduced functional connectivity during both cognitive tasks and rest. These data suggest long-range connectivity may be compromised in this disorder, and current neurological theories of autism contend disrupted inter-regional interactions may be an underlying mechanism explaining behavioral symptomatology. However, it is unclear whether deficient neuronal communication is attributable to fewer long-range tracts or more of a local deficit in neural circuitry. This study examines the integrity of local circuitry by focusing on gamma band activity in auditory cortices of children and adolescents with autism. Ten children and adolescents with autism and 10 matched controls participated. Both groups listened to 500 ms duration monaural click trains with a 25 ms inter-click interval, as magnetoencephalography was acquired from the contralateral hemisphere. To estimate 40 Hz spectral power density, we performed time-frequency decomposition of the single-trial magnetic steady-state response data using complex demodulation. Children and adolescents with autism exhibited significantly reduced left hemispheric 40 Hz power from 200-500 ms post-stimulus onset. In contrast, no significant between group differences were observed for right hemispheric cortices. The production and/or maintenance of left hemispheric gamma oscillations appeared abnormal in participants with autism. We interpret these data as indicating that in autism, particular brain regions may be unable to generate the high-frequency activity likely necessary for binding and other forms of inter-regional interactions. These findings augment connectivity theories of autism with novel evidence that aberrations in local circuitry could underlie putative deficiencies in long-range neural communication.

  19. Changes in MEG resting-state networks are related to cognitive decline in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Demuru

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: Altered RSN functional connectivity was found in T1DM patients depending on clinical status. Lower DMN functional connectivity was related to poorer cognitive functioning. These results indicate that functional connectivity may play a key role in T1DM-related cognitive dysfunction.

  20. Which physiological components are more suitable for visual ERP based brain-computer interface? A preliminary MEG/EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luigi; Sami, Saber; Hillebrand, Arjan; Fawcett, Ian P; Quitadamo, Lucia Rita; Seri, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    We investigated which evoked response component occurring in the first 800 ms after stimulus presentation was most suitable to be used in a classical P300-based brain-computer interface speller protocol. Data was acquired from 275 Magnetoencephalographic sensors in two subjects and from 61 Electroencephalographic sensors in four. To better characterize the evoked physiological responses and minimize the effect of response overlap, a 1000 ms Inter Stimulus Interval was preferred to the short (components other than the P300 maximally represented in the occipital region, could be successfully used to improve classification accuracy and finally drive this class of BCIs.

  1. Arterial CO2 Fluctuations Modulate Neuronal Rhythmicity: Implications for MEG and fMRI Studies of Resting-State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Ian D; Whittaker, Joseph R; Bright, Molly G; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-08-17

    A fast emerging technique for studying human resting state networks (RSNs) is based on spontaneous temporal fluctuations in neuronal oscillatory power, as measured by magnetoencephalography. However, it has been demonstrated recently that this power is sensitive to modulations in arterial CO2 concentration. Arterial CO2 can be modulated by natural fluctuations in breathing pattern, as might typically occur during the acquisition of an RSN experiment. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the fine-scale dependence of neuronal oscillatory power on arterial CO2 concentration, showing that reductions in alpha, beta, and gamma power are observed with even very mild levels of hypercapnia (increased arterial CO2). We use a graded hypercapnia paradigm and participant feedback to rule out a sensory cause, suggesting a predominantly physiological origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that natural fluctuations in arterial CO2, without administration of inspired CO2, are of a sufficient level to influence neuronal oscillatory power significantly in the delta-, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-frequency bands. A more thorough understanding of the relationship between physiological factors and cortical rhythmicity is required. In light of these findings, existing results, paradigms, and analysis techniques for the study of resting-state brain data should be revisited. In this study, we show for the first time that neuronal oscillatory power is intimately linked to arterial CO2 concentration down to the fine-scale modulations that occur during spontaneous breathing. We extend these results to demonstrate a correlation between neuronal oscillatory power and spontaneous arterial CO2 fluctuations in awake humans at rest. This work identifies a need for studies investigating resting-state networks in the human brain to measure and account for the impact of spontaneous changes in arterial CO2 on the neuronal signals of interest. Changes in breathing pattern that are time locked to task performance could also lead to confounding effects on neuronal oscillatory power when considering the electrophysiological response to functional stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Driver et al.

  2. "Uten autisme, så er det ikke meg" : en kvalitativ tekstanalyse av internettfora som uttrykksmiddel for mennesker med autisme

    OpenAIRE

    Steensæth, Hege

    2009-01-01

    Bakgrunn, problemstilling og formål: Temaet i denne studien er hvordan internettfora kan være et uttrykksmiddel for mennesker med autisme og Aperger syndrom. Jeg vil fokusere på de to begrepene selvinnsikt og empati, og studere hvordan dette kommer til uttrykk blant denne gruppen mennesker på internett. Bakgrunnen for temavalget er interessen for diagnosen autisme. Internett er en viktig del av vår hverdag. Det er et nyttig redskap ikke minst i forhold til å holde kontakt med venner ...

  3. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann...... areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased...... with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI) revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow...

  4. Second-language learning effects on automaticity of speech processing of Japanese phonetic contrasts: An MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisagi, Miwako; Shafer, Valerie L; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Kotek, Hadas; Sugawara, Ayaka; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    We examined discrimination of a second-language (L2) vowel duration contrast in English learners of Japanese (JP) with different amounts of experience using the magnetoencephalography mismatch field (MMF) component. Twelve L2 learners were tested before and after a second semester of college-level JP; half attended a regular rate course and half an accelerated course with more hours per week. Results showed no significant change in MMF for either the regular or accelerated learning group from beginning to end of the course. We also compared these groups against nine L2 learners who had completed four semesters of college-level JP. These 4-semester learners did not significantly differ from 2-semester learners, in that only a difference in hemisphere activation (interacting with time) between the two groups approached significance. These findings suggest that targeted training of L2 phonology may be necessary to allow for changes in processing of L2 speech contrasts at an early, automatic level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortical processing of near-threshold tactile stimuli in a paired-stimulus paradigm--an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wühle, Anja; Preissl, Hubert; Braun, Christoph

    2011-08-01

    In the present magnetoencephalography study, we applied a paired-stimulus paradigm to study the weak cortical responses evoked by near-threshold tactile prime stimuli by means of their attenuating effect on the cortical responses evoked by subsequently applied above-threshold test stimuli. In stimulus pairs with adequate interstimulus intervals (ISIs), the extent of test stimulus response attenuation is related to the amplitude of prime stimulus responses, and the duration of the attenuating effect indicates how long memory traces of a prime stimulus reside in cortical areas. We hypothesized that the attenuation of test stimulus responses, studied for ISIs of 30, 60 and 150 ms, would provide insight into the temporal dynamics of near-threshold stimulus processing in primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), and reveal differences in response amplitude due to conscious perception. Attenuation of test stimulus responses in SI was observed for ISIs up to 60 ms, whereas in SII the effect outlasted the ISI of 150 ms. Differences due to conscious perception of the near-threshold stimuli were only observed in SII with stronger attenuation for perceived than for missed near-threshold stimuli. Applying this indirect approach to near-threshold stimulus processing, we could show that the extent and duration of response attenuation is related to prime stimulus processing and differential temporal and functional characteristics of near-threshold stimulus information processing in SI and SII: transient processing of basic stimulus information not sufficient for conscious perception in SI and long-lasting activations involving conscious perception in SII. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Bayesian multi-dipole modelling of a single topography in MEG by adaptive sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrentino, Alberto; Luria, Gianvittorio; Aramini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel Bayesian approach to the problem of estimating neural currents in the brain from a fixed distribution of magnetic field (called topography), measured by magnetoencephalography. Differently from recent studies that describe inversion techniques, such as spatio-temporal regularization/filtering, in which neural dynamics always plays a role, we face here a purely static inverse problem. Neural currents are modelled as an unknown number of current dipoles, whose state space is described in terms of a variable-dimension model. Within the resulting Bayesian framework, we set up a sequential Monte Carlo sampler to explore the posterior distribution. An adaptation technique is employed in order to effectively balance the computational cost and the quality of the sample approximation. Then, both the number and the parameters of the unknown current dipoles are simultaneously estimated. The performance of the method is assessed by means of synthetic data, generated by source configurations containing up to four dipoles. Eventually, we describe the results obtained by analysing data from a real experiment, involving somatosensory evoked fields, and compare them to those provided by three other methods. (paper)

  7. Aplicación de técnicas de data mining para descubrimiento de patrones en datos de MEG

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Sánchez, Clara

    2018-01-01

    Resumen La enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA) es una enfermedad neurodegenerativa que se manifiesta mediante deterioro cognitivo y trastornos conductuales, que se traducen en pérdida de memoria inmediata y otras capacidades mentales a medida que se mu eren y atrofian las neuronas de diferentes zonas del cerebro . T ambién es conocida por ser una de las formas más comunes de demencia. Esta enfermedad no tiene cura y es terminal, además la causa sigue sin ser c...

  8. Evaluation of smoothing in an iterative lp-norm minimization algorithm for surface-based source localization of MEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jooman; Sic Kim, June; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Kwang Suk

    2007-08-01

    The imaging of neural sources of magnetoencephalographic data based on distributed source models requires additional constraints on the source distribution in order to overcome ill-posedness and obtain a plausible solution. The minimum lp norm (0 temporal gyrus.

  9. Long-term memory traces for language sounds are highly context-sensitive: an MEG/ERF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Gebauer, Line; Mcgregor, William

    Introduction: An early component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP), the mismatch negativity (MMN), has been shown to be sensitive to native phonemic language sound contrasts compared to non-native or allophonic language sound contrasts. So far this has not been attested for different...... impact on the proposed long-term memory traces for native phonological categories. In order to generate different MMF responses to the same language sound contrast depending on the phonetic context, these long-term memory traces must thus be context-sensitive themselves or exist as separate traces...

  10. On the relationship between cortical excitability and visual oscillatory responses - A concurrent tDCS-MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, T.R.; Esterer, S.; Herring, J.D.; Bergmann, T.O.; Jensen, O.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations in the alpha band (8-12Hz) in visual cortex are considered to instantiate 'attentional gating' via the inhibition of activity in regions representing task-irrelevant parts of space. In contrast, visual gamma-band activity (40-100Hz) is regarded as representing a bottom-up drive

  11. Photogrammetry-Based Head Digitization for Rapid and Accurate Localization of EEG Electrodes and MEG Fiducial Markers Using a Single Digital SLR Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausner, Tommy; Dalal, Sarang S; Crespo-García, Maité

    2017-01-01

    The performance of EEG source reconstruction has benefited from the increasing use of advanced head modeling techniques that take advantage of MRI together with the precise positions of the recording electrodes. The prevailing technique for registering EEG electrode coordinates involves electromagnetic digitization. However, the procedure adds several minutes to experiment preparation and typical digitizers may not be accurate enough for optimal source reconstruction performance (Dalal et al., 2014). Here, we present a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective alternative method to register EEG electrode positions, using a single digital SLR camera, photogrammetry software, and computer vision techniques implemented in our open-source toolbox, janus3D . Our approach uses photogrammetry to construct 3D models from multiple photographs of the participant's head wearing the EEG electrode cap. Electrodes are detected automatically or semi-automatically using a template. The rigid facial features from these photo-based models are then surface-matched to MRI-based head reconstructions to facilitate coregistration to MRI space. This method yields a final electrode coregistration error of 0.8 mm, while a standard technique using an electromagnetic digitizer yielded an error of 6.1 mm. The technique furthermore reduces preparation time, and could be extended to a multi-camera array, which would make the procedure virtually instantaneous. In addition to EEG, the technique could likewise capture the position of the fiducial markers used in magnetoencephalography systems to register head position.

  12. Preserved high-centrality hubs but efficient network reorganization during eyes-open state compared with eyes-closed resting state: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Lee, Dong-Soo; Jeon, Beom Seok; Chung, Chun Kee

    2014-04-01

    A question to be addressed in the present study is how different the eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) resting states are across frequency bands in terms of efficiency and centrality of the brain functional network. We investigated both the global and nodal efficiency and betweenness centrality in the EC and EO resting states from 39 volunteers. Mutual information was used to obtain the functional connectivity for each of the four frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta, and gamma). We showed that the cortical hubs with high betweenness centrality were maintained in the EC and EO resting states. We further showed that these hubs were associated with more than three frequency bands, suggesting that these hubs play an important role in the brain functional network at multiple temporal scales in the resting states. Enhanced global efficiency values were found in the theta and alpha bands in the EO state compared with those in the EC state. Moreover, it turned out that in the EO state the functional network was reorganized to enhance nodal efficiency at the nodes related to both the default mode and the dorsal attention networks and sensory-related resting-state networks. This result suggests that in the EO state the brain functional network was efficiently reorganized, facilitating the adaptation of the brain network to the change in state, which could help in understanding brain disorders that have a disturbance in communication with external environments by using the adaptation ability of brain functional networks.

  13. Theta band activity in response to emotional expressions and its relationship with gamma band activity as revealed by MEG and advanced beamformer source imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eLuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations in the theta and gamma bands have been shown to be important for cognition. Here we examined the temporal and spatial relationship between the two frequency bands in emotional processing using Magnetoencephalography and an advanced dynamic beamformer source imaging method called Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We found that areas including the amygdala, visual and frontal cortex showed significant event-related synchronization (ERS in both bands, suggesting a functional association of neuronal oscillations in the same areas in the two bands. However, while the temporal profile in both bands was similar in the amygdala, the peak in gamma band power was much earlier within both visual and frontal areas. Our results do not support a traditional view that the localizations of lower and higher frequencies are spatially distinct. Instead, they suggest that in emotional processing, neuronal oscillations in the gamma and theta bands may reflect, at least in visual and frontal cortex either different but related functional processes or, perhaps more probably, different computational components of the same functional process.

  14. Patterns of altered neural synchrony in the default mode network in autism spectrum disorder revealed with magnetoencephalography (MEG): Relationship to clinical symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajiness-O'Neill, Renée; Brennan, Jonathan R; Moran, John E; Richard, Annette E; Flores, Ana-Mercedes; Swick, Casey; Goodcase, Ryan; Andersen, Tiffany; McFarlane, Kaitlyn; Rusiniak, Kenneth; Kovelman, Ioulia; Wagley, Neelima; Ugolini, Maggie; Albright, Jeremy; Bowyer, Susan M

    2018-03-01

    Disrupted neural synchrony may be a primary electrophysiological abnormality in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), altering communication between discrete brain regions and contributing to abnormalities in patterns of connectivity within identified neural networks. Studies exploring brain dynamics to comprehensively characterize and link connectivity to large-scale cortical networks and clinical symptoms are lagging considerably. Patterns of neural coherence within the Default Mode Network (DMN) and Salience Network (SN) during resting state were investigated in 12 children with ASD (M Age  = 9.2) and 13 age and gender-matched neurotypicals (NT) (M Age  = 9.3) with magnetoencephalography. Coherence between 231 brain region pairs within four frequency bands (theta (4-7 Hz), alpha, (8-12 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-80 Hz)) was calculated. Relationships between neural coherence and social functioning were examined. ASD was characterized by lower synchronization across all frequencies, reaching clinical significance in the gamma band. Lower gamma synchrony between fronto-temporo-parietal regions was observed, partially consistent with diminished default mode network (DMN) connectivity. Lower gamma coherence in ASD was evident in cross-hemispheric connections between: angular with inferior/middle frontal; middle temporal with middle/inferior frontal; and within right-hemispheric connections between angular, middle temporal, and inferior/middle frontal cortices. Lower gamma coherence between left angular and left superior frontal, right inferior/middle frontal, and right precuneus and between right angular and inferior/middle frontal cortices was related to lower social/social-communication functioning. Results suggest a pattern of lower gamma band coherence in a subset of regions within the DMN in ASD (angular and middle temporal cortical areas) related to lower social/social-communicative functioning. Autism Res 2018, 11: 434-449. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Communication between different areas of the brain was observed in children with ASD and neurotypical children while awake, but not working on a task. Magnetoencephalography was used to measure tiny magnetic fields naturally generated via brain activity. The brains of children with ASD showed less communication between areas that are important for social information processing compared to the brains of neurotypical children. The amount of communication between these areas was associated with social and social communication difficulties. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The correlation between white-matter microstructure and the complexity of spontaneous brain activity: a difussion tensor imaging-MEG study.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, A; Ríos-Lago, M; Abásolo, D; Hornero, R; Alvarez-Linera, J; Paul, N; Maestú, F; Ortiz, T

    2011-01-01

    The advent of new signal processing methods, such as non-linear analysis techniques, represents a new perspective which adds further value to brain signals' analysis. Particularly, Lempel–Ziv's Complexity (LZC) has proven to be useful in exploring the complexity of the brain electromagnetic activity. However, an important problem is the lack of knowledge about the physiological determinants of these measures. Although acorrelation between complexity and connectivity has been proposed, this hy...

  16. Oscillatory Dynamics Supporting Semantic Cognition: MEG Evidence for the Contribution of the Anterior Temporal Lobe Hub and Modality-Specific Spokes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Mollo

    Full Text Available The "hub and spoke model" of semantic representation suggests that the multimodal features of objects are drawn together by an anterior temporal lobe (ATL "hub", while modality-specific "spokes" capture perceptual/action features. However, relatively little is known about how these components are recruited through time to support object identification. We used magnetoencephalography to measure neural oscillations within left ATL, lateral fusiform cortex (FC and central sulcus (CS during word-picture matching at different levels of specificity (employing superordinate vs. specific labels for different categories (manmade vs. animal. This allowed us to determine (i when each site was sensitive to semantic category and (ii whether this was modulated by task demands. In ATL, there were two phases of response: from around 100 ms post-stimulus there were phasic bursts of low gamma activity resulting in reductions in oscillatory power, relative to a baseline period, that were modulated by both category and specificity; this was followed by more sustained power decreases across frequency bands from 250 ms onwards. In the spokes, initial power increases were not stronger for specific identification, while later power decreases were stronger for specific-level identification in FC for animals and in CS for manmade objects (from around 150 ms and 200 ms, respectively. These data are inconsistent with a temporal sequence in which early sensory-motor activity is followed by later retrieval in ATL. Instead, knowledge emerges from the rapid recruitment of both hub and spokes, with early specificity and category effects in the ATL hub. The balance between these components depends on semantic category and task, with visual cortex playing a greater role in the fine-grained identification of animals and motor cortex contributing to the identification of tools.

  17. High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of systems containing ethylene glycol, water and methane - Experimental measurements and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Berg, Ole J.; Solbraa, Even

    2007-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium measurements of the binary MEG-methane and the ternary MEG-water-methane system at low temperatures and high pressures which are of interest to applications related to natural gas processing. Emphasis is given to MEG and water solubility...

  18. Visualizing spikes in source-space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Duez, Lene; Scherg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reviewing magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings is time-consuming: signals from the 306 MEG-sensors are typically reviewed divided into six arrays of 51 sensors each, thus browsing each recording six times in order to evaluate all signals. A novel method of reconstructing the MEG sig...

  19. Clinical magnetoencephalography for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2011-04-01

    Noninvasive neuroimaging aids in surgical planning and in counseling patients about possible risks of surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) performs the most common types of surgical planning that the neurosurgeon faces, including localization of epileptic discharges, determination of the hemispheric dominance of verbal processing, and the ability to locate eloquent cortex. MEG is most useful when it is combined with structural imaging, most commonly with structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR diffusion imaging. This article reviews the history of clinical MEG, introduces the basic concepts about the biophysics of MEG, and outlines the basic neurosurgical applications of MEG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Scarab/Saffron Development Project Case study: Material Selection Criteria for the Monoethylene Glycol Recovery Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, A.M.; Habib, S.; Shinaishin, A.

    2004-01-01

    MEG Recovery Unit for Scarab/Saffron development project is the first application in gas production. The Mono Ethylene Glycol Recovery Unit (MEG) recovers MEG from Water/MEG stream and removes salts and other contaminants. MEG Recovery Unit Equipment Design Criteria were designed for two parallel trains A and B, each train is capable to treat 500 bbl MEG, 1500 bbl water and 9 ton salt. The MEG unit is a combination of two unit operations; MEG Recovery unit is normally applicable in the oil and gas industries that is applying distillation technique, while the new technology is salt treatment and handling. The MEG Unit material selection is made to be suitable for the entire design life which is 25 years, the materials for MEG Recovery Unit have been selected among the available corrosion resistance alloys, where requested by the service and ambient conditions. Therefore all. the parts of the MEG unit that are in saline service are in either (2205 duplex, AISI 316L) and in Inconel alloy 625 related to operating temperature. This case study focused at Inconel alloy 625, which is selected for salt service and their operation problem occurred during the construction and operating conditions

  1. Evaluation of postoperative sharp waveforms through EEG and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Tanaka, Naoaki; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Milligan, Tracey A; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Khoshbin, Shahram; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Bromfield, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    EEGs obtained after craniotomy are difficult to read because of a breach rhythm consisting of unfiltered sharply contoured physiologic waveforms that can mimic interictal epileptiform discharges. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is less affected by the skull breach. The postcraniotomy EEG and MEG scans of 20 patients were reviewed by two experienced electroencephalographers. Larger interrater variability was found for EEG as compared with MEG. Review of patients who had postoperative seizures suggested that EEG was more sensitive but less specific than MEG in detecting interictal epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, several instances of sharp waveforms that were difficult to evaluate on EEG were found to be more easily interpretable on MEG. MEG may also help determine whether asymmetries in physiologic rhythms on EEG result from the skull defect or are pathologic. MEG should be considered as an adjunctive study in patients with a breach rhythm for evaluation of interictal epileptiform discharges and cerebral dysfunction.

  2. Frequency domain beamforming of magnetoencephalographic beta band activity in epilepsy patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heers, Marcel; Hirschmann, Jan; Jacobs, Julia; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Butz, Markus; von Lehe, Marec; Elger, Christian E; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wellmer, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    Spike-based magnetoencephalography (MEG) source localization is an established method in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients. Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are associated with focal epileptic discharges of variable morphologies in the beta frequency band in addition to single epileptic spikes. Therefore, we investigated the potential diagnostic value of MEG-based localization of spike-independent beta band (12-30Hz) activity generated by epileptogenic lesions. Five patients with FCD IIB underwent MEG. In one patient, invasive EEG (iEEG) was recorded simultaneously with MEG. In two patients, iEEG succeeded MEG, and two patients had MEG only. MEG and iEEG were evaluated for epileptic spikes. Two minutes of iEEG data and MEG epochs with no spikes as well as MEG epochs with epileptic spikes were analyzed in the frequency domain. MEG oscillatory beta band activity was localized using Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources. Intralesional beta band activity was coherent between simultaneous MEG and iEEG recordings. Continuous 14Hz beta band power correlated with the rate of interictal epileptic discharges detected in iEEG. In cases where visual MEG evaluation revealed epileptic spikes, the sources of beta band activity localized within <2cm of the epileptogenic lesion as shown on magnetic resonance imaging. This result held even when visually marked epileptic spikes were deselected. When epileptic spikes were detectable in iEEG but not MEG, MEG beta band activity source localization failed. Source localization of beta band activity has the potential to contribute to the identification of epileptic foci in addition to source localization of visually marked epileptic spikes. Thus, this technique may assist in the localization of epileptic foci in patients with suspected FCD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mapping the signal-to-noise-ratios of cortical sources in magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenholz, Daniel M; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Sharon, Dahlia; Ishitobi, Mamiko; Vaina, Lucia M; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-04-01

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) have been available for decades, their relative merits are still debated. We examined regional differences in signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) of cortical sources in MEG and EEG. Data from four subjects were used to simulate focal and extended sources located on the cortical surface reconstructed from high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The SNR maps for MEG and EEG were found to be complementary. The SNR of deep sources was larger in EEG than in MEG, whereas the opposite was typically the case for superficial sources. Overall, the SNR maps were more uniform for EEG than for MEG. When using a noise model based on uniformly distributed random sources on the cortex, the SNR in MEG was found to be underestimated, compared with the maps obtained with noise estimated from actual recorded MEG and EEG data. With extended sources, the total area of cortex in which the SNR was higher in EEG than in MEG was larger than with focal sources. Clinically, SNR maps in a patient explained differential sensitivity of MEG and EEG in detecting epileptic activity. Our results emphasize the benefits of recording MEG and EEG simultaneously. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. BDNF, produced by a TPO-stimulated megakaryocytic cell line, regulates autocrine proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Shogo [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Nagasawa, Ayumi; Masuda, Yuya; Tsunematsu, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Hayasaka, Koji; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Chikara [Division of Laboratory and Transfusion Medicine, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ozaki, Yukio [Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi (Japan); Moriyama, Takanori, E-mail: moriyama@hs.hokuda.ac.jp [Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It has been thought that BDNF is not produced in the megakaryocytic lineage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEG-01 produces BDNF upon TPO stimulation and regulates its proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF accelerates proliferation of MEG-01 in an autocrine manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF may be an autocrine MEG-CSF, which regulates megakaryopoiesis. -- Abstract: While human platelets release endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) upon activation, a previous report on MEG-01, a megakaryocytic cell line, found no trace of BDNF production, and the pathophysiological function of platelet BDNF has remained elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that MEG-01 produces BDNF in the presence of TPO and that this serves to potentiate cell proliferation. Our in vitro findings suggest that BDNF regulates MEG-01 proliferation in an autocrine manner, and we suggest that BDNF may be a physiological autocrine regulator of megakaryocyte progenitors.

  5. Clinical Application of Spatiotemporal Distributed Source Analysis in Presurgical Evaluation of Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial electroencephalography placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has ...

  6. Patterns of Spontaneous Magnetoencephalographic Activity in Schizophrenic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Siekmeier, Peter J.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) non-invasively measures the magnetic fields produced by the brain. Pertinent research articles from 1993 to 2009 that measured spontaneous, whole-head MEG activity in schizophrenic patients were reviewed. Data on localization of oscillatory activity and correlation of these findings with psychotic symptoms are summarized. While the variety of measures used by different research groups makes a quantitative meta-analysis difficult, it appears that MEG activity in pa...

  7. On-line measurements of liquid carry-over from scrubbers using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, A.; Hassfjell, S.; Finborud, A.

    2004-01-01

    A method to measure liquid carry-over from scrubbers using gamma-emitting tracers is described and results from field tests at two onshore installations are presented. One water/1,2-ethanediol (MEG) and two hydrocarbon liquid (condensate) tracers have been used in the tests. One of the condensate tracers deposited to some extent inside the process pipe, while the other had a too high vapor pressure. The water/MEG tracer showed no MEG carry-over while the carry-over of MEG was documented to be considerable. (author)

  8. Surface modification and multiple exciton generation studies of lead(II) sulfide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Jennifer M.

    2011-12-01

    Solar energy is a green alternative to fossil fuels but solar technologies to date have been plagued by low conversion efficiencies and high input costs making solar power inaccessible to much of the developing world. Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) may provide a route to efficient, economical solar devices through a phenomenon called multiple exciton generation (MEG). Through MEG, semiconductor NPs use a high-energy input photon to create more than one exciton (electron-hole pair) per photon absorbed, thereby exhibiting large photoconversion efficiencies. While MEG has been studied in many NP systems, and we understand some of the factors that affect MEG, a rigorous analysis of the NP-ligand interface with respect to MEG is missing. This dissertation describes how the NP ligand shell directly affects MEG and subsequent charge carrier recombination. Chapter I describes the motivation for studying MEG with respect to NP surface chemistry. Chapter II provides an in-depth overview of the transient absorption experiment used to measure MEG in the NP samples. Chapter III highlights the effect of oleic acid and sodium 2, 3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate on MEG in PbS NPs. The differences in carrier recombination were accounted for by two differences between these ligands: the coordinating atom and/or the secondary structure of the ligand. Because of these hypotheses, experiments were designed to elucidate the origin of these effects by controlling the NP ligand shell. Chapter IV details a viable synthetic route to thiol and amine-capped PbS NPs using sodium 3-mercaptopropane sulfonate as an intermediate ligand. With the versatile ligand exchange described in Chapter IV, the MEG yield and carrier recombination was investigated for ligands with varying headgroups but the same secondary structure. The correlation of ligand donor atom to MEG is outlined in Chapter V. Finally, Chapter VI discusses the conclusions and future outlook of the research reported in this dissertation

  9. Effective electromagnetic noise cancellation with beamformers and synthetic gradiometry in shielded and partly shielded environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjamian, P.; Worthen, S.F.; Hillebrand, A.; Furlong, P.L.; Chizh, B.A.; Hobson, A.R.; Aziz, Q.; Barnes, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The major challenge of MEG, the inverse problem, is to estimate the very weak primary neuronal currents from the measurements of extracranial magnetic fields. The non-uniqueness of this inverse solution is compounded by the fact that MEG signals contain large environmental and physiological noise

  10. Development of Human Somatosensory Cortical Functions - What have We Learned from Magnetoencephalography: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Pihko, Elina

    2014-01-01

    The mysteries of early development of cortical processing in humans have started to unravel with the help of new non-invasive brain research tools like multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this review, we evaluate, within a wider neuroscientific and clinical context, the value of MEG in studying normal and disturbed functional development of the human somatosensory system. The combination of excellent temporal resolution and good localization accuracy provided by MEG has, in the case of somatosensory studies, enabled the differentiation of activation patterns from the newborn's primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) areas. Furthermore, MEG has shown that the functioning of both SI and SII in newborns has particular immature features in comparison with adults. In extremely preterm infants, the neonatal MEG response from SII also seems to potentially predict developmental outcome: those lacking SII responses at term show worse motor performance at age 2 years than those with normal SII responses at term. In older children with unilateral early brain lesions, bilateral alterations in somatosensory cortical activation detected in MEG imply that the impact of a localized insult may have an unexpectedly wide effect on cortical somatosensory networks. The achievements over the last decade show that MEG provides a unique approach for studying the development of the somatosensory system and its disturbances in childhood. MEG well complements other neuroimaging methods in studies of cortical processes in the developing brain.

  11. Development of Human Somatosensory Cortical Functions – What have We Learned from Magnetoencephalography: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Pihko, Elina

    2014-01-01

    The mysteries of early development of cortical processing in humans have started to unravel with the help of new non-invasive brain research tools like multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this review, we evaluate, within a wider neuroscientific and clinical context, the value of MEG in studying normal and disturbed functional development of the human somatosensory system. The combination of excellent temporal resolution and good localization accuracy provided by MEG has, in the case of somatosensory studies, enabled the differentiation of activation patterns from the newborn’s primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) areas. Furthermore, MEG has shown that the functioning of both SI and SII in newborns has particular immature features in comparison with adults. In extremely preterm infants, the neonatal MEG response from SII also seems to potentially predict developmental outcome: those lacking SII responses at term show worse motor performance at age 2 years than those with normal SII responses at term. In older children with unilateral early brain lesions, bilateral alterations in somatosensory cortical activation detected in MEG imply that the impact of a localized insult may have an unexpectedly wide effect on cortical somatosensory networks. The achievements over the last decade show that MEG provides a unique approach for studying the development of the somatosensory system and its disturbances in childhood. MEG well complements other neuroimaging methods in studies of cortical processes in the developing brain. PMID:24672468

  12. Magnetoencephalography signals are influenced by skull defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S; Flemming, L; Haueisen, J

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals had previously been hypothesized to have negligible sensitivity to skull defects. The objective is to experimentally investigate the influence of conducting skull defects on MEG and EEG signals. A miniaturized electric dipole was implanted in vivo into rabbit brains. Simultaneous recording using 64-channel EEG and 16-channel MEG was conducted, first above the intact skull and then above a skull defect. Skull defects were filled with agar gels, which had been formulated to have tissue-like homogeneous conductivities. The dipole was moved beneath the skull defects, and measurements were taken at regularly spaced points. The EEG signal amplitude increased 2-10 times, whereas the MEG signal amplitude reduced by as much as 20%. The EEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was under the edge of the defect, whereas the MEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was central under the defect. The change in MEG field-map topography (relative difference measure, RDM(∗)=0.15) was geometrically related to the skull defect edge. MEG and EEG signals can be substantially affected by skull defects. MEG source modeling requires realistic volume conductor head models that incorporate skull defects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    data for liquid-liquid equilibrium of North Sea condensate + MEG and North Sea condensate + MEG + water systems for temperatures from 303.15 to 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. These data are successfully modeled using the cubic-plus-association equation of state. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zaria with urethritis and cervicitis were screened for their susceptibility pattems against eight antibiotics, using the agar diffusion plate method. Antibiotic susceptibility testing. Pure Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates were screened against eight antibiotics made up of: penicillin G. (2.4meg), ampicillin (10 meg), tetracycline (10.

  15. Using Radiation Pattern Measurements for Mobile Handset Performance Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2005-01-01

    The mean effective gain (MEG) is an attractive performance measure of mobile handsets, since it incorporates both directional and polarization properties of the handset and environment. In this work the MEG is computed from measured spherical radiation patterns of five different mobile handsets...

  16. Loss of non-coding RNA expression from the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted locus correlates with reduced neural differentiation potential in human embryonic stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chu-Fan; Wu, Fang-Chun; Tai, Kang-Yu; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Kai-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Chen, Hsin-Fu; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2015-01-05

    Pluripotent stem cells are increasingly used to build therapeutic models, including the transplantation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including delta-like homolog 1 gene and the type III iodothyronine deiodinase gene (DLK1-DIO3) imprinted locus-derived maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), were found to be expressed during neural development. The deregulation of these lncRNAs is associated with various neurological diseases. The imprinted locus DLK1-DIO3 encodes abundant non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are regulated by differential methylation of the locus. We aim to study the correlation between the DLK1-DIO3-derived ncRNAs and the capacity of hESCs to differentiate into neural lineages. We classified hESC sublines into MEG3-ON and MEG3-OFF based on the expression levels of MEG3 and its downstream microRNAs as detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). A cDNA microarray was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of hESCs. To investigate the capacity of neural differentiation in MEG3-ON and MEG3-OFF hESCs, we performed neural lineage differentiation followed by neural lineage marker expression and neurite formation analyses via qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. MEG3-knockdown via small interfering RNA (siRNA) and small hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to investigate the potential causative effect of MEG3 in regulating neural lineage-related gene expression. DLK1-DIO3-derived ncRNAs were repressed in MEG3-OFF hESCs compared with those in the MEG3-ON hESCs. The transcriptome profile indicated that many genes related to nervous system development and neural-type tumors were differentially expressed in MEG3-OFF hESCs. Three independent MEG3-knockdown assays using different siRNA and shRNA constructs consistently resulted in downregulation of some neural lineage genes. Lower expression levels of stage-specific neural lineage markers and

  17. Multiexciton Absorption and Multiple Exciton Generation in CdSe Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yong

    2008-04-01

    Efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG) in semiconductor quantum dots has been recently reported. The MEG efficiency has so far been evaluated assuming that the change (bleaching) of the absorption spectrum due to MEG is linearly proportional to the number of excitons NX. Here, we critically examine this assumption using atomistic pseudopotential calculations for colloidal CdSe nanocrystals. We find that the bleaching of the first absorption peak depends nonlinearly on NX, due to carrier-carrier interactions. This nonlinearity mandates an upper bound of 1.5 to the value of the normalized bleaching that can be attributed to MEG, significantly smaller than the limit of 2.0 predicted by the linear scaling assumption. Thus, measured values of the normalized bleaching in excess of 1.5 cannot be due entirely to MEG, but must originate in part from other mechanisms.

  18. A 20-channel magnetoencephalography system based on optically pumped magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borna, Amir; Carter, Tony R.; Goldberg, Josh D.; Colombo, Anthony P.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Berry, Christopher; McKay, Jim; Stephen, Julia; Weisend, Michael; Schwindt, Peter D. D.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system that uses optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) to sense the magnetic fields of the human brain. The system consists of an array of 20 OPM channels conforming to the human subject’s head, a person-sized magnetic shield containing the array and the human subject, a laser system to drive the OPM array, and various control and data acquisition systems. We conducted two MEG experiments: auditory evoked magnetic field and somatosensory evoked magnetic field, on three healthy male subjects, using both our OPM array and a 306-channel Elekta-Neuromag superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) MEG system. The described OPM array measures the tangential components of the magnetic field as opposed to the radial component measured by most SQUID-based MEG systems. Herein, we compare the results of the OPM- and SQUID-based MEG systems on the auditory and somatosensory data recorded in the same individuals on both systems.

  19. Magnetoencephalography: From SQUIDs to neuroscience. Neuroimage 20th anniversary special edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-06-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), with its direct view to the cortex through the magnetically transparent skull, has developed from its conception in physics laboratories to a powerful tool of basic and clinical neuroscience. MEG provides millisecond time resolution and allows real-time tracking of brain activation sequences during sensory processing, motor planning and action, cognition, language perception and production, social interaction, and various brain disorders. Current-day neuromagnetometers house hundreds of SQUIDs, superconducting quantum interference devices, to pick up signals generated by concerted action of cortical neurons. Complementary MEG measures of neuronal involvement include evoked responses, modulation of cortical rhythms, properties of the on-going neural activity, and interareal connectivity. Future MEG breakthroughs in understanding brain dynamics are expected through advanced signal analysis and combined use of MEG with hemodynamic imaging (fMRI). Methodological development progresses most efficiently when linked with insightful neuroscientific questions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  1. Crisis del lóbulo temporal registrada mediante magnetoencefalografía: caso clínico Temporal lobe seizure recorded by magnetoencephalography: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Amo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La localización del inicio de las crisis es un factor importante para la evaluación prequirúrgica de la epilepsia. En este trabajo se describe la localización del inicio de una crisis registrada mediante magnetoencefalografía (MEG en un niño de 12 años que presenta crisis parciales complejas farmacorresistentes. La RM muestra una lesión de 20mm de diámetro en el hipocampo izquierdo. EEG de superficie con ondas theta temporales izquierdas. Registro MEG interictal con punta-onda aislada posterior e inferior a la lesión de la RM. Registro MEG ictal con punta-onda (2 Hz. La localización de los dipolos indica el inicio de la crisis en la circunvolución temporal inferior en la misma localización que la actividad interictal MEG. Esta actividad ictal se propaga bilateralmente a áreas frontales. El registro corticográfico intraquirúrgico confirma los resultados de la localización interictal mediante MEG.Ictal onset localization is a important factor in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. This paper describes the localization of a seizure onset recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG from a 12-year-old male patient who suffered from complex partial drug-resistant seizures. MRI revealed a 20mm diameter lesion located in left hippocampus. Scalp EEG showed left temporal theta waves. Interictal MEG registrations detected isolated spike-wave activity posterior and inferior to the MRI lesion. Ictal MEG showed continuous spike-wave activity (2 Hz. Dipole localization sited seizure onset in the inferior left temporal gyrus, the same localization of the interictal MEG activity. This ictal activity spreads bilaterally to frontal areas. Intrasurgical electrocorticography recording confirmed interictal MEG results.

  2. Propagation of epileptic spikes reconstructed from spatiotemporal magnetoencephalographic and electroencephalographic source analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Liu, Hesheng; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Lee, Jong Woo; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Belliveau, John W; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of spatiotemporal source analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) for representing the propagation of frontotemporal spikes in patients with partial epilepsy. This study focuses on frontotemporal spikes, which are typically characterized by a preceding anterior temporal peak followed by an ipsilateral inferior frontal peak. Ten patients with frontotemporal spikes on MEG/EEG were studied. We analyzed the propagation of temporal to frontal epileptic spikes on both MEG and EEG independently by using a cortically constrained minimum norm estimate (MNE). Spatiotemporal source distribution of each spike was obtained on the cortical surface derived from the patient's MRI. All patients underwent an extraoperative intracranial EEG (IEEG) recording covering temporal and frontal lobes after presurgical evaluation. We extracted source waveforms of MEG and EEG from the source distribution of interictal spikes at the sites corresponding to the location of intracranial electrodes. The time differences of the ipsilateral temporal and frontal peaks as obtained by MEG, EEG and IEEG were statistically compared in each patient. In all patients, MEG and IEEG showed similar time differences between temporal and frontal peaks. The time differences of EEG spikes were significantly smaller than those of IEEG in nine of ten patients. Spatiotemporal analysis of MEG spikes models the time course of frontotemporal spikes as observed on IEEG more adequately than EEG in our patients. Spatiotemporal source analysis may be useful for planning epilepsy surgery, by predicting the pattern of IEEG spikes. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetoencephalography: Basic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG is the measurement of the magnetic field generated by the electrical activity of neurons. It is usually combined with a magnetic resonance imaging to get what is called magnetic source imaging. The technology that has helped record these minute magnetic fields is super-conducting quantum interference detector which is like a highly sensitive magnetic field meter. To attenuate the external magnetic noise the MEG is housed inside a magnetically shielded room. The actual sensors recording magnetic fields are magnetometers and/or gradiometers. MEG fields pass through the head without any distortion. This is a significant advantage of MEG over electroencephalography. MEG provides a high spatial and temporal resolution. The recording and identification information should be according to the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society guidelines published in 2011. MEG currently has two approved indications in the United States, one is for pre-operative brain mapping and the other is for use in epilepsy surgery. MEG studies have shown functional brain tissue inside brain tumors.

  4. On the equivalence between the minimum entropy generation rate and the maximum conversion rate for a reactive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bispo, Heleno; Silva, Nilton; Brito, Romildo; Manzi, João

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Minimum entropy generation (MEG) principle improved the reaction performance. • MEG rate and the maximum conversion equivalence have been analyzed. • Temperature and residence time are used to the domain establishment of MEG. • Satisfying the temperature and residence time relationship results a optimal performance. - Abstract: The analysis of the equivalence between the minimum entropy generation (MEG) rate and the maximum conversion rate for a reactive system is the main purpose of this paper. While being used as a strategy of optimization, the minimum entropy production was applied to the production of propylene glycol in a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) with a view to determining the best operating conditions, and under such conditions, a high conversion rate was found. The effects of the key variables and restrictions on the validity domain of MEG were investigated, which raises issues that are included within a broad discussion. The results from simulations indicate that from the chemical reaction standpoint a maximum conversion rate can be considered as equivalent to MEG. Such a result can be clearly explained by examining the classical Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution, where the molecules of the reactive system under the condition of the MEG rate present a distribution of energy with reduced dispersion resulting in a better quality of collision between molecules with a higher conversion rate

  5. Energy Management of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power Micro Energy Grid Based on Leader-Follower Game Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijun Lin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a general model and solution algorithm for the energy management of combined cooling, heating, and power micro energy grid (MEG under the game theory framework. An innovative dynamic leader-follower game strategy is proposed in this paper to balance the interactions between MEG and user. We show that such game between MEG and user has a unique Nash equilibrium (NE, and in order to quantify the user’s expenditure and dissatisfaction, we model them and adopt the fuzzy bi-objective algorithm. For more details in the proposed game model, the MEG leads the game by deciding energy sales prices and optimizing the power, cooling and heating outputs according to the user’s load plan to maximize its own profit. With the prices being released by MEG, user’s adjustment of energy consumption follows and is again fed to MEG. In practice, we initialize simulations with daily loads of a typical community. As the numerical results demonstrate, MEG is proficient in consumption capacity of renewable energy and energy optimization. It also shows that the user achieves his economic optimum with experience of energy usage taken into account.

  6. Myricetin and methyl eugenol combination enhances the anticancer activity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction of cis-platin against HeLa cervical cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jin-Ling; Shi, Song; Shen, Yan-Li; Wang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Drug combination therapies are common practice in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of myricetin (MYR), methyl eugenol (MEG) and cisplatin (CP) both separately as well as in combination against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. To demonstrate whether MYR and MEG enhance the anticancer activity of CP against cervical cancer cells, we treated HeLa cells with MYR and MEG alone or in combination with cisplatin and evaluated cell growth and apoptosis using MTT (3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazol 2yl) 2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, LDH release assay, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that, as compared to single drug treatment, the combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in greater effect in inhibiting cancer cell growth and inducing apoptosis. Cell apoptosis induction, Caspase-3 activity, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss were systematically studied to reveal the mechanisms of synergy between MYR, MEG and CP. Combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in more potent apoptosis induction as revealed by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258 and AO-ETBR staining. The combination treatment also increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase dramatically as compared to single drug treatment. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΛΨm) as well as Caspase-3 activity was much higher in combination treatment as compared to single drug treatment. Findings of this investigation suggest that MYR and MEG combined with cisplatin is a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach in human cervical cancer.

  7. Performance of Holstein calves having free access to milk and dosed with Megasphaera elsdenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukengela Claude Muya

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Megasphaera elsdenii converts lactate and glucose into butyrate, the main volatile fatty acid responsible of papillae development and may benefit calf performance. Twenty-six Holstein calves (BW = 34.5 ± 1.65 kg were randomly assigned at birth to a control group (Meg0 and a group that received an oral dose of M. elsdenii NCIMB 41125 at 14 d of age (Meg14. Calves received colostrum for the first 3 d followed by free choice access to whole milk until weaning at 56 d. From d 4 onward, starter and water were offered ad libitum. Intakes were measured daily and body weights (BW weekly. Blood samples were collected on day 7, 21, 28, 42, and 56 for β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA analysis. Performance was measured for an additional 14 d post-weaning. Pre-weaning milk intake was lower (p = 0.010 and starter DMI (dry matter intake greater (p = 0.001 for Meg14 than Meg0 calves. Total DMI, metabolisable energy (ME intake and average daily gain (ADG were similar (p > 0.05 for both groups, but Meg14 calves had greater weaning BW (p = 0.012 and feed efficiency (p < 0.029. The average BHBA between d 21 and 56 was greater for Meg14 (p = 0.03 compared to Meg0 calves. After weaning, Meg14 calves had greater DMI (p = 0.027, ME intake (p = 0.023 and ADG (p = 0.002 and tended to have better feed efficiencies (p = 0.07 than Meg0 calves. Administering M. elsdenii NCIMB 41125 improved starter intake and feed efficiency, which was associated with high blood BHBA.

  8. Clinical applications of magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stufflebeam, Steven M; Tanaka, Naoaki; Ahlfors, Seppo P

    2009-06-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), in which magnetic fields generated by brain activity are recorded outside of the head, is now in routine clinical practice throughout the world. MEG has become a recognized and vital part of the presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy and patients with brain tumors. We review investigations that show an improvement in the postsurgical outcomes of patients with epilepsy by localizing epileptic discharges. We also describe the most common clinical MEG applications that affect the management of patients, and discuss some applications that are close to having a clinical impact on patients. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  10. Phase equilibrium of North Sea oils with polar chemicals: Experiments and CPA modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This work consists of a combined experimental and modeling study for oil - MEG - water systems, of relevance to petroleum applications. We present new experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the mutual solubility of two North Sea oils + MEG and North Sea oils + MEG + water systems...... in the temperature range 303.15-323.15 K and at atmospheric pressure. These new data are for North Sea oils which are substantially heavier and with higher aromatic/naphthenic content compared to previous studies. The new data compare favorably with previously reported measurements for other North Sea oils. The data...

  11. Magnetocardiography and magnetoencephalography measurements at room temperature using tunnel magneto-resistance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kosuke; Oogane, Mikihiko; Kanno, Akitake; Imada, Masahiro; Jono, Junichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Okuno, Tetsuo; Aritomi, Yuuji; Morikawa, Masahiro; Tsuchida, Masaaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Ando, Yasuo

    2018-02-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were detected at room temperature using tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) sensors. TMR sensors developed with low-noise amplifier circuits detected the MCG R wave without averaging, and the QRS complex was clearly observed with averaging at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Spatial mapping of the MCG was also achieved. Averaging of MEG signals triggered by electroencephalography (EEG) clearly observed the phase inversion of the alpha rhythm with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.7 between EEG and MEG.

  12. Estudo de liberação e permeação in vitro do diclofenaco de dietilamônio em microemulsão gel-like In vitro release and permeation of a diclofenac diethylamine from microemulsion gel-like

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexsandro da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to produce and characterize a new microemulsion gel-like carrier system (MEG by using the pseudo-ternary phase-diagram concept. The diclofenac diethylamine (DDA was incorporated in the MEG and its in vitro release and permeation profiles were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. The results revealed that the commercial DDA emulgel provided significantly higher Kp of DDA (2.2-fold as compared to the MEG. Similar data were obtained in the permeation studies in which DDA Kp 4.7-fold higher. Therefore, MEG presents higher potential as a topical delivery system for DDA when compared to the commercial DDA emulgel.

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in mental illnesses. Scientists have already begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ...

  15. 78 FR 36815 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement of Consent: Issuance of a U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Meg Donovan Foreign Relations authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2000 and 2001 (enacted by Pub, L, 106-113... child trafficking and other forms of passport fraud. Methodology: Passport Services collects information...

  16. 78 FR 37269 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement of Exigent/Special Family...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Meg Donovan Foreign Relations authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2000 and 2001 (enacted by Pub. L. 106-113..., and other forms of passport fraud. Methodology: Passport Services collects information from U.S...

  17. Cognitive decline in Parkinson’s disease is associated with slowing of resting-state brain activity: a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Stoffers, D.; Deijen, J.B.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Stam, C.J.; Berendse, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dementia (PDD) are still poorly understood. Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have demonstrated widespread slowing of oscillatory brain activity as a neurophysiological

  18. Colloidal Quantum-Dot Photodetectors Exploiting Multiexciton Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Sukhovatkin, V.

    2009-06-18

    Multiexciton generation (MEG) has been indirectly observed in colloidal quantum dots, both in solution and the solid state, but has not yet been shown to enhance photocurrent in an optoelectronic device. Here, we report a class of solution-processed photoconductive detectors, sensitive in the ultraviolet, visible, and the infrared, in which the internal gain is dramatically enhanced for photon energies Ephoton greater than 2.7 times the quantum-confined bandgap Ebandgap. Three thin-film devices with different quantum-confined bandgaps (set by the size of their constituent lead sulfide nanoparticles) show enhancement determined by the bandgap-normalized photon energy, Ephoton/Ebandgap, which is a clear signature of MEG. The findings point to a valuable role for MEG in enhancing the photocurrent in a solid-state optoelectronic device. We compare the conditions on carrier excitation, recombination, and transport for photoconductive versus photovoltaic devices to benefit from MEG.

  19. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammers, Jürgen, E-mail: J.Dammers@fz-juelich.de; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jon Shah, N. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA)—Translational Brain Medicine, Jülich (Germany)

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  20. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dr. Carlos Zarate of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) looks at a patient's electromagnetic brain activity with a powerful and fast MEG brain imaging scanner. NIH Research Uncovers New Clue to Treating ...

  1. Muscle 3243A-->G mutation load and capacity of the mitochondrial energy-generating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.M.; Schuelke, M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Trijbels, F.J.M.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Lucke, B.; Wintjes, L.T.M.; Morava, E.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Smits, B.W.; Hol, F.A.; Siers, M.H.; Ter Laak, H.; van der Knaap, M.S.; van Spronsen, F.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; van den Heuvel, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) encompasses the mitochondrial enzymatic reactions from oxidation of pyruvate to the export of adenosine triphosphate. It is investigated in intact muscle mitochondria by measuring the pyruvate oxidation and adenosine triphosphate

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  3. Treatment of primary brain lymphoma without immune deficiency, The importance of chemotherapy before radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihani M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find a more efficacious treatment for patients with primary central nervous system Lymphoma using chemotherapy. The objective was to determine the optimal time for radiotherapy treatment in relation to chemotherapy. Retrospective evaluation in patients with brain lymphoma was conducted from 1992 to 1998. Twenty-three patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups based on the timing of radiotherapy in relation to the chemotherapy. The first group of patients (n=13 initially received radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. Five of these patients receied classic CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicine, Vincistine and Prednisone, six patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2 and Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and two patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2, Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine (600 Megs/M2 every 2 to 3 weeks. The second group of patients (Group II, n=10 received the followeing treatment regimen: a course of BCNU 120 Megs/M2 with Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2, Mesna and Etoposide 120 Megs/M2 on the first day of treatment (course A. Two weeks later, treatment was continued with a course of Cis-platin 35 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 600 Megs/M2 (course B. The treatment was continued 14 days later with a course of Mitoxantron 12 Megs/M2, Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2 puls Mesna (course C. After the fourth week of chemotherapy, these patients received radiotherapy to the brain (5000 RADS in 4 weeks. During radiotherapy and at the beginning of course chemotherapy, intrathecal therapy with Methorexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemothotrexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemotherapy treatment was repeated to a total of 3 times. After complete clearance of the tumor determined by MRI and absence of tumor cells in the spinal fluid, the chemotherapeutic regimen was repeated one last time. The

  4. Modeling the liquid-liquid equilibrium of petroleum fluid and polar compounds containing systems with the PC-SAFT equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Yan, Wei; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    A critical test for the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (FOS) is the modeling of systems containing petroleum fluid and polar compounds. In this work, two approaches are proposed for the simplified PC-SAFT EOS to obtain the necessary pure component...... parameters for the characterized non-associating pseudo-components of petroleum fluids. New pure component parameters of mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) are obtained by considering the liquid liquid equilibrium (LLE) data of MEG with normal hydrocarbons in the estimation process and a simple binary interaction...... scheme of MEG with pseudo-components is proposed. These new parameters are applied to model LLE of the systems of petroleum fluid + MEG with or without water. The results show that the simplified PC-SAFT EOS yields promising predictions of the key mutual solubility of these systems: 15-18% overall...

  5. Epileptogenic zone localization using magnetoencephalography predicts seizure freedom in epilepsy surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Imber, Brandon S.; Raygor, Kunal P.; Honma, Susanne M.; Mizuiri, Danielle; Mantle, Mary; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of epilepsy surgery depends critically upon successful localization of the epileptogenic zone. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive detection of interictal spike activity in epilepsy, which can then be localized in three dimensions using magnetic source imaging (MSI) techniques. However, the clinical value of MEG in the pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation is not fully understood, as studies to date are limited by either a lack of long-term seizure outcomes or small sample size. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of focal epilepsy patients who received MEG for interictal spike mapping followed by surgical resection at our institution. Results We studied 132 surgical patients, with mean post-operative follow-up of 3.6 years (minimum 1 year). Dipole source modelling was successful in 103 (78%) patients, while no interictal spikes were seen in others. Among patients with successful dipole modelling, MEG findings were concordant with and specific to: i) the region of resection in 66% of patients, ii) invasive electrocorticography (ECoG) findings in 67% of individuals, and iii) the MRI abnormality in 74% of cases. MEG showed discordant lateralization in ~5% of cases. After surgery, 70% of all patients achieved seizure-freedom (Engel class I outcome). Whereas 85% of patients with concordant and specific MEG findings became seizure-free, this outcome was achieved by only 37% of individuals with MEG findings that were non-specific or discordant with the region of resection (χ2 = 26.4, p < 0.001). MEG reliability was comparable in patients with or without localized scalp EEG, and overall, localizing MEG findings predicted seizure freedom with an odds ratio of 5.11 (2.23–11.8, 95% CI). Significance MEG is a valuable tool for non-invasive interictal spike mapping in epilepsy surgery, including patients with non-localized findings on long-term EEG monitoring, and localization of the epileptogenic zone using MEG is associated

  6. Magnetoencephalographic mapping of interictal spike propagation: a technical and clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, K; Lin, F-H; Camposano, S; Foxe, D M; Grant, P E; Bourgeois, B F; Ahlfors, S P; Stufflebeam, S M

    2007-09-01

    Distinguishing propagated epileptic activity from primary epileptic foci is of critical importance in presurgical evaluation of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. We studied an 11-year-old patient with complex partial epilepsy by using simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG). In EEG, bilateral interictal discharges appeared synchronous, whereas MEG source analysis suggested propagation of spikes from the right to the left frontal lobe.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of artifact removal in real magnetoencephalogram signals with blind source separation

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Javier; Hornero, Roberto; Fernandez Perez, Alvaro; Abasolo, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) is contaminated with undesired signals, which are called artifacts. Some of the most important ones are the cardiac and the ocular artifacts (CA and OA, respectively), and the power line noise (PLN). Blind source separation (BSS) has been used to reduce the influence of the artifacts in the data. There is a plethora of BSS-based artifact removal approaches, but few comparative analyses. In this study, MEG background activity from 26 subjects was processed with f...

  8. La mégaline/lrp2 exprimée dans le neuroépithélium antérieur est critique pour la croissance oculaire

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Megalin is a large multiligand endocytic receptor essentially known as the key receptor for protein reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule. Murin megalin appears to be essential for early forebrain and eye development but the perinatal lethality of Meg-/- mice precludes further analysis. To study the implication of megalin in the formation of the eye we generated (in the laboratory ) FoxG1-Cre MegL/L mice lacking megalin specifically in the anterior neuroepithelium.The phenotypic analysis ...

  9. Functional brain network characterization and adaptivity during task practice in healthy volunteers and people with schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Shennan Aibel Weiss; Danielle S Bassett; Daniel eRubinstein; Tom eHolroyd; Jose eApud; Dwight eDickinson; Richard eCoppola

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Cognitive remediation involves task practice and may improve deficits in people suffering from schizophrenia, but little is known about underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. In people with schizophrenia and controls, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine accuracy and practice-related changes in parameters indexing neural network structure and activity, to determine whether these might be useful assays of the efficacy of cognitive remediation. Two MEG recordings were ac...

  10. Magnetoencephalography: From SQUIDs to neuroscience Neuroimage 20th Anniversary Special Edition

    OpenAIRE

    Hari, Riitta; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), with its direct view to the cortex through the magnetically transparent skull, has developed from its conception in physics laboratories to a powerful tool of basic and clinical neuroscience. MEG provides millisecond time resolution and allows real-time tracking of brain activation sequences during sensory processing, motor planning and action, cognition, language perception and production, social interaction, and various brain disorders. Current-day neuromagneto...

  11. Robust and Antibacterial Polymer/Mechanically Exfoliated Graphene Nanocomposite Fibers for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu; Bai, Dongchen; Hu, Xinjun; Ren, Nan; Gao, Wensheng; Chen, Songbo; Chen, Huqiang; Lu, Yue; Li, Jiangong; Bai, Yongxiao

    2018-01-24

    With the increasing demand for composites of multifunctional and integrated performance, graphene-based nanocomposites have been attracting increasing attention in biomedical applications because of their outstanding physicochemical properties and biocompatibility. High product yields and dispersion of graphene in the preparation process of graphene-based nanocomposites have long been a challenge. Further, the mechanical properties and biosafety of final nanocomposites are very important for real usage in biomedical applications. Here, we presented a novel high-throughput method of graphene on mechanical exfoliation in a natural honey medium, and a yield of ∼91% of graphene nanoflakes can be easily achieved with 97.76% of single-layer graphenes. The mechanically exfoliated graphene (MEG) can be well-dispersed in the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix. The PVA/MEG nanocomposite fibers are obtained by gel spinning and stretched 20 times. As a candidate for monofilament sutures, the PVA/MEG nanocomposite fibers with 0.3 wt % of MEG have an ultrahigh ultimate tensile strength of 2.1 GPa, which is far higher than that of the neat PVA fiber (0.75 GPa). In addition, the PVA/MEG nanocomposite fibers also have antibacterial property, low cytotoxicity, and other properties. On the basis of the above-mentioned properties, the effects of a common surgical suture and PVA/MEG nanocomposite fibers on wound healing are evaluated. As a result, the wounds treated with PVA/MEG nanocomposite fibers with 0.3 wt % of MEG show the best healing after 5 days of surgery. It is possible that this novel surgical suture will be available in the market relying on the gentle, inexpensive method of obtaining nonoxidized graphene and the simple process of obtaining nanocomposite fibers.

  12. A Multimodal Perspective on the Composition of Cortical Oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C Ronnqvist

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An expanding corpus of research details the relationship between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measures and neuronal network oscillations. Typically, integrated electroencephalography (EEG and fMRI, or parallel magnetoencephalography (MEG and fMRI are used to draw inference about the consanguinity of BOLD and electrical measurements. However, there is a relative dearth of information about the relationship between E/MEG and the focal networks from which these signals emanate. Consequently, the genesis and composition of E/MEG oscillations requires further clarification.Here we aim to contribute to understanding through a series of parallel measurements of primary motor cortex (M1 oscillations, using human MEG and in-vitro rodent local field potentials. We compare spontaneous activity in the ~10Hz mu and 15-30Hz beta frequency ranges and compare MEG signals with independent and integrated layers III and V (LIII/LV from in vitro recordings. We explore the mechanisms of oscillatory generation, using specific pharmacological modulation with the GABA-A alpha-1 subunit modulator zolpidem. Finally, to determine the contribution of cortico-cortical connectivity, we recorded in-vitro M1, during an incision to sever lateral connections between M1 and S1 cortices.We demonstrate that frequency distribution of MEG signals appear have closer statistically similarity with signals from integrated rather than independent LIII/LV laminae. GABAergic modulation in both modalities elicited comparable changes in the power of the beta band. Finally, cortico-cortical connectivity in SMC appears to directly influence the power of the mu rhythm in LIII.These findings suggest that the MEG signal is an amalgam of outputs from LIII and LV, that multiple frequencies can arise from the same cortical area and that in vitro and MEG M1 oscillations are driven by comparable mechanisms. Finally, cortico-cortical connectivity is reflected in the power of the SMC mu

  13. Resources and Development: Structure and Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Syrquin Moshe

    2007-01-01

    The sustained increase in per capita product and the sweeping structural changes that characterize the epoch that Simon Kuznets (1966) defined as Modern Economic Grosth (MEG) were made possible by the substitution of inanimate power for animal power as a source of energy. Malthusian limits to growth were overcome by the pervasive application of science-based technology to production. The paper summarizes the main features of the structural transformation during MEG and the likely evolution of...

  14. Marine Resiliency Study II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-06

    prevention or treatment protocols, or the use of new technology (e.g. MEG). 5. In coordination with HQMC, NIMH and Army STARRS, to determine...experimental designs such as targeted prevention or treatment protocols or the use of new technology (e.g. MEG) to identify biomarkers. A specific goal of the...Pennsylvania Philadelphia, P A 19104-6205 201210 bartery to be used. Data analysjs/interprel Boston VA Research I 50 S. Huntington Avenue. 28345-503

  15. Methyleugenol hepatocellular cancer initiating effects in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary M; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Jeffrey, Alan M; Duan, Jian-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Methyleugenol (MEG), a constituent of plants used in the human diet, is hepatocarcinogenic in rodents. In an experiment to elucidate its mode of action in rat liver, male F344 rats were administered MEG intragastrically at 3 doses per week for up to 16 weeks in an initiation phase, after which half the rats were fed 500 ppm phenobarbital (PB) in the diet to promote liver neoplasia and the other half were maintained on control diet for 24 weeks. At 8 and 16 week interim terminations, (32)P-nucleotide postlabeling assay revealed 3 adducts in livers of all MEG groups. The hepatocellular replicating fractions, measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry, were doubled or more in all MEG groups. Hepatocellular altered foci, detected by glutathione S-transferase-placental type (π) immunohistochemistry, were present beginning with the high dose group at 8 weeks and extending to all MEG groups at 16 weeks. At the end of maintenance/promotion phase, the incidences, multiplicity and size of foci was similar between control and low dose groups, while those of mid and high dose groups were increased. Hepatocellular adenomas occurred in the mid and high dose groups, attaining higher multiplicity and size with PB. Thus, MEG had rapid initiating activity, reflecting the formation of DNA adducts and possibly cell proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross-correlation of motor activity signals from dc-magnetoencephalography, near-infrared spectroscopy, and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Tilmann H; Leistner, Stefanie; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Macdonald, Rainer; Trahms, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal and vascular responses due to finger movements were synchronously measured using dc-magnetoencephalography (dcMEG) and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (trNIRS). The finger movements were monitored with electromyography (EMG). Cortical responses related to the finger movement sequence were extracted by independent component analysis from both the dcMEG and the trNIRS data. The temporal relations between EMG rate, dcMEG, and trNIRS responses were assessed pairwise using the cross-correlation function (CCF), which does not require epoch averaging. A positive lag on a scale of seconds was found for the maximum of the CCF between dcMEG and trNIRS. A zero lag is observed for the CCF between dcMEG and EMG. Additionally this CCF exhibits oscillations at the frequency of individual finger movements. These findings show that the dcMEG with a bandwidth up to 8 Hz records both slow and faster neuronal responses, whereas the vascular response is confirmed to change on a scale of seconds.

  17. Multi Drug Loaded Thermo-Responsive Fibrinogen-graft-Poly(N-vinyl Caprolactam) Nanogels for Breast Cancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Baby, Thejus; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    This study aims at the targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Megestrol acetate (Meg) loaded fibrinogen-graft-poly(N-Vinyl caprolactam) nanogels (5-FU/Meg-fib-graft-PNVCL NGs) toward α5β1-integrins receptors expressed on breast cancer cells to have enhanced anti-cancer effect in vitro. To achieve this aim, we developed biocompatible thermoresponsive fib-graft-PNVCL NGs using fibrinogen and carboxyl terminated PNVCL via EDC/NHS amidation reaction. The Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) of fib-graft-PNVCL could be tuned according to PNVCL/fibrinogen compositions. The 100-120 nm sized nanogels of fib-graft-PNVCL (LCST = 35 ?1 'C) was prepared using CaCl2 cross-linker. The 5-FU/Meg-fib-graft-PNVCL NGs showed a particle size of 150-170 nm size. The drug loading efficiency with 5-FU was 62% while Meg showed 74%. The 5-FU and Meg release was prominent above LCST than below LCST. The multi drug loaded fib-graft-PNVCL NGs showed enhanced toxicity, apoptosis and uptake by breast cancer (MCF-7) cells compared to their individual doses above their LCST. The in vivo assessment in Swiss albino mice showed sustained release of Meg and 5-FU as early as 3 days, confirming the therapeutic efficiency of the formulation. These results demonstrate an enhanced platform for the future animal studies on breast tumor xenograft model.

  18. Thrombin Maybe Plays an Important Role in MK Differentiation into Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. After development and differentiation, megakaryocytes (MKs can produce platelets. As is well known, thrombopoietin (TPO can induce MKs to differentiate. The effect of thrombin on MKs differentiation is not clear. In this study, we used a human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line (Meg-01 to assess the effect of thrombin on MKs differentiation. Methods. In order to interrogate the role of thrombin in Meg-01 cells differentiation, the changes of morphology, cellular function, and expression of diverse factors were analyzed. Results. The results show that thrombin suppresses Meg-01 cells proliferation and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Thrombin upregulates the expression of CD41b, which is one of the most important MK markers. Globin transcription factor 1 (GATA-1, an important transcriptional regulator, controls MK development and maturation. The expression of GATA-1 is also upregulated by thrombin in Meg-01 cells. The expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibitory protein, is downregulated by thrombin. Phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK were upregulated by thrombin in Meg-01 cells. All the results are consistent with Meg-01 cells treated with TPO. Discussion and Conclusion. In conclusion, all these data indicate that thrombin maybe plays an important role in MK differentiation into platelets. However, whether the platelet-like particles are certainly platelets remains unknown.

  19. Magnetoencephalography-guided surgery in frontal lobe epilepsy using neuronavigation and intraoperative MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Björn; Roessler, Karl; Rampp, Stefan; Hamer, Hajo M; Blumcke, Ingmar; Stefan, Hermann; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Especially in hidden lesions causing drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), the localization of the epileptic zone EZ can be a challenge. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can raise the chances for localization of the (EZ) in combination with electroencephalography (EEG). We investigated the impact of MEG-guided epilepsy surgery with the aid of neuronavigation and intraoperative MR imaging (iopMRI) on seizure outcome of FLE patients. Twenty-eight patients (15 females, 13 males; mean age 31.0±11.1 years) underwent surgery in our department. All patients underwent presurgical MEG monitoring (two-sensor Magnes II or whole head WH3600 MEG system; 4-D Neuroimaging, San Diego, CA, USA). Of those, six patients (group 1) with MRI-negative FLE were operated on before 2002 with intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) and invasive EEG mapping only. Eleven patients with MRI-negative FLE (group 2) and eleven with lesional FLE (group 3) underwent surgery using 1.5T-iopMRI and neuronavigation, including intraoperative visualization of the MEG localizations in 22 and functional MR imaging (for motor and speech areas) as well as DTI fiber tracking (for language and pyramidal tracts) in 13 patients. In the first group, complete resection of the defined EZ including the MEG localization according to the latest postoperative MRI was achieved in four out of six patients. Groups two and three had complete removal of the MEG localizations in 20/22 (91%, 10 of 11 each). Intraoperative MRI revealed incomplete resection of the MEG localizations of four patients (12%; two in both groups), leading to successful re-resection. Transient and permanent neurological deficits alike occurred in 7.1%, surgery-associated complications in 11% of all patients. In the first group, excellent seizure outcome (Engel Class IA) was achieved in three (50%), in the second in 7 patients (61%) and third group in 8 patients (64%, two iopMRI-based re-resections). Mean follow-up was 70.3 months (from 12 to 284

  20. Spectral spatiotemporal imaging of cortical oscillations and interactions in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Dale, Anders M; Belliveau, John W; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents a computationally efficient source estimation algorithm that localizes cortical oscillations and their phase relationships. The proposed method employs wavelet-transformed magnetoencephalography (MEG) data and uses anatomical MRI to constrain the current locations to the cortical mantle. In addition, the locations of the sources can be further confined with the help of functional MRI (fMRI) data. As a result, we obtain spatiotemporal maps of spectral power and phase relationships. As an example, we show how the phase locking value (PLV), that is, the trial-by-trial phase relationship between the stimulus and response, can be imaged on the cortex. We apply the method to spontaneous, evoked, and driven cortical oscillations measured with MEG. We test the method of combining MEG, structural MRI, and fMRI using simulated cortical oscillations along Heschl's gyrus (HG). We also analyze sustained auditory gamma-band neuromagnetic fields from MEG and fMRI measurements. Our results show that combining the MEG recording with fMRI improves source localization for the non-noise-normalized wavelet power. In contrast, noise-normalized spectral power or PLV localization may not benefit from the fMRI constraint. We show that if the thresholds are not properly chosen, noise-normalized spectral power or PLV estimates may contain false (phantom) sources, independent of the inclusion of the fMRI prior information. The proposed algorithm can be used for evoked MEG/EEG and block-designed or event-related fMRI paradigms, or for spontaneous MEG data sets. Spectral spatiotemporal imaging of cortical oscillations and interactions in the human brain can provide further understanding of large-scale neural activity and communication between different brain regions.

  1. FLI1 level during megakaryopoiesis affects thrombopoiesis and platelet biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Karen K; Jarocha, Danuta J; Lyde, Randolph B; Hayes, Vincent; Thom, Christopher S; Sullivan, Spencer K; French, Deborah L; Poncz, Mortimer

    2017-06-29

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), a critical transcription factor (TF) during megakaryocyte differentiation, is among genes hemizygously deleted in Jacobsen syndrome, resulting in a macrothrombocytopenia termed Paris-Trousseau syndrome (PTSx). Recently, heterozygote human FLI1 mutations have been ascribed to cause thrombocytopenia. We studied induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived megakaryocytes (iMegs) to better understand these clinical disorders, beginning with iPSCs generated from a patient with PTSx and iPSCs from a control line with a targeted heterozygous FLI1 knockout (FLI1 +/- ). PTSx and FLI1 +/- iMegs replicate many of the described megakaryocyte/platelet features, including a decrease in iMeg yield and fewer platelets released per iMeg. Platelets released in vivo from infusion of these iMegs had poor half-lives and functionality. We noted that the closely linked E26 transformation-specific proto-oncogene 1 (ETS1) is overexpressed in these FLI1-deficient iMegs, suggesting FLI1 negatively regulates ETS1 in megakaryopoiesis. Finally, we examined whether FLI1 overexpression would affect megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. We found increased yield of noninjured, in vitro iMeg yield and increased in vivo yield, half-life, and functionality of released platelets. These studies confirm FLI1 heterozygosity results in pleiotropic defects similar to those noted with other critical megakaryocyte-specific TFs; however, unlike those TFs, FLI1 overexpression improved yield and functionality. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Adsorption and regeneration of expanded graphite modified by CTAB-KBr/H3PO4 for marine oil pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Congbin; Jiao, Chunlei; Yao, Ruihua; Lin, Aijun; Jiao, Wentao

    2018-02-01

    The cleaning-up of viscous oil spilled in ocean is a global challenge, especially in Bohai, due to its slow current movement and poor self-purification capacity. Frequent oil-spill accidents not only cause severe and long-term damages to marine ecosystems, but also lead to a great loss of valuable resources. To eliminate the environmental pollution of oil spills, an efficient and environment-friendly oil-recovery approach is necessary. In this study, 1 expanded graphite (EG) modified by CTAB-KBr/H 3 PO 4 was synthesized via composite intercalation agents of CTAB-KBr and natural flake graphite, followed by the activation of phosphoric acid at low temperature. The resultant modified expanded graphite (M-EG) obtained an interconnected and continuous open microstructure with lower polarity surface, more and larger pores, and increased surface hydrophobicity. Due to these characteristics, M-EG exhibited a superior adsorption capacity towards marine oil. The saturated adsorption capacities of M-EG were as large as 7.44  g/g for engine oil, 6.12 g/g for crude oil, 5.34 g/g for diesel oil and 4.10 g/g for gasoline oil in 120min, exceeding the capacity of pristine EG. Furthermore, M-EG maintained good removal efficiency under different adsorption conditions, such as temperature, oil types, and sodium salt concentration. In addition, oils sorbed into M-EG could be recovered either by a simple compression or filtration-drying treatment with a recovery ratio of 58-83%. However, filtration-drying treatment shows better performance in preserving microstructures of M-EG, which ensures the adsorbents can be recycled several times. High removal capability, fast adsorption efficiency, excellent stability and good recycling performance make M-EG an ideal candidate for treating marine oil pollution in practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dose-response and operational thresholds/NOAELs for in vitro mutagenic effects from DNA-reactive mutagens, MMS and MNU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottenger, Lynn H; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Fontaine, Donald D; McFadden, Lisa G; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B

    2009-08-01

    The dose-response relationships for in vitro mutagenicity induced by methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) or methylnitrosourea (MNU) in L5178Y mouse lymphoma (ML) cells were examined. DNA adducts (N7-methylguanine, N7MeG and O(6)-methylguanine, O(6)MeG) were quantified as biomarkers of exposure. Both endpoints were assessed using 5replicates/dose (4-h treatment) with MMS or MNU (0.0069-50muM), or vehicle (1% DMSO). Mutant frequency (MF) (thymidine kinase (TK) locus) was determined using the soft agar cloning methodology and a 2-day expression period; in addition, microwell and Sequester-Express-Select (SES) methods were used for MMS. Isolated DNA was acid-hydrolyzed, and adducts quantified by LC/ESI-MS/MS, using authentic and internal standards. MF dose-responses were analyzed using several statistical approaches, all of which confirmed that a threshold dose-response model provided the best fit. NOAELs for MF were 10muM MMS and 0.69muM MNU, based on ANOVA and Dunnett's test (p/=10muM MMS or 3.45muM MNU. O(6)MeG levels were only quantifiable at >/=10muM MNU; O(6)MeG was not quantifiable in control or MMS-treated cells at current detection limits. Thus, (1) cells treated with MMS did not demonstrate increases in TK(-) MF, but did demonstrate quantifiable levels of N7MeG adducts; and (2) the levels of N7MeG adducts did not correlate with induced MF, as MNU-treated cells had fewer N7MeG adducts but higher MF compared with MMS-treated cells, for quasi-equimolar doses. Taken together, these results demonstrate operational thresholds, defined as the highest dose for which the response is not significantly (statistically or biologically) distinguishable from the control/background values, for induction of mutations and N7MeG adducts in ML cells treated with MMS or MNU, and a lack of correlation between induced MF and levels of N7MeG adducts.

  4. The correlation between ictal semiology and magnetoencephalographic localization in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xintong; Rampp, Stefan; Weigel, Daniel; Kasper, Burkhard; Zhou, Dong; Stefan, Hermann

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of ictal semiology with localization and/or lateralization by magnetoencephalography (MEG). Seven patients from the Neurology Department of the University Hospital Erlangen who underwent resective surgery for frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) with an Engel 1a outcome were investigated retrospectively. MEG localizations were classified according to five compartments (separate or combined) of the frontal lobe: frontal basal (FB), frontal lateral (FL), frontal polar (FP), frontal mesial (FM), and frontal precentral (FPr). On the basis of previous studies that investigated the value of ictal semiology in localization and lateralization, we compared the experiential localization and/or lateralization of the epileptogenic region deduced from ictal semiology, that is, both seizure history and ictal video/EEG monitoring, with MEG localization. It is easier to determine lateralization than localization from ictal semiology because of the variety of signs and fast propagation in FLE. All of the patients had specific MEG localizations according to favorable postoperative outcome. Three patients had MEG foci associated with ictal semiology; in another four, the MEG localization was adjacent to the estimated area suggested by ictal semiology. Head version signs could be observed in all compartments of the frontal lobe: clonic in FB and FP areas; postural in FPr, FL, and FM areas; hypermotor in FB, FP, FPr, and FM areas; sensation aura in FB, FL, and FM areas; and automatisms in FP, FPr, and FL areas. All patients had concordant lateralizing and limited valuable locating information from ictal semiology, but no complete correlation with MEG foci. Ictal semiology may indicate the involvement of a symptomatogenic brain region during a seizure, but extent of seizure onset in central motor or sensorimotor area is not reliable enough to indicate the seizure onset zone and favorable postoperative outcome in FLE. MEG provided specific

  5. Multiexciton absorption in CdSe nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yong

    2009-03-01

    Efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG) has been recently reported in semiconductor nanocrystals. In this process, a single absorbed photon generates two or more electron-hole pairs. The MEG efficiency has so far been evaluated assuming that the change (bleaching) of the absorption spectrum due to MEG is linearly proportional to the number of excitons (NX) that are present in the nanocrystal. We have examined this assumption using atomistic pseudopotential calculations for colloidal CdSe nanocrystals ranging in size from 3 to 4.6 nm. We found that the bleaching of the first absorption peak, δα1S, depends non-linearly on NX, due to carrier-carrier interactions. When a single exciton is present in the nanocrystal, the 1S exciton peak is already 65-75% bleached. This non-linearity mandates an upper bound of 1.5 to the value of the normalized bleaching that can be attributed to MEG, significantly smaller than the limit of 2.0 predicted by the linear scaling assumption. Thus, measured values of the normalized bleaching in excess of 1.5 in CdSe nanocrystals cannot be due entirely to MEG, but must originate in part from other mechanisms.

  6. Alzheimer's disease: The state of the art in resting-state magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, M M A; van der Flier, W M; Stam, C J; Hillebrand, A; Scheltens, Ph; van Straaten, E C W

    2017-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by functional brain changes that can be detected in imaging studies, including electromagnetic activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Here, we systematically review the studies that have examined resting-state MEG changes in AD and identify areas that lack scientific or clinical progress. Three levels of MEG analysis will be covered: (i) single-channel signal analysis, (ii) pairwise analyses over time series, which includes the study of interdependencies between two time series and (iii) global network analyses. We discuss the findings in the light of other functional modalities, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Overall, single-channel MEG results show consistent changes in AD that are in line with EEG studies, but the full potential of the high spatial resolution of MEG and advanced functional connectivity and network analysis has yet to be fully exploited. Adding these features to the current knowledge will potentially aid in uncovering organizational patterns of brain function in AD and thereby aid the understanding of neuronal mechanisms leading to cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multireaction equilibrium geothermometry: A sensitivity analysis using data from the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2016-01-01

    A multireaction chemical equilibria geothermometry (MEG) model applicable to high-temperature geothermal systems has been developed over the past three decades. Given sufficient data, this model provides more constraint on calculated reservoir temperatures than classical chemical geothermometers that are based on either the concentration of silica (SiO2), or the ratios of cation concentrations. A set of 23 chemical analyses from Ojo Caliente Spring and 22 analyses from other thermal features in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park are used to examine the sensitivity of calculated reservoir temperatures using the GeoT MEG code (Spycher et al. 2013, 2014) to quantify the effects of solute concentrations, degassing, and mineral assemblages on calculated reservoir temperatures. Results of our analysis demonstrate that the MEG model can resolve reservoir temperatures within approximately ±15°C, and that natural variation in fluid compositions represents a greater source of variance in calculated reservoir temperatures than variations caused by analytical uncertainty (assuming ~5% for major elements). The analysis also suggests that MEG calculations are particularly sensitive to variations in silica concentration, the concentrations of the redox species Fe(II) and H2S, and that the parameters defining steam separation and CO2 degassing from the liquid may be adequately determined by numerical optimization. Results from this study can provide guidance for future applications of MEG models, and thus provide more reliable information on geothermal energy resources during exploration.

  8. Magnetoencephalography as a Tool in Psychiatric Research: Current Status and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlhaas, Peter J; Liddle, Peter; Linden, David E J; Nobre, Anna C; Singh, Krish D; Gross, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging to provide mechanistic insights into circuit dysfunctions in major psychiatric conditions and the development of biomarkers are core challenges in current psychiatric research. We propose that recent technological and analytic advances in magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that allows measurement of neuronal events directly and noninvasively with millisecond resolution, provides novel opportunities to address these fundamental questions. Because of its potential in delineating normal and abnormal brain dynamics, we propose that MEG provides a crucial tool to advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and the dementias. We summarize the mechanisms underlying the generation of MEG signals and the tools available to reconstruct generators and underlying networks using advanced source-reconstruction techniques. We then surveyed recent studies that have used MEG to examine aberrant rhythmic activity in neuropsychiatric disorders. This was followed by links with preclinical research that has highlighted possible neurobiological mechanisms, such as disturbances in excitation/inhibition parameters, that could account for measured changes in neural oscillations. Finally, we discuss challenges as well as novel methodological developments that could pave the way for widespread application of MEG in translational research with the aim of developing biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis.

  9. Context, evidence and attitude: the case for photography in medical examinations of asylum seekers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Rebekah; Oomen, Janus

    2010-07-01

    Can photographs of scars serve as evidence of torture? Amnesty International's Medical Examination Group in the Netherlands (AI-MEG) has, for more than a decade, been photographing torture scars to supplement the testimonies of asylum seekers who have been denied refuge. AI-MEG only intervenes at this point, when asylum seekers face extradition. Proving allegations of torture is of vital importance, as asylum seekers face rising anti-immigrant sentiment in European countries. All victims examined by AI-MEG present a combination of mental, physical and emotional scars. We summarize five cases where AI-MEG used photography in their medical examinations, and consider the ethical role physicians play in helping asylum seekers obtain refuge. Though photographs cannot capture all forms of trauma, as visual documents, they are a compelling form of concrete evidence of torture. In this way, photographs complement verbal testimonies and help doctors and immigration authorities to see and understand physical scars left by various forms of torture. AI-MEG explains in medical terms the connections between the visible late sequelae of torture and victims' testimonies. They then assess whether or not the physical scars are consistent with the forms of torture recounted by victims, using the terminology of the Istanbul Protocol (1999), the United Nations-adopted manual of guidelines that explains how to document torture. This paper outlines the medical examination process and argues for the use of photography as medical evidence on behalf of asylum seekers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization, inclusion mode, phase-solubility and in vitro release studies of inclusion binary complexes with cyclodextrins and meglumine using sulfamerazine as model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Carolina; Gomes de Oliveira, Anselmo; Longhi, Marcela

    2014-07-01

    In order to investigate the effect on the aqueous solubility and release rate of sulfamerazine (SMR) as model drug, inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin (βCD), methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and a binary system with meglumine (MEG) were developed. The formation of 1:1 inclusion complexes of SMR with the CDs and a SMR:MEG binary system in solution and in solid state was revealed by phase solubility studies (PSS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis and X-Ray diffractometry (XRD) studies. The CDs solubilization of SMR could be improved by ionization of the drug molecule through pH adjustments. The higher apparent stability constants of SMR:CDs complexes were obtained in pH 2.00, demonstrating that CDs present more affinity for the unionized drug. The best approach for SMR solubility enhancement results from the combination of MEG and pH adjustment, with a 34-fold increment and a Smax of 54.8 mg/ml. The permeability of the drug was reduced due to the presence of βCD, MβCD, HPβCD and MEG when used as solubilizers. The study then suggests interesting applications of CD or MEG complexes for modulating the release rate of SMR through semipermeable membranes.

  11. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  12. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penna, Stefania Della; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population. (paper)

  13. Clinical application of spatiotemporal distributed source analysis in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoaki eTanaka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG, which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial EEG placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has advantages over the conventional single dipole analysis for obtaining accurate sources and understanding the propagation of epileptic spikes. In this article, we review the source analysis methods, describe the techniques of the distributed source analysis, interpretation of source distribution maps, and discuss the benefits and feasibility of this method in evaluation of epilepsy.

  14. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalographic spikes in patients with intractable frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; von Pechmann, Deidre; Wakeman, Daniel G; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Liu, Hesheng; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical value of spatiotemporal source analysis for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ictal MEG and simultaneous scalp EEG was recorded in five patients with medically intractable frontal lobe epilepsy. Dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs) were calculated at the peak of early ictal spikes for the purpose of estimating the spatiotemporal cortical source distribution. DSPM solutions were mapped onto a cortical surface, which was derived from each patient's MRI. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) were calculated using a single-dipole model for comparison with dSPMs. In all patients, dSPMs tended to have a localized activation, consistent with the clinically determined ictal onset zone, whereas most ECDs were considered to be inappropriate sources according to their goodness-of-fit values. Analyzing ictal MEG spikes by using dSPMs may provide useful information in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

  15. Clinical application of spatiotemporal distributed source analysis in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial electroencephalography placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has advantages over the conventional single dipole analysis for obtaining accurate sources and understanding the propagation of epileptic spikes. In this article, we review the source analysis methods, describe the techniques of the distributed source analysis, interpretation of source distribution maps, and discuss the benefits and feasibility of this method in evaluation of epilepsy.

  16. Multiple exciton generation in quantum dot-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Heather; Jellicoe, Tom C.; Davis, Nathaniel J. L. K.; Böhm, Marcus L.

    2018-01-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum-confined semiconductors is the process by which multiple bound charge-carrier pairs are generated after absorption of a single high-energy photon. Such charge-carrier multiplication effects have been highlighted as particularly beneficial for solar cells where they have the potential to increase the photocurrent significantly. Indeed, recent research efforts have proved that more than one charge-carrier pair per incident solar photon can be extracted in photovoltaic devices incorporating quantum-confined semiconductors. While these proof-of-concept applications underline the potential of MEG in solar cells, the impact of the carrier multiplication effect on the device performance remains rather low. This review covers recent advancements in the understanding and application of MEG as a photocurrent-enhancing mechanism in quantum dot-based photovoltaics.

  17. Liquid-liquid equilibria for binary and ternary systems containing glycols, aromatic hydrocarbons, and water: Experimental measurements and modeling with the CPA EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2006-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium data of four binary glycol + aromatic hydrocarbon systems and three ternary systems containing water have been measured at atmospheric pressure. The measured systems are monoethylene glycol (MEG) + benzene or toluene, triethylene glycol (TEG) + benzene or toluene, MEG...... + water + benzene, MEG + water + toluene, and TEG + water + toluene. The binary systems are correlated with the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state while the ternary systems are predicted from interaction parameters obtained from the binary systems. Very satisfactory liquid-liquid equilibrium...... correlations are obtained for the binary systems using temperature-independent interaction parameters, while adequate predictions are achieved for multicomponent water + glycol + aromatic hydrocarbons systems when accounting for the solvation between the aromatic hydrocarbons and glycols or water....

  18. Model quality and safety studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    evaluation group (MEG) is a European initiative on evaluation of technical models used within the major industrial hazard area and is supported by the EC DGXII, Directorate-General for Science, Research and Development. Closely related to MEG is REDIPHEM, which is the acronym of a research project supported...... by the EC Environment Research Programme focusing on assessment of the quality of experimental data and models for dense gas dispersion created within the EC funded research programmes. Technical models are used in a number of areas of industrial hazards assessment. It is becoming more and more apparent...... of ensuring that model development is of a standard that is commensurate with the importance of model use. The aim of MEG is to improve the culture in which models are developed and used and so ensure that technical models used in all aspects of major hazard evaluation are up to date with technical...

  19. Early visual analysis tool using magnetoencephalography for treatment and recovery of neuronal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Waqas; Neoh, Yee Yik; Bin Hamid, Nor Hisham; Reza, Faruque; Idris, Zamzuri; Tang, Tong Boon

    2017-10-01

    Functional neuroimaging modalities play an important role in deciding the diagnosis and course of treatment of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. This article presents an analytical tool with visualization by exploiting the strengths of the MEG (magnetoencephalographic) neuroimaging technique. The tool automates MEG data import (in tSSS format), channel information extraction, time/frequency decomposition, and circular graph visualization (connectogram) for simple result inspection. For advanced users, the tool also provides magnitude squared coherence (MSC) values allowing personalized threshold levels, and the computation of default model from MEG data of control population. Default model obtained from healthy population data serves as a useful benchmark to diagnose and monitor neuronal recovery during treatment. The proposed tool further provides optional labels with international 10-10 system nomenclature in order to facilitate comparison studies with EEG (electroencephalography) sensor space. Potential applications in epilepsy and traumatic brain injury studies are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros Barrantes, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cell death induced by O 6 MeG has been investigated and inhibition of homologous recombination as a strategy for sensitization of tumor cells against methylating agents S N 1. Dependence of the cell cycle was determined toxic responses triggered by O''6 MeG and evaluated by proliferation assays if apoptotic cells have originated exclusively from the second post-treatment cycle. Dependence of O''6 MeG was found at DSB formation. The activation of the control points of the cell cycle and induction of apoptosis is generated during the second cell cycle. Additionally, a portion of the cells has been determined that triggers apoptosis in subsequent generations in the second cell cycle. Inhibition of homologous recombination has been a reasonable strategy to increase S N 1 alkylating agent effectiveness. Evidence has been provided in NHEJ dependent inhibition of DNA-PK that not significantly sensitizes the glioblastoma cells against temozolomide [es

  1. Integration of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetoencephalography Functional Maps Into a CyberKnife Planning System: Feasibility Study for Motor Activity Localization and Dose Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martin, Elena; Duran, Dunja; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Visani, Elisa; Aquino, Domenico; Marchetti, Marcello; Sebastiano, Davide Rossi; Cusumano, Davide; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Panzica, Ferruccio; Fariselli, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provide noninvasive localization of eloquent brain areas for presurgical planning. The aim of this study is the integration of MEG and fMRI maps into a CyberKnife (CK) system to optimize dose planning. Four patients with brain metastases in the motor area underwent functional imaging study of the hand motor cortex before radiosurgery. MEG data were acquired during a visually cued hand motor task. Motor activations were identified also using an fMRI block-designed paradigm. MEG and fMRI maps were then integrated into a CK system and contoured as organs at risk for treatment planning optimization. The integration of fMRI data into the CK system was achieved for all patients by means of a standardized protocol. We also implemented an ad hoc pipeline to convert the MEG signal into a DICOM standard, to make sure that it was readable by our CK treatment planning system. Inclusion of the activation areas into the optimization plan allowed the creation of treatment plans that reduced the irradiation of the motor cortex yet not affecting the brain peripheral dose. The availability of advanced neuroimaging techniques is playing an increasingly important role in radiosurgical planning strategy. We successfully imported MEG and fMRI activations into a CK system. This additional information can improve dose sparing of eloquent areas, allowing a more comprehensive investigation of the related dose-volume constraints that in theory could translate into a gain in tumor local control, and a reduction of neurological complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The population genomic landscape of human genetic structure, admixture history and local adaptation in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lian; Hoh, Boon Peng; Lu, Dongsheng; Fu, Ruiqing; Phipps, Maude E; Li, Shilin; Nur-Shafawati, Ab Rajab; Hatin, Wan Isa; Ismail, Endom; Mokhtar, Siti Shuhada; Jin, Li; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Xu, Shuhua

    2014-09-01

    Peninsular Malaysia is a strategic region which might have played an important role in the initial peopling and subsequent human migrations in Asia. However, the genetic diversity and history of human populations--especially indigenous populations--inhabiting this area remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted a genome-wide study using over 900,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four major Malaysian ethnic groups (MEGs; Malay, Proto-Malay, Senoi and Negrito), and made comparisons of 17 world-wide populations. Our data revealed that Peninsular Malaysia has greater genetic diversity corresponding to its role as a contact zone of both early and recent human migrations in Asia. However, each single Orang Asli (indigenous) group was less diverse with a smaller effective population size (N(e)) than a European or an East Asian population, indicating a substantial isolation of some duration for these groups. All four MEGs were genetically more similar to Asian populations than to other continental groups, and the divergence time between MEGs and East Asian populations (12,000--6,000 years ago) was also much shorter than that between East Asians and Europeans. Thus, Malaysian Orang Asli groups, despite their significantly different features, may share a common origin with the other Asian groups. Nevertheless, we identified traces of recent gene flow from non-Asians to MEGs. Finally, natural selection signatures were detected in a batch of genes associated with immune response, human height, skin pigmentation, hair and facial morphology and blood pressure in MEGs. Notable examples include SYN3 which is associated with human height in all Orang Asli groups, a height-related gene (PNPT1) and two blood pressure-related genes (CDH13 and PAX5) in Negritos. We conclude that a long isolation period, subsequent gene flow and local adaptations have jointly shaped the genetic architectures of MEGs, and this study provides insight into the peopling and human migration

  4. Nitrex project - Gårdsjöen, Status report for 1990-91

    OpenAIRE

    Dise, N.; Wright, R.; Andersson, I.; Brandrud, T.E.; Carlsson, U.; Clemensson-Lindell, A.; Hauhs, M.; Hultberg, H.; Huse, M.; Kjønnaas, J.; Klemedtsson, L.; Kroglund, F.; Müller, D.; Nygaard, P.H.; Nyström, U.

    1992-01-01

    At the NITREX site at Gårdsjön, Sweden, ambient nitrogen deposition of 90 meg m² yr 1 will be experimentally increased by 286 meg m² yr 1 to an entire forested catchment G2 to study the potential for nitrogen saturation. Investigations include mearsurements of catchment inputs and outputs, as well as studies of vegetation, soil, mycorrhiza, fine roots and fish response. Results from the pre-treatment period 1990-91 show acidic runoff and soil solution with high concentrations of inorganic alu...

  5. Magnetoencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon; Edgar, J.C.; Gaetz, William C.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) may not be familiar to many pediatric radiologists, it is an increasingly available neuroimaging technique both for evaluating normal and abnormal intracranial neural activity and for functional mapping. By providing spatial, temporal, and time-frequency spectral information, MEG affords patients with epilepsy, intracranial neoplasia, and vascular malformations an opportunity for a sensitive and accurate non-invasive preoperative evaluation. This technique can optimize selection of surgical candidates as well as increase confidence in preoperative counseling and prognosis. Research applications that appear promising for near-future clinical translation include the evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, and schizophrenia. (orig.)

  6. A K-means multivariate approach for clustering independent components from magnetoencephalographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadone, Sara; de Pasquale, Francesco; Mantini, Dante; Della Penna, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is typically applied on functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data due to its data-driven nature. In these applications, ICA needs to be extended from single to multi-session and multi-subject studies for interpreting and assigning a statistical significance at the group level. Here a novel strategy for analyzing MEG independent components (ICs) is presented, Multivariate Algorithm for Grouping MEG Independent Components K-means based (MAGMICK). The proposed approach is able to capture spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity in MEG studies by running ICA at subject level and then clustering the ICs across sessions and subjects. Distinctive features of MAGMICK are: i) the implementation of an efficient set of "MEG fingerprints" designed to summarize properties of MEG ICs as they are built on spatial, temporal and spectral parameters; ii) the implementation of a modified version of the standard K-means procedure to improve its data-driven character. This algorithm groups the obtained ICs automatically estimating the number of clusters through an adaptive weighting of the parameters and a constraint on the ICs independence, i.e. components coming from the same session (at subject level) or subject (at group level) cannot be grouped together. The performances of MAGMICK are illustrated by analyzing two sets of MEG data obtained during a finger tapping task and median nerve stimulation. The results demonstrate that the method can extract consistent patterns of spatial topography and spectral properties across sessions and subjects that are in good agreement with the literature. In addition, these results are compared to those from a modified version of affinity propagation clustering method. The comparison, evaluated in terms of different clustering validity indices, shows that our methodology often outperforms the clustering algorithm. Eventually, these results are

  7. Modeling of the Mixed Solvent Electrolyte System CO2-Na2CO3-NaHCO3-Monoethylene Glycol-Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2009-01-01

    The extended UNIQUAC electrolyte activity coefficient model has been correlated to 751 experimental solid−liquid equilibrium (SLE), vapor−liquid equilibrium (VLE), and excess enthalpy data for the mixed solvent CO2−NaHCO3−Na2CO3−monoethylene glycol(MEG)−H2O electrolyte system. The model...... was validated by predicting the excess heat capacity. The model is consistent, and one set of binary interaction parameters are used for calculating all the properties between −50 and 90 °C. The model is compared to experimental data of infinite dilution activity coefficient measurements of MEG and may be used...

  8. Statistics, synergy, and mechanism of multiple photogeneration of excitons in quantum dots: Fundamental and applied aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksengendler, B. L.; Turaeva, N. N.; Uralov, I.; Marasulov, M. B.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of multiple exciton generation is analyzed based on statistical physics, quantum mechanics, and synergetics. Statistical problems of the effect of multiple exciton generation (MEG) are broadened and take into account not only exciton generation, but also background excitation. The study of the role of surface states of quantum dots is based on the synergy of self-catalyzed electronic reactions. An analysis of the MEG mechanism is based on the idea of electronic shaking using the sudden perturbation method in quantum mechanics. All of the above-mentioned results are applied to the problem of calculating the limiting efficiency to transform solar energy into electric energy. (authors)

  9. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  10. Magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Lurie Family Foundations MEG Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Edgar, J.C.; Gaetz, William C.; Roberts, Timothy P.L. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Lurie Family Foundations MEG Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) may not be familiar to many pediatric radiologists, it is an increasingly available neuroimaging technique both for evaluating normal and abnormal intracranial neural activity and for functional mapping. By providing spatial, temporal, and time-frequency spectral information, MEG affords patients with epilepsy, intracranial neoplasia, and vascular malformations an opportunity for a sensitive and accurate non-invasive preoperative evaluation. This technique can optimize selection of surgical candidates as well as increase confidence in preoperative counseling and prognosis. Research applications that appear promising for near-future clinical translation include the evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, and schizophrenia. (orig.)

  11. When Focal Points are Out of Focus: A Game-Theoretic Analysis of Come Dine with Me

    OpenAIRE

    David Schüller; Thorsten Upmann

    2013-01-01

    We interpret the TV-show Come Dine with Me as a simultaneous non-cooperative game with evaluation levels as strategic variables, and show that it belongs to a class of strategic games which we label mutual evaluations games (MEG). Any MEG possesses a ‘zero equilibrium’—i. e. a Nash equilibrium where all players evaluate each other with the lowest available scores — as well as numberless ‘non-zero equilibria’. Since the former is an equilibrium in weakly dominant strategies, it may...

  12. Measured Variation in performance of handheld antennas for a large number of test persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Olesen, Kim

    This work investigates the variation in the mean effective gain (MEG) for a large number of test persons in order to find how much the difference in anatomy and persons who wear glasses, etc., changes the MEG (i.e., the received signal power with respect to a reference). The evaluation was carried......” and a person present is on the average 3 dB for a directive patch antenna, 6 dB for a whip antenna and 10 dB for a helical antenna...

  13. Response Inhibition in Adults and Teenagers: Spatiotemporal Differences in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Julie; Mills, Travis; Pang, Elizabeth W.; Taylor, Margot J.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition is a core executive function reliant on the frontal lobes that shows protracted maturation through to adulthood. We investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of response inhibition during a visual go/no-go task in 14 teenagers and 14 adults using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a contrast between two no-go experimental conditions…

  14. Purification and fractional analysis of methanolic extract of Wedelia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wedelia trilobata (L.) Hitch (WT), commonly known as yellow dots or creeping daisy, is a shrub possessing potent biological activities, and is traditionally used a medicinal plant in Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani systems of medicines, and it has also been tried against leukemia cell line MEG- 01. In the present ...

  15. Symmetry considerations in the quasi-static approximation of volume conductor theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, J.C.; de Munck, J.C.; van Dijk, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    In living subjects electromagnetic signals are generated which can be measured electrically with electrodes and normal amplifiers or magnetically, by means of SQUID-magnetometers. The former technique is called EEG (electro-encephalography), the latter MEG (magneto-encephalography). Since the

  16. Bioelectromagnetic forward problem: isolated source approach revis(it)ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, M; Sarvas, J

    2012-06-07

    Electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG and MEG) are non-invasive modalities for studying the electrical activity of the brain by measuring voltages on the scalp and magnetic fields outside the head. In the forward problem of EEG and MEG, the relationship between the neural sources and resulting signals is characterized using electromagnetic field theory. This forward problem is commonly solved with the boundary-element method (BEM). The EEG forward problem is numerically challenging due to the low relative conductivity of the skull. In this work, we revise the isolated source approach (ISA) that enables the accurate, computationally efficient BEM solution of this problem. The ISA is formulated for generic basis and weight functions that enable the use of Galerkin weighting. The implementation of the ISA-formulated linear Galerkin BEM (LGISA) is first verified in spherical geometry. Then, the LGISA is compared with conventional Galerkin and symmetric BEM approaches in a realistic 3-shell EEG/MEG model. The results show that the LGISA is a state-of-the-art method for EEG/MEG forward modeling: the ISA formulation increases the accuracy and decreases the computational load. Contrary to some earlier studies, the results show that the ISA increases the accuracy also in the computation of magnetic fields.

  17. Slowing of oscillatory brain activity is a stable characteristic of Parkinson's disease without dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, D.; Bosboom, JL; Deijen, J.B.; Wolters, E.C.M.J.; Berendse, H.W.; Stam, L.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive changes in resting-state oscillatory brain activity have recently been demonstrated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in moderately advanced, non-demented Parkinson's disease patients relative to age-matched controls. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset and evolution

  18. Cortical oscillatory activity associated with the perception of illusory and real visual contours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinsey, K.; Anderson, S.J.; Hadjipapas, A.; Nevado, A.; Hillebrand, A.; Holliday, I.E.

    2009-01-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the nature of oscillatory brain rhythms when passively viewing both illusory and real visual contours. Three stimuli were employed: a Kanizsa triangle; a Kanizsa triangle with a real triangular contour superimposed; and a control figure in which the

  19. The brain’s resting state activity is shaped by synchronized cross frequency coupling of neural oscillations (Author’s Manuscript)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    uthor M anuscript A uthor M anuscript magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. International Congress Series 1300. New Frontiers in Biomagnetism . Proceedings...of the 15th International Conference on Biomagnetism ; Vancouver, BC, Canada. August 21-25, 2006; 2007. p. 615-618. Yeo BTT, Krienen FM, Sepulcre J

  20. [Biomagnetism from the neuropsychiatric viewpoint--principles of recent developments in diagnostic procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, G E; Lemke, S

    1985-04-01

    The following survey is intended to demonstrate and discuss some principle problems of biomagnetism and the application in clinical fields. The development of special technical parameters especially by the SQUID method is initiating new possibilities of research and completing the neurobiologically determinated basis and conditions of neuropsychiatric disorders. The Magnetoencephalography (MEG) will be represent an important role of a new functional diagnostic method.

  1. Microstructure and oxidation performance of a γ–γ ′ Pt-aluminide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    of γ–γ ′ bond coats to reduce rumpling, their oxidation resistance needs to improve significantly for them to be considered as an alternative to conventional β-(Ni, Pt)Al bond coats for use in TBCs. Acknowledgements. The authors acknowledge the assistance provided by the. ETC, MEG, SFAG and EMG groups of DMRL.

  2. Voluntary breath holding affects spontaneous brain activity measured by magnetoencephalography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, N. A.; Reits, D.

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity was measured by multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) during voluntary breath holds. Significant changes in the activity are limited to the alpha rhythm: 0.25 Hz frequency increase and narrowing of the peak. The area of alpha activity shifts slightly toward (fronto-)

  3. Neuromagnetic Vistas into Typical and Atypical Development of Frontal Lobe Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Margot J.; Doesburg, Sam M.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2014-01-01

    The frontal lobes are involved in many higher-order cognitive functions such as social cognition executive functions and language and speech. These functions are complex and follow a prolonged developmental course from childhood through to early adulthood. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is ideal for the study of development of these functions, due to its combination of temporal and spatial resolution which allows the determination of age-related changes in both neural timing and location. There are several challenges for MEG developmental studies: to design tasks appropriate to capture the neurodevelopmental trajectory of these cognitive functions, and to develop appropriate analysis strategies to capture various aspects of neuromagnetic frontal lobe activity. Here, we review our MEG research on social and executive functions, and speech in typically developing children and in two clinical groups – children with autism spectrum disorder and children born very preterm. The studies include facial emotional processing, inhibition, visual short-term memory, speech production, and resting-state networks. We present data from event-related analyses as well as on oscillations and connectivity analyses and review their contributions to understanding frontal lobe cognitive development. We also discuss the challenges of testing young children in the MEG and the development of age-appropriate technologies and paradigms. PMID:24994980

  4. Conceptual process design and economic analysis of a process based on liquid-liquid extraction for the recovery of glycols from aqueous streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Chavez, L.Y.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of monoethylene glycol (MEG) and 1,2-propylene glycol (PG) from aqueous streams via liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) using a tailor-made ionic liquid [TOA MNaph] is evaluated as an alternative technology to conventional triple effect evaporation of water. In this paper, the conceptual

  5. Cross-Modal Interactions during Perception of Audiovisual Speech and Nonspeech Signals: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertrich, Ingo; Dietrich, Susanne; Ackermann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    During speech communication, visual information may interact with the auditory system at various processing stages. Most noteworthy, recent magnetoencephalography (MEG) data provided first evidence for early and preattentive phonetic/phonological encoding of the visual data stream--prior to its fusion with auditory phonological features [Hertrich,…

  6. Generating Clients and Referral Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Martha; Price, Meg; Becht, Monika

    1997-01-01

    Includes three theme articles: "Visibility, Connectedness, and Collaboration: Keys to Marketing a Private Practice" (Martha Russell); "If You Build It (and Publicize It) They Will Come: An Overview of Private Practice Marketing Strategies" (Meg Price); and "The Art of Networking in Private Practice" (Monika Becht). (SK)

  7. Using Young Adult Literature to Provide Case Studies for Discussion of Bullying: An Analysis of the 2014 Pura Belpré Award Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing Meg Medina's young adult novel "Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass" (2013) through the lens of multidisciplinary research on school bullying provides a case study in using young adult literature (YAL) to stimulate high school discussions about bullying. Strategies for using anti-bullying YAL and recommendations of additional…

  8. The necessity for a time local dimension in systems with time-varying attractors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Særmark, Knud H; Ashkenazy, Y; Levitan, J

    1997-01-01

    We show that a simple non-linear system for ordinary differential equations may possess a time-varying attractor dimension. This indicates that it is infeasible to characterize EEG and MEG time series with a single time global dimension. We suggest another measure for the description of non...

  9. Herpetologist Transports Third-Graders to Frogland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Catherine E.; Cook, Helen M.

    2004-01-01

    A partnership between a university and a science and technology magnet school brings a renowned herpetologist. Dr. Meg Stewart, to involve third-graders in her studies of coqui frogs. These students prepared to meet this scientist with a series of lesson plans (eight activities and four lab lessons) to learn the anatomy, behavior, and diversity of…

  10. Two DNA glycosylases in Esherichia coli which release primarily 3-methyladenine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.; Yang, C.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two enzymes have been partially purified from Escherichia coli and designated 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases I and II. The apparent molecular weight of glycosylase I is 20,000, and that of II is 27,000. Glycosylase I releases 3-methyladenine (3-MeA) while II releases 3-MeA, 3-methylguanine (3-MeG), 7-methylguanine (7-MeG), and 7-methyladenine (7-MeA). The rate of release of 3-MeA by glycosylase II is 30 times that of 7-MeG. Glycosylase I is missing in mutants tag 1 and tag 2. In crude extracts, the 3-MeA activity of II is approximately 10% of the total 3-MeA activity. A 50% inactivation at 48 0 C required 5 min for I and 65 min for II. The 3-MeA and 7-MeG activities of the glycosylase II preparation could not be separated by isoelectric focusing, by chromatography of DEAE, Sephadex G-100, phosphocellulose, DNA-cellulose, or carboxymethylcellulose, or by heating at 50 0 C

  11. Making through the Lens of Culture and Power: Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughi, Shirin; Hooper, Paula K.; Escudé, Meg

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Shirin Vossoughi, Paula Hooper, and Meg Escudé advance a critique of branded, culturally normative definitions of making and caution against their uncritical adoption into the educational sphere. The authors argue that the ways making and equity are conceptualized can either restrict or expand the possibility that the growing maker…

  12. Development and Evaluation of Coatings from Cactus opuntia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two different coatings were developed from the mucilage of Cactus and their effects were investigated on the quality and storability of mango fruits. The two experimental coatings were: Pure mucilage extracts (ME) and Mucilage extract mixed with 5ml glycerol (MEG) which served as plasticizer. The following parameters ...

  13. An Effective Way to Improve Mathematics Achievement in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taik

    2010-01-01

    The local Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEARUP) partnership serves 11 K-8 schools with the lowest achievement scores and the highest poverty rates in a large Midwestern urban district. Recently, GEARUP launched a specially designed teaching program, Mathematics Enhancement Group (MEG), for underachievers in…

  14. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder through Brain Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    inhibition and attentional control. Neuroimage, 50(3), 1313–1319. Haxby, James V, Hoffman , Elizabeth A, & Gobbini, M Ida. 2000. The distributed hu– man...Gjedde, Albert . 1998. Origin of human motor readiness field linked to left middle frontal gyrus by MEG and PET. Neuroimage, 8(2), 214–220. Pedregosa, F

  15. Detecting Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Resting State Magnetoencephalographic Connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily A Vakorin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate means to detect mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI using objective and quantitative measures remain elusive. Conventional imaging typically detects no abnormalities despite post-concussive symptoms. In the present study, we recorded resting state magnetoencephalograms (MEG from adults with mTBI and controls. Atlas-guided reconstruction of resting state activity was performed for 90 cortical and subcortical regions, and calculation of inter-regional oscillatory phase synchrony at various frequencies was performed. We demonstrate that mTBI is associated with reduced network connectivity in the delta and gamma frequency range (>30 Hz, together with increased connectivity in the slower alpha band (8-12 Hz. A similar temporal pattern was associated with correlations between network connectivity and the length of time between the injury and the MEG scan. Using such resting state MEG network synchrony we were able to detect mTBI with 88% accuracy. Classification confidence was also correlated with clinical symptom severity scores. These results provide the first evidence that imaging of MEG network connectivity, in combination with machine learning, has the potential to accurately detect and determine the severity of mTBI.

  16. Magnetic source localization of early visual mismatch response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susac, A.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Huonker, R.; Supek, S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported a visual analogue of the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) response that is based on sensory memory. The neural generators and attention dependence of the visual MMN (vMMN) still remain unclear. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) and spatio-temporal source

  17. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Action Observation in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji-Babul, Naznin; Moiseev, Alexander; Cheung, Teresa; Weeks, Daniel J.; Cheyne, Douglas; Ribary, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Results of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain imaging study conducted to examine the cortical responses during action execution and action observation in 10 healthy adults and 8 age-matched adults with Down syndrome are reported. During execution, the motor responses were strongly lateralized on the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral side…

  18. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain : MRI of the brain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electroencephalography (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET),. fMRI, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Electrophysiological methods, such as EEG and magneto encephalography (MEG), are based on the direct mapping of transient brain electrical (or the associated magnetic) dipoles generated by neuronal ...

  19. Polar motion as boundary condition in an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the determination of period and damping of the Chandler oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, F.; Kirschner, S.; Neubersch, D.

    2012-12-01

    Earth rotation has been monitored using space geodetic techniques since many decades. The geophysical interpretation of observed time series of Earth rotation parameters (ERP) polar motion and length-of-day is commonly based on numerical models that describe and balance variations of angular momentum in various subsystems of the Earth. Naturally, models are dependent on geometrical, rheological and physical parameters. Many of these are weakly determined from other models or observations. In our study we present an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the improvement of parameters of the dynamic Earth system model DyMEG which acts as a simulator of ERP. In particular we focus on the improvement of the pole tide Love number k2. In the frame of a sensitivity analysis k2 has been identified as one of the most crucial parameters of DyMEG since it directly influences the modeled Chandler oscillation. At the same time k2 is one of the most uncertain parameters in the model. Our simulations with DyMEG cover a period of 60 years after which a steady state of k2 is reached. The estimate for k2, accounting for the anelastic response of the Earth's mantle and the ocean, is 0.3531 + 0.0030i. We demonstrate that the application of the improved parameter k2 in DyMEG leads to significantly better results for polar motion than the original value taken from the Conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS).

  20. The Anterior Midline Field: Coercion or Decision Making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkkanen, Liina; Martin, Andrea E.; McElree, Brian; Smart, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    To study the neural bases of semantic composition in language processing without confounds from syntactic composition, recent magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies have investigated the processing of constructions that exhibit some type of syntax-semantics mismatch. The most studied case of such a mismatch is "complement coercion;" expressions such…

  1. Developers@CERN Forums: It is about U and I

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    No, this is not the title of latest film of Meg Ryan, this is the third edition of the Developers@CERN forum! So If you want to here about the latest cutting edge technologies and techniques on User Interfaces this is your place. Be prepared for a good dose of discussions, code and a lot of fun!

  2. Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium data for mono ethylene glycol extraction from water with the new ionic liquid tetraoctyl ammonium 2-methyl-1-naphtoate as solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Chavez, L.Y.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal recovery of mono ethylene glycol (MEG) from aqueous streams is one of the most energy demanding operations in industry, because of the large amount of water that needs to be evaporated. The use of alternative technologies such as liquid–liquid extraction could save energy. A new tailor made

  3. Hearing and seeing meaning in noise. Alpha, beta and gamma oscillations predict gestural enhancement of degraded speech comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijvers, L.; Özyürek, A.; Jensen, O.

    2018-01-01

    During face-to-face communication, listeners integrate speech with gestures. The semantic information conveyed by iconic gestures (e.g., a drinking gesture) can aid speech comprehension in adverse listening conditions. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we investigated the spatiotemporal

  4. One Year of Musical Training Affects Development of Auditory Cortical-Evoked Fields in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2006-01-01

    Auditory evoked responses to a violin tone and a noise-burst stimulus were recorded from 4- to 6-year-old children in four repeated measurements over a 1-year period using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Half of the subjects participated in musical lessons throughout the year; the other half had no music lessons. Auditory evoked magnetic fields…

  5. Experimental study and phase equilibrium modeling of systems containing acid gas and glycol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Waheed; Breil, Martin P.; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study phase equilibria of systems containing acid gases and glycols. The acid gases include carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon dioxide (CO2) while glycols include monoethylene glycol (MEG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and triethylene glycol (TEG). A brief lit...

  6. 78 FR 47320 - Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ..., Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Meg Watson, Epidemiologist, Epidemiology and Applied... approximately 8,500 deaths from melanoma. Melanoma, which causes more deaths than other types of skin cancer, is...

  7. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escudero, Javier; Evrim, Acar Ataman; Fernández, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    dynamics. We consider the "refined composite multiscale entropy" (rcMSE), which computes entropy "profiles" showing levels of physiological complexity over temporal scales for individual signals. We compute the rcMSE of resting-state magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings from 36 patients with Alzheimer...

  8. Comparison of herpes simplex (HSV) proteins synthesized in Vero, HEP-2 and human megakaryocyte-like cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soslau, G.; Pastorino, M.B.; Morgan, D.A.; Brodsky, I.; Howett, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The natural human host blood cell capable of supporting herpes virus replication has yet to be defined. They found that a recently cultured human megakaryocyte-like (Meg) cell line can support HSV 1 and 2 replication as demonstrated by growth inhibition, CPE, virus production and HSV DNA synthesis. The HSV proteins synthesized and post-translationally modified in Vero and HEp-2 infected cells were compared to the protein species produced in the infected Meg cell since differences may influence antigenic properties and host range. Host cell protein synthesis was greatly reduced in all three cell lines within hours post infection (pi). However, maximum viral protein synthesis occurs between 4 and 24 hrs pi with the Meg cells as compared to 24-48 hrs pi with the other cell lines. The immunoprecipitated 35 S-methionine labeled HSV protein gel patterns for each infected cell line are qualitatively and quantitatively very different from each other. Dramatic differences were also observed when infected cells were labeled with 32 P-ATP (in vitro method) or 32 Pi (in vivo method). Finally, analysis of 3 H-mannose labeled HSV glycoproteins demonstrates that the post-translational modifications of these proteins are significantly altered in the Meg cell as compared to the Vero and HEp-2 cells

  9. Choice of Magnetometers and Gradiometers after Signal Space Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Pilar; López-Sanz, David; Maestú, Fernando; Pereda, Ernesto

    2017-12-16

    Modern Elekta Neuromag MEG devices include 102 sensor triplets containing one magnetometer and two planar gradiometers. The first processing step is often a signal space separation (SSS), which provides a powerful noise reduction. A question commonly raised by researchers and reviewers relates to which data should be employed in analyses: (1) magnetometers only, (2) gradiometers only, (3) magnetometers and gradiometers together. The MEG community is currently divided with regard to the proper answer. First, we provide theoretical evidence that both gradiometers and magnetometers result from the backprojection of the same SSS components. Then, we compare resting state and task-related sensor and source estimations from magnetometers and gradiometers in real MEG recordings before and after SSS. SSS introduced a strong increase in the similarity between source time series derived from magnetometers and gradiometers (r² = 0.3-0.8 before SSS and r² > 0.80 after SSS). After SSS, resting state power spectrum and functional connectivity, as well as visual evoked responses, derived from both magnetometers and gradiometers were highly similar (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient > 0.8, r² > 0.8). After SSS, magnetometer and gradiometer data are estimated from a single set of SSS components (usually ≤ 80). Equivalent results can be obtained with both sensor types in typical MEG experiments.

  10. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; Dijk, van B.; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain

  11. Assessing pediatric ileocolonic Crohn's disease activity based on global MR enterography scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerri, Fabio; Zuliani, Monica; Giorgi, Benedetta; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Al Bunni, Faise [Rovigo Hospital, Radiology Unit, S. Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo (Italy); Guariso, Graziella; Gasparetto, Marco; Cananzi, Mara [University of Padova, Department of Women and Child Health, Padova (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    This study was aimed at correlating a magnetic resonance index of activity (MaRIA) and a magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) with activity indexes in a paediatric population with Crohn's disease (CD). This retrospective study included 32 paediatric patients (median age 14.5 years, 18 male) with proven CD who underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE). A correlation analysis was performed on the MRE-based scores, the simplified endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD), the paediatric Crohn's disease activity index (PCDAI), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Based on PCDAI, comparison of both global MaRIA and MEGS was made between patients with mild and moderate/severe disease activity. Global MaRIA correlated with SES-CD (r = 0.70, p = 0.001) and PCDAI (r = 0.42, p = 0.016). MEGS correlated with PCDAI (r = 0.46, p = 0.007) and CRP levels (r = 0.35, p = 0.046). MEGS differed significantly (p = 0.027) between patients grouped by clinical disease severity. MRE-based global scores correlated with clinical indexes of CD activity. Therefore, they represent a potential useful tool to predict CD activity and severity, as well as a possible promising alternative to endoscopy, to monitor paediatric patients with CD during their follow-up. (orig.)

  12. Early, Equivalent ERP Masked Priming Effects for Regular and Irregular Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joanna; Stockall, Linnaea

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from behavioral masked priming (Rastle & Davis, 2008), EEG masked priming (Morris, Frank, Grainger, & Holcomb, 2007) and single word MEG (Zweig & Pylkkanen, 2008) experiments has provided robust support for a model of lexical processing which includes an early, automatic, visual word form based stage of morphological parsing…

  13. Students in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insights on Law & Society, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes three articles that focus on people affected by immigration: (1) "Locked Up Tight" (Margaret Graham Tebo); (2) "Asylum May Be a Matter of Life and Death" (Mary Meg McCarthy); and (3) "The Next Gideon?" (Siobhan Morrissey). Includes adult detainees, asylum seekers, and refugee minors. (CMK)

  14. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-10

    Nov 10, 2012 ... driving motivation for the widespread expectation of TeV-scale new physics. Such new physics is in reach for discovery at the LHC which sets the current experimental .... The 2010 data did not reproduce the 2009 excess of signal-like events. MEG quotes the combined 90% CL upper limit [15]. B(μ+ → e.

  15. Multiple Exciton Generation in Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semonin, O. E.

    Photovoltaics are limited in their power conversion efficiency (PCE) by very rapid relaxation of energetic carriers to the band edge. Therefore, photons from the visible and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum typically are not efficiently converted into electrical energy. One approach that can address this is multiple exciton generation (MEG), where a single photon of sufficient energy can generate multiple excited electron-hole pairs. This process has been shown to be more efficient in quantum dots than bulk semiconductors, but it has never been demonstrated in the photocurrent of a solar cell. In order to demonstrate that multiple exciton generation can address fundamental limits for conventional photovoltaics, I have developed prototype devices from colloidal PbS and PbSe quantum dot inks. I have characterized both the colloidal suspensions and films of quantum dots with the goal of understanding what properties determine the efficiency of the solar cell and of the MEG process. I have found surface chemistry effects on solar cells, photoluminescence, and MEG, and I have found some chemical treatments that lead to solar cells showing MEG. These devices show external quantum efficiency (EQE) greater than 100% for certain parts of the solar spectrum, and I extract internal quantum efficiency (IQE) consistent with previous measurements of colloidal suspensions of quantum dots. These findings are a small first step toward breaking the single junction Shockley-Queisser limit of present-day first and second generation solar cells, thus moving photovoltaic cells toward a new regime of efficiency.

  16. How Often to Get a Pap Test (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-10

    Cervical cancer has declined in the U.S., and the decline is largely due to Pap testing and follow-up. Screening recommendations have changed. In this podcast, Meg Watson discusses Pap testing.  Created: 1/10/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/10/2013.

  17. Annotation: What Electrical Brain Activity Tells Us about Brain Function that Other Techniques Cannot Tell Us--A Child Psychiatric Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Monitoring brain processes in real time requires genuine subsecond resolution to follow the typical timing and frequency of neural events. Non-invasive recordings of electric (EEG/ERP) and magnetic (MEG) fields provide this time resolution. They directly measure neural activations associated with a wide variety of brain states and…

  18. Prestimulus alpha and mu activity predicts failure to inhibit motor responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazaheri, A.; Nieuwenhuis, I.L.C.; Dijk, H.P. van; Jensen, O.

    2009-01-01

    Do certain brain states predispose humans to commit errors in monotonous tasks? We used MEG to investigate how oscillatory brain activity indexes the brain state in subjects performing a Go-noGo task. Elevated occipital alpha and sensorimotor mu activity just prior to the presentation of the stimuli

  19. Effects of sleep deprivation on event-related fields and alpha activity during rhythmic force production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of sleep deprivation (SD) on event-related fields and the distribution of power over the scalp of MEG imaged brain activity was studied during acoustically paced rhythmic force production. At the behavioral level, SD resulted in a reduction of the lag (negative asynchrony) between

  20. The gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) in the gas-liquid Multi-stage Agitated Contactor (MAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breman, B.B; Beenackers, A.A C M; Bouma, M.J; VanderWerf, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Data on the volumetric liquid-side gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient, k(L)a, in a Multi-stage Agitated Contractor (MAC) are reported for three gas-liquid systems (air-water, helium-n-octane, and air-Monoethylene Glycol (MEG)). k(L)a (s(-1)) was determined using a dynamic method with moderately

  1. Naised, kes teevad suurt raha / Katrin Kapara

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kapara, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Maailma rikkaimate inimeste edetabelit koostava ajakirja Forbes nimestikus oli tänavu 99 naist. Liliane Bettencourt - kosmeetikaimpeeriumi LþOreal pärija, Zhang Xin - firma SOHO China omanik, Cristina Green - jaekaubanduskettide omanik, Jelena Baturina - Vene ärinaine, Meg Whitman - eBay käivitaja, Oprah Winfrey - Ameerika telesaatejuht

  2. Expression and imprinting of DIO3 and DIO3OS genes in Holstein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WENZHI YANG

    D. L. 2004 Complex organization and structure of sense and antisense transcripts expressed from theDIO3imprinted locus. Genomics 83, 413–424. Hou X. H., Li D. J., Su H., Hu J. Q., Li N. and Li S. J. 2011 Molec- ular cloning, expression, and imprinting status of maternally expressed gene 8 (MEG8) in dairy cattle. Russ.

  3. Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    expression in human neuroblastoma: up- regulation by hypoxia. Int J Cancer, 1999. 81(1): p. 113-7. 4. Yang, Q.W., et al., Methylation -associated silencing...64. 11. Martin, L., et al., Recognition of O6MeG lesions by MGMT and mismatch repair proficiency may be a prerequisite for low-dose radiation

  4. Liquid-liquid equilibria for glycols plus hydrocarbons: Data and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derawi, Samer; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium data for seven binary glycol-hydrocarbon systems have been measured in the temperature range 32 degreesC to 80 degreesC and at the pressure 1 bar. The measured systems are monoethylene glycol (MEG) + heptane, methyleyclohexane (MCH) + hexane, propylene glycol (PG...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second ... Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov The National ...

  6. Synthesis and Conductivity Mapping of SnS Quantum Dots for Photovoltaic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prastani, C; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Quantumdots (QDs) are considered a possible solution to overcome the Shockley–Queisser efficiency limit of 31% for single junction solar cells by efficiently absorbing above band gap energy photons through Multiple Exciton Generation (MEG) or sub band gap energy photons using an Intermediate Band

  7. FIRST DIGIT DISTRIBUTION IN SOME BIOLOGICAL DATA SETS. POSSIBLE EXPLANATIONS FOR DEPARTURES FROM BENFORD'S LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Hernández Cáceres

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore whether the first digit law (FDL is abided by data sets from biological origin.Materials and Methods: Data were collected from different sources, including gene data length for bacteria, pre-vaccination measles incidence data and absolute values from human MEG recordings. First digit frequencies were computed and compared to predictions from FDL. Simulations included a simple model for two-dimensional epidemics spread and a randomly set upper bound model aimed to explain the behaviour of MEG data.Results: We observed that FDL is obeyed in a case of epidemic data reported at a putative focus of spread (pre-vaccination measles incidence for Preston, England. However, peculiar departures were observed for gene length distribution in microorganisms, magneto-encephalograms (MEG, and epidemic data pooled from large geographical regions.Conclusions: Simulation studies revealed that averaging data on a scenario of propagating waves can explain some of the observed distortions from FDL. This could help to understand the behaviour of epidemics data. A randomly set upper bound model (RUBM can likely explain the observed behaviour of MEG data. Explanation for gene length data behaviour requires further theoretical work.

  8. Application of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with widespread spike or slow-wave activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Hideaki; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Takano, Kyoko; Okajima, Maki; Knake, Susanne; Hatanaka, Keisaku; Kohsaka, Shinobu; Saitoh, Shinji; Dale, Anders M; Halgren, Eric

    2005-08-01

    To examine whether magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be used to determine patterns of brain activity underlying widespread paroxysms of epilepsy patients, thereby extending the applicability of MEG to a larger population of epilepsy patients. We studied two children with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. Case 1 had widespread spikes in EEG with an operation scar from a resection of a brain tumor; Case 2 had hemispheric slow-wave activity in EEG with sensory auras. MEG was collected with a 204-channel helmet-shaped sensor array. Dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs) were constructed to estimate the cortical distribution of interictal discharges for these patients. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) also were calculated for comparison with the results of dSPM. In case 1 with widespread spikes, dSPM presented the major activity at the vicinity of the operation scar in the left frontal lobe at the peak of the spikes, and some activities were detected in the left temporal lobe just before the peak in some spikes. In case 2 with hemispheric slow waves, the most active area was located in the left parietal lobe, and additional activity was seen at the ipsilateral temporal and frontal lobes in dSPM. The source estimates correlated well with the ictal manifestation and interictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings for this patient. In comparison with the results of ECDs, ECDs could not express a prior activity at the left temporal lobe in case 1 and did not model well the MEG data in case 2. We suggest that by means of dSPM, MEG is useful for presurgical evaluation of patients, not only with localized epileptiform activity, but also with widespread spikes or slow waves, because it requires no selections of channels and no time-point selection.

  9. Reorganization of the somatosensory cortex in hemiplegic cerebral palsy associated with impaired sensory tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Papadelis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies argue that sensory deficits in hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP are related to deviant somatosensory processing in the ipsilesional primary somatosensory cortex (S1. A separate body of structural neuroimaging literature argues that these deficits are due to structural damage of the ascending sensory tracts (AST. The relationship between the functional and structural integrity of the somatosensory system and the sensory performance is largely unknown in HCP. To address this relationship, we combined findings from magnetoencephalography (MEG and probabilistic diffusion tractography (PDT in 10 children with HCP and 13 typically developing (TD children. With MEG, we mapped the functionally active regions in the contralateral S1 during tactile stimulation of the thumb, middle, and little fingers of both hands. Using these MEG-defined functional active regions as regions of interest for PDT, we estimated the diffusion parameters of the AST. Somatosensory function was assessed via two-point discrimination tests. Our MEG data showed: (i an abnormal somatotopic organization in all children with HCP in either one or both of their hemispheres; (ii longer Euclidean distances between the digit maps in the S1 of children with HCP compared to TD children; (iii suppressed gamma responses at early latencies for both hemispheres of children with HCP; and (iv a positive correlation between the Euclidean distances and the sensory tests for the more affected hemisphere of children with HCP. Our MEG-guided PDT data showed: (i higher mean and radian diffusivity of the AST in children with HCP; (ii a positive correlation between the axial diffusivity of the AST with the sensory tests for the more affected hemisphere; and (iii a negative correlation between the gamma power change and the AD of the AST for the MA hemisphere. Our findings associate for the first time bilateral cortical functional reorganization in the S1 of HCP children with

  10. Reliability for non-invasive somatosensory cortex localization: Implications for pre-surgical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jack; Boe, Shaun; Bardouille, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    In patients with epilepsy or space occupying tumors in cortical regions, surgical resection is often considered as the primary treatment. Pre-surgical neuroimaging can provide a detailed map of pathological and functional cortex, leading to safer surgery. Mapping can be achieved non-invasively using magnetoencephalography (MEG), and is concordant with invasive findings. However, the reliability of MEG mapping between sessions is not well established. The inter-session reliability is an important property in pre-surgical mapping to establish resection margins, but repeated scans are impracticable. The present study sought to quantify the intersession reliability of MEG localization of somatosensory cortex (S1). Eighteen healthy individuals underwent MEG sessions on 3 consecutive days. Five participants were excluded due to technical issues during one of the three days. Each session included clinical-style S1 localization using electrical stimuli to each median nerve at sub-motor thresholds. The 35 ms peak of the somatosensory evoked field was used for localizing S1 in each session using a single equivalent current dipole model. Intersession reliability was quantified using two methods. Average Euclidean Distance (AED) quantified the difference in localization between each session and the inter-session mean localization. Session Euclidean Distance (SED) quantified the difference in localization between each pair of sessions. Results showed the AED was 4.8 ± 1.9 mm, whereas the SED was 8.3 ± 3.4mm. While the AED values obtained parallel those reported previously in smaller samples, the SED values were substantially larger. Clinicians should consider up to an 8mm confidence interval around the estimated location of S1 based on MEG pre-surgical mapping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reorganization of the somatosensory cortex in hemiplegic cerebral palsy associated with impaired sensory tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Butler, Erin E; Rubenstein, Madelyn; Sun, Limin; Zollei, Lilla; Nimec, Donna; Snyder, Brian; Grant, Patricia Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies argue that sensory deficits in hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) are related to deviant somatosensory processing in the ipsilesional primary somatosensory cortex (S1). A separate body of structural neuroimaging literature argues that these deficits are due to structural damage of the ascending sensory tracts (AST). The relationship between the functional and structural integrity of the somatosensory system and the sensory performance is largely unknown in HCP. To address this relationship, we combined findings from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and probabilistic diffusion tractography (PDT) in 10 children with HCP and 13 typically developing (TD) children. With MEG, we mapped the functionally active regions in the contralateral S1 during tactile stimulation of the thumb, middle, and little fingers of both hands. Using these MEG-defined functional active regions as regions of interest for PDT, we estimated the diffusion parameters of the AST. Somatosensory function was assessed via two-point discrimination tests. Our MEG data showed: (i) an abnormal somatotopic organization in all children with HCP in either one or both of their hemispheres; (ii) longer Euclidean distances between the digit maps in the S1 of children with HCP compared to TD children; (iii) suppressed gamma responses at early latencies for both hemispheres of children with HCP; and (iv) a positive correlation between the Euclidean distances and the sensory tests for the more affected hemisphere of children with HCP. Our MEG-guided PDT data showed: (i) higher mean and radian diffusivity of the AST in children with HCP; (ii) a positive correlation between the axial diffusivity of the AST with the sensory tests for the more affected hemisphere; and (iii) a negative correlation between the gamma power change and the AD of the AST for the MA hemisphere. Our findings associate for the first time bilateral cortical functional reorganization in the S1 of HCP children with

  12. Magnetoencephalography recording and analysis

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    Jayabal Velmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG non-invasively measures the magnetic field generated due to the excitatory postsynaptic electrical activity of the apical dendritic pyramidal cells. Such a tiny magnetic field is measured with the help of the biomagnetometer sensors coupled with the Super Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID inside the magnetically shielded room (MSR. The subjects are usually screened for the presence of ferromagnetic materials, and then the head position indicator coils, electroencephalography (EEG electrodes (if measured simultaneously, and fiducials are digitized using a 3D digitizer, which aids in movement correction and also in transferring the MEG data from the head coordinates to the device and voxel coordinates, thereby enabling more accurate co-registration and localization. MEG data pre-processing involves filtering the data for environmental and subject interferences, artefact identification, and rejection. Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI is processed for correction and identifying fiducials. After choosing and computing for the appropriate head models (spherical or realistic; boundary/finite element model, the interictal/ictal epileptiform discharges are selected and modeled by an appropriate source modeling technique (clinically and commonly used - single equivalent current dipole - ECD model. The equivalent current dipole (ECD source localization of the modeled interictal epileptiform discharge (IED is considered physiologically valid or acceptable based on waveform morphology, isofield pattern, and dipole parameters (localization, dipole moment, confidence volume, goodness of fit. Thus, MEG source localization can aid clinicians in sublobar localization, lateralization, and grid placement, by evoking the irritative/seizure onset zone. It also accurately localizes the eloquent cortex-like visual, language areas. MEG also aids in diagnosing and delineating multiple novel findings in other neuropsychiatric

  13. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

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    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  14. The Schistosome Oesophageal Gland: Initiator of Blood Processing

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    Li, Xiao-Hong; de Castro-Borges, William; Parker-Manuel, Sophie; Vance, Gillian M.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Neves, Leandro X.; Evans, Gareth J. O.; Wilson, R. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the ultrastructure of the schistosome esophageal gland was described >35 years ago, its role in the processing of ingested blood has never been established. The current study was prompted by our identification of MEG-4.1 expression in the gland and the observation of erythrocyte uncoating in the posterior esophagus. Methodology/Principal Findings The salient feature of the posterior esophagus, characterized by confocal and electron microscopy, is the enormous increase in membrane surface area provided by the plate-like extensions and basal invaginations of the lining syncytium, with unique crystalloid vesicles releasing their contents between the plates. The feeding process was shown by video microscopy to be divided into two phases, blood first accumulating in the anterior lumen before passing as a bolus to the posterior. There it streamed around a plug of material revealed by confocal microscopy as tethered leucocytes. These were present in far larger numbers than predicted from the volume of the lumen, and in varying states of damage and destruction. Intact erythrocytes were detected in the anterior esophagus but not observed thereafter, implying that their lysis occurred rapidly as they enter the posterior. Two further genes, MEGs 4.2 and 14, were shown to be expressed exclusively in the esophageal gland. Bioinformatics predicted that MEGs 4.1 and 4.2 possessed a common hydrophobic region with a shared motif, while antibodies to SjMEG-4.1 showed it was bound to leucocytes in the esophageal lumen. It was also predicted that MEGs 4.1 and 14 were heavily O-glycosylated and this was confirmed for the former by 2D-electrophoresis and Western blotting. Conclusions/Significance The esophageal gland and its products play a central role in the processing of ingested blood. The binding of host antibodies in the esophageal lumen shows that some constituents are antibody targets and could provide a new source of vaccine candidates. PMID:23936568

  15. High-resolution analysis of parent-of-origin allelic expression in the Arabidopsis Endosperm.

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    Philip Wolff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon leading to parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has mainly been observed in the endosperm, an ephemeral triploid tissue derived after fertilization of the diploid central cell with a haploid sperm cell. In an effort to identify novel imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived after reciprocal crosses of Arabidopsis Col-0 and Bur-0 accessions. Using polymorphic sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we could identify more than 60 genes with potential parent-of-origin specific expression. By analyzing the distribution of DNA methylation and epigenetic marks established by Polycomb group (PcG proteins using publicly available datasets, we suggest that for maternally expressed genes (MEGs repression of the paternally inherited alleles largely depends on DNA methylation or PcG-mediated repression, whereas repression of the maternal alleles of paternally expressed genes (PEGs predominantly depends on PcG proteins. While maternal alleles of MEGs are also targeted by PcG proteins, such targeting does not cause complete repression. Candidate MEGs and PEGs are enriched for cis-proximal transposons, suggesting that transposons might be a driving force for the evolution of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis. In addition, we find that MEGs and PEGs are significantly faster evolving when compared to other genes in the genome. In contrast to the predominant location of mammalian imprinted genes in clusters, cluster formation was only detected for few MEGs and PEGs, suggesting that clustering is not a major requirement for imprinted gene regulation in Arabidopsis.

  16. Behavior pattern of beef heifers supplemented with different energy sources on oat and ryegrass pasture

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    Luiz Angelo Damian Pizzuti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate behavior patterns of heifers grazing on black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., fed supplementation with brown rice meal and/or protected fat. A total of 28 Charolais × Nellore crossbred heifers at average initial age of 18 months and with initial live weight of 274.9±4.97 kg were used in the experiment. Animals were kept in oat + ryegrass pastures and distributed in the following treatments: no supplementation; Megalac (MEG: protected fat supplementation; supplementation with brown rice meal (BRM; and supplementation with BRM + MEG. The neutral detergent fiber (NDF intake of pasture either in kg or in percentage of live weight was not changed by supply of supplement, but increased linearly (0.045 kg per day over grazing periods. Supplementation with BRM and BRM + MEG reduced grazing time, 49.63%, in relation to non-supplemented animals and animals supplemented with MEG, 63.13%. Feeding seasons per minute increased over the experimental period with reduction in time spent in each feeding station. The number of bites per feeding station decreased linearly, with a variation of 34.48% in the late grazing period. Heifers supplemented with BRM and BRM + MEG require less time for grazing and increase their idle time, with no modification in displacement patterns within the paddocks and pasture ingestion. Grazing and idle time does not change in the distinct periods of pasture use, but rumination time increases with days of pasture use and with increase in NDF intake.

  17. Effect of Field Spread on Resting-State Magneto Encephalography Functional Network Analysis: A Computational Modeling Study.

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    Silva Pereira, Silvana; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mühlberg, Stefanie; Maris, Eric; van Ede, Freek; Griffa, Alessandra; Hagmann, Patric; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-11-01

    A popular way to analyze resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and magneto encephalography (MEG) data is to treat them as a functional network in which sensors are identified with nodes and the interaction between channel time series and the network connections. Although conceptually appealing, the network-theoretical approach to sensor-level