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Sample records for meets pyrosequencing sampling

  1. Utilizing pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR to characterize fungal populations among house dust samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnenmann, Matthew W; Coronado, Gloria; Thompson, Beti; Griffith, William C; Hanson, John Delton; Vesper, Stephen; Faustman, Elaine M

    2012-08-01

    Molecular techniques are an alternative to culturing and counting methods in quantifying indoor fungal contamination. Pyrosequencing offers the possibility of identifying unexpected indoor fungi. In this study, 50 house dust samples were collected from homes in the Yakima Valley, WA. Each sample was analyzed by quantitative PCR (QPCR) for 36 common fungi and by fungal tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) for these and additional fungi. Only 24 of the samples yielded amplified results using fTEFAP but QPCR successfully amplified all 50 samples. Over 450 fungal species were detected by fTEFAP but most were rare. Twenty-two fungi were found by fTEFAP to occur with at least an average of ≥0.5% relative occurrence. Many of these fungi seem to be associated with plants, soil or human skin. Combining fTEFAP and QPCR can enhance studies of fungal contamination in homes.

  2. Pyrosequencing of environmental soil samples reveals biodiversity of the Phytophthora resident community in chestnut forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Andrea; Bruni, Natalia; Tomassini, Alessia; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    Pyrosequencing analysis was performed on soils from Italian chestnut groves to evaluate the diversity of the resident Phytophthora community. Sequences analysed with a custom database discriminated 15 pathogenic Phytophthoras including species common to chestnut soils, while a total of nine species were detected with baiting. The two sites studied differed in Phytophthora diversity and the presence of specific taxa responded to specific ecological traits of the sites. Furthermore, some species not previously recorded were represented by a discrete number of reads; among these species, Phytophthora ramorum was detected at both sites. Pyrosequencing was demonstrated to be a very sensitive technique to describe the Phytophthora community in soil and was able to detect species not easy to be isolated from soil with standard baiting techniques. In particular, pyrosequencing is an highly efficient tool for investigating the colonization of new environments by alien species, and for ecological and adaptive studies coupled with biological detection methods. This study represents the first application of pyrosequencing for describing Phytophthoras in environmental soil samples. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Cryogenically Ground Samples from Primary and Secondary/Persistent Endodontic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Demiryürek, Ebru Özsezer; Onuk, Ertan Emek

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize the microbial communities of primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections using high-throughput pyrosequencing from the pulverized samples. The roots of 20 extracted human teeth with primary endodontic infection and 20 teeth with secondary/persistent endodontic infection were collected. The outer surfaces of the roots were disinfected, and whole roots were cryopulverized. 16S amplicon pyrosequencing data from the DNA extracted from the pulverized root powders were obtained, and microorganism abundance and diversity were calculated. Data were analyzed using statistical and bioinformatic methods. Pyrosequencing analysis resulted a total of 2,606,128 sequences from 40 samples. A total of 15 phyla, 160 genera, and 368 species were detected. No significant difference between primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections was found regarding the diversity and richness of operational taxonomic units at the phyla, genera, and species levels (P > .005). The present study revealed that the microbial diversity of secondary/persistent endodontic infections did not differ than those of primary endodontic infections. A new archaeal species, Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia, was detected in root canals of 1 patient with primary endodontic infection for the first time. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical Neuropathology practice news 1-2014: pyrosequencing meets clinical and analytical performance criteria for routine testing of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S; Manzl, Claudia; Filipits, Martin; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Pulverer, Walter; Dieckmann, Karin; Widhalm, Georg; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Knosp, Engelbert; Marosi, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    2014-01-01

    Testing of the MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma is relevant for clinical decision making and research applications. Two recent and independent phase III therapy trials confirmed a prognostic and predictive value of the MGMT promoter methylation status in elderly glioblastoma patients. Several methods for MGMT promoter methylation testing have been proposed, but seem to be of limited test reliability. Therefore, and also due to feasibility reasons, translation of MGMT methylation testing into routine use has been protracted so far. Pyrosequencing after prior DNA bisulfite modification has emerged as a reliable, accurate, fast and easy-to-use method for MGMT promoter methylation testing in tumor tissues (including formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded samples). We performed an intra- and inter-laboratory ring trial which demonstrates a high analytical performance of this technique. Thus, pyrosequencing- based assessment of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma meets the criteria of high analytical test performance and can be recommended for clinical application, provided that strict quality control is performed. Our article summarizes clinical indications, practical instructions and open issues for MGMT promoter methylation testing in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing.

  5. Deep sampling of the Palomero maize transcriptome by a high throughput strategy of pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Jiménez-Moraila, Beatriz; Martínez, Octavio; Vielle-Calzada, Jean Philippe; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2009-07-06

    In-depth sequencing analysis has not been able to determine the overall complexity of transcriptional activity of a plant organ or tissue sample. In some cases, deep parallel sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs), although not yet optimized for the sequencing of cDNAs, has represented an efficient procedure for validating gene prediction and estimating overall gene coverage. This approach could be very valuable for complex plant genomes. In addition, little emphasis has been given to efforts aiming at an estimation of the overall transcriptional universe found in a multicellular organism at a specific developmental stage. To explore, in depth, the transcriptional diversity in an ancient maize landrace, we developed a protocol to optimize the sequencing of cDNAs and performed 4 consecutive GS20-454 pyrosequencing runs of a cDNA library obtained from 2 week-old Palomero Toluqueño maize plants. The protocol reported here allowed obtaining over 90% of informative sequences. These GS20-454 runs generated over 1.5 Million reads, representing the largest amount of sequences reported from a single plant cDNA library. A collection of 367,391 quality-filtered reads (30.09 Mb) from a single run was sufficient to identify transcripts corresponding to 34% of public maize ESTs databases; total sequences generated after 4 filtered runs increased this coverage to 50%. Comparisons of all 1.5 Million reads to the Maize Assembled Genomic Islands (MAGIs) provided evidence for the transcriptional activity of 11% of MAGIs. We estimate that 5.67% (86,069 sequences) do not align with public ESTs or annotated genes, potentially representing new maize transcripts. Following the assembly of 74.4% of the reads in 65,493 contigs, real-time PCR of selected genes confirmed a predicted correlation between the abundance of GS20-454 sequences and corresponding levels of gene expression. A protocol was developed that significantly increases the number, length and quality of cDNA reads using

  6. Deep sampling of the Palomero maize transcriptome by a high throughput strategy of pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Estrella Luis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-depth sequencing analysis has not been able to determine the overall complexity of transcriptional activity of a plant organ or tissue sample. In some cases, deep parallel sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs, although not yet optimized for the sequencing of cDNAs, has represented an efficient procedure for validating gene prediction and estimating overall gene coverage. This approach could be very valuable for complex plant genomes. In addition, little emphasis has been given to efforts aiming at an estimation of the overall transcriptional universe found in a multicellular organism at a specific developmental stage. Results To explore, in depth, the transcriptional diversity in an ancient maize landrace, we developed a protocol to optimize the sequencing of cDNAs and performed 4 consecutive GS20–454 pyrosequencing runs of a cDNA library obtained from 2 week-old Palomero Toluqueño maize plants. The protocol reported here allowed obtaining over 90% of informative sequences. These GS20–454 runs generated over 1.5 Million reads, representing the largest amount of sequences reported from a single plant cDNA library. A collection of 367,391 quality-filtered reads (30.09 Mb from a single run was sufficient to identify transcripts corresponding to 34% of public maize ESTs databases; total sequences generated after 4 filtered runs increased this coverage to 50%. Comparisons of all 1.5 Million reads to the Maize Assembled Genomic Islands (MAGIs provided evidence for the transcriptional activity of 11% of MAGIs. We estimate that 5.67% (86,069 sequences do not align with public ESTs or annotated genes, potentially representing new maize transcripts. Following the assembly of 74.4% of the reads in 65,493 contigs, real-time PCR of selected genes confirmed a predicted correlation between the abundance of GS20–454 sequences and corresponding levels of gene expression. Conclusion A protocol was developed that significantly

  7. 454 pyrosequencing analysis on faecal samples from a randomized DBPC trial of colicky infants treated with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Roos

    Full Text Available To analyze the global microbial composition, using large-scale DNA sequencing of 16 S rRNA genes, in faecal samples from colicky infants given L. reuteri DSM 17938 or placebo.Twenty-nine colicky infants (age 10-60 days were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either Lactobacillus reuteri (10(8 cfu or a placebo once daily for 21 days. Responders were defined as subjects with a decrease of 50% in daily crying time at day 21 compared with the starting point. The microbiota of faecal samples from day 1 and 21 were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing. The primers: Bakt_341F and Bakt_805R, complemented with 454 adapters and sample specific barcodes were used for PCR amplification of the 16 S rRNA genes. The structure of the data was explored by using permutational multivariate analysis of variance and effects of different variables were visualized with ordination analysis.The infants' faecal microbiota were composed of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the four main phyla. The composition of the microbiota in infants with colic had very high inter-individual variability with Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios varying from 4000 to 0.025. On an individual basis, the microbiota was, however, relatively stable over time. Treatment with L. reuteri DSM 17938 did not change the global composition of the microbiota, but when comparing responders with non-responders the group responders had an increased relative abundance of the phyla Bacteroidetes and genus Bacteroides at day 21 compared with day 0. Furthermore, the phyla composition of the infants at day 21 could be divided into three enterotype groups, dominated by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, respectively.L. reuteri DSM 17938 did not affect the global composition of the microbiota. However, the increase of Bacteroidetes in the responder infants indicated that a decrease in colicky symptoms was linked to changes of the microbiota.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  8. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

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    Altimari A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Altimari,1,* Dario de Biase,2,* Giovanna De Maglio,3 Elisa Gruppioni,1 Elisa Capizzi,1 Alessio Degiovanni,1 Antonia D'Errico,1 Annalisa Pession,2 Stefano Pizzolitto,3 Michelangelo Fiorentino,1,# Giovanni Tallini2,#1Laboratory of Molecular Oncologic and Transplantation Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Anatomic Pathology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, 3Department of Pathology, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Udine, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work #These authors share senior authorshipAbstract: Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen® real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03, percentage of mutation for

  9. Methodological improvements of pyrosequencing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharizadeh, Baback; Akhras, Michael; Nourizad, Nader; Ghaderi, Mehran; Yasuda, Kenji; Nyrén, Pål; Pourmand, Nader

    2009-01-01

    Pyrosequencing technology is a rather novel DNA sequencing method based on the sequencing-by-synthesis principle. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique employs a cascade of four enzymatic reactions producing sequence peak signals. The method has been proven highly suitable for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis and sequencing of short stretches of DNA. Although the pyrosequencing procedure is relatively straightforward, users may face challenges due to varying parameters in PCR and sequencing primer design, sample preparation and nucleotide dispensation; such challenges are labor and cost intensive. In this study, these issues have been addressed to increase signal quality and assure sequence accuracy. PMID:16530870

  10. Pyrosequencing-Based Assays for Rapid Detection of HER2 and HER3 Mutations in Clinical Samples Uncover an E332E Mutation Affecting HER3 in Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, Paula; Chamizo, Cristina; Moreno, Víctor; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Carvajal, Nerea; Daoud, Lina; Zazo, Sandra; Martín-Aparicio, Ester; Cristóbal, Ion; Rincón, Raúl; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Rojo, Federico

    2015-08-17

    Mutations in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (HER) are associated with poor prognosis of several types of solid tumors. Although HER-mutation detection methods are currently available, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), alternative pyrosequencing allow the rapid characterization of specific mutations. We developed specific PCR-based pyrosequencing assays for identification of most prevalent HER2 and HER3 mutations, including S310F/Y, R678Q, L755M/P/S/W, V777A/L/M, 774-776 insertion, and V842I mutations in HER2, as well as M91I, V104M/L, D297N/V/Y, and E332E/K mutations in HER3. We tested 85 Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embbeded (FFPE) samples and we detected three HER2-V842I mutations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), ovarian carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma patients, respectively, and a HER2-L755M mutation in a CRC specimen. We also determined the presence of a HER3-E332K mutation in an urothelial carcinoma sample, and two HER3-D297Y mutations, in both gastric adenocarcinoma and CRC specimens. The D297Y mutation was previously detected in breast and gastric tumors, but not in CRC. Moreover, we found a not-previously-described HER3-E332E synonymous mutation in a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma patient. The pyrosequencing assays presented here allow the detection and characterization of specific HER2 and HER3 mutations. These pyrosequencing assays might be implemented in routine diagnosis for molecular characterization of HER2/HER3 receptors as an alternative to complex NGS approaches.

  11. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in fecal samples reveals high diversity of hindgut microflora in horses and potential links to chronic laminitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steelman Samantha M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nutrition and health of horses is closely tied to their gastrointestinal microflora. Gut bacteria break down plant structural carbohydrates and produce volatile fatty acids, which are a major source of energy for horses. Bacterial communities are also essential for maintaining gut homeostasis and have been hypothesized to contribute to various diseases including laminitis. We performed pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA bacterial genes isolated from fecal material to characterize hindgut bacterial communities in healthy horses and those with chronic laminitis. Results Fecal samples were collected from 10 normal horses and 8 horses with chronic laminitis. Genomic DNA was extracted and the V4-V5 segment of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the 454 platform generating a mean of 2,425 reads per sample after quality trimming. The bacterial communities were dominated by Firmicutes (69.21% control, 56.72% laminitis and Verrucomicrobia (18.13% control, 27.63% laminitis, followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes. We observed more OTUs per individual in the laminitis group than the control group (419.6 and 355.2, respectively, P = 0.019 along with a difference in the abundance of two unassigned Clostridiales genera (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01. The most abundant bacteria were Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and Treponema spp.; along with unassigned genera from Subdivision 5 of Verrucomicrobia, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae, which together constituted ~ 80% of all OTUs. There was a high level of individual variation across all taxonomic ranks. Conclusions Our exploration of the equine fecal microflora revealed higher bacterial diversity in horses with chronic laminitis and identification of two Clostridiales genera that differed in abundance from control horses. There was large individual variation in bacterial communities that was not explained in our study. The core hindgut microflora was

  12. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in fecal samples reveals high diversity of hindgut microflora in horses and potential links to chronic laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Samantha M; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Dowd, Scot; Suchodolski, Jan; Janečka, Jan E

    2012-11-27

    The nutrition and health of horses is closely tied to their gastrointestinal microflora. Gut bacteria break down plant structural carbohydrates and produce volatile fatty acids, which are a major source of energy for horses. Bacterial communities are also essential for maintaining gut homeostasis and have been hypothesized to contribute to various diseases including laminitis. We performed pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA bacterial genes isolated from fecal material to characterize hindgut bacterial communities in healthy horses and those with chronic laminitis. Fecal samples were collected from 10 normal horses and 8 horses with chronic laminitis. Genomic DNA was extracted and the V4-V5 segment of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the 454 platform generating a mean of 2,425 reads per sample after quality trimming. The bacterial communities were dominated by Firmicutes (69.21% control, 56.72% laminitis) and Verrucomicrobia (18.13% control, 27.63% laminitis), followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes. We observed more OTUs per individual in the laminitis group than the control group (419.6 and 355.2, respectively, P = 0.019) along with a difference in the abundance of two unassigned Clostridiales genera (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01). The most abundant bacteria were Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and Treponema spp.; along with unassigned genera from Subdivision 5 of Verrucomicrobia, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae, which together constituted ~ 80% of all OTUs. There was a high level of individual variation across all taxonomic ranks. Our exploration of the equine fecal microflora revealed higher bacterial diversity in horses with chronic laminitis and identification of two Clostridiales genera that differed in abundance from control horses. There was large individual variation in bacterial communities that was not explained in our study. The core hindgut microflora was dominated by Streptococcus spp., several cellulytic genera, and

  13. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

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    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  14. Molecular identification of Paragonimus species by DNA pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-06-01

    DNA pyrosequencing for PCR amplicons is an attractive strategy for the identification of microorganisms because of its short time performance for large number of samples. In this study, the primers targeting the fragment of ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were newly developed for pyrosequencing-based identification of 6 Paragonimus species, Paragonimus bangkokensis, Paragonimus harinasutai, Paragonimus heterotremus, Paragonimus macrorchis, Paragonimus siamensis and Paragonimus westermani. Pyrosequencing determination of 39 nucleotides of partial ITS2 region could discriminate 6 Paragonimus species, and could also detect intra-species genetic variation of P. macrorchis. This DNA pyrosequencing-based identification can be a valuable tool to improve species-level identification of Paragonimus in the endemic areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing of Reference and Clinical Samples and Investigation of the Temperature Stability of MicroBiome Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-16

    quantitative PCR (qPCR) using Taqman Universal Master Mix II (Invitrogen) to determine 16S rDNA copy number in DNA samples. PCR fusion primers LB-27F2...ponent abundances if a result consistent with the formula can be reliably produced. To investigate the relative bacterial abundances, the level of results...profiling with an application to pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage samples. PloS one 2012, 7(4):e34605. 48. Zhao J, Li J, Schloss PD, Kalikin LM, Raymond TA

  16. Minutes of the 28th annual plutonium sample exchange meeting. Part I: isotopic sample exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following: list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 24 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: interlaboratory comparisons of plutonium isotope ratios. The plutonium ratios considered are 240/239, 241/239, 242/239, 238/239, 239/240, 241/240, 242/240, and 238/240; carbon, uranium, iron, and nickel data; mass spectroscopy data; determination of plutonium 241 half-life; review of plutonium overplating sample loading technique; on-line measurement evaluation system for isotopic analysis; and description of a new thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  17. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected.

  18. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M.

    2012-06-01

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected

  19. Multi-index Monte Carlo: when sparsity meets sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2015-06-27

    We propose and analyze a novel multi-index Monte Carlo (MIMC) method for weak approximation of stochastic models that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. The MIMC method is both a stochastic version of the combination technique introduced by Zenger, Griebel and collaborators and an extension of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method first described by Heinrich and Giles. Inspired by Giles’s seminal work, we use in MIMC high-order mixed differences instead of using first-order differences as in MLMC to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. This in turn yields new and improved complexity results, which are natural generalizations of Giles’s MLMC analysis and which increase the domain of the problem parameters for which we achieve the optimal convergence, O(TOL−2). Moreover, in MIMC, the rate of increase of required memory with respect to TOL is independent of the number of directions up to a logarithmic term which allows far more accurate solutions to be calculated for higher dimensions than what is possible when using MLMC. We motivate the setting of MIMC by first focusing on a simple full tensor index set. We then propose a systematic construction of optimal sets of indices for MIMC based on properly defined profits that in turn depend on the average cost per sample and the corresponding weak error and variance. Under standard assumptions on the convergence rates of the weak error, variance and work per sample, the optimal index set turns out to be the total degree type. In some cases, using optimal index sets, MIMC achieves a better rate for the computational complexity than the corresponding rate when using full tensor index sets. We also show the asymptotic normality of the statistical error in the resulting MIMC estimator and justify in this way our error estimate, which allows both the required accuracy and the confidence level in our computational

  20. Development of a candidate method for forensic microbial genotyping using multiplex pyrosequencing combined with a universal biotinylated primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Mao, Xuhu; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Hou, Yiping; Yun, Libing

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genotyping can be used for crime scene investigations and contribute to the attribution of biological attacks for microbial forensics. PyroMark ID Pyrosequencer as an accurate detection platform for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been applied to identify and resolve microorganisms involved in closely Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7). To explore more applications and improve the efficiency for pyrosequencing in this field, we developed a method integrated multiplex pyrosequencing with a universal primer. Two multiplex pyrosequencing assays with a universal biotinylated primer were designed to analyze five SNPs located in four gene of E. coli O157:H7 strain. The accuracy of the established assays was validated by genotyping reference strain E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 and E. coli K-12. We also demonstrated that two multiplex pyrosequencing assays were specific and sensitive for genotyping closely related E. coli O157 strains. Reproducibility of results and multiplexing capability were evaluated by a comparison of this method with the monoplex pyrosequencing. Furthermore, these two multiplex pyrosequencing assays have been successfully applied to detect 11 E. coli O157 strains isolated from 1504 Chinese livestock samples. This method reduces costs and time consumption in the process of pyrosequencing analysis, and potentially serves as a rapid tool and reliable candidate strategy for the microbial identification and other genotyping application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Report of the advisory group meeting on elemental analysis of extremely small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains summary of discussions held at the meeting with brief description and comparative characteristics of most common nuclear analytical techniques used for analysis of very small samples as well as the conclusions of the meeting. Some aspect of reference materials and quality control are also discussed. The publication also contains individual contributions made by the participants, each of these papers haven provided with an abstract and indexed separately

  2. Characterization of bacterial populations in Danish raw milk cheeses made with different starter cultures by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masoud, Wafa Mahmoud Hasan; Takamiya, Monica K Wik; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2011-01-01

    ripening. Other bacteria like Corynebacterium, Halomonas, Pediococcus, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus, which were encountered in some cheese samples at low percentages compared with the total bacterial populations, were only detected by pyrosequencing. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing is an efficient method...

  3. Integrating high-throughput pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR to analyze complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Husen; Parameswaran, Prathap; Badalamenti, Jonathan; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    New high-throughput technologies continue to emerge for studying complex microbial communities. In particular, massively parallel pyrosequencing enables very high numbers of sequences, providing a more complete view of community structures and a more accurate inference of the functions than has been possible just a few years ago. In parallel, quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) allows quantitative monitoring of specific community members over time, space, or different environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss the principles of these two methods and their complementary applications in studying microbial ecology in bioenvironmental systems. We explain parallel sequencing of amplicon libraries and using bar codes to differentiate multiple samples in a pyrosequencing run. We also describe best procedures and chemistries for QPCR amplifications and address advantages of applying automation to increase accuracy. We provide three examples in which we used pyrosequencing and QPCR together to define and quantify members of microbial communities: in the human large intestine, in a methanogenic digester whose sludge was made more bioavailable by a high-voltage pretreatment, and on the biofilm anode of a microbial electrolytic cell. We highlight our key findings in these systems and how both methods were used in concert to achieve those findings. Finally, we supply detailed methods for generating PCR amplicon libraries for pyrosequencing, pyrosequencing data analysis, QPCR methodology, instrumentation, and automation.

  4. Metabarcoding Analysis of Phytophthora Diversity Using Genus-Specific Primers and 454 Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigigallo, Maria I; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Cacciola, Santa O; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzani, Simona M; Cooke, David E L; Schena, L

    2016-03-01

    A metabarcoding method based on genus-specific primers and 454 pyrosequencing was utilized to investigate the genetic diversity of Phytophthora spp. in soil and root samples of potted plants, from eight nurseries. Pyrosequencing enabled the detection of 25 Phytophthora phylotypes distributed in seven different clades and provided a much higher resolution than a corresponding cloning/Sanger sequencing approach. Eleven of these phylotypes, including P. cactorum, P. citricola s.str., P. palmivora, P. palmivora-like, P. megasperma or P. gonapodyides, P. ramorum, and five putative new Phytophthora species phylogenetically related to clades 1, 2, 4, 6, and 7 were detected only with the 454 pyrosequencing approach. We also found an additional 18 novel records of a phylotype in a particular nursery that were not detected with cloning/Sanger sequencing. Several aspects confirmed the reliability of the method: (i) many identical sequence types were identified independently in different nurseries, (ii) most sequence types identified with 454 pyrosequencing were identical to those from the cloning/Sanger sequencing approach and/or perfectly matched GenBank deposited sequences, and (iii) the divergence noted between sequence types of putative new Phytophthora species and all other detected sequences was sufficient to rule out sequencing errors. The proposed method represents a powerful tool to study Phytophthora diversity providing that particular attention is paid to the analysis of 454 pyrosequencing raw read sequences and to the identification of sequence types.

  5. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramae, E.E.; Verbruggen, E.; Hillekens, R.H.E.; De Hollander, M.; Röling, W.F.M.; Van der Heijden, M.G.A.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age) in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM) cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA

  6. Absolute Quantitation of DNA Methylation of 28 Candidate Genes in Prostate Cancer Using Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataڑa Vasiljeviš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis and its mapping is likely to provide biomarkers for improved diagnostic and risk assessment in prostate cancer (PCa. We quantified and compared absolute methylation levels among 28 candidate genes in 48 PCa and 29 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH samples using the pyrosequencing (PSQ method to identify genes with diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  7. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the invitation of the Physical Research. Laboratory, the 58th Annual Meeting of the. Academy was held at Ahmedabad from 6 to 9. November 1992. The meetings were held at the. Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) and the. Space Applications Centre (SAC) and were organized by PRl, in cooperation with ~AC, the.

  8. Can the dissociative PTSD subtype be identified across two distinct trauma samples meeting caseness for PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Műllerová, Jana; Elklit, Ask; Armour, Cherie

    2016-08-01

    For over a century, the occurrence of dissociative symptoms in connection to traumatic exposure has been acknowledged in the scientific literature. Recently, the importance of dissociation has also been recognized in the long-term traumatic response within the DSM-5 nomenclature. Several studies have confirmed the existence of the dissociative posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype. However, there is a lack of studies investigating latent profiles of PTSD solely in victims with PTSD. This study investigates the possible presence of PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) across two distinct trauma samples meeting caseness for DSM-5 PTSD based on self-reports (N = 787). Moreover, we assessed if a number of risk factors resulted in an increased probability of membership in a dissociative compared with a non-dissociative PTSD class. The results of LCA revealed a two-class solution with two highly symptomatic classes: a dissociative class and a non-dissociative class across both samples. Increased emotion-focused coping increased the probability of individuals being grouped into the dissociative class across both samples. Social support reduced the probability of individuals being grouped into the dissociative class but only in the victims of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) suffering from whiplash. The results are discussed in light of their clinical implications and suggest that the dissociative subtype can be identified in victims of incest and victims of MVA suffering from whiplash meeting caseness for DSM-5 PTSD.

  9. Wolbachia Sequence Typing in Butterflies Using Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungmi; Shin, Su-Kyoung; Jeong, Gilsang; Yi, Hana

    2015-09-01

    Wolbachia is an obligate symbiotic bacteria that is ubiquitous in arthropods, with 25-70% of insect species estimated to be infected. Wolbachia species can interact with their insect hosts in a mutualistic or parasitic manner. Sequence types (ST) of Wolbachia are determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of housekeeping genes. However, there are some limitations to MLST with respect to the generation of clone libraries and the Sanger sequencing method when a host is infected with multiple STs of Wolbachia. To assess the feasibility of massive parallel sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, we used pyrosequencing for sequence typing of Wolbachia in butterflies. We collected three species of butterflies (Eurema hecabe, Eurema laeta, and Tongeia fischeri) common to Korea and screened them for Wolbachia STs. We found that T. fischeri was infected with a single ST of Wolbachia, ST41. In contrast, E. hecabe and E. laeta were each infected with two STs of Wolbachia, ST41 and ST40. Our results clearly demonstrate that pyrosequencing-based MLST has a higher sensitivity than cloning and Sanger sequencing methods for the detection of minor alleles. Considering the high prevalence of infection with multiple Wolbachia STs, next-generation sequencing with improved analysis would assist with scaling up approaches to Wolbachia MLST.

  10. Prognostic Role of Methylation Status of the MGMT Promoter Determined Quantitatively by Pyrosequencing in Glioblastoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Ki Uk; Kim, Young Zoon

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether pyrosequencing can be used to determine the methylation status of the MGMT promoter as a clinical biomarker using relatively old archival tissue samples of glioblastoma. We also examined other prognostic factors for survival of glioblastoma patients. The available study set included formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue from 104 patients at two institutes from 1997 to 2012, all of which were diagnosed histopathologically as glioblastoma. Clinicopathologic data were collected by review of medical records. For pyrosequencing analysis, the PyroMark Q96 CpG MGMT kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) was used to detect the level of methylation at exon 1 positions 17-39 of the MGMT gene, which contains 5 CpGs. Methylation of the MGMT promoter was detected in 43 (41.3%) of 104 samples. The average percentage methylation was 14.0±16.8% overall and 39.0±14.7% for methylated cases. There was no significant pattern of linear increase or decrease according to the age of the FFPE block (p=0.687). In multivariate analysis, age, performance status, extent of surgery, method of adjuvant therapy, and methylation status estimated by pyrosequencing were independently associated with overall survival. Additionally, patients with a high level of methylation survived longer than those with low methylation (p=0.016). In this study, the status and extent of methylation of the MGMT promoter analyzed by pyrosequencing were associated with overall survival in glioblastoma patients. Pyrosequencing is a quantitative method that overcomes the problems of MSP and a simple technique for accurate analysis of DNA sequences.

  11. Bacterial communities in the gut and reproductive organs of Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae based on 454 pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Wang

    Full Text Available The citrus fruit fly Bactrocera minax is associated with diverse bacterial communities. We used a 454 pyrosequencing technology to study in depth the microbial communities associated with gut and reproductive organs of Bactrocera minax. Our dataset consisted of 100,749 reads with an average length of 400 bp. The saturated rarefaction curves and species richness indices indicate that the sampling was comprehensive. We found highly diverse bacterial communities, with individual sample containing approximately 361 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs. A total of 17 bacterial phyla were obtained from the flies. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA revealed that Proteobacteria was dominant in all samples (75%-95%. Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were also commonly found in the total clones. Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were the major genera. However, bacterial diversity (Chao1, Shannon and Simpson indices and community structure (PCA analysis varied across samples. Female ovary has the most diverse bacteria, followed by male testis, and the bacteria diversity of reproductive organs is richer than that of the gut. The observed variation can be caused by sex and tissue, possibly to meet the host's physiological demands.

  12. Bacterial communities in the gut and reproductive organs of Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ailin; Yao, Zhichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Zhang, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    The citrus fruit fly Bactrocera minax is associated with diverse bacterial communities. We used a 454 pyrosequencing technology to study in depth the microbial communities associated with gut and reproductive organs of Bactrocera minax. Our dataset consisted of 100,749 reads with an average length of 400 bp. The saturated rarefaction curves and species richness indices indicate that the sampling was comprehensive. We found highly diverse bacterial communities, with individual sample containing approximately 361 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). A total of 17 bacterial phyla were obtained from the flies. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA revealed that Proteobacteria was dominant in all samples (75%-95%). Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were also commonly found in the total clones. Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were the major genera. However, bacterial diversity (Chao1, Shannon and Simpson indices) and community structure (PCA analysis) varied across samples. Female ovary has the most diverse bacteria, followed by male testis, and the bacteria diversity of reproductive organs is richer than that of the gut. The observed variation can be caused by sex and tissue, possibly to meet the host's physiological demands.

  13. MGMT promoter methylation in gliomas-assessment by pyrosequencing and quantitative methylation-specific PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter is a favorable prognostic factor in glioblastoma patients. However, reported methylation frequencies vary significantly partly due to lack of consensus in the choice of analytical method. Method We examined 35 low- and 99 high-grade gliomas using quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) and pyrosequencing. Gene expression level of MGMT was analyzed by RT-PCR. Results When examined by qMSP, 26% of low-grade and 37% of high-grade gliomas were found to be methylated, whereas 97% of low-grade and 55% of high-grade gliomas were found methylated by pyrosequencing. The average MGMT gene expression level was significantly lower in the group of patients with a methylated promoter independent of method used for methylation detection. Primary glioblastoma patients with a methylated MGMT promoter (as evaluated by both methylation detection methods) had approximately 5 months longer median survival compared to patients with an unmethylated promoter (log-rank test; pyrosequencing P = .02, qMSP P = .06). One third of the analyzed samples had conflicting methylation results when comparing the data from the qMSP and pyrosequencing. The overall survival analysis shows that these patients have an intermediate prognosis between the groups with concordant MGMT promoter methylation results when comparing the two methods. Conclusion In our opinion, MGMT promoter methylation analysis gives sufficient prognostic information to merit its inclusion in the standard management of patients with high-grade gliomas, and in this study pyrosequencing came across as the better analytical method. PMID:22390413

  14. MGMT promoter methylation in gliomas-assessment by pyrosequencing and quantitative methylation-specific PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håvik Annette

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT gene promoter is a favorable prognostic factor in glioblastoma patients. However, reported methylation frequencies vary significantly partly due to lack of consensus in the choice of analytical method. Method We examined 35 low- and 99 high-grade gliomas using quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP and pyrosequencing. Gene expression level of MGMT was analyzed by RT-PCR. Results When examined by qMSP, 26% of low-grade and 37% of high-grade gliomas were found to be methylated, whereas 97% of low-grade and 55% of high-grade gliomas were found methylated by pyrosequencing. The average MGMT gene expression level was significantly lower in the group of patients with a methylated promoter independent of method used for methylation detection. Primary glioblastoma patients with a methylated MGMT promoter (as evaluated by both methylation detection methods had approximately 5 months longer median survival compared to patients with an unmethylated promoter (log-rank test; pyrosequencing P = .02, qMSP P = .06. One third of the analyzed samples had conflicting methylation results when comparing the data from the qMSP and pyrosequencing. The overall survival analysis shows that these patients have an intermediate prognosis between the groups with concordant MGMT promoter methylation results when comparing the two methods. Conclusion In our opinion, MGMT promoter methylation analysis gives sufficient prognostic information to merit its inclusion in the standard management of patients with high-grade gliomas, and in this study pyrosequencing came across as the better analytical method.

  15. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The organization and arrangements for the scientific meetings, cultural event and the visits to Lothal and SAC were superb. The Academy is grateful to the Physical Research Laboratory particularly R K Varma, Director, PRL, to the. Institute for Plasma Research and its Director. P K Kaw, to the Space Applications Centre and.

  16. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Defence Minister, Government of India on some of his experiences in technology development in India. A summary of his lecture appears in this issue. In the afternoon the .... of steel armour for our Light Tank which has found wide application to meet the ... basic issues: how information is encoded in the structure of DNA ...

  17. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1985-11-07

    Nov 7, 1985 ... Business Meeting of Fellows. Evening Lecture. Architecture of the universe- R Cowsik ... and technical capabilities to plan, design and build satellites for earth observations, such as. Bhaskara I and II have ... Water Resources Systems Planning-. Some case studies for India. Edited by. Mahesh C Chaturvedi ...

  18. Rapid species determination of Nocardia keratitis using pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W; Tuohy, Marion; Millstein, Michael E; Jeng, Bennie H

    2007-01-01

    To describe a new technique, pyrosequencing, which allows for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium and Nocardia species. Interventional case report. The medical records of a patient presenting with an infectious keratitis were reviewed. A case of Nocardia abscessus/arthrititis/asiatica keratitis was diagnosed in a young individual with the aid of pyrosequencing technology. Based on presumed antibiotic sensitivities, therapy with topical trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole eyedrops was initiated, and the infection was cleared rapidly with minimal residual scarring. Pyrosequencing may be a useful tool in aiding the rapid diagnosis and treatment of ocular infections caused by slow-growing pathogens.

  19. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: A promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I E C

    2014-10-01

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5min intervals for 1h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345±15×103 to 425±35×103cellsmL-1) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39±3.5% to 53±4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Report on the second ALMERA network coordination meeting and the ALMERA soil sampling intercomparison exercise IAEA/SIE/01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The overall aim of the meeting was to evaluate the current status of the ALMERA network laboratories and to help to improve their technical competence through harmonization of sampling, monitoring and measurement protocols and staff training. The meeting was also addressed to defining the structure of the ALMERA network and future proficiency tests and intercomparison trials to be organized by the IAEA to help the laboratories to maintain and improve the quality of their analytical measurements. 45 participants from 29 different institutions attended the meeting

  1. Detection and identification of Candida species associated with Candida vaginitis by real-time PCR and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trama, Jason P; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E

    2005-04-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is currently considered the most sensitive method to detect low abundance DNA of pathogens in clinical samples. Furthermore, obtaining DNA sequence is the 'gold standard' of precise molecular detection. Here we combine species-specific real-time PCR and pyrosequencing to rapidly amplify and sequence ribosomal DNA from Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis, which are commonly associated with candida vaginitis (CV). A standard curve was developed from plasmids containing the target DNA for each of the Candida species. A minimum real-time PCR and pyrosequencing detection limit of 100 copies per reaction was achieved. The combined technique was applied to the identification of the four Candida species in DNA extracts from vaginal samples. The results from 231 samples were compared with conventional PCR methods of identification. The results of both methods agreed on all but two samples, which were determined by both methods to contain C. albicans, but real-time PCR and pyrosequencing identified a second species that went undetected by conventional PCR. This is the first application of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing to DNA from vaginal samples for identification of four Candida species associated with CV, without the need for time-consuming culture methods.

  2. Inferring viral quasispecies spectra from 454 pyrosequencing reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Măndoiu Ion

    2011-07-01

    ://alla.cs.gsu.edu/~software/VISPA/vispa.html. Conclusions ViSpA enables accurate viral quasispecies spectrum reconstruction from 454 pyrosequencing reads. We are currently exploring extensions applicable to the analysis of high-throughput sequencing data from bacterial metagenomic samples and ecological samples of eukaryote populations.

  3. Pyrosequencing Reveals Fungal Communities in the Rhizosphere of Xinjiang Jujube

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    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are important soil components as both decomposers and plant symbionts and play a major role in ecological and biogeochemical processes. However, little is known about the richness and structure of fungal communities. DNA sequencing technologies allow for the direct estimation of microbial community diversity, avoiding culture-based biases. We therefore used 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the fungal communities in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube. We obtained no less than 40,488 internal transcribed spacer (ITS rDNA reads, the number of each sample was 6943, 6647, 6584, 6550, 6860, and 6904, and we used bioinformatics and multivariate statistics to analyze the results. The index of diversity showed greater richness in the rhizosphere fungal community of a 3-year-old jujube than in that of an 8-year-old jujube. Most operational taxonomic units belonged to Ascomycota, and taxonomic analyses identified Hypocreales as the dominant fungal order. Our results demonstrated that the fungal orders are present in different proportions in different sampling areas. Redundancy analysis (RDA revealed a significant correlation between soil properties and the abundance of fungal phyla. Our results indicated lower fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube than that reported in other studies, and we hope our findings provide a reference for future research.

  4. Identification and delineation of members of the Entamoeba complex by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, Christen R; Lebbad, Marianne; Verweij, Jaco J; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Nielsen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Henrik V

    2010-12-01

    A method using a single-round PCR coupled to pyrosequencing was developed for the detection and differentiation of members of the Entamoeba complex. The technique was evaluated using DNA isolated directly from faecal specimens and compared with a duplex real-time PCR targeting Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar, and a conventional single-round PCR for the detection of Entamoeba moshkovskii. Tetranucleate cysts from 102 faecal specimens from Swedish, Danish and Dutch patients test-positive for the Entamoeba complex by coproscopic examination were identified to species using each of the three methods. Although none of the patients were confirmed to be positive for E. moshkovskii, E. histolytica and E. dispar were identified in 17 and 86 of the samples, respectively, one of the samples containing both species. There was concordance in results between pyrosequencing and the two other methods used. This study showed that PCR and pyrosequencing could be used for the rapid and high throughput identification of Entamoeba species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of transient bacteraemia following dental extractions by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Benítez-Páez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current manuscript aims to determine the prevalence, duration and bacterial diversity of bacteraemia following dental extractions using conventional culture-dependent methods and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. METHODS: The study group included 8 patients undergoing dental extractions under general anaesthesia. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected at baseline, 30 seconds and 15 minutes after the dental extractions. Blood samples were analysed for bacteraemia applying conventional microbiological cultures under aerobic and anaerobic conditions as well as pyrosequencing using universal bacterial primers that target the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. RESULTS: Transient bacteremia was detected by culture-based methods in one sample at baseline time, in eight samples at 30 seconds, and in six samples at 15 minutes after surgical procedure; whereas bacteraemia was detected only in five blood samples at 30 seconds after dental extraction by using pyrosequencing. By applying conventional microbiological methods, a single microbial species was detected in six patients, and Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently cultured identified bacterium. By using pyrosequencing approaches however, the estimated blood microbial diversity after dental extractions was 13.4±1.7 bacterial families and 22.8±1.1 genera per sample. CONCLUSION: The application of 16S rDNA pyrosequencing underestimated the prevalence and duration of bacteraemia following dental extractions, presumably due to not reaching the minimum DNA required for PCR amplification. However, this molecular technique, unlike conventional culture-dependent methods, revealed an extraordinarily high bacterial diversity of post-extraction bacteraemia. We propose that microorganisms recovered by culture may be only the tip of an iceberg of a really diverse microbiota whose viability and potential pathogenicity should be further studied.

  6. Materials of the 3.Poznan analytical meeting: The novel methods of samples preparation and analysis of trace amounts of elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference on Novel Methods of Samples Preparation and Analysis of Trace Amounts of Elements was the eight of succeeding meetings organized annually since 1985 by the Committee of Analytical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The following groups of topics have been extensively discussed: accuracy and precision in trace amounts analysis, sample preparation methods, certification and application of standards and many other topics important for analytical chemistry of trace amount of different elements. Total 43 lectures have been presented in the course of meeting

  7. Pyrosequencing identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis W-Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drancourt Michel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The worldwide expanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis W-Beijing family is associated with treatment failure and relapse. Its identification currently relies on spoligotyping and conventional sequencing. We developed pyrosequencing as an alternative method for its identification. Findings Pyrosequencing found a G/A substitution in the Rv0927c-pstS3 intergenic spacer and a RD105 deletion, identifying 8/104 M. tuberculosis isolates as W-Beijing isolates. In addition, pyrosequencing found a previously unreported TGC deletion in the Rv0927c gene of W-Beijing isolates. Total concordance was found between the pyrosequencing data and conventional sequencing, as well as reference molecular identification. Multispacer Sequence Typing assigned the W-Beijing isolates to the Asian lineage and the 96 non-W-Beijing isolates to the Euro-American lineage (P -5. The W-Beijing isolates were all susceptible to streptomycin, rifampin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide; no resistance-associated mutations were detected in these eight W-Beijing isolates. There were no statistically significant differences in the antibiotic susceptibility of W-Beijing and non-W-Beijing isolates (p = 0.2, X2 test. Pyrosequencing correctly identified M. tuberculosis organisms in 26/26 sputum specimens exhibiting acid-fast bacilli. Pyrosequencing results were obtained within four hours, incurring an estimated cost of 1.86 €/test. Conclusion Pyrosequencing of the Rv0927c gene and adjacent intergenic spacer is an efficient, low-cost technique for the rapid identification of W-Beijing isolates.

  8. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mark Ibekwe

    Full Text Available Current microbial source tracking (MST methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs, recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ≤400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP, Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%, agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%, and Prado Park sediment (6.00%, respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78-4.08%. Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health.

  9. Oral microbiome profiles: 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and microarray assay comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Ahn

    Full Text Available The human oral microbiome is potentially related to diverse health conditions and high-throughput technology provides the possibility of surveying microbial community structure at high resolution. We compared two oral microbiome survey methods: broad-based microbiome identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and targeted characterization of microbes by custom DNA microarray.Oral wash samples were collected from 20 individuals at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. 16S rRNA gene survey was performed by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3-V5 region (450 bp. Targeted identification by DNA microarray was carried out with the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Correlations and relative abundance were compared at phylum and genus level, between 16S rRNA sequence read ratio and HOMIM hybridization intensity.The major phyla, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were identified with high correlation by the two methods (r = 0.70∼0.86. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing identified 77 genera and HOMIM identified 49, with 37 genera detected by both methods; more than 98% of classified bacteria were assigned in these 37 genera. Concordance by the two assays (presence/absence and correlations were high for common genera (Streptococcus, Veillonella, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, and Haemophilus; Correlation = 0.70-0.84.Microbiome community profiles assessed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and HOMIM were highly correlated at the phylum level and, when comparing the more commonly detected taxa, also at the genus level. Both methods are currently suitable for high-throughput epidemiologic investigations relating identified and more common oral microbial taxa to disease risk; yet, pyrosequencing may provide a broader spectrum of taxa identification, a distinct sequence-read record, and greater detection sensitivity.

  10. Comparison study of MS-HRM and pyrosequencing techniques for quantification of APC and CDKN2A gene methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Migheli

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing.

  11. Pyrosequencing as a tool for the detection of Phytophthora species: error rate and risk of false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, A M; Bonants, P; Tomassini, A; Bruni, N; Vannini, A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the description of Phytophthora communities in terms of taxa identification and risk of assignment for false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). Pyrosequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons was used to describe the structure of a DNA mixture comprising eight Phytophthora spp. and Pythium vexans. Pyrosequencing resulted in 16 965 reads, detecting all species in the template DNA mixture. Reducing the ITS1 sequence identity threshold resulted in a decrease in numbers of unmatched reads but a concomitant increase in the numbers of false MOTUs. The total error rate was 0·63% and comprised mainly mismatches (0·25%) Pyrosequencing of ITS1 region is an efficient and accurate technique for the detection and identification of Phytophthora spp. in environmental samples. However, the risk of allocating false MOTUs, even when demonstrated to be low, may require additional validation with alternative detection methods. Phytophthora spp. are considered among the most destructive groups of invasive plant pathogens, affecting thousands of cultivated and wild plants worldwide. Simultaneous early detection of Phytophthora complexes in environmental samples offers an unique opportunity for the interception of known and unknown species along pathways of introduction, along with the identification of these organisms in invaded environments. © 2012 The Authors Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Bacterial Communities and Antibiotic Resistance Communities in a Full-Scale Hospital Wastewater Treatment Plant by High-Throughput Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The community of whole microbes and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB in hospital wastewater treatment plants (WWTP receiving domestic wastewater (DWW and hospital wastewater (HWW was investigated. Samples from an influent of a secondary clarifier, at each treatment train, were characterized for the whole microbial community and ARB on the antibiotic resistance database, based on high-throughput pyrosequencing. The pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the abundance of Bacteroidetes in the DWW sample was higher (~1.6 times than in the HWW sample, whereas the abundance of Proteobacteria in the HWW sample was greater than in the DWW sample. At the top twenty of the genus level, distinct genera were observed—Saprospiraceae in the DWW and Zoogloea in the HWW. Apart from the top twenty genera, minor genera showed various antibiotic resistance types based on the antibiotic resistance gene database.

  13. Detection of MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hao; Tubbs, Raymond; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials on patients with glioblastoma revealed that O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status significantly predicts patient's response to alkylating agents. In this study, we sought to develop and validate a quantitative MGMT methylation assay using pyrosequencing on glioblastoma. We quantified promoter methylation of MGMT using pyrosequencing on paraffin-embedded fine needle aspiration biopsy tissues from 43 glioblastoma. Using a 10% cutoff, MGMT methylation was identified in 37% cases of glioblastoma and 0% of the non-neoplastic epileptic tissue. Methylation of any individual CpG island in MGMT promoter ranged between 33% and 95%, with a mean of 65%. By a serial dilution of genomic DNA of a homogenously methylated cancer cell line with an unmethylated cell line, the analytical sensitivity is at 5% for pyrosequencing to detect MGMT methylation. The minimal amount of genomic DNA required is 100 ng (approximately 3,000 cells) in small fine needle biopsy specimens. Compared with methylation-specific PCR, pyrosequencing is comparably sensitive, relatively specific, and also provides quantitative information for each CpG methylation.

  14. Evaluation of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for bacterial fingerprinting of rumen microbiome compared to pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami, Elie; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2014-01-22

    The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data.

  15. Evaluation of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis for Bacterial Fingerprinting of Rumen Microbiome Compared to Pyrosequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Jami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA, an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data.

  16. Analysis of oral microbiota in children with dental caries by PCR-DGGE and barcoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Kong, Jianming; Jia, Peng; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Yuezhu; Pan, Zhiwen; Huang, Wujing; Li, Lanjuan; Chen, Hui; Xiang, Charlie

    2010-10-01

    Oral microbiota plays a vital role in maintaining the homeostasis of oral cavity. Dental caries are among the most common oral diseases in children and pathogenic bacteria contribute to the development of the disease. However, the overall structure of bacterial communities in the oral cavity from children with dental caries has not been explored deeply heretofore. We used high-throughput barcoded pyrosequencing and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine bacterial diversity of oral microbiota in saliva and supragingival plaques from 60 children aged 3 to 6 years old with and without dental caries from China. The multiplex barcoded pyrosequencing was performed in a single run, with multiple samples tagged uniquely by multiplex identifiers. As PCR-DGGE analysis is a conventional molecular ecological approach, this analysis was also performed on the same samples and the results of both approaches were compared. A total of 186,787 high-quality sequences were obtained for evaluating bacterial diversity and 41,905 unique sequences represented all phylotypes. We found that the oral microbiota in children was far more diverse than previous studies reported, and more than 200 genera belonging to ten phyla were found in the oral cavity. The phylotypes in saliva and supragingival plaques were significantly different and could be divided into two distinct clusters (p oral microbiome analyzed by PCR-DGGE and barcoded pyrosequencing was employed to cross validate the data sets. The genera of Streptococcus, Veillonella, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, Leptotrichia, and Thiomonas in plaques were significantly associated with dental caries (p oral microbiota allowed for a better understanding of oral microecosystem, and these pathogenic populations in plaque provide new insights into the etiology of dental caries and suggest new targets for interventions of the disease.

  17. Rapid detection and identification of Bacillus anthracis in food using pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Janzen, Timothy W; Shields, Michael J; Hahn, Kristen R; Thomas, Matthew C; Goji, Noriko

    2013-08-01

    The development of advanced methodologies for the detection of Bacillus anthracis has been evolving rapidly since the release of the anthrax spores in the mail in 2001. Recent advances in detection and identification techniques could prove to be an essential component in the defense against biological attacks. Sequence based such as pyrosequencing, which has the capability to determine short DNA stretches in real-time using biotinylated PCR amplicons, has potential biodefense applications. Using markers from the virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2) and chromosomal regions, we have demonstrated the power of this technology in the rapid, specific and sensitive detection of B. anthracis spores in food matrices including milk, juice, bottled water, and processed meat. The combined use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing showed positive detection when liquid foods (bottled water, milk, juice), and processed meat were experimentally inoculated with 6CFU/mL and 6CFU/g, respectively, without an enrichment step. Pyrosequencing is completed in about 60min (following PCR amplification) and yields accurate and reliable results with an added layer of confidence. The entire assay (from sample preparation to sequencing information) can be completed in about 7.5h. A typical run on food samples yielded 67-80bp reads with 94-100% identity to the expected sequence. This sequence based approach is a novel application for the detection of anthrax spores in food with potential application in foodborne bioterrorism response and biodefense involving the use of anthrax spores. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Using a constraint-based regression method for relative quantification of somatic mutations in pyrosequencing signals: a case for NRAS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroise, Jerome; Badir, Jamal; Nienhaus, Louise; Robert, Annie; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Pyrosequencing Allele Quantification (AQ) is a cost-effective DNA sequencing method that can be used for detecting somatic mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. The method displays a low turnaround time and a high sensitivity. Pyrosequencing suffers however from two main drawbacks including (i) low specificity and (ii) difficult signal interpretation when multiple mutations are reported in a hotspot genomic region. Using a constraint-based regression method, the new AdvISER-PYRO-SMQ algorithm was developed in the current study and implemented into an R package. As a proof-of-concept, AdvISER-PYRO-SMQ was used to identify a set of 9 distinct point mutations affecting codon 61 of the NRAS oncogene. In parallel, a pyrosequencing assay using the Qiagen software and its AQ module was used to assess selectively the presence of a single point mutation (NRAS[Formula: see text] - Q61R-1) among the set of codon 61 mutations, and to analyze related pyrosequencing signals. AdvISER-PYRO-SMQ produced a lower limit of blank (0 %) than the AQ module of Qiagen software (5.1 %) and similar limit of detection were obtained for both software (5.6 vs 4.8 %). AdvISER-PYRO-SMQ was able to screen for the presence of 9 distinct mutations with a single pyrosequencing reaction whereas the AQ module was limited to screen a single mutation per reaction. Using a constraint-based regression method enables to analyze pyrosequencing signal and to detect multiple mutations within a hotspot genomic region with an optimal compromise between sensitivity and specificity. The AdvISER-PYRO-SMQ R package provides a generic tool which can be applied on a wide range of somatic mutations. Its implementation in a Shiny web interactive application (available at https://ucl-irec-ctma.shinyapps.io/Pyrosequencing-NRAS-61/) enables its use in research or clinical routine applications.

  19. An Appropriate Cutoff Value for Determining the Colonization of Helicobacter pylori by the Pyrosequencing Method: Comparison with Conventional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Kim, Nayoung; Jo, Hyun Jin; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-10-01

    Sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has improved the characterization of microbial communities. It enabled the detection of low abundance gastric Helicobacter pylori sequences even in subjects that were found to be H. pylori negative with conventional methods. The objective of this study was to obtain a cutoff value for H. pylori colonization in gastric mucosa samples by pyrosequencing method. Gastric mucosal biopsies were taken from 63 subjects whose H. pylori status was determined by a combination of serology, rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Microbial DNA from mucosal samples was amplified by PCR using universal bacterial primers. 16S rDNA amplicons were pyrosequenced. ROC curve analysis was performed to determine the cutoff value for H. pylori colonization by pyrosequencing. In addition, temporal changes in the stomach microbiota were observed in eight initially H. pylori-positive and eight H. pylori-negative subjects at a single time point 1-8 years later. Of the 63 subjects, the presence of H. pylori sequences was detected in all (28/28) conventionally H. pylori-positive samples and in 60% (21/35) of H. pylori-negative samples. The average percent of H. pylori reads in each sample was 0.67 ± 1.09% in the H. pylori-negative group. Cutoff value for clinically positive H. pylori status was approximately 1.22% based on ROC curve analysis (AUC = 0.957; p Helicobacter pylori was successfully eradicated in five of seven treated H. pylori-positive subjects (71.4%), and the percentage of H. pylori reads in these five subjects dropped from 1.3-95.18% to 0-0.16% after eradication. These results suggest that the cutoff value of H. pylori sequence percentage for H. pylori colonization by pyrosequencing could be set at approximately 1%. It might be helpful to analyze gastric microbiota related to H. pylori sequence status. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Past-Year Treatment Utilization Among Individuals Meeting DSM-5 PTSD Criteria: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew C; Sripada, Rebecca K; Bohnert, Kipling M

    2018-03-01

    Little is known regarding treatment utilization among individuals meeting DSM-5 criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were analyzed from the third wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample using DSM-5 criteria. Factors related to increased odds of PTSD treatment utilization for individuals meeting lifetime criteria included some college education versus less than a high school degree (odds ratio [OR]=3.17), having health insurance versus no insurance (OR=2.86), having a comorbid phobia disorder versus not having a phobia disorder (OR=1.36), and greater PTSD symptom count (OR=1.11). Older age (OR=.40), identifying as black or Asian versus white non-Hispanic (OR=.70 and OR=.28, respectively), and greater social functioning (OR=.98) were associated with decreased odds of PTSD treatment utilization. Results highlight factors that may be useful in identifying population subgroups with PTSD that are at risk for underutilization of services.

  1. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    In a hospital-based, case–control study from Chennai, HPV was ... KEM Hospital. Non-malignant/benign cervical tissues were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for reasons other than cervical cancer, such as prolapse, fibroids, cyst, etc. After obtaining these samples ... The quality and quantity of the DNA were ...

  2. Barcoding lichen-forming fungi using 454 pyrosequencing is challenged by artifactual and biological sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Kristiina; Cornejo, Carolina; Keller, Christine; Flück, Daniela; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Although lichens (lichen-forming fungi) play an important role in the ecological integrity of many vulnerable landscapes, only a minority of lichen-forming fungi have been barcoded out of the currently accepted ∼18 000 species. Regular Sanger sequencing can be problematic when analyzing lichens since saprophytic, endophytic, and parasitic fungi live intimately admixed, resulting in low-quality sequencing reads. Here, high-throughput, long-read 454 pyrosequencing in a GS FLX+ System was tested to barcode the fungal partner of 100 epiphytic lichen species from Switzerland using fungal-specific primers when amplifying the full internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). The present study shows the potential of DNA barcoding using pyrosequencing, in that the expected lichen fungus was successfully sequenced for all samples except one. Alignment solutions such as BLAST were found to be largely adequate for the generated long reads. In addition, the NCBI nucleotide database-currently the most complete database for lichen-forming fungi-can be used as a reference database when identifying common species, since the majority of analyzed lichens were identified correctly to the species or at least to the genus level. However, several issues were encountered, including a high sequencing error rate, multiple ITS versions in a genome (incomplete concerted evolution), and in some samples the presence of mixed lichen-forming fungi (possible lichen chimeras).

  3. Investigation of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) hindgut microbiome via 16S pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Christopher J; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2013-12-27

    As a dietary source, the foliage of Eucalyptus spp. is low in available protein and carbohydrate while containing polyphenolic compounds that interfere with enzymatic digestion. To overcome this, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) has evolved a range of anatomical and physiological adaptations to assist with digestion and absorption of nutrients from this food source. Microbial fermentation of partially digested eucalyptus leaves is thought to be critical in this process, however, little is known about the composition and diversity of microorganisms that are associated with digestive health in this native species. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of caecum, colon and faecal pellet samples from two wild, free ranging, Queensland koalas. Our results reveal a highly complex and diverse ecosystem with considerable intra-individual variation. Although samples were dominated by sequences from the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla there was considerable variation at the genus level. This study is the first non-culture based microbiota analysis, using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing, and provides preliminary data to expand our understanding of the koala hindgut. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pyrosequencing: sequence typing at the speed of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggle, Matthew A; Clarke, Stuart C

    2004-10-01

    Nucleotide sequencing is an established method for gaining information relating to partial gene, whole gene, or whole genome sequence. Here we describe some of the background leading to the advent of modern nucleotide sequencing and how it has led to the development of Pyrosequencing, a relatively new method for real-time nucleotide sequencing. In particular, we describe how this method can be used for typing bacterial pathogens.

  5. 454 Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial diversity of activated sludge from 14 sewage treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Shao, Ming-Fei; Ye, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Activated sludge (AS) contains highly complex microbial communities. In this study, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of AS samples from 14 sewage treatment plants of Asia (mainland China, Hong Kong, and Singapore), and North America (Canada and the United States). A total of 259 K effective sequences of 16S rRNA gene V4 region were obtained from these AS samples. These sequences revealed huge amount of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in AS, that is, 1183–3567 OTUs in a sludge sample, at 3% cutoff level and sequencing depth of 16 489 sequences. Clear geographical differences among the AS samples from Asia and North America were revealed by (1) cluster analyses based on abundances of OTUs or the genus/family/order assigned by Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and (2) the principal coordinate analyses based on OTUs abundances, RDP taxa abundances and UniFrac of OTUs and their distances. In addition to certain unique bacterial populations in each AS sample, some genera were dominant, and core populations shared by multiple samples, including two commonly reported genera of Zoogloea and Dechloromonas, three genera not frequently reported (i.e., Prosthecobacter, Caldilinea and Tricoccus) and three genera not well described so far (i.e., Gp4 and Gp6 in Acidobacteria and Subdivision3 genera incertae sedis of Verrucomicrobia). Pyrosequencing analyses of multiple AS samples in this study also revealed the minority populations that are hard to be explored by traditional molecular methods and showed that a large proportion of sequences could not be assigned to taxonomic affiliations even at the phylum/class levels. PMID:22170428

  6. Work scheme to isolate the different microorganisms found in hydrogen-producing reactors: A study of effectiveness by pyrosequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Laura; Braga, Lucía; Castelló, Elena; Etchebehere, Claudia

    2018-03-24

    The aim of this research was to create a work scheme for the isolation of the different microorganisms commonly found in hydrogen-producing reactors and to test its effectiveness. Methods were selected to isolate anaerobic spore-forming fermenters, anaerobic fermenters that do not form spores, facultative aerobic fermenters, and lactic acid bacteria. The methods were tested in two samples taken from a hydrogen-producing reactor fed with cheese whey. 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolates were compared with pyrosequencing analysis from the same samples. The isolates represented more than 88% of the abundance detected by pyrosequencing. Organisms from the genera Clostridium, Rahnella, Megasphaera, Lactobacillus, Propionibacterium, Bifidobacterium, Chryseobacterium, and Acetobacter were isolated. Hydrogen-producing capacity was confirmed for the Clostridium, Rahnella, and Megasphaera isolates. Co-culture experiments indicate that Megasphaera prevented the total inhibition of Clostridium by Lactobacillus. The work scheme proposed was effective to isolate most of the microorganisms detected by pyrosequencing. Physiological studies suggested a key role of Megasphaera. We showed the high culturability of the microbial communities from hydrogen-producing bioreactors. The isolates can be used to perform physiological studies to understand the H 2 producing process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Rumen bacterial community evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses in dairy sheep fed marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Carrera, T; Toral, P G; Frutos, P; McEwan, N R; Hervás, G; Abecia, L; Pinloche, E; Girdwood, S E; Belenguer, A

    2014-03-01

    Developing novel strategies to increase the content of bioactive unsaturated fatty acids (FA) in ruminant-derived products requires a deeper understanding of rumen biohydrogenation and bacteria involved in this process. Although high-throughput pyrosequencing may allow for a great coverage of bacterial diversity, it has hardly been used to investigate the microbiology of ruminal FA metabolism. In this experiment, 454 pyrosequencing and a molecular fingerprinting technique (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism; T-RFLP) were used concurrently to assess the effect of diet supplementation with marine algae (MA) on the rumen bacterial community of dairy sheep. Eleven lactating ewes were divided in 2 lots and offered a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and concentrate (40:60), supplemented with 0 (control) or 8 (MA) g of MA/kg of dry matter. After 54 d on treatments, animals were slaughtered and samples of rumen content and fluid were collected separately for microbial analysis. Pyrosequencing yielded a greater coverage of bacterial diversity than T-RFLP and allowed the identification of low abundant populations. Conversely, both molecular approaches pointed to similar conclusions and showed that relevant changes due to MA addition were observed within the major ruminal phyla, namely Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Decreases in the abundance of unclassified Bacteroidales, Porphyromonadaceae, and Ruminococcaceae and increases in as-yet uncultured species of the family Succinivibrionaceae, might be related to a potential role of these groups in different pathways of rumen FA metabolism. Diet supplementation with MA, however, had no effect on the relative abundance of Butyrivibrio and Pseudobutyrivibrio genera. In addition, results from both 454 pyrosequencing and T-RFLP indicate that the effect of MA was rather consistent in rumen content or fluid samples, despite inherent differences between these fractions in their bacterial composition

  8. Gene discovery using next-generation pyrosequencing to develop ESTs for Phalaenopsis orchids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Orchids are one of the most diversified angiosperms, but few genomic resources are available for these non-model plants. In addition to the ecological significance, Phalaenopsis has been considered as an economically important floriculture industry worldwide. We aimed to use massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing for a global characterization of the Phalaenopsis transcriptome. Results To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA from 10 samples of different tissues, various developmental stages, and biotic- or abiotic-stressed plants. We obtained 206,960 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with an average read length of 228 bp. These reads were assembled into 8,233 contigs and 34,630 singletons. The unigenes were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR) protein database. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, these analyses identified 22,234 different genes (E-value cutoff, e-7). Assembled sequences were annotated with Gene Ontology, Gene Family and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Among these annotations, over 780 unigenes encoding putative transcription factors were identified. Conclusion Pyrosequencing was effective in identifying a large set of unigenes from Phalaenopsis. The informative EST dataset we developed constitutes a much-needed resource for discovery of genes involved in various biological processes in Phalaenopsis and other orchid species. These transcribed sequences will narrow the gap between study of model organisms with many genomic resources and species that are important for ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:21749684

  9. After Action Report - CUP-2 Comparative Sample Analysis Meeting - Kazakhstan September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kips, Ruth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, Rachel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, Gary [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oujo, Kaitlin [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Geist, William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) visited the Kazakhstan Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) to discuss the results and conclusions of a joint sample analysis (CUP-2 uranium ore concentrate) between LLNL, INP and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Fig. 1). The U.S. delegation also met with the newly-appointed Director-General of the INP (S. Sakhiyev) who expressed his continued support for this collaboration. On the last day of the visit, the delegation toured the new medical isotope production facilities (which is expected to begin operation in a few months), as well as INP’s Nuclear Security Training Center (co-funded by DOE, the Defense Threat Reduction Initiative (DTRA) and the Kazakhstan government). Construction of the Nuclear Security Training Center is expected to be completed by the end of 2016.

  10. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing.

  11. PyroTRF-ID: a novel bioinformatics methodology for the affiliation of terminal-restriction fragments using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissbrodt David G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In molecular microbial ecology, massive sequencing is gradually replacing classical fingerprinting techniques such as terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP combined with cloning-sequencing for the characterization of microbiomes. Here, a bioinformatics methodology for pyrosequencing-based T-RF identification (PyroTRF-ID was developed to combine pyrosequencing and T-RFLP approaches for the description of microbial communities. The strength of this methodology relies on the identification of T-RFs by comparison of experimental and digital T-RFLP profiles obtained from the same samples. DNA extracts were subjected to amplification of the 16S rRNA gene pool, T-RFLP with the HaeIII restriction enzyme, 454 tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing, and PyroTRF-ID analysis. Digital T-RFLP profiles were generated from the denoised full pyrosequencing datasets, and the sequences contributing to each digital T-RF were classified to taxonomic bins using the Greengenes reference database. The method was tested both on bacterial communities found in chloroethene-contaminated groundwater samples and in aerobic granular sludge biofilms originating from wastewater treatment systems. Results PyroTRF-ID was efficient for high-throughput mapping and digital T-RFLP profiling of pyrosequencing datasets. After denoising, a dataset comprising ca. 10′000 reads of 300 to 500 bp was typically processed within ca. 20 minutes on a high-performance computing cluster, running on a Linux-related CentOS 5.5 operating system, enabling parallel processing of multiple samples. Both digital and experimental T-RFLP profiles were aligned with maximum cross-correlation coefficients of 0.71 and 0.92 for high- and low-complexity environments, respectively. On average, 63±18% of all experimental T-RFs (30 to 93 peaks per sample were affiliated to phylotypes. Conclusions PyroTRF-ID profits from complementary advantages of pyrosequencing and T

  12. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inceoglu, Özgül; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2011-01-01

    Background: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. Methodology/Principal Findings: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize...... the structure of bacterial communities in a field cropped with potato. The rhizospheres of six cultivars denoted Aveka, Aventra, Karnico, Modena, Premiere and Desiree, at three growth stages (young, flowering and senescence) were examined, in addition to corresponding bulk soils. Around 350,000 sequences were...... obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample). Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria...

  13. Metatranscriptomics and pyrosequencing facilitate discovery of potential viral natural enemies of the invasive Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia pubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Steven M; Oi, David H; Yu, Fahong; Tan, Xin-Xing; Buss, Eileen A

    2012-01-01

    Nylanderia pubens (Forel) is an invasive ant species that in recent years has developed into a serious nuisance problem in the Caribbean and United States. A rapidly expanding range, explosive localized population growth, and control difficulties have elevated this ant to pest status. Professional entomologists and the pest control industry in the United States are urgently trying to understand its biology and develop effective control methods. Currently, no known biological-based control agents are available for use in controlling N. pubens. Metagenomics and pyrosequencing techniques were employed to examine the transcriptome of field-collected N. pubens colonies in an effort to identify virus infections with potential to serve as control agents against this pest ant. Pyrosequencing (454-platform) of a non-normalized N. pubens expression library generated 1,306,177 raw sequence reads comprising 450 Mbp. Assembly resulted in generation of 59,017 non-redundant sequences, including 27,348 contigs and 31,669 singlets. BLAST analysis of these non-redundant sequences identified 51 of potential viral origin. Additional analyses winnowed this list of potential viruses to three that appear to replicate in N. pubens. Pyrosequencing the transcriptome of field-collected samples of N. pubens has identified at least three sequences that are likely of viral origin and, in which, N. pubens serves as host. In addition, the N. pubens transcriptome provides a genetic resource for the scientific community which is especially important at this early stage of developing a knowledgebase for this new pest.

  14. MGMT promoter methylation determined by HRM in comparison to MSP and pyrosequencing for predicting high-grade glioma response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzeny, Olivier J; Christmann, Markus; Renovanz, Mirjam; Giese, Alf; Sommer, Clemens; Kaina, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) causes resistance of cancer cells to alkylating agents and, therefore, is a well-established predictive marker for high-grade gliomas that are routinely treated with alkylating drugs. Since MGMT is highly epigenetically regulated, the MGMT promoter methylation status is taken as an indicator of MGMT silencing, predicting the outcome of glioma therapy. MGMT promoter methylation is usually determined by methylation specific PCR (MSP), which is a labor intensive and error-prone method often used semi-quantitatively. Searching for alternatives, we used closed-tube high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, which is a quantitative method, and compared it with MSP and pyrosequencing regarding its predictive value. We analyzed glioblastoma cell lines with known MGMT activity and formalin-fixed samples from IDH1 wild-type high-grade glioma patients (WHO grade III/IV) treated with radiation and temozolomide by HRM, MSP, and pyrosequencing. The data were compared as to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients exhibiting the methylated and unmethylated MGMT status. A promoter methylation cut-off level relevant for PFS and OS was determined. In a multivariate Cox regression model, methylation of MGMT promoter of high-grade gliomas analyzed by HRM, but not MSP, was found to be an independent predictive marker for OS. Univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed for PFS and OS a significant and better discrimination between methylated and unmethylated tumors when quantitative HRM was used instead of MSP. Compared to MSP and pyrosequencing, the HRM method is simple, cost effective, highly accurate and fast. HRM is at least equivalent to pyrosequencing in quantifying the methylation level. It is superior in predicting PFS and OS of high-grade glioma patients compared to MSP and, therefore, can be recommended being used routinely for determination of the MGMT status of gliomas.

  15. Pyrosequencing based assessment of bacterial diversity in Turkish Rhipicephalus annulatus and Dermacentor marginatus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Saban; Dowd, Scot E; Davinic, Marko; Bursali, Ahmet; Keskin, Adem

    2017-03-01

    Ticks continue to be a threat to human and animal health in Turkey, as they are considered important vectors of human and animal diseases. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the microbial communities of two tick species, Rhipicephalus annulatus and Dermacenter marginatus, analyze patterns of co-occurrence among microbial taxa, identify and compare pathogens contributing human diseases, and determine whether avirulent symbionts could exclude human pathogens from tick communities. Furthermore, this study explores a microbiome of the R. annulatus and D. marginatus via the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique to describe their bacterial diversity. Pyrosequencing was performed on adult males and females isolated from humans from two high-risk Turkish provinces, Sivas and Amasya, during tick outbreaks in 2009. A total of 36,253 sequences were utilized for analyses of the 8 tick samples. Several pathogenic genera such as Francisella, Coxiella, Rickettsia, and Shigella were detected in the ticks tested. The most distinguishable difference between the two species of ticks was the lack of known human pathogen Rickettsia in R. annulatus and in samples 9 and 10 of D. marginatus. These samples had higher relative abundance of Flavobacterium sp., Curvibacter sp., Acidovorax sp., and Bacteroidaceae genera mostly representing symbionts which form a large component of normal tick microbiota. The outcome of this study is consistent with the predictions of the community ecological theory that diversity-rich bacteriomes are more resistant to bacterial invasion (and consequent pathogen dissemination) than diversity-deprived ones.

  16. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongjit Thanchomnang

    Full Text Available Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1 gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse.

  17. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse.

  18. Development of microsatellite markers in Fosterella rusbyi (Bromeliaceae) using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhrmann, Tina; Wagner, Natascha; Krapp, Florian; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Fosterella rusbyi (Bromeliaceae) to evaluate the population genetic structure and genetic diversity of natural populations of F. rusbyi and other Fosterella species in Bolivia. 454 pyrosequencing technology was used to generate 73027 sequence reads from F. rusbyi DNA, which together contained 2796 perfect simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Primer pairs were designed for 30 loci, of which 15 were used to genotype 30 F. rusbyi plants from two geographical areas in Bolivia. All markers were polymorphic, with two to nine alleles in the overall sample. Cross-species amplification was tested in 10 additional Fosterella species. Seven loci showed consistent amplification in six or more species. The 15 SSR markers developed for F. rusbyi are promising candidates for population genetic analyses within F. rusbyi and other species of Fosterella.

  19. Pyrosequencing as a method for SNP identification in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta

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    Kanthaswamy S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are the primate most used for biomedical research, but phenotypic differences between Indian-origin and Chinese rhesus macaques have encouraged genetic methods for identifying genetic differences between these two populations. The completion of the rhesus genome has led to the identification of many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in this species. These single nucleotide polymorphisms have many advantages over the short tandem repeat (STR loci currently used to assay genetic variation. However, the number of currently identified polymorphisms is too small for whole genome analysis or studies of quantitative trait loci. To that end, we tested a combination of methods to identify large numbers of high-confidence SNPs, and screen those with high minor allele frequencies (MAF. Results By testing our previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identified a subset of high-confidence, high-MAF polymorphisms. Resequencing revealed a large number of regionally specific SNPs not identified through a single pyrosequencing run. By resequencing a pooled sample of four individuals, we reliably identified loci with a MAF of at least 12.5%. Finally, we found that when applied to a larger, geographically variable sample of rhesus, a large proportion of our loci were variable in both populations, and very few loci were ancestry informative. Despite this fact, the SNP loci were more effective at discriminating Indian and Chinese rhesus than STR loci. Conclusion Pyrosequencing and pooled resequencing are viable methods for the identification of high-MAF SNP loci in rhesus macaques. These SNP loci are appropriate for screening both the inter- and intra-population genetic variation.

  20. Rapid detection method for Bacillus anthracis using a combination of multiplexed real-time PCR and pyrosequencing and its application for food biodefense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Timothy W; Thomas, Matthew C; Goji, Noriko; Shields, Michael J; Hahn, Kristen R; Amoako, Kingsley K

    2015-02-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has the capacity to form highly resilient spores as part of its life cycle. The potential for the dissemination of these spores using food as a vehicle is a huge public health concern and, hence, requires the development of a foodborne bioterrorism response approach. In this work, we address a critical gap in food biodefense by presenting a novel, combined, sequential method involving the use of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for the rapid, specific detection of B. anthracis spores in three food matrices: milk, apple juice, and bottled water. The food samples were experimentally inoculated with 40 CFU ml(-1), and DNA was extracted from the spores and analyzed after immunomagnetic separation. Applying the combination of multiplex real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, we successfully detected the presence of targets on both of the virulence plasmids and the chromosome. The results showed that DNA amplicons generated from a five-target multiplexed real-time PCR detection using biotin-labeled primers can be used for single-plex pyrosequencing detection. The combined use of multiplexed real-time PCR and pyrosequencing is a novel, rapid detection method for B. anthracis from food and provides a tool for accurate, quantitative identification with potential biodefense applications.

  1. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  2. Characterization of the microbial communities along the gastrointestinal tract of sheep by 454 pyrosequencing analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The gastrointestinal tract of sheep contain complex microbial communities that influence numerous aspects of the sheep’s health and development. The objective of this study was to analyze the composition and diversity of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract sections (rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum of sheep. Methods This analysis was performed by 454 pyrosequencing using the V3-V6 region of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from five healthy, small tailed Han sheep aged 10 months, obtained at market. The bacterial composition of sheep gastrointestinal microbiota was investigated at the phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species levels. Results The dominant bacterial phyla in the entire gastrointestinal sections were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. In the stomach, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Prevotella, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, and Butyrivibrio. In the small intestine, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Escherichia, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcus. In the large intestine, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Ruminococcus, unclassified Ruminococcaceae, and Prevotella. R. flavefaciens, B. fibrisolvens, and S. ruminantium were three most dominant species in the sheep gastrointestinal tract. Principal Coordinates Analysis showed that the microbial communities from each gastrointestinal section could be separated into three groups according to similarity of community composition: stomach (rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum, small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and large intestine (cecum, colon, and rectum. Conclusion This is the first study to characterize the entire gastrointestinal microbiota in sheep by use of 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, expanding our knowledge of the gastrointestinal bacterial community of sheep.

  3. Pyrosequencing analysis of the human microbiota of healthy Chinese undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidating the biogeography of bacterial communities on the human body is critical for establishing healthy baselines from which to detect differences associated with disease; however, little is known about the baseline bacterial profiles from various human habitats of healthy Chinese undergraduates. Results Using parallel barcoded 454 pyrosequencing targeting on the 16S rRNA gene V3 region, the bacterial diversity of the nasopharynx, saliva, dominant hands, and feces were investigated from 10 healthy Chinese junior boarding undergraduates at Zhejiang University. The participants were 21–24 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) undergraduates. Our data represent an important step for determining the diversity of Chinese healthy microbiota, and can be used for more large-scale studies that focus on the interactions between healthy and diseases states for young Chinese adults in the same age range. PMID:23758874

  4. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  5. Pyrosequencing evidence for iron-cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2015-04-01

    The diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to Fe cycling in marine sediments are still poorly understood. Marine microorganisms in general are difficult to isolate and those that have been successfully isolated may not represent the main endogenous population. Various culture-independent techniques have been applied to characterize marine microbial communities, but only recently, has high throughput pyrosequencing been applied in marine sediment studies. Initial results are promising in capturing the full complexity of microbial communities in sediments. We performed a pyrosequencing-based study in marine and brackish sediments of the Baltic Sea; to our knowledge this is the first pyrosequencing study focused on the zone of Fe cycling. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial and archaeal community composition near the sediment surface showing ongoing Fe cycling as a first step in characterizing the microorganisms potentially involved in Fe cycling. Two 35-cm-cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak, SK, North-Baltic Sea and the Bothnian Bay, BB, Northern Baltic Sea. Porewater (Fe2+, Mn2+, SO42-) and solid phase (Fe, Mn, total S) concentrations were measured and 16S rRNA genes were analysed using 454-pyrosequencing. Additionally, stable S and O isotope signatures of dissolved sulfate were measured at SK site. Sediment biogeochemistry indicated an intense suboxic zone with accumulation of dissolved Fe in the top 30 cm but only minor net sulfate (SO42-) reduction at both sites. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulfide levels were below the detection limit in both sediments. Stable S and O isotope signatures suggest only minor net sulfate reduction. Fe reduction in the studied sediments is dominated by microbial dissimilatory Fe

  6. Phylogenetic characterization of fecal microbial communities of dogs fed diets with or without supplemental dietary fiber using 454 pyrosequencing.

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    Ingmar S Middelbos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dogs suffer from many of the same maladies as humans that may be affected by the gut microbiome, but knowledge of the canine microbiome is incomplete. This work aimed to use 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing to phylogenetically characterize hindgut microbiome in dogs and determine how consumption of dietary fiber affects community structure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six healthy adult dogs were used in a crossover design. A control diet without supplemental fiber and a beet pulp-supplemented (7.5% diet were fed. Fecal DNA was extracted and the V3 hypervariable region of the microbial 16S rDNA gene amplified using primers suitable for 454-pyrosequencing. Microbial diversity was assessed on random 2000-sequence subsamples of individual and pooled DNA samples by diet. Our dataset comprised 77,771 reads with an average length of 141 nt. Individual samples contained approximately 129 OTU, with Fusobacteria (23-40% of reads, Firmicutes (14-28% of reads and Bacteroidetes (31-34% of reads being co-dominant phyla. Feeding dietary fiber generally decreased Fusobacteria and increased Firmicutes, but these changes were not equally apparent in all dogs. UniFrac analysis revealed that structure of the gut microbiome was affected by diet and Firmicutes appeared to play a strong role in by-diet clustering. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest three co-dominant bacterial phyla in the canine hindgut. Furthermore, a relatively small amount of dietary fiber changed the structure of the gut microbiome detectably. Our data are among the first to characterize the healthy canine gut microbiome using pyrosequencing and provide a basis for studies focused on devising dietary interventions for microbiome-associated diseases.

  7. Spatial distribution of cryptic species diversity in european freshwater amphipods (Gammarus fossarum as revealed by pyrosequencing.

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    Anja Marie Westram

    Full Text Available In order to understand and protect ecosystems, local gene pools need to be evaluated with respect to their uniqueness. Cryptic species present a challenge in this context because their presence, if unrecognized, may lead to serious misjudgement of the distribution of evolutionarily distinct genetic entities. In this study, we describe the current geographical distribution of cryptic species of the ecologically important stream amphipod Gammarus fossarum (types A, B and C. We use a novel pyrosequencing assay for molecular species identification and survey 62 populations in Switzerland, plus several populations in Germany and eastern France. In addition, we compile data from previous publications (mainly Germany. A clear transition is observed from type A in the east (Danube and Po drainages to types B and, more rarely, C in the west (Meuse, Rhone, and four smaller French river systems. Within the Rhine drainage, the cryptic species meet in a contact zone which spans the entire G. fossarum distribution range from north to south. This large-scale geographical sorting indicates that types A and B persisted in separate refugia during Pleistocene glaciations. Within the contact zone, the species rarely co-occur at the same site, suggesting that ecological processes may preclude long-term coexistence. The clear phylogeographical signal observed in this study implies that, in many parts of Europe, only one of the cryptic species is present.

  8. Spatial Distribution of Cryptic Species Diversity in European Freshwater Amphipods (Gammarus fossarum) as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westram, Anja Marie; Jokela, Jukka; Baumgartner, Caroline; Keller, Irene

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand and protect ecosystems, local gene pools need to be evaluated with respect to their uniqueness. Cryptic species present a challenge in this context because their presence, if unrecognized, may lead to serious misjudgement of the distribution of evolutionarily distinct genetic entities. In this study, we describe the current geographical distribution of cryptic species of the ecologically important stream amphipod Gammarus fossarum (types A, B and C). We use a novel pyrosequencing assay for molecular species identification and survey 62 populations in Switzerland, plus several populations in Germany and eastern France. In addition, we compile data from previous publications (mainly Germany). A clear transition is observed from type A in the east (Danube and Po drainages) to types B and, more rarely, C in the west (Meuse, Rhone, and four smaller French river systems). Within the Rhine drainage, the cryptic species meet in a contact zone which spans the entire G. fossarum distribution range from north to south. This large-scale geographical sorting indicates that types A and B persisted in separate refugia during Pleistocene glaciations. Within the contact zone, the species rarely co-occur at the same site, suggesting that ecological processes may preclude long-term coexistence. The clear phylogeographical signal observed in this study implies that, in many parts of Europe, only one of the cryptic species is present. PMID:21909373

  9. Pyrosequencing data analysis software: a useful tool for EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF mutation analysis

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    Shen Shanxiang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrosequencing is a new technology and can be used for mutation tests. However, its data analysis is a manual process and involves sophisticated algorithms. During this process, human errors may occur. A better way of analyzing pyrosequencing data is needed in clinical diagnostic laboratory. Computer software is potentially useful for pyrosequencing data analysis. We have developed such software, which is able to perform pyrosequencing mutation data analysis for epidermal growth factor receptor, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1. The input data for analysis includes the targeted nucleotide sequence, common mutations in the targeted sequence, pyrosequencing dispensing order, pyrogram peak order and peak heights. The output includes mutation type and percentage of mutant gene in the specimen. Results The data from 1375 pyrosequencing test results were analyzed using the software in parallel with manual analysis. The software was able to generate correct results for all 1375 cases. Conclusion The software developed is a useful molecular diagnostic tool for pyrosequencing mutation data analysis. This software can increase laboratory data analysis efficiency and reduce data analysis error rate. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1348911657684292.

  10. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial diversity of airag, khoormog and tarag, traditional fermented dairy products of mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kaihei; Dugersuren, Jamyan; Demberel, Shirchin; Watanabe, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Here, we used pyrosequencing to obtain a detailed analysis of the microbial diversities of traditional fermented dairy products of Mongolia. From 22 Airag (fermented mare's milk), 5 Khoormog (fermented camel's milk) and 26 Tarag (fermented milk of cows, goats and yaks) samples collected in the Mongolian provinces of Arhangai, Bulgan, Dundgobi, Tov, Uburhangai and Umnugobi, we obtained a total of 81 operational taxonomic units, which were assigned to 15 families, 21 genera and 41 species in 3 phyla. The genus Lactobacillus is a core bacterial component of Mongolian fermented milks, and Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens and Lactobacillus delbrueckii were the predominant species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the Airag, Khoormog and Tarag samples, respectively. By using this pyrosequencing approach, we successfully detected most LAB species that have been isolated as well as seven LAB species that have not been found in our previous culture-based study. A subsequent analysis of the principal components of the samples revealed that L. delbrueckii, L. helveticus, L. kefiranofaciens and Streptococcus thermophilus were the main factors influencing the microbial diversity of these Mongolian traditional fermented dairy products and that this diversity correlated with the animal species from which the milk was sourced.

  11. Bacterial biomes and potential human pathogens in irrigation water and leafy greens from different production systems described using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, M; Chidamba, L; Korsten, L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the influence of irrigation water microbial quality on leafy green vegetables produced in commercial and small-scale farms as well as homestead gardens using pyrosequencing. Next generation sequencing analysis of the V1-V3 hypervariable region of bacterial 16S rDNA was used to compare bacterial diversity in irrigation water sources and on leafy vegetables. In all samples (12) analysed, the phylum Proteobacteria (64·5%), class Gammaproteobacteria (56·6%) and genus Aeromonas (14·4%) were found to be dominant. Of the total Escherichia sequences detected in tested samples, lettuce (16·3%) from the one commercial farm harboured more sequences than cabbage from the small-scale farm (1·3%) or homestead gardens (1·9%). Escherichia sequences were detected in both irrigation water (4·6%) and on cabbage (1·3%) samples from the small-scale farm. The genus Salmonella was absent in borehole water but was detected in the holding dam water (biomes in irrigation water and on leafy greens were described with pyrosequencing and revealed insights into prevalence of potential and opportunistic pathogens across different production systems. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of the bacterial community during fermentation of Alaska pollock sikhae: traditional Korean seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin Kim, Hyo; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee Turner, Timothy; Lee, Myung-Ki

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the bacterial community of Alaska pollock sikhae, a traditional Korean food made by natural fermentation with Alaska pollock, utilizing pyrosequencing. We fermented the Alaska pollock sikhae at two different temperatures (10°C and 20°C). Before fermentations, the bacterial community was varied. After fermentations, however, Lactobacillus sakei became dominant. The Alaska pollock sikhae sample before fermentations contained only 2% L. sakei, but the sample on day 6 of fermentation at 10°C comprised 74% L. sakei (90% at 20°C). In addition, we observed a reduction in the composition of unpreferred bacterial species for foods after fermentation. The composition of unpreferred bacterial species was more than 30% of total reads in samples before fermentation and decreased to less than 0.2% after fermentation. This result suggested that the fermentation of Alaska pollock sikhae can be beneficial for food safety. Alaska pollock sikhae might be a favorable habitat for L. sakei. Our study is the first report illustrating the alteration of the bacterial community of Alaska pollock sikhae during fermentation utilizing pyrosequencing analysis.

  13. Assessment of bacterial diversity in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus through tag-encoded pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendele Kylie G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ticks are regarded as the most relevant vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, hinders livestock production in tropical and subtropical parts of the world where it is endemic. Tick microbiomes remain largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to explore the R. microplus microbiome by applying the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP technique to characterize its bacterial diversity. Pyrosequencing was performed on adult males and females, eggs, and gut and ovary tissues from adult females derived from samples of R. microplus collected during outbreaks in southern Texas. Results Raw data from bTEFAP were screened and trimmed based upon quality scores and binned into individual sample collections. Bacteria identified to the species level include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Staphylococcus sciuri, Serratia marcescens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Finegoldia magna. One hundred twenty-one bacterial genera were detected in all the life stages and tissues sampled. The total number of genera identified by tick sample comprised: 53 in adult males, 61 in adult females, 11 in gut tissue, 7 in ovarian tissue, and 54 in the eggs. Notable genera detected in the cattle tick include Wolbachia, Coxiella, and Borrelia. The molecular approach applied in this study allowed us to assess the relative abundance of the microbiota associated with R. microplus. Conclusions This report represents the first survey of the bacteriome in the cattle tick using non-culture based molecular approaches. Comparisons of our results with previous bacterial surveys provide an indication of geographic variation in the assemblages of bacteria associated with R. microplus. Additional reports on the identification of new bacterial species maintained in nature by R. microplus that may be

  14. Assessment of bacterial diversity in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus through tag-encoded pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Ticks are regarded as the most relevant vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, hinders livestock production in tropical and subtropical parts of the world where it is endemic. Tick microbiomes remain largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to explore the R. microplus microbiome by applying the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique to characterize its bacterial diversity. Pyrosequencing was performed on adult males and females, eggs, and gut and ovary tissues from adult females derived from samples of R. microplus collected during outbreaks in southern Texas. Results Raw data from bTEFAP were screened and trimmed based upon quality scores and binned into individual sample collections. Bacteria identified to the species level include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Staphylococcus sciuri, Serratia marcescens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Finegoldia magna. One hundred twenty-one bacterial genera were detected in all the life stages and tissues sampled. The total number of genera identified by tick sample comprised: 53 in adult males, 61 in adult females, 11 in gut tissue, 7 in ovarian tissue, and 54 in the eggs. Notable genera detected in the cattle tick include Wolbachia, Coxiella, and Borrelia. The molecular approach applied in this study allowed us to assess the relative abundance of the microbiota associated with R. microplus. Conclusions This report represents the first survey of the bacteriome in the cattle tick using non-culture based molecular approaches. Comparisons of our results with previous bacterial surveys provide an indication of geographic variation in the assemblages of bacteria associated with R. microplus. Additional reports on the identification of new bacterial species maintained in nature by R. microplus that may be pathogenic to its vertebrate hosts

  15. [The quantitative testing of V617F mutation in gen JAK2 using pyrosequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaeva, E A; Mironov, K O; Dribnokhodova, T E; Subbotina, E E; Bashmakova; Ol'hovskiĭ, I A; Shipulin, G A

    2014-11-01

    The somatic mutation V617F in gen JAK2 is a frequent cause of chronic myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. The quantitative testing of relative percentage of mutant allele can be used in establishing severity of disease and its prognosis and in prescription of remedy inhibiting activity of JAK2. To quantitatively test mutation the pyrosequencing technique was applied. The developed technique permits detecting and quantitatively, testing percentage of mutation fraction since 7%. The "gray zone" is presented by samples with percentage of mutant allele from 4% to 7%. The dependence of expected percentage of mutant fraction in analyzed sample from observed value of signal is described by equation of line with regression coefficients y = - 0.97, x = -1.32 and at that measurement uncertainty consists ± 0.7. The developed technique is approved officially on clinical material from 192 patients with main forms of myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. It was detected 64 samples with mautant fraction percentage from 13% to 91%. The developed technique permits implementing monitoring of therapy of myeloprolific diseases and facilitates to optimize tactics of treatment.

  16. Shedding light on the microbial community of the macropod foregut using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Maree Gulino

    Full Text Available Twenty macropods from five locations in Queensland, Australia, grazing on a variety of native pastures were surveyed and the bacterial community of the foregut was examined using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing. Specifically, the V3/V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was examined. A total of 5040 OTUs were identified in the data set (post filtering. Thirty-two OTUs were identified as 'shared' OTUS (i.e. present in all samples belonging to either Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes (Clostridiales/Bacteroidales. These phyla predominated the general microbial community in all macropods. Genera represented within the shared OTUs included: unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, unclassified Clostridiales, Peptococcus sp. Coprococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Blautia sp., Ruminoccocus sp., Eubacterium sp., Dorea sp., Oscillospira sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The composition of the bacterial community of the foregut samples of each the host species (Macropus rufus, Macropus giganteus and Macropus robustus was significantly different allowing differentiation between the host species based on alpha and beta diversity measures. Specifically, eleven dominant OTUs that separated the three host species were identified and classified as: unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Bacteroidales, Prevotella spp. and a Syntrophococcus sucromutans. Putative reductive acetogens and fibrolytic bacteria were also identified in samples. Future work will investigate the presence and role of fibrolytics and acetogens in these ecosystems. Ideally, the isolation and characterization of these organisms will be used for enhanced feed efficiency in cattle, methane mitigation and potentially for other industries such as the biofuel industry.

  17. Diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in the Fildes Region (maritime Antarctica as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng Fei eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in four different soils (human-, penguin-, seal-colony impacted soils and pristine soil in the Fildes Region (King George Island, Antarctica using 454 pyrosequencing with bacterial-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia were abundant phyla in almost all the soil samples. The four types of soils were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community structure. Thermotogae, Cyanobacteria, Fibrobacteres, Deinococcus-Thermus, and Chlorobi obviously varied in their abundance among the 4 soil types. Considering all the samples together, members of the genera Gaiella, Chloracidobacterium, Nitrospira, Polaromonas, Gemmatimonas, Sphingomonas and Chthoniobacter were found to predominate, whereas members of the genera Chamaesiphon, Herbaspirillum, Hirschia, Nevskia, Nitrosococcus, Rhodococcus, Rhodomicrobium, and Xanthomonas varied obviously in their abundance among the four soil types. Distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p < 0.01, phosphate phosphorus (p < 0.01, organic carbon (p < 0.05, and organic nitrogen (p < 0.05 were the most significant factors that correlated with the community distribution of soil bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the soil bacterial communities in human-, penguin-, and seal- colony impacted soils from ice-free areas in maritime Antarctica using high-throughput pyrosequencing.

  18. The ambrosia symbiosis is specific in some species and promiscuous in others: evidence from community pyrosequencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostovčík, Martin; Bateman, C.C.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Stelinski, L.L.; Jordal, B.H.; Hulcr, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2015), s. 126-138 ISSN 1751-7362 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ambrosia symbiosis * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.328, year: 2015

  19. Pyrosequencing the canine faecal microbiota: breadth and depth of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Daniel; Wallis, Corrin; Colyer, Alison; Penn, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian intestinal microbiota remain poorly understood despite decades of interest and investigation by culture-based and other long-established methodologies. Using high-throughput sequencing technology we now report a detailed analysis of canine faecal microbiota. The study group of animals comprised eleven healthy adult miniature Schnauzer dogs of mixed sex and age, some closely related and all housed in kennel and pen accommodation on the same premises with similar feeding and exercise regimes. DNA was extracted from faecal specimens and subjected to PCR amplification of 16S rDNA, followed by sequencing of the 5' region that included variable regions V1 and V2. Barcoded amplicons were sequenced by Roche-454 FLX high-throughput pyrosequencing. Sequences were assigned to taxa using the Ribosomal Database Project Bayesian classifier and revealed dominance of Fusobacterium and Bacteroidetes phyla. Differences between animals in the proportions of different taxa, among 10,000 reads per animal, were clear and not supportive of the concept of a "core microbiota". Despite this variability in prominent genera, littermates were shown to have a more similar faecal microbial composition than unrelated dogs. Diversity of the microbiota was also assessed by assignment of sequence reads into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the level of 97% sequence identity. The OTU data were then subjected to rarefaction analysis and determination of Chao1 richness estimates. The data indicated that faecal microbiota comprised possibly as many as 500 to 1500 OTUs.

  20. Pyrosequencing the canine faecal microbiota: breadth and depth of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hand

    Full Text Available Mammalian intestinal microbiota remain poorly understood despite decades of interest and investigation by culture-based and other long-established methodologies. Using high-throughput sequencing technology we now report a detailed analysis of canine faecal microbiota. The study group of animals comprised eleven healthy adult miniature Schnauzer dogs of mixed sex and age, some closely related and all housed in kennel and pen accommodation on the same premises with similar feeding and exercise regimes. DNA was extracted from faecal specimens and subjected to PCR amplification of 16S rDNA, followed by sequencing of the 5' region that included variable regions V1 and V2. Barcoded amplicons were sequenced by Roche-454 FLX high-throughput pyrosequencing. Sequences were assigned to taxa using the Ribosomal Database Project Bayesian classifier and revealed dominance of Fusobacterium and Bacteroidetes phyla. Differences between animals in the proportions of different taxa, among 10,000 reads per animal, were clear and not supportive of the concept of a "core microbiota". Despite this variability in prominent genera, littermates were shown to have a more similar faecal microbial composition than unrelated dogs. Diversity of the microbiota was also assessed by assignment of sequence reads into operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the level of 97% sequence identity. The OTU data were then subjected to rarefaction analysis and determination of Chao1 richness estimates. The data indicated that faecal microbiota comprised possibly as many as 500 to 1500 OTUs.

  1. 454-Pyrosequencing: A Molecular Battiscope for Freshwater Viral Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Rooks

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses, the most abundant biological entities on the planet, are capable of infecting organisms from all three branches of life, although the majority infect bacteria where the greatest degree of cellular diversity lies. However, the characterization and assessment of viral diversity in natural environments is only beginning to become a possibility. Through the development of a novel technique for the harvest of viral DNA and the application of 454 pyrosequencing, a snapshot of the diversity of the DNA viruses harvested from a standing pond on a cattle farm has been obtained. A high abundance of viral genotypes (785 were present within the virome. The absolute numbers of lambdoid and Shiga toxin (Stx encoding phages detected suggested that the depth of sequencing had enabled recovery of only ca. 8% of the total virus population, numbers that agreed within less than an order of magnitude with predictions made by rarefaction analysis. The most abundant viral genotypes in the pond were bacteriophages (93.7%. The predominant viral genotypes infecting higher life forms found in association with the farm were pathogens that cause disease in cattle and humans, e.g. members of the Herpesviridae. The techniques and analysis described here provide a fresh approach to the monitoring of viral populations in the aquatic environment, with the potential to become integral to the development of risk analysis tools for monitoring the dissemination of viral agents of animal, plant and human diseases.

  2. 76 FR 3603 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Methods of Analysis and Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ..., College Park, MD 20740. Documents related to the 32nd session of the CCMAS will be accessible via the... Approval, CFSAN, FDA, Harvey W. Wiley Federal Building, 5100 Paint Branch Parkway, College Park, MD 20740... INFORMATION ABOUT THE PUBLIC MEETING CONTACT: Marie Maratos, U.S. Codex Office, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW...

  3. Bacterial community analysis during fermentation of ten representative kinds of kimchi with barcoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jin; Chun, Jongsik; Cha, Chang-Jun; Park, Wan-Soo; Jeon, Che Ok; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2012-05-01

    Kimchi, a food made of fermented vegetables, is densely populated by indigenous microorganisms that originate from the raw ingredients under normal conditions. Most microbiological studies on kimchi have been on the most popular dish, baechu-kimchi (Chinese cabbage kimchi). Therefore, relatively little is known about the various other kinds of kimchi (depending on the region, season, main ingredient, starter culture inoculation and recipe). In this study, we collected 100 samples periodically during the fermentation of ten representative kinds of kimchi (including starter-inoculated kimchi) that were stored in the refrigerator (4 °C) during the 30-35 days fermentation period. The multiplex barcoded pyrosequencing of a hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene tagged with sample-specific barcodes for multiplex identifiers was employed for bacterial community profiling. We found that bacterial communities differed between starter-inoculated and non-inoculated kimchi at the early stages of fermentation, but overall there were no significant differences in the late phases. Also, the diversity and richness of bacterial communities varied depending on the various types of kimchi, and these differences could largely be explained by the major ingredients and the manufacture processes of each types of kimchi. This study provides the comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing the biodiversity of the kimchi ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E Kuramae

    Full Text Available We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA. The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most "active" fungi (as recovered via RNA. Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production. Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time.

  5. Pyrosequencing analysis of oral microbiota in children with severe early childhood dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Severe early childhood caries are a prevalent public health problem among preschool children throughout the world. However, little is known about the microbiota found in association with severe early childhood caries. Our study aimed to explore the bacterial microbiota of dental plaques to study the etiology of severe early childhood caries through pyrosequencing analysis based on 16S rRNA gene V1-V3 hypervariable regions. Forty participants were enrolled in the study, and we obtained twenty samples of supragingival plaque from caries-free subjects and twenty samples from subjects with severe early childhood caries. A total of 175,918 reads met the quality control standards, and the bacteria found belonged to fourteen phyla and sixty-three genera. Our results show the overall structure and microbial composition of oral bacterial communities, and they suggest that these bacteria may present a core microbiome in the dental plaque microbiota. Three genera, Streptococcus, Granulicatella, and Actinomyces, were increased significantly in children with severe dental cavities. These data may facilitate improvements in the prevention and treatment of severe early childhood caries.

  6. Microbial communities analysis assessed by pyrosequencing--a new approach applied to conservation state studies of mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, T; Mirão, J; Candeias, A; Caldeira, A T

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge about the microbial communities present in mural paintings is of utmost importance to develop effective conservation and mitigation strategies. The present paper describes a methodological approach for the detailed characterisation of microorganisms thriving in mural paintings by combining culture-dependent methods that allow the identification of microorganisms capable of growing in the laboratory conditions and to obtain high cell densities for further studies, and culture independent methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. The coupled use of culture-dependent methods and DGGE does not give enough information to investigate the diversity and abundance of microorganisms present in wall paintings. Pyrosequencing, a novel molecular technique, used here for the first time in this area of research, allowed the identification of a large number of microorganisms, confirming some already identified by the cultivation-dependent methods such as fungi of the genera Penicillium and Cladosporium, but also providing a great contribution in the identification of several genera and species, not previously identified in these artworks, giving also a detailed overview of contaminants which was not possible with the other approaches. The results obtained on several mural painting samples show a strong relationship between the most deteriorated areas of the paintings and higher microbial contamination.

  7. Bacterial diversity in Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis geminata ant colonies characterized by 16S amplicon 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Heather D; Plowes, Rob; Sen, Ruchira; Kellner, Katrin; Meyer, Eli; Estrada, Dora A; Dowd, Scot E; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2011-05-01

    Social insects harbor diverse assemblages of bacterial microbes, which may play a crucial role in the success or failure of biological invasions. The invasive fire ant Solenopsis invicta (Formicidae, Hymenoptera) is a model system for understanding the dynamics of invasive social insects and their biological control. However, little is known about microbes as biotic factors influencing the success or failure of ant invasions. This pilot study is the first attempt to characterize and compare microbial communities associated with the introduced S. invicta and the native Solenopsis geminata in the USA. Using 16S amplicon 454 pyrosequencing, bacterial communities of workers, brood, and soil from nest walls were compared between neighboring S. invicta and S. geminata colonies at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, Austin, Texas, with the aim of identifying potential pathogenic, commensal, or mutualistic microbial associates. Two samples of S. geminata workers showed high counts of Spiroplasma bacteria, a known pathogen or mutualist of other insects. A subsequent analysis using PCR and sequencing confirmed the presence of Spiroplasma in additional colonies of both Solenopsis species. Wolbachia was found in one alate sample of S. geminata, while one brood sample of S. invicta had a high count of Lactococcus. As expected, ant samples from both species showed much lower microbial diversity than the surrounding soil. Both ant species had similar overall bacterial diversities, although little overlap in specific microbes. To properly characterize a single bacterial community associated with a Solenopsis ant sample, rarefaction analyses indicate that it is necessary to obtain 5,000-10,000 sequences. Overall, 16S amplicon 454 pyrosequencing appears to be a cost-effective approach to screen whole microbial diversity associated with invasive ant species.

  8. Simultaneous pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA, IncP-1 trfA, and merA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsgaard, Peter Nikolai; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Hansen, Lars H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of amplicon pyrosequencing makes it possible to produce thousands of sequences of the same gene at relatively low costs. Here we show that it is possible to simultaneously sequence the 16S rRNA gene, IncP-1 trfA gene and mercury reductase gene (merA) as a way for screening the diversity...... of several genes in the same samples. As a proof-of-concept two different soil samples and a wastewater sample were screened. Multiplexing identifiers (MIDs) and sequencing adapters were added to amplicons using a tailed PCR ...

  9. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs. PMID:26605793

  10. The Prognostic Value of Pyrosequencing-Detected MGMT Promoter Hypermethylation in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Villani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response and good prognosis in patients with glioblastoma (GBM. Transcriptionally active MGMT rapidly removes the alkyl adducts, preventing the formation of cross-links and thereby causing resistance to alkylating drugs. Studies with pyrosequencing (PSQ showed that this technique has a higher reproducibility and sensitivity than other techniques. However, the definition of a prognostically relevant threshold for the percentage of MGMT methylation remains one of the most critical issues in the use of PSQ analysis. The aim of this study was to define the cut-off value correlated with good favourable prognostic outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 51 patients (33 males, 18 females with GBM who underwent surgery or biopsy. The Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis showed that the best possible criteria for PSQ-detected percentage of MGMT methylation that predicted progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were 19% and 13%, respectively. Patients with ≤19% of PSQ-detected MGMT had a shorter PFS (HR: 0.24, p<0.01; those ones with ≤13% had a shorter OS (HR: 0.33, p<0.05. Our study reinforces the importance of MGMT in the management of GBM patients, but future studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm our findings.

  11. Comprehensive pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial microbiota of the skin of patients with seborrheic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiomi; Cho, Otomi; Saito, Chie; Saito, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sugita, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic inflammatory dermatologic condition in which erythema and itching develop on areas of the body with sebaceous glands, such as the scalp, face and chest. The inflammation is evoked directly by oleic acid, which is hydrolyzed from sebum by lipases secreted by skin microorganisms. Although the skin fungal genus, Malassezia, is thought to be the causative agent of SD, analysis of the bacterial microbiota of skin samples of patients with SD is necessary to clarify any association with Malassezia because the skin microbiota comprises diverse bacterial and fungal genera. In the present study, bacterial microbiotas were analyzed at non-lesional and lesional sites of 24 patients with SD by pyrosequencing and qPCR. Principal coordinate analysis revealed clear separation between the microbiota of non-lesional and lesional sites. Acinetobacter, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were abundant at both sites. Propionibacterium was abundant at non-lesional sites, whereas Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus predominated at lesional sites; however, the extent of Propionibacterium colonization did not differ significantly between lesional and non-lesional sites according to qPCR. Given that these abundant bacteria hydrolyze sebum, they may also contribute to SD development. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial microbiotas of the skin of SD patients. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Isolation of 18 Microsatellite Loci in the Desert Mistletoe Phoradendron californicum (Santalaceae Via 454 Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Arroyo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the parasitic mistletoe Phoradendron californicum to investigate to what extent population genetic structure depends on host tree distribution within a highly fragmented landscape. Methods and Results: Fourteen unlinked polymorphic and four monomorphic nuclear microsatellite markers were developed using a genomic shotgun pyrosequencing method. A total of 187 alleles plus four monomorphic loci alleles were found in 98 individuals sampled in three populations from the Sonoran Desert in the Baja California peninsula (Mexico. Loci averaged 13.3 alleles per locus (range 4–28, and observed and expected heterozygosities within populations varied from 0.167–0.879 and 0.364–0.932, respectively. Conclusions: Levels of polymorphism of the reported markers are adequate for studies of diversity and fragmentation in natural populations of this parasitic plant. Cross-species amplifications in P. juniperinum and P. diguetianum only showed four markers that could be useful in P. diguetianum.

  13. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  14. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Inceoğlu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the structure of bacterial communities in a field cropped with potato. The rhizospheres of six cultivars denoted Aveka, Aventra, Karnico, Modena, Premiere and Desiree, at three growth stages (young, flowering and senescence were examined, in addition to corresponding bulk soils. Around 350,000 sequences were obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample. Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, next to as-yet-unclassified bacteria, dominated. Other groups that were consistently found, albeit at lower abundance, were Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Principal components analyses revealed that rhizosphere samples were significantly different from corresponding bulk soil in each growth stage. Furthermore, cultivar effects were found in the young plant stage, whereas these became insignificant in the flowering and senescence stages. Besides, an effect of time of season was observed for both rhizosphere and bulk soils. The analyzed rhizosphere samples of the potato cultivars were grouped into two groups, in accordance with the allocation of carbon to starch in their tubers, i.e. Aveka, Aventra and Karnico (high versus Premiere and Desiree (low and thus replicates per group were established. CONCLUSIONS: Across all potato cultivars, the young plant stages revealed cultivar-dependent bacterial community structures, which disappeared in the flowering and senescence stages. Furthermore, Pseudomonas, Beta-, Alpha- and

  15. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds.

  16. Rapid and accurate pyrosequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmerie William G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid genome sequence information is vital to several disciplines in plant biology, including phylogenetics and molecular biology. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced plastid genomes, fuelled largely by advances in conventional Sanger sequencing technology. Here we report a further significant reduction in time and cost for plastid genome sequencing through the successful use of a newly available pyrosequencing platform, the Genome Sequencer 20 (GS 20 System (454 Life Sciences Corporation, to rapidly and accurately sequence the whole plastid genomes of the basal eudicot angiosperms Nandina domestica (Berberidaceae and Platanus occidentalis (Platanaceae. Results More than 99.75% of each plastid genome was simultaneously obtained during two GS 20 sequence runs, to an average depth of coverage of 24.6× in Nandina and 17.3× in Platanus. The Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes shared essentially identical gene complements and possessed the typical angiosperm plastid structure and gene arrangement. To assess the accuracy of the GS 20 sequence, over 45 kilobases of sequence were generated for each genome using conventional sequencing. Overall error rates of 0.043% and 0.031% were observed in GS 20 sequence for Nandina and Platanus, respectively. More than 97% of all observed errors were associated with homopolymer runs, with ~60% of all errors associated with homopolymer runs of 5 or more nucleotides and ~50% of all errors associated with regions of extensive homopolymer runs. No substitution errors were present in either genome. Error rates were generally higher in the single-copy and noncoding regions of both plastid genomes relative to the inverted repeat and coding regions. Conclusion Highly accurate and essentially complete sequence information was obtained for the Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes using the GS 20 System. More importantly, the high accuracy

  17. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and and pyrosequencing for the characterisation of the caries-associated microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin eSchulze-Schweifing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture.

  18. Characteristics of 454 pyrosequencing data--enabling realistic simulation with flowsim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Susanne; Malde, Ketil; Lanzén, Anders; Sharma, Animesh; Jonassen, Inge

    2010-09-15

    The commercial launch of 454 pyrosequencing in 2005 was a milestone in genome sequencing in terms of performance and cost. Throughout the three available releases, average read lengths have increased to approximately 500 base pairs and are thus approaching read lengths obtained from traditional Sanger sequencing. Study design of sequencing projects would benefit from being able to simulate experiments. We explore 454 raw data to investigate its characteristics and derive empirical distributions for the flow values generated by pyrosequencing. Based on our findings, we implement Flowsim, a simulator that generates realistic pyrosequencing data files of arbitrary size from a given set of input DNA sequences. We finally use our simulator to examine the impact of sequence lengths on the results of concrete whole-genome assemblies, and we suggest its use in planning of sequencing projects, benchmarking of assembly methods and other fields. Flowsim is freely available under the General Public License from http://blog.malde.org/index.php/flowsim/.

  19. Lessons learned from microsatellite development for nonmodel organisms using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoebel, C N; Brodbeck, S; Buehler, D; Cornejo, C; Gajurel, J; Hartikainen, H; Keller, D; Leys, M; Ríčanová, S; Segelbacher, G; Werth, S; Csencsics, D

    2013-03-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way of microsatellite development from 454 pyrosequencing data and analyse data sets of 17 nonmodel species (plants, fungi, invertebrates, birds and a mammal) for microsatellite repeats and flanking regions suitable for primer development. We then compare the numbers of successfully lab-tested microsatellite markers for the various species and furthermore describe diverse challenges that might arise in different study species, for example, large genome size or nonpure extraction of genomic DNA. Successful primer identification was feasible for all species. We found that in species for which large repeat numbers are uncommon, such as fungi, polymorphic markers can nevertheless be developed from 454 pyrosequencing reads containing small repeat numbers (five to six repeats). Furthermore, the development of microsatellite markers for species with large genomes was also with Next Generation Sequencing techniques more cost and time-consuming than for species with smaller genomes. In this study, we showed that depending on the species, a different amount of 454 pyrosequencing data might be required for successful identification of a sufficient number of microsatellite markers for ecological genetic studies. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Performance of Different Analytical Software Packages in Quantification of DNA Methylation by Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Grasso

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing has emerged as an alternative method of nucleic acid sequencing, well suited for many applications which aim to characterize single nucleotide polymorphisms, mutations, microbial types and CpG methylation in the target DNA. The commercially available pyrosequencing systems can harbor two different types of software which allow analysis in AQ or CpG mode, respectively, both widely employed for DNA methylation analysis.Aim of the study was to assess the performance for DNA methylation analysis at CpG sites of the two pyrosequencing software which allow analysis in AQ or CpG mode, respectively. Despite CpG mode having been specifically generated for CpG methylation quantification, many investigations on this topic have been carried out with AQ mode. As proof of equivalent performance of the two software for this type of analysis is not available, the focus of this paper was to evaluate if the two modes currently used for CpG methylation assessment by pyrosequencing may give overlapping results.We compared the performance of the two software in quantifying DNA methylation in the promoter of selected genes (GSTP1, MGMT, LINE-1 by testing two case series which include DNA from paraffin embedded prostate cancer tissues (PC study, N = 36 and DNA from blood fractions of healthy people (DD study, N = 28, respectively.We found discrepancy in the two pyrosequencing software-based quality assignment of DNA methylation assays. Compared to the software for analysis in the AQ mode, less permissive criteria are supported by the Pyro Q-CpG software, which enables analysis in CpG mode. CpG mode warns the operators about potential unsatisfactory performance of the assay and ensures a more accurate quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation at CpG sites.The implementation of CpG mode is strongly advisable in order to improve the reliability of the methylation analysis results achievable by pyrosequencing.

  1. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT: MEETING IN MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, On-Line Tools for Proper Vertical Positioning of Sampling Intervals During Site Assessment, describes an approach to locating monitoring wells that is based on application of ground water models. The ideal use of both the model and site assessment funds is to ...

  2. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing reveals bacterial dysbiosis in the duodenum of dogs with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canine idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is believed to be caused by a complex interaction of genetic, immunologic, and microbial factors. While mucosa-associated bacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of canine IBD, detailed studies investigating the enteric microbiota using deep sequencing techniques are lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate mucosa-adherent microbiota in the duodenum of dogs with spontaneous idiopathic IBD using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biopsy samples of small intestinal mucosa were collected endoscopically from healthy dogs (n = 6 and dogs with moderate IBD (n = 7 or severe IBD (n = 7 as assessed by a clinical disease activity index. Total RNA was extracted from biopsy specimens and 454-pyrosequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene was performed on aliquots of cDNA from each dog. Intestinal inflammation was associated with significant differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota when compared to healthy dogs. PCoA plots based on the unweighted UniFrac distance metric indicated clustering of samples between healthy dogs and dogs with IBD (ANOSIM, p<0.001. Proportions of Fusobacteria (p = 0.010, Bacteroidaceae (p = 0.015, Prevotellaceae (p = 0.022, and Clostridiales (p = 0.019 were significantly more abundant in healthy dogs. In contrast, specific bacterial genera within Proteobacteria, including Diaphorobacter (p = 0.044 and Acinetobacter (p = 0.040, were either more abundant or more frequently identified in IBD dogs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, dogs with spontaneous IBD exhibit alterations in microbial groups, which bear resemblance to dysbiosis reported in humans with chronic intestinal inflammation. These bacterial groups may serve as useful targets for monitoring intestinal inflammation.

  3. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of the microbiome associated with the horn fly, Haematobia irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavesam, Azhahianambi; Guerrero, Felix D; Heekin, Andrew M; Wang, Ju; Dowd, Scot E; Sun, Yan; Foil, Lane D; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2012-01-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans, is one of the most economically important pests of cattle. Insecticides have been a major element of horn fly management programs. Growing concerns with insecticide resistance, insecticide residues on farm products, and non-availability of new generation insecticides, are serious issues for the livestock industry. Alternative horn fly control methods offer the promise to decrease the use of insecticides and reduce the amount of insecticide residues on livestock products and give an impetus to the organic livestock farming segment. The horn fly, an obligatory blood feeder, requires the help of microflora to supply additional nutrients and metabolize the blood meal. Recent advancements in DNA sequencing methodologies enable researchers to examine the microflora diversity independent of culture methods. We used the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) method to carry out the classification analysis of bacterial flora in adult female and male horn flies and horn fly eggs. The bTEFAP method identified 16S rDNA sequences in our samples which allowed the identification of various prokaryotic taxa associated with the life stage examined. This is the first comprehensive report of bacterial flora associated with the horn fly using a culture-independent method. Several rumen, environmental, symbiotic and pathogenic bacteria associated with the horn fly were identified and quantified. This is the first report of the presence of Wolbachia in horn flies of USA origin and is the first report of the presence of Rikenella in an obligatory blood feeding insect.

  4. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of the microbiome associated with the horn fly, Haematobia irritans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhahianambi Palavesam

    Full Text Available The horn fly, Haematobia irritans, is one of the most economically important pests of cattle. Insecticides have been a major element of horn fly management programs. Growing concerns with insecticide resistance, insecticide residues on farm products, and non-availability of new generation insecticides, are serious issues for the livestock industry. Alternative horn fly control methods offer the promise to decrease the use of insecticides and reduce the amount of insecticide residues on livestock products and give an impetus to the organic livestock farming segment. The horn fly, an obligatory blood feeder, requires the help of microflora to supply additional nutrients and metabolize the blood meal. Recent advancements in DNA sequencing methodologies enable researchers to examine the microflora diversity independent of culture methods. We used the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP method to carry out the classification analysis of bacterial flora in adult female and male horn flies and horn fly eggs. The bTEFAP method identified 16S rDNA sequences in our samples which allowed the identification of various prokaryotic taxa associated with the life stage examined. This is the first comprehensive report of bacterial flora associated with the horn fly using a culture-independent method. Several rumen, environmental, symbiotic and pathogenic bacteria associated with the horn fly were identified and quantified. This is the first report of the presence of Wolbachia in horn flies of USA origin and is the first report of the presence of Rikenella in an obligatory blood feeding insect.

  5. Pyrosequencing of bacterial symbionts within Axinella corrugata sponges: diversity and seasonal variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine sponge species are of significant interest to many scientific fields including marine ecology, conservation biology, genetics, host-microbe symbiosis and pharmacology. One of the most intriguing aspects of the sponge "holobiont" system is the unique physiology, interaction with microbes from the marine environment and the development of a complex commensal microbial community. However, intraspecific variability and temporal stability of sponge-associated bacterial symbionts remain relatively unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have characterized the bacterial symbiont community biodiversity of seven different individuals of the Caribbean reef sponge Axinella corrugata, from two different Florida reef locations during variable seasons using multiplex 454 pyrosequencing of 16 S rRNA amplicons. Over 265,512 high-quality 16 S rRNA sequences were generated and analyzed. Utilizing versatile bioinformatics methods and analytical software such as the QIIME and CloVR packages, we have identified 9,444 distinct bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Approximately 65,550 rRNA sequences (24% could not be matched to bacteria at the class level, and may therefore represent novel taxa. Differentially abundant classes between seasonal Axinella communities included Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Acidobacter and Nitrospira. Comparisons with a proximal outgroup sponge species (Amphimedon compressa, and the growing sponge symbiont literature, indicate that this study has identified approximately 330 A. corrugata-specific symbiotic OTUs, many of which are related to the sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae. This family appeared exclusively within A. corrugata, comprising >34.5% of all sequenced amplicons. Other A. corrugata symbionts such as Deltaproteobacteria, Bdellovibrio, and Thiocystis among many others are described. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Slight shifts in several bacterial taxa

  6. Exploring and quantifying fungal diversity in freshwater lake ecosystems using rDNA cloning/sequencing and SSU tag pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchy, Sébastien; Sanciu, Giovanna; Jobard, Marlène; Rasconi, Serena; Gerphagnon, Mélanie; Chabé, Magali; Cian, Amandine; Meloni, Dionigia; Niquil, Nathalie; Christaki, Urania; Viscogliosi, Eric; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2011-06-01

    Water samples were collected along transects from the shore to the centre of two French lakes: the deep, volcanic, oligomesotrophic and low allochthonic-impacted Lake Pavin, and the productive and higher allochthonic-impacted Lake Aydat. The biodiversity was analysed using two approaches: the classical approach consisting of cloning/sequencing of the 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and partial 28S region using primers designed for fungus sequences, and the pyrosequencing of 18S rRNA hypervariable V2, V3 and V5 regions using two primer sets (one universal for eukaryotes and one for fungi). The classical approach yielded 146 (Lake Pavin) and 143 (Lake Aydat) sequences, corresponding to 46 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) respectively. Fungi represented half of the OTUs identified in Lake Pavin and 30% in Lake Aydat, and were dominated by sequences from Chytridiomycota found throughout Lake Pavin but mostly in the central pelagic zone of Lake Aydat. The pyrosequencing approach yielded 42,064 (Pavin) and 61,371 (Aydat) reads, of which 12-15% and 9-19% reads were assigned to fungi in Lakes Pavin and Aydat respectively. Chytridiomycota members were also dominant among these reads, with OTUs displaying up to > 33-fold overrepresentation in the centre compared with the riparian areas of Lake Aydat. Besides fungi, both approaches revealed other major eukaryote groups, with the highest diversity in the central areas of lakes. One of the major findings of our study was that the two lakes displayed contrasting spatial distributions, homogenous for Lake Pavin and heterogeneous for Lake Aydat, which may be related to their peculiarities. This study represents the first unveiling of microbial eukaryote and fungus diversity assessed with two complementary molecular methods, and is considered a major milestone towards understanding the dynamics and ecology of fungi in freshwater lake ecosystems, which are directly link to the abundance and distribution of taxa. © 2011 Society for

  7. Diversity of thermophilic bacteria in raw, pasteurized and selectively-cultured milk, as assessed by culturing, PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; Rachid, Caio T C C; Fernández, Elena; Rychlik, Tomasz; Alegría, Angel; Peixoto, Raquel S; Mayo, Baltasar

    2013-10-01

    Thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus helveticus, enjoy worldwide economic importance as dairy starters. To assess the diversity of thermophilic bacteria in milk, milk samples were enriched in thermophilic organisms through a stepwise procedure which included pasteurization of milk at 63 °C for 30 min (PM samples) and pasteurization followed by incubation at 42 °C for 24 h (IPM samples). The microbial composition of these samples was analyzed by culture-dependent (at 42 °C) and culture-independent (PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons) microbial techniques. The results were then compared to those obtained for their corresponding starting raw milk counterparts (RM samples). Twenty different species were scored by culturing among 352 isolates purified from the counting plates and identified by molecular methods. Mesophilic LAB species (Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus garvieae) were dominant (87% of the isolates) among the RM samples. However, S. thermophilus and Lb. delbrueckii were found to be the dominant recoverable organisms in both PM and IPM samples. The DGGE profiles of RM and PM samples were found to be very similar; the most prominent bands belonging to Lactococcus, Leuconostoc and Streptococcus species. In contrast, just three DGGE bands were obtained for IPM samples, two of which were assigned to S. thermophilus. The pyrosequencing results scored 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% sequence divergence in an RM sample, while only 13 were encountered in two IPM samples. This technique identified Leuconostoc citreum as the dominant microorganism in the RM sample, while S. thermophilus constituted more than 98% of the reads in the IPM samples. The procedure followed in this study allowed to estimate the bacterial diversity in milk and afford a suitable strategy for the isolation of new thermophilic LAB strains, among which adequate

  8. The use of genus-specific amplicon pyrosequencing to assess phytophthora species diversity using eDNA from soil and water in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Català, Santiago; Pérez-Sierra, Ana; Abad-Campos, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora is one of the most important and aggressive plant pathogenic genera in agriculture and forestry. Early detection and identification of its pathways of infection and spread are of high importance to minimize the threat they pose to natural ecosystems. eDNA was extracted from soil and water from forests and plantations in the north of Spain. Phytophthora-specific primers were adapted for use in high-throughput Sequencing (HTS). Primers were tested in a control reaction containing eight Phytophthora species and applied to water and soil eDNA samples from northern Spain. Different score coverage threshold values were tested for optimal Phytophthora species separation in a custom-curated database and in the control reaction. Clustering at 99% was the optimal criteria to separate most of the Phytophthora species. Multiple Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs) corresponding to 36 distinct Phytophthora species were amplified in the environmental samples. Pyrosequencing of amplicons from soil samples revealed low Phytophthora diversity (13 species) in comparison with the 35 species detected in water samples. Thirteen of the MOTUs detected in rivers and streams showed no close match to sequences in international sequence databases, revealing that eDNA pyrosequencing is a useful strategy to assess Phytophthora species diversity in natural ecosystems.

  9. Pyrosequencing analysis of source water switch and sulfate-induced bacterial community transformation in simulated drinking water distribution pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Zhang, Weiyu; Cui, Jing; Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Dongsheng; Wu, Nan; Liu, Xinyuan

    2017-12-01

    Inter-basin water transfer and source water switching will be increasingly launched due to significant population increase and the shortage of the local water resources in cities around the world. Source water switch may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms, and loose deposits in drinking water distribution system (DWDS). Great sulfate alteration during source water switch had been deemed as the main cause of a red water case that occurred in a northern China city. To ascertain the relationship between water quality changing and bacterial communities of biofilms in DWDS and possible bacteria risk in a red water case, water quality changing experiments in simulated DWDSs were conducted for approximately 2 years. Twenty-five corrosion scale samples and eight water samples collected from pipe harvest sites or during experimental periods were analyzed for their bacterial community composition by 454-pyrosequencing technology. Taxonomy results together with redundancy analysis (RDA) or canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis all indicated that bacterial community of samples with groundwater (GW) or surface water (SW) supply history and their variations under high sulfate water were rather different owing to different water source histories and the original pipe scale characteristics. Potential opportunistic pathogens: Burkholderia, Escherichia-Shigella, Mycobacterium, Serratia, Ralstonia, Novosphingobium, Flavobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Sphingopyxis were observed in scale or water samples.

  10. Outsourcing cytological samples to a referral laboratory for EGFR testing in non-small cell lung cancer: does theory meet practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliar, E; Malapelle, U; Bellevicine, C; de Luca, C; Troncone, G

    2015-10-01

    Guidelines from the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) consider cytology suitable for testing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung adenocarcinoma. The guidelines recommend that cytopathologists first discuss the possibility of testing squamous cell carcinomas (SqCC) in multidisciplinary meetings. Second, cell blocks should be analysed rather than smear preparations and, third, specimens should be sent to external molecular laboratories within three working days of receiving requests. This study monitored how these recommendations are met in practice. Our laboratory received 596 requests from cytologists from 13 different institutions. For each case, the cytological diagnosis, cytopreparation type, and time between the request and sample mailing were compared with the recommendations. Of the 596 samples, 32 (5.4%) had been reported as SqCC. Three of these (9.4%) showed EGFR mutation. Cytological slides, either ThinPrep(™) (51.2%) or direct smears (43.2%), were more frequently received than cell blocks (5.7%). The mean time between the oncologist's request and specimen dispatching was 5.8 working days. The occurrence of mutations in samples reported as SqCC was higher than expected. This questions the reliability of the original diagnosis, which reinforced the recommendation to evaluate the opportunity for testing non-adenocarcinoma cytology on a case-by-case basis. In spite of CAP/IASLC/AMP recommendations, cell blocks were underutilized for EGFR testing, but cytological slides were suitable for DNA analyses. Significant efforts are needed to avoid delays in outsourcing cytological samples for EGFR testing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Report of the consultants' meeting on rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples, Vienna, 5-9 September 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The experience gained from the post Chernobyl activities revealed that there was a need to screen a large number of samples under these post accident situations as well as the need to get information quickly so that decisions about accident response and food control can be made. The participants of the Consultants' Meeting on MEF recommended that the Agency ''initiates a co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on collecting and developing, as necessary, rapid methods for measuring radioactivity in food and environmental samples to facilitate international trade, for emergency cases, etc''. Interest in the release of radionuclides to the environment, especially to the foodchain, has been heightened by recent nuclear incidents. In the intermediate and late post-accident period, where the interest is in food control rather than evacuation and sheltering, rapid methods would be useful for screening purposes as well as providing timely information and easing overload. Development of new methods would also have application for routine monitoring of environmental samples. The rapid radiochemical and instrumental methods are intended to permit a determination of radionuclides at a concentration of at least one order of magnitude below those specified for food in the WHO publication ''Derived Intervention Levels for Radionuclides in Food'' and the IAEA publication, ''Safety Series 81''. The rapid methods could include rapid screening methods for determination of the approximate or gross radionuclide content in samples, very rapid methods for a more reliable determination or rapid methods for a reasonable accurate determination of the radionuclide content. The specifications for each type of method were outlined. It was emphasized that the overall objectives of developing rapid methods should be achieved with the minimum sacrifice in reliability, practicality and economy. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of pyrosequencer-generated sequence-signatures to identify the influenza B-lineage and the subclade of the B/Yamataga-lineage viruses from currently circulating human influenza B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi-Mo; Iannello, Pina; Caldwell, Natalie; Jelley, Lauren; Komadina, Naomi; Baas, Chantal; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G

    2013-09-01

    Influenza B viruses belong to two antigenically and genetically distinct lineages which co-circulate in varying proportions in many countries. To develop simple, rapid, accurate and robust methods to detect and differentiate currently circulating B-lineage viruses in respiratory samples and virus isolates. Haemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences from more than 6300 influenza B strains were analysed to identify signature sequences that could be used to distinguish between B-lineages and sublineages. Pyrosequencing and a real time PCR assays were developed to detect the major B-lineages (B/Victoria/2/87 or B/Yamagata/16/88) and pyrosequencing for a unique mutation was used to further differentiate the B/Yamagata viruses into two currently co-circulating subgroups. More than 300 influenza virus-containing samples, including original specimens, cell and egg grown viruses, were tested with a 100% accuracy. Furthermore, when the same PCR primers were used in an rRT-PCR assay, the two lineages could be differentiated by their distinct ranges of melting temperature with an overall accuracy of 99% for 158 samples tested. These new pyrosequencing and rRT-PCR methods have the potential to aid the rapid identification of influenza B-lineages for surveillance purposes and to increase the available data for bi-annual selection of viruses for updating influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of genetically modified organisms by pyrosequencing on a portable photodiode-based bioluminescence sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinxin; Wei, Guijiang; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    A portable bioluminescence analyser for detecting the DNA sequence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was developed by using a photodiode (PD) array. Pyrosequencing on eight genes (zSSIIb, Bt11 and Bt176 gene of genetically modified maize; Lectin, 35S-CTP4, CP4EPSPS, CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator of the genetically modified Roundup ready soya) was successfully detected with this instrument. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles. The maize and soya available from three different provenances in China were detected. The results indicate that pyrosequencing using the small size of the detector is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable way in a farm/field test of GMO analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers from the humivorous termite Cavitermes tuberosus (Isoptera: Termitinae) using pyrosequencing technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fournier, D.; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2015), s. 521-524 ISSN 1877-7252 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Cavitermes tuberosus * termite * microsatellite * pyrosequencing * population genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2015

  16. Rapid strategy for screening by pyrosequencing of influenza virus reassortants--candidates for live attenuated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbik, Svetlana V; Pearce, Nicholas C; Levine, Marnie L; Klimov, Alexander I; Villanueva, Julie M; Bousse, Tatiana L

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccine viruses (LAIVs) can be generated by classical reassortment of gene segments between a cold adapted, temperature sensitive and attenuated Master Donor Virus (MDV) and a seasonal wild-type (wt) virus. The vaccine candidates contain hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from the circulating wt viruses and the remaining six genes derived from the MDV strains. Rapid, efficient selection of the viruses with 6∶2 genome compositions from the large number of genetically different viruses generated during reassortment is essential for the biannual production schedule of vaccine viruses. This manuscript describes a new approach for the genotypic analysis of LAIV reassortant virus clones based on pyrosequencing. LAIV candidate viruses were created by classical reassortment of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) (A/Victoria/361/2011, A/Ohio/02/2012, A/Texas/50/2012) or influenza A (H7N9) (A/Anhui/1/2013) wt viruses with the MDV A/Leningrad/134/17/57(H2N2). Using strain-specific pyrosequencing assays, mixed gene variations were detected in the allantoic progenies during the cloning procedure. The pyrosequencing analysis also allowed for estimation of the relative abundance of segment variants in mixed populations. This semi-quantitative approach was used for selecting specific clones for the subsequent cloning procedures. The present study demonstrates that pyrosequencing analysis is a useful technique for rapid and reliable genotyping of reassortants and intermediate clones during the preparation of LAIV candidates, and can expedite the selection of vaccine virus candidates.

  17. Rapid strategy for screening by pyrosequencing of influenza virus reassortants--candidates for live attenuated vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Shcherbik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Live attenuated influenza vaccine viruses (LAIVs can be generated by classical reassortment of gene segments between a cold adapted, temperature sensitive and attenuated Master Donor Virus (MDV and a seasonal wild-type (wt virus. The vaccine candidates contain hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes derived from the circulating wt viruses and the remaining six genes derived from the MDV strains. Rapid, efficient selection of the viruses with 6∶2 genome compositions from the large number of genetically different viruses generated during reassortment is essential for the biannual production schedule of vaccine viruses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This manuscript describes a new approach for the genotypic analysis of LAIV reassortant virus clones based on pyrosequencing. LAIV candidate viruses were created by classical reassortment of seasonal influenza A (H3N2 (A/Victoria/361/2011, A/Ohio/02/2012, A/Texas/50/2012 or influenza A (H7N9 (A/Anhui/1/2013 wt viruses with the MDV A/Leningrad/134/17/57(H2N2. Using strain-specific pyrosequencing assays, mixed gene variations were detected in the allantoic progenies during the cloning procedure. The pyrosequencing analysis also allowed for estimation of the relative abundance of segment variants in mixed populations. This semi-quantitative approach was used for selecting specific clones for the subsequent cloning procedures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study demonstrates that pyrosequencing analysis is a useful technique for rapid and reliable genotyping of reassortants and intermediate clones during the preparation of LAIV candidates, and can expedite the selection of vaccine virus candidates.

  18. Global characterization of Artemisia annua glandular trichome transcriptome using 454 pyrosequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yejun; Zhang, Qing; Qi, Yan; Guo, Dianjing

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Glandular trichomes produce a wide variety of commercially important secondary metabolites in many plant species. The most prominent anti-malarial drug artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone, is produced in glandular trichomes of Artemisia annua. However, only limited genomic information is currently available in this non-model plant species. Results We present a global characterization of A. annua glandular trichome transcriptome using 454 pyrosequencing. Sequencing runs us...

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla w...

  20. Pyrosequencing Reveals Soil Enzyme Activities and Bacterial Communities Impacted by Graphene and Its Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yan; Wang, Yi; Guan, Yina; Ma, Jiangtao; Cai, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guanghua; Zhao, Xiyue

    2017-10-25

    Graphene (GN) and graphene oxides (GOs) are novel carbon nanomaterial; they have been attracting much attention because of their excellent properties and are widely applied in many areas, including energy, electronics, biomedicine, environmental science, etc. With industrial production and consumption of GN/GO, they will inevitably enter the soil and water environments. GN/GO may directly cause certain harm to microorganisms and lead to ecological and environmental risks. GOs are GN derivatives with abundant oxygen-containing functional groups in their graphitic backbone. The structure and chemistry of GN show obvious differences compared to those of GO, which lead to the different environmental behaviors. In this study, four different types of soil (S1-S4) were employed to investigate the effect of GN and GO on soil enzymatic activity, microbial population, and bacterial community through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that soil enzyme activity (invertase, protease, catalase, and urease) and microbial population (bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi) changed after GN/GO release into soils. Soil microbial community species are more rich, and the diversity also increases after GO/GN application. The phylum of Proteobacteria increased at 90 days after treatment (DAT) after GN/GO application. The phylum of Chloroflexi occurred after GN application at 90 DAT in S1 soil and reached 4.6%. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in S2, S3, and S4 soils; it ranged from 43.6 to 71.4% in S2 soil, from 45.6 to 73.7% in S3 soil, and from 38.1 to 56.7% in S4 soil. The most abundant genera were Bacillus (37.5-47.0%) and Lactococcus (28.0-39.0%) in S1 soil, Lysobacter and Flavobacterium in S2 soil, Pedobacter in S3 soil, and Massilia in S4 soil. The effect of GN and GO on the soil microbial community is time-dependent, and there are no significant differences between the samples at 10 and 90 DAT.

  1. Wrinkles in the rare biosphere: Pyrosequencing errors can lead to artificial inflation of diversity estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Engelbrektson, Anna; Ochman, Howard; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-08-01

    Massively parallel pyrosequencing of the small subunit (16S) ribosomal RNA gene has revealed that the extent of rare microbial populations in several environments, the 'rare biosphere', is orders of magnitude higher than previously thought. One important caveat with this method is that sequencing error could artificially inflate diversity estimates. Although the per-base error of 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing has been shown to be as good as or lower than Sanger sequencing, no direct assessments of pyrosequencing errors on diversity estimates have been reported. Using only Escherichia coli MG1655 as a reference template, we find that 16S rDNA diversity is grossly overestimated unless relatively stringent read quality filtering and low clustering thresholds are applied. In particular, the common practice of removing reads with unresolved bases and anomalous read lengths is insufficient to ensure accurate estimates of microbial diversity. Furthermore, common and reproducible homopolymer length errors can result in relatively abundant spurious phylotypes further confounding data interpretation. We suggest that stringent quality-based trimming of 16S pyrotags and clustering thresholds no greater than 97% identity should be used to avoid overestimates of the rare biosphere.

  2. Vertical stratification of microbial communities in the Red Sea revealed by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Peiyuan

    2010-07-29

    The ecosystems of the Red Sea are among the least-explored microbial habitats in the marine environment. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities in the water column overlying the Atlantis II Deep and Discovery Deep in the Red Sea. Taxonomic classification of pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed vertical stratification of microbial diversity from the surface water to 1500 m below the surface. Significant differences in both bacterial and archaeal diversity were observed in the upper (2 and 50 m) and deeper layers (200 and 1500 m). There were no obvious differences in community structure at the same depth for the two sampling stations. The bacterial community in the upper layer was dominated by Cyanobacteria whereas the deeper layer harbored a large proportion of Proteobacteria. Among Archaea, Euryarchaeota, especially Halobacteriales, were dominant in the upper layer but diminished drastically in the deeper layer where Desulfurococcales belonging to Crenarchaeota became the dominant group. The results of our study indicate that the microbial communities sampled in this study are different from those identified in water column in other parts of the world. The depth-wise compositional variation in the microbial communities is attributable to their adaptations to the various environments in the Red Sea. © 2011 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterioplankton community structure in the Arctic waters as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yin-Xin; Zhang, Fang; He, Jian-Feng; Lee, Sang H; Qiao, Zong-Yun; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Fjords and open oceans are two typical marine ecosystems in the Arctic region, where glacial meltwater and sea ice meltwater have great effects on the bacterioplankton community structure during the summer season. This study aimed to determine the differences in bacterioplankton communities between these two ecosystems in the Arctic region. We conducted a detailed census of microbial communities in Kongsfjorden (Spitsbergen) and the Chukchi Borderland using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant members of the bacterioplankton community in Kongsfjorden. By contrast, the most abundant bacterial groups in the surface seawater samples from the Chukchi Borderland were Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Differences in bacterial communities were found between the surface and subsurface waters in the investigation area of the Chukchi Borderland, and significant differences in bacterial community structure were also observed in the subsurface water between the shelf and deep basin areas. These results suggest the effect of hydrogeographic conditions on bacterial communities. Ubiquitous phylotypes found in all the investigated samples belonged to a few bacterial groups that dominate marine bacterioplankton communities. The sequence data suggested that changes in environmental conditions result in abundant rare phylotypes and reduced amounts of other phylotypes.

  4. The microbial community in the feces of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum as determined by barcoded pyrosequencing analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaorui Bian

    Full Text Available As a non-ruminant herbivore, the white rhinoceros has the ability to utilize fibrous plant matter through microbial fermentation in the hindgut. So far, there has been no report using molecular techniques to study the gut microbiota of the white rhinoceros. We used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize 105,651 sequences of 16S rRNA genes obtained from fecal samples from five white rhinoceroses. Results showed that Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in the samples, which were comprised largely of unclassified bacteria. The microbiota of one animal treated with drug therapy differed from those in other healthy animals, and was dominated by Aerococcus -related bacteria. The core microbiota in the healthy rhinoceros were dominated by phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, represented by the Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Rikenellaceae and Prevotellaceae families. The present work provides a phylogenetic framework for understanding the complex microbial community of the rhinoceros; however, further studies are required to link the distinctive microbiota with their digestive role in the hindgut of the white rhinoceros.

  5. The microbial community in the feces of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) as determined by barcoded pyrosequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Gaorui; Ma, Li; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2013-01-01

    As a non-ruminant herbivore, the white rhinoceros has the ability to utilize fibrous plant matter through microbial fermentation in the hindgut. So far, there has been no report using molecular techniques to study the gut microbiota of the white rhinoceros. We used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize 105,651 sequences of 16S rRNA genes obtained from fecal samples from five white rhinoceroses. Results showed that Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in the samples, which were comprised largely of unclassified bacteria. The microbiota of one animal treated with drug therapy differed from those in other healthy animals, and was dominated by Aerococcus -related bacteria. The core microbiota in the healthy rhinoceros were dominated by phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, represented by the Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Rikenellaceae and Prevotellaceae families. The present work provides a phylogenetic framework for understanding the complex microbial community of the rhinoceros; however, further studies are required to link the distinctive microbiota with their digestive role in the hindgut of the white rhinoceros.

  6. Zooplankton diversity across three Red Sea reefs using pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2014-07-30

    Coral reefs are considered among the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, yet little is known about the diversity of plankton in the surrounding water column. Moreover, few studies have utilized genomic methods to investigate zooplankton diversity in any habitat. This study investigated the diversity of taxa by sampling 45 stations around three reef systems in the central/southern Red Sea. The diversity of metazoan plankton was investigated by targeting the 18S rRNA gene and clustering OTUs at 97% sequence similarity. A total of 754 and 854 metazoan OTUs were observed in the data set for the 1380F and 1389F primer sets respectively. The phylum Arthropoda dominated both primer sets accounting for ~60% of reads followed by Cnidaria (~20%). Only about 20% of OTUs were shared between all three reef systems and the relation between geographic distance and Jaccard Similarity measures was not significant. Cluster analysis showed that there was no distinct split between reefs and stations from different reefs clustered together both for metazoans as a whole and for the phyla Arthropoda, Cnidaria and Chordata separately. This suggests that distance may not be a determining factor in the taxonomic composition of stations.

  7. 454 Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial diversity and community structure in termite guts, mounds and surrounding soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makonde, Huxley M; Mwirichia, Romano; Osiemo, Zipporah; Boga, Hamadi I; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Termites constitute part of diverse and economically important termite fauna in Africa, but information on gut microbiota and their associated soil microbiome is still inadequate. In this study, we assessed and compared the bacterial diversity and community structure between termites' gut, their mounds and surrounding soil using the 454 pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. A wood-feeder termite (Microcerotermes sp.), three fungus-cultivating termites (Macrotermes michaelseni, Odontotermes sp. and Microtermes sp.), their associated mounds and corresponding savannah soil samples were analyzed. The pH of the gut homogenates and soil physico-chemical properties were determined. The results indicated significant difference in bacterial community composition and structure between the gut and corresponding soil samples. Soil samples (Chao1 index ranged from 1359 to 2619) had higher species richness than gut samples (Chao1 index ranged from 461 to 1527). The bacterial composition and community structure in the gut of Macrotermes michaelseni and Odontotermes sp. were almost identical but different from that of Microtermes and Microcerotermes species, which had unique community structures. The most predominant bacterial phyla in the gut were Bacteroidetes (40-58 %), Spirochaetes (10-70 %), Firmicutes (17-27 %) and Fibrobacteres (13 %) while in the soil samples were Acidobacteria (28-45 %), Actinobacteria (20-40 %) and Proteobacteria (18-24 %). Some termite gut-specific bacterial lineages belonging to the genera Dysgonomonas, Parabacteroides, Paludibacter, Tannerella, Alistipes, BCf9-17 termite group and Termite Treponema cluster were observed. The results not only demonstrated a high level of bacterial diversity in the gut and surrounding soil environments, but also presence of distinct bacterial communities that are yet to be cultivated. Therefore, combined efforts using both culture and culture-independent methods are suggested to

  8. The communities of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaf endophytic bacteria, analyzed by 16S-ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Fernando M; Marina, María; Pieckenstain, Fernando L

    2014-02-01

    Endophytic bacterial communities of tomato leaves were analyzed by 16S-rRNA gene pyrosequencing and compared to rhizosphere communities. Leaf endophytes mainly comprised five phyla, among which Proteobacteria was the most represented (90%), followed by Actinobacteria (1,5%), Planctomycetes (1,4%), Verrucomicrobia (1,1%), and Acidobacteria (0,5%). Gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant class of Proteobacteria (84%), while Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria represented 12% and 4% of this phylum, respectively. Rarefaction curves for endophytic bacteria saturated at 80 OTUs, indicating a lower diversity as compared to rhizosphere samples (> 1700 OTUs). Hierarchical clustering also revealed that leaf endophytic communities strongly differed from rhizospheric ones. Some OTUs assigned to Bacillus, Stenotrophomonas, and Acinetobacter, as well as some unclassified Enterobacteriaceae were specific for the endophytic community, probably representing bacteria specialized in colonizing this niche. On the other hand, some OTUs detected in the leaf endophytic community were also present in the rhizosphere, probably representing soil bacteria that endophytically colonize leaves. As a whole, this study describes the composition of the endophytic bacterial communities of tomato leaves, identifying a variety of genera that could exert multiple effects on growth and health of tomato plants. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of bacterial diversity in Hyalomma aegyptium, H. marginatum and H. excavatum ticks through tag-encoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Adem; Bursali, Ahmet; Snow, David E; Dowd, Scot E; Tekin, Saban

    2017-12-01

    Ticks are among the most significant human-biting ectoparasites and they play a major role in transmission of many pathogenic agents to humans. In the present study, three species of Hyalomma ticks, Hyalomma aegyptium, H. marginatum and H. excavatum, were examined for the presence of zoonotic bacteria, both male and female ticks alike. Examination of microbial diversity with tag-encoded pyrosequencing indicates that H. marginatum and H. excavatum were more diversity rich than H. aegyptium. Although numerous pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacterial genera were detected, including Acidovorax, Bacillus, Bacteroides, Bdellovibrio, Clostridium, Curvibacter, Escherichia, Flavobacterium, Limnohabitans, Paenibacillus, Ralstonia, Sarcina, Sediminibacterium, Segetibacter Stenotrophomonas and Variovorax, the predominant zoonotic bacteria represented in these ticks were genera Borrelia, Francisella, and Rickettsia. To the authors' knowledge, this work represents the first detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in the tick H. excavatum, raising questions regarding the vector competency of this tick, as well as associations of different disease representations perhaps through previously unforeseen routes of pathogen introduction. Likewise, similar questions are related to the presence of Legionella pneumophila in one H. excavatum sample.

  10. Dental plaque development on a hydroxyapatite disk in young adults observed by using a barcoded pyrosequencing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Yasui, Masaki; Shibata, Yukie; Furuta, Michiko; Saeki, Yoji; Eshima, Nobuoki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Dental plaque is a dynamic microbial biofilm ecosystem that comprises hundreds of species including difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. We observed the assembly of a plaque bacterial community through 16S rRNA gene analysis. Plaque samples that accumulated on a hydroxyapatite disk for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days with saliva on day 0 were collected from 19 young adults using a removable resin splint. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the total bacterial amount gradually increased and reached a plateau on day 4. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the microbial richness and diversity particularly increased between days 5 and 7. A principal coordinate analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac showed the community assembly in a time-related manner, which became increasingly similar to the salivary microbiota. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Abiotrophia, Gemella, and Rothia were predominant in the plaque bacterial community in the earlier days, whereas obligate anaerobes, such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga showed increased dominance on later days. UniFrac analysis also demonstrated that dental caries experience had a significant effect on the assembly process. Our results reveal the development pattern of the plaque bacterial community as well as the inter-individual differences associated with dental caries experience. PMID:25633431

  11. Dental plaque development on a hydroxyapatite disk in young adults observed by using a barcoded pyrosequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Yasui, Masaki; Shibata, Yukie; Furuta, Michiko; Saeki, Yoji; Eshima, Nobuoki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-30

    Dental plaque is a dynamic microbial biofilm ecosystem that comprises hundreds of species including difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. We observed the assembly of a plaque bacterial community through 16S rRNA gene analysis. Plaque samples that accumulated on a hydroxyapatite disk for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days with saliva on day 0 were collected from 19 young adults using a removable resin splint. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the total bacterial amount gradually increased and reached a plateau on day 4. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the microbial richness and diversity particularly increased between days 5 and 7. A principal coordinate analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac showed the community assembly in a time-related manner, which became increasingly similar to the salivary microbiota. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Abiotrophia, Gemella, and Rothia were predominant in the plaque bacterial community in the earlier days, whereas obligate anaerobes, such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga showed increased dominance on later days. UniFrac analysis also demonstrated that dental caries experience had a significant effect on the assembly process. Our results reveal the development pattern of the plaque bacterial community as well as the inter-individual differences associated with dental caries experience.

  12. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Alain B. Pajarillo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level. Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs.

  13. Characterizing the emergence and persistence of drug resistant mutations in HIV-1 subtype C infections using 454 ultra deep pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansode Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of HIV-1 RNA in the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral therapies (ARTs is well documented while less is known about the role of historical viruses stored in the proviral DNA. The primary focus of this work was to characterize the genetic diversity and evolution of HIV drug resistant variants in an individual’s provirus during antiretroviral therapy using next generation sequencing. Methods Blood samples were collected prior to antiretroviral therapy exposure and during the course of treatment from five patients in whom drug resistance mutations had previously been identified using consensus sequencing. The spectrum of viral variants present in the provirus at each sampling time-point were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing from multiple combined PCR products. The prevalence of viral variants containing drug resistant mutations (DRMs was characterized at each time-point. Results Low abundance drug resistant viruses were identified in 14 of 15 sampling time-points from the five patients. In all individuals DRMs against current therapy were identified at one or more of the sampling time-points. In two of the five individuals studied these DRMs were present prior to treatment exposure and were present at high prevalence within the amplified and sequenced viral population. DRMs to drugs other than those being currently used were identified in four of the five individuals. Conclusion The presence of DRMs in the provirus, regardless of their observed prevalence did not appear to have an effect on clinical outcomes in the short term suggesting that the drug resistant viral variants present in the proviral DNA do not appear to play a role in the short term in facilitating the emergence of drug resistance.

  14. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Boissy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance. The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70% at the phylum level, Clostridia (44% at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%. In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the

  15. Characterization of microsatellite loci from two-spotted octopus Octopus bimaculatus Verrill 1883 from pyrosequencing reads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Contreras, J. F.; Munguía-Vega, A.; Ceballos-Vázquez, B. P.; Arellano-Martínez, M.; Culver, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We characterized 22 novel microsatellite loci in the two-spotted octopus Octopus bimaculatus using 454 pyrosequencing reads. All loci were polymorphic and will be used in studies of marine connectivity aimed at increasing sustainability of the resource. The mean number alleles per locus was 13.09 (range 7–19) and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.50 to 1.00. Four loci pairs were linked and three deviated from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Eighteen and 12 loci were polymorphic in Octopus bimaculoides and Octopus hubbsorum, respectively.

  16. 454 pyrosequencing analyses of bacterial and archaeal richness in 21 full-scale biogas digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Carina; Al-Soud, Waleed A; Larsson, Madeleine; Alm, Erik; Yekta, Sepehr S; Svensson, Bo H; Sørensen, Søren J; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-09-01

    The microbial community of 21 full-scale biogas reactors was examined using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These reactors included seven (six mesophilic and one thermophilic) digesting sewage sludge (SS) and 14 (ten mesophilic and four thermophilic) codigesting (CD) various combinations of wastes from slaughterhouses, restaurants, households, etc. The pyrosequencing generated more than 160,000 sequences representing 11 phyla, 23 classes, and 95 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. The bacterial community was always both more abundant and more diverse than the archaeal community. At the phylum level, the foremost populations in the SS reactors included Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Spirochetes, and Euryarchaeota, while Firmicutes was the most prevalent in the CD reactors. The main bacterial class in all reactors was Clostridia. Acetoclastic methanogens were detected in the SS, but not in the CD reactors. Their absence suggests that methane formation from acetate takes place mainly via syntrophic acetate oxidation in the CD reactors. A principal component analysis of the communities at genus level revealed three clusters: SS reactors, mesophilic CD reactors (including one thermophilic CD and one SS), and thermophilic CD reactors. Thus, the microbial composition was mainly governed by the substrate differences and the process temperature. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sponge-specific unknown bacterial groups detected in marine sponges collected from Korea through barcoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong-Bin; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Jin-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial diversity of 10 marine sponges belonging to the species Cliona celata, an unidentified Cliona species, Haliclona cinerea, Halichondria okadai, Hymeniacidon sinapium, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis, Penares incrustans, Spirastrella abata, and Spirastrella panis collected from Jeju Island and Chuja Island was investigated using amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The microbial diversity of these sponges has as of yet rarely or never been investigated. All sponges, except Cliona celata, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis, and Penares incrustans, showed simple bacterial diversity, in which one or two bacterial OTUs occupied more than 50% of the pyrosequencing reads and their OTU rank abundance curves saturated quickly. Most of the predominant OTUs belonged to Alpha-, Beta-, or Gammaproteobacteria. Some of the OTUs from the sponges with low diversity were distantly (88%~89%) or moderately (93%~97%) related to known sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of the representative sequences of the OTUs were related to the sequences originating from sponges and corals, and formed sponge-specific or -related clades. The marine sponges investigated herein harbored unexplored bacterial diversity, and further studies should be done to understand the microbes present in sponges.

  18. Comparisons of the fungal and protistan communities among different marine sponge holobionts by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Liu, Fang; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Ren, Yi; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-05-01

    To date, the knowledge of eukaryotic communities associated with sponges remains limited compared with prokaryotic communities. In a manner similar to prokaryotes, it could be hypothesized that sponge holobionts have phylogenetically diverse eukaryotic symbionts, and the eukaryotic community structures in different sponge holobionts were probably different. In order to test this hypothesis, the communities of eukaryota associated with 11 species of South China Sea sponges were compared with the V4 region of 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene using 454 pyrosequencing. Consequently, 135 and 721 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi and protists were obtained at 97 % sequence similarity, respectively. These sequences were assigned to 2 phyla of fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) and 9 phyla of protists including 5 algal phyla (Chlorophyta, Haptophyta, Streptophyta, Rhodophyta, and Stramenopiles) and 4 protozoal phyla (Alveolata, Cercozoa, Haplosporidia, and Radiolaria) including 47 orders (12 fungi, 35 protists). Entorrhizales of fungi and 18 orders of protists were detected in marine sponges for the first time. Particularly, Tilletiales of fungi and Chlorocystidales of protists were detected for the first time in marine habitats. Though Ascomycota, Alveolata, and Radiolaria were detected in all the 11 sponge species, sponge holobionts have different fungi and protistan communities according to OTU comparison and principal component analysis at the order level. This study provided the first insights into the fungal and protistan communities associated with different marine sponge holobionts using pyrosequencing, thus further extending the knowledge on sponge-associated eukaryotic diversity.

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals diverse microbial community associated with the zoanthid Palythoa australiae from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; He, Liming; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-05-01

    Diverse sessile organisms inhabit the coral reef ecosystems, including corals, sponges, and sea anemones. In the past decades, scleractinian corals (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia) and their associated microorganisms have attracted much attention. Zoanthids (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Zoanthidea) are commonly found in coral reefs. However, little is known about the community structure of zoanthid-associated microbiota. In this study, the microbial community associated with the zoanthid Palythoa australiae in the South China Sea was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. As a result, 2,353 bacterial, 583 archaeal, and 36 eukaryotic microbial ribotypes were detected, respectively. A total of 22 bacterial phyla (16 formally described phyla and six candidate phyla) were recovered. Proteobacteria was the most abundant group, followed by Chloroflexi and Actinobacteria. High-abundance Rhizobiales and diverse Chloroflexi were observed in the bacterial community. The archaeal population was composed of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, with Marine Group I as the dominant lineage. In particular, Candidatus Nitrosopumilus dominated the archaeal community. Besides bacteria and archaea, the zoanthid harbored eukaryotic microorganisms including fungi and algae though their diversity was very low. This study provided the first insights into the microbial community associated with P. australiae by 454 pyrosequencing, consequently laid a basis for the understanding of the association of P. australiae-microbes symbioses.

  20. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lank Simon M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons.

  1. Pyrosequencing investigation into the bacterial community in permafrost soils along the China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline (CRCOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sizhong; Wen, Xi; Jin, Huijun; Wu, Qingbai

    2012-01-01

    The China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline (CRCOP) goes through 441 km permafrost soils in northeastern China. The bioremediation in case of oil spills is a major concern. So far, little is known about the indigenous bacteria inhabiting in the permafrost soils along the pipeline. A pilot 454 pyrosequencing analysis on the communities from four selected sites which possess high environment risk along the CRCOP is herein presented. The results reveal an immense bacterial diversity than previously anticipated. A total of 14448 OTUs with 84834 reads are identified, which could be assigned into 39 different phyla, and 223 families or 386 genera. Only five phyla sustain a mean OTU abundance more than 5% in all the samples, but they altogether account for 85.08% of total reads. Proteobacteria accounts for 41.65% of the total OTUs or 45% of the reads across all samples, and its proportion generally increases with soil depth, but OTUs numerically decline. Among Proteobacteria, the abundance of Beta-, Alpha-, Delta- and Gamma- subdivisions average to 38.7% (2331 OTUs), 37.5% (2257 OTUs), 10.35% (616 OTUs), and 6.21% (374 OTUs), respectively. Acidobacteria (esp. Acidobacteriaceae), Actinobacteria (esp. Intrasporangiaceae), Bacteroidetes (esp. Sphingobacteria and Flavobacteria) and Chloroflexi (esp. Anaerolineaceae) are also very common, accounting for 8.56% (1237 OTUs), 7.86% (1136 OTUs); 7.35% (1063 OTUs) and 8.27% (1195 OTUs) of total libraries, respectively. The ordination analysis indicates that bacteria communities in the upper active layer cluster together (similar), while bacterial consortia from the lower active layer and permafrost table scatter (less similar). The abundance of Rhodococcus (12 OTUs), Pseudomonas (71 OTUs) and Sphingomonas (87 OTUs) is even less (<0.01%). This effort to profile the background diversity may set the first stage for better evaluating the bacterial dynamics in response to accidental oil spills.

  2. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure along different management types in German forest and grassland soils.

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    Heiko Nacke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure in nine forest and nine grassland soils from the Schwäbische Alb that covered six different management types. The dataset comprised 598,962 sequences that were affiliated to the domain Bacteria. The number of classified sequences per sample ranged from 23,515 to 39,259. Bacterial diversity was more phylum rich in grassland soils than in forest soils. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences were Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Significant variations in relative abundances of bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes, including Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Alphaproteobacteria, between the land use types forest and grassland were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Phenylobacter, Bacillus, Kribbella, Streptomyces, Agromyces, and Defluviicoccus. In addition, soil bacterial community structure showed significant differences between beech and spruce forest soils. The relative abundances of bacterial groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with soil pH, but little or no relationships to management type and other soil properties were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Soil bacterial community composition and diversity of the six analyzed management types showed significant differences between the land

  3. Community analysis of chronic wound bacteria using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing: impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota.

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    Lance B Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial colonization is hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in the non-healing state of chronic wounds. We characterized wound bacteria from a cohort of chronic wound patients using a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing approach and assessed the impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We prospectively enrolled 24 patients at a referral wound center in Baltimore, MD; sampled patients' wounds by curette; cultured samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions; and pyrosequenced the 16S rRNA V3 hypervariable region. The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed an average of 10 different bacterial families in wounds--approximately 4 times more than estimated by culture-based analyses. Fastidious anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales family XI were among the most prevalent bacteria identified exclusively by 16S rRNA gene-based analyses. Community-scale analyses showed that wound microbiota from antibiotic treated patients were significantly different from untreated patients (p = 0.007 and were characterized by increased Pseudomonadaceae abundance. These analyses also revealed that antibiotic use was associated with decreased Streptococcaceae among diabetics and that Streptococcaceae was more abundant among diabetics as compared to non-diabetics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed complex bacterial communities including anaerobic bacteria that may play causative roles in the non-healing state of some chronic wounds. Our data suggest that antimicrobial therapy alters community structure--reducing some bacteria while selecting for others.

  4. Pyrosequencing of the genital microbiotas of HIV-seropositive and -seronegative women reveals Lactobacillus iners as the predominant Lactobacillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Gregory T; Gilbert, Douglas; Landay, Alan L; Zariffard, Reza; French, Audrey L; Patel, Pranjal; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    The species of vaginal lactobacilli in HIV-seropositive and -seronegative women were determined by 16S gene pyrosequencing. Lactobacillus iners sequences were the predominant lactobacillus sequences in 66% of HIV(+) women and 90% of HIV(-) women. This has implications for resistance of HIV(+) and HIV(-) women to genital colonization by pathogenic organisms.

  5. Pyrosequencing of the Genital Microbiotas of HIV-Seropositive and -Seronegative Women Reveals Lactobacillus iners as the Predominant Lactobacillus Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Spear, Gregory T.; Gilbert, Douglas; Landay, Alan L.; Zariffard, Reza; French, Audrey L.; Patel, Pranjal; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    The species of vaginal lactobacilli in HIV-seropositive and -seronegative women were determined by 16S gene pyrosequencing. Lactobacillus iners sequences were the predominant lactobacillus sequences in 66% of HIV+ women and 90% of HIV− women. This has implications for resistance of HIV+ and HIV− women to genital colonization by pathogenic organisms.

  6. Analysis of soil fungal communities by amplicon pyrosequencing: current approaches to data analysis and the introduction of the pipeline SEED

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Větrovský, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2013), s. 1027-1037 ISSN 0178-2762 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12050; GA MŠk LD12048; GA ČR GAP504/12/0709 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungal community * Internal transcribed spacer * Pyrosequencing pipeline Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2013

  7. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for the northern mauxia shrimp, Acetes chinensis, using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kang, Hyun-Sook; Noh, Eun-Soo; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min

    2014-12-01

    Among the 14 species in the Acetes genus, Acetes japonicus and Acetes chinensis, are the only and also abundant two species around the Korean Peninsula, and are used in traditional recipes. These species are of great economic importance, but little is known about their population genetics, despite the fact that information of this kind is important for stock assessment, fisheries management and identification of origin. A total of 9 microsatellite (MS) markers for A. chinensis were developed using pyrosequencing techniques. Polymorphisms of these markers were evaluated in 96 wild individuals collected from the Yellow Sea off the coast of Korea. A total of 133 alleles were detected at nine loci, with a cross-species transferability of 56% with A. japonicus. These markers will facilitate assessment of population genetic diversity in the genus Acetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) via 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Sina; Wöhrmann, Tina; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2015-05-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed in Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) to evaluate the level of clonality, population structure, and genetic diversity of the species within its native and introduced range. A total of 1371 microsatellites were found in 43,565 reads from 454 pyrosequencing of genomic V. minor DNA. Additional microsatellite loci were mined from publicly available cDNA sequences. After several rounds of screening, 18 primer pairs flanking di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide repeats were identified that revealed high levels of genetic diversity in two native Italian populations, with two to 11 alleles per locus. Clonal growth predominated in two populations from the introduced range in Germany. Five loci successfully cross-amplified in three additional Vinca species. The novel polymorphic microsatellite markers are promising tools for studying clonality and population genetics of V. minor and for assessing the historical origin of Central European populations.

  9. Pyrosequencing-Based Seasonal Observation of Prokaryotic Diversity in Pneumatophore-Associated Soil of Avicennia marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanka Loganathachetti, Dinesh; Sadaiappan, Balamurugan; Poosakkannu, Anbu; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Pneumatophores are aerial roots developing from the main roots of mangrove plants away from the gravity. The below ground pneumatophore-associated soil prokaryotic community of Avicennia marina was studied by amplicon pyrosequencing (39,378 reads) during monsoon and summer seasons. Apart from the most dominant phylum Proteobacteria in both seasons, the second most were Acidobacteria (summer) and Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast (monsoon). Similarly, Acidobacteria_Gp10 and Cyanobacteria were the second most abundant at class level during summer and monsoon, respectively. Archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota was the most abundant followed by Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. The classes detected in our study were Thermoprotei, Halobacteria, and Methanomicrobia. The highest richness and diversity were observed during summer for bacteria, whereas the same phenomena for archaea in monsoon at 97% sequence similarity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to catalog the prokaryotic diversity of pnueumatophore-associated soil.

  10. Characterization of the rainbow trout transcriptome using Sanger and 454-pyrosequencing approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorgaard Gary H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainbow trout are important fish for aquaculture and recreational fisheries and serves as a model species for research investigations associated with carcinogenesis, comparative immunology, toxicology and evolutionary biology. However, to date there is no genome reference sequence to facilitate the development of molecular technologies that utilize high-throughput characterizations of gene expression and genetic variation. Alternatively, transcriptome sequencing is a rapid and efficient means for gene discovery and genetic marker development. Although a large number (258,973 of EST sequences are publicly available, the nature of rainbow trout duplicated genome hinders assembly and complicates annotation. Results High-throughput deep sequencing of the Swanson rainbow trout doubled-haploid transcriptome using 454-pyrosequencing technology yielded ~1.3 million reads with an average length of 344 bp, a total of 447 million bases. De novo assembly of the sequences yielded 151,847 Tentative Consensus (TC sequences (average length of 662 bp and 224,391 singletons. A combination assembly of both the 454-pyrosequencing ESTs and the pre-existing sequences resulted in 161,818 TCs (average length of 758 bp and 261,071 singletons. Gene Ontology analysis of the combination assembly showed high similarities to transcriptomes of other fish species with known genome sequences. Conclusion The 454 library significantly increased the suite of ESTs available for rainbow trout, allowing improved assembly and annotation of the transcriptome. Furthermore, the 454 sequencing enables functional genome research in rainbow trout, providing a wealth of sequence data to serve as a reference transcriptome for future studies including identification of paralogous sequences and/or allelic variation, digital gene expression and proteomic research.

  11. Combining pyrosequencing and isotopic approaches to assess denitrification in a hyporheic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Kaown, Dugin; Mayer, Bernhard; Lee, Jin-Yong; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2018-03-12

    Hyporheic zones are considered hot spots for numerically vast and phylogenetically diverse microbial communities. However, biogeochemical effects of hyporheic zones have rarely been investigated in detail because of the difficulty in accurately measuring denitrification in these zones. To date, little is known about the hydroecology of hyporheic zones. The effect of changes in hydraulic conditions on the community variations of indigenous microorganisms and water quality was examined based on the depth of the hyporheic zone. In particular, we report on the use of the pyrosequencing technique to elucidate denitrifying bacteria (DNB) community profiles combined with the stable isotope composition of nitrate and hydrological patterns in the hyporheic zones to reveal whether denitrification occurs. δ 15 N-NO 3 and δ 18 O-NO 3 values of nitrate were analyzed to evaluate the transformation processes of nitrate in upwelling and downwelling areas and mixed zones. The isotope values indicated different origins of water in upwelling and downwelling zones and that denitrification occurred predominantly in the upwelling areas. Analyses of microbial communities in the hyporheic zone showed that the new genera, species, and isotope data were associated with the hydrological uniqueness of the hyporheic zones. The 16S rRNA sequences were determined and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the DNB communities distributed and gathered the genus Comamonas denitrificans within the mixing patterns of the hyporheic zones and that the relative scarcity of these microbes in these zones was caused by the lack of appropriate substrates. The delineation of the surface water-groundwater mixing zone was quantitatively determined by systematically combining the hydrological and heat transfer analyses and by comparing denitrifying bacteria communities and N isotope data. This study showed that pyrosequencing and isotopic approaches are useful for evaluating the transformation processes of

  12. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. Results We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt). These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724) including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and transcription factors were also identified in this study. Conclusions This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and will aid in the

  13. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimmapuram Jyothi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. Results We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt. These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724 including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs and transcription factors were also identified in this study. Conclusions This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and

  14. Assessment of bacterial endosymbiont diversity in Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larvae using a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach

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    Hirsch Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weevils of the genus Otiorhynchus are regarded as devastating pests in a wide variety of horticultural crops worldwide. So far, little is known on the presence of endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp.. Investigation of endosymbiosis in this genus may help to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies in these weevils (parthenogenesis or sexual reproduction, host-symbiont interactions, and may provide a future basis for novel pest management strategy development. Here, we used a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach to assess the bacterial endosymbiont diversity in larvae of four economically important Otiorhynchus species. Results High-throughput tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of a bacterial 16S rDNA fragment was used to characterise bacterial communities associated with different Otiorhynchus spp. larvae. By sequencing a total of ~48,000 PCR amplicons, we identified 49 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs as bacterial endosymbionts in the four studied Otiorhynchus species. More than 90% of all sequence reads belonged either to the genus Rickettsia or showed homology to the phylogenetic group of “Candidatus Blochmannia” and to endosymbionts of the lice Pedicinus obtusus and P. badii. By using specific primers for the genera Rickettsia and “Candidatus Blochmannia”, we identified a new phylogenetic clade of Rickettsia as well as “Candidatus Nardonella” endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp. which are closely related to “Candidatus Blochmannia” bacteria. Conclusions Here, we used multitag 454 pyrosequencing for assessment of insect endosymbiotic communities in weevils. As 454 pyrosequencing generates only quite short sequences, results of such studies can be regarded as a first step towards identifying respective endosymbiotic species in insects. In the second step of our study, we analysed sequences of specific gene regions for a more detailed phylogeny of selected endosymbiont genera

  15. Microplanktonic community structure in a coastal system relative to a Phaeocystis bloom inferred from morphological and tag pyrosequencing methods.

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    Sébastien Monchy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Massive phytoplankton blooms, like the recurrent Phaeocystis proliferation observed every year in the Eastern English Channel (EEC, have a significant influence on the overall planktonic community structure and their food web dynamics. As well as being an important area for local fisheries, the EEC is an ideal ecosystem for work on microbial diversity. This is because, although its environmental context is relatively complex, it is reasonably well understood due to several years of monitoring and morphological observations of its planktonic organisms. The objective of our study was to better understand the under-explored microbial eukaryotic diversity relative to the Phaeocystis bloom. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The community structure of microplankton (diatoms, haptophytes, ciliates and dinoflagellates was studied through morphological observations and tag pyrosequencing. During the annual Phaeocystis spring bloom, the phytoplankton biomass increased by 34-fold, while the microzooplankton biomass showed a 4-fold increase, representing on average about 4.6% of the biomass of their phytoplankton prey. Tag pyrosequencing unveiled an extensive diversity of Gymnodiniaceae, with G. spirale and G. fusiformis representing the most abundant reads. An extended diversity of Phaeocystales, with partial 18S rDNA genes sequence identity as low as 85% was found, with taxa corresponding to P. globosa, but also to unknown Phaeocystaceae. CONCLUSIONS: Morphological analyses and pyrosequencing were generally in accordance with capturing frequency shifts of abundant taxa. Tag pyrosequencing allowed highlighting the maintenance of microplankton diversity during the Phaeocystis bloom and the increase of the taxa presenting low number of reads (minor taxa along with the dominant ones in response to biotic and/or abiotic changing conditions. Although molecular approaches have enhanced our perception on diversity, it has come to light that the

  16. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for Ginkgo biloba using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Wang, X X; Xu, M; Cao, F L; Yu, F X; Xu, L A

    2016-03-28

    As a "living fossil" that is used to understand the evolutionary history of seed plants, Ginkgo biloba is a well-known multipurpose tree with edible seeds, medicinal properties, and ornamental value, but little is known about its genetic diversity. Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), markers have proven to be powerful tools for genetic studies of plants. In this study, we isolated 30 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci in G. biloba using 454 pyrosequencing. The characteristics of these loci were tested with 48 cultivars. The number of alleles (NA) per locus ranged from two to seven. The observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.750 and from 0.021 to 0.792, with an average of 0.326 and 0.443, respectively. In terms of genetic diversity in the Ginkgo population, NA was 3.300, NE was 2.090, I was 0.782, HO was 0.326, and HE was 0.443. These polymorphic SSRs will be useful for the assessment of population genetic diversity and resource conservation of G. biloba.

  17. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity of pressure ulcers using bTEFAP pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Drake M; Snow, David E; Rees, Eric; Zischkau, Ann M; Hanson, J Delton; Wolcott, Randall D; Sun, Yan; White, Jennifer; Kumar, Shashi; Dowd, Scot E

    2010-09-21

    Decubitus ulcers, also known as bedsores or pressure ulcers, affect millions of hospitalized patients each year. The microflora of chronic wounds such as ulcers most commonly exist in the biofilm phenotype and have been known to significantly impair normal healing trajectories. Bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP), a universal bacterial identification method, was used to identify bacterial populations in 49 decubitus ulcers. Diversity estimators were utilized and wound community compositions analyzed in relation to metadata such as Age, race, gender, and comorbidities. Decubitus ulcers are shown to be polymicrobial in nature with no single bacterium exclusively colonizing the wounds. The microbial community among such ulcers is highly variable. While there are between 3 and 10 primary populations in each wound there can be hundreds of different species present many of which are in trace amounts. There is no clearly significant differences in the microbial ecology of decubitus ulcer in relation to metadata except when considering diabetes. The microbial populations and composition in the decubitus ulcers of diabetics may be significantly different from the communities in non-diabetics. Based upon the continued elucidation of chronic wound bioburdens as polymicrobial infections, it is recommended that, in addition to traditional biofilm-based wound care strategies, an antimicrobial/antibiofilm treatment program can be tailored to each patient's respective wound microflora.

  18. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity of Pressure ulcers using bTEFAP pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Randall D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decubitus ulcers, also known as bedsores or pressure ulcers, affect millions of hospitalized patients each year. The microflora of chronic wounds such as ulcers most commonly exist in the biofilm phenotype and have been known to significantly impair normal healing trajectories. Methods Bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP, a universal bacterial identification method, was used to identify bacterial populations in 49 decubitus ulcers. Diversity estimators were utilized and wound community compositions analyzed in relation to metadata such as Age, race, gender, and comorbidities. Results Decubitus ulcers are shown to be polymicrobial in nature with no single bacterium exclusively colonizing the wounds. The microbial community among such ulcers is highly variable. While there are between 3 and 10 primary populations in each wound there can be hundreds of different species present many of which are in trace amounts. There is no clearly significant differences in the microbial ecology of decubitus ulcer in relation to metadata except when considering diabetes. The microbial populations and composition in the decubitus ulcers of diabetics may be significantly different from the communities in non-diabetics. Conclusions Based upon the continued elucidation of chronic wound bioburdens as polymicrobial infections, it is recommended that, in addition to traditional biofilm-based wound care strategies, an antimicrobial/antibiofilm treatment program can be tailored to each patient's respective wound microflora.

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla were detected from the Red Sea sponges, 11 of which were absent from the surrounding sea water and 4 were recorded in sponges for the first time. Up to 100 OTUs with richness estimates of up to 300 archaeal species were revealed from a single sponge species. This is by far the highest archaeal diversity ever recorded for sponges. A non-negligible proportion of unclassified reads was observed in sponges. Our results demonstrated that the sponge-associated microbial communities remained highly consistent in the same sponge species from different locations, although they varied at different degrees among different sponge species. A significant proportion of the tag sequences from the sponges could be assigned to one of the sponge-specific clusters previously defined. In addition, the sponge-associated microbial communities were consistently divergent from those present in the surrounding sea water. Our results suggest that the Red Sea sponges possess highly sponge-specific or even sponge-species-specific microbial communities that are resistant to environmental disturbance, and much of their microbial diversity remains to be explored.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi assemblages in Chernozem great groups revealed by massively parallel pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mulan; Hamel, Chantal; St Arnaud, Marc; He, Yong; Grant, Cynthia; Lupwayi, Newton; Janzen, Henry; Malhi, Sukhdev S; Yang, Xiaohong; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal resources present in wheat fields of the Canadian Prairie were explored using 454 pyrosequencing. Of the 33 dominant AM fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) found in the 76 wheat fields surveyed at anthesis in 2009, 14 clustered as Funneliformis - Rhizophagus, 16 as Claroideoglomus, and 3 as Diversisporales. An OTU of Funneliformis mosseae and one OTU of Diversisporales each accounted for approximately 16% of all AM fungal OTUs. The former was ubiquitous, and the latter was mainly restricted to the Black and Dark Brown Chernozems. AM fungal OTU community composition was better explained by the Chernozem great groups (P = 0.044) than by measured soil properties. Fifty-two percent of the AM fungal OTUs were unrelated to measured soil properties. Black Chernozems hosted the largest AM fungal OTU diversity and almost twice the number of AM fungal sequences seen in Dark Brown Chernozems, the great group ranking second for AM fungal sequence abundance. Brown Chernozems hosted the lowest AM fungal abundance and an AM fungal diversity as low as that seen in Gray soils. We concluded that Black Chernozems are most conducive to AM fungal proliferation. AM fungi are generally distributed according to Chernozem great groups in the Canadian Prairie, although some taxa are evenly distributed in all soil groups.

  1. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of two closely related ground beetle species with marked genital divergence using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Kotaro; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Nishimura, Osamu; Sota, Teiji

    2014-09-01

    Ground beetles of the subgenus Ohomopterus (genus Carabus) show marked divergence in species-specific male and female genital morphologies, which contributes to reproductive isolation among species. Characterizing the genetic basis of species-specific genital morphology is essential for understanding their diversification, but genomic information on Ohomopterus is not yet available. We analyzed mRNA extracted from abdominal sections of the last instar larvae and pupae of two sister species, Carabus (Ohomopterus) iwawakianus and C. (O.) uenoi, which show marked differences in genital morphology, to compare transcriptomic profiles using Roche 454 pyrosequencing. We obtained 1,608,572 high-quality reads and assembled them into 176,278 unique sequences, of which 66,049 sequences were combined into 12,662 clusters. Differential expression analyses for sexed pupae suggested that four and five clusters were differentially expressed between species for males and females, respectively. We also identified orthologous sequences of genes involved in genital development in Drosophila, which potentially affect genital development and species-specific genital morphology in Ohomopterus. This study provides the first large transcriptomic data set for a morphologically diversified beetle group, which can facilitate future studies on the genetic basis of species-specific genitalia.

  2. Fungal succession in an in-vessel composting system characterized using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langarica-Fuentes, Adrian; Zafar, Urooj; Heyworth, Alan; Brown, Thomas; Fox, Graeme; Robson, Geoffrey D

    2014-05-01

    Fungi are known to have an important role in the composting process as degraders of recalcitrant materials such as cellulose and lignin. Previous attempts to study the diversity and succession of fungi in compost systems have relied on the use of culture-dependent analyses and low-resolution DNA-fingerprinting techniques, lacking the necessary depth to analyse such a rich ecosystem. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the fungal community composition at the different stages of an in-vessel composting process. A complex succession of fungi was revealed, with 251 fungal OTUs identified throughout the monitoring period. The Ascomycota were the dominant phylum (82.5% of all sequences recovered), followed by the Basidiomycota (10.4%) and the subphylum Mucoromycotina (4.9%). In the starting materials and early stages of the process, yeast species from the Saccharomycetales were abundant, while in latter stages and in the high temperature regions of the pile, fungi from the orders Eurotiales, Sordariales, Mucorales, Agaricales and Microascales were the most prominent. This study provides an improved understanding of the fungal diversity occurring during the composting of municipal solid waste, and this knowledge can lead to the development of more efficient composting practices and a better evaluation of the end-product quality. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Assessment by Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing and Response to Maraviroc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Rodriguez

    Full Text Available Maraviroc is an HIV entry inhibitor that alters the conformation of CCR5 and is poorly efficient in patients infected by viruses that use CXCR4 as an entry coreceptor. The goal of this study was to assess the capacity of ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS and different data analysis approaches to characterize HIV tropism at baseline and predict the therapeutic outcome on maraviroc treatment.113 patients with detectable HIV-1 RNA on HAART were treated with maraviroc. The virological response was assessed at months 1, 3 and 6. The sequence of the HIV V3 loop was determined at baseline and prediction of maraviroc response by different software and interpretation algorithms was analyzed.UDPS followed by analysis with the Pyrotrop software or geno2pheno algorithm provided better prediction of the response to maraviroc than Sanger sequencing. We also found that the H34Y/S substitution in the V3 loop was the strongest individual predictor of maraviroc response, stronger than substitutions at positions 11 or 25 classically used in interpretation algorithms.UDPS is a powerful tool that can be used with confidence to predict maraviroc response in HIV-1-infected patients. Improvement of the predictive value of interpretation algorithms is possible and our results suggest that adding the H34S/Y substitution would substantially improve the performance of the 11/25/charge rule.

  4. Polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic foot ulcer biofilm infections determined using bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot E Dowd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. CONCLUSIONS: In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP. Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Subgingival Plaque Microbiota by High-Throughput 16S rDNA Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Daniel; Zhu, Chunxia; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Qi; Dong, Qunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for chronic periodontitis. We investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes on the subgingival plaque bacterial composition by applying culture-independent 16S rDNA sequencing to periodontal bacteria isolated from four groups of volunteers: non-diabetic subjects without periodontitis, non-diabetic subjects with periodontitis, type 2 diabetic patients without periodontitis, and type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis. A total of 71,373 high-quality sequences were produced from the V1-V3 region of 16S rDNA genes by 454 pyrosequencing. Those 16S rDNA sequences were classified into 16 phyla, 27 classes, 48 orders, 85 families, 126 genera, and 1141 species-level OTUs. Comparing periodontally healthy samples with periodontitis samples identified 20 health-associated and 15 periodontitis-associated OTUs. In the subjects with healthy periodontium, the abundances of three genera (Prevotella, Pseudomonas, and Tannerella) and nine OTUs were significantly different between diabetic patients and their non-diabetic counterparts. In the subjects carrying periodontitis, the abundances of three phyla (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes), two genera (Actinomyces and Aggregatibacter), and six OTUs were also significantly different between diabetics and non-diabetics. Our results show that type 2 diabetes mellitus could alter the bacterial composition in the subgingival plaque. PMID:23613868

  6. Pyrosequencing reveals correlations between extremely acidophilic bacterial communities with hydrogen sulphide concentrations, pH and inert polymer coatings at concrete sewer crown surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaling, E; Yang, K; Yan, T

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the acidophilic bacterial communities involved in microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC). Our study sites located downstream from a forced main provided a unique opportunity to study the microbial communities involved in MICC under different environmental conditions (gradients of atmospheric H(2)S, sulphate concentration and pH) and under pipe modifications (coated vs uncoated). Bacterial cell density estimated by both cultivation- and DNA-based methods was low in the corroded sewer samples. Pyrosequencing and cloning showed that Mycobacterium and Acidithiobacillus dominated the acidophilic microbial communities. Methylacidiphilum was also dominant in samples where methane was detected. Correlation analysis indicated that Mycobacterium and Acidithiobacillus were significantly affected by pH and that Mycobacterium could better withstand highly acidic conditions compared to Acidithiobacillus. Communities dominated by Mycobacterium favoured conditions in the lined sewer pipes, while communities with a higher relative abundance of Acidithiobacillus favoured the unlined sewer pipes. Identifying the key micro-organisms involved in MICC and knowing how they interact with their environment are essential aspects for identifying steps towards concrete corrosion management. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. The Analysis of a Microbial Community in the UV/O3-Anaerobic/Aerobic Integrated Process for Petrochemical Nanofiltration Concentrate (NFC Treatment by 454-Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wei

    Full Text Available In this study, high-throughput pyrosequencing was applied on the analysis of the microbial community of activated sludge and biofilm in a lab-scale UV/O3- anaerobic/aerobic (A/O integrated process for the treatment of petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC wastewater. NFC is a type of saline wastewater with low biodegradability. From the anaerobic activated sludge (Sample A and aerobic biofilm (Sample O, 59,748 and 51,231 valid sequence reads were obtained, respectively. The dominant phylotypes related to the metabolism of organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH biodegradation, assimilation of carbon from benzene, and the biodegradation of nitrogenous organic compounds were detected as genus Clostridium, genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, class Betaproteobacteria, and genus Hyphomicrobium. Furthermore, the nitrite-oxidising bacteria Nitrospira, nitrite-reducing and sulphate-oxidising bacteria (NR-SRB Thioalkalivibrio were also detected. In the last twenty operational days, the total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal efficiencies on average were 64.93% and 62.06%, respectively. The removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and Total Nitrogen (TN on average were 90.51% and 75.11% during the entire treatment process.

  8. Logic Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Tugué, Tosiyuki; Slaman, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings include the papers presented at the logic meeting held at the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, in the summer of 1987. The meeting mainly covered the current research in various areas of mathematical logic and its applications in Japan. Several lectures were also presented by logicians from other countries, who visited Japan in the summer of 1987.

  9. Gene discovery using massively parallel pyrosequencing to develop ESTs for the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Daniel A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flesh flies in the genus Sarcophaga are important models for investigating endocrinology, diapause, cold hardiness, reproduction, and immunity. Despite the prominence of Sarcophaga flesh flies as models for insect physiology and biochemistry, and in forensic studies, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for members of this genus. We used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-FLX platform to produce a substantial EST dataset for the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from whole bodies of all life stages and normalized the cDNA pool after reverse transcription. Results We obtained 207,110 ESTs with an average read length of 241 bp. These reads assembled into 20,995 contigs and 31,056 singletons. Using BLAST searches of the NR and NT databases we were able to identify 11,757 unique gene elements (ES. crassipalpis unigenes among GO Biological Process functional groups with that of the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome suggests that our ESTs are broadly representative of the flesh fly transcriptome. Insertion and deletion errors in 454 sequencing present a serious hurdle to comparative transcriptome analysis. Aided by a new approach to correcting for these errors, we performed a comparative analysis of genetic divergence across GO categories among S. crassipalpis, D. melanogaster, and Anopheles gambiae. The results suggest that non-synonymous substitutions occur at similar rates across categories, although genes related to response to stimuli may evolve slightly faster. In addition, we identified over 500 potential microsatellite loci and more than 12,000 SNPs among our ESTs. Conclusion Our data provides the first large-scale EST-project for flesh flies, a much-needed resource for exploring this model species. In addition, we identified a large number of potential microsatellite and SNP markers that could be used in population and systematic

  10. Cyanobacterial composition and spatial distribution based on pyrosequencing data in the Gurbantunggut Desert, Northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingchang; Li, Renhui; Xiao, Peng; Su, Yangui; Zhang, Yuanming

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are the primary colonizers and form a dominant component of soil photosynthetic communities in biological soil crusts. They are crucial in improving soil environments, namely accumulating soil carbon and nitrogen. Many classical studies have examined cyanobacterial diversity in desert crusts, but relatively few comprehensive molecular surveys have been conducted. We used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to investigate cyanobacterial composition and distribution on regional scales in the Gurbantunggut Desert. The relationship between cyanobacterial distribution and environmental factors was also explored. A total of 24,973 cyanobacteria partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, and 507OTUs were selected, as most OTUs had very few reads. Among these, 347 OTU sequences were of cyanobacteria origin, belonging to Oscillatoriales, Nostocales, Chroococcales, and uncultured cyanobacterium clone, respectively. Microcoleus vaginatus, Chroococcidiopsis spp. and M. steenstrupii were the dominant species in most areas of the Gurbantunggut Desert. Compared with other desert, the Gurbantunggut Desert differed in the prominence of Chroococcidiopsis spp. and lack of Pseudanabaenales. Species composition and abundance of cyanobacteria also showed distinct variations. Soil texture, precipitation, and nutrients and salt levels affected cyanobacterial distribution. Increased precipitation was helpful in improving cyanobacterial diversity. A higher content of coarse sand promoted the colonization and growth of Oscillatoriales and some phylotypes of Chroococcales. The fine-textured soil with higher nutrients and salts supported more varied populations of cyanobacteria, namely some heterocystous cyanobacteria. The results suggested that the Gurbantunggut Desert was rich in cyanobacteria and that precipitation was a primary regulating factor for cyanobacterial composition on a regional scale. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Pyrosequencing reveals changes in soil bacterial communities after conversion of Yungas forests to agriculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela S Montecchia

    Full Text Available The Southern Andean Yungas in Northwest Argentina constitute one of the main biodiversity hotspots in the world. Considerable changes in land use have taken place in this ecoregion, predominantly related to forest conversion to croplands, inducing losses in above-ground biodiversity and with potential impact on soil microbial communities. In this study, we used high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to assess whether land-use change and time under agriculture affect the composition and diversity of soil bacterial communities. We selected two areas dedicated to sugarcane and soybean production, comprising both short- and long-term agricultural sites, and used the adjacent native forest soils as a reference. Land-use change altered the composition of bacterial communities, with differences between productive areas despite the similarities between both forests. At the phylum level, only Verrucomicrobia and Firmicutes changed in abundance after deforestation for sugarcane and soybean cropping, respectively. In cultivated soils, Verrucomicrobia decreased sharply (~80%, while Firmicutes were more abundant. Despite the fact that local diversity was increased in sugarcane systems and was not altered by soybean cropping, phylogenetic beta diversity declined along both chronosequences, evidencing a homogenization of soil bacterial communities over time. In spite of the detected alteration in composition and diversity, we found a core microbiome resistant to the disturbances caused by the conversion of forests to cultivated lands and few or none exclusive OTUs for each land-use type. The overall changes in the relative abundance of copiotrophic and oligotrophic taxa may have an impact in soil ecosystem functionality. However, communities with many taxa in common may also share many functional attributes, allowing to maintain at least some soil ecosystem services after forest conversion to croplands.

  12. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Onon

    2010-11-18

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla were detected from the Red Sea sponges, 11 of which were absent from the surrounding sea water and 4 were recorded in sponges for the first time. Up to 100 OTUs with richness estimates of up to 300 archaeal species were revealed from a single sponge species. This is by far the highest archaeal diversity ever recorded for sponges. A non-negligible proportion of unclassified reads was observed in sponges. Our results demonstrated that the sponge-associated microbial communities remained highly consistent in the same sponge species from different locations, although they varied at different degrees among different sponge species. A significant proportion of the tag sequences from the sponges could be assigned to one of the sponge-specific clusters previously defined. In addition, the sponge-associated microbial communities were consistently divergent from those present in the surrounding sea water. Our results suggest that the Red Sea sponges possess highly sponge-specific or even sponge-species-specific microbial communities that are resistant to environmental disturbance, and much of their microbial diversity remains to be explored. © 2011 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  13. Minerals Intake Distributions in a Large Sample of Iranian at-Risk Population Using the National Cancer Institute Method: Do They Meet Their Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Zahra; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2015-01-01

    Minerals are required for the body's normal function. The current study assessed the intake distribution of minerals and estimated the prevalence of inadequacy and excess among a representative sample of healthy middle aged and elderly Iranian people. In this cross-sectional study, the second follow up to the Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS), 1922 generally healthy people aged 40 and older were investigated. Dietary intakes were collected using 24 hour recalls and two or more consecutive food records. Distribution of minerals intake was estimated using traditional (averaging dietary intake days) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) methods, and the results obtained from the two methods, were compared. The prevalence of minerals intake inadequacy or excess was estimated using the estimated average requirement (EAR) cut-point method, the probability approach and the tolerable upper intake levels (UL). There were remarkable differences between values obtained using traditional and NCI methods, particularly in the lower and upper percentiles of the estimated intake distributions. A high prevalence of inadequacy of magnesium (50 - 100 %), calcium (21 - 93 %) and zinc (30 - 55 % for males > 50 years) was observed. Significant gender differences were found regarding inadequate intakes of calcium (21 - 76 % for males vs. 45 - 93 % for females), magnesium (92 % vs. 100 %), iron (0 vs. 15 % for age group 40 - 50 years) and zinc (29 - 55 % vs. 0 %) (all; p < 0.05). Severely imbalanced intakes of magnesium, calcium and zinc were observed among the middle-aged and elderly Iranian population. Nutritional interventions and population-based education to improve healthy diets among the studied population at risk are needed.

  14. Real-time monitoring of methane oxidation in a simulated landfill cover soil and MiSeq pyrosequencing analysis of the related bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhilin; Zhao, Tiantao; Gao, Yanhui; He, Zhi; Zhang, Lijie; Peng, Xuya; Song, Liyan

    2017-10-01

    Real-time CH 4 oxidation in a landfill cover soil was studied using automated gas sampling that determined biogas (CH 4 and CO 2 ) and O 2 concentrations at various depths in a simulated landfill cover soil (SLCS) column reactor. The real-time monitoring system obtained more than 10,000 biogas (CH 4 and CO 2 ) and O 2 data points covering 32 steady states of CH 4 oxidation with 32 different CH 4 fluxes (0.2-125mol·m -2 ·d -1 ). The kinetics of CH 4 oxidation at different depths (0-20cm, 20-40cm, and 40-60cm) of SLCS were well fit by a CH 4 -O 2 dual-substrate model based on 32 values (averaged, n=5-15) of equilibrated CH 4 concentrations. The quality of the fit (R 2 ranged from 0.90 to 0.96) was higher than those reported in previous studies, which suggests that real time monitoring is beneficial for CH 4 oxidation simulations. MiSeq pyrosequencing indicated that CH 4 flux events changed the bacterial community structure (e.g., increased the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Methanotrophs) and resulted in a relative increase in the amount of type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter and Methylococcales) and a decrease in the amount of type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring the microbiota of the red-brown defect in smear-ripened cheese by 454-pyrosequencing and its prevention using different cleaning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzon, Raffaele; Carafa, Ilaria; Tuohy, Kieran; Cervantes, Gonzalo; Vernetti, Luca; Barmaz, Andrea; Larcher, Roberto; Franciosi, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Red-brown pigmentation can occasionally form in smeared-ripened cheese such as Fontina during the ripening process. This reaction is due to over-development of the typical microbiota present on the rind. Previous studies have demonstrated the relationship between red-brown pigmentation and the traditional utilization of wooden shelves during cheese ripening. The first part of the paper focuses on the characterisation of yeast and bacterial microbiota: plate counts and 454-pyrosequencing were performed in spoiled (n = 6) and non-spoiled cheeses (n = 6) and on the wooden shelves used during ripening. The second part shows different systems tested for cleaning the wooden shelves and avoiding the development of the red-brown defect in cheese: washing with hot water and ozone treatment. Actinobacteria, dominated on the wooden shelves, suggesting to be responsible for the red-brown pigmentation; they were also found in traces in the defected cheese samples. Galactomyces and Debaryomyces were the main species characterizing the yeast population, with Debaryomyces being the most dominant species on the shelves used during ripening of the red-brown defective cheese. Hot water treatment reduced the microbial contamination of shelves, whereas only the ozone treatment ensured complete elimination of both yeast and bacteria, resulting in the cheese rind not having the red-brown defect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison of parallel pyrosequencing and sanger clone-based sequencing and its impact on the characterization of the genetic diversity of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhua Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyrosequencing technology has the potential to rapidly sequence HIV-1 viral quasispecies without requiring the traditional approach of cloning. In this study, we investigated the utility of ultra-deep pyrosequencing to characterize genetic diversity of the HIV-1 gag quasispecies and assessed the possible contribution of pyrosequencing technology in studying HIV-1 biology and evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HIV-1 gag gene was amplified from 96 patients using nested PCR. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced using capillary based Sanger fluorescent dideoxy termination sequencing. The same PCR products were also directly sequenced using the 454 pyrosequencing technology. The two sequencing methods were evaluated for their ability to characterize quasispecies variation, and to reveal sites under host immune pressure for their putative functional significance. A total of 14,034 variations were identified by 454 pyrosequencing versus 3,632 variations by Sanger clone-based (SCB sequencing. 11,050 of these variations were detected only by pyrosequencing. These undetected variations were located in the HIV-1 Gag region which is known to contain putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL and neutralizing antibody epitopes, and sites related to virus assembly and packaging. Analysis of the positively selected sites derived by the two sequencing methods identified several differences. All of them were located within the CTL epitope regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ultra-deep pyrosequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for characterization of HIV-1 genetic diversity with enhanced sensitivity, efficiency, and accuracy. It also improved reliability of downstream evolutionary and functional analysis of HIV-1 quasispecies.

  17. A Comparison of Parallel Pyrosequencing and Sanger Clone-Based Sequencing and Its Impact on the Characterization of the Genetic Diversity of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Binhua; Luo, Ma; Scott-Herridge, Joel; Semeniuk, Christina; Mendoza, Mark; Capina, Rupert; Sheardown, Brent; Ji, Hezhao; Kimani, Joshua; Ball, Blake T.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Graham, Morag; Tyler, Shane; Jones, Steven J. M.; Plummer, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyrosequencing technology has the potential to rapidly sequence HIV-1 viral quasispecies without requiring the traditional approach of cloning. In this study, we investigated the utility of ultra-deep pyrosequencing to characterize genetic diversity of the HIV-1 gag quasispecies and assessed the possible contribution of pyrosequencing technology in studying HIV-1 biology and evolution. Methodology/Principal Findings HIV-1 gag gene was amplified from 96 patients using nested PCR. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced using capillary based Sanger fluorescent dideoxy termination sequencing. The same PCR products were also directly sequenced using the 454 pyrosequencing technology. The two sequencing methods were evaluated for their ability to characterize quasispecies variation, and to reveal sites under host immune pressure for their putative functional significance. A total of 14,034 variations were identified by 454 pyrosequencing versus 3,632 variations by Sanger clone-based (SCB) sequencing. 11,050 of these variations were detected only by pyrosequencing. These undetected variations were located in the HIV-1 Gag region which is known to contain putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and neutralizing antibody epitopes, and sites related to virus assembly and packaging. Analysis of the positively selected sites derived by the two sequencing methods identified several differences. All of them were located within the CTL epitope regions. Conclusions/Significance Ultra-deep pyrosequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for characterization of HIV-1 genetic diversity with enhanced sensitivity, efficiency, and accuracy. It also improved reliability of downstream evolutionary and functional analysis of HIV-1 quasispecies. PMID:22039546

  18. Full-exon pyrosequencing screening of BRCA germline mutations in Mexican women with inherited breast and ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vaca-Paniagua

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer comprises 10% of all breast cancers. The most prevalent genes causing this pathology are BRCA1 and BRCA2 (breast cancer early onset 1 and 2, which also predispose to other cancers. Despite the outstanding relevance of genetic screening of BRCA deleterious variants in patients with a history of familial cancer, this practice is not common in Latin American public institutions. In this work we assessed mutations in the entire exonic and splice-site regions of BRCA in 39 patients with breast and ovarian cancer and with familial history of breast cancer or with clinical features suggestive for BRCA mutations by massive parallel pyrosequencing. First we evaluated the method with controls and found 41-485 reads per sequence in BRCA pathogenic mutations. Negative controls did not show deleterious variants, confirming the suitability of the approach. In patients diagnosed with cancer we found 4 novel deleterious mutations (c.2805_2808delAGAT and c.3124_3133delAGCAATATTA in BRCA1; c.2639_2640delTG and c.5114_5117delTAAA in BRCA2. The prevalence of BRCA mutations in these patients was 10.2%. Moreover, we discovered 16 variants with unknown clinical significance (11 in exons and 5 in introns; 4 were predicted as possibly pathogenic by in silico analyses, and 3 have not been described previously. This study illustrates how massive pyrosequencing technology can be applied to screen for BRCA mutations in the whole exonic and splice regions in patients with suspected BRCA-related cancers. This is the first effort to analyse the mutational status of BRCA genes on a Mexican-mestizo population by means of pyrosequencing.

  19. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    You were hundreds of persons to participate in our information meetings of October 3 and 6 2014, and we thank you for your participation! The full presentation is available here. A summary of the topics is available here (in french).

  20. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  1. Assessing the feasibility of GS FLX Pyrosequencing for sequencing the Atlantic salmon genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubieniecki Krzysztof P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a whole genome duplication event and wealth of biological data, salmonids are excellent model organisms for studying evolutionary processes, fates of duplicated genes and genetic and physiological processes associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. It is surprising therefore, that no salmonid genome has been sequenced. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar is a good representative salmonid for sequencing given its importance in aquaculture and the genomic resources available. However, the size and complexity of the genome combined with the lack of a sequenced reference genome from a closely related fish makes assembly challenging. Given the cost and time limitations of Sanger sequencing as well as recent improvements to next generation sequencing technologies, we examined the feasibility of using the Genome Sequencer (GS FLX pyrosequencing system to obtain the sequence of a salmonid genome. Eight pooled BACs belonging to a minimum tiling path covering ~1 Mb of the Atlantic salmon genome were sequenced by GS FLX shotgun and Long Paired End sequencing and compared with a ninth BAC sequenced by Sanger sequencing of a shotgun library. Results An initial assembly using only GS FLX shotgun sequences (average read length 248.5 bp with ~30× coverage allowed gene identification, but was incomplete even when 126 Sanger-generated BAC-end sequences (~0.09× coverage were incorporated. The addition of paired end sequencing reads (additional ~26× coverage produced a final assembly comprising 175 contigs assembled into four scaffolds with 171 gaps. Sanger sequencing of the ninth BAC (~10.5× coverage produced nine contigs and two scaffolds. The number of scaffolds produced by the GS FLX assembly was comparable to Sanger-generated sequencing; however, the number of gaps was much higher in the GS FLX assembly. Conclusion These results represent the first use of GS FLX paired end reads for de novo sequence assembly. Our data demonstrated

  2. Profiling the venom gland transcriptomes of Costa Rican snakes by 454 pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Libia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A long term research goal of venomics, of applied importance for improving current antivenom therapy, but also for drug discovery, is to understand the pharmacological potential of venoms. Individually or combined, proteomic and transcriptomic studies have demonstrated their feasibility to explore in depth the molecular diversity of venoms. In the absence of genome sequence, transcriptomes represent also valuable searchable databases for proteomic projects. Results The venom gland transcriptomes of 8 Costa Rican taxa from 5 genera (Crotalus, Bothrops, Atropoides, Cerrophidion, and Bothriechis of pitvipers were investigated using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing. 100,394 out of 330,010 masked reads produced significant hits in the available databases. 5.165,220 nucleotides (8.27% were masked by RepeatMasker, the vast majority of which corresponding to class I (retroelements and class II (DNA transposons mobile elements. BLAST hits included 79,991 matches to entries of the taxonomic suborder Serpentes, of which 62,433 displayed similarity to documented venom proteins. Strong discrepancies between the transcriptome-computed and the proteome-gathered toxin compositions were obvious at first sight. Although the reasons underlaying this discrepancy are elusive, since no clear trend within or between species is apparent, the data indicate that individual mRNA species may be translationally controlled in a species-dependent manner. The minimum number of genes from each toxin family transcribed into the venom gland transcriptome of each species was calculated from multiple alignments of reads matched to a full-length reference sequence of each toxin family. Reads encoding ORF regions of Kazal-type inhibitor-like proteins were uniquely found in Bothriechis schlegelii and B. lateralis transcriptomes, suggesting a genus-specific recruitment event during the early-Middle Miocene. A transcriptome-based cladogram supports the large

  3. Pyrosequencing Reveals the Predominance of Pseudomonadaceae in Gut Microbiome of a Gall Midge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Bansal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbes are known to play various roles in insects such as digestion of inaccessible nutrients, synthesis of deficient amino acids, and interaction with ecological environments, including host plants. Here, we analyzed the gut microbiome in Hessian fly, a serious pest of wheat. A total of 3,654 high quality sequences of the V3 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene were obtained through 454-pyrosequencing. From these sequences, 311 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were obtained at the >97% similarity cutoff. In the gut of 1st instar, otu01, a member of Pseudomonas, was predominant, representing 90.2% of total sequences. otu13, an unidentified genus in the Pseudomonadaceae family, represented 1.9% of total sequences. The remaining OTUs were each less than 1%. In the gut of the 2nd instar, otu01 and otu13 decreased to 85.5% and 1.5%, respectively. otu04, a member of Buttiauxella, represented 9.7% of total sequences. The remaining OTUs were each less than 1%. In the gut of the 3rd instar, otu01 and otu13 further decreased to 29.0% and 0%, respectively. otu06, otu08, and otu16, also three members of the Pseudomonadaceae family were 13.2%, 8.6%, and 2.3%, respectively. In addition, otu04 and otu14, two members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, were 4.7% and 2.5%; otu18 and otu20, two members of the Xanthomonadaceae family, were 1.3% and 1.2%, respectively; otu12, a member of Achromobacter, was 4.2%; otu19, a member of Undibacterium, was 1.4%; and otu9, otu10, and otu15, members of various families, were 6.1%, 6.3%, and 1.9%, respectively. The investigation into dynamics of Pseudomonas, the most abundant genera, revealed that its population level was at peak in freshly hatched or 1 day larvae as well as in later developmental stages, thus suggesting a prominent role for this bacterium in Hessian fly development and in its interaction with host plants. This study is the first comprehensive survey on bacteria associated with the gut of a gall

  4. Shedding light on the performance of a pyrosequencing assay for drug-resistant tuberculosis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, Sophia B; Seifert, Marva; Lin, Shou-Yean; Catanzaro, Donald; Garfein, Richard S; Jackson, Roberta L; Crudu, Valeriu; Rodrigues, Camilla; Victor, Thomas C; Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C

    2016-08-31

    Rapid molecular diagnostics, with their ability to quickly identify genetic mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical specimens, have great potential as tools to control multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB). The Qiagen PyroMark Q96 ID system is a commercially available pyrosequencing (PSQ) platform that has been validated for rapid M/XDR-TB diagnosis. However, the details of the assay's diagnostic and technical performance have yet to be thoroughly investigated in diverse clinical environments. This study evaluates the diagnostic performance of the PSQ assay for 1128 clinical specimens from patients from three areas of high TB burden. We report on the diagnostic performance of the PSQ assay between the three sites and identify variables associated with poor PSQ technical performance. In India, the sensitivity of the PSQ assay ranged from 89 to 98 % for the detection of phenotypic resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, fluoroquinolones, and the injectables. In Moldova, assay sensitivity ranged from 7 to 94 %, and in South Africa, assay sensitivity ranged from 71 to 92 %. Specificity was high (94-100 %) across all sites. The addition of eis promoter sequencing information greatly improved the sensitivity of kanamycin resistance detection in Moldova (7 % to 79 %). Nearly all (89.4 %) sequencing reactions conducted on smear-positive, culture-positive specimens and most (70.8 %) reactions conducted on smear-negative, culture-positive specimens yielded valid PSQ reads. An investigation into the variables influencing sequencing failures indicated smear negativity, culture negativity, site (Moldova), and sequencing of the rpoB, gyrA, and rrs genes were highly associated with poor PSQ technical performance (adj. OR > 2.0). This study has important implications for the global implementation of PSQ as a molecular TB diagnostic, as it demonstrates how regional factors may impact PSQ diagnostic

  5. Profiling the venom gland transcriptomes of Costa Rican snakes by 454 pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A long term research goal of venomics, of applied importance for improving current antivenom therapy, but also for drug discovery, is to understand the pharmacological potential of venoms. Individually or combined, proteomic and transcriptomic studies have demonstrated their feasibility to explore in depth the molecular diversity of venoms. In the absence of genome sequence, transcriptomes represent also valuable searchable databases for proteomic projects. Results The venom gland transcriptomes of 8 Costa Rican taxa from 5 genera (Crotalus, Bothrops, Atropoides, Cerrophidion, and Bothriechis) of pitvipers were investigated using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing. 100,394 out of 330,010 masked reads produced significant hits in the available databases. 5.165,220 nucleotides (8.27%) were masked by RepeatMasker, the vast majority of which corresponding to class I (retroelements) and class II (DNA transposons) mobile elements. BLAST hits included 79,991 matches to entries of the taxonomic suborder Serpentes, of which 62,433 displayed similarity to documented venom proteins. Strong discrepancies between the transcriptome-computed and the proteome-gathered toxin compositions were obvious at first sight. Although the reasons underlaying this discrepancy are elusive, since no clear trend within or between species is apparent, the data indicate that individual mRNA species may be translationally controlled in a species-dependent manner. The minimum number of genes from each toxin family transcribed into the venom gland transcriptome of each species was calculated from multiple alignments of reads matched to a full-length reference sequence of each toxin family. Reads encoding ORF regions of Kazal-type inhibitor-like proteins were uniquely found in Bothriechis schlegelii and B. lateralis transcriptomes, suggesting a genus-specific recruitment event during the early-Middle Miocene. A transcriptome-based cladogram supports the large divergence between A. mexicanus

  6. Application of high-throughput pyrosequencing in the analysis of microbiota of food commodities procured from small and large retail outlets in a U.S. metropolitan area - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Daleniece; Pal, Chandan; Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jia, Chunrong; Zerwekh, Tyler; Dowd, Scot E; Banerjee, Pratik

    2018-03-01

    With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, it is possible to comprehensively analyze the microbial community of foods without culturing them in the laboratory. The estimation of all microbes inhabiting a food commodity (food microbiota) therefore may shed light on the microbial quality and safety of foods. In this study, we utilized high-throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes as well as traditional microbiological methods to evaluate the bacterial diversity and the predicted metabolic pathways associated with the bacterial communities of selected foods (romaine lettuce, cabbage, deli meat, and chicken legs, total 200 samples) procured from small and large retail outlets located in Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee, USA. For high-throughput sequencing, microbial genomic DNA was directly extracted from the food products and subjected to genetic sequencing. Aerobic plate count of all food samples was also performed. Foods from small stores (such as corner stores) were found to contain higher bacterial counts as compared to large stores (such as supermarkets). High-throughput pyrosequencing in tandem with bioinformatics analyses revealed a comprehensive picture of the bacterial ecology of foods at different taxonomic levels. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the most abundant phyla across all products. At the genus level, Enterobacter and Pantoea in vegetables, and Bacillus and Aeromonas in animal products were found to be the most abundant. The bacterial predicted metabolic pathways such as inosine-5'-phosphate biosynthesis I, methylglyoxal (MG) degradation pathways, urea cycle, dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis I, and mevalonate pathway I differed in foods procured from small stores as compared to large groceries or supermarkets. The results from this study revealed that the bacterial ecology (both in terms of numbers and types of bacteria) of food commodities might differ based on the vending outlet type (large vs. small) of retail stores. The

  7. 454-Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bacterial Communities from Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Bioreactors Utilizing Universal Primers: Effect of Annealing Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gonzalez-Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S rRNA genes. A metagenomic analysis (pyrosequencing of total bacterial diversity including anammox population in five autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies, two bench-scale models (MBR and Low Temperature CANON and three full-scale bioreactors (anammox, CANON, and DEMON, was successfully carried out by optimization of primer selection and PCR conditions (annealing temperature. The universal primer 530F was identified as the best candidate for total bacteria and anammox bacteria diversity coverage. Salt-adjusted optimum annealing temperature of primer 530F was calculated (47°C and hence a range of annealing temperatures of 44–49°C was tested. Pyrosequencing data showed that annealing temperature of 45°C yielded the best results in terms of species richness and diversity for all bioreactors analyzed.

  8. Clinical Neuropathology practice guide 5-2015: MGMT methylation pyrosequencing in glioblastoma: unresolved issues and open questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowski, Michal; Berghoff, Anna S; Marosi, Christine; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Heinzl, Harald; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Preusser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status has prognostic and, in the subpopulation of elderly patients, predictive value in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Therefore, knowledge of the MGMT promoter methylation status is important for clinical decision-making. So far, MGMT testing has been limited by the lack of a robust test with sufficiently high analytical performance. Recently, one of several available pyrosequencing protocols has been shown to be an accurate and robust method for MGMT testing in an intra- and interlaboratory ring trial. However, some uncertainties remain with regard to methodological issues, cut-off definitions, and optimal use in the clinical setting. In this article, we highlight and discuss several of these open questions. The main unresolved issues are the definition of the most relevant CpG sites to analyze for clinical purposes and the determination of a cut-off value for dichotomization of quantitative MGMT pyrosequencing results into "MGMT methylated" and "MGMT unmethylated" patient subgroups as a basis for further treatment decisions.

  9. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila; Girkov, Mia Seremet; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kjeldsen, Tina Ellegaard; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value = 0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated with shorter overall survival (p-value = 0.006). In future cancer research allelic MSP-pyrosequencing may be used to study a wide range of other loci. PMID:24071855

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department CERN Global Network An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) ...

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN The new account management system Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium ...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department The CERN Ombuds The new account management system Crèche progress + Restaurants Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Summer Student program Bringing Library services to users Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  14. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  15. Sliding window analyses for optimal selection of mini-barcodes, and application to 454-pyrosequencing for specimen identification from degraded DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Boyer

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding remains a challenge when applied to diet analyses, ancient DNA studies, environmental DNA samples and, more generally, in any cases where DNA samples have not been adequately preserved. Because the size of the commonly used barcoding marker (COI is over 600 base pairs (bp, amplification fails when the DNA molecule is degraded into smaller fragments. However, relevant information for specimen identification may not be evenly distributed along the barcoding region, and a shorter target can be sufficient for identification purposes. This study proposes a new, widely applicable, method to compare the performance of all potential 'mini-barcodes' for a given molecular marker and to objectively select the shortest and most informative one. Our method is based on a sliding window analysis implemented in the new R package SPIDER (Species IDentity and Evolution in R. This method is applicable to any taxon and any molecular marker. Here, it was tested on earthworm DNA that had been degraded through digestion by carnivorous landsnails. A 100 bp region of 16 S rDNA was selected as the shortest informative fragment (mini-barcode required for accurate specimen identification. Corresponding primers were designed and used to amplify degraded earthworm (prey DNA from 46 landsnail (predator faeces using 454-pyrosequencing. This led to the detection of 18 earthworm species in the diet of the snail. We encourage molecular ecologists to use this method to objectively select the most informative region of the gene they aim to amplify from degraded DNA. The method and tools provided here, can be particularly useful (1 when dealing with degraded DNA for which only small fragments can be amplified, (2 for cases where no consensus has yet been reached on the appropriate barcode gene, or (3 to allow direct analysis of short reads derived from massively parallel sequencing without the need for bioinformatic consolidation.

  16. Sliding window analyses for optimal selection of mini-barcodes, and application to 454-pyrosequencing for specimen identification from degraded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stephane; Brown, Samuel D J; Collins, Rupert A; Cruickshank, Robert H; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Wratten, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding remains a challenge when applied to diet analyses, ancient DNA studies, environmental DNA samples and, more generally, in any cases where DNA samples have not been adequately preserved. Because the size of the commonly used barcoding marker (COI) is over 600 base pairs (bp), amplification fails when the DNA molecule is degraded into smaller fragments. However, relevant information for specimen identification may not be evenly distributed along the barcoding region, and a shorter target can be sufficient for identification purposes. This study proposes a new, widely applicable, method to compare the performance of all potential 'mini-barcodes' for a given molecular marker and to objectively select the shortest and most informative one. Our method is based on a sliding window analysis implemented in the new R package SPIDER (Species IDentity and Evolution in R). This method is applicable to any taxon and any molecular marker. Here, it was tested on earthworm DNA that had been degraded through digestion by carnivorous landsnails. A 100 bp region of 16 S rDNA was selected as the shortest informative fragment (mini-barcode) required for accurate specimen identification. Corresponding primers were designed and used to amplify degraded earthworm (prey) DNA from 46 landsnail (predator) faeces using 454-pyrosequencing. This led to the detection of 18 earthworm species in the diet of the snail. We encourage molecular ecologists to use this method to objectively select the most informative region of the gene they aim to amplify from degraded DNA. The method and tools provided here, can be particularly useful (1) when dealing with degraded DNA for which only small fragments can be amplified, (2) for cases where no consensus has yet been reached on the appropriate barcode gene, or (3) to allow direct analysis of short reads derived from massively parallel sequencing without the need for bioinformatic consolidation.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of the fecal microbial community in herbivorous land and marine iguanas of the Galápagos Islands using 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Wheeler, Emily; Cann, Isaac K O; Mackie, Roderick I

    2011-09-01

    Herbivorous reptiles depend on complex gut microbial communities to effectively degrade dietary polysaccharides. The composition of these fermentative communities may vary based on dietary differences. To explore the role of diet in shaping gut microbial communities, we evaluated the fecal samples from two related host species--the algae-consuming marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and land iguanas (LI) (genus Conolophus) that consume terrestrial vegetation. Marine and LI fecal samples were collected from different islands in the Galápagos archipelago. High-throughput 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing was used to provide a comparative analysis of fecal microbial diversity. At the phylum level, the fecal microbial community in iguanas was predominated by Firmicutes (69.5±7.9%) and Bacteroidetes (6.2±2.8%), as well as unclassified Bacteria (20.6±8.6%), suggesting that a large portion of iguana fecal microbiota is novel and could be involved in currently unknown functions. Host species differed in the abundance of specific bacterial groups. Bacteroides spp., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae were significantly more abundant in the marine iguanas (MI) (P-value>1E-9). In contrast, Ruminococcaceae were present at >5-fold higher abundance in the LI than MI (P-value>6E-14). Archaea were only detected in the LI. The number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the LI (356-896 OTUs) was >2-fold higher than in the MI (112-567 OTUs), and this increase in OTU diversity could be related to the complexity of the resident bacterial population and their gene repertoire required to breakdown the recalcitrant polysaccharides prevalent in terrestrial plants. Our findings suggest that dietary differences contribute to gut microbial community differentiation in herbivorous lizards. Most importantly, this study provides a better understanding of the microbial diversity in the iguana gut; therefore facilitating future efforts to discover novel bacterial-associated enzymes that

  18. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  19. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Robert Aymar

    2005-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 12 January 2006 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2005 and to present the perspectives for this coming year. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season Robert AYMAR

  20. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 18 January 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg.. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2006 and to present the perspectives for this special year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg.. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg.. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  1. Scientific meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    One of the main aims of the IAEA is to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information and one of the main ways of doing this is to convene international scientific meetings. They range from large international conferences bringing together several hundred scientists, smaller symposia attended by an average of 150 to 250 participants and seminars designed to instruct rather than inform, to smaller panels and study groups of 10 to 30 experts brought together to advise on a particular programme or to develop a set of regulations. The topics of these meetings cover every part of the Agency's activities and form a backbone of many of its programmes. (author)

  2. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  3. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  4. Identification of a Bacillus anthracis specific indel in the yeaC gene and development of a rapid pyrosequencing assay for distinguishing B. anthracis from the B. cereus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmod, Nadia Z; Gupta, Radhey S; Shah, Haroun N

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a potential source of bioterrorism. The existing assays for its identification lack specificity due to the close genetic relationship it exhibits to other members of the B. cereus group. Our comparative analyses of protein sequences from Bacillus species have identified a 24 amino acid deletion in a conserved region of the YeaC protein that is uniquely present in B. anthracis. PCR primers based on conserved regions flanking this indel in the Bacillus cereus group of species (viz. Bacillus cereus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, B. mycoides, B. weihenstephnensis and B. pseudomycoides) specifically amplified a 282 bp fragment from all six reference B. anthracis strains, whereas a 354 bp fragment was amplified from 15 other B. cereus group of species/strains. These fragments, due to large size difference, are readily distinguished by means of agarose gel electrophoresis. In contrast to the B. cereus group, no PCR amplification was observed with any of the non-B. cereus group of species/strains. This indel was also used for developing a rapid pyrosequencing assay for the identification of B. anthracis. Its performance was evaluated by examining the presence or absence of this indel in a panel of 81 B. cereus-like isolates from various sources that included 39 B. anthracis strains. Based upon the sequence data from the pyrograms, the yeaC indel was found to be a distinctive characteristic of various B. anthracis strains tested and not found in any other species/strains from these samples. Therefore, this B. anthracis specific indel provides a robust and highly-specific chromosomal marker for the identification of this high-risk pathogen from other members of the B. cereus group independent of a strain's virulence. The pyrosequencing platform also allows for the rapid and simultaneous screening of multiple samples for the presence of this B. anthracis-specific marker. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 15 June 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) b. IT Service Review Meeting (ITSRM) c. GS User Commission Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in bra...

  6. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  7. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Re...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :   Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)...

  10. August Meeting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... exists on this new trend of Igbo women (re)venturing into the public sphere is, one would suggest or argue, ... section looks at the history, structure and dynamics of the 'August Meeting' assembly among Igbo ..... authority were divided between the sexes in a complementary fashion, was operational. In the ...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Fellows, Associates and Summer Student Programmes Particle Data Book distribution Revoking Computer accounts Equipment insurance on site Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Dates for meetings in 2003 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (74837...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria  W. Adam  (71661) Belgium  G. Wilquet  (74664) Bulgaria  R. Tzenov  (77958) Czech Republic  P. Závada&am...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) Fr...

  14. Pyrosequencing the Bemisia tabaci transcriptome reveals a highly diverse bacterial community and a robust system for insecticide resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is a phloem-feeding insect poised to become one of the major insect pests in open field and greenhouse production systems throughout the world. The high level of resistance to insecticides is a main factor that hinders continued use of insecticides for suppression of B. tabaci. Despite its prevalence, little is known about B. tabaci at the genome level. To fill this gap, an invasive B. tabaci B biotype was subjected to pyrosequencing-based transcriptome analysis to identify genes and gene networks putatively involved in various physiological and toxicological processes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Roche 454 pyrosequencing, 857,205 reads containing approximately 340 megabases were obtained from the B. tabaci transcriptome. De novo assembly generated 178,669 unigenes including 30,980 from insects, 17,881 from bacteria, and 129,808 from the nohit. A total of 50,835 (28.45% unigenes showed similarity to the non-redundant database in GenBank with a cut-off E-value of 10-5. Among them, 40,611 unigenes were assigned to one or more GO terms and 6,917 unigenes were assigned to 288 known pathways. De novo metatranscriptome analysis revealed highly diverse bacterial symbionts in B. tabaci, and demonstrated the host-symbiont cooperation in amino acid production. In-depth transcriptome analysis indentified putative molecular markers, and genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance and nutrient digestion. The utility of this transcriptome was validated by a thiamethoxam resistance study, in which annotated cytochrome P450 genes were significantly overexpressed in the resistant B. tabaci in comparison to its susceptible counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: This transcriptome/metatranscriptome analysis sheds light on the molecular understanding of symbiosis and insecticide resistance in an agriculturally important phloem-feeding insect pest, and lays the foundation for future functional genomics research of the

  15. Measuring turnover of SIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells using pyrosequencing: implications for the timing of HIV eradication therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette C Reece

    Full Text Available Resting CD4+ T cells are a reservoir of latent HIV-1. Understanding the turnover of HIV DNA in these cells has implications for the development of eradication strategies. Most studies of viral latency focus on viral persistence under antiretroviral therapy (ART. We studied the turnover of SIV DNA resting CD4+ T cells during active infection in a cohort of 20 SIV-infected pigtail macaques. We compared SIV sequences at two Mane-A1*084:01-restricted CTL epitopes using serial plasma RNA and resting CD4+ T cell DNA samples by pyrosequencing, and used a mathematical modeling approach to estimate SIV DNA turnover. We found SIV DNA turnover in resting CD4+ T cells was slow in animals with low chronic viral loads, consistent with the long persistence of latency seen under ART. However, in animals with high levels of chronic viral replication, turnover was high. SIV DNA half-life within resting CD4 cells correleated with viral load (p = 0.0052 at the Gag KP9 CTL epitope. At a second CTL epitope in Tat (KVA10 there was a trend towards an association of SIV DNA half-life in resting CD4 cells and viral load (p = 0.0971. Further, we found that the turnover of resting CD4+ T cell SIV DNA was higher for escape during early infection than for escape later in infection (p = 0.0084. Our results suggest viral DNA within resting CD4 T cells is more labile and may be more susceptible to reactivation/eradication treatments when there are higher levels of virus replication and during early/acute infection.

  16. Fecal microbial diversity in pre-weaned dairy calves as described by pyrosequencing of metagenomic 16S rDNA. Associations of Faecalibacterium species with health and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Oikonomou

    Full Text Available In this study, we use barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the fecal microbiota of neonatal calves and identify possible relationships of certain microbiota profiles with health and weight gain. Fecal samples were obtained weekly from 61 calves from birth until weaning (seventh week of the calves' life. Firmicutes was the most prevalent phylum, with a prevalence ranging from 63.84% to 81.90%, followed by Bacteroidetes (8.36% to 23.93%, Proteobacteria (3.72% to 9.75%, Fusobacteria (0.76% to 5.67%, and Actinobacteria (1.02% to 2.35%. Chao1 index gradually increased from the first to the seventh postnatal week. Chao1 index was lower during the third, fourth, and fifth week of life in calves that suffered from pneumonia and were treated with antibiotics. Diarrhea incidence during the first four weeks of the calves' life was also associated with a reduction of microbial diversity during the third week of life. Increased fecal microbial diversity after the second week of life was associated with higher weight gain. Using discriminant analysis we were able to show differences in the microbiota profiles between different weeks of life, between high and low weight gain groups of calves, and between calves affected and not affected with diarrhea during the first four weeks life. The prevalence of Faecalibacterium spp. in the first week of life was associated with weight gain and the incidence of diarrhea, with higher prevalence being associated with higher weight gain and less diarrhea. Representative sequences from Faecalibacterium spp. were closely affiliated to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results presented here provide new information regarding the intestinal microbiota of neonatal calves and its association with health and growth. Fecal microbial diversity was associated with calf age, disease status and growth rates. Results suggesting a possible beneficial effect of Faecalibacterium spp. on health and growth are promising.

  17. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  18. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  19. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  20. Meeting information

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 1986 Ocean Sciences Meeting of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) will be held January 13-17, 1986, in New Orleans, La., at the Fairmont Hotel. Co-sponsoring societies are the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Marine Technology Society (MTS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Oceanic Engineering Society (OES).

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - W. Adam (71661) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (75877) Denmark - J.B. Hansen...

  2. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tThe CERN Press Office 7.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 8.\tThe Burotel project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria C...

  3. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of Conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Cze...

  4. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 June 2009At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management CERN Social Services User services in GS Department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - G. Walzel (76592) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (7587...

  5. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tAn update on safety at CERN 7.\tChildcare initiative 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.\tUsers’ Office news 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75...

  6. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The CERN Press Office An update on Safety at CERN The Burotel project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria, W. Adam (71661) Belgium, C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic, P. Závada (75877) Denmark, J.B. Hansen (...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. ...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tOther business 13.\tAgenda of the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Re...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2011 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising       News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Report on new CHIS rules Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria M. Jeitler (76307) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson)...

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (7594...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Ada...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Reports from ACCU representatives 2. Adoption of the agenda on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. Matters arising 9. Any Other Business 5. News from the CERN Management 10. Agenda for the next meeting 6. Property Protection at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (74837) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic ...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 December 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Restaurant No. 1 extension An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Election of the ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Záv...

  15. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Registration plans for portables 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Reports from ACCU representatives 3. Minutes of the previous meeting on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting 7. Equal Opportunities Commission Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): AustriaW. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgari...

  16. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941...

  18. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (7...

  19. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agendafor the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Fin...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  1. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t7.\tCar sharing pilot project3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees4.\tMatters arising9.\tUsers’ Office newss5.\tNews from the CERN Management10.\tAny Other Business11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)Bulgaria\tPortugalP...

  2. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on Fellows and Associates Programme Overview of safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K....

  3. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. ...

  4. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finlan...

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 December 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Closure of computer accounts upon CERN contract expiry Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Election of ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets). Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  6. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.     Chairman's remarks 2.     Adoption of the agenda 3.     Minutes of the previous meeting 4.     Matters arising 5.     News from the CERN Management 6.     Report on Fellows and Associates programme 7.     Overview of safety at CERN 8.     Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.     Users' Office news 10.  Any Other Business 11.  Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets):Austria W. Adam  (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria ...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Dosimetry at CERN Status of collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office newss Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (7935...

  8. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (7...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (716...

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 160-1-009 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Purchasing procedures at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news CERN Clubs Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Las...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic S. Nemecek (71144) ...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda,8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management11. Any Other Business 6. CHIS news and follow-up of survey12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661)NorwayH. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (7591...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer S. Laplace...

  15. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users'Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) ...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  17. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 June 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Open Access Publishing Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini ...

  18. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (...

  19. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 6. The PH Department 2. Adoption of the agenda 7. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. News from the CERN Management 9. Any Other Business 5. Matters arising 10. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic P. Závada ...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. Health Insurance news and follow-up of survey 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wil...

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  2. ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  3. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. La...

  4. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 6.\tDosimetry at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 7.\tStatus of collaborative tools at CERN 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising 9.\tUsers’ Office newss 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway G. Løvhøiden (73176) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland M. Witek (78967) Bulgaria Portugal...

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equal Opportunities Commission 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. Registration plans for portables 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgar...

  6. ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tLHC 2008 start-up events 7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilq...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Matters arising The PH Department Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tCar sharing pilot project 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tUsers’ Office newss 4.\tMatters arising10.\tAny Other Business 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tAgenda for the next meeting 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. News from the CERN Management 4. Minutes of the previous meeting 5. Matters arising 6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board 7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office 8. Update on Computing Issues 9. Users' Office News 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Bryan Pattison (Secretary). ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Z vada (75...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Bryan Pattison

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building1. Chairman's remarks2. Adoption of the agenda3. News from the CERN Management4. Minutes of the previous meeting5. Matters arising6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office8. Update on Computing Issues9. Users' Office News10. Any Other Business11. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail toBryan Pattison(Secretary).ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :Austria G. Neuhofer (74094)Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)Czech Republic P. Závada (75877)Den...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Video-conferencing/recording Fellows programme Operational Circular No. 6 EP Space management Update on Computing Issues Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary)  ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha ...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 March 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in the Council Chamber Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Follow-up on Space Management Users' Desktop needs PIE procedures Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer L. Serin (712...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 September 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Health Insurance Questionnaire Host States Relations Service Update on EP Space management Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions / EP Division

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising EP Space management Cars Housing EDH from the User's point of view VRVS Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) France M. Déj...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskin...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiis...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising10.\tUsers’ Office news 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 6. LHC 2008 start-up events 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Aust...

  20. 454-Pyrosequencing survey of microbiota in adult Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) corroborates a core microbiome and additional symbiotic and entomopathogenic bacterial associates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete surveys of insect endosymbionts including species of economic importance have until recently been hampered by a lack of high-throughput genetic assays. We used 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplicon of adult spotted wing Drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) from souther...

  1. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based...... on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed...... in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value=0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated...

  2. Pyrosequencing for classification of human FcγRIIIA allotypes: a comparison with PCR-based techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia; Gale, James M; Nickl, Christian K; Khalili, Parisa; Shirley, Brian; Wilson, Bridget S; Vasef, Mohammad A; Winter, Stuart S

    2014-12-01

    Surface-specific antigens expressed by hematopoietic cells are attractive targets for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) involve various mechanisms to eliminate target cells, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)- and phagocytosis (ADCP)-mediated killing through natural killer (NK) and macrophage effector cells bearing FcγRIIIA (CD16). The clinical efficacy of ADCC is particularly impacted by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) found in the gene encoding FcγRIIIA (FCGR3A), which generates a variable distribution of the 158 V/V, F/V or F/F CD16 allotypes (F = phenylalanine, V = valine) in the normal human population. Currently, most patients are not screened for CD16 allotypes, creating the potential to include in their treatment a mAb-based therapy that may have limited benefit. Therefore, it is important to identify CD16 allotypes when considering mAb therapies that require ADCC/ADCP. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable PCR-based assay for classification of human FcγRIIIA allotypes. We studied 42 normal human subjects for the incidence of FcγRIIIA-158 polymorphisms using comparative molecular approaches. The results of our study showed 100% accuracy in genotyping by pyrosequencing. In contrast, nested PCR-based allele-specific restriction assay and quantitative PCR techniques proved to be relatively less sensitive and less specific in distinguishing variant genotypes. Since the efficacy of the mAb-based targeted immunotherapy may be highly dependent upon the CD16 polymorphism in a given individual, we recommend pyrosequencing for CD16 allotype testing.

  3. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2012-08-03

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals.

  4. Evaluation of culture-based techniques and 454 pyrosequencing for the analysis of fungal diversity in potting media and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, A M; Al-Mazroui, S S; Phillips, A J L

    2015-08-01

    Potting media and organic fertilizers (OFs) are commonly used in agricultural systems. However, there is a lack of studies on the efficiency of culture-based techniques in assessing the level of fungal diversity in these products. A study was conducted to investigate the efficiency of seven culture-based techniques and pyrosequencing for characterizing fungal diversity in potting media and OFs. Fungal diversity was evaluated using serial dilution, direct plating and baiting with carrot slices, potato slices, radish seeds, cucumber seeds and cucumber cotyledons. Identity of all the isolates was confirmed on the basis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (ITS rRNA) sequence data. The direct plating technique was found to be superior over other culture-based techniques in the number of fungal species detected. It was also found to be simple and the least time consuming technique. Comparing the efficiency of direct plating with 454 pyrosequencing revealed that pyrosequencing detected 12 and 15 times more fungal species from potting media and OFs respectively. Analysis revealed that there were differences between potting media and OFs in the dominant phyla, classes, orders, families, genera and species detected. Zygomycota (52%) and Chytridiomycota (60%) were the predominant phyla in potting media and OFs respectively. The superiority of pyrosequencing over cultural methods could be related to the ability to detect obligate fungi, slow growing fungi and fungi that exist at low population densities. The evaluated methods in this study, especially direct plating and pyrosequencing, may be used as tools to help detect and reduce movement of unwanted fungi between countries and regions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Detection by real-time PCR and pyrosequencing of the cry1Ab and cry1Ac genes introduced in genetically modified (GM) constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debode, Frederic; Janssen, Eric; Bragard, Claude; Berben, Gilbert

    2017-08-01

    The presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed is mainly detected by the use of targets focusing on promoters and terminators. As some genes are frequently used in genetically modified (GM) construction, they also constitute excellent screening elements and their use is increasing. In this paper we propose a new target for the detection of cry1Ab and cry1Ac genes by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing. The specificity, sensitivity and robustness of the real-time PCR method were tested following the recommendations of international guidelines and the method met the expected performance criteria. This paper also shows how the robustness testing was assessed. This new cry1Ab/Ac method can provide a positive signal with a larger number of GM events than do the other existing methods using double dye-probes. The method permits the analysis of results with less ambiguity than the SYBRGreen method recommended by the European Reference Laboratory (EURL) GM Food and Feed (GMFF). A pyrosequencing method was also developed to gain additional information thanks to the sequence of the amplicon. This method of sequencing-by-synthesis can determine the sequence between the primers used for PCR. Pyrosequencing showed that the sequences internal to the primers present differences following the GM events considered and three different sequences were observed. The sensitivity of the pyrosequencing was tested on reference flours with a low percentage GM content and different copy numbers. Improvements in the pyrosequencing protocol provided correct sequences with 50 copies of the target. Below this copy number, the quality of the sequence was more random.

  6. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      MARS 2015 FIVE YEARLY REVIEW CONTRACT POLICY PENSION FUND GENERAL INFORMATION   COME AND BE INFORMED! PUBLIC MEETINGS Friday 3rd October at 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Friday 3rd October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Monday 6th October at 10 am Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-018 Meyrin Monday 6th October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin  

  7. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, 2007 is a very special year for CERN. I would like to review the status of our activities with you, and I invite you to a presentation on Wednesday 27 June 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meetingto be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m.in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Va...

  9. 75 FR 66061 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... language interpreters will be available at the Board meetings and hearing. Persons attending Board meetings...

  10. 78 FR 12715 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and committee meetings. Persons attending...

  11. 77 FR 7126 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and committee meetings. Persons attending...

  12. 76 FR 78611 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and committee meetings. Persons attending...

  13. 75 FR 39205 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... sign language interpreters will be available at the Board meetings and information meeting. Persons...

  14. The Bacterial Microbiome in Paired Vaginal and Vestibular Samples from Women with Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaram, Aswathi; Witkin, Steven S.; Zhou, IA; Brown, Celeste J.; Rey, Gustavo E.; Linhares, Iara M.; Ledger, William J.; Forney, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Composition of the bacterial microbiome in the vagina and vestibule from 30 women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) and 15 healthy controls were compared by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA amplicons. Vaginal concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β were determined by ELISA. Questionnaires elicited clinical and symptom data. Eighteen genera were detected in vaginal samples, and 23 genera were identified in vestibule samples, from women with VVS. The genera at both sites and the mean number of gener...

  15. Meeting on risk and monitoring analysis techniques for food safety - RLA/5/060/ARCAL Project (ARCAL CXXVIII): sampling plans and introduction to chemical risk assessment in food innocuousness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Some of the Latinoamerican countries such us Bolivia, Colombia, Uruguay and Venezuela participant in the meeting gave an exposition about the risk analysis and monitoring techniques in food safety in their countyries. With the aim to study components of risk analysis, food innocuousness, evaluation and chemical dangers, toxicity, exposure, change of paradigms in the global food system, data sources, study in animals and in vitro, sensitivity analysis, risk assessment in health it carried out the meeting

  16. Meeting Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  17. Meetings and Meeting Modeling in Smart Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real time or off-line. The research reported here forms part of the European 5th and 6th framework programme projects multi-modal meeting

  18. Meetings and meeting modeling in smart surroundings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nishida, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real-time or off-line. Intelligent real-time and off-line generation requires understanding of what is going on during a meeting. The

  19. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    MARS SURVEY 5YR 2015 GENERAL INFORMATION ELECTIONS 2013   COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Tuesday 1st Oct. 10 am Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Tuesday 1st Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin Friday 4 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Monday 7 Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Tuesday 8 Oct. 10 am Amphi Kjell Johnsen, 30-7-018 Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2013: lessons learned Survey: five-yearly review, give us your opinion General information CVI 2014 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS) Elections 2013 Renewal of the Staff Council 2014 - 2015  

  20. Analysis of the distal gut bacterial community by 454-pyrosequencing in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahal, Ousama; Valdes, Eduardo V; McBride, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the structure of the fecal bacterial community of five giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) at Disney's Animal Kingdom, FL. Fecal genomic DNA was extracted and variable regions 1-3 of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and then sequenced. The MOTHUR software-program was used for sequence processing, diversity analysis, and classification. A total of 181,689 non-chimeric bacterial sequences were obtained, and average number of sequences per sample was 36,338 -± 8,818. Sequences were assigned to 8,284 operational taxonomic units (OTU) with 95% of genetic similarity, which included 2,942 singletons (36%). Number of OTUs per sample was 2,554 ± 264. Samples were normalized and alpha (intra-sample) diversity indices; Chao1, Inverse Simpson, Shannon, and coverage were estimated as 3,712 ± 430, 116 -± 70, 6.1 ± 0.4, and 96 ± 1%, respectively. Thirteen phyla were detected and Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes were the most dominant phyla (more than 2% of total sequences), and constituted 92% of the classified sequences, 66% of total sequences, and 43% of total OTUs. Our computation predicted that three OTUs were likely to be present in at least three of the five samples at greater than 1% dominance rate. These OTUs were Treponema, an unidentified OTU belonging to the order Bacteroidales, and Ruminococcus. This report was the first to characterize the bacterial community of the distal gut in giraffes utilizing fecal samples, and it demonstrated that the distal gut of giraffes is likely a potential reservoir for a number of undocumented species of bacteria. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Characterisation Of The Porcine Lung Transcriptome Using High-Throughput Pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panitz, Frank; Nielsen, Rasmus Ory; Andersen, Pernille K

    abundance. Our objective was to investigate animals previously not affected by lung disease and those that had been affected. To this end lung tissue samples were collected, separately pooled and tagged before sequencing using the Roche/454 FLX platform. We sequenced about one million reads that were...... clustered and mapped to the current pig genome reference sequence. Identified genes or clusters were annotated for functional classes and mined for singe nucleotide polymorphisms. In addition, we compared gene expression between sample groups in order to investigate possible changes in the lung...

  2. 454 pyrosequencing based transcriptome analysis of Zygaena filipendulae with focus on genes involved in biosynthesis of cyanogenic glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrobelny, Mika; Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Gorodkin, Jan; Bak, Søren

    2009-12-02

    An essential driving component in the co-evolution of plants and insects is the ability to produce and handle bioactive compounds. Plants produce bioactive natural products for defense, but some insects detoxify and/or sequester the compounds, opening up for new niches with fewer competitors. To study the molecular mechanism behind the co-adaption in plant-insect interactions, we have investigated the interactions between Lotus corniculatus and Zygaena filipendulae. They both contain cyanogenic glucosides which liberate toxic hydrogen cyanide upon breakdown. Moths belonging to the Zygaena family are the only insects known, able to carry out both de novo biosynthesis and sequestration of the same cyanogenic glucosides as those from their feed plants. The biosynthetic pathway for cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis in Z. filipendulae proceeds using the same intermediates as in the well known pathway from plants, but none of the enzymes responsible have been identified. A genomics strategy founded on 454 pyrosequencing of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome was undertaken to identify some of these enzymes in Z. filipendulae. Comparisons of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome with the sequenced genomes of Bombyx mori, Drosophila melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae indicate a high coverage of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome. 11% of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome sequences were assigned to Gene Ontology categories. Candidate genes for enzymes functioning in the biosynthesis of cyanogenic glucosides (cytochrome P450 and family 1 glycosyltransferases) were identified based on sequence length, number of copies and presence/absence of close homologs in D. melanogaster, B. mori and the cyanogenic butterfly Heliconius. Examination of biased codon usage, GC content and selection on gene candidates support the notion of cyanogenesis as an "old" trait within Ditrysia, as well as its origins being convergent between plants and insects

  3. 454 pyrosequencing based transcriptome analysis of Zygaena filipendulae with focus on genes involved in biosynthesis of cyanogenic glucosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Niels

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An essential driving component in the co-evolution of plants and insects is the ability to produce and handle bioactive compounds. Plants produce bioactive natural products for defense, but some insects detoxify and/or sequester the compounds, opening up for new niches with fewer competitors. To study the molecular mechanism behind the co-adaption in plant-insect interactions, we have investigated the interactions between Lotus corniculatus and Zygaena filipendulae. They both contain cyanogenic glucosides which liberate toxic hydrogen cyanide upon breakdown. Moths belonging to the Zygaena family are the only insects known, able to carry out both de novo biosynthesis and sequestration of the same cyanogenic glucosides as those from their feed plants. The biosynthetic pathway for cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis in Z. filipendulae proceeds using the same intermediates as in the well known pathway from plants, but none of the enzymes responsible have been identified. A genomics strategy founded on 454 pyrosequencing of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome was undertaken to identify some of these enzymes in Z. filipendulae. Results Comparisons of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome with the sequenced genomes of Bombyx mori, Drosophila melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae indicate a high coverage of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome. 11% of the Z. filipendulae transcriptome sequences were assigned to Gene Ontology categories. Candidate genes for enzymes functioning in the biosynthesis of cyanogenic glucosides (cytochrome P450 and family 1 glycosyltransferases were identified based on sequence length, number of copies and presence/absence of close homologs in D. melanogaster, B. mori and the cyanogenic butterfly Heliconius. Examination of biased codon usage, GC content and selection on gene candidates support the notion of cyanogenesis as an "old" trait within Ditrysia, as well as its origins being

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in cutthroat trout subspecies using genome reduction, barcoding, and 454 pyro-sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston Derek D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonids are popular sport fishes, and as such have been subjected to widespread stocking throughout western North America. Historically, stocking was done with little regard for genetic variation among populations and has resulted in genetic mixing among species and subspecies in many areas, thus putting the genetic integrity of native salmonid populations at risk and creating a need to assess the genetic constitution of native salmonid populations. Cutthroat trout is a salmonid species with pronounced geographic structure (there are 10 extant subspecies and a recent history of hybridization with introduced rainbow trout in many populations. Genetic admixture has also occurred among cutthroat trout subspecies in areas where introductions have brought two or more subspecies into contact. Consequently, management agencies have increased their efforts to evaluate the genetic composition of cutthroat trout populations to identify populations that remain uncompromised and manage them accordingly, but additional genetic markers are needed to do so effectively. Here we used genome reduction, MID-barcoding, and 454-pyrosequencing to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms that differentiate cutthroat trout subspecies and can be used as a rapid, cost-effective method to characterize the genetic composition of cutthroat trout populations. Results Thirty cutthroat and six rainbow trout individuals were subjected to genome reduction and next-generation sequencing. A total of 1,499,670 reads averaging 379 base pairs in length were generated by 454-pyrosequencing, resulting in 569,060,077 total base pairs sequenced. A total of 43,558 putative SNPs were identified, and of those, 125 SNP primers were developed that successfully amplified 96 cutthroat trout and rainbow trout individuals. These SNP loci were able to differentiate most cutthroat trout subspecies using distance methods and Structure analyses. Conclusions Genomic and

  5. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Last Monday at 9 a.m. the Council Chamber was full, with several people standing, for the public meeting of the Staff Association. Simultaneously, many of our colleagues followed the presentations in the Amphitheatre in Prévessin. We would like to thank all of you for the interest you have shown and for your feedback. In the introduction we explained how the Staff Association represents the staff in its discussions with Management and Member States, and how the staff itself defined, by its participation in the 2013 staff survey, the priority assigned to various points related to the employment conditions. The position of the Staff Association regarding the new contract policy, to be implemented as of 31 March 2015 after approval by Council, was stated. Then, in the framework of the 2015 five-yearly review, the general approach that we would like to see for the new career structure, was explained. Concerning diversity, based on what we know about the situation in other international organiza...

  6. Fruitful meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont

    2010-01-01

    The annual meeting for the LHC Performance Workshop was held in Chamonix from 25 to 29 January 2010 in the Centre de Congrès Le Majestic. The Workshop focused on how to reach the maximum operating energy.   The LHC Performance Workshop took place between 25 and 29 January 2010 in a rather chilly Chamonix. Following the successful start of beam commissioning last year, there remain a number of important questions about the near future of the machine. Topics discussed included the maximum operational energy that will be possible in 2010 and the steps need to go above the planned 2010 start-up energy of 3.5 TeV. Of particular importance were the required splice and magnet consolidation measures that would be demanded by an increase above this energy.  The energy in the magnets and beams will always represent a considerable threat, and the possible impact of an incident and the potential measures required to speed up a recovery were put on the table. Safety is critical and there were...

  7. Combined amplicon pyrosequencing assays reveal presence of the apicomplexan "type-N" (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Slapeta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. "type-N" symbiont belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. METHODS & PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa-Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus. We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef

  8. Pyrosequencing reveals the effect of mobilizing agents and lignocellulosic substrate amendment on microbial community composition in a real industrial PAH-polluted soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lladó, S., E-mail: llado@biomed.cas.cz [Department of Microbiology, University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Covino, S., E-mail: covino@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Solanas, A.M., E-mail: asolanas@ub.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Petruccioli, M., E-mail: petrucci@unitus.it [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems [DIBAF], University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); D’annibale, A., E-mail: dannib@unitus.it [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems [DIBAF], University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); Viñas, M., E-mail: marc.vinas@irta.cat [GIRO Joint Research Unit IRTA-UPC, Institute of Research and Technology Food and Agriculture [IRTA], Torre Marimon, E-08140 Caldes de Montbui (Spain)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Soil microbial community assessment through classical (MPN) and molecular tools (DGGE and pyrosequencing) is provided. • A failure of exogenous white rot fungi to colonize the polluted soil is shown by DGGE and pyrosequencing. • Surfactant Brij 30 hampers 4-ring PAHs degradation due to toxicity over Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes populations. • A high prevalence of Fusarium and Scedosporium populations is revealed during soil bioremediation. • Cupriavidus, Mycobacterium and Chithinophagaceae are potential HMW–PAH degraders in the soil. - Abstract: Bacterial and fungal biodiversity throughout different biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments applied to an industrial creosote-polluted soil were analyzed by means of polyphasic approach in order to gain insight into the microbial community structure and dynamics. Pyrosequencing data obtained from initial creosote polluted soil (after a biopiling step) revealed that Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial groups, whereas Fusarium and Scedosporium were the main fungal genera in the contaminated soil. At the end of 60-days laboratory scale bioremediation assays, pyrosequencing and DGGE data showed that (i) major bacterial community shifts were caused by the type of mobilizing agent added to the soil and, to a lesser extent, by the addition of lignocellulosic substrate; and (ii) the presence of the non-ionic surfactant (Brij 30) hampered the proliferation of Actinobacteria (Mycobacteriaceae) and Bacteroidetes (Chitinophagaceae) and, in the absence of lignocellulosic substrate, also impeded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation. The results show the importance of implementing bioremediation experiments combined with microbiome assessment to gain insight on the effect of crucial parameters (e.g. use of additives) over the potential functions of complex microbial communities harbored in polluted soils, essential for bioremediation success.

  9. Combined amplicon pyrosequencing assays reveal presence of the apicomplexan "type-N" (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus) and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapeta, Jan; Linares, Marjorie C

    2013-01-01

    The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. "type-N" symbiont) belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata) is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa-Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus). We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales) formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef environments, it is important not only to understand the evolution of these

  10. Pyrosequencing reveals the effect of mobilizing agents and lignocellulosic substrate amendment on microbial community composition in a real industrial PAH-polluted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lladó, S.; Covino, S.; Solanas, A.M.; Petruccioli, M.; D’annibale, A.; Viñas, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Soil microbial community assessment through classical (MPN) and molecular tools (DGGE and pyrosequencing) is provided. • A failure of exogenous white rot fungi to colonize the polluted soil is shown by DGGE and pyrosequencing. • Surfactant Brij 30 hampers 4-ring PAHs degradation due to toxicity over Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes populations. • A high prevalence of Fusarium and Scedosporium populations is revealed during soil bioremediation. • Cupriavidus, Mycobacterium and Chithinophagaceae are potential HMW–PAH degraders in the soil. - Abstract: Bacterial and fungal biodiversity throughout different biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments applied to an industrial creosote-polluted soil were analyzed by means of polyphasic approach in order to gain insight into the microbial community structure and dynamics. Pyrosequencing data obtained from initial creosote polluted soil (after a biopiling step) revealed that Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial groups, whereas Fusarium and Scedosporium were the main fungal genera in the contaminated soil. At the end of 60-days laboratory scale bioremediation assays, pyrosequencing and DGGE data showed that (i) major bacterial community shifts were caused by the type of mobilizing agent added to the soil and, to a lesser extent, by the addition of lignocellulosic substrate; and (ii) the presence of the non-ionic surfactant (Brij 30) hampered the proliferation of Actinobacteria (Mycobacteriaceae) and Bacteroidetes (Chitinophagaceae) and, in the absence of lignocellulosic substrate, also impeded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation. The results show the importance of implementing bioremediation experiments combined with microbiome assessment to gain insight on the effect of crucial parameters (e.g. use of additives) over the potential functions of complex microbial communities harbored in polluted soils, essential for bioremediation success

  11. Pyrosequencing revealed shifts of prokaryotic communities between healthy and disease-like tissues of the Red Sea sponge Crella cyathophora

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhao-Ming

    2015-06-11

    Sponge diseases have been widely reported, yet the causal factors and major pathogenic microbes remain elusive. In this study, two individuals of the sponge Crella cyathophora in total that showed similar disease-like characteristics were collected from two different locations along the Red Sea coast separated by more than 30 kilometers. The disease-like parts of the two individuals were both covered by green surfaces, and the body size was much smaller compared with adjacent healthy regions. Here, using high-throughput pyrosequencing technology, we investigated the prokaryotic communities in healthy and disease-like sponge tissues as well as adjacent seawater. Microbes in healthy tissues belonged mainly to the Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and were much more diverse at the phylum level than reported previously. Interestingly, the disease-like tissues from the two sponge individuals underwent shifts of prokaryotic communities and were both enriched with a novel clade affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia, implying its intimate connection with the disease-like Red Sea sponge C. cyathophora. Enrichment of the phylum Verrucomicrobia was also considered to be correlated with the presence of algae assemblages forming the green surface of the disease-like sponge tissues. This finding represents an interesting case of sponge disease and is valuable for further study.

  12. Culture independent survey of the microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hail, Daymon; Lauzìere, Isabelle; Dowd, Scot E; Bextine, Blake

    2011-02-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), is an invasive pest that has spread across the southern and western United States. H. vitripennis is highly polyphagous and voracious, feeding on at least 100 plant species and consuming up to 100 times its weight in xylem fluid daily. The insect is a vector of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Wells), which is the causative agent of Pierce's disease in grapevines. To evaluate the microbial flora associated with H. vitripennis, total DNA extracts from hemolymph, alimentary canal excretions, and whole insect bodies were subjected to 16S rDNA pyrosequencing using the bTEFAP methodology and the resulting sequences (370-520 bp in length) were compared with a curated high quality 16S database derived from GenBank http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Species from the genera Wolbachia, Delftia (formerly Pseudomonas), Pectobacterium, Moraxella, Serratia, Bacillus, and many others were detected and a comprehensive picture of the microbiome associated with H. vitripennis was established. Some of the bacteria identified in this report are initial discoveries; providing a breadth of knowledge to the microbial flora of this insect pest can serve as a reservoir of information for developing biological control strategies. © 2011 Entomological Society of America

  13. Comparison between cultivated and total bacterial communities associated with Cucurbita pepo using cultivation-dependent techniques and 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eevers, N; Beckers, B; Op de Beeck, M; White, J C; Vangronsveld, J; Weyens, N

    2016-02-01

    Endophytic bacteria often have beneficial effects on their host plants that can be exploited for bioremediation applications but, according to the literature, only 0.001-1% of all endophytic microbes should be cultivable. This study compared the cultivated endophytic communities of the roots and shoots of Cucurbita pepo with the total endophytic communities as determined by cultivation-dependent techniques and 454 pyrosequencing. The ten most abundant taxa of the total communities aligned well with the cultivated taxa; however, the abundance of these taxa in the two communities differed greatly. Enterobacter showed very low presence in the total communities, whereas they were dominantly present in the cultivated communities. Although Rhizobium dominated in total root and shoot communities, it was poorly cultivable and even then only in growth media containing plant extract. Since endophytes likely contribute to plant-growth promotion, cultivated bacterial strains were tested for their plant-growth promoting capabilities, and the results were correlated with their abundance in the total community. Bacillus and Pseudomonas showed promising results when considering cultivability, abundance in the total community and plant-growth promoting capability. This study demonstrated that, although a limited number of bacterial genera were cultivable, current cultivation-dependent techniques may be sufficient for further isolation and inoculation experiments that aim to improve phytoremediation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Barcoded pyrosequencing-based metagenomic analysis of the faecal microbiome of three purebred pig lines after cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Chae, Jong Pyo; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Kim, In Ho; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The microbial communities in the pig gut perform a variety of beneficial functions. Along with host genetics and diet, farm management practices are an important aspect of agricultural animal production that could influence gut microbial diversity. In this study, we used barcoded pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes to characterise the faecal microbiome of three common commercial purebred pig lines (Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire) before and after cohabitation. The diversity of faecal microbiota was characterised by employing phylogenetic, distance-based and multivariate-clustering approaches. Bacterial diversity tended to become more uniform after mixing of the litters. Age-related shifts were also observed at various taxonomic levels, with an increase in the proportion of the phylum Firmicutes and a decrease in Bacteroidetes over time, regardless of the purebred group. Cohabitation had a detectable effect on the microbial shift among purebred pigs. We identified the bacterial genus Parasutterella as having utility in discriminating pigs according to time. Similarly, Dialister and Bacteroides can be used to differentiate the purebred lines used. The microbial communities of the three purebred pigs became more similar after cohabitation, but retained a certain degree of breed specificity, with the microbiota of Landrace and Yorkshire remaining distinct from that of their distant relative, Duroc.

  15. Identification of microbial communities in open and closed circuit bioelectrochemical MBRs by high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    Full Text Available Two bioelectrochemical membrane bioreactors (MBRs developed by integrating microbial fuel cell and MBR technology were operated under closed-circuit and open-circuit modes, and high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to investigate the effects of the power generation on the microbial community of bio-anode and bio-cathode. Microbes on the anode under open-circuit operation (AO were enriched and highly diverse when compared to those on the anode under closed-circuit operation (AC. However, among the cathodes the closed-circuit mode (CC had richer and more diverse microbial community compared to the cathode under open-circuit mode (CO. On the anodes AO and AC, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, while Firmicutes was enriched only on AC. Deltaproteobacteria affiliated to Proteobacteria were also more abundant on AC than AO. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Desulfuromonas, which are well-known electrogenic bacteria, were much higher on AC (10.2% when compared to AO (0.11%, indicating that closed-circuit operation was more conducive for the growth of electrogenic bacteria on the anodes. On the cathodes, Protebacteria was robust on CC while Bacteroidetes was more abundant on CO. Rhodobacter and Hydrogenophaga were also enriched on CC than CO, suggesting that these genera play a role in electron transfer from the cathode surface to the terminal electron acceptors in the bioelectrochemical MBR under closed-circuit operation.

  16. Tracking the evolution of dengue virus strains D2S10 and D2S20 by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Makhluf

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus worldwide. In this study, we used pyrosequencing to analyze the whole viral genome of two mouse-adapted strains, D2S10 and D2S20, that induce a dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS-like lethal disease in mice lacking the type I and/or type II interferon receptors. Previous experiments with D2S10 indicated that N124D and K128E mutations in the envelope protein were responsible for the severe disease induced in mice compared to its parental strain PL046. Here we demonstrate that D2S20 is more virulent than D2S10 and captured the presence of five key amino acid mutations--T70I, N83D, and K122I in envelope (E, and A62T in nonstructural protein 2A (NS2A and G605V in nonstructural protein 5 (NS5--that may account for this. These findings set the foundation for further dissection of the viral determinants responsible for dengue disease manifestations in mouse models.

  17. Barcoded Pyrosequencing Reveals a Shift in the Bacterial Community in the Rhizosphere and Rhizoplane of Rehmannia glutinosa under Consecutive Monoculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkun Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The production and quality of Rehmannia glutinosa can be dramatically reduced by replant disease under consecutive monoculture. The root-associated microbiome, also known as the second genome of the plant, was investigated to understand its impact on plant health. Culture-dependent and culture-independent pyrosequencing analysis was applied to assess the shifts in soil bacterial communities in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane under consecutive monoculture. The results show that the root-associated microbiome (including rhizosphere and rhizoplane microbiomes was significantly impacted by rhizocompartments and consecutive monoculture. Consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa led to a significant decline in the relative abundance of the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Furthermore, the families Flavobacteriaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae enriched while Pseudomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Micrococcaceae decreased under consecutive monoculture. At the genus level, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, and Arthrobacter were prevalent in the newly planted soil, which decreased in consecutive monocultured soils. Besides, culture-dependent analysis confirmed the widespread presence of Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. in newly planted soil and their strong antagonistic activities against fungal pathogens. In conclusion, R. glutinosa monoculture resulted in distinct root-associated microbiome variation with a reduction in the abundance of beneficial microbes, which might contribute to the declined soil suppressiveness to fungal pathogens in the monoculture regime.

  18. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pyrosequencing revealed shifts of prokaryotic communities between healthy and disease-like tissues of the Red Sea sponge Crella cyathophora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Ming Gao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sponge diseases have been widely reported, yet the causal factors and major pathogenic microbes remain elusive. In this study, two individuals of the sponge Crella cyathophora in total that showed similar disease-like characteristics were collected from two different locations along the Red Sea coast separated by more than 30 kilometers. The disease-like parts of the two individuals were both covered by green surfaces, and the body size was much smaller compared with adjacent healthy regions. Here, using high-throughput pyrosequencing technology, we investigated the prokaryotic communities in healthy and disease-like sponge tissues as well as adjacent seawater. Microbes in healthy tissues belonged mainly to the Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and were much more diverse at the phylum level than reported previously. Interestingly, the disease-like tissues from the two sponge individuals underwent shifts of prokaryotic communities and were both enriched with a novel clade affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia, implying its intimate connection with the disease-like Red Sea sponge C. cyathophora. Enrichment of the phylum Verrucomicrobia was also considered to be correlated with the presence of algae assemblages forming the green surface of the disease-like sponge tissues. This finding represents an interesting case of sponge disease and is valuable for further study.

  20. Rapid development of microsatellite markers with 454 pyrosequencing in a vulnerable fish, the mottled skate, Raja pulchra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Park, Jung-Youn; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2012-01-01

    The mottled skate, Raja pulchra, is an economically valuable fish. However, due to a severe population decline, it is listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. To analyze its genetic structure and diversity, microsatellite markers were developed using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 17,033 reads containing dinucleotide microsatellite repeat units (mean, 487 base pairs) were identified from 453,549 reads. Among 32 loci containing more than nine repeat units, 20 primer sets (62%) produced strong PCR products, of which 14 were polymorphic. In an analysis of 60 individuals from two R. pulchra populations, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 1-10, and the mean allelic richness was 4.7. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test showed significant deviation in two of the 28 single-loci after sequential Bonferroni's correction. Using 11 primer sets, cross-species amplification was demonstrated in nine related species from four families within two classes. Among the 11 loci amplified from three other Rajidae family species; three loci were polymorphic. A monomorphic locus was amplified in all three Rajidae family species and the Dasyatidae family. Two Rajidae polymorphic loci amplified monomorphic target DNAs in four species belonging to the Carcharhiniformes class, and another was polymorphic in two Carcharhiniformes species.

  1. MGMT pyrosequencing-based cut-off methylation level and clinical outcome in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrieri, Lorena; De Carlo, Elisa; Gerratana, Lorenzo; De Maglio, Giovanna; Macerelli, Marianna; Pisa, Federica Edith; Masiero, Elena; Aprile, Giuseppe; Follador, Alessandro; Puglisi, Fabio; Fasola, Gianpiero; Rizzato, Simona; Pizzolitto, Stefano

    2018-03-09

    MGMT promoter methylation has been associated with improved survival in glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide. However, there is no consensus on specific cut-off levels of methylation. The aims of the study were to explore the prognostic impact of MGMT methylation status and to analyze the role of specific cut-off values. We analyzed 108 glioblastoma multiforme patients treated between 2008 and 2013 stratified according to three pyrosequencing-based quantitative methylation in: unmethylated (methylation methylated (>29%). The three-class stratification has a prognostic impact (median progression-free survival: 7.97, 11.6 and 15 months respectively; p = 0.004; median OS: 13.2, 15.8 and 19.5 months, respectively; p = 0.0002), especially in patients exposed to temozolomide. Our study confirmed that the independent prognostic role of MGMT methylation status. An average level of methylation between all investigated CpGs of 9% may help discriminating between methylated and unmethylated tumors.

  2. Pyrosequencing dried blood spots reveals differences in HIV drug resistance between treatment naïve and experienced patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhao Ji

    Full Text Available Dried blood spots (DBS are an alternative specimen collection format for HIV-1 genotyping. DBS produce HIV genotyping results that are robust and equivalent to plasma when using conventional sequencing methods. However, using tagged, pooled pyrosequencing, we demonstrate that concordance between plasma and DBS is not absolute and varies according to viral load (VL, duration of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART status. The plasma/DBS concordance is the highest when VL is ≥5,000 copies/ml and/or the patient has no ART exposure and/or when the duration of HIV infection is ≤2 years. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that VL is most important independent predictor for concordance of DBS with plasma genotypes. This is the first study to use next generation sequencing to identify discordance between DBS and plasma genotypes. Consideration should be given to VL, duration of infection, and ART exposure when interpreting DBS genotypes produced using next generation sequencing. These findings are of particular significance when DBS are to be used for clinical monitoring purposes.

  3. Identification of IL-28B Genotype Modification in Hepatocytes after Living Donor Liver Transplantation by Laser Capture Microdissection and Pyrosequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Wah Chiu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to elucidate the biogenetic modification of donor and recipient interleukin-28B (IL-28B genotypes in liver graft biopsies after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT for chronic hepatitis C virus- (HCV- related, end-stage liver disease. Fifty liver graft biopsies were collected from recipients during LDLT treatment for HCV-related, end-stage liver disease. DNA was extracted from all 50 liver tissues, and the IL-28B single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs8099917 and rs12979860 were studied for allelic discrimination by real-time PCR analysis. Blood samples were obtained from donors and recipients on postoperative day 0 (POD0, POD7, and POD30. We randomly selected five liver biopsies and isolated the hepatocytes by laser capture microdissection (LCM to evaluate genotype modifications resulting from LDLT. After LDLT, the IL-28B SNP rs8099917 was identified not only in the liver graft biopsies and donors’ sera (TT = 41 : 43; GT = 9 : 5; GG = 0 : 2, but also in liver graft biopsies and recipients’ sera on POD0 (TT = 41 : 44; GT = 9 : 4; GG = 0 : 2, POD7 (TT = 41 : 30; GT = 9 : 18; GG = 0 : 2, and POD30 (TT = 41 : 29; GT = 9 : 19; GG = 0 : 2. A significant difference was observed between the rs8099917 allele frequencies of liver graft biopsies and recipients’ sera on POD30 (p=0.039. In addition, a significant difference was also noted between the rs12979860 allele frequencies of liver graft biopsies and donors’ sera (CT = 49 : 39; TT = 1 : 10 (p=0.012 and of liver graft biopsies and recipients’ sera on POD0 (CT = 49 : 39; TT = 1 : 11 (p=0.002, POD7 (CT = 49 : 42; TT = 1 : 8 (p=0.016, and POD30 (CT = 49 : 41; TT = 1 : 9 (p=0.008. This phenomenon was confirmed by pyrosequencing of hepatocytes isolated by LCM. Following LDLT, the TT-to-GT IL-28B genotype modification predominated in rs8099917, and the CC-to-CT modification predominated

  4. Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) nucleotide polymorphism determination using formalin fixed tissues in EHV-1 induced abortions and myelopathies with real-time PCR and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Deepanker; Del Piero, Fabio; Cieply, Stephen; Feria, Willard; Acland, Helen

    2013-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) strains with a single point mutation at the 2254 nucleotide position with a G2254 constitution within the DNA polymerase gene are associated strongly with equine myeloencephalopathies. Infections with non-neuropathogenic EHV-1 strains without the G2254 nucleotide but with an A2254 nucleotide are associated less frequently with equine neurologic disease. A retrospective study utilizing DNA extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues was conducted with real time PCR and pyrosequencing, to determine the infecting EHV-1 strains. Infection with EHV-1 A2254 and or G2254 strain was detected with real time PCR, and was confirmed with a rapid pyrosequencing technique. Pyrosequencing was useful in at least 2 cases where real time PCR was equivocal in determining the infecting EHV-1 strain type. The strain with G2254 mutation was detected in 9.4% of 21 studied abortion cases, and in 86.6% of 15 neurologic cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Maravic, H.

    1993-01-01

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  6. A set of plastid microsatellite loci for the genus Dyckia (Bromeliaceae) derived from 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, Florian; Wöhrmann, Tina; Pinangé, Diego Sotero de Barros; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2012-12-01

    Phylogeographical analyses of Dyckia (Bromeliaceae) suffer from low levels of sequence variation. Plastid microsatellite markers were developed to achieve a better-resolved genus-wide plastid genealogy of Dyckia. • Approximately 84% of the D. marnier-lapostollei plastome was sequenced using 454 technology. Flanking primer pairs were designed for 34 out of 36 chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) detected, and 12 loci were further characterized by genotyping Dyckia samples at the level of populations and species. Three, five, and six cpSSRs were polymorphic among four individuals of D. limae, 12 individuals of D. dissitiflora, and 12 of D. pernambucana, respectively, with two to three alleles per locus and species. All loci were polymorphic among 19 different Dyckia species, with three to 10 alleles per locus. Ten primer pairs cross-amplified with bromeliad genera from five subfamilies. • The set of 12 cpSSR markers provides a toolbox to analyze phylogeographical patterns of Dyckia species.

  7. Pyrosequencing analysis of the protist communities in a High Arctic meromictic lake: DNA preservation and change

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    Sophie eCharvet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High Arctic meromictic lakes are extreme environments characterized by cold temperatures, low nutrient inputs from their polar desert catchments and prolonged periods of low irradiance and darkness. These lakes are permanently stratified with an oxygenated freshwater layer (mixolimnion overlying a saline, anoxic water column (monimolimnion. The physical and chemical properties of the deepest known lake of this type in the circumpolar Arctic, Lake A, on the far northern coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, have been studied over the last 15 years, but little is known about the lake’s biological communities. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to investigate the protist communities down the water column at three sampling times: under the ice at the end of winter in 2008, during an unusual period of warming and ice-out the same year, and again under the ice in mid-summer 2009. Sequences of many protist taxa occurred throughout the water column at all sampling times, including in the deep anoxic layer where growth is highly unlikely. Furthermore, there were sequences for taxonomic groups including diatoms and marine taxa, which have never been observed in Lake A by microscopic analysis. However the sequences of other taxa such as ciliates, chrysophytes, Cercozoa and Telonema varied with depth, between years and during the transition to ice-free conditions. These results imply that there are seasonally active taxa in the surface waters of the lake that are sensitive to depth and change with time. DNA from these taxa is superimposed upon background DNA from multiple internal and external sources that is preserved in the deep, cold, largely anoxic water column.

  8. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research programme: Rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples, Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Warsaw, Poland 4-8 September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Concern about the release of radionuclides to the environment, especially to the foodchain, has been heightened by recent nuclear incidents. The assessment of any release of radioactivity demands rapid, reliable and practical techniques. In the intermediate and late post-accident period, where the interest is in food control rather then evacuation and sheltering, rapid methods would be useful for screening purposes as well as providing timely information and easing sample workload minimizing sample overloads. In the first research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research program ''Rapid.... samples'', the specifications for the time required for sample preparation, separation, and analysis and the accuracy desired were outlined. Considerable attention was given to the need to develop rapid method for sample preparation and dissolution. Emphasis was placed on achieving the development of rapid methods with the minimum sacrifice in reliability, practicality and economy

  9. 76 FR 37062 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...-time transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and...

  10. 77 FR 51513 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...-time transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and...

  11. 77 FR 36479 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and committee...

  12. Pyrosequencing of supra- and subgingival biofilms from inflamed peri-implant and periodontal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumann, Simone; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Scherer, Ralph; Schilhabel, Markus; Winkel, Andreas; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Eberhard, Jörg; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-12-17

    To investigate the microbial composition of biofilms at inflamed peri-implant and periodontal tissues in the same subject, using 16S rRNA sequencing. Supra- and submucosal, and supra- and subgingival plaque samples were collected from 7 subjects suffering from diseased peri-implant and periodontal tissues. Bacterial DNA was isolated and 16S rRNA genes were amplified, sequenced and aligned for the identification of bacterial genera. 43734 chimera-depleted, denoised sequences were identified, corresponding to 1 phylum, 8 classes, 10 orders, 44 families and 150 genera. The most abundant families or genera found in supramucosal or supragingival plaque were Streptoccocaceae, Rothia and Porphyromonas. In submucosal plaque, the most abundant family or genera found were Rothia, Streptococcaceae and Porphyromonas on implants. The most abundant subgingival bacteria on teeth were Prevotella, Streptococcaceae, and TG5. The number of sequences found for the genera Tannerella and Aggregatibacter on implants differed significantly between supra- and submucosal locations before multiple testing. The analyses demonstrated no significant differences between microbiomes on implants and teeth in supra- or submucosal and supra- or subgingival biofilms. Diseased peri-implant and periodontal tissues in the same subject share similiar bacterial genera and based on the analysis of taxa on a genus level biofilm compositions may not account for the potentially distinct pathologies at implants or teeth.

  13. Pyrosequencing of microbial community of typical chernozem in contrast land use conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Olga, Kutovaya; Azida, Tkhakakhova

    2015-04-01

    Chernozems are the principal soil resourse of Russia, so the sustainable use of these fertile soils in the intensive agriculturural production is of great importance, especially in terms of agro-ecological security of the country. The increase in agricultural inputs - intensive cropping, soil fallowing application accompanied with high frequency of mechanical treatment, result in decrease in soil organic matter content as well as soil structure degradation and, finally, lead to the loss of soil fertility. Soil microorganisms can serve as bioindicators of anthropogenic stress experienced by the soil during its agricultural use, so they may be universal indicators of soil quality (soil health) used for optimization and biologization of agricultural systems. The way to study the relationship between the structural status of the soil, its microbial communities and the organic matter content is the comparative analysis of soil aggregates in conditions of different land use practices. The objects of our research were soil samples of soil with permanent wheat cropping (50 years), continuous dead fallow (50 years) soil, and recovering soil (for 18 years under native steppe vegetation, fallowed in previous). The analysis of 16 S rRNA gene amplicon libraries of typical chernozem in conditions of different land use systems revealed that the way of agricultural use is a strong determinant of soil microbiome taxonomic composition. It was shown that the continuous «dead fallowing» application (for 50 years) lead to the establishment of olygothrophic components of microbial community, including spore-forming members of phylum Firmicutes. The increase of Acidobacteria lineages in this variant may be an indicator of some acidification of soil during long-time fallowing application. The variant of continuous wheat cropping lead to increasing in Proteobacteria lineages. The variant of soil under native steppe vegetation was characterized by the highest values of biodiversity

  14. Comparative and Joint Analysis of Two Metagenomic Datasets from a Biogas Fermenter Obtained by 454-Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenicke, Sebastian; Ander, Christina; Bekel, Thomas; Bisdorf, Regina; Dröge, Marcus; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Jünemann, Sebastian; Kaiser, Olaf; Krause, Lutz; Tille, Felix; Zakrzewski, Martha; Pühler, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Biogas production from renewable resources is attracting increased attention as an alternative energy source due to the limited availability of traditional fossil fuels. Many countries are promoting the use of alternative energy sources for sustainable energy production. In this study, a metagenome from a production-scale biogas fermenter was analysed employing Roche's GS FLX Titanium technology and compared to a previous dataset obtained from the same community DNA sample that was sequenced on the GS FLX platform. Taxonomic profiling based on 16S rRNA-specific sequences and an Environmental Gene Tag (EGT) analysis employing CARMA demonstrated that both approaches benefit from the longer read lengths obtained on the Titanium platform. Results confirmed Clostridia as the most prevalent taxonomic class, whereas species of the order Methanomicrobiales are dominant among methanogenic Archaea. However, the analyses also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous study, including members of the genera Streptococcus, Acetivibrio, Garciella, Tissierella, and Gelria, which might also play a role in the fermentation process leading to the formation of methane. Taking advantage of the CARMA feature to correlate taxonomic information of sequences with their assigned functions, it appeared that Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, dominate within the functional context of polysaccharide degradation whereas Methanomicrobiales represent the most abundant taxonomic group responsible for methane production. Clostridia is the most important class involved in the reductive CoA pathway (Wood-Ljungdahl pathway) that is characteristic for acetogenesis. Based on binning of 16S rRNA-specific sequences allocated to the dominant genus Methanoculleus, it could be shown that this genus is represented by several different species. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences placed them in close proximity to the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanoculleus

  15. Comparative and joint analysis of two metagenomic datasets from a biogas fermenter obtained by 454-pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Jaenicke

    Full Text Available Biogas production from renewable resources is attracting increased attention as an alternative energy source due to the limited availability of traditional fossil fuels. Many countries are promoting the use of alternative energy sources for sustainable energy production. In this study, a metagenome from a production-scale biogas fermenter was analysed employing Roche's GS FLX Titanium technology and compared to a previous dataset obtained from the same community DNA sample that was sequenced on the GS FLX platform. Taxonomic profiling based on 16S rRNA-specific sequences and an Environmental Gene Tag (EGT analysis employing CARMA demonstrated that both approaches benefit from the longer read lengths obtained on the Titanium platform. Results confirmed Clostridia as the most prevalent taxonomic class, whereas species of the order Methanomicrobiales are dominant among methanogenic Archaea. However, the analyses also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous study, including members of the genera Streptococcus, Acetivibrio, Garciella, Tissierella, and Gelria, which might also play a role in the fermentation process leading to the formation of methane. Taking advantage of the CARMA feature to correlate taxonomic information of sequences with their assigned functions, it appeared that Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, dominate within the functional context of polysaccharide degradation whereas Methanomicrobiales represent the most abundant taxonomic group responsible for methane production. Clostridia is the most important class involved in the reductive CoA pathway (Wood-Ljungdahl pathway that is characteristic for acetogenesis. Based on binning of 16S rRNA-specific sequences allocated to the dominant genus Methanoculleus, it could be shown that this genus is represented by several different species. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences placed them in close proximity to the hydrogenotrophic methanogen

  16. Investigation of ruminal bacterial diversity in dairy cattle fed supplementary monensin alone and in combination with fat, using pyrosequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; Eastridge, M L; Yu, Z

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and compare the effects of monensin, both alone and together with dietary fat, on ruminal bacterial communities in dairy cattle fed the following 3 diets: a control diet, the control diet supplemented with monensin, and the control diet supplemented with both monensin and fat. Bacterial communities in the liquid and the adherent fractions of rumen content were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Most sequences were assigned to phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, irrespective of diets and fractions. Prevotella was the most dominant genus, but most sequences could not be classified at the genus level. The proportion of Gram-positive Firmicutes was reduced by 4.5% in response to monensin but increased by 12.8% by combination of monensin and fat, compared with the control diet. Some of the operational taxonomic units in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were also affected by monensin or by the combination of monensin with fat. The proportion of numerous bacteria potentially involved in lipolysis and (or) biohydrogenation was increased by both monensin and fat. The Shannon diversity index was decreased in the control diet supplemented with both monensin and fat, compared with the other 2 diet groups. Supplementary fats hinder bacterial attachment to plant particles and then result in decreased bacterial diversity in the rumen. The finding of this study may help in understanding the effect of monensin and fat on ruminant nutrition and the adverse effect of monensin and fat, such as milk fat depression and decreased feed digestibility.

  17. Small RNA pyrosequencing in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica reveals strain-specific small RNAs that target virulence genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Small RNA mediated gene silencing is a well-conserved regulatory pathway. In the parasite Entamoeba histolytica an endogenous RNAi pathway exists, however, the depth and diversity of the small RNA population remains unknown. Results To characterize the small RNA population that associates with E. histolytica Argonaute-2 (EhAGO2-2), we immunoprecipitated small RNAs that associate with it and performed one full pyrosequencing run. Data analysis revealed new features of the 27nt small RNAs including the 5′-G predominance, distinct small RNA distribution patterns on protein coding genes, small RNAs mapping to both introns and exon-exon junctions, and small RNA targeted genes that are clustered particularly in sections of genome duplication. Characterization of genomic loci to which both sense and antisense small RNAs mapped showed that both sets of small RNAs have 5′-polyphosphate termini; strand-specific RT-PCR detected transcripts in both directions at these loci suggesting that both transcripts may serve as template for small RNA generation. In order to determine whether small RNA abundance patterns account for strain-specific gene expression profiles of E. histolytica virulent and non-virulent strains, we sequenced small RNAs from a non-virulent strain and found that small RNAs mapped to genes in a manner consistent with their regulation of strain-specific virulence genes. Conclusions We provided a full spectrum analysis for E. histolytica AGO2-2 associated 27nt small RNAs. Additionally, comparative analysis of small RNA populations from virulent and non-virulent amebic strains indicates that small RNA populations may regulate virulence genes. PMID:23347563

  18. De novo sequence assembly and characterization of Lycoris aurea transcriptome using GS FLX titanium platform of 454 pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lycoris aurea, also called Golden Magic Lily, is an ornamentally and medicinally important species of the Amaryllidaceae family. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST dataset for L. aurea using high-throughput sequencing technology. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total RNA was isolated from leaves with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, salicylic acid (SA, or methyl jasmonate (MeJA treatment, stems, and flowers at the bud, blooming, and wilting stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, a total of 937,990 high quality reads (308.63 Mb with an average read length of 329 bp were generated. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 141,111 unique sequences, comprising 24,604 contigs and 116,507 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literatures, many putative genes involved in Amaryllidaceae alkaloids synthesis, including PAL, TYDC OMT, NMT, P450, and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this Lycoris. Furthermore, 6,386 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in L. aurea. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will provide useful

  19. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eMinard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated however. Some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimise the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 98,520 sequences obtained. Ae. albopictus is known to harbour two Wolbachia strains, wAlbA and wAlbB, and quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, i.e. the bacteria-to-host gene ratios, of the strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 100.01 and 5.47 × 100.1 for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 100.1 and 1.4 × 101 for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 32 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using the different in method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from

  20. Pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium and identification of a large transferable pathogenicity island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonten Marc JM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of nosocomial infections in immunocompromized patients. Results We present a pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of seven E. faecium strains that were isolated from various sources. In the genomes of clinical isolates several antibiotic resistance genes were identified, including the vanA transposon that confers resistance to vancomycin in two strains. A functional comparison between E. faecium and the related opportunistic pathogen E. faecalis based on differences in the presence of protein families, revealed divergence in plant carbohydrate metabolic pathways and oxidative stress defense mechanisms. The E. faecium pan-genome was estimated to be essentially unlimited in size, indicating that E. faecium can efficiently acquire and incorporate exogenous DNA in its gene pool. One of the most prominent sources of genomic diversity consists of bacteriophages that have integrated in the genome. The CRISPR-Cas system, which contributes to immunity against bacteriophage infection in prokaryotes, is not present in the sequenced strains. Three sequenced isolates carry the esp gene, which is involved in urinary tract infections and biofilm formation. The esp gene is located on a large pathogenicity island (PAI, which is between 64 and 104 kb in size. Conjugation experiments showed that the entire esp PAI can be transferred horizontally and inserts in a site-specific manner. Conclusions Genes involved in environmental persistence, colonization and virulence can easily be aquired by E. faecium. This will make the development of successful treatment strategies targeted against this organism a challenge for years to come.

  1. Rapid identification of genetic modifications in Bacillus anthracis using whole genome draft sequences generated by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anthrax letter attacks of 2001 highlighted the need for rapid identification of biothreat agents not only for epidemiological surveillance of the intentional outbreak but also for implementing appropriate countermeasures, such as antibiotic treatment, in a timely manner to prevent further casualties. It is clear from the 2001 cases that survival may be markedly improved by administration of antimicrobial therapy during the early symptomatic phase of the illness; i.e., within 3 days of appearance of symptoms. Microbiological detection methods are feasible only for organisms that can be cultured in vitro and cannot detect all genetic modifications with the exception of antibiotic resistance. Currently available immuno or nucleic acid-based rapid detection assays utilize known, organism-specific proteins or genomic DNA signatures respectively. Hence, these assays lack the ability to detect novel natural variations or intentional genetic modifications that circumvent the targets of the detection assays or in the case of a biological attack using an antibiotic resistant or virulence enhanced Bacillus anthracis, to advise on therapeutic treatments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that the Roche 454-based pyrosequencing can generate whole genome draft sequences of deep and broad enough coverage of a bacterial genome in less than 24 hours. Furthermore, using the unfinished draft sequences, we demonstrate that unbiased identification of known as well as heretofore-unreported genetic modifications that include indels and single nucleotide polymorphisms conferring antibiotic and phage resistances is feasible within the next 12 hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Second generation sequencing technologies have paved the way for sequence-based rapid identification of both known and previously undocumented genetic modifications in cultured, conventional and newly emerging biothreat agents. Our findings have significant implications in

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense Using 454 Pyrosequencing for Discovery of Genes and Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Keyi; Qiu, Gaofeng; Feng, Jianbin; Li, Jiale

    2012-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. Methodology and Principal Findings Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59Mb) with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425), cellular component (44,112) and biological process (67,679) categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusions The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating

  3. Transcriptome analysis of the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense using 454 pyrosequencing for discovery of genes and markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyi Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59 Mb with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425, cellular component (44,112 and biological process (67,679 categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for

  4. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Venous sampling Venous sampling is a diagnostic procedure that uses ... the limitations of venous sampling? What is venous sampling? Venous sampling is a diagnostic procedure that involves ...

  5. Variations in bacterial and fungal community composition along the soil depth profiles determined by pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, D.; Yoo, G.; Jun, S. C.; Yun, S. T.; Chung, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play key roles in nutrient cycling, and are distributed throughout the soil profile. Currently, there is little information about the characteristics of the microbial communities along the soil depth because most studies focus on microorganisms inhabiting the soil surface. To better understand the functions and composition of microbial communities and the biogeochemical factors that shape them at different soil depth, we analyzed soil microbial activities and bacterial and fungal community composition in a soil profile of a fallow field located in central Korea. Soil samples were taken using 120-cm soil cores. To analyze the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, barcoded pyrosequnecing analysis of 16S rRNA genes (bacteria) and ITS region (fungi) was conducted. Among the bacterial groups, the abundance of Proteobacteria (38.5, 23.2, 23.3, 26.1 and 17.5%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) and Firmicutes (12.8, 11.3, 8.6, 4.3 and 0.4%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) decreased with soil depth. On the other hand, the abundance of Ascomycota (51.2, 48.6, 65.7, 46.1, and 45.7%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively), a dominant fungal group at this site, showed no significant difference along the soil profile. To examine the vertical difference of microbial activities, activity of five extracellular enzymes that take part in cycling of C, N, and P in soil ecosystems, beta-1,4-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-1,4-xylosidase, beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase were analyzed. The soil enzyme activity declined with soil depth. For example, acid phosphatase activity was 88.5 (± 14.6 (± 1 SE)), 30.0 (± 5.9), 18.0 (± 3.5), 14.1 (± 3.7), and 10.7 (± 3.8) nmol g-1 hr-1, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively. These metagenomics studies, along with other studies on microbial functions, are expected to enhance our understanding on the complexity of

  6. 75 FR 38463 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ...; address portside sampling; require electronic monitoring, and address other elements of catch monitoring... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... England Fishery Management Council (Council) is scheduling a public meeting of its Herring Oversight...

  7. 75 FR 47780 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ...; observer coverage and portside sampling; and measures to require electronic monitoring. 2. Provide AP... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... England Fishery Management Council's (Council) Herring Advisory Panel (AP) will meet to consider actions...

  8. Remedial action programs annual meeting: Meeting notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office was pleased to host the 1987 Remedial Action programs Annual Meeting and herein presents notes from that meeting as prepared (on relatively short notice) by participants. These notes are a summary of the information derived from the workshops, case studies, and ad hoc committee reports rather than formal proceedings. The order of the materials in this report follows the actual sequence of presentations during the annual meeting

  9. 76 FR 37356 - 2011 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ...] 2011 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public Meeting... Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System.'' The topic to be discussed is animal and retail sampling methods for the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS...

  10. 77 FR 38274 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... June 27, 2012. CHANGES TO OPEN MEETING: REVISED AGENDA AND TIME: Matters to be Considered: (1) Decisional Matters: Play Yards--Final Rule; (2) Briefing Matter: Representative Samples; 10 a.m.-12 p.m...

  11. Bioinformatic analysis of ESTs collected by Sanger and pyrosequencing methods for a keystone forest tree species: oak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Saneyoshi; Le Provost, Grégoire; Léger, Valérie; Klopp, Christophe; Noirot, Céline; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Salin, Franck; Salse, Jérôme; Abrouk, Michael; Murat, Florent; Brendel, Oliver; Derory, Jérémy; Abadie, Pierre; Léger, Patrick; Cabane, Cyril; Barré, Aurélien; de Daruvar, Antoine; Couloux, Arnaud; Wincker, Patrick; Reviron, Marie-Pierre; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2010-11-23

    The Fagaceae family comprises about 1,000 woody species worldwide. About half belong to the Quercus family. These oaks are often a source of raw material for biomass wood and fiber. Pedunculate and sessile oaks, are among the most important deciduous forest tree species in Europe. Despite their ecological and economical importance, very few genomic resources have yet been generated for these species. Here, we describe the development of an EST catalogue that will support ecosystem genomics studies, where geneticists, ecophysiologists, molecular biologists and ecologists join their efforts for understanding, monitoring and predicting functional genetic diversity. We generated 145,827 sequence reads from 20 cDNA libraries using the Sanger method. Unexploitable chromatograms and quality checking lead us to eliminate 19,941 sequences. Finally a total of 125,925 ESTs were retained from 111,361 cDNA clones. Pyrosequencing was also conducted for 14 libraries, generating 1,948,579 reads, from which 370,566 sequences (19.0%) were eliminated, resulting in 1,578,192 sequences. Following clustering and assembly using TGICL pipeline, 1,704,117 EST sequences collapsed into 69,154 tentative contigs and 153,517 singletons, providing 222,671 non-redundant sequences (including alternative transcripts). We also assembled the sequences using MIRA and PartiGene software and compared the three unigene sets. Gene ontology annotation was then assigned to 29,303 unigene elements. Blast search against the SWISS-PROT database revealed putative homologs for 32,810 (14.7%) unigene elements, but more extensive search with Pfam, Refseq_protein, Refseq_RNA and eight gene indices revealed homology for 67.4% of them. The EST catalogue was examined for putative homologs of candidate genes involved in bud phenology, cuticle formation, phenylpropanoids biosynthesis and cell wall formation. Our results suggest a good coverage of genes involved in these traits. Comparative orthologous sequences (COS

  12. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Region in Patients with Cirrhosis Using an Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Fahriye; Ciftci, Sevgi; Akyuz, Filiz; Abaci, Neslihan; Cakiris, Aris; Akyuz, Umit; Demir, Kadir; Besisik, Fatih; Ustek, Duran; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin

    2017-09-01

    HCV (Hepatitis C Virus) is genetically more diverse than HBV and HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and exists as quasispecies within infected individuals. This is due to the lack of efficient proofreading of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Consequently, quasispecies emerge depending on the mutation rate of the viral polymerase, which may display a high level of genetic variability in a population. In infected individuals, HCV replicates and circulates as quasispecies composed of a complex mixture of different but closely related genomes that undergoes continuous change due to competitive selection and cooperation between arising mutants. The aim of this study is to investigate mutations in the NS5A region as a whole, including ISDR, PKRBD, IRRDR, and V3 of HCV genotype 1b cirrhosis patients being naive and nonresponders, treated with IFN (interferon) + ribavirin (RBN) by using an ultra-deep pyrosequencing method (UDPS). During the study, five patients (four females, and one male, mean age 59.8 ± 11 years) with HCV related cirrhosis were analyzed. Three patients received IFN + RBN for six months, but two patients did not receive any therapy. HCV-RNA concentrations in patients' sera were determined using a COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR Test, Version 2.0. Genotyping was performed by using a commercial reverse hybridization method, Line Probe Assay. The quasispecies for the NS5A region were investigated using UDPS. All five patients were HCV genotype 1b (Mean Child-Pugh score 7.2 ± 1.9, 2 pts Child A, 2 pts Child B, and one pt Child C) but only one patient had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 19 different mutations were detected in each of the five patients (ranging from 3 to 6 mutations per patient). In all five patients, several mutations in the ISDR and PKR-BD regions were detected. On the other hand, mutations in the V3 and IRRDR regions were only detected in one patient. UDPS is a new sequencing technology and a very sensitive method in detection

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of ESTs collected by Sanger and pyrosequencing methods for a keystone forest tree species: oak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léger Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Fagaceae family comprises about 1,000 woody species worldwide. About half belong to the Quercus family. These oaks are often a source of raw material for biomass wood and fiber. Pedunculate and sessile oaks, are among the most important deciduous forest tree species in Europe. Despite their ecological and economical importance, very few genomic resources have yet been generated for these species. Here, we describe the development of an EST catalogue that will support ecosystem genomics studies, where geneticists, ecophysiologists, molecular biologists and ecologists join their efforts for understanding, monitoring and predicting functional genetic diversity. Results We generated 145,827 sequence reads from 20 cDNA libraries using the Sanger method. Unexploitable chromatograms and quality checking lead us to eliminate 19,941 sequences. Finally a total of 125,925 ESTs were retained from 111,361 cDNA clones. Pyrosequencing was also conducted for 14 libraries, generating 1,948,579 reads, from which 370,566 sequences (19.0% were eliminated, resulting in 1,578,192 sequences. Following clustering and assembly using TGICL pipeline, 1,704,117 EST sequences collapsed into 69,154 tentative contigs and 153,517 singletons, providing 222,671 non-redundant sequences (including alternative transcripts. We also assembled the sequences using MIRA and PartiGene software and compared the three unigene sets. Gene ontology annotation was then assigned to 29,303 unigene elements. Blast search against the SWISS-PROT database revealed putative homologs for 32,810 (14.7% unigene elements, but more extensive search with Pfam, Refseq_protein, Refseq_RNA and eight gene indices revealed homology for 67.4% of them. The EST catalogue was examined for putative homologs of candidate genes involved in bud phenology, cuticle formation, phenylpropanoids biosynthesis and cell wall formation. Our results suggest a good coverage of genes involved in these

  14. Cataloguing the bacterial community of the Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma using 16S rRNA based metagenomics pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Gad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma (GSP is an extreme region, a hypersaline environment from marine origin and a unique area of the Salt National Wild Refuge in the north-central region of Oklahoma. In this study we analyzed the diversity and distribution of bacteria in two habitats; vegetated areas (GAB and salt flat areas (GAS in the sediments of GSP using the high-throughput techniques of 16S rRNA gene amplicon (V1-V2 regions metagenomics-454 pyrosequencing. The filtered sequences resulted to a total of 303,723 paired end reads were generated, assigned into 1646 numbers of OTUs and 56.4% G + C content for GAB, and a total of 144,496 paired end reads were generated, assigned into 785 numbers of OTUs and 56.7% G+ C content for GAS. All the resulting 16S rRNA was of an average length ~ 187 bp, assigned to 37 bacterial phyla and candidate divisions. The abundant OTUs were affiliated with Proteobacteria (36.2% in GAB and 31.5% in GAS, Alphaproteobacteria (13.3% in GAB and 8.7% in GAS, Gammaproteobacteria (13% in GAB and 14.2% in GAS, Deltaproteobacteria (6.5% in GAB and 6.1% in GAS, Betaproteobacteria (2.6% in GAB and 1.14% in GAS, Bacteroidetes (16.8% in GAB and 24.3% in GAS, Chloroflexi (8.7% in GAB and 6% in GAS, Actinobacteria (8.5% in GAB and 5.8% in GAS and Firmicutes (6.5% in GAB and 6.6% in GAS. This is the first study of a high resolution microbial phylogenetic profile of the GSP and the findings stipulate evidence of the bacterial heterogeneity that might be originated by surface and subsurface environments and better understanding of the ecosystem dynamics of GSP. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI with accession numbers; LT699840-LT700186.

  15. Identification and analysis of miRNAs in human breast cancer and teratoma samples using deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Jacobsen, Anders; Lindow, Morten

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: Here we describe the analysis of 454 pyrosequencing of small RNA from four different tissues: Breast cancer, normal adjacent breast, and two teratoma cell lines. We developed a pipeline for identifying new miRNAs, emphasizing extracting and retaining as much data as possible from even noisy...... sequencing data. We investigated differential expression of miRNAs in the breast cancer and normal adjacent breast samples, and systematically examined the mature sequence end variability of miRNA compared to non-miRNA loci. RESULTS: We identified five novel miRNAs, as well as two putative alternative...... precursors for known miRNAs. Several miRNAs were differentially expressed between the breast cancer and normal breast samples. The end variability was shown to be significantly different between miRNA and non-miRNA loci. CONCLUSIONS: Pyrosequencing of small RNAs, together with a computational pipeline, can...

  16. Boat sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citanovic, M.; Bezlaj, H.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation describes essential boat sampling activities: on site boat sampling process optimization and qualification; boat sampling of base material (beltline region); boat sampling of weld material (weld No. 4); problems accompanied with weld crown varieties, RPV shell inner radius tolerance, local corrosion pitting and water clarity. The equipment used for boat sampling is described too. 7 pictures

  17. 75 FR 13075 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... listening system, computer assisted real-time transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be...

  18. 76 FR 21702 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... system, computer assisted real-time transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be...

  19. 78 FR 52499 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... system, Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART), and sign language interpreters will be...

  20. 75 FR 1780 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... INFORMATION: Parts of this meeting of the Board will be open to the public (limited space available) and parts will be closed to the public. In order to increase the accessibility to Board meetings, persons...

  1. Pyrosequencing reveals the effect of mobilizing agents and lignocellulosic substrate amendment on microbial community composition in a real industrial PAH-polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, S; Covino, S; Solanas, A M; Petruccioli, M; D'annibale, A; Viñas, M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal biodiversity throughout different biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments applied to an industrial creosote-polluted soil were analyzed by means of polyphasic approach in order to gain insight into the microbial community structure and dynamics. Pyrosequencing data obtained from initial creosote polluted soil (after a biopiling step) revealed that Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial groups, whereas Fusarium and Scedosporium were the main fungal genera in the contaminated soil. At the end of 60-days laboratory scale bioremediation assays, pyrosequencing and DGGE data showed that (i) major bacterial community shifts were caused by the type of mobilizing agent added to the soil and, to a lesser extent, by the addition of lignocellulosic substrate; and (ii) the presence of the non-ionic surfactant (Brij 30) hampered the proliferation of Actinobacteria (Mycobacteriaceae) and Bacteroidetes (Chitinophagaceae) and, in the absence of lignocellulosic substrate, also impeded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation. The results show the importance of implementing bioremediation experiments combined with microbiome assessment to gain insight on the effect of crucial parameters (e.g. use of additives) over the potential functions of complex microbial communities harbored in polluted soils, essential for bioremediation success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple markers pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and host-specific fungal communities on the mangrove trees Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Yonathan; Buée, Marc; Marchand, Cyril; Levasseur, Anthony; Record, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Fungi are important actors in ecological processes and trophic webs in mangroves. Although saprophytic fungi occurring in the intertidal part of mangrove have been well studied, little is known about the diversity and structure of the fungal communities in this ecosystem or about the importance of functional groups like pathogens and mutualists. Using tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the ITS1, ITS2, nu-ssu-V5 and nu-ssu-V7 regions, we studied and compared the fungal communities found on the marine and aerial parts of Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa trees in a mangrove in New Caledonia. A total of 209,544 reads were analysed, corresponding to several thousand molecular operational taxonomic units (OTU). There is a marked zonation in the species distribution, with most of the OTU being found specifically in one of the microhabitat studied. Ascomycetes are the dominant phylum (82%), Basidiomycetes are very rare (3%), and 15% of the sequences correspond to unknown taxa. Our results indicate that host specificity is a key factor in the distribution of the highly diverse fungal communities, in both the aerial and intertidal parts of the trees. This study also validates the usefulness of multiple markers in tag-encoded pyrosequencing to consolidate and refine the assessment of the taxonomic diversity. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Making Meetings Work Better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standke, Linda

    1978-01-01

    Focusing on the increased use by trainers of off-site facilities for employee training meetings, this article looks at some improvements and the expanding market in the meeting site industry. It also highlights emerging trends in the industry and covers the growth of meeting planning into a profession. (EM)

  4. Making Meetings Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jennifer; McMurray, Cari L.

    1997-01-01

    Offers practical ideas to make meetings more effective. Stresses the importance of planning and describes the following three types of meetings: information, brainstorming, and decision making. Notes components of successful meetings: an agenda, facilitator, timekeeper, recorder, and effective communication and conflict management skills. Suggests…

  5. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  6. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  7. Meetings in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    Meetings in organizations have evolved from the infrequent, slightly authoritarian meeting of the 1950?s to today?s ubiquitous and often longwinded, every-body-has-a-right-to-speak meeting. But two important, recent trends in work and business pose new challenges. Today, organizational work is se...... changes in business and work life, the meeting has changed little. It has been poorly integrated into the organizational value chain and is rarely experienced as very important to either customers or employees.......Meetings in organizations have evolved from the infrequent, slightly authoritarian meeting of the 1950?s to today?s ubiquitous and often longwinded, every-body-has-a-right-to-speak meeting. But two important, recent trends in work and business pose new challenges. Today, organizational work is seen...

  8. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level

  9. 39 CFR 6.1 - Regular meetings, annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regular meetings, annual meeting. 6.1 Section 6.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MEETINGS (ARTICLE VI) § 6.1 Regular meetings, annual meeting. The Board shall meet regularly on a schedule...

  10. Field efficacy of four anthelmintics and confirmation of drug-resistant nematodes by controlled efficacy test and pyrosequencing on a sheep and goat farm in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Espinoza, Miguel; Thamsborg, Stig M; Demeler, Janina; Enemark, Heidi L

    2014-12-15

    We describe a case of anthelmintic resistance on one of the largest organic small ruminant farms in Denmark. The flock was established in 2007 by purchase of animals from other Danish farms and had history of clinical parasitism, high mortality of young stock and anthelmintic treatment failure. In October 2011, 40 lambs and 40 kids were selected for a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) with fenbendazole (FBZ), ivermectin (IVM), moxidectin (MOX) and levamisole (LEV). Lambs were treated with the recommended sheep dose of each product while kids received the sheep dose of IVM, 1.5× sheep dose of MOX and 2× sheep dose of FBZ and LEV. Untreated lambs and kids were also included and three methods for calculating faecal egg count (FEC) reduction were compared. In a subsequent investigation, a controlled efficacy test (CET) with FBZ and IVM was performed in lambs infected with Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis isolated from adult goats on the farm. Recovered specimens of H. contortus were subjected to pyrosequencing for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to benzimidazole (BZ) resistance. During the FECRT, FECs in untreated lambs dropped significantly by 47%. No FEC reduction was detected in untreated kids. After FBZ treatments, FEC reductions in lambs and kids ranged from 15 to 54% and 49-56%, respectively, according to the different calculation methods. Post IVM treatments, FEC reductions in lambs and kids varied between 71-90% and 81-83%, correspondingly. LEV and MOX reduced FECs by 98-100% in both species. In the CET, FBZ reduced H. contortus worm counts by 52-56% and no reduction in T. colubriformis counts were detected after treatment. IVM eliminated 100% of H. contortus and reduced T. colubriformis counts by 84-92%, according to different calculation methods. Pyrosequencing of isolated H. contortus revealed increased frequencies of the BZ resistance-related SNP in codon 200 of the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene

  11. A* Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Maddison, Chris J.; Tarlow, Daniel; Minka, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The problem of drawing samples from a discrete distribution can be converted into a discrete optimization problem. In this work, we show how sampling from a continuous distribution can be converted into an optimization problem over continuous space. Central to the method is a stochastic process recently described in mathematical statistics that we call the Gumbel process. We present a new construction of the Gumbel process and A* sampling, a practical generic sampling algorithm that searches ...

  12. Clostridium XIV Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynd, Lee

    2016-08-28

    The 14th biannual Clostridium meeting was held at Dartmouth College from August 28 through 31, 2016. As noted in the meeting program (http://clostridiumxiv.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Clostridium_XIV_program.pdf). the meeting featured 119 registered attendees, 33 oral presentations, 5 of which were given by younger presenters, 40 posters, and 2 keynote presentations, with strong participation by female and international scientists.

  13. Bacterial tag encoded FLX titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP based assessment of prokaryotic diversity in metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Dudhagara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diversity and archaeal diversity in metagenome of the Lonar soda lake sediment were assessed by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP. Metagenome comprised 5093 sequences with 2,531,282 bp and 53 ± 2% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the Bioproject database with accession no. PRJNA218849. Metagenome sequence represented the presence of 83.1% bacterial and 10.5% archaeal origin. A total of 14 different bacteria demonstrating 57 species were recorded with dominating species like Coxiella burnetii (17%, Fibrobacter intestinalis (12% and Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans (11%. Occurrence of two archaeal phyla representing 24 species, among them Methanosaeta harundinacea (35%, Methanoculleus chikugoensis (12% and Methanolinea tarda (11% were dominating species. Significant presence of 11% sequences as an unclassified indicated the possibilities for unknown novel prokaryotes from the metagenome.

  14. A sweetpotato gene index established by de novo assembly of pyrosequencing and Sanger sequences and mining for gene-based microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.), a hexaploid outcrossing crop, is an important staple and food security crop in developing countries in Africa and Asia. The availability of genomic resources for sweetpotato is in striking contrast to its importance for human nutrition. Previously existing sequence data were restricted to around 22,000 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences and ~ 1,500 GenBank sequences. We have used 454 pyrosequencing to augment the available gene sequence information to enhance functional genomics and marker design for this plant species. Results Two quarter 454 pyrosequencing runs used two normalized cDNA collections from stems and leaves from drought-stressed sweetpotato clone Tanzania and yielded 524,209 reads, which were assembled together with 22,094 publically available expressed sequence tags into 31,685 sets of overlapping DNA segments and 34,733 unassembled sequences. Blastx comparisons with the UniRef100 database allowed annotation of 23,957 contigs and 15,342 singletons resulting in 24,657 putatively unique genes. Further, 27,119 sequences had no match to protein sequences of UniRef100database. On the basis of this gene index, we have identified 1,661 gene-based microsatellite sequences, of which 223 were selected for testing and 195 were successfully amplified in a test panel of 6 hexaploid (I. batatas) and 2 diploid (I. trifida) accessions. Conclusions The sweetpotato gene index is a useful source for functionally annotated sweetpotato gene sequences that contains three times more gene sequence information for sweetpotato than previous EST assemblies. A searchable version of the gene index, including a blastn function, is available at http://www.cipotato.org/sweetpotato_gene_index. PMID:20977749

  15. Pyrosequencing Reveals Bacterial Communities in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution System: An Integral Study of Bulk Water, Suspended Solids, Loose Deposits, and Pipe Wall Biofilm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, G.

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  16. Microbial community diversities and taxa abundances in soils along a seven-year gradient of potato monoculture using high throughput pyrosequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have focused on linking soil community structure, diversity, or specific taxa to disturbances. Relatively little attention has been directed to crop monoculture soils, particularly potato monoculture. Information about microbial community changes over time between monoculture and non-monoculture treatments is lacking. Furthermore, few studies have examined microbial communities in potato monoculture soils using a high throughput pyrosequencing approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Soils along a seven-year gradient of potato monoculture were collected and microbial communities were characterized using high throughput pyrosequencing approach. Principal findings are as follows. First, diversity (H(Shannon and richness (S(Chao1 indices of bacterial community, but not of fungal community, were linearly decreased over time and corresponded to a decline of soil sustainability represented by yield decline and disease incidence increase. Second, Fusarium, the only soilborne pathogen-associated fungal genus substantially detected, was linearly increased over time in abundance and was closely associated with yield decline. Third, Fusarium abundance was negatively correlated with soil organic matter (OM and total nitrogen (TN but positively with electrical conductivity (EC. Fourth, Fusarium was correlated in abundances with 6 bacterial taxa over time. CONCLUSIONS: Soil bacterial and fungal communities exhibited differential responses to the potato monoculture. The overall soil bacterial communities were shaped by potato monoculture. Fusarium was the only soilborne pathogen-associated genus associated with disease incidence increase and yield decline. The changes of soil OM, TN and EC were responsible for Fusarium enrichment, in addition to selections by the monoculture crop. Acidobacteria and Nitrospirae were linearly decreased over time in abundance, corresponding to the decrease of OM, suggesting their similar

  17. Pyrosequencing reveals bacterial communities in unchlorinated drinking water distribution system: an integral study of bulk water, suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Bakker, G L; Li, S; Vreeburg, J H G; Verberk, J Q J C; Medema, G J; Liu, W T; Van Dijk, J C

    2014-05-20

    The current understanding of drinking water distribution system (DWDS) microbiology is limited to pipe wall biofilm and bulk water; the contributions of particle-associated bacteria (from suspended solids and loose deposits) have long been neglected. Analyzing the composition and correlation of bacterial communities from different phases helped us to locate where most of the bacteria are and understand the interactions among these phases. In the present study, the bacteria from four critical phases of an unchlorinated DWDS, including bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, suspended solids, and loose deposits, were quantified and identified by adenosine triphosphate analysis and pyrosequencing, respectively. The results showed that the bulk water bacteria (including the contribution of suspended solids) contributed less than 2% of the total bacteria. The bacteria associated with loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm that accumulated in the DWDS accounted for over 98% of the total bacteria, and the contributions of bacteria in loose deposits and pipe wall biofilm were comparable. Depending on the amount of loose deposits, its contribution can be 7-fold higher than the pipe wall biofilm. Pyrosequencing revealed relatively stable bacterial communities in bulk water, pipe wall biofilm, and suspended solids throughout the distribution system; however, the communities present in loose deposits were dependent on the amount of loose deposits locally. Bacteria within the phases of suspended solids, loose deposits, and pipe wall biofilm were similar in phylogenetic composition. The bulk water bacteria (dominated by Polaromonas spp.) were clearly different from the bacteria from the other three phases (dominated by Sphingomonas spp.). This study highlighted that the integral DWDS ecology should include contributions from all of the four phases, especially the bacteria harbored by loose deposits. The accumulation of loose deposits and the aging process create variable microenvironments

  18. [Investigation of human papillomavirus prevalence in women in Eskişehir, Turkey by Pap smear, hybrid capture 2 test and consensus real-time polymerase chain reaction and typing with pyrosequencing method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ferhat Gürkan; Us, Tercan; Kaşifoğlu, Nilgün; Özalp, Sabit Sinan; Akgün, Yurdanur; Öge, Tufan

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have a broad range of clinical spectrum from subclinical or asymptomatic infection to anogenital carcinoma. The detection of HPV-DNA and determination of the risk groups in cervical cancer (CC) screening is very important because CC is considered to be a preventable illness which is the third most common cancer type of women in the world. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of HPV-DNA in women by two different molecular methods and to compare their results together with the results of cytology, in Eskişehir, Central Anatolia, Turkey. A total of 1081 women aged between 30-65 years, who applied to Eskişehir Early Diagnosis, Screening and Training of Cancer Center (KETEM) for screening were included in the study. Three separate cervical samples were collected simultaneously from the participants for cytologic examination and molecular studies. In the first step of the study, all cervical samples were investigated for the presence of HPV-DNA by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen, Germany) method. In the second part of the study, consensus real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) (Takara Bio Inc., Japan) was performed in 152 samples which included HC2 positive and randomly selected negative samples, and then the HPV genotypes were detected by using a commercial kit based on pyrosequencing method (Diatech Pharmacogenetics S.R.L, Italy). In the first part of the study, HC2 test was found positive in 3% (32/1081) of the women, while in 4.4% (47/1081) Pap smear was positive alone or with HC2 test. Five (0.5%) samples yielded positive results with both of the methods, and four of them were positive for high risk HPV types. Cytology results were negative in 19 out of 23 (23/1081, 2.1%) samples that were reported as high risk HPV by HC2 test. On the other hand, 42 (42/1081, 3.9%) samples that were positive by cytology yielded negative results by HC2 test. In the second part of the study, 32 (21.1%) of 152 selected

  19. Soil sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunati, G.U.; Banfi, C.; Pasturenzi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This study attempts to survey the problems associated with techniques and strategies of soil sampling. Keeping in mind the well defined objectives of a sampling campaign, the aim was to highlight the most important aspect of representativeness of samples as a function of the available resources. Particular emphasis was given to the techniques and particularly to a description of the many types of samplers which are in use. The procedures and techniques employed during the investigations following the Seveso accident are described. (orig.)

  20. Microbiome analysis of stool samples from African Americans with colon polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Hassan; Yooseph, Shibu; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Lee, Edward; Torralbo, Manolito; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Shokrani, Babak; Nelson, Karen; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Colonic polyps are common tumors occurring in ~50% of Western populations with ~10% risk of malignant progression. Dietary agents have been considered the primary environmental exposure to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) development. However, the colonic mucosa is permanently in contact with the microbiota and its metabolic products including toxins that also have the potential to trigger oncogenic transformation. To analyze fecal DNA for microbiota composition and functional potential in African Americans with pre-neoplastic lesions. We analyzed the bacterial composition of stool samples from 6 healthy individuals and 6 patients with colon polyps using 16S ribosomal RNA-based phylogenetic microarray; the Human intestinal Tract Chip (HITChip) and 16S rRNA gene barcoded 454 pyrosequencing. The functional potential was determined by sequence-based metagenomics using 454 pyrosequencing. Fecal microbiota profiling of samples from the healthy and polyp patients using both a phylogenetic microarraying (HITChip) and barcoded 454 pyrosequencing generated similar results. A distinction between both sets of samples was only obtained when the analysis was performed at the sub-genus level. Most of the species leading to the dissociation were from the Bacteroides group. The metagenomic analysis did not reveal major differences in bacterial gene prevalence/abundances between the two groups even when the analysis and comparisons were restricted to available Bacteroides genomes. This study reveals that at the pre-neoplastic stages, there is a trend showing microbiota changes between healthy and colon polyp patients at the sub-genus level. These differences were not reflected at the genome/functions levels. Bacteria and associated functions within the Bacteroides group need to be further analyzed and dissected to pinpoint potential actors in the early colon oncogenic transformation in a large sample size.

  1. Microbiome analysis of stool samples from African Americans with colon polyps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Brim

    Full Text Available Colonic polyps are common tumors occurring in ~50% of Western populations with ~10% risk of malignant progression. Dietary agents have been considered the primary environmental exposure to promote colorectal cancer (CRC development. However, the colonic mucosa is permanently in contact with the microbiota and its metabolic products including toxins that also have the potential to trigger oncogenic transformation.To analyze fecal DNA for microbiota composition and functional potential in African Americans with pre-neoplastic lesions.We analyzed the bacterial composition of stool samples from 6 healthy individuals and 6 patients with colon polyps using 16S ribosomal RNA-based phylogenetic microarray; the Human intestinal Tract Chip (HITChip and 16S rRNA gene barcoded 454 pyrosequencing. The functional potential was determined by sequence-based metagenomics using 454 pyrosequencing.Fecal microbiota profiling of samples from the healthy and polyp patients using both a phylogenetic microarraying (HITChip and barcoded 454 pyrosequencing generated similar results. A distinction between both sets of samples was only obtained when the analysis was performed at the sub-genus level. Most of the species leading to the dissociation were from the Bacteroides group. The metagenomic analysis did not reveal major differences in bacterial gene prevalence/abundances between the two groups even when the analysis and comparisons were restricted to available Bacteroides genomes.This study reveals that at the pre-neoplastic stages, there is a trend showing microbiota changes between healthy and colon polyp patients at the sub-genus level. These differences were not reflected at the genome/functions levels. Bacteria and associated functions within the Bacteroides group need to be further analyzed and dissected to pinpoint potential actors in the early colon oncogenic transformation in a large sample size.

  2. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  3. 52nd Annual Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1987-01-01

    Jan 1, 1987 ... At the invitation of the Banaras Hindu. University, Varanasi, the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Academy was held in the BHU campus from Friday 7 to Monday 10 November 1986. The Meeting began with the inaugural function in the newly completed University. Auditorium, Swatantrata Bhavan, at 6 p.m. on.

  4. 75 FR 22100 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... (closed to public). Wednesday, May 12, 2010 9-Noon Public Hearing on Information and Communication Technology Standards and Guidelines. 1:30-3 p.m. Board Meeting. ADDRESSES: All meetings will be held at the Embassy Suites DC Convention Center Hotel, located at 900 10th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20001. FOR...

  5. 57th Annual Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1992-01-01

    Jan 1, 1992 ... At the invitation of the National Chemical. Laboratory, Pune, the 57th Annual Meeting of the Academy was held at Pune ftom 8 to 11. November 1991. The Meeting began with the inaugural session on the morning of Friday, 8 November at the National Chemical laboratory (NCl). Auditorium. Dr R A ...

  6. Taking minutes of meetings

    CERN Document Server

    Gutmann, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    aking Minutes of Meetings guides you through the entire process behind minute taking: arranging the meeting; writing the agenda; creating the optimum environment; structuring the meeting and writing notes up accurately. The minute-taker is one of the most important and powerful people in a meeting and you can use this opportunity to develop your knowledge, broaden your horizons and build credibility within the organization. Taking Minutes of Meetings is an easy to read 'dip-in, dip-out' guide which shows you how to confidently arrange meetings and produce minutes. It provides hands-on advice about the sections of a meeting as well as tips on how to create an agenda, personal preparation, best practice advice on taking notes and how to improve your accuracy. Brand new chapters of this 4th edition include guidance on using technology to maximize effectiveness and practical help with taking minutes for a variety of different types of meetings. The creating success series of books... With over one million copi...

  7. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  8. Language sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan; Bakker, Dik

    1998-01-01

    This article has two aims: [1] to present a revised version of the sampling method that was originally proposed in 1993 by Rijkhoff, Bakker, Hengeveld and Kahrel, and [2] to discuss a number of other approaches to language sampling in the light of our own method. We will also demonstrate how our...

  9. Sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis is certainly one of the most important steps to consider in trace or ultratrace analysis. For many years scientists have tried to simplify the sample preparation process. It is rarely possible to inject a neat liquid sample or a sample where preparation may not be any more complex than dissolution of the sample in a given solvent. The last process alone can remove insoluble materials, which is especially helpful with the samples in complex matrices if other interactions do not affect extraction. Here, it is very likely a large number of components will not dissolve and are, therefore, eliminated by a simple filtration process. In most cases, the process of sample preparation is not as simple as dissolution of the component interest. At times, enrichment is necessary, that is, the component of interest is present in very large volume or mass of material. It needs to be concentrated in some manner so a small volume of the concentrated or enriched sample can be injected into HPLC. 88 refs

  10. Sampling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  11. Making Ends Meet After Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J; Wyse, Jessica J B; Dobson, Cheyney; Morenoff, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    Former prisoners are at high risk of economic insecurity due to the challenges they face in finding employment and to the difficulties of securing and maintaining public assistance while incarcerated. This study examines the processes through which former prisoners attain economic security, examining how they meet basic material needs and achieve upward mobility over time. It draws on unique qualitative data from in-depth, unstructured interviews with a sample of former prisoners followed over a two to three year period to assess how subjects draw upon a combination of employment, social supports, and public benefits to make ends meet. Findings reveal considerable struggle among our subjects to meet even minimal needs for shelter and food, although economic security and stability could be attained when employment or public benefits were coupled with familial social support. Sustained economic security was rarely achieved absent either strong social support or access to long-term public benefits. However, a select few were able to leverage material support and social networks into trajectories of upward mobility and economic independence. Policy implications are discussed.

  12. Hot sample archiving. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Study revision evaluated the alternatives to provide tank waste characterization analytical samples for a time period as recommended by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Program. The recommendation of storing 40 ml segment samples for a period of approximately 18 months (6 months past the approval date of the Tank Characterization Report) and then composite the core segment material in 125 ml containers for a period of five years. The study considers storage at 222-S facility. It was determined that the critical storage problem was in the hot cell area. The 40 ml sample container has enough material for approximately 3 times the required amount for a complete laboratory re-analysis. The final result is that 222-S can meet the sample archive storage requirements. During the 100% capture rate the capacity is exceeded in the hot cell area, but quick, inexpensive options are available to meet the requirements

  13. Fluidic sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2--39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02--0.05 gpm (77--192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016--0.026 gpm (60--100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140--150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate

  14. Automatic analysis of multiparty meetings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AMI) meeting corpus, the development of a meeting speech recognition system, and systems for the automatic segmentation, summarization and social processing of meetings, together with some example applications based on these systems.

  15. Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC) When sparsity meets sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Tempone, Raul

    2015-01-07

    This talk focuses into our newest method: Multi Index Monte Carlo (MIMC). The MIMC method uses a stochastic combination technique to solve the given approximation problem, generalizing the notion of standard MLMC levels into a set of multi indices that should be properly chosen to exploit the available regularity. Indeed, instead of using first-order differences as in standard MLMC, MIMC uses high-order differences to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. This in turn gives a new improved complexity result that increases the domain of the problem parameters for which the method achieves the optimal convergence rate, O(TOL-2). Using optimal index sets that we determined, MIMC achieves a better rate for the computational complexity does not depend on the dimensionality of the underlying problem, up to logarithmic factors. We present numerical results related to a three dimensional PDE with random coefficients to substantiate some of the derived computational complexity rates. Finally, using the Lindeberg-Feller theorem, we also show the asymptotic normality of the statistical error in the MIMC estimator and justify in this way our error estimate that allows prescribing both the required accuracy and confidence in the final result

  16. Science meeting. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    the document is a collection of the science meeting abstracts in the fields of nuclear physics, medical sciences, chemistry, agriculture, environment, engineering, material sciences different aspects of energy and presents research done in 2000 in these fields

  17. CMS Collaboration Board Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first CMS Collaboration Board meeting of the year (2013) provided an opportunity to thank Teresa Rodrigo, Matthias Kasemann and Randy Ruchti, the 2011-12 CB Chair, Deputy Chair and Secretary, respectively.

  18. Experts' meeting: Maintenance '83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The brochure presents, in full wording, 20 papers read at the experts' meeting ''Maintenance '83'' in Wiesbaden. Most of the papers discuss reliability data (acquisition, evaluation, processing) of nearly all fields of industry. (RW) [de

  19. ASIST 2002 annual meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Peek, R

    2003-01-01

    Review of discussions and presentations at the American Society for Information Science and Technology 2002 annual meeting. Topics covered included new models of scholarly publishing and the development of the semantic web (1 page).

  20. 77 FR 74827 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... on Information and Communications Technologies: Closed to Public 1:30-3:00 p.m. Board Meeting..., charter for new Rail Advisory Committee (vote) Executive Director's Report Public Comment, Open Topics All...

  1. Review of Meeting Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the 21st meeting of the International Atomic and Molecular Data Centres Network. The traditional DCN meeting objectives are: to exchange information about activities in the Centres and review progress; to coordinate work in the Centres; to assess priorities in data evaluation and data production; to make plans for specific evaluations; and to evaluate and revise procedures for collection and exchange of bibliographical and numerical data. All of these are objectives for the present meeting too. In addition to the presentations from DCN and prospective DCN members we have two participants from outside the field of fusion data: Dr N. Mason will tell us about coordination of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre and Dr S. Simakov will describe the manner in which nuclear structure and cross-section database development is coordinated by our colleagues in the Nuclear Data Section. In the discussions on Thursday and Friday there are two topics that need special attention this year: the future of our bibliographical data compilation and ways in which we can strengthen data evaluation activities, all with emphasis on collision processes and plasma-material interaction. The first 3 Data Centre Network meetings were held in 1977, 1980 and 1982 and the reports of those meetings make interesting reading and can still provide inspiration for the present meeting. I show some excerpts in the presentation. In 1977 the emphasis was on the coordination of the bibliographical database, AMBDAS, and a collision data index, CIAMDA, as the initial activities of the Network and of the newly formed IAEA A+M Data Unit. In 1980 the central topic of discussion at the meeting shifted to the numerical database and to data evaluation. The Network recommended that numerical data be reviewed by a selected group of scientists and that no unevaluated numerical A+M collision data should be distributed by the IAEA. The report of the meeting in 1982 shows that the bibliographical

  2. Sedimentation-related meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sedimentation committee would like to provide information on several meetings that took place in October 1983.The second annual meeting of the American Geomorphological Field Group was organized by S. Wells and T. Gardner and held in Chaco Canyon, N. Mex., October 7-10. Field excursions included visits to instrumented watersheds in badland areas, examination of the Quaternary history of Chaco Canyon, and investigation of fluvial problems associated with uranium mine tailings disposal and coal reclamation.

  3. myrmeet | meetings | Resources | public

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, Mysuru ...

  4. 42 CFR 1003.133 - Statistical sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 1003.133 Section 1003.133... AUTHORITIES CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND EXCLUSIONS § 1003.133 Statistical sampling. (a) In meeting... statistical sampling study as evidence of the number and amount of claims and/or requests for payment as...

  5. IAVCEI meets at IUGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiken, Grant

    Although distant from erupting volcanos, the Vienna meeting of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior attracted about 100 volcanologists with promise of technical exchange, music, and good food. In all fairness, turnout was small due to the highly successful IAVCEI meetings held in the last 2 years at Santa Fe, N.Mex., and Mainz, Germany, and the excellent meeting held the following week in Naples, Italy, in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Vesuvius Observatory. IAVCEI met during the 20th General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics held in August. For IAVCEI, the most important discussions held during the Vienna meeting concerned the association's future with the IUGG. Over the last 10 years, there has been great excitement and a burgeoning attendance at IAVCEI meetings but poor attendance at IUGG general assemblies. Many volcanologists perceive IUGG as an indifferent bureaucracy with little concern for IAVCEI. On this basis, members of IAVCEI proposed that their association become independent. However, the decision has been made to stay with IUGG because of the potential for interdisciplinary meetings with other associations.

  6. The meeting goer's lament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H

    1980-10-22

    Executives spend about 69% of their time in meeting with at least two other people, according to a recent study out of McGill University. In spite of this, participants do not consider this to be time used wisely and, according to the respondents, the problem seems to be growing worse. Despite the claims of some executives that government regulations or increased corporate complexity underlies the problem, society at large is viewed as the source of the change. Meyer asserts that all institutions have become less authoritarian and the trend away from command has left persuasion and consensus as the basis for corporate level decision-making. Although executives seem to agree that most time is wasted because participants fail to be succinct, the author argues that leaders could improve meetings by choosing the right participants, guiding them briskly through the agenda, and closing the meeting before it degenerates into a shouting match. The article suggests that chief executives are concluding that meeting skills can be learned. Most of the FORTUNE 500 companies have hired outside experts to teach these skills and some companies are building inhouse units for the same purpose. Since meetings have become an integral part of the business day, Meyer concluded that the goal of the executive should be to use the meeting time well.

  7. De novo assembly and transcriptome analysis of five major tissues of Jatropha curcas L. using GS FLX titanium platform of 454 pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parani Madasamy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jatropha curcas L. is an important non-edible oilseed crop with promising future in biodiesel production. However, factors like oil yield, oil composition, toxic compounds in oil cake, pests and diseases limit its commercial potential. Well established genetic engineering methods using cloned genes could be used to address these limitations. Earlier, 10,983 unigenes from Sanger sequencing of ESTs, and 3,484 unique assembled transcripts from 454 pyrosequencing of uncloned cDNAs were reported. In order to expedite the process of gene discovery, we have undertaken 454 pyrosequencing of normalized cDNAs prepared from roots, mature leaves, flowers, developing seeds, and embryos of J. curcas. Results From 383,918 raw reads, we obtained 381,957 quality-filtered and trimmed reads that are suitable for the assembly of transcript sequences. De novo contig assembly of these reads generated 17,457 assembled transcripts (contigs and 54,002 singletons. Average length of the assembled transcripts was 916 bp. About 30% of the transcripts were longer than 1000 bases, and the size of the longest transcript was 7,173 bases. BLASTX analysis revealed that 2,589 of these transcripts are full-length. The assembled transcripts were validated by RT-PCR analysis of 28 transcripts. The results showed that the transcripts were correctly assembled and represent actively expressed genes. KEGG pathway mapping showed that 2,320 transcripts are related to major biochemical pathways including the oil biosynthesis pathway. Overall, the current study reports 14,327 new assembled transcripts which included 2589 full-length transcripts and 27 transcripts that are directly involved in oil biosynthesis. Conclusion The large number of transcripts reported in the current study together with existing ESTs and transcript sequences will serve as an invaluable genetic resource for crop improvement in jatropha. Sequence information of those genes that are involved in oil

  8. Linking pre-meeting communication to meeting effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, J.A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Landowski, N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of communication that occurs just before workplace meetings (i.e. pre-meeting talk). The paper explores how four specific types of pre-meeting talk (small talk, work talk, meeting preparatory talk, and shop talk) impact

  9. Viability of lymph node samples obtained by echobronchoscopy in the study of epigenetic alterations in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; De Chiara, Loretta; Botana-Rial, Maribel; González-Piñeiro, Ana; Tardio-Baiges, Antoni; Núñez-Delgado, Manuel; Valverde Pérez, Diana; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis of microscopic lymph node metastasis in lung cancer is challenging despite the constant advances in tumor staging. The analysis of the methylation status of certain genes in lymph node samples could improve the diagnostic capability of conventional cyto-histological methods. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of methylation studies using cytological lymph node samples. Prospective study including 88 patients with a diagnosis or strong suspicion of non-small cell lung cancer, in which an echobronchoscopy was performed on mediastinal or hilar lymph nodes for diagnostic and/or staging. DNA was extracted from cytological lymph node samples and sodium bisulfite modification was performed. Methylation studies for p16/INK4a and SHOX2 were accomplished by MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing. The methodology used in our study yielded optimal/good DNA quality in 90% of the cases. No differences in DNA concentration were observed with respect to the lymph node biopsied and final diagnosis. Methylation analyses using MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing were not possible in a small number of samples mainly due to low DNA concentration, inadequate purity, fragmentation and/or degradation as a consequence of bisulfite conversion. Methylation quantification using MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing of cytological lymph node samples obtained using echobronchoscopy is feasible if an appropriate DNA concentration is obtained, notably contributing to the identification of epigenetic biomarkers capable of improving decision-making for the benefit of potentially curable lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  11. Diversity and distribution of lichen-associated fungi in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Xin-Li; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities associated with seven lichen species in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Lichen-associated fungal communities showed high diversity, with a total of 42,259 reads belonging to 370 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being found. Of these OTUs, 294 belonged to Ascomycota, 54 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Zygomycota, and 20 to unknown fungi. Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were the major classes, whereas the dominant orders were Helotiales, Capnodiales, and Chaetothyriales. Interestingly, most fungal OTUs were closely related to fungi from various habitats (e.g., soil, rock, plant tissues) in the Arctic, Antarctic and alpine regions, which suggests that living in association with lichen thalli may be a transient stage of life cycle for these fungi and that long-distance dispersal may be important to the fungi in the Arctic. In addition, host-related factors shaped the lichen-associated fungal communities in this region. Taken together, these results suggest that lichens thalli act as reservoirs of diverse fungi from various niches, which may improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic. PMID:26463847

  12. Diversity and distribution of lichen-associated fungi in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Xin-Li; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2015-10-14

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities associated with seven lichen species in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic) using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Lichen-associated fungal communities showed high diversity, with a total of 42,259 reads belonging to 370 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being found. Of these OTUs, 294 belonged to Ascomycota, 54 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Zygomycota, and 20 to unknown fungi. Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were the major classes, whereas the dominant orders were Helotiales, Capnodiales, and Chaetothyriales. Interestingly, most fungal OTUs were closely related to fungi from various habitats (e.g., soil, rock, plant tissues) in the Arctic, Antarctic and alpine regions, which suggests that living in association with lichen thalli may be a transient stage of life cycle for these fungi and that long-distance dispersal may be important to the fungi in the Arctic. In addition, host-related factors shaped the lichen-associated fungal communities in this region. Taken together, these results suggest that lichens thalli act as reservoirs of diverse fungi from various niches, which may improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic.

  13. Bacterial community structure in High-Arctic snow and freshwater as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Møller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow over sea ice and an ice-covered freshwater lake were examined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of cultivated isolates. Both the pyrosequence and cultivation data indicated that the phylogenetic composition of the microbial assemblages was different within the snow layers and between snow and freshwater. The highest diversity was seen in snow. In the middle and top snow layers, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated, although Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were relatively abundant also. High numbers of chloroplasts were also observed. In the deepest snow layer, large percentages of Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were seen. In freshwater, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the most abundant phyla while relatively few Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were present. Possibly, light intensity controlled the distribution of the Cyanobacteria and algae in the snow while carbon and nitrogen fixed by these autotrophs in turn fed the heterotrophic bacteria. In the lake, a probable lower light input relative to snow resulted in low numbers of Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts and, hence, limited input of organic carbon and nitrogen to the heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, differences in the physicochemical conditions may play an important role in the processes leading to distinctive bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow and freshwater.

  14. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Patients Infected with CRF07_BC Using Phenotypic Assay and Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The usefulness of ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS for the diagnosis of HIV-1 drug resistance (DR remains to be determined. Previously, we reported an explosive outbreak of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 07_BC among injection drug users (IDUs in Taiwan in 2004. The goal of this study was to characterize the DR of CRF07_BC strains using different assays including UDPS. Seven CRF07_BC isolates including 4 from early epidemic (collected in 2004-2005 and 3 from late epidemic (collected in 2008 were obtained from treatment-naïve patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral RNA was extracted directly from patient's plasma or from cultural supernatant and the pol sequences were determined using RT-PCR sequencing or UDPS. For comparison, phenotypic drug susceptibility assay using MAGIC-5 cells (in-house phenotypic assay and Antivirogram were performed. In-house phenotypic assay showed that all the early epidemic and none of the late epidemic CRF07_BC isolates were resistant to most protease inhibitors (PIs (4.4-47.3 fold. Neither genotypic assay nor Antivirogram detected any DR mutations. UDPS showed that early epidemic isolates contained 0.01-0.08% of PI DR major mutations. Furthermore, the combinations of major and accessory PI DR mutations significantly correlated with the phenotypic DR. The in-house phenotypic assay is superior to other conventional phenotypic assays in the detection of DR variants with a frequency as low as 0.01%.

  15. Pyrosequencing of the bacteria associated with Platygyra carnosus corals with skeletal growth anomalies reveals differences in bacterial community composition in apparently healthy and diseased tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Chun-Yee Ng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Corals are rapidly declining globally due to coral diseases. Skeletal growth anomalies (SGA or coral tumors are a group of coral diseases that affect coral reefs worldwide, including Hong Kong waters in the Indo-Pacific region. To better understand how bacterial communities may vary in corals with SGA, for the first time, we examined the bacterial composition associated with the apparently healthy and the diseased tissues of SGA-affected Platgyra carnosus using 16S ribosomal rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria as the main phyla in both the apparently healthy and the diseased tissues. A significant difference in the bacterial community composition was observed between the two conditions at the OTU level. Diseased tissues were associated with higher abundances of Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes, and a lower abundance of Spirochaetes. Several OTUs belonging to Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiales, Gammaproteobacteria, and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroidetes (CFB were strongly associated with the diseased tissues. These groups of bacteria may contain potential pathogens involved with the development of SGA or opportunistic secondary or tertiary colonizers that proliferated upon the health-compromised coral host. We suggest that these bacterial groups to be further studied based on inoculation experiments and testing of Koch’s postulates in efforts to understand the etiology and progression of SGA.

  16. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byeng R; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon; Eun, Jong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  17. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeng R. Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n=6 were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB. Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS; 0.17% condensed tannins (CT dry matter (DM; 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM, and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM. A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB to 46.5% (control and 47.1% (15% PB. Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%, Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%, and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7% population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P=0.05 with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  18. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, D Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Rovnyak, Virginia G; Rovnyak, David

    2018-02-13

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, D. Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E.; Rovnyak, Virginia G.; Rovnyak, David

    2018-03-01

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license.

  20. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  1. Twelfth ITER negotiation meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Delegations from China, European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States of America gathered on Jeju Island, Korea, on 6 December 2005, to complete their negotiations on an Agreement on the joint implementation of the ITER international fusion energy project. At the start of the Meeting, the Delegations unanimously and enthusiastically welcomed India as a full Party to the ITER venture. A Delegation from India then joined the Meeting and participated fully in the discussions that followed. The seven ITER Delegations also welcomed to the Meeting the newly designated Nominee Director-General for the prospective ITER Organization, Ambassador Kaname Ikeda, who is to take up his duties as leader of the project. Based on the results of intensive working level meetings held throughout the previous week, the Delegations have succeeded in clearing the remaining key issues such as decision-making, intellectual property and management within the prospective ITER Organization and adjustments to the sharing of resources as a result of India's participation, including in particular cost sharing and in-kind contributions, leaving only a few legal points requiring resolution during the final lawyers' meeting to review the text for coherence and internal consistency

  2. 75 FR 55540 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ..., measures to maximize sampling, measures to address net slippage, maximized retention, electronic monitoring... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... New England Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a three-day Council meeting to consider...

  3. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on June 7, 2012, in Binghamton, New... the business meeting and encouraged to review the Commission's Public Meeting Rules of Conduct, which...

  4. 77 FR 52106 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on September 20, 2012, in Harrisburg... attend the business meeting and encouraged to review the Commission's Public Meeting Rules of Conduct...

  5. 78 FR 32295 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on June 20, 2013, in Harrisburg... meeting and encouraged to review the Commission's Public Meeting Rules of Conduct, which are posted on the...

  6. 78 FR 52601 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on September 19, 2013, in Binghamton... attend the business meeting and encouraged to review the Commission's Public Meeting Rules of Conduct...

  7. Leopold Fellows meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    Communicating the results of environmental science research to nonscientists was the focus of a week-long meeting of fellows of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (ALLP) in June. Participating were 20 mid-career university facultymembers, the first group of ALLP fellows to be selected.Discussions were held on the role of scientists in society, techniques for effective leadership, improving communications skills, and working productively with news media. The training program considers both print and broadcast media as well as other outreach vehicles. The meeting was held at Kah Nee Ta Resort on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Warm Springs, Oregon, June 15-21, 1999.

  8. 15. ESRF users meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotis C, Kafatos; Ulrich, K.U.; Weib, S.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.; Foerstendorf, H.; Zanker, H.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Kirschner, J.; Robach, O.; Ferrer, S.; Lyman, P.F.; Shneerson, V.L.; Fung, R.; Harder, R.J.; Parihar, S.S.; Johnson-Steigelman, H.T.; Lu, E.D.; Saldin, D.K.; Eastwood, D.S.; Atkinson, D.; Tanner, B.K.; Hase, T.P.A.; Van Kampen, M.; Hjorvarsson, B.; Brown, S.; Thompson, P.; Konovalov, O.; Saint-Martin, E.; Daillant, J.; Luzet, D.; Szlachetko, J.; Barrett, R.; Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, M.; Monaco, A.; Chumakov, A.; Crichton, W.; Van Buerck, I.; Wortmann, G.; Meyer, A.; Ponkratz, U.; Ruffer, R.; Sakurai, Y.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Buslaps, T.; Honkimki, V.; Maeno, Y.; Collart, E.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.P.; Leininger, Ph.; Ishii, H.; Cai, Y.; Cheong, S.W.; Martins, R.M.S.; Schell, N.; Beckers, M.; Silva, R.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Acapito, F.; Seta, M. de; Capelini, G.; Giorgi, M.; Schorr, G.; Geandier, G.; Alves Marques, M.; Barros Marquesa, M.I. de; Cabaco, M.I.; Gaspara, A.M.; Marques, M.P.M.; Amado, A.M.; Amorim da Costa, A.M.; Bruneseaux, F.; Weisbecker, P.; Brandao, M.J.; Aeby-Gautier, E.; Simmonds, H.; Lei, C.; Das, A.; Trolley, D.; Thomas, H.E.; Macdonald, J.E.; Wiegart, L.; Tolan, M.; Struth, B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Hart, D.C.; Imhof, A.; Van Blaaderen, A.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Snigirev, A.; Mossaid, A.; Snigireva, I.; Reconditi, M.; Brunello, E.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers the posters presented on the one day and a half long plenary meeting workshop. This meeting workshop is a privileged forum where ESRF users can exchange their views on the latest scientific and technical development involving synchrotron radiation. One poster deals with the investigation of colloid composition and uranium bond structure to see whether the migration of contaminants from abandoned mines could be stimulated or attenuated by colloids. Another poster is dedicated to the investigation of the uranium speciation in covered mine tailings by a combination of micro-spectroscopic and wet chemical approaches. 2 posters deal with the contribution of synchrotron radiation to radiotherapy

  9. 15. ESRF users meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotis C, Kafatos; Ulrich, K.U.; Weib, S.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.; Foerstendorf, H.; Zanker, H.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Kirschner, J.; Robach, O.; Ferrer, S.; Lyman, P.F.; Shneerson, V.L.; Fung, R.; Harder, R.J.; Parihar, S.S.; Johnson-Steigelman, H.T.; Lu, E.D.; Saldin, D.K.; Eastwood, D.S.; Atkinson, D.; Tanner, B.K.; Hase, T.P.A.; Van Kampen, M.; Hjorvarsson, B.; Brown, S.; Thompson, P.; Konovalov, O.; Saint-Martin, E.; Daillant, J.; Luzet, D.; Szlachetko, J.; Barrett, R.; Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, M.; Monaco, A.; Chumakov, A.; Crichton, W.; Van Buerck, I.; Wortmann, G.; Meyer, A.; Ponkratz, U.; Ruffer, R.; Sakurai, Y.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Buslaps, T.; Honkimki, V.; Maeno, Y.; Collart, E.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.P.; Leininger, Ph.; Ishii, H.; Cai, Y.; Cheong, S.W.; Martins, R.M.S.; Schell, N.; Beckers, M.; Silva, R.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Acapito, F.; Seta, M. de; Capelini, G.; Giorgi, M.; Schorr, G.; Geandier, G.; Alves Marques, M.; Barros Marquesa, M.I. de; Cabaco, M.I.; Gaspara, A.M.; Marques, M.P.M.; Amado, A.M.; Amorim da Costa, A.M.; Bruneseaux, F.; Weisbecker, P.; Brandao, M.J.; Aeby-Gautier, E.; Simmonds, H.; Lei, C.; Das, A.; Trolley, D.; Thomas, H.E.; Macdonald, J.E.; Wiegart, L.; Tolan, M.; Struth, B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Hart, D.C.; Imhof, A.; Van Blaaderen, A.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Snigirev, A.; Mossaid, A.; Snigireva, I.; Reconditi, M.; Brunello, E

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the posters presented on the one day and a half long plenary meeting workshop. This meeting workshop is a privileged forum where ESRF users can exchange their views on the latest scientific and technical development involving synchrotron radiation. One poster deals with the investigation of colloid composition and uranium bond structure to see whether the migration of contaminants from abandoned mines could be stimulated or attenuated by colloids. Another poster is dedicated to the investigation of the uranium speciation in covered mine tailings by a combination of micro-spectroscopic and wet chemical approaches. 2 posters deal with the contribution of synchrotron radiation to radiotherapy.

  10. Detection of inferred CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 variants and evolutionary intermediates using ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien M Bunnik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 variants is associated with accelerated disease progression. CXCR4-using variants are believed to evolve from CCR5-using variants, but due to the extremely low frequency at which transitional intermediate variants are often present, the kinetics and mutational pathways involved in this process have been difficult to study and are therefore poorly understood. Here, we used ultra-deep sequencing of the V3 loop of the viral envelope in combination with the V3-based coreceptor prediction tools PSSM(NSI/SI and geno2pheno([coreceptor] to detect HIV-1 variants during the transition from CCR5- to CXCR4-usage. We analyzed PBMC and serum samples obtained from eight HIV-1-infected individuals at three-month intervals up to one year prior to the first phenotypic detection of CXCR4-using variants in the MT-2 assay. Between 3,482 and 10,521 reads were generated from each sample. In all individuals, V3 sequences of predicted CXCR4-using HIV-1 were detected at least three months prior to phenotypic detection of CXCR4-using variants in the MT-2 assay. Subsequent analysis of the genetic relationships of these V3 sequences using minimum spanning trees revealed that the transition in coreceptor usage followed a stepwise mutational pathway involving sequential intermediate variants, which were generally present at relatively low frequencies compared to the major predicted CCR5- and CXCR4-using variants. In addition, we observed differences between individuals with respect to the number of predicted CXCR4-using variants, the diversity among major predicted CCR5-using variants, and the presence or absence of intermediate variants with discordant phenotype predictions. These results provide the first detailed description of the mutational pathways in V3 during the transition from CCR5- to CXCR4-usage in natural HIV-1 infection.

  11. 75 FR 49466 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ...-sea monitoring; address portside sampling; require electronic monitoring; and address other elements of catch monitoring in the Atlantic herring fishery. Other business may also be discussed. 2... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  12. 2. biophysical work meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The report comprises 18 papers held at the 2nd Biophysical Work Meeting, 11 - 13 September 1991 in Schlema, Germany. The history of biophysics in Germany particularly of radiation biophysics and radon research, measurements of the radiation effects of radon and the derivation of limits, radon balneotherapy and consequences of uranium ore mining are dealt with. (orig.) [de

  13. 101TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 September 2013 at 9.15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS Department 6. Progress on health insurance for Users 7. Users’ Office News 8. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees      a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB)      b. IT Service Review Meeting 9. Matters arising 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for t...

  14. 94TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 December 2011 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising       News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Users’ Office news Report on new CHIS rules Creche status Report on Summer Students Users Organization in the U.S. (US LUO) Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees Accommodation Facilities Working Group Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch subject = Next ACCU meeting.   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review th...

  15. 96TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Friday 15 June 2012 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising       5. Experience with the Service Desk 6. Guidelines for private festivities on CERN sites 7. News from the CERN Management 8. Report on services from GS department 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. IT Service Review Meeting 10. Users’ Office news 11. Any Other Business 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary)   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of ...

  16. Meeting diversity in ergonomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikaar, R.N.; Koningsveld, E.A.P.; Settels, P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Key Features: Offers the conceptual tools for creating more adaptable ergonomic designs to meet the needs of diverse human populations, Unlock the strategic business value found in ergonomically safe and comfortable products, Learn from in-depth case studies how ergonomic intervention was

  17. Mid-Year Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1995-06-01

    Jun 1, 1995 ... "Relationship of T cell macrophage signals and function lymphocyte in response to antigens of intracellular pathogen (Salmonella typhi)". Sri Niwas, Univ. of .... materials research done in Indian laboratories. Six lectures by overseas speakers provided an international perspective to the meeting. Obituaries.

  18. Diamond Jubilee Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1995-01-01

    Jan 1, 1995 ... Nimish A. Shah (Tata Institute of Fundamental. Research, Bombay) on "Unipotent flows and counting ... customary annual business meeting of Fellows at the Institute's Faculty Hall in the evening. Besides ...... appointed as economic botanist in the Central. Research Institute of the Travancore University,.

  19. Meeting diversity in ergonomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looze, M.P. de; Pikaar, R.

    2006-01-01

    The plenary lectures from the 16th World Congress on Ergonomics, Maastricht, July 10-14, 2006, have been documented in this special issue. Its theme was ‘Meeting Diversity'. The contributions, ranging from scientific papers to technical notes or short statements, cover different aspects of the

  20. Golden Jubilee Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1985-04-01

    Apr 1, 1985 ... Science: Its Motivations. Golden Jubilee Inaugural lecture delivered by Prof. S. Chandrasekhar, at the Golden Jubilee Meeting on 6. February 1985. .... these quotations. From the outset Kepler realized that a careful study of the orbit of Mars will provide the key to planetary motions because its orbit.

  1. 76 FR 10557 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... Printing on accessible currency. Tuesday, March 8, 2011 9:30-4 p.m. Ad Hoc Committee Meetings: Closed to... perfume, cologne, and other fragrances for the comfort of other participants (see http://www.access-board.gov/about/policies/fragrance.htm for more information). David M. Capozzi, Executive Director. BILLING...

  2. Mid-Year Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1995-06-01

    Jun 1, 1995 ... The sixth Mid-Year Meeting of the Academy will be held at the Indian Institute of Science,. Bangalore on Friday 28 July and Saturday 29. July 1995. As in the past, there will be. leCtures by new Fellows and Associates and special lectures by Mr Madhavrao Scindia,. Minister of Human Resource ...

  3. 109TH ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday, 8 September 2015 at 9.15 a.m. in Room Georges Charpak (Room F, 60-6-015)   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Report on services from GS department Report on services from IT department News from the CERN Management 60 years of the Staff Association The CERN Ombuds Opportunities to visit CERN Users’ Office News Matters arising Any other business ACCU Meetings 2016 (proposal) Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any other business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to ACCU.Secretary@cern.ch. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is a forum for discussion between the CERN Management and representatives of the CERN users in order to review the practical means taken by CERN to support the work of Use...

  4. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  5. Mid Year Meetings | Events

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    17th Mid-Year Meeting. Dates: 14 and 15 July 2006. Venue: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru. Schedule. One-day symposium 'Biology Today', 13 July, at Main Auditorium, Raman Research Institute, Bengaluru. See programme. (REVISED PROGRAMME, 5 July) (UPDATED 20 June) 14 July 2006 (Friday) ...

  6. 113th ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday, 6 September 2016​ at 9.15 a.m. in room Georges Charpak (Room F, 60-6-015).   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Report on services from SMB Department Report on services from IT Department The International School Ferney-Voltaire / St. Genis The CERN Alumni Project Changes in rules to obtain dosimeters Changes of CHIS health insurance rules for MPAs Matters arising Any Other Business ACCU meetings 2017 Agenda for the next meeting   The Advisory Committee of CERN Users (ACCU) is a forum for discussion between the CERN Management and representatives of the CERN Users in order to review the practical means taken by CERN to support the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are: Austria M. Jeitler (manfred.jeitler@cern.ch) Belgium M. T...

  7. Pyrosequencing Reveals the Microbial Communities in the Red Sea Sponge Carteriospongia foliascens and Their Impressive Shifts in Abnormal Tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhaoming

    2014-04-24

    Abnormality and disease in sponges have been widely reported, yet how sponge-associated microbes respond correspondingly remains inconclusive. Here, individuals of the sponge Carteriospongia foliascens under abnormal status were collected from the Rabigh Bay along the Red Sea coast. Microbial communities in both healthy and abnormal sponge tissues and adjacent seawater were compared to check the influences of these abnormalities on sponge-associated microbes. In healthy tissues, we revealed low microbial diversity with less than 100 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample. Cyanobacteria, affiliated mainly with the sponge-specific species “Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum,” were the dominant bacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Intraspecies dynamics of microbial communities in healthy tissues were observed among sponge individuals, and potential anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were found. In comparison with healthy tissues and the adjacent seawater, abnormal tissues showed dramatic increase in microbial diversity and decrease in the abundance of sponge-specific microbial clusters. The dominated cyanobacterial species Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum decreased and shifted to unspecific cyanobacterial clades. OTUs that showed high similarity to sequences derived from diseased corals, such as Leptolyngbya sp., were found to be abundant in abnormal tissues. Heterotrophic Planctomycetes were also specifically enriched in abnormal tissues. Overall, we revealed the microbial communities of the cyanobacteria-rich sponge, C. foliascens, and their impressive shifts under abnormality.

  8. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed

  9. Direct RNA-based detection of CTX-M β-lactamases in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstream infections with ESBL-producers are associated with increased mortality, which is due to delayed appropriate treatment resulting in clinical failure. Current routine diagnostics for detection of bloodstream infections consists of blood culture followed by species identification and susceptibility testing. In attempts to improve and accelerate diagnostic procedures, PCR-based methods have been developed. These methods focus on species identification covering only a limited number of ESBL coding genes. Therefore, they fail to cover the steadily further evolving genetic diversity of clinically relevant β-lactamases. We have recently designed a fast and novel RNA targeting method to detect and specify CTX-M alleles from bacterial cultures, based on an amplification-pyrosequencing approach. We further developed this assay towards a diagnostic tool for clinical use and evaluated its sensitivity and specificity when applied directly to human blood samples. An optimized protocol for mRNA isolation allows detection of specific CTX-M groups from as little as 100 CFU/mL blood via reverse transcription, amplification, and pyrosequencing directly from human EDTA blood samples as well as from pre-incubated human blood cultures with a turnaround time for test results of <7 h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Differences in gastric mucosal microbiota profiling in patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using pyrosequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Byung Kwon; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Bo Youl; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the early stage of cancer development. However, various bacteria that promote the synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be involved in the later stages. We aimed to determine the microbial composition of gastric mucosa from the patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using 454 GS FLX Titanium. Gastric mucosal biopsy samples were collected from 31 patients during endoscopy. After the extraction of genomic DNA, variable region V5 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were sequenced using 454 high-throughput sequencer. The composition, diversity, and richness of microbial communities were compared between three groups. The composition of H. pylori-containing Epsilonproteobacteria class appeared to be the most prevalent, but the relative increase in the Bacilli class in the gastric cancer group was noticed, resulting in a significant difference compared with the chronic gastritis group. By analyzing the Helicobacter-dominant group at a family level, the relative abundance of Helicobacteraceae family was significantly lower in the gastric cancer group compared with chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia groups, while the relative abundance of Streptococcaceae family significantly increased. In a UPGMA clustering of Helicobacter-dominant group based on UniFrac distance, the chronic gastritis group and gastric cancer group were clearly separated, while the intestinal metaplasia group was distributed in between the two groups. The evenness and diversity of gastric microbiota in the gastric cancer group was increased compared with other groups. In Helicobacter predominant patients, the microbial compositions of gastric mucosa from gastric cancer patients are significantly different to chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia patients. These alterations of gastric microbial composition may play an important, as-yet-undetermined role in

  11. Dynamics of envelope evolution in clade C SHIV-infected pig-tailed macaques during disease progression analyzed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For Yue Tso

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope during disease progression can provide tremendous insights for vaccine development, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV infection of non-human primate provides an ideal platform for such studies. A newly developed clade C SHIV, SHIV-1157ipd3N4, which was able to infect rhesus macaques, closely resembled primary HIV-1 in transmission and pathogenesis, was used to infect several pig-tailed macaques. One of the infected animals subsequently progressed to AIDS, whereas one remained a non-progressor. The viral envelope evolution in the infected animals during disease progression was analyzed by a bioinformatics approach using ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Our results showed substantial envelope variations emerging in the progressor animal after the onset of AIDS. These envelope variations impacted the length of the variable loops and charges of different envelope regions. Additionally, multiple mutations were located at the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites, potentially affecting receptor binding affinity, viral fitness and they might be selected at late stages of disease. More importantly, these envelope mutations are not random since they had repeatedly been observed in a rhesus macaque and a human infant infected by either SHIV or HIV-1, respectively, carrying the parental envelope of the infectious molecular clone SHIV-1157ipd3N4. Moreover, similar mutations were also observed from other studies on different clades of envelopes regardless of the host species. These recurring mutations in different envelopes suggest that there may be a common evolutionary pattern and selection pathway for the HIV-1 envelope during disease progression.

  12. Technical note: Advantages and limitations of authenticating Palmera goat dairy products by pyrosequencing the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaoui, B; Manunza, A; Castelló, A; D'Andrea, M; Pilla, F; Capote, J; Jordana, J; Ferrando, A; Martínez, A; Cabrera, B; Delgado, J V; Landi, V; Gómez, M; Pons, A; El Ouni, M; Vidal, O; Amills, M

    2014-11-01

    Inferring the breed of origin of dairy products can be achieved through molecular analysis of genetic markers with a population-specific pattern of segregation. The goal of the current work was to generate such markers in goats by resequencing several pigmentation genes [melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT), tyrosinase (TYR), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TYRP2)]. This experiment revealed 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), including 5 missense mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. These markers were genotyped in 560 goats from 18 breeds originally from Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, the Canary Islands, and North Africa. Although the majority of SNP segregated at moderate frequencies in all populations (including 2 additional markers that were used as a source of information), we identified a c.764G>A SNP in MC1R that displayed highly divergent allelic frequencies in the Palmera breed compared with the Majorera and Tinerfeña breeds from the Canary Islands. Thus, we optimized a pyrosequencing-based technique that allowed us to estimate, very accurately, the allele frequencies of this marker in complex DNA mixtures from different individuals. Once validated, we applied this method to generating breed-specific DNA profiles that made it possible to detect fraudulent cheeses in which Palmero cheese was manufactured with milk from Majorera goats. One limitation of this approach, however, is that it cannot be used to detect illegal manufacturing where Palmero dairy products are produced by mixing milk from Palmera and Majorera goats, because the c.764G>A SNP segregates in both breeds. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of buds and leaves using 454 pyrosequencing to discover genes associated with the biosynthesis of active ingredients in Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lonicera japonica Thunb. is a plant used in traditional Chinese medicine known for its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-carcinogenic, and antiviral pharmacological properties. The major active secondary metabolites of this plant are chlorogenic acid (CGA and luteoloside. While the biosynthetic pathways of these metabolites are relatively well known, the genetic information available for this species, especially the biosynthetic pathways of its active ingredients, is limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained one million reads (average length of 400 bp in a whole sequence run using a Roche/454 GS FLX titanium platform. Altogether, 85.69% of the unigenes covering the entire life cycle of the plant were annotated and 325 unigenes were assigned to secondary metabolic pathways. Moreover, 2039 unigenes were predicted as transcription factors. Nearly all of the possible enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of CGA and luteoloside were discovered in L. japonica. Three hydroxycinnamoyl transferase genes, including two hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase genes and one hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT gene featuring high similarity to known genes from other species, were cloned. The HCT gene was discovered for the first time in L. japonica. In addition, 188 candidate cytochrome P450 unigenes and 245 glycosyltransferase unigenes were found in the expressed sequence tag (EST dataset. CONCLUSION: This study provides a high quality EST database for L. japonica by 454 pyrosequencing. Based on the EST annotation, a set of putative genes involved in CGA and luteoloside biosynthetic pathways were discovered. The database serves as an important source of public information on genetic markers, gene expression, genomics, and functional genomics in L. japonica.

  14. Transcriptome Characterization of Cymbidium sinense 'Dharma' Using 454 Pyrosequencing and Its Application in the Identification of Genes Associated with Leaf Color Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genfa Zhu

    Full Text Available The highly variable leaf color of Cymbidium sinense significantly improves its horticultural and economic value, and makes it highly desirable in the flower markets in China and Southeast Asia. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanism underlying leaf-color variations. In this study, we found the content of photosynthetic pigments, especially chlorophyll degradation metabolite in the leaf-color mutants is distinguished significantly from that in the wild type of Cymbidium sinense 'Dharma'. To further determine the candidate genes controlling leaf-color variations, we first sequenced the global transcriptome using 454 pyrosequencing. More than 0.7 million expressed sequence tags (ESTs with an average read length of 445.9 bp were generated and assembled into 103,295 isotigs representing 68,460 genes. Of these isotigs, 43,433 were significantly aligned to known proteins in the public database, of which 29,299 could be categorized into 42 functional groups in the gene ontology system, 10,079 classified into 23 functional classifications in the clusters of orthologous groups system, and 23,092 assigned to 139 clusters of specific metabolic pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Among these annotations, 95 isotigs were designated as involved in chlorophyll metabolism. On this basis, we identified 16 key enzyme-encoding genes in the chlorophyll metabolism pathway, the full length cDNAs and expressions of which were further confirmed. Expression pattern indicated that the key enzyme-encoding genes for chlorophyll degradation were more highly expressed in the leaf color mutants, as was consistent with their lower chlorophyll contents. This study is the first to supply an informative 454 EST dataset for Cymbidium sinense 'Dharma' and to identify original leaf color-associated genes, which provide important resources to facilitate gene discovery for molecular breeding, marketable trait discovery, and investigating

  15. Efficient Biostimulation of Native and Introduced Quorum-Quenching Rhodococcus erythropolis Populations Is Revealed by a Combination of Analytical Chemistry, Microbiology, and Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirou, Amélie; Mondy, Samuel; An, Shu; Charrier, Amélie; Sarrazin, Amélie; Thoison, Odile; DuBow, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of the quorum-sensing (QS) signals known as N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) by soil bacteria may be useful as a beneficial trait for protecting crops, such as potato plants, against the worldwide pathogen Pectobacterium. In this work, analytical chemistry and microbial and molecular approaches were combined to explore and compare biostimulation of native and introduced AHL-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis populations in the rhizosphere of potato plants cultivated in farm greenhouses under hydroponic conditions. We first identified gamma-heptalactone (GHL) as a novel biostimulating agent that efficiently promotes plant root colonization by AHL-degrading R. erythropolis population. We also characterized an AHL-degrading biocontrol R. erythropolis isolate, R138, which was introduced in the potato rhizosphere. Moreover, root colonization by AHL-degrading bacteria receiving different combinations of GHL and R138 treatments was compared by using a cultivation-based approach (percentage of AHL-degrading bacteria), pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified rrs loci (total bacterial community), and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the qsdA gene, which encodes an AHL lactonase in R. erythropolis. Higher densities of the AHL-degrading R. erythropolis population in the rhizosphere were observed when GHL treatment was associated with biocontrol strain R138. Under this condition, the introduced R. erythropolis population displaced the native R. erythropolis population. Finally, chemical analyses revealed that GHL, gamma-caprolactone (GCL), and their by-products, gamma-hydroxyheptanoic acid and gamma-hydroxycaproic acid, rapidly disappeared from the rhizosphere and did not accumulate in plant tissues. This integrative study highlights biostimulation as a potential innovative approach for improving root colonization by beneficial bacteria. PMID:22081576

  16. 75 FR 73083 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... format and alternative media, including large print/ type; digital disk; and audio and video tape. Best... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting November 30, 2010. The Federal Communications Commission will hold an Open Meeting on the subjects listed below on...

  17. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  18. 2014 Accelerators meeting, Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucotte, Arnaud; Lamy, Thierry; De Conto, Jean-Marie; Fontaine, Alain; Revol, Jean-Luc; Nadolski, Laurent S.; Kazamias, Sophie; Vretenar, Maurizio; Ferrando, Philippe; Laune, Bernard; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The Accelerators meeting is organised every two years by the Accelerators division of the French Society of Physics (SFP). It brings together about 50 participants during a one-day meeting. The morning sessions are devoted to scientific presentations while the afternoon is dedicated to technical visits of facilities. This document brings together the available presentations (slides): 1 - Presentation of the Laboratory of subatomic physics and cosmology - LPSC-Grenoble (Lucotte, Arnaud; Lamy, Thierry); 2 - Presentation of the Accelerators division of the French Society of Physics (Fontaine, Alain; Revol, Jean-Luc); 3 - Presentation of Grenoble's master diplomas in Accelerator physics (Nadolski, Laurent S.); 4 - Presentation of Paris' master diplomas in big instruments (Kazamias, Sophie); 5 - Particle accelerators and European Union's projects (Vretenar, Maurizio); 6 - French research infrastructures (Ferrando, Philippe); 7 - Coordination of accelerators activity in France (Laune, Bernard; Vedrine, Pierre)

  19. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate C...

  20. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Jim Virdee

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratula...

  1. CMS MANANGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs; status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08; preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate CMS Management and the Detector Groups for the...

  2. RH Department Information Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, HR Department would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Thursday 30 September 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)* A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 a.m. The presentation will cover the CERN Competency Model which consists of the technical and behavioral competencies that are intrinsic to our Organization and its application in the various HR processes. This presentation will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 30 September! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted and thereafter available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  3. 95TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2012 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   1.     Chairperson's remarks                            2.     Adoption of the agenda                               3.     Minutes of the previous meeting 4.     Matters arising        &am...

  4. 97TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 September 2012 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002      Chairperson's remarks                        Adoption of the agenda                               Minutes of the previous meeting New CERN Authentication and Authorization, and CERN Data Protection Policy Report on services from GS department               &am...

  5. ISKAF2010 Science Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Joeri

    Radio astronomy - in its broadest sense from metre to sub-millimetre wavelengths - is making a major leap forward. Triggered by the efforts being made towards realising the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a number of new facilities, or major upgrades of existing facilities, are coming on-line, bringing new excitement among radio astronomers and revitalising the interest of the astronomical community in general. The fantastic capabilities of these new facilities will revolutionise the way we do radio astronomy. The use of innovative technology solutions (including new software approaches and calibration algorithms) is expected to significantly enhance the performance of this new generation of radio telescopes. The associated advances in sensitivity, field-of-view, frequency range and spectral resolution guarantees that new and exciting science will be conducted. We are now truly entering a new golden age for radio astronomy. And this is only the beginning! The meeting takes its inspiration from the opening of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) but there are many other telescopes or upgrades that are now coming online. These include the E-VLA, e-MERLIN, e-VLBI, MWA, PAPER, ATA, eSMA, EMBRACE, SCUBA-2, APEX, IRAM, Yebes and ATCA (CABB). Some of these facilities are now beginning to produce their first results. This meeting aims to provide an overview of these first successes and indeed struggles(!), and highlight the future perspective and longer term goals of our community. These initial results will give a first taste of the science (and the challenges) that we will enjoy with the SKA. Several major elements of new telescopes like MEERKAT, ALMA, ASKAP, APERTIF, LWA, SRT and FAST are also expected to be producing some initial technical results around this time - these will also be covered in the programme of the meeting. In summary, we encourage presentations on results that use new or recently upgraded telescopes, or results that use new challenging techniques or address

  6. 2016 Accelerators meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, Michel; Revol, Jean-Luc; Biarrotte, Jean-Luc; Napoly, Olivier; Jardin, Pascal; Chautard, Frederic; Thomas, Jean Charles; Petit, Eric

    2016-09-01

    The Accelerators meeting is organised every two years by the Accelerators division of the French Society of Physics (SFP). It brings together about 50 participants during a one-day meeting. The morning sessions are devoted to scientific presentations while the afternoon is dedicated to technical visits of facilities. This document brings together the available presentations (slides): 1 - Presentation of the Ganil - Grand accelerateur national d'ions lourds/Big national heavy-ion accelerator, Caen (Jardin, Pascal); 2 - Presentation of the Accelerators division of the French Society of Physics (Revol, Jean-Luc); 3 - Forward-looking and Prospective view (Napoly, Olivier); 4 - Accelerators at the National Institute of Nuclear and particle physics, situation, Forward-looking and Prospective view (Biarrotte, Jean-Luc); 5 - GANIL-SPIRAL2, missions and goals (Thomas, Jean Charles); 6 - The SPIRAL2 project (Petit, Eric)

  7. Air sampling in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R.; Wiblin, C.M.; McGuire, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC's Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ''Air sampling in the Workplace.'' That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC's regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed

  8. Learning to Facilitate (Online) Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Peter; Bull, Susan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching collaboration skills directly by building on competences for meeting facilitation. (Online) meetings provide a rich arena to practice collaboration since they can serve multiple purposes: learning, problem solving, decision making, idea generation and advancement...

  9. 75 FR 53966 - Regular Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ...: Parts of this meeting of the Board will be open to the public (limited space available) and parts will be closed to the public. In order to increase the accessibility to Board meetings, persons requiring...

  10. 102nd ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2013 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS Department 6. Progress on Health Insurance for Users 7. Users Office News 8. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees      a. Accommodation Facilities Working Group 9. Matters arising 10. Any Other Business 11. Election of a new ACCU Chairperson 12. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical measures taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory....

  11. 108TH ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday, 9 June 2015 at 9.15 a.m. in room Georges Charpak (Room F, 60-6-015): Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Report on services from GS Department a. General Services b. Collaboration between CERN and HUG Report on services from IT Department 50th anniversary of the CERN Bulletin News from the CERN Management Progress on Health Insurance for Users Users’ Office News Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Restaurants' Supervisory committee Matters arising Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to ACCU.Secretary@cern.ch. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is a forum for discussion between the CERN Management and representatives of the CERN Us...

  12. 99th ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 March 2013 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS department      6. Overview on Service Desk and Management status 7. CHIS/UNIQA health insurance issues 8. Users’ Office News 9. CERN Team & Collaboration Accounts 10. Diversity at CERN 11. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees       a. Academic Training Committee 12. Matters arising 13. Any Other Business 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and...

  13. 107th ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday 10 March 2015 at 9:15 a.m. in the Council Chamber (503-1-001): Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Report on services from the GS Department Report on services from the IT Department a. Change of the portable phone contract from Sunrise to Swisscom Progress on Health Insurance for Users Users’ Office News Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) Matters arising Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to ACCU.Secretary@cern.ch. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is a forum for discussion between the CERN Management and representatives of the CERN Users in order to review the practical means...

  14. 105TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday 9 September 2014 at 9.15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS and IT Departments 6. Recent developments in dosimetry + medical services support for Users 7. Progress on Health Insurance for Users 8. Users’ Office News 9. Matters arising 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail.  Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are: Austria &nb...

  15. 100TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 June 2013 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. 25 years of ACCU 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Report on services from GS department 7. Status of the Health Insurance Project for Users 8. Users’ Office News 9. Public WiFi at CERN 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Restaurants' Supervisory Committee 11. Matters arising 12. Any Other Business 13. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Re...

  16. 103nd ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday 11 March 2014 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS Department 6. Progress on Health Insurance for Users 7. Users Office News 8. Matters arising 9. Any Other Business 10. Election of a new ACCU Chairperson 11. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives in ACCU are: Austria M. Jeitler manfred.jeitler@cern.ch Belgium M. Tytgat michael.tytgat@ce...

  17. 104th ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday 3 June 2014 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS and IT Departments 6. Progress on Health Insurance for Users 7. Users' Office News 8. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees a. Academic Training Committee 9. Matters arising 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives in ACCU are: Austria M. Jeitler manf...

  18. 98TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Friday 7 December 2012 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.      Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Status of Vidyo Health insurance issues Usage of Gate E for family members and opening times Users’ Office news Matters arising Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are: Austria M. Jeitler manfred.jeitler@cern.ch Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) catherine....

  19. UN legal advisers meet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Legal Advisers from twelve international organizations belonging to the United Nations Organization's family met at the Agency's Headquarters in Vienna on 19 and 20 May to discuss legal problems of common administrative interest. The meeting was held on the initiative of the Agency while the UN Conference on the Law of Treaties was taking place in Vienna during April and May. With Mr. Constantin A. Stavropoulos, Under-Secretary, Legal Counsel of the United Nations, as chairman, this was the second meeting of Legal Advisers since 1954. The following organizations were represented: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, International Atomic Energy Agency, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, International Civil Aviation Organization, International Labour Organisation, Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization, International Monetary Fund, International Telecommunication Union, United Nations, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, World Health Organization. Topics discussed included the recruitment of legal staff and possible exchange of staff between organizations; competence and procedure of internal appeals committees, experience with cases before the Administrative Tribunals and evaluation of their judgments; experience with Staff Credit Unions; privileges and immunities of international organizations; headquarters and host government agreements; and patent policies of international organizations. Consultations will continue through correspondence and further meetings. (author)

  20. 110th ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Agenda for the meeting to be held on Tuesday, 8 December 2015​ at 9:15 a.m. in room Georges Charpak (Room F, 60-6-015).   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department Report on services from IT department Strategic Communications Plan 2016-2020 Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees Academic Training Committee Users’ Office News Matters arising Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson (Dragoslav.Lazic@cern.ch) or to the Secretary (ACCU.Secretary@cern.ch). Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is a forum for discussion between the CERN Management and representatives of the CERN users in order to review the practical means taken by CERN to support the...