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Sample records for meeting report nasa radiation

  1. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  2. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  3. NASA reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, John E.; Fisk, Lennard A.; Aldrich, Arnold A.; Utsman, Thomas E.; Griffin, Michael D.; Cohen, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Activities and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs, both ongoing and planned, are described by NASA administrative personnel from the offices of Space Science and Applications, Space Systems Development, Space Flight, Exploration, and from the Johnson Space Center. NASA's multi-year strategic plan, called Vision 21, is also discussed. It proposes to use the unique perspective of space to better understand Earth. Among the NASA programs mentioned are the Magellan to Venus and Galileo to Jupiter spacecraft, the Cosmic Background Explorer, Pegsat (the first Pegasus payload), Hubble, the Joint U.S./German ROSAT X-ray Mission, Ulysses to Jupiter and over the sun, the Astro-Spacelab Mission, and the Gamma Ray Observatory. Copies of viewgraphs that illustrate some of these missions, and others, are provided. Also discussed were life science research plans, economic factors as they relate to space missions, and the outlook for international cooperation.

  4. The fourth UNDP/RCA/IAEA/meeting of national co-ordinators for radiation technology. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the Meeting were to provide information for the Terminal Report of the joint UNDP/RCA/IAEA project RAS/92/073 and to look into future activities under the Radiation Technology project. The main achievements of this Meeting are: The Meeting reviewed the implementation of all radiation technology sub-projects and agreed that all of them were successful but not yet equally developed among RCA Member States. The Meeting recommended to have three projects carried out in the form of Co-ordinated Research Programs and requested the IAEA to find new ways to implement the organized in RCA Member States to carry these CRPs out. Figs, tabs

  5. 75 FR 2892 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-003)] NASA Advisory Council; Science...: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The Meeting will be held for...

  6. 78 FR 10213 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-012] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The meeting will be held...

  7. 75 FR 14472 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-033)] NASA Advisory Council; Science...: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The Meeting will be held for...

  8. 77 FR 38678 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-052)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The meeting will be held...

  9. 75 FR 54389 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-103)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The Meeting will be held for the...

  10. 78 FR 42111 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (13-080)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The meeting will be held...

  11. 75 FR 4588 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 10-011] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This will be the first meeting of this Committee. DATES: February 11, 2010--11 a.m.-1 p.m. (EST). Meet-Me-Number: 1-877-613-3958; 2939943. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300...

  12. [NCRP comments on radiation protection related reports, proposed standards, and meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Two NCRP Reports, two Annual Meeting Proceedings and one Commentary have been published during this period. NCRP Report No. 105, Radiation Protection for Medical and Allied Health Personnel is a rewrite and update of NCRP Report No. 48, which had the same title and which it supersedes. The primary objective of the new report is to update the material to include new radiation sources used in medicine. NCRP Report No. 106, Limit for Exposure to ''Hot Particles'' on the Skin was prepared in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report addresses the potential biological effect of microscopic radioactive particles on the skin and reviews the presently available information on the subject. Proceedings No. 10, Radon, is the proceedings of the 24th Annual Meeting of the NCRP. Proceedings No. 11, Radiation Protection Today---The NCRP at Sixty Years is the proceedings of the 25th Annual Meeting of the NCRP. Commentary No. 5, Review of the Publication, Living Without Landfills, was recently released. Also included is a list of NCRP committee reports which were released in the current reporting period

  13. Nuclear Reaction Data and Uncertainties for Radiation Damage. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Simakov, S.P.

    2016-08-01

    This Meeting was organized to implement the recommendation of the second Research Coordinated Meeting (RCM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections” to analyse the accuracy and consistency of the radiation damage-relevant nuclear data in the major nuclear data evaluations with the eventual goal of identifying the most reliable data and providing quantitative uncertainty estimates. Participants have considered the status of the primary nuclear data, such as reaction recoils spectra in the latest releases of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, FENDL, ROSFOND and TENDL nuclear data libraries, and the ways of deriving the damage quantities KERMA, NRT- or arc-dpa and gas production cross sections as well as the recipes for an assessment of their uncertainties. This report contains the contemporary view of the Meeting participants on these issues in the form of a consolidated set of statements, recommendations and individual summaries. (author)

  14. 78 FR 41804 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (13-077)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Wednesday, July 31... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 9H40, Program Review Center, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20456 FOR...

  15. 76 FR 4133 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-007)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 10, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Local Time. Friday, February 11, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  16. 75 FR 5629 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-019)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 18, 2010, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST; Friday, February 19, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  17. 77 FR 9997 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-016)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Thursday, March 8, 2012, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., local time and Friday, March 9, 2012, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., local time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  18. 75 FR 4875 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-015)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... the NASA Advisory Council. This will be the first meeting of this Committee. DATES: February 17, 2010--10 a.m.-4 p.m. (EST). ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC, Room CD61. FOR...

  19. 75 FR 59747 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-113)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, October 6, 2010...

  20. 76 FR 41825 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Avenue, NASA Research Park, NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000. FOR FURTHER... Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, 202/358-1148. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda for the meeting will...

  1. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  2. 77 FR 67028 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-093] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to the NAC. The [[Page 67029

  3. Space Radiation Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of space radiation on astronauts is one of the most important limiting factors for human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit, including a journey to Mars. This talk will present an overview of space radiation issues that arise throughout the solar system and will describe research efforts at NASA aimed at studying space radiation effects on astronauts, including the experimental program at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent work on galactic cosmic ray simulation at ground based accelerators will also be presented. The three major sources of space radiation, namely geomagnetically trapped particles, solar particle events and galactic cosmic rays will be discussed as well as recent discoveries of the harmful effects of space radiation on the human body. Some suggestions will also be given for developing a space radiation program in the Republic of Korea.

  4. 78 FR 77501 - NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-153] NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting...

  5. Reporting of Uncertainty at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is designed to disseminate new scientific findings and technical advances to professionals. Best practices of scientific dissemination require that some level of uncertainty (or imprecision) is provided. Methods and Materials: A total of 279 scientific abstracts were selected for oral presentation in a clinical session at the 2013 ASTRO Annual Meeting. A random sample of these abstracts was reviewed to determine whether a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) or analogous measure of precision was provided for time-to-event analyses. Results: A sample of 140 abstracts was reviewed. Of the 65 abstracts with Kaplan-Meier or cumulative incidence analyses, 6 included some measure of precision (6 of 65 = 9%; 95% CI, 2-16). Of the 43 abstracts reporting ratios for time-to-event analyses (eg, hazard ratio, risk ratio), 22 included some measure of precision (22 of 43 = 51%; 95% CI, 36-66). Conclusions: Measures of precision are not provided in a significant percentage of abstracts selected for oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of ASTRO

  6. NASA Accountability Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  7. NASA Docking System (NDS) Technical Integration Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA Docking System (NDS) as NASA's implementation of the International Docking System Standard (IDSS). The goals of the NDS, is to build on proven technologies previously demonstrated in flight and to advance the state of the art of docking systems by incorporating Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) technology into the NDS. A Hardware Demonstration was included in the meeting, and there was discussion about software, NDS major system interfaces, integration information, schedule, and future upgrades.

  8. 77 FR 41203 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-057] NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces an open meeting of the NASA International...

  9. 78 FR 77502 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (13-154)] NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA International Space...

  10. 77 FR 2765 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-003)] NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces an open meeting of the NASA International...

  11. 77 FR 66082 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-090] NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces an open meeting of the NASA International...

  12. NASA space radiation transport code development consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the Univ. of Tennessee (lead institution), the Univ. of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking. (authors)

  13. 75 FR 8997 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-021)] NASA Advisory Council; Science...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to...

  14. 78 FR 67202 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-131] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory..., 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: This meeting will take place at NASA Headquarters...

  15. 76 FR 64111 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... agenda for the meeting will include reports from the Council Committees: --Aeronautics --Audit, Finance... --Information Technology Infrastructure --Science --Technology and Innovation The meeting will be open to the... affiliation (if applicable), to the GSFC Protective Services Division no later than the close of business on...

  16. 76 FR 41824 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-068)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory..., 2011, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Ames Conference...

  17. 75 FR 13597 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the...: The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update. --Kepler...

  18. 77 FR 62536 - Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-081] Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee... Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee. This Subcommittee reports to...: The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Proposed...

  19. 78 FR 66384 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics...: --Astrophysics Division Update --Presentation of Astrophysics Roadmap --Reports from Program Analysis Groups...

  20. 77 FR 38090 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics...: --Astrophysics Division Update --James Webb Space Telescope Update --Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope Report...

  1. 78 FR 10640 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (13-010)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory..., or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open to the public up to...

  2. 75 FR 15743 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-034)] NASA Advisory Council; Exploration... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory...-358-1715; [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda topics for the meeting will...

  3. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-172)] NASA Advisory Council... the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the purpose of soliciting from the aeronautics... 20546, (202) 358-0566, or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open...

  4. Summary Report of the First Research Coordination Meeting on Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.; Greenwood, L.R.; Simakov, S.P.

    2013-12-01

    The Nuclear Data Section of IAEA has initiated a new Coordinated Research Project with the main goal of reviewing and recommending primary damage response functions for neutron and ion irradiations of materials. The output of this CRP will be a database of recommended damage response functions for selected materials with corresponding documentation. It will serve the needs of the fission, fusion and accelerator neutron source communities. The first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) was held 4 to 8 November 2013 at the IAEA. At this meeting, the attendees discussed the objectives of the whole CRP, presented their contributions and elaborated on consolidated recommendations and actions for implementation over the next 1.5 year period. This Summary Report documents the individual contributions and joint decisions made during this meeting. The identified research needs were refined through extensive discussion, and a consensus was developed which defined the CRP objectives in two broad categories. The first addresses the underlying physics-related research relevant to nuclear reactions and ion stopping powers, while the second task will address the development of new materials damage response functions. (author)

  5. 78 FR 20357 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-037] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory...:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Room 6H45...

  6. 76 FR 8380 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-114)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory...:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Rooms 9H40 and 3H46...

  7. 77 FR 6824 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-010] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory....m. to 2 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Room 3H46 and 7H45...

  8. 78 FR 41115 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-074] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory... Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 7H45, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER...

  9. 77 FR 38093 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-046] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory.... to 2:30 p.m., local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Building 1, Room E100E...

  10. 76 FR 17158 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-026)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory....m. to 2 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 5H45, Washington, DC...

  11. 76 FR 59446 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice11-084] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory..., 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 3H46...

  12. 75 FR 35091 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-068)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory....m. to 1:30 p.m., e.d.t. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 3H46, Washington, DC...

  13. 78 FR 31977 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ..., to participate in this meeting by telephone. The Adobe Connect link is https://connect.arc.nasa.gov... Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-1557, fax (202) 358-4118, or peter...

  14. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. (author)

  15. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-09-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. 76 FR 58303 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-081)] NASA Advisory Council; Science...-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science...

  17. 75 FR 74089 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-149)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science Committee of the NAC...

  18. 76 FR 31641 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-050] NASA Advisory Council; Science...-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science...

  19. 78 FR 21421 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-048] NASA Advisory Council; Science...-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the...

  20. 78 FR 77719 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-156] NASA Advisory Council; Science...-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science...

  1. NASA FY 2000 Accountability Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This Accountability Report consolidates reports required by various statutes and summarizes NASA's program accomplishments and its stewardship over budget and financial resources. It is a culmination of NASA's management process, which begins with mission definition and program planning, continues with the formulation and justification of budgets for the President and Congress, and ends with scientific and engineering program accomplishments. The report covers activities from October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000. Achievements are highlighted in the Statement of the Administrator and summarized in the Report.

  2. 75 FR 17166 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-038)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... a.m. to 1 p.m.; Eastern Daylight Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Langley Research Center, Building 1219, Room...

  3. 76 FR 16643 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-024)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory.... ADDRESSES: Thursday, April 14, 2011--NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Lilly Drive Building 4825...

  4. 76 FR 58843 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-082] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  5. 75 FR 16197 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-036)] NASA Advisory Council; Space..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee. DATES: Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 3-5 p.m. CDT. ADDRESSES: NASA Johnson Space...

  6. 78 FR 77502 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (13-152)] NASA Applied Sciences Advisory... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied Sciences Advisory Committee.... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 3P40, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-079)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory....m. to 4 p.m. (local time). ADDRESSES: NASA Glenn Research Center, Building 15, Small Dining...

  8. 76 FR 18800 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-028)] NASA Advisory Council; Exploration... National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, April 26, 2011, 1 p.m.-6 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  9. 78 FR 41114 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-075] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... planning. DATES: Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  10. 76 FR 3673 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-005)] NASA Advisory Council; Space..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council.... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 7C61, Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  11. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 12-047] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA..., July 24, 2012, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC...

  12. 78 FR 57178 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-115] NASA Applied Sciences Advisory... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied Sciences Advisory Committee.... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 1Q39, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  13. 78 FR 69885 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-133] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Susan L. Minor, Executive Secretary for the Aeronautics Committee, NASA Headquarters...

  14. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-087)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory..., 2010, 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Ames Conference Center, Building 3, 500...

  15. 75 FR 4875 - NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-014)] NASA Commercial Space Committee... and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee to the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, February 16, 2010, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Eastern. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E...

  16. The assessment of occupational protection conditions in workplaces with high levels of exposure to natural radiation. Report from a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure from natural radiation is, in the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000 Report, estimated to contribute to more than 80 percent of the world-wide annual collective dose from occupational exposure, uranium mining excluded. The Agency's Radiation Safety Standards Series, the Requirements, and the Safety Guides (jointly sponsored by the Agency and the International Labour Office), address the control of occupational exposures from natural sources of radiation. In addition, some Safety Reports on specific issues are in the process of being finalized. Following upon recommendations to the Agency from its Member States to provide further guidance on the control of occupational exposure to natural radiation, a Technical Committee Meeting on Assessment of Occupational Radiation Protection Conditions in Workplaces with High Levels of Exposure to Natural Radiation was held in Vienna from 7 to 11 May 2001. The objective of the meeting was to produce an inventory of problem areas, make an assessment of the problem and propose a draft work plan for the Agency, This IAEA Working Material includes the report from the meeting, including the presentations made. Based on the recommendations made by the Technical Committee, a work plan is being initiated, implying that more attention will be paid to occupational exposure from natural radiation sources in the Occupational Radiation Protection programme

  17. NASA study of cataract in astronauts (NASCA). Report 1: Cross-sectional study of the relationship of exposure to space radiation and risk of lens opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylack, Leo T; Peterson, Leif E; Feiveson, Alan H; Wear, Mary L; Manuel, F Keith; Tung, William H; Hardy, Dale S; Marak, Lisa J; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-07-01

    The NASA Study of Cataract in Astronauts (NASCA) is a 5-year longitudinal study of the effect of space radiation exposure on the severity/progression of nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular (PSC) lens opacities. Here we report on baseline data that will be used over the course of the longitudinal study. Participants include 171 consenting astronauts who flew at least one mission in space and a comparison group made up of three components: (a) 53 astronauts who had not flown in space, (b) 95 military aircrew personnel, and (c) 99 non-aircrew ground-based comparison subjects. Continuous measures of nuclear, cortical and PSC lens opacities were derived from Nidek EAS 1000 digitized images. Age, demographics, general health, nutritional intake and solar ocular exposure were measured at baseline. Astronauts who flew at least one mission were matched to comparison subjects using propensity scores based on demographic characteristics and medical history stratified by gender and smoking (ever/never). The cross-sectional data for matched subjects were analyzed by fitting customized non-normal regression models to examine the effect of space radiation on each measure of opacity. The variability and median of cortical cataracts were significantly higher for exposed astronauts than for nonexposed astronauts and comparison subjects with similar ages (P=0.015). Galactic cosmic space radiation (GCR) may be linked to increased PSC area (P=0.056) and the number of PSC centers (P=0.095). Within the astronaut group, PSC size was greater in subjects with higher space radiation doses (P=0.016). No association was found between space radiation and nuclear cataracts. Cross-sectional data analysis revealed a small deleterious effect of space radiation for cortical cataracts and possibly for PSC cataracts. These results suggest increased cataract risks at smaller radiation doses than have been reported previously.

  18. Occupational safety meets radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severitt, S.; Oehm, J.; Sobetzko, T.; Kloth, M.

    2012-01-01

    The cooperation circle ''Synergies in operational Security'' is a joint working group of the Association of German Safety Engineers (VDSI) and the German-Swiss Professional Association for Radiation Protection (FS). The tasks of the KKSyS are arising from the written agreement of the two associations. This includes work on technical issues. In this regard, the KKSyS currently is dealing with the description of the interface Occupational Safety / Radiation Protection. ''Ignorance is no defense'' - the KKSyS creates a brochure with the working title ''Occupational Safety meets radiation protection - practical guides for assessing the hazards of ionizing radiation.'' The target groups are entrepreneurs and by them instructed persons to carry out the hazard assessment. Our aim is to create practical guides, simple to understand. The practical guides should assist those, who have to decide, whether an existing hazard potential through ionizing radiation requires special radiation protection measures or whether the usual measures of occupational safety are sufficient. (orig.)

  19. 75 FR 2893 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Updates on Select Astrophysics Missions --Discussion of...

  20. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting on Primary Radiation Damage: From Nuclear Reaction to Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R. E.; Nordlund, K.; Simakov, S.P.

    2012-11-01

    The Meeting was convened to bring together the experts from both the nuclear data and materials research communities because of their common objective of accurately characterizing irradiation environments and resulting material damage. The meeting demonstrated that significant uncertainties remain regarding both the status of nuclear data and the use of these data by the materials modeling community to determine the primary damage state obtained in irradiated materials. At the conclusion of the meeting, the participants agreed that there is clear motivation to initiate a CRP that engages participants from the nuclear data and materials research communities. The overall objective of this CRP would be to determine the best possible parameter (or a few parameters) for correlating damage from irradiation facilities with very different particle types and energy spectra, including fission and fusion reactors, charged particle accelerators, and spallation irradiation facilities. Regarding progress achieved during the last decade in the atomistic simulation of primary defects in crystalline materials, one of the essential and quantitative outcomes from the CRP is expected to be cross sections for point defects left after recoil cascade quenching. (author)

  1. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-061)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial...: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee of the NASA...

  2. 78 FR 49296 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    .... Greg Mann, Office of International and Interagency Relations, (202) 358-5140, NASA Headquarters... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-091] NASA International Space Station... meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended...

  3. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...... the world covering a wide spectrum from fundamental mechanistic studies to metabolism, clinical studies, and drug development. In this report, we summarize the recent and exciting findings presented by the speakers at the meeting....

  4. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--radiation research and radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  5. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-006)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  6. 77 FR 20852 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-027)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  7. Data, Meet Compute: NASA's Cumulus Ingest Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) houses nearly 30PBs of critical Earth Science data and with upcoming missions is expected to balloon to between 200PBs-300PBs over the next seven years. In addition to the massive increase in data collected, researchers and application developers want more and faster access - enabling complex visualizations, long time-series analysis, and cross dataset research without needing to copy and manage massive amounts of data locally. NASA has looked to the cloud to address these needs, building its Cumulus system to manage the ingest of diverse data in a wide variety of formats into the cloud. In this talk, we look at what Cumulus is from a high level and then take a deep dive into how it manages complexity and versioning associated with multiple AWS Lambda and ECS microservices communicating through AWS Step Functions across several disparate installations

  8. 76 FR 26771 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as... the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee. This Task Group reports to the Science Committee of...

  9. 76 FR 21073 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as... the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee. This Task Group reports to the Science Committee of...

  10. 77 FR 67029 - NASA Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ...: Aeronautics Audit, Finance and Analysis Commercial Space Education and Public Outreach Human Exploration and Operations Information Technology Infrastructure Science Technology and Innovation The meeting will be open... birth to the MSFC Protective Services Office no later than the close of business on November 19, 2012...

  11. NASA Self-Assessment of Space Radiation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space exploration involves unavoidable exposures to high-energy galactic cosmic rays whose penetration power and associated secondary radiation makes radiation shielding ineffective and cost prohibitive. NASA recognizing the possible health dangers from cosmic rays notified the U.S. Congress as early as 1959 of the need for a dedicated heavy ion accelerator to study the largely unknown biological effects of galactic cosmic rays on astronauts. Information and scientific tools to study radiation health effects expanded over the new decades as NASA exploration programs to the moon and preparations for Mars exploration were carried out. In the 1970 s through the early 1990 s a more than 3-fold increase over earlier estimates of fatal cancer risks from gamma-rays, and new knowledge of the biological dangers of high LET radiation were obtained. Other research has increased concern for degenerative risks to the central nervous system and other tissues at lower doses compared to earlier estimates. In 1996 a review by the National Academy of Sciences Space Science Board re-iterated the need for a dedicated ground-based accelerator facility capable of providing up to 2000 research hours per year to reduce uncertainties in risks projections and develop effective mitigation measures. In 1998 NASA appropriated funds for construction of a dedicated research facility and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) opened for research in October of 2003. This year marks the 8th year of NSRL research were about 1000 research hours per year have been utilized. In anticipation of the approaching ten year milestone, funded investigators and selected others are invited to participate in a critical self-assessment of NSRL research progress towards NASA s goals in space radiation research. A Blue and Red Team Assessment format has been integrated into meeting posters and special plenary sessions to allow for a critical debate on the progress of the research and major gaps areas. Blue

  12. Educational Activity for the Radiation Emergency System in the Northern Part of Japan: Meeting Report on "The 3rd Educational Symposium on Radiation and Health (ESRAH) by Young Scientists in 2016".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuya, Yusuke; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Kimura, Takaaki; Mori, Ryosuke; Yamada, Ryota; Saga, Ryo; Fujishima, Yohei; Date, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    In the northern part of Japan, close cooperation is essential in preparing for any possible emergency response to radiation accidents because several facilities, such as the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, the MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant and the Vitrified Waste Storage Center, exist in Rokkasho Village (Aomori Prefecture). After the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, special attention should be given to the relationship between radiation and human health, as well as establishing a system for managing with a radiation emergency. In the area of Hokkaido and Aomori prefectures in Japan, since 2008 an exchange meeting between Hokkaido University and Hirosaki University has been held every year to have opportunities to discuss radiation effects on human health and to collect the latest news on monitoring environmental radiation. This meeting was elevated to an international meeting in 2014 titled "Educational Symposium on Radiation and Health (ESRAH) by Young Scientists". The 3rd ESRAH meeting took place in 2016, with the theme "Investigating Radiation Impact on the Environmental and Health". Here we report the meeting findings on the continuing educational efforts after the Fukushima incident, what was accomplished in terms of building a community educational approaches, and future goals.

  13. 75 FR 19661 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... includes the following topics: --Review European Space Agency-NASA Coordination on Planetary Protection... Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC...

  14. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging

  15. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 52 papers are included in part 1

  16. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 55 papers are included in part 2

  17. 78 FR 2293 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --NASA Astrophysics Roadmapping It...

  18. Report of the meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is given of the meeting on the Impact of changing Conditions in the Oil Market on Energy Policies in the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) held in Jordan in 1989. The report contains information on the main objective of the meeting; the countries who attended; the opening speech; the keynote address; the election of officers; the adoption of the programme of work; the presentation and discussion of ESCWA documents on the fluctuations of oil prices and energy policies and the impact of changing conditions in the oil market on energy policies in the ESCWA region; the presentation and discussion of working papers prepared by experts from within and outside the region and representatives of regional and international organizations; general debate; and finally the conclusions and recommendations. (UK)

  19. 75 FR 51852 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    .... Donald Miller, Office of International and Interagency Relations, (202) 358-1527, National Aeronautics... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-090)] NASA International Space Station... meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended...

  20. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  1. LLW Forum meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  2. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  3. NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NTRS is a valuable resource for researchers, students, educators, and the public to access NASA's current and historical technical literature and engineering...

  4. 77 FR 58412 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-075] NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science...

  5. 76 FR 49508 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-073] NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science...

  6. 75 FR 61778 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-118)] NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics...

  7. Proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is a proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics held on Feb. 22 and 23 in 1978 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo. The reports includes the following items (1) studies on neutronics with accelerators (2) radiation damage (3) shielding design (4) radiation streaming (5) shielding experiments from a point of view of radiation measurements (6) shielding benchmark experiments (7) prospects on the study of neutronics. All items are written in Japanese. (auth.)

  8. 78 FR 39341 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-070] NASA Advisory Council; Science..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This [[Page 39342

  9. 75 FR 55616 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-110)] NASA Advisory Council...-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announce a meeting for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Tuesday, September...

  10. 1990 Fall Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1990 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 3-7, continued the steady growth trend for the western meeting set over the last decade. About 5200 members registered for the meeting and 3836 papers were given. The scientific kickoff to the meeting was provided by a Union session on initial results of the current Magellan mission to Venus. The mission was also the focus of a public lecture and short film on highlights of the mission and an extensive Union poster session.

  11. Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1997-01-01

    The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the ''Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States'' held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 9-11 December 1996. The present activities on nuclear data for radiotherapy are summarized in Member States, the present status of nuclear data for photon, neutron and proton therapy is reviewed and topics which are not presently covered by other institutions are identified. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  12. 77 FR 64561 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-083] NASA Advisory Council; Technology...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Technology and Innovation Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). The meeting will be...

  13. The impact of biology on risk assessment -- Workshop of the National Research Council's board on radiation effects research. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Grosovsky, A.; Hanawalt, P.C.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The linear, nonthreshold extrapolation from a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation derived at higher doses to doses for which regulatory standards are proposed is being challenged by some scientists and defended by others. It appears that the risks associated with exposures to doses of interest are below the risks that can be measured with epidemiologic studies. Therefore, many have looked to biology to provide information relevant to risk assessment. The workshop reported here, ''The Impact of biology on Risk Assessment,'' was planned to address the need for further information by bringing together scientists who have been working in key fields of biology and others who have been contemplating the issues associated specifically with this question. The goals of the workshop were to summarize and review the status of the relevant biology, to determine how the reported biologic data might influence risk assessment, and to identify subjects on which more data is needed

  14. 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the 2011 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. As is typical with odd year editions, this is an abbreviated Range Safety Annual Report providing updates and links to full articles from the previous year's report. It also provides more complete articles covering new subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed and updated in the 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2011 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again the web-based format was used to present the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition and hope you enjoy this year's product as well. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. In conclusion, it has been a busy and productive year. I'd like to extend a personal Thank You to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the upcoming year.

  15. 76 FR 5405 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics... contacting Marian Norris. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division...

  16. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Betty P. (Editor); Stewart, Lynne M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    NASA and contractor employees achieved many notable improvements in 1989. The highlights of those improvements, described in this seventh annual Accomplishments Report, demonstrate that the people who support NASA's activities are getting more involved in quality and continuous improvement efforts. Their gains solidly support NASA's and this Nation's goal to remain a leader in space exploration and in world-wide market competition, and, when communicated to others through avenues such as this report, foster improvement efforts across government and industry. The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories in this report reflect NASA principles set forth in the 1980's and are more commonly known today as Total Quality Management (TQM): top management leadership and support; strategic planning; focus on the customer; employee training and recognition; employee empowerment and teamwork; measurement and analysis; and quality assurance.

  17. 75 FR 4110 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-010)] NASA Advisory Council; Technology... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announce a meeting of the newly formed Technology and Innovation Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This will be the first meeting of...

  18. NASA aviation safety reporting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation safety reports that relate to loss of control in flight, problems that occur as a result of similar sounding alphanumerics, and pilot incapacitation are presented. Problems related to the go around maneuver in air carrier operations, and bulletins (and FAA responses to them) that pertain to air traffic control systems and procedures are included.

  19. Report of the Consultant’s Meeting on the development of an E-learning system for radiation technologies applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Consultant’s Meeting (CM) on the development of an e-learning system for radiation technologies applications in industry (radiotracers and nucleonic measurement systems) convened at IAEA headquarter in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 31 January 2014. The meeting was held with 6 experts from Germany, Korea, France, Croatia, Indonesia and Albania to discuss and evaluate issues related to the development of an e-learning system for radiation technologies applications in industry and about the mechanisms for e-learning implementation. The list of participants is attached as Appendix I. The foremost objective of the consultant’s meeting is to prepare a technical document which will provide practical information and guidelines for the development of an e-learning system for radiotracers and sealed source applications in industry. The preparation of a technical report on status and strategy for the development of the e-learning system was the main output of this CM. Nuclear techniques, as tracers and sealed sources applications, have been widely used in various industries to optimize and monitor processes, improve product quality, save energy and materials and reduce environmental impact. Their technical, economic and environmental benefits have been well demonstrated and recognized in many industrial sectors. The major radiotracer and sealed source techniques have been transferred to many developing MS through IAEA TC projects. The usefulness of nuclear techniques in evaluation or trouble shooting industrial processes has been proved beyond doubt. There are many instances, where nuclear techniques based on either open or sealed sources have been used on laboratory and industrial scales to provide solutions to problems which otherwise would have been insoluble

  20. 78 FR 42553 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ...; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee..., DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Deborah Diaz, ITIC Executive Secretariat, NASA...

  1. 77 FR 67027 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12- 091] NASA Advisory Council; Science... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science Subcommittee of the [[Page 67028

  2. Report of scientific meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herino, R.; Delville, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the two days organized in November 2005 on the energy and the nano-technologies and focused on the energy storage and distribution. After a presentation of the context, it takes stock on the different projects presented. The second part details the program and offers an abstract of each presentation. (A.L.B.)

  3. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 20) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at these meetings by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satcom industry.

  4. NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) collects, analyzes, and distributes de-identified safety information provided through confidentially submitted reports from frontline aviation personnel. Since its inception in 1976, the ASRS has collected over 1.4 million reports and has never breached the identity of the people sharing their information about events or safety issues. From this volume of data, the ASRS has released over 6,000 aviation safety alerts concerning potential hazards and safety concerns. The ASRS processes these reports, evaluates the information, and provides selected de-identified report information through the online ASRS Database at http:asrs.arc.nasa.gov. The NASA ASRS is also a founding member of the International Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (ICASS) group which is a collection of other national aviation reporting systems throughout the world. The ASRS model has also been replicated for application to improving safety in railroad, medical, fire fighting, and other domains. This presentation will discuss confidential, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting systems and their advantages in providing information for safety improvements.

  5. 77 FR 12086 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... following topics: --Earth Science Division Update --Committee on Earth Observations Satellites and Other...

  6. 75 FR 65673 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... following topics: --Earth Science Division Update. --Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice...

  7. FAA and NASA UTM Research Transition Team: Communications and Navigation (CN) Working Group (WCG) Kickoff Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoo; Larrow, Jarrett

    2017-01-01

    This is NASA FAA UTM Research Transition Team Communications and Navigation working group kick off meeting presentation that addresses the followings. Objectives overview Overall timeline and scope Outcomes and expectations Communication method and frequency of meetings Upcoming evaluation Next steps.

  8. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics... topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update on Balloons Return to Flight Changes --James Webb Space...

  9. 75 FR 51116 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics... topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --2010 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey --Update on...

  10. NASA Space Radiation Program Integrative Risk Model Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sandridge, Chris

    2015-01-01

    NASA Space Radiation Program Element scientists have been actively involved in development of an integrative risk models toolkit that includes models for acute radiation risk and organ dose projection (ARRBOD), NASA space radiation cancer risk projection (NSCR), hemocyte dose estimation (HemoDose), GCR event-based risk model code (GERMcode), and relativistic ion tracks (RITRACKS), NASA radiation track image (NASARTI), and the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space (OLTARIS). This session will introduce the components of the risk toolkit with opportunity for hands on demonstrations. The brief descriptions of each tools are: ARRBOD for Organ dose projection and acute radiation risk calculation from exposure to solar particle event; NSCR for Projection of cancer risk from exposure to space radiation; HemoDose for retrospective dose estimation by using multi-type blood cell counts; GERMcode for basic physical and biophysical properties for an ion beam, and biophysical and radiobiological properties for a beam transport to the target in the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory beam line; RITRACKS for simulation of heavy ion and delta-ray track structure, radiation chemistry, DNA structure and DNA damage at the molecular scale; NASARTI for modeling of the effects of space radiation on human cells and tissue by incorporating a physical model of tracks, cell nucleus, and DNA damage foci with image segmentation for the automated count; and OLTARIS, an integrated tool set utilizing HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) intended to help scientists and engineers study the effects of space radiation on shielding materials, electronics, and biological systems.

  11. 75 FR 11200 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-025)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, March 30, 2010, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., EST. ADDRESSES: NASA... Administration, Washington, DC, 20546. Phone 202-358-1686, fax: 202-358-3878, [email protected]nasa.gov...

  12. 75 FR 28821 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-060)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., EDST. ADDRESSES: NASA... Space Administration, Washington, DC 20546. Phone 202- 358-1686, fax: 202-358-3878, [email protected]nasa...

  13. 75 FR 53349 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-098)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday September 14, 8 a.m. to 12 noon CDT. ADDRESSES: NASA..., Washington, DC 20546. Phone 202- 358-1686, fax: 202-358-3878, [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY...

  14. 75 FR 17437 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-039)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Monday, April 26, 2010, 1:30 p.m.-6 p.m. CDT. ADDRESSES: NASA Johnson Space Center, Gilruth Conference Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058. FOR FURTHER...

  15. 77 FR 52067 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [12-069] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space.... DATES: Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 11:45 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), The Showroom, Building M-3, NASA Ames Conference Center, 500 Severyns Road, NASA Research...

  16. 77 FR 13153 - Information Collection; NASA Contractor Financial Management Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ..., [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The NASA Contractor Financial Management... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-019] Information Collection; NASA Contractor Financial Management Reports AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION...

  17. 76 FR 52016 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-074)] NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel...

  18. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--radiation research and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 12 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation research and its application sub-volume

  19. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 24 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

  20. 76 FR 69292 - NASA Advisory Council Science Committee Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-113] NASA Advisory Council Science..., Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces that the meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council originally scheduled...

  1. 78 FR 70963 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ....m. to 2:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Kennedy Space Center, Headquarters Building, Room 2229... Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-2245, or [email protected] meeting at the NASA Kennedy Space Center must provide their full name, company affiliation (if applicable...

  2. 75 FR 80081 - NASA Advisory Council; Exploration Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-167)] NASA Advisory Council... the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 10:30 a.m.-5:45 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Glennan Conference Room-1Q39; 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20546 FOR...

  3. 75 FR 39974 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-074)] NASA Advisory Council; Space... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, July 28, 2010, 2-5 p.m. EDT. ADDRESSES: Doubletree..., Washington, DC 20546, 202/358-1507, [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda for the...

  4. 75 FR 5630 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-017)] NASA Advisory Council; Space... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, February 17, 2010, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20456, Room 2U22. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  5. 75 FR 39973 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-076)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee to the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, July 29, 2010, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., Eastern. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., PRC/Room 9H40, Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  6. 76 FR 3674 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-006)] NASA Advisory Council; Commercial... Committee to the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Glennan Conference Center, Room 1Q39, Washington, DC 20546...

  7. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ..., Building 152, Dailey Road, NASA Research Park, NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, CA 95035... Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566... Christensen, Protocol Specialist, Office of the Center Director, NASA ARC, Moffett Field, CA. For questions...

  8. Report of fission study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  9. Exascale Workshop Panel Report Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Exascale Review Panel consists of 12 scientists and engineers with experience in various aspects of high-performance computing and its application, development, and management. The Panel hear presentations by several representatives of the workshops and town meetings convened over the past few years to examine the need for exascale computation capability and the justification for a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop such capability. This report summarizes information provided by the presenters and substantial written reports to the Panel in advance of the meeting in Washington D.C. on January 19-20, 2010. The report also summarizes the Panel's conclusions with regard to the justification of a DOE-led exascale initiative.

  10. The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of reports based on safety-related incidents submitted to the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System by pilots, controllers, and, occasionally, other participants in the National Aviation System (refs. 1-13). ASRS operates under a memorandum of agreement between the National Aviation and Space Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration. The report contains, first, a special study prepared by the ASRS Office Staff, of pilot- and controller-submitted reports related to the perceived operation of the ATC system since the 1981 walkout of the controllers' labor organization. Next is a research paper analyzing incidents occurring while single-pilot crews were conducting IFR flights. A third section presents a selection of Alert Bulletins issued by ASRS, with the responses they have elicited from FAA and others concerned. Finally, the report contains a list of publications produced by ASRS with instructions for obtaining them.

  11. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  12. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  13. NASA Space Radiation Risk Project: Overview and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Chappell, Lori J.; George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Hu, Shaowen; Kidane, Yared H.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Kovyrshina, Tatiana; Norman, Ryan B.; Nounu, Hatem N.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Risk project is responsible for integrating new experimental and computational results into models to predict risk of cancer and acute radiation syndrome (ARS) for use in mission planning and systems design, as well as current space operations. The project has several parallel efforts focused on proving NASA's radiation risk projection capability in both the near and long term. This presentation will give an overview, with select results from these efforts including the following topics: verification, validation, and streamlining the transition of models to use in decision making; relative biological effectiveness and dose rate effect estimation using a combination of stochastic track structure simulations, DNA damage model calculations and experimental data; ARS model improvements; pathway analysis from gene expression data sets; solar particle event probabilistic exposure calculation including correlated uncertainties for use in design optimization.

  14. Philippine country report on radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, E.G.

    1993-01-01

    This report was presented during the First National Coordinators Meeting for Radiation Technology, held in Takasaki, Japan, 6-9 September 1993. The report was about the active involvement of Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in research and development on the application of radiation technology. Activities were on mutation breeding, food irradiation, radiation sterilization, wood-plastic combinations and radiation chemistry. The transfer of technology in the Philippines was supported and assisted by the UNDP/IAEA Industrial Project. With these technologies, many industries were interested in radiation processing

  15. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests

  16. 75 FR 41899 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda for the meeting includes the following topic: Earth Science Program's...

  17. 78 FR 52216 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The primary topic on the agenda for the meeting is:- Earth Science program annual...

  18. 78 FR 18373 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Review of Earth Science...

  19. 76 FR 21073 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Earth Science Division Update...

  20. 77 FR 27253 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... Earth Science Decadal Survey Midterm Review It is imperative that the meeting be held on this date to...

  1. 76 FR 14106 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics...: --Astrophysics Division Update. It is imperative that the meeting be held on these dates to accommodate the...

  2. 78 FR 20356 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics... password [email protected] The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division...

  3. NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    History Documents US Underground Nuclear Test History Reports NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports Enewetak Atoll Cleanup Documents TRAC About Who We Are Our Values History Locations Our Leadership Director Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current

  4. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Elgart, S. Robin; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2017-01-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  5. Radiation Hazard control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Miki, Ryota; Aoki, Yutaka; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Hutai, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Norihiko; Okazaki, Koji

    1992-01-01

    The results of radiation control for one year from April, 1991 to March, 1992 in the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University are reported. As for the persons engaging in radiation-related works as of April, 1991, 57 teachers in the Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Faculties of Science and Engineering, Pharmacology and Agriculture, 17 students of Department of Science and Engineering who utilize the reactor facility for graduation research, and 55 students of Department of Science and Engineering and others as the persons engaging in radiation-related works regarding the law on injury prevention, 129 persons in total became the object of radiation control. The state of operation of the nuclear reactor in fiscal year 1991 was the highest thermal output 1 W, the cumulative thermal output 362.62 Wh, and the total time of operation was 563.27 h. The operation of the neutron generator was carried out for 1.17 h because of the periodic inspection and the trial operation. In personal control, the abnormality due to radiation exposure was not found. The radiation control in laboratories and in fields are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Solutions Network Formulation Report. NASA's Potential Contributions for Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation in Conjunction with Photocatalysis for Urban Air Pollution Mitigation and Increasing Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lauren; Ryan, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using NASA Earth science research on atmospheric ozone and aerosols data as a means to predict and evaluate the effectiveness of photocatalytically created surfaces (building materials like glass, tile and cement) for air pollution mitigation purposes. When these surfaces are exposed to near UV light, organic molecules, like air pollutants and smog precursors, will degrade into environmentally friendly compounds. U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) is responsible for forecasting daily air quality by using the Air Quality Index (AQI) that is provided by AIRNow. EPA is partnered with AIRNow and is responsible for calculating the AQI for five major air pollutants that are regulated by the Clean Air Act. In this Solution, UV irradiance data acquired from the satellite mission Aura and the OMI Surface UV algorithm will be used to help understand both the efficacy and efficiency of the photocatalytic decomposition process these surfaces facilitate, and their ability to reduce air pollutants. Prediction models that estimate photocatalytic function do not exist. NASA UV irradiance data will enable this capability, so that air quality agencies that are run by state and local officials can develop and implement programs that utilize photocatalysis for urban air pollution control and, enable them to make effective decisions about air pollution protection programs.

  7. 77 FR 6825 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ...; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, March 7, 2012... CONTACT: Ms. Karen Harper, Executive Secretary for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee...

  8. 78 FR 72718 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ...; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee (ITIC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Tuesday... Chief Information Officer Space Launch System Kennedy Space Center Operations and Technology Issues...

  9. Multidisciplinary collaboration for meeting radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation emergencies preparedness depend on the participation of many kinds of professionals in a concerted effort to meet whatever unforeseen situation may arise. This is true even for an injury involving only a single individual, the most common kind of radiation emergency. Each local hospital supporting a nuclear power facility performs at least one medical drill annually to review its ability to manage radiation casualties. Admitting even one injured and contaminated plant employee to the emergency room requires the involvement of many hospital departments, including the nursing, medical, security, housekeeping, radiology, clinical laboratories, and administration groups. The triage of several injured victims to regional hospitals would demand even more personnel and coordination of their efforts. In an extreme situation, the need for health care personnel could be enormous. Planning for large-scale radiation emergencies should involve physicians, but there must also be advice from and coordination with nurses, health physicists, emergency management specialists, emergency medical technicians, and state and local police and fire officials

  10. 75 FR 70951 - NASA Advisory Council; NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    .... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Glennan Conference Center Room 1Q39, Washington, DC 20546... identification such as a driver's license to enter the NASA Headquarters building (West Lobby--Visitor Control..., company affiliation (if applicable) to include address, telephone number, and their title, place of birth...

  11. Proceedings of the Fourth Working Meeting on Radiation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The meeting aimed at the exchange of information and experiences both in basic and applied research in radiation chemistry, radiation physics, and radiation biology including radiation processing, irradiation plants and techniques, methods and instrumentation as well as radiation dosimetry. Author and subject indexes are included

  12. 78 FR 72718 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (13-139)] NASA Advisory Council; Audit... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and... includes briefings on the following topics: Finance Update Budget Update NASA Strategic Planning and...

  13. 78 FR 21631 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... the Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory Council have been revised. The revised... 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Monday, April 22, 2013, 9:00...

  14. 77 FR 67677 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Statement Audit FY 2013 Financial Management Initiatives Administrative Savings NASA Budget Government..., Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Monday, November 26, 2012, 9:00 a.m.-5:15 p.m...

  15. Radiation hazard control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Hisanaga, Saemi; Miki, Ryota; Kawai, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yutaka; Sone, Koji; Okada, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the radiation hazard control activities performed at the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University, Japan, during the one-year period from April 1989 to March 1990. Personal radiation hazard control is outlined first focusing on results of physical examination and data of personal exposure dose equivalent. Radiation control in laboratory is then described. Dose equivalent at various places is discussed on the basis of monthly total dose equivalent measured on film badges, measurements made by TLD, and observations made through a continuous radiations monitoring system. The concentration of radiations in air and water is discussed focusing on their measured concentrations in air at the air outlets of tracer/accelerator facilities, and radioactivity in waste water sampled in the reactor facilities and tracer/accelerator facilities. Another discussion is made on the surface contamination density over the floors, draft systems, sink surface, etc. Concerning outdoor radiation hazard control, furthermore, TLD measurements of environmental gamma-rays, data on total gamma-ray radioactivity in environmental samples, and analysis of gamma-ray emitting nuclides in environmental samples are described and discussed. (N.K.)

  16. 76 FR 20717 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...: Doubletree Hotel, 2080 North Atlantic Ave, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Jacob... for the meeting includes the following topics: --Space Operations Mission Directorate FY2012 Budget...

  17. 76 FR 17712 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Glennan Conference Center Room 1Q39, Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER... a valid picture identification such as a driver's license to enter the NASA Headquarters building... address, citizenship, company affiliation (if applicable) to include address, telephone number, and their...

  18. 75 FR 17437 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-040)] NASA Advisory Council; Audit... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and... topic: GAO High Risk List The meeting will be open to the public up to the seating capacity of the room...

  19. 77 FR 38092 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    .... The meeting will be held for the purpose of soliciting from the information technology community and... NAC Information Technology Infrastructure Committee meeting in Building 28. All U.S. citizens and... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-048] NASA Advisory Council; Information...

  20. 78 FR 70963 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... of the Technology and Innovation Committee (TIC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). The meeting will... Propellant Storage and Transfer; and a discussion of barriers to innovation and innovation enablers. DATES... Barriers to Innovation and Innovation Enablers The meeting will be open to the public up to the seating...

  1. Improvements to the Ionizing Radiation Risk Assessment Program for NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semones, E. J.; Bahadori, A. A.; Picco, C. E.; Shavers, M. R.; Flores-McLaughlin, J.

    2011-01-01

    To perform dosimetry and risk assessment, NASA collects astronaut ionizing radiation exposure data from space flight, medical imaging and therapy, aviation training activities and prior occupational exposure histories. Career risk of exposure induced death (REID) from radiation is limited to 3 percent at a 95 percent confidence level. The Radiation Health Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is implementing a program to integrate the gathering, storage, analysis and reporting of astronaut ionizing radiation dose and risk data and records. This work has several motivations, including more efficient analyses and greater flexibility in testing and adopting new methods for evaluating risks. The foundation for these improvements is a set of software tools called the Astronaut Radiation Exposure Analysis System (AREAS). AREAS is a series of MATLAB(Registered TradeMark)-based dose and risk analysis modules that interface with an enterprise level SQL Server database by means of a secure web service. It communicates with other JSC medical and space weather databases to maintain data integrity and consistency across systems. AREAS is part of a larger NASA Space Medicine effort, the Mission Medical Integration Strategy, with the goal of collecting accurate, high-quality and detailed astronaut health data, and then securely, timely and reliably presenting it to medical support personnel. The modular approach to the AREAS design accommodates past, current, and future sources of data from active and passive detectors, space radiation transport algorithms, computational phantoms and cancer risk models. Revisions of the cancer risk model, new radiation detection equipment and improved anthropomorphic computational phantoms can be incorporated. Notable hardware updates include the Radiation Environment Monitor (which uses Medipix technology to report real-time, on-board dosimetry measurements), an updated Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter, and the Southwest Research Institute

  2. Report of second FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting on in vitro techniques for selection of radiation-induced mutants adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The meeting was attended by scientists from nine countries: Bangladesh, China P.R., Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, India, Pakistan, Peru and United States of America. The participants in this Research Coordination Meeting are working on the improvement of potato, sweet potato, garlic, sugarcane, pineapple and alfalfa by combining in vitro techniques with induced mutagenesis to select for resistance to salinity, freezing, heat, drought, and water-logging depending upon adverse condition prevailing in their region. The participants reported results of their experiments on the radio-sensitivity tests on in vitro cultured plant material, such as micropropagated plants and organogenic or embryogenic callus cultures. In addition, reports on the modifications of culture media required to regenerate and multiply local varieties and to carry out in vitro selection for specific stress conditions were presented. Refs, figs, tabs.

  3. Report of second FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting on in vitro techniques for selection of radiation-induced mutants adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The meeting was attended by scientists from nine countries: Bangladesh, China P.R., Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, India, Pakistan, Peru and United States of America. The participants in this Research Coordination Meeting are working on the improvement of potato, sweet potato, garlic, sugarcane, pineapple and alfalfa by combining in vitro techniques with induced mutagenesis to select for resistance to salinity, freezing, heat, drought, and water-logging depending upon adverse condition prevailing in their region. The participants reported results of their experiments on the radio-sensitivity tests on in vitro cultured plant material, such as micropropagated plants and organogenic or embryogenic callus cultures. In addition, reports on the modifications of culture media required to regenerate and multiply local varieties and to carry out in vitro selection for specific stress conditions were presented. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Radiation monitor reporting requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes

  5. Radiation control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Masayo; Matsuda, Toshiro; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Yamamoto, Tomosada; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of radiation control during April 2013 and April 2014 at the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University. The subjects of radiation control were totally 148 persons including teaching staff and students who engaged in radiation jobs at the Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Faculty of Science and Engineering, and the Faculty of Pharmacy. As for the operating conditions of the reactor, total operating time was 485.28 hours. Since new regulations came into force in accordance with the law revision in December 2013, this reactor became unable to operate since the regular inspection in February 2014, and the verification of compliance to the new regulatory standards has become necessary for the restart. In this paper, the following are described as the radiation management that was carried out on a regular basis in FY2013: (1) health diagnosis and individual exposure dose management, as personal management, (2) dose rate measurements in facilities and measurements of radioactive substance concentration in the air and water, as facility management, and (3) measurement data and analysis results of environmental γ-ray dose rate, total β radioactivity concentration in environmental samples, and γ-ray nuclide analysis of environmental samples, as field management. (A.O.)

  6. NASA total quality management 1990 accomplishments report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's efforts in Total Quality Management are based on continuous improvement and serve as a foundation for NASA's present and future endeavors. Given here are numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. These accomplishment benefit our Agency and help to achieve our primary goal, keeping American in the forefront of the aerospace industry.

  7. IFPA meeting 2008 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast...

  8. IFPA meeting 2009 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the annual meeting of the International Federation of Placenta Associations (IFPA). At IFPA Meeting 2009 diverse topics were discussed in twelve themed workshops. Topics covered included: immune response to pregnancy; signaling between fetus and placenta...

  9. Seventh meeting of radiation protection skilled persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhel, Th.; Briandchamplong, J.; Gambini, D.J.; Ammerich, M.; Aubert, B.; Barbey, P.; Biau, A.; Bruchet, H.; Capelle, M.H.; Flon, E.; Gauron, Ch.; Gravelotte, D.; Guerin, Ch.; Le Denmat, D.; Lemoine, Th.; Lombard, J.; Lucas, St.; Menechal, Ph.; Mignien, S.; Million, M.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Prevot, S.; Radecki, J.J.; Rigaud, S.; Taillandier, P.; Timbert, M.; Vidal, J.P.; Bardelay, Ch.; Lahaye, Th.; Balduyck, S.; Chasson, E.; Rehel, J.L.; Chatellier, Ch.; Barret, Ch.; Guersen, J.; Degrange, J.P.; Sevestre, B.; Lahaye, Th.; Rodde, S.; Marchal, C.; Lefaure, Ch.; Bouk'il, H.; Gneiting, M.; Auboiroux, B.; Riedel, A.; Feuardent, J.; Scanff, P.; Bof, M.; Lochard, J.; Godet, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty-three presentations out of 25 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - the evolution of workers' international protection rules against ionizing radiation risks (C. Bardelay); 2 - presentation of the report of the working group on radiation protection (P. Barbey); 3 - position of the French nuclear safety authority and of the labor general direction about the position of permanent expert groups in radiation protection concerning the expected evolutions in the occupation and training of radioprotection skilled persons (RSP), (T. Lahaye); 4 - experience feedback: RSP in surgery operating theater - a sometimes delicate intervention (S. Balduyck); 5 - workplace analysis in dental surgery: constraints and specificities (D. Le Denmat); 6 - workplace analysis: tritium atmospheric contamination (S. Rigaud); 7 - revision of the NFC 15-160 standard relative to radiology facilities (J.L. Rehel); 8 - example of area tele-dosimetry usage - the Pitie Salpetriere hospital experiment (C. Chatellier and C. Barret); 9 - contribution of radio-attenuation lead gloves in interventional radiology (J. Guersen); 10 - zoning in the medical domain: encountered problems typology and evaluation of possible solutions (Degrange, J.P.); 11 - management of used sealed sources distributed by the CEA and CISBIO (B. Sevestre); 12 - how to perform a measurement in radiation protection - how about measurement uncertainty (M. Ammerich); 13 - national campaign of control about the application of workers radiation protection rules (T. Lahaye); 14 - transparency and inspection approach in local nuclear applications: gamma-graphy, research, nuclear medicine, interventional radiography and radiotherapy (S. Rodde and C. Marchal); 15 - local/regional networks of RSPs and radiation protection actors: 2008 audit results and recent evolutions (C. Lefaure); 16 - role and missions of the external RSP

  10. 2017 Midwest Zebrafish Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Elizabeth; Petersen, Sarah C; Smith, Cody J

    2017-12-01

    The 2017 Midwest Zebrafish meeting was held from June 16 to 18 at the University of Cincinnati, sponsored by the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Divisions of Developmental Biology, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, and Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. The meeting, organized by Saulius Sumanas, Joshua Waxman, and Chunyue Yin, hosted >130 attendees from 16 different states. Scientific sessions were focused on morphogenesis, neural development, novel technologies, and disease models, with Steve Ekker, Stephen Potter, and Lila Solnica-Krezel presenting keynote talks. In this article, we highlight the results and emerging themes from the meeting.

  11. NASA Space Radiation Protection Strategies: Risk Assessment and Permissible Exposure Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z. S.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2017-01-01

    Permissible exposure limits (PELs) for short-term and career astronaut exposures to space radiation have been set and approved by NASA with the goal of protecting astronauts against health risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure. Short term PELs are intended to prevent clinically significant deterministic health effects, including performance decrements, which could threaten astronaut health and jeopardize mission success. Career PELs are implemented to control late occurring health effects, including a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) from cancer, and dose limits are used to prevent cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. For radiation protection, meeting the cancer PEL is currently the design driver for galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event shielding, mission duration, and crew certification (e.g., 1-year ISS missions). The risk of cancer development is the largest known long-term health consequence following radiation exposure, and current estimates for long-term health risks due to cardiovascular diseases are approximately 30% to 40% of the cancer risk for exposures above an estimated threshold (Deep Space one-year and Mars missions). Large uncertainties currently exist in estimating the health risks of space radiation exposure. Improved understanding through radiobiology and physics research allows increased accuracy in risk estimation and is essential for ensuring astronaut health as well as for controlling mission costs, optimization of mission operations, vehicle design, and countermeasure assessment. We will review the Space Radiation Program Element's research strategies to increase accuracy in risk models and to inform development and validation of the permissible exposure limits.

  12. Comparative assessment of radiation versus nutritional and other factors that may influence immune status. Report of a Joint IAEA/WHO advisory group meeting, Vienna, Austria, 3-6 May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting was convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization in May 1994 to review the role of radiation, nutrition, toxic chemicals and other factors that may influence immune status in human populations. Priorities for future research were proposed, and possibilities for using isotope in such studies were identified. The Group recommended that the IAEA should initiate a broadly based Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) focussed mainly on the effects of low-level radiation on immune status in human populations. The main variables of interest are (i) the level of individual radiation exposure, and (ii) the nutritional status. Possible experimental groups include persons living in areas of high radiation background (e.g. in countries where areas of high radiation background are known to occur naturally, or at high altitudes, or in areas affected by Chernobyl accident). Other possible experimental groups comprise radiation workers and uranium miners. It was also recommended that the contribution of toxic chemical exposure to immune dysfunction in these population groups should be assessed. Such research should be complemented by animal studies, and possibly also by in vitro studies with human and animal cells, by some participants in the CRP. This report has been prepared as a source of information for potential participants in the proposed CRP and for other persons associated with related programmes of the IAEA and the WHO. 15 refs, 1 fig., 7 tabs

  13. NASA Education Recommendation Report - Education Design Team 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengra, Trish; Stofan, James

    2011-01-01

    NASA people are passionate about their work. NASA's missions are exciting to learners of all ages. And since its creation in 1958, NASA's people have been passionate about sharing their inspiring discoveries, research and exploration with students and educators. In May 2010, NASA administration chartered an Education Design Team composed of 12 members chosen from the Office of Education, NASA's Mission Directorates and Centers for their depth of knowledge and education expertise, and directed them to evaluate the Agency's program in the context of current trends in education. By improving NASA's educational offerings, he was confident that the Agency can play a leading role in inspiring student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as few other organizations can. Through its unique workforce, facilities, research and innovations, NASA can expand its efforts to engage underserved and underrepresented communities in science and mathematics. Through the Agency's STEM education efforts and science and exploration missions, NASA can help the United States successfully compete, prosper and be secure in the 21st century global community. After several months of intense effort, including meeting with education experts; reviewing Administration policies, congressional direction and education research; and seeking input from those passionate about education at NASA, the Education Design Team made six recommendations to improve the impact of NASA's Education Program: (1) Focus the NASA Education Program to improve its impact on areas of greatest national need (2) Identify and strategically manage NASA Education partnerships (3) Participate in National and State STEM Education policy discussions (4) Establish a structure to allow the Office of Education, Centers and Mission Directorates to implement a strategically integrated portfolio (5) Expand the charter of the Education Coordinating Committee to enable deliberate Education Program design (6

  14. Megavoltage radiation therapy: Meeting the technological needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyk, J.

    2002-01-01

    addressing technological needs for megavoltage radiation treatment, that the radiation treatment machine technology not be considered in isolation from the technologies associated with the other steps of the treatment process. It makes no sense to have highly sophisticated linear accelerators capable of 3-D conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if there is not a good imaging capability for accurately defining the extent and location of both tumours and normal tissues. Requirements for a radiation therapy facility have been defined in an IAEA report. This report considered cobalt-60 megavoltage therapy machines but indicated that the IAEA would not consider provisions for linear accelerators. In 1993, the Pan American Health Organization along with the WHO and the IAEA produced a report describing the design requirements for megavoltage x-ray machines for cancer treatment in developing countries. Clearly, even within the last decade, there are still different opinions on the benefits (and risks) of cobalt-60 versus linear accelerators for provision of radiation treatment especially in the context of developing countries. There are a number of considerations when a particular institution in any country makes decisions about the purchase of radiation therapy equipment. Broadly speaking, these include: Societal infrastructure considerations (e.g. is there stable electrical power available to support the treatment and related technologies?); Financial considerations (e.g. are there sufficient financial resources to purchase, operate, maintain and eventually dispose of the treatment technology?); Types and stage of diseases most likely to be treated (e.g. late stage diseases have different planning and treatment requirements compared to early stage and well localized tumours); The number and types of professional staff available to support the treatment technologies (e.g. radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists (technologists), and

  15. Executive committee report: geotechnical instrumentation working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.; Rogue, F.; Beloff, W.R.; Binnall, E.; Gregory, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Responding to the widespread need for the geotechnical community to discuss instrumentation for nuclear waste repositories, a meeting was held December 2 and 3, 1981, in Denver, Colorado. This report gives the group's consensus recommendations to aid in making decisions for development of instrumentation for future repository work. The main conclusions of the working group meeting were as follows: (1) monitoring of geotechnical parameters in nuclear waste repositories will be necessary to meet licensing requirements; (2) currently available instruments are underdeveloped for this monitoring; (3) research and development to provide adequate instrumentation will need to be performed under federal sponsorship by national laboratories, universities, contractors, and consultants; and (4) a NASA-type reliability program is needed to meet the quality assurance, durability, calibration, and time schedule demands of geotechnical instrumentation development. This will require significant financial commitments from the federal sector

  16. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  17. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry.

  18. Radiation Protection Institute Annual Report for 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The report covers the activities of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013. The report is grouped under the following headings: establishment, vision and mission; personnel and organization; major activities and research projects; IAEA, Technical Cooperation and AFRA projects; ongoing research projects and programs; income and expenditure statements, physical development and human resource development, training courses, meetings and conferences. (A. B.)

  19. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... topics: --Overview of Research in Space Life and Physical Sciences --Space Station and Future Exploration... Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the Research Subcommittee of the Human Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA...

  20. 76 FR 64386 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ..., Executive Secretary for the Information Technology Infrastructure Committee, National Aeronautics and Space... they are attending the NASA Advisory Council, Information Technology Infrastructure Committee meeting in Building 34, Room W305. All U.S. citizens desiring to attend the Information Technology...

  1. The impact of biology on risk assessment -- Workshop of the National Research Council`s board on radiation effects research. Meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Grosovsky, A. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Hanawalt, P.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Jostes, R.F. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States). Board on Radiation Effects Research; Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Cancer Biology; Morgan, W.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Oleinick, N.L. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ullrich, R.L. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Therapy

    1997-12-31

    The linear, nonthreshold extrapolation from a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation derived at higher doses to doses for which regulatory standards are proposed is being challenged by some scientists and defended by others. It appears that the risks associated with exposures to doses of interest are below the risks that can be measured with epidemiologic studies. Therefore, many have looked to biology to provide information relevant to risk assessment. The workshop reported here, ``The Impact of biology on Risk Assessment,`` was planned to address the need for further information by bringing together scientists who have been working in key fields of biology and others who have been contemplating the issues associated specifically with this question. The goals of the workshop were to summarize and review the status of the relevant biology, to determine how the reported biologic data might influence risk assessment, and to identify subjects on which more data is needed.

  2. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards

  4. International meeting on radiation chemistry and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The conference heard 76 papers; the abstracts of 74 of them were inputted in INIS. They deal with the basic principles and mechanisms of radiation chemistry, with radiolysis, radiation cross-linking of polymers, with methods and instruments for irradiation beam dosimetry, and with radiation application in the irradiation of foods and wastes. (M.D.)

  5. 76 FR 35481 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Update. --Research and Analysis Update. --Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope Science Definition Team... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-054] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This subcommittee reports to the Science Committee of the NAC...

  6. 76 FR 59172 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... Space Telescope, Science Definition Team. --Physics of the Cosmos/Cosmic Origins/Exoplanet Program... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-083)] NASA Advisory Council; Science... Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science Committee of the NAC...

  7. IFPA meeting 2012 workshop report I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, W E; Carter, Anthony Michael; De Mestre, A M

    2013-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively...

  8. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, Anthony Michael

    2013-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collecti...

  9. IFPA meeting 2010 workshop report I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, C.; Antczak, D.F.; Carvalho, J.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At IFPA Meeting 2010 there were twelve themed workshops, six of which are summarized in this report. 1. The immunology workshop focused on normal and pathological functions of the maternal immune system in pregnancy. 2. The transport wor...

  10. Meeting of senior officials on managing nuclear knowledge. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In response to the recommendations of several Agency advisory committees, e.g. INSAG, SAGNE 2002, SAGNA, SAGTAC, to address issues related to nuclear knowledge management, the IAEA convened a meeting on Managing Nuclear Knowledge with senior representatives from Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to sharpen awareness and understanding of the emerging concerns about the maintenance and preservation of knowledge and expertise in nuclear science, technology and applications and to better comprehend the role of the Agency in this process. The meeting was attended by more than 70 participants from 35 Member States and 4 international organizations, representing academic leaders, senior level executives, managers and governmental officials. This report includes general recommendations, summary of the keynote of the Member States, statements on the role of the IAEA and International cooperation in managing nuclear knowledge

  11. Fall 2015 NASA Internship, and Space Radiation Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This fall, I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in an internship at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. I was placed into the Human Health & Performance Directorate, where I was specifically tasked to work with Dr. Zarana Patel, researching the impacts of cosmic level radiation on human cells. Using different laboratory techniques, we were able to examine the cells to see if any damage had been done due to radiation exposure, and if so, how much damage was done. Cell culture samples were exposed at different doses, and fixed at different time points so that we could accumulate a large pool of quantifiable data. After examining quantifiable results relative to the impacts of space radiation on the human body at the cellular and chromosomal level, researchers can defer to different areas of the space program that have to do with astronaut safety, and research and development (extravehicular mobility unit construction, vehicle design and construction, etc.). This experience has been very eye-opening, and I was able to learn quite a bit. I learned some new laboratory techniques, and I did my best to try and learn new ways to balance such a hectic work and school schedule. I also learned some very intimate thing about working at NASA; I learned that far more people want to watch you succeed, rather than watch you fail, and I also learned that this is a place that is alive with innovators and explorers - people who have a sole purpose of exploring space for the betterment of humanity, and not for any other reason. It's truly inspiring. All of these experiences during my internship have impacted me in a really profound way, so much that my educational and career goals are completely different than when I started. I started out as a biotechnology major, and I discovered recently toward the end of the internship, that I don't want to work in a lab, nor was I as enthralled by biological life sciences as a believed myself to be. Taking that all into

  12. RESULTS OF THE FIRST RUN OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; BRENNAN, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The results of commissioning of this new facility were reported in [l]. In this report we will describe the results of the first run. The NSRL is capable of making use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. Many modes of operation were explored during the first run, demonstrating all the capabilities designed into the system. Heavy ion intensities from 100 particles per pulse up to 12 x 10 9 particles per pulse were delivered to a large variety of experiments, providing a dose range up to 70 Gy/min over a 5 x 5 cm 2 area. Results presented will include those related to the production of beams that are highly uniform in both the transverse and longitudinal planes of motion [2

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage

  14. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage

  15. Report of nuclear powered ship meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The research and development of nuclear powered ships in Japan have been advanced centering around the Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency established in 1963. It is regretful that the development of ''Mutsu'' is largely behind the schedule due to the radiation leak in 1974, and the expected objective has not yet been attained even today. The government decided to advance the research on the improvement of marine nuclear reactors in 1980, and this new research function was given to the Agency by changing its organization. However, recently various arguments have arisen concerning the way of the research and development of nuclear ships in Japan centering around ''Mutsu'', such as the necessity of developing nuclear ships, the enormous expenditure for the development, the aging of ''Mutsu'' more than 10 years after the construction, the introduction of nuclear ship technology from foreign countries and so on. By the end of fiscal 1984, the Agency is expected to merge with other organization related to atomic energy, therefore, it is necessary to decide the way of research and development. This meeting organized by the Atomic Energy Commission makes this report to show the way of thinking about the above arguments. (Kako, I.)

  16. Radiation Protection Institute Annual Report for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The report covers the activities of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2012. It is grouped under the following topics: vision and mission; personnel, major activities, research projects, IAEA Technical Cooperation and AFRA projects; ongoing research projects and programs. Also included are income and expenditure statements, physical and human resource development; IAEA training courses, national and IAEA training courses and meetings hosted; and publications. (A. B.)

  17. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report

  19. Proceedings of the 26th annual meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the 26th Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements which addressed the topic Health and Ecological Implications of Radioactively Contaminated Environments, a topic of great current interest and importance. The meeting was divided into five subtopics. The first dealt with the contaminated sites themselves, the second with human health implications, the third on remediation, the fourth (a panel) on lessons learned and issues of the future and finally a summation. The meeting also included progress reports on the work of three NCRP committees, Scientific Committee 1-2 on the Assessment of Risk for Radiation Protection Purposes, Scientific Committee 66 on Biological Effects and Exposure Criteria for Ultrasound and Scientific Committee 83 on Identification of Research Needs for Radiation Protection. Summaries of these reports prepared by their respective chairmen are included in this volume

  20. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks. 2015 Letter Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Conner, Carol E. H.; Masys, Daniel R.; Liverman, Catharyn T.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has requested a study from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to provide an independent review of more than 30 evidence reports on human health risks for long duration and exploration spaceflight. The evidence reports, which are publicly available, are categorized into five broad categories: (1) behavioral health and performance; (2) human health countermeasures (with a focus on bone metabolism and orthopedics, nutrition, immunology, and cardiac and pulmonary physiology); (3) radiation; (4) human factors issues; and (5) exploration medical capabilities. The reports are revised on an ongoing basis to incorporate new scientific information. In conducting this study, an IOM ad hoc committee will build on the 2008 IOM report Review of NASA's Human Research Program Evidence Books. That report provided an assessment of the process used for developing the evidence reports and provided an initial review of the evidence reports that had been completed at that time. Each year, NASA staff will identify a set of evidence reports for committee review. Over the course of the study all evidence reports will be reviewed. The committee will hold an annual scientific workshop to receive input on the evidence reports it is reviewing that year and an update on the recent literature. The committee will issue an annual letter report that addresses the following questions relevant to each evidence report: 1. Does the evidence report provide sufficient evidence, as well as sufficient risk context, that the risk is of concern for long-term space missions? 2. Does the evidence report make the case for the research gaps presented? 3. Are there any additional gaps in knowledge or areas of fundamental research that should be considered to enhance the basic understanding of this specific risk? 4. Does the evidence report address relevant interactions among risks? 5. Is input from additional disciplines needed? 6. Is the breadth of the cited literature sufficient? 7. What is the overall

  1. Meeting Report - proteostasis in Ericeira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrain, Colin; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan; Domingos, Pedro M

    2018-03-01

    It was a sunny Ericeira, in Portugal, that received the participants of the EMBO Workshop on Proteostasis, from 17 to 21 November 2017. Most participants gave talks or presented posters concerning their most recent research results, and lively scientific discussions occurred against the backdrop of the beautiful Atlantic Ocean.Proteostasis is the portmanteau of the words protein and homeostasis, and it refers to the biological mechanisms controlling the biogenesis, folding, trafficking and degradation of proteins in cells. An imbalance in proteostasis can lead to the accumulation of misfolded proteins or excessive protein degradation, and is associated with many human diseases. A wide variety of research approaches are used to identify the mechanisms that regulate proteostasis, typically involving different model organisms (yeast, invertebrates or mammalian systems) and different methodologies (genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, structural biology, cell biology and organismal biology). Around 140 researchers in the proteostasis field met in the Hotel Vila Galé, Ericeira, Portugal for the EMBO Workshop in Proteostasis, organized by Pedro Domingos (ITQB-NOVA, Oeiras, Portugal) and Colin Adrain (IGC, Oeiras, Portugal). In this report, we attempt to review and integrate the ideas that emerged at the workshop. Owing to space restrictions, we could not cover all talks or posters and we apologize to the colleagues whose presentations could not be discussed. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto Cruz, National Hispanic University (left) at Amesto sign the educational MOU between NHU and Ames.

  3. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  4. The Nasa space radiation school, an excellent training in radiobiology and space radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogin, G.

    2009-01-01

    The astronauts have to spend more time in space and the colonization of the moon and Mars are in the cross hairs of international agencies. The cosmic radiation from which we are protected on ground by atmosphere and by the terrestrial magnetosphere (.4 mSv/year according to Who) become really threatening since 20 km altitude, delivering an average radiation dose of a therapeutic kind to astronauts with peaks related to solar events. It is composed in majority of hadrons: protons (85%) and heavy ions (13%), but also photons (2%) of high energy (GeV/n)). the incurred risks are multiple: early ones(cataract, central nervous system damages, whole body irradiation) but especially delayed ones (carcinogenesis). The astronauts radiation protection turns poor and the rate of death risk by cancer returning from a mission on Mars has been estimated at 5%. The Nasa created in 2004 a summer school aiming to awareness young researchers to the space radiobiology specificities. Areas concerned as follow: radioinduced DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, bystander effect, genome instability, neuro degeneration, delayed effects and carcinogenesis in relation with radiation exposure. (N.C.)

  5. Risk Management of New Microelectronics for NASA: Radiation Knowledge-base

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA Missions - implications to reliability and radiation constraints. Approach to Insertion of New Technologies Technology Knowledge-base development. Technology model/tool development and validation. Summary comments.

  6. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York's challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria

  7. Chernobyl'-88. Reports of the 1. All-Union scientific and technical meeting on results of accident effect elimination at the Chernobyl' NPP. V. 1. Radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatenko, E.I.

    1989-01-01

    Information on the contamination levels within the 30 km area and in the adjacent area after the Chernobyl'-4 reactor accident is presented. There are some data on reper isotope ratio which add some knowledge about the processes taking place in the reactor core after the reactor accident. The time-dependent background radiation variations for the first two years after the accident are demonstrated

  8. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  9. The eighth NASA total quality management accomplishments report, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The eighth annual accomplishments report provides numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. NASA's continuous improvement efforts can provide insight for others to succeed in their own endeavors. The report covers: top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  10. Radiation Practices. Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 1811 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2003. There were 1962 responsible parties engaged in licence-exempt dental X-ray practices, made notifiable to STUK. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was carried out through regular inspections performed at places of use, postal control, guidance, maintenance of a Dose Register and research intended to support the regulatory control. A total of 10 900 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2003. 135 000 dose entries were made in the register maintained by STUK. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation concentrated on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. At the end of 2003, 90 workplaces including a total of 141 work areas were subject to ongoing radon monitoring. A total of 2485 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. The DOS Laboratory of STO joined the international MRA agreement on the 'self declaration principle'. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation focused particularly on mobile phones and sun-beds. Mobile phone market control began by measuring the radiation produced by a range of 12 mobile phones of varying type. Spot check inspections were conducted at tanning facilities and a report was completed on radiation safety improvements at such establishments. A method of measurement based on commercial CCD spectroradiometers was developed for spectral measurements of UV phototherapy appliances and sunbeds. The said method is also suitable for measurements at places of use. A new type of magnetometer, which measures peak values over a wide frequency band weighted according to exposure limits, was developed for measuring low frequency magnetic fields. In

  11. 48 CFR 1852.242-73 - NASA contractor financial management reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.242-73 NASA contractor financial management reporting. As prescribed in 1842.7202, insert the following clause: NASA Contractor Financial Management Reporting (NOV 2004) (a) The Contractor... instructions in NASA Procedures and Guidelines (NPR) 9501.2, NASA Contractor Financial Management Reporting...

  12. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  13. Dose reporting in ion beam therapy. Proceedings of a meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    Following the pioneering work in Berkeley, USA, ion beam therapy for cancer treatment is at present offered in Chiba and Hyogo in Japan, and Darmstadt in Germany. Other facilities are coming close to completion or are at various stages of planning in Europe and Japan. In all these facilities, carbon ions have been selected as the ions of choice, at least in the first phase. Taking into account this fast development, the complicated technical and radiobiological research issues involved, and the hope it raises for some types of cancer patients, the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements (ICRU) jointly sponsored a technical meeting held in Vienna, 23-24 June 2004. That first meeting was orientated mainly towards radiobiology: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions versus photons, and related issues. One of the main differences between ion beam therapy and other modern radiotherapy techniques (such as proton beam therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy) is related to radiobiology and in particular the increased RBE of carbon ions compared to both protons and photons (i.e., high linear energy transfer (LET) versus low LET radiation). Another important issue for international agencies and commissions, such as the IAEA and the ICRU, is a worldwide agreement and harmonisation for reporting the treatments. In order to evaluate the merits of ion beam therapy, it is essential that the treatments be reported in a similar/comparable way in all centres so that the clinical reports and protocols can be understood and interpreted without ambiguity by the radiation therapy community in general. For the last few decades, the ICRU has published several reports containing recommendations on how to report external photon beam or electron beam therapy, and brachytherapy. A report on proton beam therapy, jointly prepared by the ICRU and the IAEA, is now completed and is being published in the ICRU series. In line with this

  14. Radiation Exposure and Mortality from Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer in Early NASA Astronauts: Space for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, S. R.; Little, M. P.; Campbell, L. J.; Milder, C. M.; Shavers, M. R.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z. S.

    2018-01-01

    Of the many possible health challenges posed during extended exploratory missions to space, the effects of space radiation on cardiovascular disease and cancer are of particular concern. There are unique challenges to estimating those radiation risks; care and appropriate and rigorous methodology should be applied when considering small cohorts such as the NASA astronaut population. The objective of this work was to establish whether there is evidence for excess cardiovascular disease or cancer mortality in an early NASA astronaut cohort and determine if a correlation exists between space radiation exposure and mortality.

  15. A quality assurance programme for radiation therapy dosimetry: Report of a consultants' meeting to review the status and to plant the development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Andreo, P.

    1996-01-01

    Four national External Audit Groups (EAG) in charge of operating quality audits for radiotherapy dosimetry have been created through a Co-ordinated Research Programme ''Development of a Quality Assurance Programme for Radiation Therapy Dosimetry in Developing Countries'' (E2-40-07). The present status of the development of the measuring systems and measuring procedures for the EAGs has been compared to the methodology established by Quality Audit Networks operating at present in Europe. To harmonize different EAG procedures, a document entitled ''Guidelines to prepare a Quality Manual for External Audit Groups on Dosimetry in Radiotherapy '' has been outlined and a first draft prepared. The ''Guidelines...'' covers quality policy, quality systems and quality structures including process control following the recommendations of ISO 9000 series and ISO/IEC guide No. 25. When completed, this document can be used as a guide on how to prepare the quality manual for national EAGs in developing countries. Due to increased interest in the project three new participants have been admitted. (author)

  16. NASA's Earth Science Flight Program Meets the Challenges of Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianson, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Earth science flight program is a dynamic undertaking that consists of a large fleet of operating satellites, an array of satellite and instrument projects in various stages of development, a robust airborne science program, and a massive data archiving and distribution system. Each element of the flight program is complex and present unique challenges. NASA builds upon its successes and learns from its setbacks to manage this evolving portfolio to meet NASA's Earth science objectives. NASA fleet of 16 operating missions provide a wide range of scientific measurements made from dedicated Earth science satellites and from instruments mounted to the International Space Station. For operational missions, the program must address issues such as an aging satellites operating well beyond their prime mission, constellation flying, and collision avoidance with other spacecraft and orbital debris. Projects in development are divided into two broad categories: systematic missions and pathfinders. The Earth Systematic Missions (ESM) include a broad range of multi-disciplinary Earth-observing research satellite missions aimed at understanding the Earth system and its response to natural and human-induced forces and changes. Understanding these forces will help determine how to predict future changes, and how to mitigate or adapt to these changes. The Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program provides frequent, regular, competitively selected Earth science research opportunities that accommodate new and emerging scientific priorities and measurement capabilities. This results in a series of relatively low-cost, small-sized investigations and missions. Principal investigators whose scientific objectives support a variety of studies lead these missions, including studies of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, polar ice regions, or solid Earth. This portfolio of missions and investigations provides opportunity for investment in innovative Earth science that enhances

  17. Radiation practices. Annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2003-06-01

    A total of 1820 safety licences granted for the use of radiation in Finland were current at the end of 2002. There were also 2037 undertakings for dental X-ray diagnostics (licencefree). The Safety Licence Register of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) listed 14 120 radiation devices and 262 radionuclide laboratories. In 2002, STUK performed 401 inspections of licensed practices and 25 inspections of licence-free dental X-ray practices. Restrictions were ordered on the use of one device. Repairs were ordered in 116 cases and recommended in 55 cases. No remarks were given in 254 cases. Imports of radioactive substances amounted to 110 157 GBq and exports totalled 22 359 GBq. Short-lived radionuclides produced in Finland amounted to 42 487 GBq. The STUK interim storage for radioactive wastes received 65 batches of low-level wastes. A total of 11 190 workers were individually monitored for radiation exposure at 1176 workplaces. Of these workers, some 32% were category A workers and 67% category B workers. In no case were annual dose limits exceeded. The total dose in the use of radiation and nuclear energy recorded in the STUK Dose Register was 6.35 Sv. The mean doses in typical diagnostic X-ray procedures based on phantom measurements were below the reference levels issued by the European Community, the IAEA and STUK. Accuracy of the therapeutic doses underlying good therapeutic results in radiotherapy has remained within acceptable limits, and no excessive doses jeopardizing the safety of therapy have occurred. In the regulatory control of natural radiation, inspection reports requesting performance of radon repairs or measurements of radon concentrations were sent to 145 enterprises. Underground radon inspections were performed in 4 mines and 7 excavation sites. The mean effective dose to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation was 1.6 mSv. Ministry of Social Affairs and Health Decree on the Limitation of Public Exposure to Non-Ionizing Radiation

  18. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-12-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2016. It was held on Dec. 1, 2016 Phoenix Island in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement, Radiation environment and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  19. The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee Open Meeting 10 October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    Full text: The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee (IRAC) held its first open meeting on 10 October 2001 in response to a request from the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) that all its advisory committees should follow the Commission's example and hold such meetings. Some of the other advisory committees have already held open meetings and others are planning to do so shortly. The aim of the meeting was to enable members of the public to meet IRAC members and to find out more about the Committee - how it worked and the type of issues it dealt with. The first two sessions were devoted to short presentations describing IRAC's work and influences, now and in the future, on radiation protection generally. The third session was a discussion forum. The agenda for the meeting and the presentations are posted on the web at: www.hse.gov.uk/foi/iracopen.htm. Each session of presentations was followed by questions of clarification and the third session of the meeting comprised an open forum. Many of the questions raised were not directly relevant to IRAC but, nevertheless, members provided brief responses and referred questions on to others as appropriate. One question had been notified in advance, asking whether members of IRAC agreed that it is now (regrettably) reasonably foreseeable that a loss of containment of radioactive material may occur at a nuclear facility as a result of impact by an aeroplane or by other hostile acts, and that this should be made clear in published guidance on REPPIR. This question was not within IRAC's remit. The Chairman of the Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee offered to take the question to the Committee's next meeting. Issues discussed included: Concerns that exposure to ionising radiation at low levels is more dangerous than is currently reflected in risk estimates. The European Parliament has adopted a resolution calling on the main international bodies, including the International Commission on Radiological

  20. 77 FR 34093 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Division Overview and Program Status --Flight Mission Status Report --Heliophysics Science Performance... visa in addition to providing the following information no less than 10 working days prior to the meeting: Full name; gender; date/place of birth; citizenship; visa information (number, type, expiration...

  1. IAEA advisory group meeting on dosimetry for high doses employed in industrial radiation processing, Vienna, 17-21 November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    In 1977 the IAEA established a programme on High-Dose Standardization and Intercomparison with the aim of developing a world-wide service for dosimetry assurance in Industrial and Research Radiation Processing Facilities. The complete proceedings of the first Advisory Group meeting held within this programme have recently been published in the IAEA Technical Reports Series (No. 205) under the title ''High-Dose Measurement in Industrial Radiation Processing''. This report of the second Advisory Group meeting provides a brief review of the state of the programme at the present time. (The full proceedings of the meeting will not be published)

  2. Review of NASA approach to space radiation risk assessments for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-02-01

    Long duration space missions present unique radiation protection challenges due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which includes high charge and energy particles and other highly ionizing radiation such as neutrons. Based on a recommendation by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, a 3% lifetime risk of exposure-induced death for cancer has been used as a basis for risk limitation by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for low-Earth orbit missions. NASA has developed a risk-based approach to radiation exposure limits that accounts for individual factors (age, gender, and smoking history) and assesses the uncertainties in risk estimates. New radiation quality factors with associated probability distribution functions to represent the quality factor's uncertainty have been developed based on track structure models and recent radiobiology data for high charge and energy particles. The current radiation dose limits are reviewed for spaceflight and the various qualitative and quantitative uncertainties that impact the risk of exposure-induced death estimates using the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model. NSCR estimates of the number of "safe days" in deep space to be within exposure limits and risk estimates for a Mars exploration mission are described.

  3. Determination of the Risk of Radiation-Associated Circulatory and Cancer Disease Mortality in a NASA Early Astronaut Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, S. R.; Chappell, L.; Milder, C. M.; Shavers, M. R.; Huff, J. L.; Little, M.; Patel, Z. S.

    2017-01-01

    Of the many possible health challenges posed during extended exploratory missions to space, the effects of space radiation on cardiovascular disease and cancer are of particular concern. There are unique challenges to estimating those radiation risks; care and appropriate and rigorous methodology should be applied when considering small cohorts such as the NASA astronaut population. The objective of this work was to determine if there was sufficient evidence for excess risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in early NASA astronaut cohorts. NASA astronauts in selection groups 1-7 were chosen; this relatively homogeneous cohort consists of 73 white males, who unlike today's astronauts, maintained similar smoking and drinking habits to the general US population, and have published radiation doses. The participants flew in space on missions Mercury through Shuttle and received space radiation doses between 0-74.1 milligrays. Cause of death information was obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) program at NASA Johnson Space Center. Mortality was compared with the US male population. Trends of mortality with dose were assessed using a logistic model, fitted by maximum likelihood. Only 32 (43.84 percent) of the 73 early astronauts have died. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) for cancer (n=7, SMR=43.4, 95 percent CI 17.8, 84.9), all circulatory disease (n=7, SMR=33.2, 95 percent CI 13.7, 65.0), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) (n=5, SMR=40.1, 95 percent CI 13.2, 89.4) were significantly lower than for the US white male population. For cerebrovascular disease, the upper confidence interval for SMR included 100, indicating it was not significantly different from the US population (n=2, SMR = 77.0, 95 percent CI 9.4, 268.2). The power of the study is low and remains below 10 percent even when risks 10 times those reported in the literature are assumed. Due to small sample size, there is currently insufficient statistical power to evaluate space

  4. Barrels XXX meeting report: Barrels in Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Bitzidou, Malamati; Palaguachi, Fernando; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2018-03-01

    The Barrels meeting annually brings together researchers focused on the rodent whisker to cortical barrel system prior to the Society for Neuroscience meeting. The 2017 meeting focused on the classification of cortical interneurons, the role interneurons have in shaping brain dynamics, and finally on the circuitry underlying oral sensations. The meeting highlighted the latest advancements in this rapidly advancing field.

  5. 48 CFR 1845.505-14 - Reports of Government property. (NASA supplements paragraphs (b))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (NASA supplements paragraphs (b)) (b) When the clause at 1852.245-73, Financial Reporting of NASA... contractor acquired property for purposes of reporting the acquisition cost in the property classifications...

  6. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2017. It was held on 13 April 2017 Gunsan Saemangeum Covention Center in Gunsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017. This proceedings is comprised of 5 ssessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  7. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2017. It was held on 13 April 2017 Gunsan Saemangeum Covention Center in Gunsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017. This proceedings is comprised of 5 ssessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  8. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-04-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2016. It was held on Apr. 6-8, 2016 Daemyung Resort in Byeonsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2016. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation Measurement, Radiation environment and prevention

  9. Reporter Concerns in 300 Mode-Related Incident Reports from NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    A model has been developed which represents prominent reporter concerns expressed in the narratives of 300 mode-related incident reports from NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The model objectively quantifies the structure of concerns which persist across situations and reporters. These concerns are described and illustrated using verbatim sentences from the original narratives. Report accession numbers are included with each sentence so that concerns can be traced back to the original reports. The results also include an inventory of mode names mentioned in the narratives, and a comparison of individual and joint concerns. The method is based on a proximity-weighted co-occurrence metric and object-oriented complexity reduction.

  10. Programmable SAW development :Sandia/NASA project final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-10-01

    This report describes a project to develop both fixed and programmable surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlators for use in a low power space communication network. This work was funded by NASA at Sandia National Laboratories for fiscal years 2004, 2003, and the final part of 2002. The role of Sandia was to develop the SAW correlator component, although additional work pertaining to use of the component in a system and system optimization was also done at Sandia. The potential of SAW correlator-based communication systems, the design and fabrication of SAW correlators, and general system utilization of those correlators are discussed here.

  11. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer faculty fellowship program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, L.M.; Chappell, C.R.; Six, F.; Karr, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    Reports on the research projects performed under the NASA/ASEE Summer faculty fellowship program are presented. The program was conducted by The University of Alabama and MSFC during the period from June 4, 1990 through August 10, 1990. Some of the topics covered include: (1) Space Shuttles; (2) Space Station Freedom; (3) information systems; (4) materials and processes; (4) Space Shuttle main engine; (5) aerospace sciences; (6) mathematical models; (7) mission operations; (8) systems analysis and integration; (9) systems control; (10) structures and dynamics; (11) aerospace safety; and (12) remote sensing

  12. NASA FACILITY FOR THE STUDY OF SPACE RADIATION EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David R.

    1963-04-15

    Information on the energies andd fluxes of trapped electrons and protons in space is summarized, and the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory being constructed to simulate most of the space particulate-energy spectrum is described. A 600-Mev proton synchrocyclotron of variable energy and electron accelerators of 1 to 10 Mev will be included. The accelerator characteristics and the arrangement of the experimental and support buildings, particularly the beam facilities, are discussed; and the planned activities of the laboratory are given. (D.C.W.)

  13. Mathematical model of solar radiation based on climatological data from NASA SSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obukhov, S. G.; Plotnikov, I. A.; Masolov, V. G.

    2018-05-01

    An original model of solar radiation arriving at the arbitrarily oriented surface has been developed. The peculiarity of the model is that it uses numerical values of the atmospheric transparency index and the surface albedo from the NASA SSE database as initial data. The model is developed in the MatLab/Simulink environment to predict the main characteristics of solar radiation for any geographical point in Russia, including those for territories with no regular actinometric observations.

  14. Report of Nuclear Powered Ship Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of nuclear-powered ships in Japan broke down due to the radiation leak on the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' in 1974, and the objective has not yet been attained. The Japan Nuclear Ship Research and Development Agency was reorganized to advance the development of nuclear-powered ships and to develop marine nuclear reactors. Recently, various opinions have been expressed regarding the development of nuclear-powered ships and Mutsu, accordingly, it is necessary to clarify the way it should be. The Atomic Energy Commission organized this meeting to discuss the problem. The practical use of nuclear-powered ships is expected at the beginning of the 21st century, but it is only the guess. But it is important to accumulate the technology, knowledge and experience to prepare for the use of nuclear-powered ships. The continuation of the development of Mutsu is important for the future, and the construction of the new home port is unavoidable. The aim of the research and development, and the concrete way of advancing the research and development of Mutsu are discussed. It is scheduled that the Agency is integrated with other atomic energy organizations by March, 1985. The consideration to be given for implementing the integration is described. (Kako, I.)

  15. (New) NASA Director Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Director Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto Cruz, National Hispanic University (seated, right) and Ames Center Director Dr. Henry McDonald follow the signing of the educational MOU between NHU and Ames.

  16. Water Cluster Leaders Meeting Summary Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of its efforts to support environmental technology innovation clusters, U.S. EPA hosted a Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting on September 25, 2016, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The meeting was an opportunity for cluster leaders from across the globe to meet...

  17. LLW Forum meeting report, May 7--9, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-05-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Chicago, Illinois, on may 7--9, 1997. Twenty-three Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 20 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Upgrading an existing disposal facility; Revisions to DOE Order 5820 re DOE waste management; Conference of radiation control program directors: Recent and upcoming activities; National Conference of State Legislatures' (NCSL) low-level radioactive waste working group: Recent and upcoming activities; Executive session; LLW forum business session; Public involvement and risk communication: Success at West Valley, New York; DOE low-level waste management program; impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency's convention on waste; Panel discussion: The environmental justice concept--Past, present and future; New technologies for processing and disposal of LLRW; High-level and low-level radioactive waste: A dialogue on parallels and intersections; Draft agreement re uniform application of manifesting procedures; Regulatory issues focus; LLW forum October 1997 agenda planning; Resolutions; LLW forum regulatory issues discussion group meets; and Attendance

  18. NASA Education Recommendation Report. Education Design Team 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The people at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are passionate about their work. NASA's missions are exciting to learners of all ages. Since its creation in 1958, NASA's people have been passionate about sharing their inspiring discoveries, research and exploration with students and educators. When retired Marine Corps General…

  19. Proceedings of the 3rd topical meeting on FEL and high power radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Shigenori

    1994-01-01

    The meeting was held on June 10 and 11, 1993, at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. This is the joint study meeting with 31st large power microwave-milliwave study meeting. At the meeting, lectures were given on the report of 1st Asia FEL study meeting, infrared free electron laser (FEL) project in JAERI, present state of Free Electron Laser Research Institute Inc., infrared FEL experiment in the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, FEL experiment in UVSOR storage ring, NIJI-4 SRFEL, simulation of FEL oscillation in photo-klystron, vacuum UVFEL in PF, beam characteristics of small photon storage ring, micro-cherenkov FEL using field emission array, coherent spontaneous emission and radiation build-up in FEL oscillator, stability of soft X-ray multilayers under exposure to multipole Wigger radiation, long life Zn 2 excimer excited with relativistic electron beam, development of large power klystron in KEK, design of 1 THz gyrotron and first experiment, experiment of relativistic peniotron, experiments of 3rd and 10th cyclotron harmonic peniotron oscillators and others. (K.I.)

  20. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-11-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2014. It was held on Nov.19-21, 2014 in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection 1, Medical treatment and Biology 1, Radiation measurement 1, Radiation environment and protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Radiation Measurement 2, Radiation environment and protection 2.

  1. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-10-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2015. It was held on Oct.23, 2015 Mayfield Hotel in Seoul, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2015. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection 1, Medical treatment and Biology 1, Radiation Measurement 1, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Radiation Measurement 2, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 2.

  2. 14. annual meeting of the European Society of Radiation Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Under the aspect of clinical application, findings of fundamental experiments on animals and cells are reported in which highly different radiation sources and doses were used. Novel and interesting results were obtained, in particular, with the application of pions and fast neutrons in the irradiation of tumour cells. (AJ) [de

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 12: An initial investigation into the production and use of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) at five NASA centers: Results of a telephone survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Nanci A.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide NASA management with an 'initial' look at the production and use of scientific and technical information (STI) at five NASA centers (Ames, Goddard, Langley, Lewis, and Marshall). The 550 respondents who were interviewed by telephone held favorable views regarding the NASA STI system. About 65 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to publish their work through the NASA STI system. About 10 percent of those respondents encountered problems using the NASA STI system services for publication. The most frequently reported problem was 'the process is too time consuming' (8.6 percent). Overall, those respondents using the NASA STI system to publish their work rated the system as excellent (24.6 percent) or good (37.6 percent). About 79 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to use the NASA STI system to access information. The most frequently reported problems were 'the time and effort it takes to locate and obtain information through the system' (14.4 percent). Overall, about 83 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system is important to performing their work. Overall, about 73 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system meets their information needs.

  4. Fifth meeting of persons competent in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During this meeting will successively be approached: the statutory frame, the practical guide for the realization of the dosimetry studies of work stations presenting a risk of exposure to ionizing radiations, a study of post in conventional and interventional radiology, study of post in interventional cardiology, the roles and the missions of the P.C.R. (person competent in radiation protection) in a subcontractor company in I.N.B. (base nuclear installation), the application of the zoning order for the activities of industrial radiography, the evolution of the statutory measures in protection of the workers against the dangers of ionizing radiations, all which concerns the P.C.R. (training, missions, certification, educational role), the controls of radioprotection, the external controls of radioprotection, the surveillance of working zones, surveillance of effluents,management of the radioactive waste and effluents, classification of the personnel and the surveillance of the exposure, dosimetry by radio photo luminescence, the systeme S.I.S.E.R.I.. (N.C.)

  5. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G; Costes, Sylvain V

    2018-04-13

    Accurate assessment of risks of long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration. It is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major health risk factor for astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently, there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low-dose, low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The NASA GeneLab project ( https://genelab.nasa.gov/ ) aims to provide a detailed library of omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information on radiation exposure for ground-based studies, GeneLab is adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight experiments. GeneLab is the first comprehensive omics database for space-related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments, utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. The GLDS is continually expanding as omics-related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of the space radiation-related data available at GeneLab.

  6. 75 FR 5629 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-018)] NASA Advisory Council; Audit... Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, February 17, 2010, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20456, Conference Room 8D48. FOR FURTHER...

  7. 2010 ANNUAL MEETING ON NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY. Pt. 4. Section reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlepsch, Thilo v.; Hering, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Summary report on 2 Sessions of Section: - New Build and Innovations (Section 12) of the ANNUAL MEETING On NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY held in Berlin on May 4 to 6, 2010. The other Sections 'Reactor Physics and Methods of Calculation (Section 1)', 'Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics (Section 2)', 'Safety of Nuclear Installations - Methods, Analysis, Results (Section 3)', 'Front End and Back End of the Fuel Cycle, Radioactive Waste, Storage (Section 4)', 'Front End of the Fuel Cycle, Fuel Elements and Core Components (Section 5)', 'Operation of Nuclear Installations (Section 6)', 'Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations (Section 7)', 'Fusion Technology (Section 8)', 'Energy Industry and Economics (Section 10)', 'Radiation Protection (Section 11)', 'New Build and Innovations (Session New Build and Innovations, Section 12)', and 'Education, Expert Knowledge, Know-how-Transfer (Section 13)' have been covered in atw issues 10, 11 and 12 (2010). (orig.)

  8. NASA Hybrid Wing Aircraft Aeroacoustic Test Documentation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Humphreys, William M.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Dan; hide

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) N2A-EXTE model aeroacoustic test. The N2A-EXTE model was tested in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel (14x22 Tunnel) from September 12, 2012 until January 28, 2013 and was designated as test T598. This document contains the following main sections: Section 1 - Introduction, Section 2 - Main Personnel, Section 3 - Test Equipment, Section 4 - Data Acquisition Systems, Section 5 - Instrumentation and Calibration, Section 6 - Test Matrix, Section 7 - Data Processing, and Section 8 - Summary. Due to the amount of material to be documented, this HWB test documentation report does not cover analysis of acquired data, which is to be presented separately by the principal investigators. Also, no attempt was made to include preliminary risk reduction tests (such as Broadband Engine Noise Simulator and Compact Jet Engine Simulator characterization tests, shielding measurement technique studies, and speaker calibration method studies), which were performed in support of this HWB test. Separate reports containing these preliminary tests are referenced where applicable.

  9. Radiation protection programme progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The progress report of the radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out in 1988 under contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. Results of more than 350 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: Radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; Behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; Nonstochastic effects of ionizing radiation; Radiation carcinogenesis; Genetic effects of ionizing radiation; Evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure a safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  10. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  11. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1996. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  12. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1998. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  13. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1997-03-25

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1996. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  14. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1998)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1999-04-15

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1998. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  15. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1998-04-10

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  16. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1995. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  17. Abstracts from the fourth annual meeting of the council on ionizing radiation measurements and standards (CIRMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards held its fourth annual meeting at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 28-30, 1995. The organization represents thousands of users of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources engaged in industrial radiation processing and sterilization, medical radiation diagnostics and therapy, nuclear power, and worker radiation protection programs. CIRMS provides a forum for discussing ionizing radiation issues; identifying, defining and prioritizing needed work; disseminating information on standards; and organizing workshops and meetings to advance ionizing radiation technology. Over 100 participants attended the meeting, which highlighted advanced techniques in radiation dosimetry and radioactivity measurements for the different ionizing radiation communities. Representatives attended from 28 corporations, 10 federal agencies, 8 national laboratories, 12 universities, and 1 state. Advanced techniques and future measurement needs were discussed in four sessions: (I) Medical Dosimetry, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, (II) Occupational and Radiation Protection Dosimetry, (III) Measurement Techniques for Public and Environmental Radiation Protection, and (IV) Measurement Techniques for Radiation Effects on Materials. An additional session (Session V) was added to this annual meeting on the implementation of ISO 9000 for those CIRMS members involved in instrument and product manufacturing, and those providing radiation measurement services. Abstracts are also included from the poster session (Session VI) held on the final day of the meeting. The 4th Annual Meeting was organized by the Chairman of the Science and Technology Committee, Mr. Joseph C. McDonald of the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  18. 12th Quadrennial Congress of the International Association for Radiation Research incorporating the 50th Annual Meeting of Radiation Research Society, RANZCR Radiation Oncology Annual Scientific Meeting and AINSE Radiation Science Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 12th International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR2003), for the first time held in the Southern Hemisphere under the auspices of the International Association of Radiation Research (IARR). The Australian affiliate of IARR is the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE). As with recent Congresses, the annual scientific meeting of the Radiation Research Society will be incorporated into the program. The Congress will be further enhanced by the integration of the annual scientific meeting of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the AINSE Radiation Science Conference. An exciting programme was presented with the main threads being radiation oncology, radiation biology, radiation chemistry/physics, radiation protection and the environment. Items in INIS scope have been separately indexed

  19. Terrestrial Sources of X-Ray Radiation and Their Effects on NASA Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffin, Scott

    2016-01-01

    X-rays are an energetic and penetrating form of ionizing electromagnetic radiation, which can degrade NASA flight hardware. The main concern posed by such radiation is degradation of active electronic devices and, in some cases, diodes. Non-electronic components are only damaged at doses that far exceed the point where any electronic device would be destroyed. For the purposes of this document, flight hardware can be taken to mean an entire instrument, the flight electronics within the instrument or the individual microelectronic devices in the flight electronics. This document will discuss and describe the ways in which NASA flight hardware might be exposed to x-rays, what is and isn't a concern, and how to tell the difference. First, we must understand what components in flight hardware may be vulnerable to degradation or failure as a result of being exposed to ionizing radiation, such as x-rays. As stated above, bulk materials (structural metals, plastics, etc.) are generally only affected by ionizing radiation at very high dose levels. Likewise, passive electronic components (e.g. resistors, capacitors, most diodes) are strongly resistant to exposure to x-rays, except at very high doses. The main concerns arise when active components, that is, components like discrete transistors and microelectronic devices, are exposed to ionizing radiation. Active components are designed to respond to minute changes in currents and voltages in the circuit. As such, it is not surprising that exposure to ionizing radiation, which creates ionized and therefore electrically active particles, may degrade the way the hardware performs. For the most part, the mechanism for this degradation is trapping of the charges generated by ionizing radiation by defects in dielectric materials in the hardware. As such, the degree of damage is a function of both the quantity of ionizing radiation exposure and the physical characteristics of the hardware itself. The metric that describes the

  20. Research reports: 1989 NASA/ASEE Summer faculty fellowship program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karr, G.R.; Six, R.; Freeman, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    For the twenty-fifth consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague

  1. NASA and ESA astronauts visit ESO. Hubble repair team meets European astronomers in Garching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    On Wednesday, February 16, 1994, seven NASA and ESA astronauts and their spouses will spend a day at the Headquarters of the European Southern Observatory. They are the members of the STS-61 crew that successfully repaired the Hubble Space Telescope during a Space Shuttle mission in December 1993. This will be the only stop in Germany during their current tour of various European countries. ESO houses the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST/ECF), a joint venture by the European Space Agency and ESO. This group of astronomers and computer specialists provide all services needed by European astronomers for observations with the Space Telescope. Currently, the European share is about 20 of the total time available at this telescope. During this visit, a Press Conference will be held on Wednesday, February 16, 11:45 - 12:30 at the ESO Headquarters Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2 D-85748 Garching bei Munchen. Please note that participation in this Press Conference is by invitation only. Media representatives may obtain invitations from Mrs. E. Volk, ESO Information Service at this address (Tel.: +49-89-32006276; Fax.: +49-89-3202362), until Friday, February 11, 1994. After the Press Conference, between 12:30 - 14:00, a light refreshment will be served at the ESO Headquarters to all participants. >From 14:00 - 15:30, the astronauts will meet with students and teachers from the many scientific institutes in Garching in the course of an open presentation at the large lecture hall of the Physics Department of the Technical University. It is a 10 minute walk from ESO to the hall. Later the same day, the astronauts will be back at ESO for a private discussion of various space astronomy issues with their astronomer colleagues, many of whom are users of the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as ground-based telescopes at the ESO La Silla Observatory and elsewhere. The astronauts continue to Switzerland in the evening.

  2. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2013. It was held on Apr.24-26, 2013 Hotel Hyundai Mokpo in Mokpo, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2013. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Radiation protection1, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 2.

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the summer meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: responsibility for nonfuel component disposal; state experiences in facility licensing; and volume projections

  4. The Intersection of NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach and Higher Education: A Special Interest Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Smith, D.; Schultz, G.; Bianchi, L.; Blair, W.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents highlights from a group discussion on how the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (EPO) community could better support undergraduate astronomy education through EPO products and resources - current and future - targeted at the college level. The discussion was organized by the SMD Astrophysics EPO Forum through a Special Interest Group Meeting at the 2010 ASP Annual Meeting in Boulder. Our session took advantage of the simultaneous presence of EPO professionals and the Cosmos in the Classroom participants to seek out diverse perspectives on and experiences in higher education.

  5. Radiation protection in the 2000s - Theory and practice. Nordic Society for Radiation Protection. Proceedings of the XIII ordinary meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paile, W.

    2003-06-01

    The XIII ordinary meeting of the Nordic Society for Radiation Protection (NSFS) was held on August 25-29, 2002 in Turku (Aabo), Finland. The main topics included: protection of the environment, information and ethics, natural radiation, reactor safety and waste management, emergency preparedness, medical use of radiation, radiation in industrial use, education and certification, radiation biology and epidemiology, and radioecology and monitoring. The proceedings of the meeting includes all the papers of the oral presentations as well as the poster presentations. Papers presenting scientific results have been subject to a referee process with evaluation of independent experts

  6. An Overview of NASA's Risk of Cardiovascular Disease from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Huff, Janice L.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The association between high doses of radiation exposure and cardiovascular damage is well established. Patients that have undergone radiotherapy for primary cancers of the head and neck and mediastinal regions have shown increased risk of heart and vascular damage and long-term development of radiation-induced heart disease [1]. In addition, recent meta-analyses of epidemiological data from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers has also shown that acute and chronic radiation exposures is strongly correlated with an increased risk of circulatory disease at doses above 0.5 Sv [2]. However, these analyses are confounded for lower doses by lifestyle factors, such as drinking, smoking, and obesity. The types of radiation found in the space environment are significantly more damaging than those found on Earth and include galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs), and trapped protons and electrons. In addition to the low-LET data, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on atherosclerosis, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Understanding the qualitative differences in biological responses produced by GCR compared to Earth-based radiation is a major focus of space radiation research and is imperative for accurate risk assessment for long duration space missions. Other knowledge gaps for the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease include the existence of a dose threshold, low dose rate effects, and potential synergies with other spaceflight stressors. The Space Radiation Program Element within NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is managing the research and risk mitigation strategies for these knowledge gaps. In this presentation, we will review the evidence and present an overview of the HRP Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure.

  7. Radiation Practices. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2005-06-01

    A total of 1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2004. There were 1924 responsible parties engaged in licence-exempt dental X-ray practices, made notifiable to STUK. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was carried out through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of a Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted to support the regulatory control. In 2004, STUK conducted 438 inspections of licensed practices and 38 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices. Restrictions were imposed on the use of five appliances. Repairs were ordered in 150 inspections and recommended in 85 inspections. No remarks were given in 229 inspections. A total of 11 082 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2004. 135 000 dose entries were made in the register maintained by STUK. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation concentrated on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. At the end of 2004, 55 workplaces including a total of 74 work areas were subject to radon monitoring. A total of 2540 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation focused particularly on mobile phones and sunbeds. Radiation safety assessments were also made for public broadcasting equipment, radars, 'artificial sun' aboard a cruise liner, UVC bactericide lamps in a bakery and show laser lights. A recommendation on radiation safety for sunbeds was prepared in association with other Nordic countries. Most research and development work was done in jointly financed research projects and

  8. Radiation practices. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. (ed.)

    2012-09-15

    1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2011. 1702 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 575 inspections of licensed practices in 2011. 633 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 11 700 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2011 and about 143 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 166 workplaces including a total of 288 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2011. Just over 3600 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK was involved in four ionizing radiation research projects, and also took part in an international expert group evaluation of STUK research activities. New alpha and beta sources were procured for metrological activities and a Co-60 irradiation device procured in 2010 was installed and taken into use. Calibration and testing services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2011 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Orders were issued to 5 responsible parties to discontinue the use of tattoo removal lasers. 7 sunbed facilities were inspected and 10 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Five mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. Non-ionizing radiation research activities were also subjected to the evaluation of STUK research activities

  9. Radiation practices. Annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2009-09-01

    1775 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2008. 1831 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. STUK conducted 424 inspections of licensed practices and 18 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices in 2008. 209 repair orders and recommendations were issued. Use of one appliance was prohibited. A total of just over 11 500 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2008, and about 140 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 89 workplaces including a total of 201 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2008. Some 3700 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2008 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Ten mobile phone types and five baby monitors were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. 25 sunbed facilities were inspected and nine laser display inspections were performed. There were 22 abnormal incidents involving the use of radiation in 2008. Seventeen of these incidents concerned the use of radiation in industry, research or transportation, four concerned the use of radiation in health care, and one concerned the use of non-ionizing radiation. None of these incidents had serious consequences. (orig.)

  10. NASA Informal Education: Final Report. A Descriptive Analysis of NASA's Informal Education Portfolio: Preliminary Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulf Fountain, Alyssa; Levy, Abigail Jurist

    2010-01-01

    This report was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA), Office of Education in July 2009 to evaluate the Informal Education Program. The goals of the evaluation were twofold: (1) to gain insight into its investment in informal education; and (2) to clarify existing distinctions between its informal education…

  11. 76 FR 20717 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and... Center), and must state that they are attending the Audit, Finance, and Analysis Committee meeting in...

  12. 77 FR 9705 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ...., local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546, Room 5H45-A. FOR... Headquarters building (West Lobby--Visitor Control Center), and must state that they are attending the NASA... address, citizenship, company affiliation (if applicable) to include address, telephone number, and their...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.245-73 - Financial reporting of NASA property in the custody of contractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Financial reporting of NASA... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.245-73 Financial reporting of NASA property in the custody of contractors. As prescribed in 1845.106-70(d), insert the following clause: Financial Reporting...

  14. 78 FR 41804 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... following information no less than 10 working days prior to the meeting: Full name; gender; date/place of... meeting includes briefings on the following topics: Finance Update Strategy, Performance, Budget Update... affiliation 3 working days prior to the meeting to Angela Herring at (202) 358-1698 or fax (202) 358- 4336...

  15. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2011. It was held on Nov.17-18, 2011 the ocean resort in Yeosu, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2011. This proceedings is comprised of 14 sessions.

  16. Proceedings of the Nordic society for radiation protection 12. ordinary meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The key themes of teh 12th ordinary general meeting of the Nordic Society for Radiation Protection were: RADIATION - ENVIRONMENT - INFORMATION. A number of outstanding international experts accepted to contribute on the meetings first day with invited presentations, which focussed on these themes...

  17. Smoke, Clouds and Radiation Brazil NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SCARB_ER2_MAS data are Smoke, Clouds and Radiation Brazil (SCARB) NASA ER2 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS)...

  18. Radiation practices. Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2010-08-01

    1 742 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2009. 1 820 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 414 inspections of licensed practices in 2009. 392 repair orders and recommendations were issued. A total of nearly 11 600 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2009. Just under 160 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 108 workplaces including a total of 219 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2009. 3655 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK took part in three major ionizing radiation research projects. An IAEA research project tested IAEA/WHO diagnostic dosimetry guidelines. The accuracy and reliability of internal and external radiotherapy dosimetric methods in modern radiotherapy technology was studied as part of a European metrology research programme. In metrological activities the calibration procedure for radiotherapy accelerator electron beam dosemeters was modified by changing from meter calibration in hospitals to laboratory calibration. Some irradiation appliances were also replaced. Calibration services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2009 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Fifteen mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. 19 sunbed facilities were inspected and ten laser display inspections were

  19. Radiation practices. Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    1760 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2010. 1789 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 384 inspections of licensed practices in 2010. 447 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 12 100 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2010. Just under 160 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 140 workplaces including a total of 348 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2010. 3428 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK took part in three major ionizing radiation research projects. An IAEA research project tested diagnostic dosimetry guidelines. The accuracy and reliability of internal and external radiotherapy dosimetric methods in modern radiotherapy technology were studied as part of a European metrology research programme. In metrological activities the dosemeter calibration procedure for radiotherapy accelerator electron beams was modified by changing from meter calibrations in hospitals to laboratory calibrations. Some irradiation appliances were also replaced. Calibration services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2010 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. 16 sunbed facilities were inspected and 8 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Ten mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of

  20. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues

  1. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  2. Meeting report--Imaging the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Violaine; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Poujol, Christel; Sagot, Isabelle; Saltel, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Every two years, the French Society for Cell Biology (SBCF) organises an international meeting called 'Imaging the Cell'. This year, the 8th edition was held on 24-26 June 2015 at University of Bordeaux Campus Victoire in the city of Bordeaux, France, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Over the course of three days, the meeting provided a forum for experts in different areas of cell imaging. Its unique approach was to combine conventional oral presentations during morning sessions with practical workshops at hosting institutes and the Bordeaux Imaging Center during the afternoons. The meeting, co-organised by Violaine Moreau and Frédéric Saltel (both INSERM U1053, Bordeaux, France), Christel Poujol and Fabrice Cordelières (both Bordeaux Imaging Center, Bordeaux, France) and Isabelle Sagot (Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, Bordeaux, France), brought together about 120 scientists including 16 outstanding speakers to discuss the latest advances in cell imaging. Thanks to recent progress in imaging technologies, cell biologists are now able to visualise, follow and manipulate cellular processes with unprecedented accuracy. The meeting sessions and workshops highlighted some of the most exciting developments in the field, with sessions dedicated to optogenetics, high-content screening, in vivo and live-cell imaging, correlative light and electron microscopy, as well as super-resolution imaging. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Radiation Practices. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2006-06-01

    1764 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2005. 1907 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was performed through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. STUK conducted 458 inspections of licensed practices and 62 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices in 2005. 273 remedial orders and recommendations were issued. Use of one appliance was prohibited. A total of 11 698 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2005. 137 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 90 workplaces including a total of 233 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2005. 2600 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2005 continued to focus particularly on mobile phones and sunbeds. 15 mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of mobile phones. A total of 44 sunbed appliances were inspected at 36 sunbed facilities. Most research and development work took place within jointly financed research projects. This work focused especially on developing testing and measuring methods for determining exposure to electromagnetic fields caused by mobile phones and their base stations. There were 13 abnormal incidents involving the use of radiation in 2005. Eight of these incidents concerned

  4. The 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Bland, J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    For the 39th consecutive year, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama in Huntsville. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The nominal starting and finishing dates for the 10-week program were May 27 through August 1, 2003. The primary objectives of the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program are to: (1) Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to NASA s research objectives; (2) provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; (3) involve students in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA s strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; (4) enhance faculty pedagogy and facilitate interdisciplinary networking; (5) encourage collaborative research and technology transfer with other Government agencies and the private sector; and (6) establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of this program.

  5. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting

  6. Radiation quantities, units and measurements. Final report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Allisy, A.; Caswell, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of human exposure to radiation and radioactivity, whether arising from environmental exposures, medical practice or industrial activities, requires a fundamental set of quantities and units with which exposures can be specified and the means and ability to make measurements which yield results in terms of these quantities and units. Radiation protection then, as well as effective use of radiation in medical applications, requires the capability to accurately quantify the characteristics and extent of radiation exposure, so that appropriate and useful assessments of the potential health consequences and risks, whether for protection of the public and workers or for diagnosis and treatment of disease, can be formulated. The work carried out via this concerted action on ''Radiation quantities, units and measurements'' has addressed these needs. Measurement of radiation is a complex subject and is a science in itself. Yet many users of radiation who need to make radiation measurements cannot be expected to become experts in this particular field. They need authoritative guidance on how to deal with the measurement problems connected with their particular use of radiation. The work carried out pursuant to this concerted action has resulted in publications that meet this need. Important achievements include the publication of seven new ICRU reports, the completion of all but the printing of three other ICRU reports, completion of the drafting work on two other reports, the development of many others reports and the initiation of seven new activities that will result in ICRU reports representing important future contribution to the needs identified in this project. (orig.)

  7. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  8. 78 FR 20359 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... ethics briefing. DATES: Thursday, April 18, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA... information (number, country, expiration date); employer/affiliation information (name of institution, address...

  9. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ..., technology transfer and licensing activities within NASA, the private sector, and other government agencies...: full name; gender; date/ place of birth; citizenship; visa/green card information (number, type...

  10. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  11. Meeting report: A young person's guide to the planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Andrew

    2004-02-01

    The UK Planetary Forum's Young Person's Planetary Meeting was a chance for young researchers to meet, speak and discuss their research with others from across the UK and to build new research contacts. The one-day symposium was organized by the UKPF with support from the RAS. Andrew Ball, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg and Tom Stallard report.

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Dianne [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  13. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, D.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  14. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2012. It was held on Nov. 28-30, 2012 Phoenix Island in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2012. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 3, Radiation protection 3.

  15. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2013. It was held on Nov.20-22, 2013 Ramada Plaza Hotel in Suwon, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2013. This proceedings is comprised of 7 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Radiation protection1, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 2, Radiation protection 3.

  16. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2014. It was held on Apr.23-25, 2014 Grand Hotel in Busan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 3, Radiation protection 3.

  17. NASA Taxonomies for Searching Problem Reports and FMEAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Throop, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Many types of hazard and risk analyses are used during the life cycle of complex systems, including Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Hazard Analysis, Fault Tree and Event Tree Analysis, Probabilistic Risk Assessment, Reliability Analysis and analysis of Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) databases. The success of these methods depends on the availability of input data and the analysts knowledge. Standard nomenclature can increase the reusability of hazard, risk and problem data. When nomenclature in the source texts is not standard, taxonomies with mapping words (sets of rough synonyms) can be combined with semantic search to identify items and tag them with metadata based on a rich standard nomenclature. Semantic search uses word meanings in the context of parsed phrases to find matches. The NASA taxonomies provide the word meanings. Spacecraft taxonomies and ontologies (generalization hierarchies with attributes and relationships, based on terms meanings) are being developed for types of subsystems, functions, entities, hazards and failures. The ontologies are broad and general, covering hardware, software and human systems. Semantic search of Space Station texts was used to validate and extend the taxonomies. The taxonomies have also been used to extract system connectivity (interaction) models and functions from requirements text. Now the Reconciler semantic search tool and the taxonomies are being applied to improve search in the Space Shuttle PRACA database, to discover recurring patterns of failure. Usual methods of string search and keyword search fall short because the entries are terse and have numerous shortcuts (irregular abbreviations, nonstandard acronyms, cryptic codes) and modifier words cannot be used in sentence context to refine the search. The limited and fixed FMEA categories associated with the entries do not make the fine distinctions needed in the search. The approach assigns PRACA report titles to problem classes in

  18. A report on NASA software engineering and Ada training requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn B.; Svabek, L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's software engineering and Ada skill base are assessed and information that may result in new models for software engineering, Ada training plans, and curricula are provided. A quantitative assessment which reflects the requirements for software engineering and Ada training across NASA is provided. A recommended implementation plan including a suggested curriculum with associated duration per course and suggested means of delivery is also provided. The distinction between education and training is made. Although it was directed to focus on NASA's need for the latter, the key relationships to software engineering education are also identified. A rationale and strategy for implementing a life cycle education and training program are detailed in support of improved software engineering practices and the transition to Ada.

  19. Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality. Second Panel Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    If a living system is exposed to ionizing radiation a sequence of events follows. It starts with the absorption and dissipation of radiation energy, and continues through various physico-chemical and biochemical reactions up to the final biological end point observed. One of the aims of research in quantitative radiation biology is to understand the mechanism of this sequence of actions and to explore the differences in quality of different kinds of radiations. Because of its complexity, progress in this work requires the combined efforts of physicists, biochemists, biologists and physicians. It should, however, be done in very close collaboration rather than in following isolated lines in any one direction. For this reason, and because of the growing importance of the field for almost all applications of ionizing radiations, it was felt desirable to bring together a group of scientists engaged in research on radiation quality who represented a wide range of interests. The first panel on Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality, convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna and held from 29 March to 2 April 1965, proved to be a successful beginning, stimulating a useful exchange of ideas and information. By this meeting, and the resulting collection of papers, published in 1966 as No. 58 of the Agency's Technical Reports Series, the importance of research on radiation quality was highlighted and the field itself became more clearly defined. The Agency held a second Panel on the same subject in Vienna from 14 to 18 April 1967. This meeting was attended by 18 experts from 10 countries, and representatives from Euratom and WHO. The Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, France, India and Poland were represented for the first time. Fourteen papers were presented and discussed in some detail. It became evident that much progress had been made since the previous meeting in certain areas such as microdosimetry, the dependence of the oxygen effect on radiation

  20. Assessment of the international meeting of radiation protection professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Cabanekova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The conclusions from and main agenda of the conference are summarized. The conference was divided into 8 sections, dealing with biological effects of ionizing radiation, general aspects of radiation protection, dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation, radiation protection problems in nuclear power plants, management of nuclear radiation emergencies, radiation load of patients and staff during medical applications of ionizing radiation (radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology), control of exposure to radiation from natural sources in the environment and at workplaces, and education in radiation protection. The programme included round-table discussions devoted to the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, optimization of the radiation load of children in radiology, and recent advances in the radon risk countermeasures area. (orig.)

  1. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared H.; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of risk factors for long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration: therefore it is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) is one of the major risk factors factor that will impact health of astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low dose, low dose rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The GeneLab project (genelab.nasa.gov) aims to provide a detailed library of Omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) currently includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information for ground-based studies, we are in the process of adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight missions. GeneLab is the first comprehensive Omics database for space related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. In addition to previously acquired data, the GLDS is continually expanding as Omics related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of space radiation related data available at GeneLab.

  2. 2007 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    This year's Annual Nuclear Technology Conference (JK) organized by the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. (KTG) was held in Karlsruhe on May 22-24. The attendance of more than 1,200 persons from 21 nations, and the increase in participation over the past few years, underline the role of this specialized congress as one of the leading international events in the field of the peaceful uses of nuclear power. The first day of the conference, with its plenary presentations, traditionally focused mainly on political and economic problems of the use of nuclear power. The situation of nuclear power in the United Kingdom, the key country of this year's meeting, was covered in depth. As usual, the program of the three-day event was organized as follows: plenary sessions on the first day were followed by topical sessions, technical sessions, and special events on the other days. This year, the conference featured a record program of 251 papers presented at these sessions. The 'Nuclear Power Campus' was arranged very successfully for the 5th time as an event comprising lectures and a 'hands-on' exhibition explaining the world of nuclear power in a transparent way to students from schools and universities. The special commitment to young scientists and to the preservation of competence in the nuclear field were emphasized at the JK 2007, among other things, in a workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'. Nearly 20 young scientists presented results of their scientific work. The Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology was accompanied by a specialized exhibition with meeting points of industry organized by 33 manufacturers, vendors, and service companies. (orig.)

  3. Desktop Access to Full-Text NACA and NASA Reports: Systems Developed by NASA Langley Technical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambur, Manjula Y.; Adams, David L.; Trinidad, P. Paul

    1997-01-01

    NASA Langley Technical Library has been involved in developing systems for full-text information delivery of NACA/NASA technical reports since 1991. This paper will describe the two prototypes it has developed and the present production system configuration. The prototype systems are a NACA CD-ROM of thirty-three classic paper NACA reports and a network-based Full-text Electronic Reports Documents System (FEDS) constructed from both paper and electronic formats of NACA and NASA reports. The production system is the DigiDoc System (DIGItal Documents) presently being developed based on the experiences gained from the two prototypes. DigiDoc configuration integrates the on-line catalog database World Wide Web interface and PDF technology to provide a powerful and flexible search and retrieval system. It describes in detail significant achievements and lessons learned in terms of data conversion, storage technologies, full-text searching and retrieval, and image databases. The conclusions from the experiences of digitization and full- text access and future plans for DigiDoc system implementation are discussed.

  4. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  5. Meeting report for mobile DNA 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaconas, George; Craig, Nancy; Curcio, M Joan; Deininger, Prescott; Feschotte, Cedric; Levin, Henry; Rice, Phoebe A; Voytas, Daniel F

    2010-08-24

    An international conference on mobile DNA was held 24-28 April 2010 in Montreal, Canada. Sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology, the conference's goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew over 190 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations, invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts. The talks were organized into eight scientific sessions, which ranged in topic from the evolutionary dynamics of mobile genetic elements to transposition reaction mechanisms. Here we present highlights from the platform sessions with a focus on talks presented by the invited speakers.

  6. Meeting Report for Mobile DNA 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaconas George

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An international conference on mobile DNA was held 24-28 April 2010 in Montreal, Canada. Sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology, the conference's goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew over 190 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations, invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts. The talks were organized into eight scientific sessions, which ranged in topic from the evolutionary dynamics of mobile genetic elements to transposition reaction mechanisms. Here we present highlights from the platform sessions with a focus on talks presented by the invited speakers.

  7. Status of industrial scale radiation treatment of wastewater and its future. Proceedings of a consultants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    Providing access to clean water resources is one of the most important objectives of the UN's Millennium Project. Contamination of surface water is a big problem for many, mostly developing countries. The main sources of liquid polluted effluents are municipalities and industry. Effective, mostly biological wastewater technologies for wastewater purification are available nowadays. However, they cannot be applied to solve all existing problems. Destruction of non-biodegradable organic compounds is one problem and biological contamination (caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, etc.) of sludge is another. Methods of their purification are sought. Ionizing radiation (gamma or X rays, electron beams) is a very effective form of energy, which can destroy organic or biological contaminants. The IAEA promotes and supports research on radiation treatment of liquid effluents. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Remediation of Polluted Waters and Wastewater by Radiation Processing aims to establish optimal treatment methodologies to disinfect and decontaminate actual samples of drinking water and wastewater by using ionizing radiation. Quite a few technical cooperation (TC) projects concerning radiation treatment of wastewater and sludge are under development. In the frame of one of such TC projects pilot plant for electron beam treatment of textile dyeing complex wastewater was constructed in the Republic of Korea. To discuss developments achieved under these projects and results of the pilot plant operation, the IAEA organized a consultants meeting in Daejon, Republic of Korea, 13-16 October 2003. These proceedings will be of value to research groups working in the field of radiation technology development. Developing Member States with radiation technology programmes will benefit from research in this area. The meeting dealt with advanced radiation processing of wastewater and its technical and economical aspects. It informed about high power accelerators ELV-12

  8. 77 FR 67028 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The agenda topics for the meeting will include: Information Technology--The Effects... Center Chandra/X-Ray Astronomy Mobile Applications Wide Area Networks The meeting will be open to the....S. visa information to include type, number, and expiration date, U.S. Social Security Number (if...

  9. 78 FR 20358 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... 10 working days prior to the meeting: full name; gender; date/place of birth; citizenship; visa... --Heliophysics Strategic Objectives and Performance Goals Science Mission Directorate Science Plan --Heliophysics... working days prior to the meeting to Marian Norris. Patricia D. Rausch, Advisory Committee Management...

  10. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  11. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. NASA Thesaurus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Thesaurus contains the authorized NASA subject terms used to index and retrieve materials in the NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) and the NTRS...

  13. ERDIT (European Radiation Detection and Imaging Technologies) Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    https://espace.cern.ch/hostel-service/Lists/Hotels/AllItems.aspx Visitor Cards together with the locations of the canteen and meeting rooms can be collected at Entrance A, Building 33 (Main Reception) situated in front of the Tram Terminal. Please ask for the "ERDIT Meeting". A CERN map with the relevant ERDIT meeting locations is here:

  14. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  15. Radiation Protection Institute - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to provide the scientific and technical support for executing the operational functions of the Radiation Protection Board. The operational activities of the Institute are listed. Also included in the report are the various research projects, training programmes and publications for the year 2015.

  16. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer. A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes key findings and outcomes from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning meeting, held on October 28-29, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

  18. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. List of publications, committee memberships andstaff members are included....

  19. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  20. 76 FR 5380 - Advisory Committees; Filing of Closed Meeting Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ...] Advisory Committees; Filing of Closed Meeting Reports AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Advisory Committee Act, the Agency has filed with the Library of Congress the annual reports of those FDA...), FDA has filed with the Library of Congress the annual reports for the following FDA advisory...

  1. 76 FR 41825 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... following information no less than 10 working days prior to the meeting: full name; gender; date/place of..., country, telephone); title/ position of attendee; home address; driver's license number and state of issue...

  2. 75 FR 33838 - NASA Advisory Council; Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ...: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as...: Millennium Harvest House, 1345 28th Street, Boulder, Colorado 80302 (room will be posted in hotel lobby). FOR...

  3. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and... building (West Lobby-- Visitor Control Center), and must state that they are attending the Audit, Finance...

  4. NASA Physical Sciences - Presentation to Annual Two Phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis; Motil, Brian; McQuillen, John

    2014-01-01

    The Two-phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team consists of researchers and members from various space agencies including ESA, JAXA, CSA, and RSA. This presentation included descriptions various fluid experiments either being conducted by or planned by NASA for the International Space Station in the areas of two-phase flow, flow boiling, capillary flow, and crygenic fluid storage.

  5. 77 FR 22807 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... meeting number on May 9th is 995 739 151, password [email protected] The agenda for the meeting includes the..., May 8, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Local Time... will also be available telephonically and by WebEx. Any interested person may call the USA toll free...

  6. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F; Sisworo, E L; Maha, M; Ismachin, M; Hilmy, N; Sumatra, M; Mugiono,; Wandowo,; Soebianto, Y S [Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  7. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  8. SMD Technology Development Story for NASA Annual Technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community-including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys-and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions-Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics-develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation-e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  9. Systems Analysis of NASA Aviation Safety Program: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon M.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Evans, Joni K.; Barr, Lawrence; Leone, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A three-month study (February to April 2010) of the NASA Aviation Safety (AvSafe) program was conducted. This study comprised three components: (1) a statistical analysis of currently available civilian subsonic aircraft data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) system to identify any significant or overlooked aviation safety issues; (2) a high-level qualitative identification of future safety risks, with an assessment of the potential impact of the NASA AvSafe research on the National Airspace System (NAS) based on these risks; and (3) a detailed, top-down analysis of the NASA AvSafe program using an established and peer-reviewed systems analysis methodology. The statistical analysis identified the top aviation "tall poles" based on NTSB accident and FAA incident data from 1997 to 2006. A separate examination of medical helicopter accidents in the United States was also conducted. Multiple external sources were used to develop a compilation of ten "tall poles" in future safety issues/risks. The top-down analysis of the AvSafe was conducted by using a modification of the Gibson methodology. Of the 17 challenging safety issues that were identified, 11 were directly addressed by the AvSafe program research portfolio.

  10. Eighth meeting of the radiation protection-skilled persons - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhel, Thierry; Lahaye, Thierry; Rousse, Carole; Perrin, Marie-Line; Billarand, Yann; Scanff, Pascale; Celier, David; El Jammal, Marie-Helene; Jacob, Sophie; Vecchiola, Sophie; Bulla, Giuseppina; Guillalmon, Christophe; Mechin, Guillaume; Guersen, Joel; Blaise, Philipp; Ammerich, Marc; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Sevestre, Bernard; Massiot, Philippe; Michel, Xavier; Raffoux, Yann; Kernisant, Billy; Lefaure, Christian; Balduyck, Sebastien; Wassilieff, Serge; Ouabdelkader, Said; Lecu, Alexis; Roy, Catherine; Pigree, Gilbert; Barbey, Pierre; Bergeron, Christophe; Schieber, Caroline

    2012-12-01

    This eighth meeting of the radiation protection skilled persons celebrated the 15. anniversary of this type of meetings. It is the occasion for radiation protection specialists to share information and their experience on various topics, in particular the recent evolutions of the regulation. This document gathers the available presentations given during this conference: 1 - Opening talk (T. Juhel); 2 - Regulatory evolutions in the domain of protection of workers exposed to ionising radiations (T. Lahaye); 3 - Evolution of the regulatory documents on the basis of the French public health law (C. Rousse); 4 - Relations between IRSN and Companies - regulatory obligations from the perspective of the radiation protection-skilled person (Y. Billarand); 5 - IRSN's follow up of workers' exposure (P. Scanff); 6 - Contribution of a 18 F preparation and injection system to the radiation protection of workers (D. Celier); 7 - Workplace analysis in interventional radiology (G. Bulla, C. Guillalmon); 8 - Interest of Workplace analyses in risk information (G. Mechin); 9 - Running of a joint operators/contractors club of radiation protection skilled persons at the scale of a CEA centre (P. Blaise); 10 - Radiological exposure of the maintenance personnel of aerial monitoring radars (X. Michel); 11 - The IRSN barometer (M.H. El Jammal); 12 - An original network of professional radiation protection: the GoogleGroup for dental radiation protection-skilled persons (Y. Raffoux); 13 - Cirkus radiation protection association - a portal for a practical and operational radiation protection (B. Kernisant); 14 - Situation of networks - what do we do in a network? What is the role of the national coordination? (S. Balduyck, C. Lefaure); 15 - Update on the situation at Fukushima (M. Ammerich); 15 - Radio-induced cataracts: why lowering the eye lens legal limit? (S. Wassilieff); 16 - O'CLOC study - Radio-induced cataracts among interventional Cardiologists (S. Jacob); 17 - Photon dosimetry of

  11. European Society for Radiation Biology 21. annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The volume contains about 100 abstracts of lectures presented to the conference covering a large variety of topics like: Radiobiology as a base for radiotherapy, radiation carcinogenesis and cellular effects, late and secondary effects of radiotherapy, radioprotection and radiosensitization, heavy ions in radiobiology and space research, microdosimetry and biological dosimetry, radiation effects on the mature and the developing central nervous system, DNA damage and repair and cellular mutations, the imact of radiation on the environment, free radicals in radiation biology

  12. Public meeting on radiation safety for industrial radiographerss: remarks, questions and answers at five NRC regional meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    Over the past several years thenumber of radiation overexposures experienced in the radiography industry has been higher than for any other single group of NRC licensees. To inform radiography licensees of NRC's concern fo these recurring overexposure incidents, NRC staff representatives met with licensees in a series of five regional meetings. At these meetings the staff presented prepared remarks and answered questions on NRC regulations and operations. The main purposes of the meetings were to express NRC's concern for the high incidence of overexposures, and to open a line of communication between the NRC and radiography licensees in an effort to achieve the common goal of improved radiation safety. The remarks presented by the staff and subjects discussed at these meetings included: the purpose, scope, findings and goals of the NRC inspection program; ways and means of incorporating safety into radiography operations; and case histories of overexposure incidents, with highlights of the causes and possible preventions. At each of the regional meetings the staff received a request for a copy of the prepared remarks and a consolidation of the questions and answers that were discussed. This document includes that information, and a copy is being provided to each organizaion or firm attending the regional meetings. Requests for other copies should be made in accordance with the directions printed inside the front cover of this document

  13. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences.

  14. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences

  15. NASA flight controllers - Meeting cultural and leadership challenges on the critical path to mission success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L., Jr.; Ritsher, Jennifer Boyd

    2006-01-01

    As part of its preparation for missions to the Moon and Mars, NASA has identified high priority critical path roadmap (CPR) questions, two of which focus on the performance of mission control personnel. NASA flight controllers have always worked in an incredibly demanding setting, but the International Space Station poses even more challenges than prior missions. We surveyed 14 senior ISS flight controllers and a contrasting sample of 12 more junior controllers about the management and cultural challenges they face and the most effective strategies for addressing them. There was substantial consensus among participants on some issues, such as the importance of building a personal relationship with Russian colleagues. Responses from junior and senior controllers differed in some areas, such as training. We frame the results in terms of two CPR questions. We aim to use our results to improve flight controller training.

  16. 21 CFR 1002.20 - Reporting of accidental radiation occurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Accidental Radiation Occurrence Reports (HFZ-240), Office of Communication, Education, and Radiation Programs, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850, and the reports and their envelopes shall be distinctly...

  17. NASA Dryden Status: Aerospace Control and Guidance Sub-Committee Meeting 109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Dryden has been engaging in some exciting work that will enable lighter weight and more fuel efficient vehicles through advanced control and dynamics technologies. The main areas of emphasis are Enabling Light-weight Flexible Structures, real time control surface optimization for fuel efficiency and autonomous formation flight. This presentation provides a description of the current and upcoming work in these areas. Additionally, status is for the Dreamchaser pilot training activity and KQ-X autonomous aerial refueling.

  18. Rulison: radiation contamination clearance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Under contract with Austral Oil Company, Eberline Instrument Corporation provided supervision and technicians to radiologically support the well plugging and site abandonment activities at the Project Rulison site during the period September 1, 1976 through October 12, 1976. The purpose of the support was to identify and prepare for removal of all radioactively contaminated materials remaining on site. The emplacement and reentry wells were successfully plugged without a serious radiological incident. There was no measurable radiation exposure above natural background to participating personnel. Decontamination and monitoring procedures assured that no equipment or material was improperly released to unrestricted use. A review of the history of project operations, the conduct of comprehensive sampling programs, and an extensive final survey, ensures that the extent of radioactivity on the site is identified and that such activity is well below established guide lines. Except for appropriate restrictions regarding deep drilling, the radiological condition of the Project Rulison site permits its return to unrestricted use

  19. Proceedings of Scientific Meeting on Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmy, Nazly; Ismachin, Moch; Suhadi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Proceedings of Scientific Meeting On Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology has been presented On Nopember 6-7, 2000 this activity that was held by Centre for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technolgy. The Scientific meeting is an information exchange facility among Researcher Industrialist for using isotope Technology in Industry Environment, Health, Agriculture and Farming. The proceedings Consist of 3 articles from keynotes speaker and 54 articles from BATAN participants as well outside. The articles is indexing separately

  20. Ames Infusion Stories for NASA Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Jan, Darrell Leslie; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    These are short (2-page) high-level summaries of technologies that have been infused - i.e., taken the next level. For example, 3DMAT started off as a Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project and graduated to the Game-changing Program (GCD), where it is being prepared for use in Orion. The Nano Entry System similarly started as CIF and graduated to GCD. The High Tortuosity Carbon Dioxide Conversion Device also started off as CIF and then received an award for further development from the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts program (NIAC).

  1. Organisation of radiation protection at Sizewell Nuclear Power Plant in the UK. Report n. 290

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouail, P.; Jeannin, B.; Lefaure, C.; Panisset, L.

    2004-01-01

    This report first describes the organisation and management of radiation protection at Sizewell Nuclear Power Plant (UK): general organisation, organisation of the radiation protection department, goals of radiation protection at plant and corporate levels, measurement of radiation protection performance, presence of health physicists in the plant, national and international comparisons. Then, it addresses the training of workers and radiation protection specialists with respect to radiation protection, the management of zoning and surveillance (action to address the radiation risk and the contamination risk). It describes the relationships of Health physicists with contractors and other workers teams, and the relationships with safety authorities. It indicates the different outages of this organisation: general planning, information sheets, physicists work planning, reviews and meetings. It describes the management of personal dosimetry with radiation work permits and actions aimed at the reduction of doses during various operations. The last part proposes a feedback experience report and evokes the generated database, and addresses events reporting

  2. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experiments Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry. NAPEX XXI took place in El Segundo, California on June 11-12, 1997 and consisted of three sessions. Session 1, entitled "ACTS Propagation Study Results & Outcome " covered the results of 20 station-years of Ka-band radio-wave propagation experiments. Session 11, 'Ka-band Propagation Studies and Models,' provided the latest developments in modeling, and analysis of experimental results about radio wave propagation phenomena for design of Ka-band satellite communications systems. Session 111, 'Propagation Research Topics,' covered a diverse range of propagation topics of interest to the space community, including overviews of handbooks and databases on radio wave propagation. The ACTS Propagation Studies miniworkshop was held on June 13, 1997 and consisted of a technical session in the morning and a plenary session in the afternoon. The morning session covered updates on the status of the ACTS Project & Propagation Program, engineering support for ACTS Propagation Terminals, and the Data Center. The plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  3. Chernobyl'-92. Reports of the 3. All-Union scientific and technical meeting on results of accident effect elimination at the Chernobyl' NPP. V. 1. Radiation monitoring. Migration of radionuclides in environment. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    Section Radiation monitoring comprises: atlas of area radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl' NPP accident, state of automated radiation monitoring control system, hydrological monitoring, radiation situation in different areas, problems of radiation monitoring and protection of water objects, methods for determining radionuclidescontents, radiochemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration mobility in the Chernobyl' effluents, the results of investigations into migration of radionuclides in soils, landscapes, bottom depositions, in the soil-plant chain

  4. Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  5. Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  6. Eighth annual occupational radiation exposure report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1976-10-01

    This is a report by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the operation of the Commission's centralized repository of personnel occupational radiation exposure information. Annual reports were received from 387 covered licensees indicating that some 78,713 individuals, having an average exposure of 0.36 rems, were monitored for exposure to radiation during 1975 and that 21,601 individuals terminated their employment or work assignment with covered licensees in 1975. The number of personnel overexposures reported in 1975 decreased from previous years. The most significant overexposures which occurred in 1975 are summarized

  7. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  8. 75 FR 15742 - NASA Advisory Council; Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as... Friday, April 16, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (times are EDT). ADDRESSES: Boston Marriott Cambridge Hotel; Two Cambridge Center, 50 Broadway; Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142; (617) 494-6600. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  9. 76 FR 4380 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ..., Office of the Chief Financial Officer. (OCFO), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters... meeting includes the following topics: Review of FY2010 Financial Statement Audit and Roadmap to Unqualified Opinion in FY 2011. Chief Financial Officer Update and Review of OCFO Responsibilities. Financial...

  10. 75 FR 33837 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... than 10 working days prior to the meeting: Full name; gender; date/ place of birth; citizenship; visa... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Ethics Briefing --Government Performance and Results Act... information 3 working days in advance by contacting Marian Norris via e-mail at [email protected] or by...

  11. 78 FR 49297 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... -- Heliophysics Science Performance Assessment -- Heliophysics Roadmap for Science and Technology 2013-2033 Status... addition to providing the following information no less than 10 working days prior to the meeting: full name; gender; date/place of birth; citizenship; visa information (number, type, expiration date...

  12. 78 FR 56246 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... topics: --Planetary Science Division Update --Mars Exploration Program Update --Government Performance... to providing the following information no less than 10 working days prior to the meeting: full name; gender; date/place of birth; citizenship; visa information (number, type, expiration date); passport...

  13. Report on radiation protection in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragan, K.; Svilicic, N.; Novakovic, M.; Franic, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in the Republic of Croatia is in charge of radiation protection, and the new Ionizing Radiation Protection Act defines the responsibilities of the different organizations and institutions. The report explains the existing national system of notification and registration in Croatia and some of the main provisions of the above referred Act. Reference is made to the national provisions for the management of disused sources, recovery or control of orphan sources, and to the national inventory of radiation sources in the country with the data collected during 1998 and 1999. (author)

  14. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  15. Report upon inquiry into radiation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In this report the committee has provided its assessment of the need and justification for the law to provide for the control of the provision of radiation apparatus, the planning needs for the provision of diagnostic and therapeutic facilities, the location of such facilities, the appropriateness or otherwise of existing legislation, the necessity for any further legislative needs and the criteria governing the provision of such radiation apparatus

  16. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  17. The International Commission of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection: meeting the challenges in NIR protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinlay, A [National Radiological Protection Board, Didcot (United Kingdom). ICNIRP

    2002-07-01

    This paper summarises ICNIRP's brief history from its beginnings as a committee of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) to the present as an independent International Commission, and examines how it has structured itself to meet the challenges in non-ionising radiation (NIR) protection now and in the future.

  18. 78 FR 21120 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration; and the Department of Health and Human Services. Observer... Pennsylvania. ISCORS objectives are: (1) To facilitate a consensus on allowable levels of radiation risk to the... meetings include presentations by the chairs of the subcommittees and discussions of current radiation...

  19. Radiation treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents for contaminant removal. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    radiation technology for environmental preservation were presented during the meeting. The electron beam (EB) technology for flue gas treatment was developed in Japan in the early 1980s. Later on, this process was investigated in pilot scale in the USA, Germany, Japan, China and Poland. Commercial EB flue gas treatment installations are operating in coal-fired plants in China and Poland. The plant in Poland treats approximately 270,000 Nm 3 /h of flue gases. High efficiency of SO x and NO x removal (up to 90% for SO x and up to 70% for NO x ) is achieved and by-product is a high quality fertilizer. The advantage of this technology over conventional ones has been clearly demonstrated from both the technical and the economic points of view. Further, its implementation depends on technical development of supply and operation of reliable, high power accelerators with minimal maintenance. In accordance with a three party contract between the IAEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Bulgarian Government a pilot plant for EB flue gas treatment was constructed in Maritza, Bulgaria to treat high humidity, high SO x and NO x gases from combustion of low-grade lignite. Flue gas of 10,000 cubic meters per hour was irradiated with three high energy accelerators, each 35 kW and 800 keV. The plant has been operating since January 2004. The efficiency of pollutant removal ranges of 90-99 % for SO x and 85-90% for NO x . Materials presented in the report will serve as basis for the preparation of guidelines and feasibility studies including cost analyses for full-scale process implementation. Public awareness and technology acceptance are other factors to be considered in furthering the dissemination of the technology

  20. Sports injuries, drowning and exposure to radiation concern Canada Safety Council meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Caroline.

    1979-01-01

    Hazards associated with surface sports, aquatic sports and exposure to radiation were considered at a meeting of the Canada Safety Council in late 1979. The session on radiation noted that 6 of 20000 radiation workers wearing dosimeters were exposed to a dose in excess of 5 rem, the annual limit set by the Atomic Energy Control Board. Radiographers were in the job classification receiving the highest doses of ionizing radiation. Concern was expressed for the emission of damaging radiation from broken mercury vapour lamps. Increased regulation rather than training was seen as the most effective solution. (T.I.)

  1. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation, April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in the fiscal year 1988. Outcome of the work is presented, covering the two major workshops for 'immunology' and for 'radiation-induced carcinogenesis' which were held in Hiroshima on November 28-29, 1988, and on March 16-18, 1989, respectively. Study meeting of 'medical radiation research program' and Japan-the U.S. joint meeting of 'DS 86' are reported, as well as the other scientific lectures and campus study seminars. Included are research abstracts published by the Research Foundation staff. The bibliography of papers, published in scientific journals and presented in scientific meetings, is provided. Appendices give the details of the aforementioned workshops, the continuing research issues, and the personnel list of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. (N.K.)

  2. Space Station: NASA's software development approach increases safety and cost risks. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology asked NASA to study software development issues for the space station. How well NASA has implemented key software engineering practices for the station was asked. Specifically, the objectives were to determine: (1) if independent verification and validation techniques are being used to ensure that critical software meets specified requirements and functions; (2) if NASA has incorporated software risk management techniques into program; (3) whether standards are in place that will prescribe a disciplined, uniform approach to software development; and (4) if software support tools will help, as intended, to maximize efficiency in developing and maintaining the software. To meet the objectives, NASA proceeded: (1) reviewing and analyzing software development objectives and strategies contained in NASA conference publications; (2) reviewing and analyzing NASA, other government, and industry guidelines for establishing good software development practices; (3) reviewing and analyzing technical proposals and contracts; (4) reviewing and analyzing software management plans, risk management plans, and program requirements; (4) reviewing and analyzing reports prepared by NASA and contractor officials that identified key issues and challenges facing the program; (5) obtaining expert opinions on what constitutes appropriate independent V-and-V and software risk management activities; (6) interviewing program officials at NASA headquarters in Washington, DC; at the Space Station Program Office in Reston, Virginia; and at the three work package centers; Johnson in Houston, Texas; Marshall in Huntsville, Alabama; and Lewis in Cleveland, Ohio; and (7) interviewing contractor officials doing work for NASA at Johnson and Marshall. The audit work was performed in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards, between April 1991 and May 1992.

  3. Chernobyl'-92. Reports of the 3. All-Union scientific and technical meeting on results of accident effect elimination at the Chernobyl' NPP. V. 1. Radiation monitoring. Migration of radionuclides in natural environment. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    Section Radiation monitoring comprises: atlas of area radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl' nuclear power station accident, state of computerized radiation control system, hydrological monitoring, radiation situation in different areas, problems of radioactive monitoring and protection of water objects, methods for determining radionuclides content, radiochemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration mobility of the Chernobyl' effluents, the results of investigations into migration of radionuclides in soils, landscapes, bottom depositions, in the soil-plant chain

  4. Report of a consultants meeting on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.

    1999-01-01

    During its biennial meeting in 1996, the Standing Advisory Committee 'SSDL Scientific Committee', recommended extending the long experience of the Agency in the field of standardization and monitoring dosimetry calibrations at radiotherapy and radiation protection level for the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) Network, to the field of diagnostic x-ray dosimetry. It was emphasized that 'Measurements on diagnostic x-ray machines have become increasingly important and some SSDLs are involved in such measurements. The Agency's dosimetry laboratory should, therefore, have proper radiation sources available to provide traceable calibrations to the SSDLs'. The purpose of the consultants' meeting was to advise the Agency on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. They were specifically requested to overview scientific achievements in the field and to give advice to the Agency on the need for further developments. The purpose of the consultants' meeting was to advise the Agency on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. They were specifically requested to overview scientific achievements in the field and to give advice to the Agency on the need for further developments

  5. Proceedings of the second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting was held in Denver, Colorado, in October 1991. The five-day meeting provided a forum for a technical exchange among the members of the ARM Science Team and a discussion of the technical aspects of the project infrastructure. The meeting included several activities: Science Team presentations, discussions of the first site occupation plan, experiment design sessions, and poster sessions. This Proceedings document includes papers presented at the meeting. The papers included are those from the technical sessions, the experiment design sessions, the first site occupation, and descriptions of locales for future sites. Individual projects are processed separately for the database

  6. The NASA/National Space Science Data Center trapped radiation environment model program, 1964 - 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vette, J.I.

    1991-11-01

    The major effort that NASA, initially with the help of the United States Air Force (USAF), carried out for 27 years to synthesize the experimental and theoretical results of space research related to energetic charged particles into a quantitative description of the terrestrial trapped radiation environment in the form of model environments is detailed. The effort is called the Trapped Radiation Environment Modeling Program (TREMP). In chapter 2 the historical background leading to the establishment of this program is given. Also, the purpose of this modeling program as established by the founders of the program is discussed. This is followed in chapter 3 by the philosophy and approach that was applied in this program throughout its lifetime. As will be seen, this philosophy led to the continuation of the program long after it would have expired. The highlights of the accomplishments are presented in chapter 4. A view to future possible efforts in this arena is given in chapter 5, mainly to pass on to future workers the differences that are perceived from these many years of experience. Chapter 6 is an appendix that details the chronology of the development of TREMP. Finally, the references, which document the work accomplished over these years, are presented in chapter 7

  7. Second meeting of competent persons in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This conference treats the subjects interesting the competent persons in radiation protection. It is divided in four sessions. The first one concerns the regulatory bases for the action of competent persons and includes three articles, the second one is about the operational dosimetry and includes six articles, the third session is devoted to the sources and waste management and represents two texts, the last and fourth session concerns the competent person in radiation protection and gives evidence. (N.C.)

  8. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  9. Report to NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems Relative to Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    The following report highlights some of the work accomplished by the Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Division of the Flight Safety Foundations since the last report to the NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems on 22 May 1963. The information presented is in summary form. Additional details may be provided upon request of the reports themselves may be obtained from AvSER.

  10. Meeting of senior officials on managing nuclear knowledge. Summary meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In response to the recommendations of several Agency advisory committees, e.g. INSAG, SAGNE 2002, SAGNA, SAGTAC, to address issues related to nuclear knowledge management, the IAEA convened a meeting on Managing Nuclear Knowledge with senior representatives from Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to sharpen awareness and understanding of the emerging concerns about the maintenance and preservation of knowledge and expertise in nuclear science, technology and applications and to better comprehend the role of the Agency in this process. The meeting was attended by more than 70 participants from 35 Member States and 4 international organizations, representing academic leaders, senior level executives, managers and governmental officials. This report includes statements and recommendation on possible activities to be undertaken by the IAEA

  11. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  12. Research report on radiation protection 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    In this research report on radiation protection the results achieved in 1981 of the research and development projects assisted by the Federal Minister of the Interior are made accessible above all to the scientists and engineers participating in this research program as well as to the research institutions on the field of radiation protection, to the members of the commission on radiological protection and of the commission for reactor safety and to the supervising and licensing authorities. The report is a compilation of individual reports, which are composed by the consignees respectively the recipients of the allowances themselves as a documentation of the progress of their works. Each individual report contains informations concerning the objectives of the project, works carried out, results achieved and further work planned. (orig.) [de

  13. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  14. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2003 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  15. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  16. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  17. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation

  18. The Nasa space radiation school, an excellent training in radiobiology and space radiation protection; La NASA space radiation summer school, une formation d'excellence en radiobiologie et radioprotection spatiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogin, G. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The astronauts have to spend more time in space and the colonization of the moon and Mars are in the cross hairs of international agencies. The cosmic radiation from which we are protected on ground by atmosphere and by the terrestrial magnetosphere (.4 mSv/year according to Who) become really threatening since 20 km altitude, delivering an average radiation dose of a therapeutic kind to astronauts with peaks related to solar events. It is composed in majority of hadrons: protons (85%) and heavy ions (13%), but also photons (2%) of high energy (GeV/n)). the incurred risks are multiple: early ones(cataract, central nervous system damages, whole body irradiation) but especially delayed ones (carcinogenesis). The astronauts radiation protection turns poor and the rate of death risk by cancer returning from a mission on Mars has been estimated at 5%. The Nasa created in 2004 a summer school aiming to awareness young researchers to the space radiobiology specificities. Areas concerned as follow: radioinduced DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, bystander effect, genome instability, neuro degeneration, delayed effects and carcinogenesis in relation with radiation exposure. (N.C.)

  19. ADVANCED RADIATION THEORY SUPPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2002, FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIS, J.; APRUZESE, J.; CHONG, Y.; CLARK, R.; DASGUPTA, A.; GIULIANI, J.; KEPPLE, P.; TERRY, R.; THORNHILL, J.; VELIKOVICH, A.

    2003-01-01

    Z-PINCH PHYSICS RADIATION FROM WIRE ARRAYS. This report describes the theory support of DTRA's Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) program carried out by NRL's Radiation Hydrodynamics Branch (Code 6720) in FY 2002. Included is work called for in DTRA MIPR 02-2045M - ''Plasma Radiation Theory Support'' and in DOE's Interagency Agreement DE-AI03-02SF22562 - ''Spectroscopic and Plasma Theory Support for Sandia National Laboratories High Energy Density Physics Campaign''. Some of this year's work was presented at the Dense Z-Pinches 5th International Conference held June 23-28 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A common theme of many of these presentations was a demonstration of the importance of correctly treating the radiation physics for simulating Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) load behavior and diagnosing load properties, e.g, stagnation temperatures and densities. These presentations are published in the AIP Conference Proceedings and, for reference, they are included in Section 1 of this report. Rather than describe each of these papers in the Executive Summary, they refer to the abstracts that accompany each paper. As a testament to the level of involvement and expertise that the Branch brings to DTRA as well as the general Z-Pinch community, eight first-authored presentations were contributed at this conference as well as a Plenary and an Invited Talk. The remaining four sections of this report discuss subjects either not presented at the conference or requiring more space than allotted in the Proceedings

  20. Final Report for Radiation Resistant Magnets II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. F. Zeller

    2005-01-01

    Report on techniques for the fabrication of radiation resistant magnets for the RIA Fragment Separator. The development of magnet designs capable of reasonable life times in high-radiation environments and having reasonable performance is of paramount importance for RIA as well as other high-intensity projects under consideration, such as the Neutrino Factory and FAIR project at GSI. Several approaches were evaluated for radiation resistant superconducting magnets. One approach was to simply use a more radiation resistant epoxy for the coil fabrication. Another approach for cryostable magnets, like the S800 Spectrograph dipole, is the use of all-inorganic materials. The final approach was the development of radiation resistant Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC) like that used in fusion magnets; though these are not radiation resistant because an organic insulator is used. Simulations have shown that the nuclear radiation heating of the first quadrupoles in the RIA Fragment Separator will be so large that cold mass minimization will be necessary with the magnet iron being at room temperature. Three different types of conductor for radiation resistant superconducting magnets have been built and successfully tested. The cyanate ester potted coils will work nicely for magnets where the lifetime dose is a factor of 20 less than the end of life of the superconductor and the rate of energy deposition is below the heat-removal limit of the coil. The all-inorganic cryostable coil and the metal oxide insulated CICC will provide conductor that will work up to the life of the superconductor and have the ability to remove large quantities of nuclear heating. Obviously, more work needs to be done on the CICC to increase the current density and to develop different insulations; and on the cyanate esters to increase the heat transfer

  1. Preparing the radiation protection worker to meet multiple needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Thorpe, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the radiation protection worker aids in protecting personnel and their surrounding environment from the hazards of radiation. These individuals use their technical knowledge, skills, and abilities to survey and monitor various project-related activities. They must also provide guidance in project design, development, and implementation. These combined efforts assure that protective measures are taken in accordance with applicable standards. The ORNL performance-based training program enhances the skills of the worker. The program incorporates job specific information on the diverse facilities and activities monitored with basic fundamentals of radiation protection. Successful completion of this program includes passing both a qualification exam and an on-the-job skills review. This paper details the structure of such a program and explains the strategies taken to reach the program's goals. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Occupational radiation exposure. Twelfth annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1982-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that is maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reports System (REIRS). This report is usually published on an annual basis and is available at all NRC public document rooms. The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from annual statistical reports submitted by all NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.407. Four categories of licensees - operating nuclear power reactors, fuel fabricators and reprocessors, industrial radiographers, and manufacturers and distributors of specified quantities of byproduct materials - also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408, and some analysis of this data is also presented in this report

  3. 4. Berder Meeting - Biology of ionizing radiation - Booklet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This conference has been organized around 5 sessions: 1) radioimmunotherapy and signaling, 2) external radiotherapy and signaling, 3) dosimetry and radiobiology, 4) early events induced by radiation, and 5) radiotherapy and tumor response. This document gathers 50 short papers the 2 first are dedicated respectively to the presentation of the 'Canceropole Grand Ouest' and the story of radioimmunotherapy

  4. NASA Pathways: Intern Employment Program Work Report Summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Kyle B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the work experience and project involvement of Kyle Davidson during his tenure at Kennedy Space Center for the summer of 2014. Projects include the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS), Restore satellite servicing program, and mechanical handling operations for the SAGE III and Rapidscat payloads.

  5. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. International Code Centres Network. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H-K.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen international experts on computational aspects of atomic, molecular and particle surface interaction data for fusion energy research participated in the 2nd technical meeting of the International Code Centres Network. Participants reported their research on data production and computational capabilities at their institutions. Experts in the field of plasma modeling of magnetic fusion research joined this meeting to present the data needs and bring the perspective of data users. The interaction and discussion among data producers and data users in this two-day meeting led to an agreement that the scope and function of Code Centres Network should be reformulated to serve the needs of fusion community in more effective way. (author)

  7. NASA Wearable Technology CLUSTER 2013-2014 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Cory; Dunne, Lucy; Zeagler, Clint; Martin, Tom; Pailes-Friedman, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Wearable technology has the potential to revolutionize the way humans interact with one another, with information, and with the electronic systems that surround them. This change can already be seen in the dramatic increase in the availability and use of wearable health and activity monitors. These devices continuously monitor the wearer using on-­-body sensors and wireless communication. They provide feedback that can be used to improve physical health and performance. Smart watches and head mounted displays are also receiving a great deal of commercial attention, providing immediate access to information via graphical displays, as well as additional sensing features. For the purposes of the Wearable Technology CLUSTER, wearable technology is broadly defined as any electronic sensing, human interfaces, computing, or communication that is mounted on the body. Current commercially available wearable devices primarily house electronics in rigid packaging to provide protection from flexing, moisture, and other contaminants. NASA mentors are interested in this approach, but are also interested in direct integration of electronics into clothing to enable more comfortable systems. For human spaceflight, wearable technology holds a great deal of promise for significantly improving safety, efficiency, autonomy, and research capacity for the crew in space and support personnel on the ground. Specific capabilities of interest include: Continuous biomedical monitoring for research and detection of health problems. Environmental monitoring for individual exposure assessments and alarms. Activity monitoring for responsive robotics and environments. Multi-modal caution and warning using tactile, auditory, and visual alarms. Wireless, hands-free, on-demand voice communication. Mobile, on-demand access to space vehicle and robotic displays and controls. Many technical challenges must be overcome to realize these wearable technology applications. For example, to make a wearable

  8. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  9. Radiation risk assessment: the 1982 UNSCEAR report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1955 the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has reported yearly to the General Assembly and at irregular intervals has submitted more comprehensive reports with detailed scientific annexes. In 1982, the eighth in the series of such substantive reports was published. It consists of a summary and a main text outlining the conclusions reached in the Committee's discussions and 12 scientific annexes reviewing in considerable detail the procedures and the scientific information on which such conclusions rest. The Summary of the main conclusions of the Committee is reprinted in this paper

  10. Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation (BSC Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-10-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment over exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explore these topics from an engineering design, laboratory testing, field monitoring, as well as practical construction perspective. By bringing various groups together (who have been conduction research or have experience in this area), a more holistic review of the design limits and current code language proposals can be completed and additional gaps identified. The results of which will help inform design standards and criteria.

  11. The NASA Radiation Interuniversity Science and Engineering(RaISE) Project: A Model for Inter-collaboration and Distance Learning in Radiation Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, Pamela S.; Saganti, P.; Obot, V.; Singleterry, R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Radiation Interuniversity Science and Engineering (RaISE) Project, which is a project that has as its goals strengthening and furthering the curriculum in radiation sciences at two Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Prairie View A&M University and Texas Southern University. Those were chosen in part because of the proximity to NASA Johnson Space Center, a lead center for the Space Radiation Health Program. The presentation reviews the courses that have been developed, both in-class, and on-line.

  12. Report on promotion of utilization of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents results of studies made by the Atomic Energy Commission concerning research and development activities to be carried out in future to promote the utilization of radiation. First, the current state of radiation utilization is described, centering on practical applications, research and development activities (for practical and advanced applications), and international cooperation (with developing and advanced nations). The second part deals with activities required in future to promote practical utilization of radiation, research and development of advanced techniques, and cooperation to be offered to developing countries. Third, specific measures to be carried out for effective radiation utilization are described. For γ-rays and electron beams, which are widely in use at present, there are some economic and social problems remaining to be solved. For advanced utilization of radiation beams, further efforts should be focused on basic research on π-meson and μ-particle beams and their application to canser treatment and nuclear fusion; research on monochromatic neutron beams; application of RI beams to the development of new materials and new analysis techniques, application of epithermal neutron beams to elementary radiography and CT; etc. The utilization, application and development of tracers are also described. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Research and Development of Isotopes Application and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singgih Sutrisno; Sofyan Yatim; Pattiradjawane, EIsje L.; Ismachin, Moch; Mugiono; Marga Utama; Komaruddin Idris

    2004-02-01

    The Proceedings of Scientific Meeting on Research and Development of Isotopes Application and Radiation has been presented on February 17-18, 2004 in Jakarta. The aims of the Meeting is to disseminate the results of research on application of nuclear techniques on agricultural, animal, industry, hydrology and environment. There were 4 invited papers and 38 papers from BATAN participants as well as outside. The articles are indexing separately. (PPIN)

  14. Radiation dose in CT are meeting the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Despite comprising only 2% of all examinations, CT contributed around 20% of the collective dose to the population from diagnostic imaging. An abdominal examination in an adult with an effective dose of 10 mSv has been estimated to increase the lifetime risk of fatal cancer by 1 in 2000. Children are 10 times more sensitive to the effects of radiation than middle aged adults. Girls are more sensitive than boys. Variations in CT practice, ease of using, urgency in multislice CT, unawaring of the 'uncoupling effect' in CT may be contributing to increasing in radiation dose. We must train and have an awareness of emerging materials and the implied changes in practice, with revision of protocols to take account of advances. The 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) ' principle applies just as much to CT as it does to conventional radiography

  15. What happens when spins meet for ionizing radiation dosimetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, Juliana F.; Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Departamento de Física e Matemática, FFCLRP, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, SP - Brazil (Brazil); Neves-Junior, Wellington F. P. [Hospital Sírio Libanês, R. Dona Adma Jafet 91, 01308-000, Bela Vista, São Paulo, SP – Brazil (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to measure radiation dose deposited in different milieu through its effects. Radiation can break chemical bonds and if they produce stable free radicals, ESR can measure their concentration through their spins and a dose can be inferred. Ionizing radiation can also promote polymerization and in this case proton relaxation times can be measured and an image weighed by T2 can be produced giving spatial information about dose. A review of the basics of these applications is presented concluding with an end-to-end test using a composite Gel-Alanine phantom to validate 3-dimensionally dose distribution delivered in a simulation of Volume Modulated Arch Therapy on the simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases. The results obtained with the gel and alanine dosimeters are consistent with the expected by the treatment planning system, showing the potential of this multidosimetric approach and validating dosimetrically the multiple brain metastases treatment using VMAT.

  16. Proceedings of the public meeting to address a proposed federal radiation research agenda. Volume 2. Science projection papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 14 science projection papers presented at a public meeting on March 10-11, 1980 to address a proposed federal radiation research agenda into the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  17. Advisory group meeting on new trends and developments in radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    High energy, ionizing radiation (gamma and electron beams) has been used by industry for many years and for different applications. Well established applications include: industrial sterilization of health care products (medical products and medicinals), radiation modification of plastics (crosslinking of wire and cable insulation, heat shrinkable materials, etc.) and radiation curing of adhesives and coatings on different substrates. The main purpose of the Advisory Group Meeting was to provide a forum for an exchange of information about the new developments in radiation technology, to review the status of these developments and to discuss potential for commercial applications. A further objective was to discuss the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in promoting new technologies, research and transfer of technology to developing countries. The meeting was expected to prepare recommendations to the Agency for future activities and programmes in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

  19. LLW Forum meeting report, October 20--22, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Annapolis, Maryland, on October 20--22, 1997. Twenty-six Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 22 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Discussion with NRC Commissioner McGaffigan; Regulatory issues session; Executive session; LLW forum business session; DOE low-level waste management program; Transportation of radioactive waste; Environmental equity: Title VI; Congressional studies on Ward Valley Site; Implementation of DOE's strategy for waste management; Relicensing Envirocare; Draft agreement for uniform application of manifesting procedures; CRCPD report; Panel: Future of low-level radioactive waste management; Agenda planning: February 1998; Resolutions; and Attendance

  20. NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program: Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Sim, Alex

    2000-01-01

    This report presents results from research flights that explored the characteristics of an ice-contaminated tailplane using various simulated ice shapes attached to the leading edge of the horizontal tailplane. A clean leading edge provided the baseline case, then three ice shapes were flown in order of increasing severity. Flight tests included both steady state and dynamic maneuvers. The steady state points were 1G wings level and steady heading sideslips. The primary dynamic maneuvers were pushovers to various G-levels; elevator doublets; and thrust transitions. These maneuvers were conducted for a full range of flap positions and aircraft angle of attack where possible. The analysis of this data set has clearly demonstrated the detrimental effects of ice contamination on aircraft stability and controllability. Paths to tailplane stall were revealed through parameter isolation and transition studies. These paths are (1) increasing ice shape severity, (2) increasing flap deflection, (3) high or low speeds, depending on whether the aircraft is in a steady state (high speed) or pushover maneuver (low speed), and (4) increasing thrust. The flight research effort was very comprehensive, but did not examine effects of tailplane design and location, or other aircraft geometry configuration effects. However, this effort provided the role of some of the parameters in promoting tailplane stall. The lessons learned will provide guidance to regulatory agencies, aircraft manufacturers, and operators on ice-contaminated tailplane stall in the effort to increase aviation safety and reduce the fatal accident rate.

  1. Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report Meeting National Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonker, L.; Dannevik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report covers the following topics: (1) Nuclear Materials--Modeling Thermohydrologic Processes at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear-Waste Repository; Dose Assessments and Resettlement Support on Rongelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. (2) Climate, Carbon, and Energy--Incorporating Surprise into Models of Global Climate Change: A Simple Climate Demonstrator Model; (3) Environmental Risk Reduction--The NASA Global Modeling Initiative: Analyzing the Atmospheric Impacts of Supersonic Aircraft; (4) National Security--Atmospheric Release Assessment Programs; and (5) Cross-Cutting Technologies/Capabilities--Advances in Technology at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry; Experimental Geophysics: Investigating Material Properties at Extreme Conditions

  2. Proceedings of the 5th annual meeting of Japanese Society of Radiation Safety Management 2006 Nagoya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This is the program and the proceedings of the 5th annual meeting of Japanese Society of Radiation Safety Management held from November 29th through December 1st of 2006. The sessions held are: (1) Radiation Measurement 1, (2) Education Method, (3) Radiation Control, (4) Waste Handling, Contamination Inspection, and Renewal, (5) Exposure Reduction, Radiation Evaluation, and Radioactivity Control (6) Radiation Measurement 2, (7) Operation Environment, (8) Medical Exposure, (9) Radiation Measurement 3, (10) Software, IT Technology, and Data Processing, (11) Emission and Drainage Handling, and (12) Radiation Effect and Contamination Countermeasure. The poster sessions held are: (1) Radiation Measurement, (2) Environmental Radiation, (3) Scattering Rate, Penetration Rate, and Contamination Inspection, (4) Education Method, (5) Medical Exposure, (6) Access Control and Software, and (7) Radiation Control Method and Monitoring. The symposia held are: (1) 'Toward Establishment of Guideline for Safe X-ray Handling Education' and 'International Situation of Radiation Safety'. 2 keynote lectures were also held. (S.K.)

  3. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'' (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources

  5. 7th Expert meeting radiation protection. International developments, waste management, challenges for the radiation protection in aging nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings of the 7th Expert meeting on radiation protection include contributions to the following topics: nuclear power and public opinion, IAEA safety standards, ISOE - information system on occupational exposure, European harmonization of the radiation protection education, WANO - challenges and results, CTBTO's global radiation measurement network, state of final radioactive waste disposal in Germany and worldwide, radioactive waste management and disposal in French NPPs, preparedness for final waste disposal in Schacht Konrad, actualization of the transport study Konrad, transport of NPPs' operational radioactive waste and waste from decommissioned reactor demolition to the final repository Konrad, qualification of radioactive waste casks for the final repository Konrad, radioactive waste disposal management concept in Switzerland, aging management and radiation protection, decontamination as effective measure for dose rate reduction - long-term and sustainable dose rate reduction by primary circuit decontamination, system and component decontamination for individual and collective dose reduction - practical examples, radiation protection map - electronic assistance for work planning, EPR dismantling already today? radiation protection register 2002-2010 - knowledge based on a decade of radiation monitoring, actual information on radiation protection in medicine, mobile telecommunication - actual research results.

  6. Solutions Network Formulation Report: Improving NOAA's PORTS(R) Through Enhanced Data Inputs from NASA's Ocean Surface Topography Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, DeNeice

    2007-01-01

    The Nation uses water-level data for a variety of practical purposes, including nautical charting, maritime navigation, hydrography, coastal engineering, and tsunami and storm surge warnings. Long-term applications include marine boundary determinations, tidal predictions, sea-level trend monitoring, oceanographic research, and climate research. Accurate and timely information concerning sea-level height, tide, and ocean current is needed to understand their impact on coastal management, disaster management, and public health. Satellite altimeter data products are currently used by hundreds of researchers and operational users to monitor ocean circulation and to improve scientists understanding of the role of the oceans in climate and weather. The NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) National Ocean Service has been monitoring sea-level variations for many years. NOAA s PORTS (Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System) DST (decision support tool), managed by the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, supports safe and cost-efficient navigation by providing ship masters and pilots with accurate real-time information required to avoid groundings and collisions. This report assesses the capacity of NASA s satellite altimeter data to meet societal decision support needs through incorporation into NOAA s PORTS. NASA has a long heritage of collecting data for ocean research, including its current Terra and Aqua missions. Numerous other missions provide additional important information for coastal management issues, and data collection will continue in the coming decade with such missions as the OSTM (Ocean Surface Topography Mission). OSTM will provide data on sea-surface heights for determining ocean circulation, climate change, and sea-level rise. We suggest that NASA incorporate OSTM altimeter data (C- and Ku-band) into NOAA s PORTS DST in support of NASA s Coastal Management National Application with secondary support to the

  7. Fourth meeting of persons competent in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.; Vidal, J.P.; Ammerich, M.; Feron, F.; Pasquier, J.L.; Lecomte, J.F.; Mansoux, H.; Menechal, Ph.; Briand-Champlong, J.; Gambini, D.J.; Bontemps, A.; Frobert, F.; Grandclaude, A.; Fraboulet, P.; Laporte, Ch.; Roussille, F.; Lahaye, Th.

    2005-01-01

    The different contributions are as follow: the landscape of radiation sources in France; decrees: general presentation; relation of the person competent in radiation protection (P.C.R.) with officials organisms: the part of the D.G.S.N.R.; relation of the P.C.R. with the official organisms: the part of I.R.S.N.; authorizations: industry, education, research; interlocutors of the P.C.R. in hospitals; enforcement of the decree relative to the training of the P.C.R. at the I.N.S.T.N.; the educational contribution of the P.C.R.; European equivalence of the P.C.R. synthesis of training, comparison to the French situation; P.C.R.: contribution, missions and means in the industrial medium; management of damaged situations by the P.C.R.: contribution of the training and the putting in position; coordination with the exterior companies and prevention plans out of I.N.B.; regulatory evolution. (N.C.)

  8. Risk communication practice after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident. Interactive explanatory meeting on radiation and its health effects in Ibaraki prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayame, Junko; Sugiyama, Kenji; Takashita, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ryuuichi

    2016-02-01

    Large amounts of radioactive material were released into the environment during the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company (hereinafter referred to as Fukushima nuclear accident) in March, 2011. The radiation dose rose in a large area of plural prefectures including Fukushima prefecture, and many people had anxiety about radiation and its health effects on their bodies. In such a situation, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) received a lot of inquiries and lecture requests about radiation from local residents in Japan. R and D Institutes/Centers of JAEA had explanatory meetings and lectures on radiation and its health effects in response to those requests. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (hereinafter referred to as NCL) of JAEA has held the explanatory meetings in Ibaraki prefecture since May 2011 in order to transmit factual information and reduce the excessive anxiety about radiation risk, based on our experience of risk communication practice and research activities over 10 years. Applying to our past risk communication process to the explanatory meetings, we built a process of interactivity between participants and our staff for the meetings. We incorporated the participants' needs into the meetings, and, as far as possible, we had interactive two-way communication so that the meetings were not one-way and persuasive but promote mutual understanding. According to the opinions and the results of questionnaire survey that were received from the participants, it became evident that the interactive explanatory meetings were effective in reducing participants' anxiety. This report explains the risk communication process for carrying out the explanatory meeting, and shows the activities of the meetings, questions and opinions from the participants, and questionnaire results that NCL implemented. (author)

  9. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  10. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2013-07-01

    The annual report 2011 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following issues: Part A: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B; Current data and their evaluation: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. The Appendix includes Explanations of terms, radiation doses and related units, external and internal radiation exposure, stochastic and deterministic radiation effects, genetic radiation effects, induction of malignant neoplasm, risk assessment, physical units and glossary, laws, ordinances, guidelines, recommendations and other regulations concerning radiation protection, list of selected radionuclides.

  11. Topic Modeling of NASA Space System Problem Reports: Research in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Lucas; Nikora, Allen P.; Meek, Joshua; Menzies, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Problem reports at NASA are similar to bug reports: they capture defects found during test, post-launch operational anomalies, and document the investigation and corrective action of the issue. These artifacts are a rich source of lessons learned for NASA, but are expensive to analyze since problem reports are comprised primarily of natural language text. We apply topic modeling to a corpus of NASA problem reports to extract trends in testing and operational failures. We collected 16,669 problem reports from six NASA space flight missions and applied Latent Dirichlet Allocation topic modeling to the document corpus. We analyze the most popular topics within and across missions, and how popular topics changed over the lifetime of a mission. We find that hardware material and flight software issues are common during the integration and testing phase, while ground station software and equipment issues are more common during the operations phase. We identify a number of challenges in topic modeling for trend analysis: 1) that the process of selecting the topic modeling parameters lacks definitive guidance, 2) defining semantically-meaningful topic labels requires nontrivial effort and domain expertise, 3) topic models derived from the combined corpus of the six missions were biased toward the larger missions, and 4) topics must be semantically distinct as well as cohesive to be useful. Nonetheless,topic modeling can identify problem themes within missions and across mission lifetimes, providing useful feedback to engineers and project managers.

  12. IAEA technical meeting: 13th meeting of the IFRC Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.; Peacock, N.J.

    2002-11-01

    This report briefly describes the proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the 13th Meeting of the Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion of the International Fusion Research Council held on 24-25 June, 2002 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna Austria. The report includes an Executive Summary of the Subcommittee from this Meeting. (author)

  13. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2010-12-01

    The annual report on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure 2009 consists of two parts. Part A: General information: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B includes current data and their evaluation for natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation.

  14. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Advanced Technology AT5 Virtualized Infiniband Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John H.; Bledsoe, Benjamin C.; Wagner, Mark; Shakshober, John; Fromkin, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The NCCS is part of the Computational and Information Sciences and Technology Office (CISTO) of Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The NCCS's mission is to enable scientists to increase their understanding of the Earth, the solar system, and the universe by supplying state-of-the-art high performance computing (HPC) solutions. To accomplish this mission, the NCCS (https://www.nccs.nasa.gov) provides high performance compute engines, mass storage, and network solutions to meet the specialized needs of the Earth and space science user communities

  15. Report on emergency exposure to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W.M.

    1960-01-01

    The Medical Research Council has continued a study of the effects on the health of persons in the neighbourhood of atomic energy installations should there be a release of radioactive material as a result of fires or other incidents. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has already reported (Medical Research Council, 1959) on the maximum permissible dietary contamination for iodine 131, strontium 89, strontium 90 and caesium. 137, since it was considered that for the members of the public normally resident in the area affected ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident and that intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances The present report deals with the problem of exposure from the exterior, namely, from external sources of beta and gamma radiation. This exposure might be derived from two sources, one of relatively short duration from the passage of a cloud of radioactive material, the other of longer duration from deposited material

  16. HMI Radiation Chemistry Department. Scientific report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Results of the R and D activities of the Radiation Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Institut, are reported, primarily dealing with the following subjects: a) Interface processes and energy conversion; b) Pulsed radiolysis and kinematics; c) Insulating materials and polymers. Activities belonging to group (a) above include the development of photosensitive materials for energy conversion, photovoltaic solar cells, light-induced hydrogen liberation, and inclusion reactions, model experiments studying photoactive interfaces, rapid kinematic measurements at interfaces after laser-induced excitation, surface preparation of amorphous silicon and its effects on electronic properties, photochemical reactions and catalysts. Work performed in group (b) above included studies into various chemical reactions involving radicals, and on interactions between atoms, ions, molecules and molecular clusters induced by low-energy collisions. Group (c) above all performed studies into the physical and chemical elementary processes induced by high-energy radiation, light and UV light, especially in electronegative gases. Further activities in this group included photochemical and radiation chemical investigations on polymers. The report lists publications and lectures prepared by H.M.I. members and guest scientists in the year 1985. (RB) [de

  17. Report on emergency exposure to external radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochin, E E; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W M [Medical Research Council, Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, London (United Kingdom); and others

    1960-12-01

    The Medical Research Council has continued a study of the effects on the health of persons in the neighbourhood of atomic energy installations should there be a release of radioactive material as a result of fires or other incidents. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has already reported (Medical Research Council, 1959) on the maximum permissible dietary contamination for iodine 131, strontium 89, strontium 90 and caesium. 137, since it was considered that for the members of the public normally resident in the area affected ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident and that intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances The present report deals with the problem of exposure from the exterior, namely, from external sources of beta and gamma radiation. This exposure might be derived from two sources, one of relatively short duration from the passage of a cloud of radioactive material, the other of longer duration from deposited material.

  18. Report of international symposium on the 22nd Japan annual nuclear energy meeting, PNC general meeting and business report about nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-15

    This conference report consists of three parts, which report the 22nd annual nuclear energy meeting in Japan, including the list of Korean delegates, program and the contents of five session, the conference report for PNC general meeting and the report on international symposium for fruition of nuclear power business. It introduces the main conception and the contents of the symposium.

  19. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Summary report of consultants' meeting. 12. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2010-02-01

    The 12th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 12-13 November 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  20. Radiation Protection Group Annual Report 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    The RP Annual Report summarises the activities carried out by CERN’s Radiation Protection Group in the year 2003. It includes contribution from the EN section of the TIS/IE Group on environmental monitoring. Chapter 1 reports on the measurements and estimations of the impact on the environment and public exposure due to the Organisation’s activities. Chapter 2 provides the results of the monitoring of CERN’s staff, users and contractors to occupational exposure. Chapter 3 deals with operational radiation protection around the accelerators and in the experimental areas. Chapter 4 reports on RP design studies for the LHC and CNGS projects. Chapter 5 addresses the various services provided by the RP Group to other Groups and Divisions at CERN, which include managing radioactive waste, high-level dosimetry, lending radioactive test sources and shipping radioactive materials. Chapter 6 describes activities other than the routine and service tasks, i.e. development work in the field of instrumentation and res...

  1. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  2. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--nuclear agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  3. Chernobyl: Its lessons: Actions for the next decade. Report on a donor meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Within the WHO International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) and Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), the WHO Regional Office for Europe is responsible for following up the increased thyroid disease after Chernobyl and mitigating the public health effects of any future accidents. At a meeting in Helsinki, the Regional Office proposed activities to Member States and sought support for their implementation. The participants - representatives of health ministries and experts from European research institutions - evaluated and approved the WHO proposals. Funds were sought for the opening of a project office in Helsinki from which WHO would provide an effective response to nuclear accidents and for assisting in the mitigation of thyroid diseases attributable to the Chernobyl accident in four priority areas: screening, treatment, mitigation of iodine deficiency and construction of an integrated thyroid disease registry. It was agreed that the report of the Meeting would be used in future fund-raising activities. (author)

  4. Summary report of the technical meeting on 'International Reactor Dosimetry File: IRDF-2002'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the presentations, recommendations and conclusions of the Technical Meeting on 'International Reactor Dosimetry File: IRDF-2002.' The purpose of this meeting was to discuss scientific and technical matters related to the subject and coordinate related tasks. Discussions were held and recommendations were given for the preparation of the files on topics related to: reactions to be included, need for new evaluations or revisions, decay data, radiation damage data, integral testing in benchmark fields, and computer codes to be included. Tasks were assigned and deadlines were set. The participants emphasized that accurate and complete knowledge of nuclear data for reactor dosimetry are essential for improving the accuracy of the reactor pressure vessel service life assessment of nuclear power plants as well as in other neutron metrology applications such as boron neutron capture therapy, therapeutic use of medical isotopes, nuclear physics measurements, and reactor safety applications. (author)

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1992 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-01-01

    Under SLAC's supervision, the SPEAR ring and injector system were operated for the first time in a truly dedicated mode for user experimentation. In October, SSRL became a division of SLAC. With that organizational change, SSRL became fully responsible for the operation, maintenance and improvement of SPEAR and its injection accelerators. At the same time, other radiation sources were studied. Free electron lasers providing enormous peak brightnesses and time average brightnesses about two orders of magnitude greater than the machines presently being constructed or commissioned were the object of one line of analysis. Ultra-short pulse beams at lower photons energies were also studied. These, as well, are described in Chapter 2. Significant gains were also made on the beam lines. Perhaps the most dramatic was the introduction of YB 66 crystals into the Jumbo monochromator, as described in Chapter 3. Looking to the future, SSRL held a workshop on Fourth Generation Light Sources in February and two workshops in conjunction with the Users Meeting. The impact of the high quality running is demonstrated by the many high quality experimental programs performed on SPEAR during the year. These are described in Chapter 6

  6. Radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the research done under this contract over the past twelve years. Since it is manifestly impossible to provide all the details involved in this work in this report only the primary results of these studies are discussed. The detailed radiolytic mechanisms and kinetics, as well as other detailed information on the systems studied have previously been reported in the annual reports, ORO-3781-1 through 14 and in the journal articles listed in the Contract Publications section of this report. The initial purpose of this work was to study the gamma-ray induced polymerization of organo-substituted carboranes in the solid state. With time this purpose changed to understanding in detail the effects plastic crystallinity had on the overall radiolysis of materials in this type of mesomorphic state. This work included the effects of phase, charge transfer, organic substituent and the ability of the carboranes to act as electron scavengers. For clarity of presentation, the work in the various areas which was performed under this contract is reported in four separate sections: plastic crystallinity, radiation chemistry, electrooptical properties, and thermal oligomerization

  7. Report on the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Dunaeva, S.; Otsuka, N.

    2010-07-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. (author)

  8. LLW Forum meeting report, January 31--February 3, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held January 31-February 3, 1995

  9. Meeting report--Getting Into and Out of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchedlishvili, Nunu; Jonak, Katarzyna; Saurin, Adrian T

    2015-11-15

    The Company of Biologists Workshop 'Getting Into and Out of Mitosis' was held 10-13 May 2015 at Wiston House in West Sussex, UK. The workshop brought together researchers from wide-ranging disciplines and provided a forum to discuss their latest work on the control of cell division from mitotic entry to exit. This report highlights the main topics and summarises the discussion around the key themes and questions that emerged from the meeting. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. LLW Forum meeting report, July 20--22, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representative, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. This report details activities of the meeting held July 20-22, 1994

  11. LLW Forum meeting report, October 26--27, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held October 26-27, 1994

  12. LLW Forum meeting report, October 26--27, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held October 26-27, 1994.

  13. LLW Forum meeting report, January 31--February 3, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held January 31-February 3, 1995.

  14. LLW Forum meeting report, February 13--16, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities at the meeting held February 13-16, 1996

  15. Report of the workshop on particle process (first meeting). A report of the Yayoi study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo, more than 10 short period workshops called Yayoi workshop have been held yearly as one of the activities of the joint utilization of the reactor 'Yayoi' and an electron linear accelerator by universities. In this report, the gists of the lectures given at the workshop on particle process which was held on August 8, 1994, are summarized. The development of scientific and technological computations in atomic energy field is briefly mentioned. The recent advance of numerical fluid dynamics is conspicuous, but still it includes many unsatisfactory points. This workshop was held, collecting the computation method using particles and the computation method without using grids for the application to fluids. Lectures were given on the SPH method in astrophysics, fragmentation of isothermal sheet-like clouds, lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook method for fluid dynamics and compressible, thermal and multi-phase models, the analysis techniques for compressible and incompressible fluids including movable boundary by PIC method, the numerical computation of high Reynolds number flow by gridless method, the development of particle method for analyzing incompressible viscous flow accompanied by breaker, the calculation of neutron and photon transport by Monte Carlo method using vector and parallel computers and the paradigm of super-parallel computation. (K.I.)

  16. DOE Task Force meeting on Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.

    1991-08-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and presentation material from the Research Assistance Task Force Meeting ''Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High-Radiation Field.'' The meeting was jointly sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Fusion Energy of the US Department of Energy in Vail, Colorado, May 28--June 1, 1991. The 26 participants represented expertise in fusion, radiation damage, electrical breakdown, ceramics, and semiconductor and electronic structures. These participants came from universities, industries, national laboratories, and government. The attendees represented eight nations. The Task Force meeting was organized in response to the recent discovery that a combination of temperature, electric field, and radiation for an extended period of time has an unexplained adverse effect in ceramics, termed radiation-enhanced electrical degradation (REED). REED occurs after an incubation period and continues to accelerate with irradiation until the ceramics can no longer be regarded as insulators. It appears that REED is irreversible and the ceramic insulators cannot be readily annealed or otherwise repaired for future services. This effect poses a serious threat for fusion reactors, which require electrical insulators in diagnostic devices, in radio frequency and neutral beam systems, and in magnetic assemblies. The problem of selecting suitable electrical insulating materials in thus far more serious than previously anticipated

  17. Proceedings of the 4th annual meeting of Japanese Society of Radiation Safety Management 2005 Kyoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the program and the proceedings of the 4th annual meeting of Japanese Society of Radiation Safety Management held from November 23rd through the 25th of 2005. The sessions held were: (1) Medical Exposure, (2) Environmental Measurement and Radiation Source Handling, (3) Radiation Measurement and Influence of Electromagnetic Waves, (4) Utilization of Irradiation, (5) Countermeasures against Contamination and Inspection of Contamination, (6) Imaging Plate, (7) Controlled Measurement and Dose Evaluation, (8) Working Environment Measurement 1, (9) Working Environment Measurement 2, (10) Establishment of Software and System, (11) Radiation Education 1, (12) Radiation Education 2, and (13) Exposure Reduction and Safety Control. The poster sessions held were: (1) Exposure Reduction and Radiation Evaluation, (2) Radiation Measurement and Influence of Electromagnetic Waves, (3) Education Training, (4) Safety Control, (5) Software, Data Handling, and Shielding Calculation, and (6) Environmental Radioactivity. The keynote lectures held were: (1) 'Situation of Medical Exposure' and (2) 'Cosmic Radiation While Boarding on Airplanes'. The symposia held were: (1) 'Food Irradiation' and (2) 'Life Science'. (S.K.)

  18. Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man. Proceedings of a Scientific Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    After an organism has suffered a radiation insult, knowledge of the dose and localization of the exposure is of the greatest importance for the treatment of any radiation damage. Supplementary to the information obtained from physical dosimetry, data obtained by biochemical indicators can, on the basis of metabolic changes in the irradiated organism, help in making early diagnosis, in assessing the extent of the radiation injury, and making a prognosis. Biochemical tests under optimal conditions would not depend on the quality and distribution of the dose in the body and would also reflect the sensitivity of the individual organisms. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization convened a joint scientific meeting on Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man in Paris-Le Vésinet, France, from 22 to 26 June 1970. The main purpose of the meeting was to discuss recent problems in determining which biochemical and metabolic changes occurring in irradiated organisms could be used as indicators of radiation injury and its extent, and could thus be of help in planning the proper treatment of the injured persons. During the meeting the results obtained with various biochemical indicators, and experimental techniques and laboratory methods used in this field, were evaluated and compared. Both research workers and clinicians were invited to participate at the meeting. They discussed the possible value of several tests, used successfully in experimental animals, for clinical application; ways of standardizing suitable tests; and mutual collaboration between laboratories and clinics. The outcome of their discussions is summarized in the conclusions and recommendations which are included in these Proceedings together with the papers presented

  19. Proceeding of the 20th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 11th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Five presentations were given with a focus on the measures for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. (1) 'Support activities of KURRI on the measures for the Fukushima nuclear accident': Introduction of the state of personal dispatch and support activities for radiation survey performed at evacuation centers. (2) 'New RI usage-emitting α-ray aiming at single cell': Developing state of a new cell irradiation effect observation system that can perform the localized irradiation of RI-derived He ion while targeting single cell under a microscope. (3) 'Reactivity measurement system at Kyoto University research reactor (KUR)': Explanation of the composition and performance of the system of real time display on the output, reactivity, and cooling water temperature of KUR, etc. and the introduction of that this system used in student experiments. (4) 'Introduction of GPS-linked automatic radiation measuring system, KURAMA': Introduction of a voluntarily developed vehicle-mounted type radiation measurement system that takes into account the local conditions of Fukushima (KURAMA). (5) 'Internal exposure dose evaluation of staff members dispatched to Fukushima': Indication of the methods and results of dose assessment, and report on that exposure management has been properly performed. The 3 of 5 papers presented at the entitled meeting are indexed individually. (A.O.)

  20. Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

  1. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  2. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note

  3. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

  4. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A.; Borak, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  5. Final Report of the NASA Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) Study Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshorn, Steven; Jefferies, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The material in this report covers the results on the NASA-wide TRA team, who are responsible for ascertaining the full extent of issues and ambiguities pertaining to TRATRL and to provide recommendations for mitigation. The team worked for approximately 6 months to become knowledgeable on the current TRATRL process and guidance and to derive recommendations for improvement.The team reviewed the TRA processes of other government agencies (OGA), including international agencies, and found that while the high-level processes are similar, the NASA process has a greater level of detail. Finally, NASA’s HQ OCT continues to monitor the GAO’s efforts to produce a TRA Best Practices Guide, a draft of which was received in February 2016. This Guide could impact the recommendations of this report.

  6. Report on the IAEA advisory group meeting on network of nuclear reaction data centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-08-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres, hold at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, Russia, 15 to 19 May 2000. The meeting was attended by 28 participants from 13 co-operating data centres from seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and actions, progress and status reports of the participating data centres and working papers considered at the meeting. (author)

  7. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Since 1980s, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the 'Super-SOR' project, the new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to sciences in vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions. The University of Tokyo considered the project as one of the most important future academic plans and strongly endorsed to construct the new facility with an electron storage ring of third generation type in the Kashiwa campus. During last year, the design of the accelerator system was slightly modified to obtain stronger support of the people in the field of bio-sciences, such as medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, etc. The energy of the storage ring was increased to 2.4 GeV, which is determined to obtain undulator radiation with sufficient brightness in X-ray region for the protein crystallography experiments. The value was also optimised to avoid considerable degradation of undulator radiation in the VUV and soft X-ray regions. However, in October last year, the president office of the University found out that the promotion of the project was very difficult for financial reasons. The budget for the new facility project is too big to be supported by a single university. The decision was intensively discussed by the International Review Committee on the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), which was held at ISSP from November 14 to 16. The committee understood that the restructuring of the University system in Japan would overstrain the financial resources of the University of Tokyo and accepted the decision by the University. Presently, SRL has inclined to install beamlines using undulator radiation in other SR facilities instead of constructing a facility with a light source accelerator. At new beamlines, SRL will promote advanced materials sciences utilizing high brilliance and small emittance of synchrotron radiation which have been considered in the Super-SOR project. They are those such as microscopy and time-resolved experiments, which will only be

  8. How NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, M.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements. The ASDC is actively working to provide their mission essential datasets as ArcGIS Image Services, Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Services (WMS), OGC Web Coverage Services (WCS) and leveraging the ArcGIS multidimensional mosaic dataset structure. Science teams and ASDC are utilizing these services, developing applications using the Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS and ArcGIS API for Javascript, and evaluating restructuring their data production and access scripts within the ArcGIS Python Toolbox framework and Geoprocessing service environment. These capabilities yield a greater usage and exposure of ASDC data holdings and provide improved geospatial analytical tools for a mission critical understanding in the areas of the earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.

  9. Summary report of IAEA technical meeting: 15. meeting of the IFRC Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.; Peacock, N.J.

    2007-02-01

    The 15th Meeting of the Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion of the International Fusion Research Council was held on 20-21 April 2006, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Work of the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit for the period 2004-2006 was reviewed, and recommendations were made for the 2008-2009 budget cycle. The proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the Subcommittee meeting are briefly described in this report. Specific recommendations of the Subcommittee from this meeting, as well as the report on the activities of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit for the period June 2004 - March 2006, are also included. (author)

  10. Meeting report VLPNPV: Sessions 1 and 2: Plenary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Following the highly successful inaugural meeting in 2012, the second installment of Virus-Like Particles and Nano-Particle Vaccines (VLPNPV), proved to be a worthy follow-up in an outstanding conference series. VLPNPV is a forum for academics and industry to address one of the major areas of need in biomedical sciences, the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. The conference was opened by Professor Marianne Manchester of the University of California, San Diego who pointed to the significance of the site chosen for the conference, the Salk Institute. Founded by Jonas Salk, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies is a non-profit, independent research institute with focuses in molecular biology and genetics, neurosciences, and plant biology. This diversity in research themes reflects the wishes of the institute's founder who saw value in using interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the basic principles in life, aimed at generating new therapies and treatments for human disease. Likewise, interdisciplinarity was reflected in the main themes of the meeting, which also highlight some of the potential advantages of virus-like particle (VLP) and nanoparticle vaccines, including novel formulations/adjuvanting effects, structurally accurate/designed antigens, production systems and capacity, and tailoring the immune response. These themes were covered by the 2 plenary sessions that opened the conference and are described in this report.

  11. Report on the meeting for examining replacing core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    At the time of examining the application for approval of reactor installation, it must be confirmed that the safety of the concerned reactor is secured with not only the initially loaded core but also the replacing core. Besides, it must be confirmed again that the various criteria concerning the safety are satisfied after the start of operation, because a part of the parameters of the replacing core is dependent on the operational history. On the above described viewpoints, the main parameters affecting the safety and the nuclear and thermal limits of replacing core were reviewed. Moreover, the contents of description concerning replacing core in the application form were examined. As the general matters concerning the safety of replacing core, the scram reactivity curves for BWRs and PWRs, the method of description in the application form concerning the fuel containing gadolinia, and the use of burnable poison in replacing core were examined. The meeting for examining replacing core was organized on September 20, 1976, at the Committee for Examining Reactor Safety, and this report was compiled as the results of 10 meetings. (Kako, I.)

  12. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1984-November 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Radiological Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Columbia University. The report consists of 17 individual reports plus an overall summary. Reports survey research results in neutron dosimetry, microdosimetry of electron beams and x-radiation, development of theoretical models for biological radiation effects and induction of oncogenic transformations. Individual abstracts were also prepared for each paper

  13. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives - Pretreatments with Primers Screening Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or Cr(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings. In the United States, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011, amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors and subcontractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts associated with supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. ESA faces its own increasingly stringent regulations within European directives such as Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical (REACH) substances and the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) which have set a mid-2017 sunset date for hexavalent chromium. NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and

  14. 2009 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Pt. 1. Section reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffrath, Andreas; Hartmann, Miks; Hoffmann, Petra Britt; Stieglitz, Robert; Hoehne, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Peter; Hollands, Thorsten; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Tietsch, Wolfgang; Sonnenburg, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary report on these 3 - out of 13 - Sessions of the Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology held in Dresden on May 12 to 14, 2009: Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics (Session 2), Safety of Nuclear Installations - Methods, Analysis, Results (Session 3), and, Front End of the Fuel Cycle, Fuel Elements and Core Components (Session 4). The other Sessions Reactor Physics and Methods of Calculation (Session 1), Front End and Back End of the Fuel Cycle, Radioactive Waste, Storage (Session 5), Operation of Nuclear Installations (Session 6), Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations (Session 7), Fusion Technology (Session 8), Research Reactors, Neutron Sources (Session 9), Energy Industry and Economics (Session 10), Radiation Protection (Session 11), New Build and Innovations (Session 12), and Education, Expert Knowledge, Know How Transfer (Session 13) have be covered in reports in further issues of atw. (orig.)

  15. 86th Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The 86 th annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13-14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12 th ) and post-conference (April 14 th ) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia's leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929-1936); during World War II (1941-1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year's conference. These included a "move and groove" physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health . Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy, Georgia's response to the

  16. Summary report on [IAEA] technical meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaeva, S.; Otsuka, N.; Schwerer, O.

    2009-08-01

    An IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 25 to 26 May 2009. The meeting was attended by 23 participants from 13 cooperating data centres. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status report of the participating data centres. (author)

  17. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program UARP and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1994 - 1996. Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Rose (Compiler); Wolfe, Kathy (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Science Division in the Office of Mission to Planet Earth at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort are also provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aeronautics. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper atmosphere and their effect on the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere, such as ozone; understand the relationship of the trace constituent composition of the lower stratosphere and the lower troposphere to the radiative balance and temperature distribution of the Earth's atmosphere; and accurately assess possible perturbations of the upper atmosphere caused by human activities as well as by natural phenomena. In compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-549, NASA has prepared a report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the stratosphere, and on the progress of UARP and ACMAP. The report for the year 1996 is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA UARP and ACMAP in a document entitled, Research Summary 1994-1996. Part 2 is entitled Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere

  18. Extended abstracts: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response [final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2000-01-01

    In July 1999, we organized the 4th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held in Killiney Bay, Dublin, Ireland, on July 17-18. Roughly 75 scientists (about equal numbers of physicists and biologists) attended the workshop, the fourth in a bi-annual series. Extended abstracts from the meeting were published in the Radiation Research journal, vol. 153, iss. 2, pp. 220-238 (February 2000)(attached). All the objectives in the proposal were met

  19. Project Radiation protection, Annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.

    1994-12-01

    According to the action plan for the period 1991-1995, the main objective of this project during 1994 was to provide operational basis, methods and procedures for solving the radiation protection problems that might appear under routine working conditions and handling of radiation sources. The aim was also to provide special methods for action in case of accidents that could affect the employed staff and the population. Overall activity was directed to maintaining and providing personnel, instrumentation, and methods for the following special radiation protection measures: operational control of the radiation field and contamination; calibration of the radiation and dosimetry instruments-secondary dosimetry metrology laboratory; instrumentation and measuring systems for radiation protection; control of environmental transfer of radioactive material; medical radiation protection [sr

  20. A Review of NASA Human Research Program's Scientific Merit Processes: Letter Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczyk, James A. (Editor); Strawbridge, Larisa M. (Editor); Schultz, Andrea M. (Editor); Liverman, Catharyn T. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Review of NASA Human Research Program's (HRP's) Scientific Merit Assessment Processes in December 2011. The committee was asked to evaluate the scientific merit assessment processes that are applied to directed research tasks2 funded through the HRP and to determine best practices from similar assessment processes that are used in other federal agencies. This letter report and its recommendations are the product of a 10-member ad hoc committee, which included individuals who had previously conducted research under the HRP, were familiar with the HRP s research portfolio and operations, had specific knowledge of peer review processes, or were familiar with scientific merit assessment processes used in other organizations and federal agencies, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF); and U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Defense (DOD), and Transportation.

  1. Report on the IAEA technical meeting on network of nuclear reaction data centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on the Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 25 to 28 September 2006. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 10 cooperating data centres of six Member States and two international organizations. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status reports of the participating data centres. (author)

  2. Report on the IAEA technical meeting on network of nuclear reaction data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.; Nichols, A.L.

    2002-08-01

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on the Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (and the biennial Data Centre Heads' Meeting) was held at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (near Paris), France, from 27 to 30 May 2002. The meeting was attended by 21 participants from 12 co-operating data centres of six Member States and two international organizations. This report contains the meeting summary, conclusions and actions, status reports of the participating data centres, and working papers considered. (author)

  3. Report on the IAEA technical meeting on network of nuclear reaction data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.

    2006-12-01

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on the Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 25 to 28 September 2006. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 10 cooperating data centres of six Member States and two international organizations. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status reports of the participating data centres. (author)

  4. Summary Report on IAEA Technical Meeting on the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko

    2011-07-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres, held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria from 23 - 24 May 2011. The meeting was attended by 25 participants from 13 cooperating data centres of nine Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. (author)

  5. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Nagy, A.

    1988-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs

  6. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Research Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP) Meeting. [Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Research and Clinical Advisory Panel convened on December 1, 2014 at the ISS Conference Facility in Houston. The panel members were provided updates to the current clinical cases and treatment plans along with the latest research activities (http://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Risks/?i=105) and preliminary study results. The following is a summary of this meeting.

  7. Synergism between diabetic and radiation retinotherapy: case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebahn, M.; Barricks, M.E.; Osterloh, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    It is suspected that radiation retinopathy is more likely to develop in an eye with preexisting diabetic retinopathy than in a normal eye. However, there is only one report of this occurring, at a radiation dose of 4500 rads. We present a woman with minimal diabetic retinopathy who had breast carcinoma which was treated with chemotherapy but metastasised to the choroid. Within nine months of external beam radiation (3000 rads in fractions of 200 rads) a fulminant retinopathy evolved in that eye, while the non-radiated eye showed no change. The histopathology of radiation and diabetic retinopathy and causes for possible synergism are discussed. As this case report shows, radiation oncologists and ophthalmologists need to be aware of the risk that patients with minimal diabetic retinopathy who have undergone chemotherapy may suffer a dramatic visual loss from radiation therapy despite a radiation dose which is considered adequate, safe, and properly fractionated. (author)

  8. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  9. Development of recommendations in the area of ionizing radiation. Final report, March 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the eight new NCRP publications of 1993, including five reports, a commentary, the proceedings of the 1992 annual meeting and a Taylor lecture. Titles are as follows: NCRP Report No. 116 Limitation of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation; NCRP Report No. 117, Research Needs for Radiation Protection; NCRP Report No. 118 Radiation Protection in the Mineral Extraction Industry; NCRP Report No. 119 A Practical Guide to the Determination of Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields; NCRP Commentary No. 8 Uncertainty in NCRP Screening Models Relating to Atmospheric Transport, Depostion and Uptake by Humans; NCRP Proceeding No. 14 Radiation Protection in Medicine; Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture No. 17 Science, Radiation Protection and the NCRP by Warren K. Sinclair

  10. An initial report of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Although radiation proctitis is one of popular adverse effects, standard treatments are not established. We reported 5 cases with the administration of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis. We made polaprezinc suppositories and administered to 5 patients with radiation proctitis. It was possible to administer it safely. 3 cases have the improvement of the symptoms. And one case had endoscopic findings improved significantly. Polaprezinc may be one of the treatments to radiation proctitis. (author)

  11. 2010 ANNUAL MEETING ON NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY. Pt. 3. Section reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Uwe; Baumann, Erik; Fischer, Ulrich; Bohnstedt, Angelika; Gehring, Michael; Roedig, Manfred; Willschuetz, Hans-Georg; Goers, Stefan; Schoenfelder, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Summary report on these 6 - out of 12 - Sessions of the Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology held in Berlin on May 3 to 6, 2010: - Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations (Session 7), - Fusion Technology (Session 8), - Energy Industry and Economics (Session 10), - Radiation Protection (Session 11), - New Build and Innovations (Session 12), and - Education, Expert Knowledge, Know-how-Transfer (Session 13). The other Sessions: - Reactor Physics and Methods of Calculation (Session 1), - Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics (Session 2), - Safety of Nuclear Installations - Methods, Analysis, Results (Session 3), - Front End and Back End of the Fuel Cycle, Radioactive Waste, Storage (Session 4), - Front End of the Fuel Cycle, Fuel Elements and Core Components (Session 5), - Operation of Nuclear Installations (Session 6) have been covered in atw issues 10 and 11 (2010). (orig.)

  12. Technical meeting on commercial applications of nuclear analytical techniques. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Technical Meeting on the Commercial Applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques held in Vienna on 23-26 November 2004, where an assessment was initiated of the world capacity and market potentials for neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy, including an estimation of economic revenues. Industry and governmental agencies were identified as stakeholders for these laboratories. Examples are given of potential benefits of these techniques to the stakeholders. The potentials for commercial applications of neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy (measurement of alpha, beta and gamma ray emitting radionuclides) are addressed. First estimates are given of the worldwide capacity of these laboratories, suggestions and examples are given for potential markets and the typical organizational and technical constraints are discussed. Two case studies of commercial neutron activation analysis laboratories at a small and a medium-size reactor are given in the 'individual contributions' section of this document. An assessment of other nuclear analytical techniques such as X ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Particle Induced X ray Emission Spectrometry or Ion Beam Analysis Spectrometry has been completed after a comprehensive collection of background information

  13. Technical meeting on commercial applications of nuclear analytical techniques. Meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Technical Meeting on the Commercial Applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques held in Vienna on 23-26 November 2004, where an assessment was initiated of the world capacity and market potentials for neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy, including an estimation of economic revenues. Industry and governmental agencies were identified as stakeholders for these laboratories. Examples are given of potential benefits of these techniques to the stakeholders. The potentials for commercial applications of neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy (measurement of alpha, beta and gamma ray emitting radionuclides) are addressed. First estimates are given of the worldwide capacity of these laboratories, suggestions and examples are given for potential markets and the typical organizational and technical constraints are discussed. Two case studies of commercial neutron activation analysis laboratories at a small and a medium-size reactor are given in the 'individual contributions' section of this document. An assessment of other nuclear analytical techniques such as X ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Particle Induced X ray Emission Spectrometry or Ion Beam Analysis Spectrometry has been completed after a comprehensive collection of background information.

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 65: Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this article, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as: (a) the order in which report components are read; (b) components used to determine if a report would be read; (c) those components that could be deleted; (d) the placement of such components as the symbols list; (e) the desirability of a table of contents; (f) the format of reference citations; (g) column layout and right margin treatment; and (h) writing style in terms of person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 58; Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this paper, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as (1) the order in which report components are read, (2) components used to determine if a report would be read, (3) those components that could be deleted, (4) the placement of such components as the symbols list, (e) the de-sirability of a table of contents, (5) the format of reference citations, (6) column layout and right margin treatment, and (7) and person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  16. Workshop Report on Managing Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Lee (Compiler); Caldeira, Ken (Compiler); Chatfield, Robert (Compiler); Langhoff, Stephanie (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The basic concept of managing Earth's radiation budget is to reduce the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the Earth so as to counterbalance the heating of the Earth that would otherwise result from the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The workshop did not seek to decide whether or under what circumstances solar radiation management should be deployed or which strategies or technologies might be best, if it were deployed. Rather, the workshop focused on defining what kinds of information might be most valuable in allowing policy makers more knowledgeably to address the various options for solar radiation management.

  17. Radiation Protection Research Needs Workshop: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davis, Jason [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, Nolan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abelquist, Eric [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In order to protect humans and the environment when using ionizing radiation for the advancement and benefit of society, accurately quantifying radiation and its potential effects remains the driver for ensuring the safety and secure use of nuclear and radiological applications of technology. In the realm of radiation protection and its various applications with the nuclear fuel cycle, (nuclear) medicine, emergency response, national defense, and space exploration, the scientific and research needs to support state and federal radiation protection needs in the United States in each of these areas are still deficient.

  18. IAEA technical committee meeting: 10th meeting of the IFRC subcommittee on atomic and molecular data for fusion. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R K

    1999-01-01

    This report describes briefly the proceedings and the conclusions and recommendations of the 10th Meeting of the Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion of the International Fusion Research Council held on May 27-28, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The report includes also the Executive Summary of the Subcommittee from this Meeting which was communicated to the IAEA Director General, and is appended with the Report on Activities of IAEA A+M Data Unit for the period July 1996 - May 1998. (author)

  19. IAEA technical committee meeting: 12th meeting of the IFRC Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R E.H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-12-01

    This report briefly describes the proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the 12th Meeting of the Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion of the International Fusion Research Council held on May 8-9, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna Austria. The report includes the Executive Summary of the Subcommittee from this Meeting which was communicated to the IAEA Director General as well as the report on the activities of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit for the period June 1999 - May 2000. (author)

  20. 9th Transgenic Technology Meeting (TT2010) in Berlin, Germany: a meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Thomas L; Sobieszczuk, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The first Transgenic Technology (TT) Meeting was organized in 1999 by Johannes Wilbertz, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden as a regional meeting. The TT Meetings continued in this way, constantly gathering additional practitioners of transgenic methodologies until the breakthrough in 2005 when the 6th TT Meeting in Barcelona, Spain, hosted by Lluis Montoliu (Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Madrid, Spain), generated the momentum to establish the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). Since 2006, the ISTT has continued to promote the TT Meetings and provide its membership with a forum to discuss best practices and new methods in the field. The TT2010 Meeting was held at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (Berlin, Germany). Participation at the TT2010 Meeting exceeded the registration capacity and set a new attendance record. Session topics included methods for the generation of rat and mouse models of human disease, fundamental and advanced topics in rodent embryonic stem cells, and the newest transgenic technologies. Short presentations from selected abstracts were of especial interest. Roundtable discussions on transgenic facility establishment and cryoarchiving of mouse lines were favorably received. Students, technical staff, and professors participated in numerous discussions and came away with practical methods and new ideas for research.