WorldWideScience

Sample records for meeting participants worked

  1. [Participative ergonomics for adapting the working space to meet the needs of nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Bouvatier, Catherine; Milanini-Magny, Giuliana; Deslandes, Hélène; Ravache, Anne-Emile; Bernard, Chloé; Mendès, Cindy; Medous, Adeline

    2011-01-01

    Presst-Next, the European study carried out between 2004 and 2006, highlighted the importance of teamwork in reducing the frequency of professional exhaustion and the early departure of care staff. On the basis of these results, the Armand-Trousseau Hospital in Paris (AP-HP 75) has committed to a participative ergonomics approach at its paediatric emergency service.

  2. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Maravic, H.

    1993-01-01

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  3. 2. biophysical work meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The report comprises 18 papers held at the 2nd Biophysical Work Meeting, 11 - 13 September 1991 in Schlema, Germany. The history of biophysics in Germany particularly of radiation biophysics and radon research, measurements of the radiation effects of radon and the derivation of limits, radon balneotherapy and consequences of uranium ore mining are dealt with. (orig.) [de

  4. Making Meetings Work Better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standke, Linda

    1978-01-01

    Focusing on the increased use by trainers of off-site facilities for employee training meetings, this article looks at some improvements and the expanding market in the meeting site industry. It also highlights emerging trends in the industry and covers the growth of meeting planning into a profession. (EM)

  5. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  6. Monitoring Technology Meets Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bygholm, Ann

    2015-01-01

    's ability to meet the complexity of care work. Understanding intersectional challenges between these care technologies and care work is fundamental to improve design and use of health informatics. In this paper we present an analysis of interaction challenges between a wet-sensor at the task of monitoring......Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies – aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks – recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology...... wet beds at a nursing home. The analysis identifies the multifaceted nature of monitoring work and the intricacy of integrating sensor technology into the complex knowledge system of monitoring work....

  7. 34 CFR 300.328 - Alternative means of meeting participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Programs, and Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.328 Alternative means of meeting participation. When conducting IEP Team meetings and placement meetings pursuant to this subpart, and subpart E...

  8. Summary records of the meetings of INFCE Working Group 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These were 6 meetings of Working Group 6 that took place between 8 December 1977 and 7 September 1979. This document consists of the summaries of those meetings and it reports on the objectives of the Working Group, the participants, the guidelines for the study, and the outline of the final report

  9. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The theme of the meeting was ``A Path to Commercialization`` and discussion was devoted to addressing the nearest-term products and the time frame for implementation. The objectives of the meeting were to identify the barriers to commercialization, methods to overcome these barriers, and the actions required to achieve success. The meeting was planned to bring together government agencies and industry customers and, suppliers to discuss and conclude where the CFCC Program is today, where it is going, and how they plan to get there. It was also planned to join component developers with end users who can describe systems needs and projected schedules for introducing CFCC components in industrial applications.

  10. Upper Limb Absence : Predictors of Work Participation and Work Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Sietke G; Bongers, Raoul M; Brouwers, Michael A; Burger, Helena; Norling-Hermansson, Liselotte M; Reneman, Michiel F; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van der Sluis, Corry K

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze work participation, work productivity, contributing factors, and physical work demands of individuals with upper limb absence (ULA). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study: postal survey (response rate, 45%). SETTING: Twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops.

  11. Remote participation at JET Task Force work: users' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttrop, W.; Kinna, D.; Farthing, J.; Hemming, O.; How, J.; Schmidt, V.

    2002-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) fusion experiment is now operated with strong involvement of physicists from outside research laboratories, which often requires remote participation in JET physics experiments. Users' experience with tools for remote collaborative work is reported, including remote computer and data access, remote meetings, shared documentation and various other communication channels

  12. Mechanical Working Group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This documents contains the minutes and viewgraphs from the October 27--28, 1992 meeting on the subject of power generation and delivery systems for military applications. Attendees represented the US Air Force and NASA. The thermal management panel reported on the capillary pump loop test facility, thermal control systems and compressors, and the oxygen heat pipe flight experiment. The aerospace power panel reported on the integrated power unit for the more electric airplane, the solar dynamic power system, the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor-gas-turbine program, the multi-megawatt CBC power system, and analytical modeling for heat pipe performance. The terrestrial power panel reported on a free piston stirling engine power generation system, fuel cell vehicles, and the advanced gas turbine project.

  13. Work, Formal Participation, and Employee Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Donald V.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a study of the effects of work and expanded employee participation in decision making on four employee outcomes: alienation, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and commitment. (Author/JOW)

  14. Upgrading radiological work practices through employee participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Following the shutdown of the Midland Plant in 1984, Consumers Power Company found itself with a need to reorganize its nuclear operations department. The reorganization took place in November 1984. At that time the plant was just completing an intermittent outage that had begun in September 1983. Over the previous 2 yr, the plant had expended 1,500 person-rem and generated 1330 m 3 of radioactive waste. In addition, an overexposure and a shipping violation in early 1984 had contributed to a deteriorating regulatory picture for radiological services. In an attempt to understand the problem confronting the plant, the new organization set up a group of meetings for each department to identify their barriers to becoming a high-performance organization. These meetings, which became known as barrier meetings, were used to identify barriers to performance, such as overly restrictive requirements, excessive paperwork, facility limitations, and improper job assignments. Following the barrier meetings, corrective actions and individuals responsible for completing these actions were identified. Most recent efforts have been in upgrading radiological work practices

  15. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  16. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed

  17. Upper Limb Absence: Predictors of Work Participation and Work Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Sietke G; Bongers, Raoul M; Brouwers, Michael A; Burger, Helena; Norling-Hermansson, Liselotte M; Reneman, Michiel F; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2016-06-01

    To analyze work participation, work productivity, contributing factors, and physical work demands of individuals with upper limb absence (ULA). Cross-sectional study: postal survey (response rate, 45%). Twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops. Individuals (n=207) with unilateral transverse upper limb reduction deficiency (RD) or acquired amputation (AA), at or proximal to the carpal level, between the ages of 18 and 65 years, and a convenience sample of control subjects (n=90) matched on age and sex. Not applicable. Employment status, self-reported work productivity measured with the Quality-Quantity method, and self-reported upper extremity work demands measured with the Upper Extremity Work Demands scale. Seventy-four percent of the individuals with RD and 57% of the individuals with AA were employed (vs 82% of the control group and 66% of the general population). Male sex, younger age, a medium or higher level of education, prosthesis use, and good general health were predictors of work participation. Work productivity was similar to that of the control group. Higher work productivity was inversely related to musculoskeletal complaint-related pain. When having predominantly mentally demanding work, individuals with ULA perceived higher upper extremity work demands compared with controls. Work participation of individuals with RD was slightly higher compared with that of the general population, whereas employment rates of individuals with AA were slightly lower. Furthermore, work productivity did not differ between individuals with RD, AA, and controls. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercising at work: barriers to women's participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, M J; Hamm, R D; Love, E J

    1993-06-01

    Only a minority of women in an urban random sample have the opportunity to exercise at work, and even fewer women use these opportunities. Lack of time and inconvenient times are the major reasons for not participating in exercise programs at work. Exercise programs at work are used by women who are already physically active, suggesting that workplace exercise programs do not serve the needs of women who may need exercise programs most. Multivariate analysis shows that age, having children, lack of energy, and lack of support are significant barriers to women's exercise participation at work. The results of this study suggest a leadership opportunity for on site occupational health nurses in addressing these barriers to workplace exercise.

  19. Participation in Sex Work: Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ron; Sanders, Teela; Myers, Ellie; Smith, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to student involvement in the sex industry. The current study comprised a cross-sectional sample of 315 undergraduates at a London university. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, data were gathered on students' financial and employment circumstances and their views on participation in sex work. Results suggested…

  20. Insights on different participation schemes to meet climate goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, Peter; Ierland, Tom van

    2009-01-01

    Models and scenarios to assess greenhouse gas mitigation action have become more diversified and detailed, allowing the simulation of more realistic global climate policy set-ups. In this paper, different participation schemes to meet different levels of radiative forcing are analysed. The focus is on scenarios that are in line with the 2 deg. C target. Typical stylised participation schemes are based either on a perfect global carbon market or delayed participation with targets only for developed countries, no actions by developing countries and no access to credits from offsetting mechanisms in developing countries. This paper adds an intermediate policy scenario assuming a gradual incorporation of all countries, including a gradually developing carbon market, and taking into account the ability to contribute of different parties. Perfect participation by all parties would be optimal, but it is shown that participation schemes involving a gradual and differentiated participation by all parties can substantially decrease global costs and still meet the 2 deg. C target. Carbon markets can compensate in part for those costs incurred by developing countries' own, autonomous mitigation actions that do not generate tradable emission credits.

  1. Sustaining Work Participation Across the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pransky, Glenn S; Fassier, Jean-Baptise; Besen, Elyssa; Blanck, Peter; Ekberg, Kerstin; Feuerstein, Michael; Munir, Fehmidah

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Many disability prevention strategies are focused on acute injuries and brief illness episodes, but there will be growing challenges for employers to manage circumstances of recurrent, chronic, or fluctuating symptoms in an aging workforce. The goal of this article is to summarize existing peer-review research in this area, compare this with employer discourse in the grey literature, and recommend future research priorities. Methods The authors participated in a year-long sponsored collaboration that ultimately led to an invited 3-day conference, "Improving Research of Employer Practices to Prevent Disability", held October 14-16, 2015, in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. The collaboration included a topical review of the scientific and industry literature, group discussion to identify key areas and challenges, drafting of initial documents, and feedback from peer researchers and a special panel of experts with employer experience. Results Cancer and mental illness were chosen as examples of chronic or recurring conditions that might challenge conventional workplace return-to-work practices. Workplace problems identified in the literature included fatigue, emotional exhaustion, poor supervisor and co-worker support, stigma, discrimination, and difficulties finding appropriate accommodations. Workplace intervention research is generally lacking, but there is preliminary support for improving workplace self-management strategies, collaborative problem-solving, and providing checklists and other tools for job accommodation, ideas echoed in the literature directed toward employers. Research might be improved by following workers from an earlier stage of developing workplace concerns. Conclusions Future research of work disability should focus on earlier identification of at-risk workers with chronic conditions, the use of more innovative and flexible accommodation strategies matched to specific functional losses, stronger integration of the workplace into on

  2. Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) (39th annual meeting). Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The 39th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG FR) was held from 15-19 May 2006 in Beijing, China, at the invitation of the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAEA). The meeting was attended by TWG-FR Members and Advisers from the following Member States (MS): Belgium (observer), Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden (observer), the United Kingdom, and the United States. Belarus, Switzerland, the European Commission, and OECD/NEA were unable to participate. Moreover, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, CERN director general emeritus, participated, upon IAEA invitation, in the meeting as distinguished scientist and IAEA expert. Mr. S.C. Chetal, from India (Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, IGCAR), was appointed chairman. The objectives of the meeting were to: - Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); - Review the progress since the 38th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; - Consider meeting arrangements for 2006 and 2007; - Reviewed the Agency's ongoing information exchange and co-ordinated research activities in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations; - Discuss future joint activities in view of the Agency's Programme and Budget Cycle 2008-2009 (and beyond)

  3. Inclusion and Participation: Working with the Tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Calder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Democracy is crucially about inclusion: a theory of democracy must account for who is to be included in the democratic process, how, and on what terms. Inclusion, if conceived democratically, is fraught with tensions. This article identifies three such tensions, arising respectively in: (i the inauguration of the democratic public; (ii enabling equal participation; and (iii the relationship between instrumental and non-instrumental accounts of democracy’s value. In each case, I argue, rather than seeking somehow to dissolve or avoid such tensions, theories of democracy should allow us to live with their implications reflexively: to work with them. Such tensions are counter-democratic to the extent that they derail what Nancy Fraser calls “participatory parity,” under which citizens count as “full partners in social interaction.” But the extent to which they do this is not itself dependent on points of paradox in the very idea of inclusion. Such parity relies on complex factors, social and economic, which democratic institutions and procedures will not by themselves address. To achieve full democratic inclusion we must already have addressed such factors; no account of democracy itself, however finely-tuned, will do this.

  4. Mixed Methods in Education Research. IES Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, May 29, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This meeting summary is organized into two major sections. The first section captures the individual contribution of meeting participants, including both Institute of Education Sciences (IES) staff and the invited technical working group members. The second section captures themes that arose during the group discussions, which were organized…

  5. Proximal Participation: A Pathway into Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Selena

    2013-01-01

    In a longitudinal case study of apprentices, the term proximal participation was coined to describe the entry process of young people, with unclear career destinations, into the trade of baking. This article unravels the significance of proximal participation in the decision-making processes of young people who enter a trade through initial…

  6. Fandom meets activism: Rethinking civic and political participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Brough

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fan activism lies at the intersection of cultural and political participation. The study of fan activism can inform our understanding of contemporary collective action more broadly. We suggest four key areas for analysis: the relationships between cultural and political participation; the tension between participation and resistance in the context of fan activism; affect and the role of content worlds in civic and political mobilization; and evaluation of the impacts of fan activism. By drawing on work across several disciplines including media studies and social movement literature, the analysis of fan activism through these lenses offers insights for theorizing contemporary cultures and modes of collective action.

  7. Voluntary Participation in Regional Fisheries Management Council Meetings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle T. Brzezinski

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient and unrepresentative participation in voluntary public hearings and policy discussions has been problematic since Aristotle's time. In fisheries, research has shown that involvement is dominated by financially resourceful and extreme-opinion stakeholders and tends to advantage groups that have a lower cost of attendance. Stakeholders may exhibit only one or all of these traits but can be still similarly advantaged. The opposites of these traits tend to characterize the disadvantaged, such as the middle-ground opinions, the less wealthy or organized, and the more remote stakeholders. Remoteness or distance is the most straightforward and objective of these characteristics to measure. We analyzed the New England Fishery Management Council's sign-in sheets for 2003-2006, estimating participants' travel distance and associations with the groundfish, scallop, and herring industries. We also evaluated the representativeness of participation by comparing attendance to landings and permit distributions. The distance analysis showed a significant correlation between attendance levels and costs via travel distance. These results suggest a potential bias toward those stakeholders residing closer to meeting locations, possibly disadvantaging parties who are further and must incur higher costs. However, few significant differences were found between the actual fishing industry and attendee distributions, suggesting that the geographical distribution of the meeting attendees is statistically similar to that of the larger fishery. The interpretation of these results must take into consideration the limited time span of the analysis, as policy changes may have altered the industry make-up and location prior to our study. Furthermore, the limited geographical input of stakeholders may lend bias to the Council's perception of ecological and social conditions throughout the spatial range of the fishery. These factors should be further considered in

  8. Participation in Students' Industrial Work Experience Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIWES has been part of the training requirement of Pharmacy students at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, for a long time now. At inception, it was done during vacations until about ten years ago when it was incorporated into the semester period. This work was done to find out the feelings and ...

  9. 75 FR 21602 - Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... OSTWG is tasked with evaluating industry efforts to promote a safe online environment for children. The... and Technology Working Group Meeting AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information... public meeting of the Online Safety and Technology Working Group (OSTWG). DATES: The meeting will be held...

  10. 75 FR 1338 - Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... promote a safe online environment for children. The Act requires the OSTWG to report its findings and... and Technology Working Group Meeting AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information... public meeting of the Online Safety and Technology Working Group (OSTWG). DATES: The meeting will be held...

  11. 78 FR 46361 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting... Trinity Management Council (TMC). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based meeting: TAMWG and...

  12. 78 FR 17226 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting... Service, announce a public meeting, teleconference and web-based meeting of the Trinity Adaptive...

  13. 78 FR 49281 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River (California) restoration...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting... Service, announce a public meeting, teleconference, and web-based meeting of the Trinity Adaptive...

  14. AER Working Group D on VVER safety analysis - report of the 2009 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    2009-01-01

    The AER Working Group D on VVER reactor safety analysis held its 18-th meeting in Rez, Czech Republic, during the period 18-19 May, 2009. The meeting was hosted by the Nuclear Research Institute Rez. Altogether 17 participants attended the meeting of the working group D, 16 from AER member organizations and 1 guest from a non-member organization. The co-ordinator of the working group, S. Kliem, served as chairman of the meeting. The meeting started with a general information exchange about the recent activities in the participating organizations. The given presentations and the discussions can be attributed to the following topics: 1) Code validation and benchmarking; 2) Safety analysis and code developments; 3) Reactor pressure vessel thermal hydraulics; 4) Future activities including discussion on the participation in the OECD/NEA Benchmark for the Kalinin-3 NPP

  15. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS...

  16. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government...

  17. Improving Work Participation of Young Adults with Physical Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, J.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis addresses the work participation of young adults with physical disabilities caused by a chronic condition. With increasing numbers of young people with a chronic physical condition living into adulthood, knowledge about the development of work participation in these young adults and the support they need to achieve suitable employment is needed. Interventions to improve the work participation of young adults with physical disabilities were lacking. The...

  18. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 52 papers are included in part 1

  19. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 55 papers are included in part 2

  20. [Investigating work, age, health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebener, M; Hasselhorn, H M

    2015-04-01

    Working life in Germany is changing. The work force is ageing and the number of people available to the labour market will - from now on - shrink considerably. Prospectively, people will have to work longer; but still today, most people leave employment long before reaching official retirement age. What are the reasons for this? In this report, a conceptual framework and the German lidA Cohort Study are presented. The "lidA conceptual framework on work, age, health and work participation" visualises determinants of employment (11 "domains") in higher working age, e. g., "work", "health", "social status" and "life style". The framework reveals 4 key characteristics of withdrawal from work: leaving working life is the result of an interplay of different domains (complexity); (early) retirement is a process with in part early determinants in the life course (processual character); retirement has a strong individual component (individuality); retirement is embedded in a strong structural frame (structure). On the basis of this framework, the "lidA Cohort Study on work, age, health and work participation" (www.lida-studie.de) investigates long-term effects of work on health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany. It is the only large study in Germany operationalising the concept of employability in a broad interdisciplinary approach. Employees subject to social security and born in 1959 or in 1965 will be interviewed (CAPI) every 3 years (N[wave 1]=6 585, N[wave 2]=4 244) and their data will be linked (where consented) with social security data covering employment history and with health insurance data. The study design ("Schaie's most efficient design") allows for a tri-factor model that isolates the impact of age, cohort and time. In 2014, the second wave was completed. In the coming years lidA will analyse the association of work, health and work participation, and identify age as well as generation differences. lidA will investigate the

  1. Improving Work Participation of Young Adults with Physical Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.C. Verhoef (Joan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis addresses the work participation of young adults with physical disabilities caused by a chronic condition. With increasing numbers of young people with a chronic physical condition living into adulthood, knowledge about the development of work

  2. Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Katen, Kim; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions. Methods. Qualitative cross-sectional

  3. IUFRO Fourth Meeting of Working Party 7.02.09, Phytophthoras in Forest and Natural Ecosystems: Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Frankel

    2009-01-01

    On behalf of the Fourth Phytophthoras in Forest and Natural Ecosystems local organizing committee and co-chairs Everett Hansen, Clive Brasier, and Giles Hardy, I thank you for your contributions to this Working Party meeting. The past week has stimulated much thought and discussion, thanks to the 100 participants from 15 countries, 48 papers and 31 posters, two field...

  4. Improving Work Participation of Young Adults with Physical Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. J.A.C. Verhoef

    2015-01-01

    This thesis addresses the work participation of young adults with physical disabilities caused by a chronic condition. With increasing numbers of young people with a chronic physical condition living into adulthood, knowledge about the development of work participation in these young adults and the

  5. Human work interaction design meets international development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, P.; Clemmensen, T.; Barricelli, B.R.

    2017-01-01

    opportunity to observe technology-mediated innovative work practices in informal settings that may be related to the notion of International Development. In this unique context, this workshop proposes to analyze findings related to opportunities for design research in this type of work domains: a) human......Over the last decade, empirical relationships between work domain analysis and HCI design have been identified by much research in the field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) across five continents. Since this workshop takes place at the Interact Conference in Mumbai, there is a unique...

  6. Norwegian GPs' participation in multidisciplinary meetings: A register-based study from 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjesdal Sturla

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of patients with chronic disorders and a more complex health service demand greater interdisciplinary collaboration in Primary Health Care. The aim of this study was therefore to identify factors related to general practitioners (GPs, their list populations and practice municipalities associated with a high rate of GP participation in multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs. Methods A national cross-sectional register-based study of Norwegian general practice was conducted, including data on all GPs in the Regular GP Scheme in 2007 (N = 3179. GPs were grouped into quartiles based on the annual number of MDMs per patient on their list, and the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Binary logistic regression was used to analyse associations between high rates of participation and characteristics of the GP, their list population and practice municipality. Results On average, GPs attended 30 MDMs per year. The majority of the meetings concerned patients in the age groups 20-59 years. Psychological disorders were the motivation for 53% of the meetings. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the following characteristics predicted a high rate of MDM attendance: younger age of the GP, with an OR of 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.1 for GPs Conclusions Psychological problems including substance addiction gave grounds for the majority of MDMs. GPs with a high proportion of consultations with such problems also participated more frequently in MDMs. List size was negatively associated with the rate of MDMs, while a more disadvantaged list population was positively associated. Working in smaller organisational units seemed to facilitate cooperation between different professionals. There may be a generation shift towards more frequent participation in interdisciplinary work among younger GPs.

  7. ALTERNATE PURSUIT WITH THREE PARTICIPANTS (THE CASE OF POINTWISE MEETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Shiryayev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The issues connected with alternate pursuit of escapees group are considered in a number of papers. So in papers [1–3] the solution of the problem has been found in the assumption that the next meeting is selected at the initial time (by the program and the players are moving straight. In paper [4] the solution of the task using the approach of R. Isaacs is given. In paper [5] the choice opportunities of the next meeting ( both software and positional are considered. The article deals with a simple differential game on the pursuer plane P and the coalition of two escapees E={E1,E2}.The movement of all the players are assumed as inertialess. The pursuer speed P exceeds the speed of each of the escapees. The targets, physical abilities and the exact location of each other in any moment of the game are known to all players. The price of the coalition (the pursuer P is (minus the total time spent by the pursuer P on the pointwise meeting with E1 and E2. A coincidence of pursuer and escapee location is meant under the meeting. The choice at the initial time of the persecution is supposed as given (software selectable regular meeting. The limit of the security zone of the second escapee has been found. A geometric approach is used in the problem solving. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically by means of computer algebra, in particular through the Wolfram Mathematics. After defining the boundary of the second escapee security zone one can study the game between the pursuer Р and three escapees acting in concord (the first escapee is eliminated from the game.

  8. Fandom meets activism: Rethinking civic and political participation

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa M. Brough; Sangita Shresthova

    2012-01-01

    Fan activism lies at the intersection of cultural and political participation. The study of fan activism can inform our understanding of contemporary collective action more broadly. We suggest four key areas for analysis: the relationships between cultural and political participation; the tension between participation and resistance in the context of fan activism; affect and the role of content worlds in civic and political mobilization; and evaluation of the impacts of fan activism. By drawi...

  9. Best practices for virtual participation in meetings: Experiences from synthesis centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Stephanie E.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Winter, Marten; Balch, Jennifer K.; Parker, John N.; Baron, Jill S.; Palmer, Margaret; Schildhauer, Mark P.; Bishop, Pamela; Meagher, Thomas R.; Specht, Alison

    2017-01-01

    The earth environment is a complex system, in which collaborative scientific approaches can provide major benefits by bringing together diverse perspectives, methods, and data, to achieve robust, synthetic understanding (Fig. 1). Face-to-face scientific meetings remain extremely valuable because of the opportunity to build deep mutual trust and understanding, and develop new collaborations and sometimes even lifelong friendships (Alberts 2013, Cooke and Hilton 2015). However, it has been argued that ecologists should be particularly sensitive to the environmental footprint of travel (Fox et al. 2009); such concerns, along with the time demands for travel, particularly for multi-national working groups, provide strong motivation for exploring virtual attendance. While not replacing the richness of face-to-face interactions entirely, it is now feasible to virtually participate in meetings through services that allow video, audio, and file sharing, as well as other Web-enabled communication.

  10. Modeling complex work systems - method meets reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Hoeve, Machteld; Lenting, Bert

    1996-01-01

    Modeling an existing task situation is often a first phase in the (re)design of information systems. For complex systems design, this model should consider both the people and the organization involved, the work, and situational aspects. Groupware Task Analysis (GTA) as part of a method for the

  11. Working women's perceptions of participation in physical activity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participation in physical activity helps one to address and reduce health risk behaviours thereby improving the quality of one's life. The current study explored the relationship between satisfaction with life and working women's perception of their participation in physical activity in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. Using a ...

  12. Exploring employee participation and work environment in hotels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Raymond; Harris, Candice; Knudsen, Herman

    2014-01-01

    We explore the relative impact of direct and representative forms of participation on quality of the work environment, based on multi-method case studies of two hotels each in New Zealand and Denmark. The degree of direct participation is higher at the New Zealand hotels, yet, workload and stress...... is higher than in the Danish ones. This confirms literature that questions whether participation is always beneficial to the work environment. On the other hand, representative forms of participation appear to offer greater opportunities for a better quality of work environment (QWE) since Danish employees...... in this study enjoy greater influence through collective bargaining and cooperation committees, and experience less workload stress than the New Zealanders....

  13. Participation in physical activity: An empirical study of working ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As more women enter the work place and advance through the hierarchy in organisations, taking on new responsibilities and facing increased work demands, the need to balance their career, family and participation in physical activity arises. This has a direct bearing on their physical and mental well being, as well as their ...

  14. Successful participation of patients in interprofessional team meetings: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; Habets, Iris Gerarda Josephine; Beurskens, Anna; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia

    2017-08-01

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions increases as a result of ageing. To deal with the complex health-care needs of these patients, it is important that health-care professionals collaborate in interprofessional teams. To deliver patient-centred care, it is often recommended to include the patient as a member of the team. To gain more insight into how health-care professionals and patients, who are used to participate in interprofessional team meetings, experience and organize patient participation in the team meetings. A qualitative study including observations of meetings (n=8), followed by semi-structured interviews with participating health-care professionals (n=8), patients and/or relatives (n=11). Professionals and patients were asked about their experiences of patient participation immediately after the team meetings. Results from both observations and interviews were analysed using content analysis. The findings show a variety of influencing factors related to patient participation that can be divided into five categories: (i) structure and task distribution, (ii) group composition, (iii) relationship between professionals and patients or relatives, (iv) patients' characteristics and (v) the purpose of the meeting. Patient participation during team meetings was appreciated by professionals and patients. A tailored approach to patient involvement during team meetings is preferable. When considering the presence of patients in team meetings, it is recommended to pay attention to patients' willingness and ability to participate, and the necessary information shared before the meeting. Participating patients seem to appreciate support and preparation for the meeting. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Work Participation of Employees with Common Mental Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Cecilie Nørby; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bjerrum, Merete

    2017-01-01

    on the synthesized findings, we recommended that the employer is involved in the rehabilitation process, and that rehabilitation professionals seek to strengthen the employee’s ability to manage work-related stress. In addition, rehabilitation professionals should provide individualized and active support and ensure......Purpose The aim was to aggregate knowledge about the opportunities, challenges and need for support employees with common mental disorders experience in relation to work participation in order to develop recommendations for practice. Methods A meta-synthesis was conducted using a meta...... findings. One synthesized finding indicates that a strong work identity and negative perceptions regarding mental disorders can impede work participation, creating an essential need for a supportive work environment. The other reveals that the diffuse nature of the symptoms of mental disorders causes...

  16. Participation in interdisciplinary meetings on genetic diagnostics (NGS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Tom; van Burgsteden, Lotte; Harms, Paulien; van Diemen, Cleo C; van Langen, Irene M

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostics using next generation sequencing (NGS) requires high-quality interdisciplinary collaboration. In order to gain insight into this crucial collaborative process, we made video recordings of a new multidisciplinary team at work in the clinical genetics department of the University Medical

  17. Executive committee report: geotechnical instrumentation working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.; Rogue, F.; Beloff, W.R.; Binnall, E.; Gregory, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Responding to the widespread need for the geotechnical community to discuss instrumentation for nuclear waste repositories, a meeting was held December 2 and 3, 1981, in Denver, Colorado. This report gives the group's consensus recommendations to aid in making decisions for development of instrumentation for future repository work. The main conclusions of the working group meeting were as follows: (1) monitoring of geotechnical parameters in nuclear waste repositories will be necessary to meet licensing requirements; (2) currently available instruments are underdeveloped for this monitoring; (3) research and development to provide adequate instrumentation will need to be performed under federal sponsorship by national laboratories, universities, contractors, and consultants; and (4) a NASA-type reliability program is needed to meet the quality assurance, durability, calibration, and time schedule demands of geotechnical instrumentation development. This will require significant financial commitments from the federal sector

  18. Assessment of participation in higher education team working activities

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu Andrés, María Angeles; García-Casas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    [EN] Since among the competences which are most valued by engineering corporations are the ability to make decisions, the capacity for teamwork, one’s initiative and the capacity for solving problems together with an efficient communication, an experience based on active learning and team-working in which participants had to put them into practice was carried out. Before starting the experience with an active learning strategy, students had to decide on what they understood by participation i...

  19. Working group on VVER safety analysis - report of the 2010 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    2010-01-01

    The AER Working Group D on WWER reactor safety analysis held its nineteenth meeting in Pisa, Italy, during the period 15-16 April, 2010. The meeting was hosted by the San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group of the University of Pisa and was held in conjunction with the second workshop on the OECD/NEA Benchmark for the Kalinin-3 WWER-1000 NPP and the fourth workshop on the OECD Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) for Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs. Altogether 12 participants attended the meeting of the working group D, 8 from AER member organizations and 4 guests from non-member organization. The co-ordinator of the working group, Mr. S. Kliem, served as chairman of the meeting. The meeting started with a general information exchange about the recent activities in the participating organizations. The given presentations and the discussions can be attributed to the following topics:-Code validation and benchmarking including the calculation of the OECD/NEA Benchmark for the Kalinin-3 WWER-1000 NPP;-Safety analyses and code developments;-Future activities A list of the participants and a list of the handouts distributed at the meeting are attached to the report. The corresponding PDF-files can be obtained from the chairman. (Author)

  20. Impact of a fatigue management in work programme on meeting work demands of individuals with rheumatic diseases: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Róisín C; O'Shea, Finbar; Doran, Michele; Connolly, Deirdre

    2018-03-25

    Work disability and job loss are serious consequences of rheumatic diseases (RDs), and fatigue is a symptom of RDs commonly reported to have an impact on work performance. A FAtigue ManagEment in Work (FAME-W) programme was developed to facilitate the self-management of fatigue in work. The present pilot study explored if FAME-W could facilitate individuals with RDs to manage fatigue in work and improve their ability to meet work demands. Twenty-seven individuals with a variety of rheumatic diagnoses completed a 4-week, 2-h occupational therapy-led self-management programme. Each week focused on fatigue-related topics, including fatigue and activity management, pain management and joint protection, mental well-being, effective communication with employers and work colleagues, and employment legislation. Individual workplace ergonomic assessments were also offered. Study measures (work function, fatigue, pain, mood and self-efficacy) were completed prior to starting FAME-W, immediately post-intervention and 12 weeks post-intervention. Participants (56% male) had a mean age of 43 years. No significant improvements were observed immediately post-programme. However, at the 12-week follow-up, significant improvements were reported in meeting work demands (scheduling [p = 0.046], output [p = 0.002], physical [p = 0.003], mental [p = 0.016]), fatigue [p = 0.001], pain [p = 0.01], anxiety [p = 0.001], depression [p physical: p = 0.005; symptoms: p = 0.010; affect: p = 0.010; social: p = 0.001). Significant improvements were reported in participants' ability to meet various demands of their work 3 months post-FAME-W. These findings suggest that FAME-W has the potential to assist individuals with RDs to meet the demands of their work, although further research is required to test the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Katen, Kim; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions. Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis. Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain. These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

  2. Intermediary cooperative associations and the institutionalization of participative work practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning; Doellgast, Virginia; Bojesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    of the Centre for the Development of Human Resources and Quality Management (SCKK), a social partnership-based organization that funds workplace development Projects at state workplaces, and of nine participative development projects that received financial and logistical support from the SCKK. These projects...... increased union and management commitment to partnership-based approaches to problem-solving, despite their ambiguous results for both groups. This suggests that intermediary cooperative associations help to enhance the normative legitimacy of participative work practices through the provision of resources...... and ‘best practice’ management approaches....

  3. Beyond participation -Social Influence on Information Technology and Work Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    in danish industry indicates that the organisation is a poor unit of operation for participative management related to integrative IT. It is proposed rather to use segments as a analytical unit for participation and influence. A segment consists of a IT- supplier and his customer. It is argued that supplier...... and customer tend to build up a interdependency of economic, social and technical character. The segments works as a fortification of a dominant alliance between suppliers representatives and parts of management. The contribution argues for a revival of the collective ressource approach or other societal...

  4. Proceedings of the fourth annual participants' information meeting, DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, D.E.; Mezga, L.J.; Stratton, L.E.; Rose, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fourth Annual Participants' Information Meeting of the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in Denver, Colorado, August 31 to September 2, 1982. The purpose of the meeting was to report and evaluate technology development funded by the program and to examine mechanisms for technology transfer. The meeting consisted of an introductory plenary session, followed by two concurrent overview sessions and then six concurrent technical sessions. There were two group meetings to review the findings of the technical sessions. The meeting concluded with a plenary summary session in which the major findings of the meeting were addressed. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  5. 'AER Working Group D On WWER Safety Analysis' Report Of The Meeting In Pisa, Italy, 26-27 April 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    2006-01-01

    AER Working Group D on WWER reactor safety analysis held its 15 t h meeting in Grand Hotel Duomo in Pisa, Italy during the period 26-27 April 2006. The meeting was hosted by the University of Pisa following the fourth workshop on the OECD/DOE/CEA WWER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark (W1000-CT) held at the same location on 24-25 April. Altogether 15 participants attended the Working Group D meeting, 11 from AER member organizations and 4 guests from non-member organizations. The coordinator for the working group, Mr. P. Siltanen (FNS) served as chairman. In addition to general information exchange on recent activities in the participating organizations, the topics of the meeting included: 1) Code development and benchmarking for reactor dynamics applications. 2) Safety analysis methodology and results. 3) Future activities. A list of participants and a list of handouts distributed at the meeting are attached to the report (Author)

  6. Work, authority and participation : the scenario of circular organizing

    OpenAIRE

    Romme,A. Georges L.

    1997-01-01

    Two antagonistic tendencies in the way work is organized can be observed in Europe and the North-American continent. First, there is the growing tendency toward more efficient and flexible modes of organizing by way of a clear (re)distribution of authority. At the other hand, the importance of participation and cooperation in the workplace is growing, also in view of ideas about empowerment, organizational democracy, and self-management. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility...

  7. International Energy Agency's Heat Pump Centre (IEA-HPC) Annual National Team Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders, M. A.

    1992-09-01

    The traveler, serving as Delegate from the United States Advanced Heat Pump National Team, participated in the activities of the fourth IEA-HPC National Team Working Group meeting. Highlights of this meeting included review and discussion of 1992 IEA-HPC activities and accomplishments, introduction of the Switzerland National Team, and development of the 1993 IEA-HPC work program. The traveler also gave a formal presentation about the Development and Activities of the IEA Advanced Heat Pump U.S. National Team.

  8. [Participants-centered Design of Annual Meeting: From the Perspectives of Instructional Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2018-01-01

     This paper examines the reform experience of the 10th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society for Pharmaceutical Palliative Care and Sciences from Instructional Systems perspectives, to check whether it was effective, efficient, and appealing for participants. "Instructional Systems" has been a research area in educational technology for the past 50 years, and has also been applied to training and human resource development in healthcare domains. If an annual meeting is to be designed for participants' learning, then perspectives of Instructional Systems can be applied to interpret the effort of the reform. First, fill in the gaps of participants' knowledge, using before-and-after comparison. Design a conference to meet the needs of its participants by checking why they attend (expectations) and what they bring in (starting status). Second, design the conference as a process of innovation. The bigger the expected changes, the more carefully participants should be prepared to accommodate them. Third, follow plan-do-check-action cycles with data for confirming and revising the new ways of running the meeting. Plan to check "exportability" of the new ways, to assess whether it can be generalized to future meetings.

  9. Finnish participation in the European utility requirements work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Finnish participation in the EUR process started already in April 1994 when IVO (Imatran Voima Oy presently Fortum Oyj) and TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy) were asked to comment EUR Volume 1 and 2 Revision A in April 1994. A formal application for the Finnish membership in the EUR organisation was sent on 20 November 1995, and Finland was accepted as an associated member on the next day. The Finnish representatives in the various EUR bodies were appointed in March 1996, at which time the formal participation in these bodies commenced. On 7 November 1996, EUR Steering Committee approved a full membership of IVO and TVO that are joint EUR members representing Finland together. A major Finnish contribution was made in 1997 when IVO and TVO performed a comparison between the EUR document and YVL guides. The period of the Finnish membership has been characterised by the compilation of EUR Volume 3 subsets, in which process IVO/Fortum and TVO have been actively participating. From the Finnish point of view, the EUR work can also be seen as a part of getting prepared to proceed with a possible new NPP project. The EUR document is a substantial aid when preparing the technical specifications for a NPP bid inquiry. The information received in connection with the detailed assessment work for Volume 3 subsets is very valuable when considering the feasibility of NPP concepts. In addition. the experiences gained in the Volume 3 activities enable to develop even better requirements that are manifested by Revision C of Volumes 1 and 2. (author)

  10. 19. working group meeting of representatives of RCA member States. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The 19. RCA Working Group Meeting was hosted by the Myanmar Atomic Energy Committee in Yangon from 10-14 March 1997. The meeting marked the 25. anniversary of the RCA which commenced in 1972. It was attended by 29 delegates from 15 visiting RCA Member States, 15 participants from Myanmar and 4 from the IAEA. The report contains the statements of the following countries: Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Viet Nam. Tabs

  11. 19. working group meeting of representatives of RCA member States. Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The 19. RCA Working Group Meeting was hosted by the Myanmar Atomic Energy Committee in Yangon from 10-14 March 1997. The meeting marked the 25. anniversary of the RCA which commenced in 1972. It was attended by 29 delegates from 15 visiting RCA Member States, 15 participants from Myanmar and 4 from the IAEA. The report contains the statements of the following countries: Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Viet Nam. Tabs.

  12. Nuclear power plant diagnostics - Safety aspects and licensing. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was to review developed systems and methods in diagnostics in the scope of their impacts and importance to the safety of Nuclear Power Plants. Papers presented on TCM came from different sources, from developers, from manufacturers, from licensing authorities and from NPP personal. They reflect up to date status in the given subject. Participants of TCM formulated three working groups to elaborate different questions which were raised during the discussions. Their results are reflected in the three chapter titles of the given material. Annex 1 to this document contains presentations made at the Technical Committee Meeting. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. National Working Group Meeting on ALK diagnostics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wendy; Fox, Stephen; O'Toole, Sandra; Morey, Adrienne; Frances, Glenn; Pavlakis, Nick; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Dettrick, Andrew; Leong, Trishe; Rathi, Vivek; Spagnolo, Dominic; Hemmings, Chris; Singh, Mahendra; Moffat, David; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wilner, Keith; Buller, Richard; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Arifeen, Shams; Binko, Justin; Alam, Mahmood

    2014-04-01

    The global landscape of molecular testing is rapidly changing, with the recent publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines and the ALK Atlas. The IASLC/CAP guidelines recommend that tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) be tested for ALK rearrangements in addition to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The spur for this recommendation is the availability of novel therapies that target these rearrangements. This article is based on coverage of a Pfizer-sponsored National Working Group Meeting on ALK Diagnostics in Lung Cancer, held around the 15th World Lung Cancer Conference, in Sydney on October 31, 2013. It is based on the presentations given by the authors at the meeting and the discussion that ensued. The content for this article was discussed and agreed on by the authors. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. 2D Presentation Techniques of Mind-maps for Blind Meeting Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölzer, Stephan; Miesenberger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Mind-maps, used as ideation technique in co-located meetings (e.g. in brainstorming sessions), which meet with increased importance in business and education, show considerably accessibility challenges for blind meeting participants. Besides an overview of general aspects of accessibility issues in co-located meetings, this paper focuses on the design and development of alternative non-visual presentation techniques for mind-maps. The different aspects of serialized presentation techniques (e.g. treeview) for Braille and audio rendering and two dimensional presentation techniques (e.g. tactile two dimensional array matrix and edge-projection method [1]) are discussed based on the user feedback gathered in intermediate tests following a user centered design approach.

  15. 34 CFR 300.501 - Opportunity to examine records; parent participation in meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Opportunity to examine records; parent participation in... discussed at a later meeting. (c) Parent involvement in placement decisions. (1) Each public agency must... placement decision may be made by a group without the involvement of a parent, if the public agency is...

  16. Family participation in care plan meetings : Promoting a collaborative organizational culture in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate

    In this study, the author evaluated a project in The Netherlands that aimed to promote family members' participation in care plan meetings at a psychogeriatric nursing home. The small-scale pilot project, which was conducted in four wards of the nursing home, was designed to involve families in

  17. Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Burgos, Daniel; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Burgos, D., Brouns, F. M. R., & Koper, E. J. R. (Submitted). Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings. In Proceedings of ICALT 2006 Conference. July 5-7, Kerkrade, The Netherlands

  18. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The IAEA Specialists` Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs.

  19. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Quality assurance in radiotherapy. Proceedings of the working meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Major efforts have been made to develop and implement Quality Assurance (QA) methodologies, aimed at reducing various sources of errors to ensure not only a high standard of radiation treatment, but first and foremost to prevent radiation accidents. Institutional QA programmes as well as inter-institutional programmes have to be implemented, together with audits by external reference national or international bodies. One of the main goals of this seminar was to deal with the design, harmonization and structures of QA programmes in different countries, as well as with implementation of these programmes at the institutional, national, regional and international levels. These activities can lead to a global QA network having the potential to significantly improve standards of care for millions of cancer patients worldwide. The meeting was jointly organized by the International Society for Radiation Oncology (ISRO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The meeting was attended by approximately 120 participants and observers representing national societies for radiation therapy and radiation medical physics in 35 countries and seven international organizations. Refs, figs, tabs.

  1. Quality assurance in radiotherapy. Proceedings of the working meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Major efforts have been made to develop and implement Quality Assurance (QA) methodologies, aimed at reducing various sources of errors to ensure not only a high standard of radiation treatment, but first and foremost to prevent radiation accidents. Institutional QA programmes as well as inter-institutional programmes have to be implemented, together with audits by external reference national or international bodies. One of the main goals of this seminar was to deal with the design, harmonization and structures of QA programmes in different countries, as well as with implementation of these programmes at the institutional, national, regional and international levels. These activities can lead to a global QA network having the potential to significantly improve standards of care for millions of cancer patients worldwide. The meeting was jointly organized by the International Society for Radiation Oncology (ISRO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The meeting was attended by approximately 120 participants and observers representing national societies for radiation therapy and radiation medical physics in 35 countries and seven international organizations

  2. 75 FR 4440 - Meeting of the Working group on Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United States-Morocco...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... decision making. Ongoing work includes: Assistance to Morocco on enhanced compliance with the Convention on... participation in environmental decision-making and enforcement. For more information, interested parties are... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6885] Meeting of the Working group on Environmental Cooperation...

  3. Report on student participants at the 2003 Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julius Dollison, Michael Neuchatz

    2003-07-01

    The first meeting of African American physicists was held in 1973 at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, with around 50 Black physicists in attendance. In 1977, this organization was formally established as the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) out of a need to address many concerns of African American physicists. During the ensuing years the Conference began to grow and was hosted by different institutions at various geographic locations. This year, the 2003 Annual Conference of the National Society of Black Physicists and Black Physics Students was hosted by Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia during the weekend of February 12th-15th, 2003. This Conference brought together over 500 African American physics students and working physicists. Also attending were corporate and graduate school recruiters, administrators, professional society representatives and others concerned with the small representation of minorities in the field of physics. The organizers of the Conference contracted with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics to conduct a formal evaluative study of the meeting, resulting in this report. The evaluation questionnaire was designed by the organizers of the NSBP conference with input from the Statistical Research Center's staff. It included questions on the students' backgrounds and demographic characteristics, physics research experience, career goals, challenges faced in their academic pursuits, and ratings of various aspects of the conference. The questionnaire was distributed at the conference when the students signed in. Of the 330 students who were registered, roughly 304 attended and were given the four-page questionnaire to complete. Responses were collected on the last night of the conference, with 172 (approximately 57%) returning completed questionnaires. This low response rate could be attributed in part to the fact that respondents were asked to provide possibly sensitive personal

  4. A Dozen Reasons Some Meetings Bomb--And Others Work Wonders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Leland P.

    1978-01-01

    Effective meetings require three simultaneous operations: task activity (working on the agenda), maintenance (keeping the group in good working order), and team building (strengthening group's capacity to face future issues successfully). Discusses twelve reasons for group dysfunction during meetings. (EM)

  5. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. 2. biophysical work meeting. Papers; 2. Biophysikalische Arbeitstagung; Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The report comprises 18 papers held at the 2nd Biophysical Work Meeting, 11 - 13 September 1991 in Schlema, Germany. The history of biophysics in Germany particularly of radiation biophysics and radon research, measurements of the radiation effects of radon and the derivation of limits, radon balneotherapy and consequences of uranium ore mining are dealt with. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Report enthaelt 18 Vortraege, die auf der 2. Biophysikalischen Arbeitstagung in Schlema vom 11. bis 13. September 1991 gehalten wurden. Es werden die Geschichte der Biophysik in Deutschland, speziell der Strahlenbiophysik und Radonforschung, Messungen von Radon und seinen Folgeprodukten, Epidemiologie und Strahlenbiologie zur Bestimmung der Strahlenwirkung des Radons und die Ableitung entsprechender Grenzwerte, Radon-Balneotherapie und Folgen des Uranerzbergbaus behandelt. (orig.)

  8. 77 FR 25150 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Amending GPS Simulator Working group Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: We are requesting to amend the date of the GPS Simulator Working group meeting notice...

  9. New Forms of Youth Participation and Work in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jurgen

    1985-01-01

    Surveys past and current youth employment and social participation programs in Sweden. Maintains that while these were effective in giving Sweden one of the lowest youth unemployment rates among market-economy nations, more must be done to ensure meaningful social participation of youth in the community. (JDH)

  10. Management of water hyacinth: Final meeting and international conference. Working paper submitted by the Regional Coordinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Full text: Final Meeting. This meeting will essentially make a terminal review of the project and register final records of work done on the various aspects, such as: - biology of the plant; - biological control; - biogas; - wastewater treatment; - papers and boards; - integrated systems, etc. We should have at the meeting a complete account of the work done in the project under each of the above headings. For example, under 'biogas' we should prepare one consolidated account of work carried out in all the three participating countries rather than individual country reports. Likewise on 'papers and boards', and the other items. To enable preparation of reports in this form there should naturally be prior consultations and contacts among the concerned investigators by correspondence and, if necessary, personal visits. These reports will then be edited and compiled by the Regional Coordinator in the form of a book or monograph on the Management of Water Hyacinth project as a whole. Contributors to chapters will be cited. International Conference. Independent of the consolidated reports, national coordinators may prepare papers for presentation at the proposed international conference. These papers could be prepared m the usual form and style for publication in international scientific journals. Although several papers could be prepared out of work done by us, we may consider the desirability of limiting the number, in order to give adequate opportunities for the other invited participants to the conference. There would be no bar on publication of these scientific papers after the conference in appropriate journals irrespective of whether a separate volume on proceedings of the conference is brought out or not. India would be happy to host the terminal review meeting to be followed by the conference. The likely period would be last week of January to first week in February, 1983. (author)

  11. Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Group work is an educational mode that promotes learning and socialisation among students. In this study, we focused on the inclusive processes when students work in small groups. The aim was to investigate and describe students' inclusive and collaborative processes in group work and how the teacher supported or impeded these transactions. Social…

  12. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    . This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...

  13. Proceedings of the seventh annual participants' information meeting. DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The Seventh Annual Department of Energy (DOE) Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP) Participants' Information Meeting was held September 10-13, 1985 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on low-level radioactive waste management activities, requirements, and plans. Attendees included representatives from the DOE Nuclear Energy and Defense Low-Level Waste Management Programs, interim operations offices and their contractor operators; representatives from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, US Environmental Protection Agency, US Geological Survey, and their contractors; representatives of states and regions responsible for development of new commercial low-level waste disposal facilities; representatives of Great Britain, France, and Canada; representatives of utilities, private contractors, and parties concerned with low-level waste management issues. The meeting was organized by topical areas to allow for the exchange of information and the promotion of discussion on specific aspects of low-level waste management. Plenary sessions were held at the start and conclusion of the meeting while seven concurrent topical sessions were held during the intervening day and a half. Session chairmen from each of these concurrent sessions presented a summary of the discussion and conclusions resulting from their respective sessions at the final plenary session

  14. Ethical challenges in nursing homes--staff's opinions and experiences with systematic ethics meetings with participation of residents' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Schmidt, Gerda; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Heller, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Many ethical problems exist in nursing homes. These include, for example, decision-making in end-of-life care, use of restraints and a lack of resources. The aim of the present study was to investigate nursing home staffs' opinions and experiences with ethical challenges and to find out which types of ethical challenges and dilemmas occur and are being discussed in nursing homes. The study used a two-tiered approach, using a questionnaire on ethical challenges and systematic ethics work, given to all employees of a Norwegian nursing home including nonmedical personnel, and a registration of systematic ethics discussions from an Austrian model of good clinical practice. Ninety-one per cent of the nursing home staff described ethical problems as a burden. Ninety per cent experienced ethical problems in their daily work. The top three ethical challenges reported by the nursing home staff were as follows: lack of resources (79%), end-of-life issues (39%) and coercion (33%). To improve systematic ethics work, most employees suggested ethics education (86%) and time for ethics discussion (82%). Of 33 documented ethics meetings from Austria during a 1-year period, 29 were prospective resident ethics meetings where decisions for a resident had to be made. Agreement about a solution was reached in all 29 cases, and this consensus was put into practice in all cases. Residents did not participate in the meetings, while relatives participated in a majority of case discussions. In many cases, the main topic was end-of-life care and life-prolonging treatment. Lack of resources, end-of-life issues and coercion were ethical challenges most often reported by nursing home staff. The staff would appreciate systematic ethics work to aid decision-making. Resident ethics meetings can help to reach consensus in decision-making for nursing home patients. In the future, residents' participation should be encouraged whenever possible. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring

  15. AER working group D on WWER safety analysis - report of the 2007 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    2007-01-01

    The AER working group D on WWER reactor safety analysis held its sixteenth meeting in Paris, France during the period 08-09 May 2007. The meeting was hosted by the CEA France. It followed the final workshop on the OECD/DOE/CEA WWER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark held at 07 May. Altogether 11 participants attend the meeting of the working group D, 7 from AER member organizations and 4 guests from non-member organizations. The co-ordinator of the working group, Mr. S. Kliem, served as chairman of the meeting. The meeting started with a general information exchange about the recent activities in the participating organizations. The given presentations and the discussions can be attributed to the following topics: -Code development and benchmarking for reactor dynamics applications; -Safety analysis methodology and results; -Future activities. New solutions for three different benchmarks were presented and discussed. These are the Second AER Dynamic Benchmark on control rod ejection at hot zero power (S. Kliem, FZD), the WWER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark (E. Syrjaelahti, VTT) and the stationary AER-FCM101 Benchmark considering a WWER-1000 reactor (C. Parisi, UniPisa). A. Kereszturi (AEKI) presented a statistical evaluation of the possibility to observe a fuel assembly mis loading event. The second presentation of E. Syrjaelahti was dedicated to the description how best-estimate coupled code calculations at VTT are supported by uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. K. Velkov (GRS) presented preliminary results of BIPR8KN/ATHLET calculations with a very detailed resolution of the calculation grid on the assessment of coolant mixing inside WWER-1000 assembly heads. Coolant mixing experiments at three different mixing test facilities, modeling different reactor types, were presented and compared by S. Kliem. A calculation study using the coupled code system KORSAR/GP on the consequences of the injection of a slug of un borated water into the reactor core was

  16. Lung cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a survey of participants at a national conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bydder, S [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hasani, A [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Broderick, C [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). WA Cancer and Palliative Care Network; Semmens, J [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). Centr for Population Health Research

    2008-04-15

    Full text: Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are a useful aid for the development of comprehensive treatment plans for cancer patients. However, little is known about the requirements for effective MDM function. Attendees at a national lung cancer conference who participated at least weekly in lung cancer MDMs were surveyed. The survey addressed the attendees' perceptions regarding the aims of MDMs, and for their own institutional MDMs, the importance and need for improvement for each of: (i) the attendance of nine discipline groups; and (ii) 15 aspects related to MDM function derived from the literature. The survey also asked participants if MDMs met their needs. There was a general agreement on the aims of the meetings. There was also an agreement on the importance of various groups' attendance and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, many respondents reported their meetings required moderate or substantial improvements in one or more areas. More than 20% of the respondents indicated improvement was required for the attendance of three discipline groups (palliative care physicians, pathologists and cardiothoracic surgeons) and 10 of the 15 examined aspects (more than half in the case of computerised databases). Only 9% of the respondents reported that none of the features surveyed needed either moderate or substantial improvement. MDMs met the needs of 79% of the respondents. We found general agreement on the aims of the meetings, the importance of various groups' attendance at MDMs and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, moderate or substantial improvements were thought to be required by many respondents. The performance of individual institutions' MDMs and the resources they have available to achieve their aims should be assessed and periodically reviewed. The survey applied here may provide a framework for MDM members to do this.

  17. Motivation, Participation, and Engagement in Human Work Interaction Design Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barricelli, Barbara Rita; Clemmensen, Torkil; Campos, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This position paper is aimed at presenting as discussion material at the CoPDA 2016 Workshop the preliminary results of a short review of the literature published by the HWID community in the last 10 years in four books. Specifically, the attention is posed on understanding the importance of moti...... of motivation, participation, and engagement in Interaction Design projects for smart and pervasive workplaces...

  18. 77 FR 58526 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology Changes...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) Salmon Subcommittee, and Model Evaluation...

  19. FAA and NASA UTM Research Transition Team: Communications and Navigation (CN) Working Group (WCG) Kickoff Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoo; Larrow, Jarrett

    2017-01-01

    This is NASA FAA UTM Research Transition Team Communications and Navigation working group kick off meeting presentation that addresses the followings. Objectives overview Overall timeline and scope Outcomes and expectations Communication method and frequency of meetings Upcoming evaluation Next steps.

  20. eParticipation that Works. Evidence from the Old Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Molinari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper collects some evidence from a now completed EU-funded project, aimed at the localisation and institutionalisation of two eParticipatory tools, DEMOS-Plan and the Electronic Town Meeting, within real public administration processes. The independent or combined usage of the two tools, supported by the Living Labs approach has been tested in 18 local pilots across several regions of Europe, from Ulster (UK to Sicily and Tuscany (Italy, from Turku Archipelago (Finland to Voroklini (Cyprus. Selected policy domains include (among others: Spatial Planning, Socio-Economic Programming, Strategic Environmental Assessment, and Open Government. Deployment has led to a number of interesting implications for the European public authorities, such as: i building up of a cost effective ICT platform that enables regular or occasional consultation of remotely and sparsely located citizens and stakeholders; ii gradually migrating the whole administrative system related to spatial data infrastructure towards a full digitalisation of the “legally compulsory” exchanges between planning agencies, local stakeholders and the general public; and iii setting the stage for these two facilities to become practically interoperable to each other and across different EU Member States.

  1. Bike2Work 2017 - youngest participant 5 year old

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Daniel Holzer with his mother Reyes Alemany Fernandez. The two of them comes in on bike every day, Daniel to attend the CERN Nursery School and Reyes to work in the Operations Group. Daniel is a member of the team "The admirers of Daniel", while Reyes cycles for "Hypercycle-6.5TeV-ATS".

  2. Results of the 3rd Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety and Preparatory Works for the 4th Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Choi, Kwang Sik; Kim, Woong Sik

    2006-01-01

    The 3 rd Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) took place from April 11-22, 2005. Fifty out of fifty-five Contracting Parties (CPs) participated with over 500 delegates in attendance. It was concluded that all CPs in attendance were in compliance with the requirements of the CNS. It was also noted that although the focus tends to be on the triennial national reports and review meetings, the CNS should emphasize an ongoing process that continually promotes the advancement of nuclear safety. With regard to this continuity process, the President of the 3 rd Review Meeting sent to all the CPs a message to remind of the lessons offered and learned from the Meeting and to put them into action as well. The president also asked that the CPs start in earnest later this year their preparations for the Forth Meeting in 2008. This paper introduces the results of the 3 rd Review Meeting and presents some suggestions on preparatory works that should be done for the next Review Meeting

  3. Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training: Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    This document serves as a support paper to the "Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training" report. This support document contains tables that show: (1) participation in education and training; (2) participation in education and training and work-life interaction; (3) future participation in education or training; (4) perceptions…

  4. Participation as a Tool for Interactional Work on Twitter: A Sociolinguistic Approach to Social Media "Engagement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draucker, Fawn T.

    2013-01-01

    This work approaches the concept of social media engagement through a lens of participation theory. Following the work of Goffman (1981) and others, this dissertation uses the concepts of the participation framework and the participant role to explore engagement as a function of participation in interaction. The purposes of this dissertation are…

  5. Summary Record of the 15th Meeting of the Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRISK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    [Task 2013(1)], - WGRISK participation to international conferences, workshops, etc. and Outcome of Other International Meetings/Activities relevant to WGRISK, - Cooperation with other NEA Working Groups, Task Groups or Expert Groups (ROBELSYS, WGAMA, WGOE, CSNI post-Fukushima activities..), - WGRISK Discussion 2014 - Risk Metrics for Level 3 PSA, - WGRISK Planning, Integrated Plan, future work, New Activities, working methods and Next Meetings

  6. Work-family balance, participation in the family work and parental self-efficacy in Chilean Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palomo Velez, G.F.P.V.

    2017-01-01

    The article analyzes differences regarding work-family balance, participation in family work, and parental self-efficacy in workers (N=300) in Chile according to their sex and their status as income providers. Three instruments (Survey Work-Home Interaction-Nijmegen, Questionnaire of Participation

  7. Report for the 2014 DCEE Working Group Meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard; Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The DCEE 2014 meeting at the Technical University of Denmark focused on interdisciplinarity in design processes while embracing the central issues of the previous workshops: design tools / methods and design education in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)....

  8. On the Degree of Participant Commitment in Non-Work Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Korn, Matthias

    -work. In work settings the role of peers is well defined, whereas in non-work settings participating peers are more elusive—like the familiar stranger at the parents’ evening at school. Furthermore, work practices are institutionalized and it is possible to enforce people to become aware of the participation...

  9. 77 FR 60138 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Teleconference/Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... meeting. Background The TAMWG affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Teleconference/ Web-Based Meeting AGENCY: Fish..., announce a public teleconference/web-based meeting of [[Page 60139

  10. Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) (41st Annual Meeting). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: - Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); - Review the progress since the 40th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; - Consider meeting arrangements for 2008, 2009, 2010 and beyond; - Review the IAEA’s ongoing information exchange and coordinated research activities in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations and international initiatives; - Discuss future joint activities in view of IAEA’s Programme and Budget Cycles beyond 2008-2009

  11. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The discussion which followed the different presentations highlighted the following points: • All the Member States representatives participating in the technical meeting welcomed this IAEA initiative and expressed their potential interest in contributing to the catalogue; • Not all the countries with a fast reactor programme were represented at the meeting. In particular, it was noted that there was no participation from China, the Russian Federation and the USA. Even contribution from Sweden and Spain would be beneficial. It will be a task of the IAEA Secretariat to try involving also these countries in the preparation of the catalogue; • The catalogue will focus only on experimental facilities supporting development of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (Sodium, Lead and Lead-Bismuth). For the time being, facilities in support of GFR and MSR research will not be included; • As for countries involved in HLM technology research, only European countries were participating at the meeting, i.e. Belgium, France, Italy and Germany. In order to avoid duplication of the work performed within the European project ADRIANA, representatives from these countries underlined that a condition for their contribution to the IAEA catalogue is the involvement of non-European countries with HLM research programmes; • The advice from the Member States is fundamental to clearly define scope, objectives and content of the catalogue. The plan for its drafting has also to be further discussed with Member States representatives; • The catalogue is also intended to identify gaps and future needs that require further R&D initiatives; • The catalogue will be a useful tool to set up international collaboration

  12. Technical meeting (TM) to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) (37th annual meeting). Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The objectives of the 37th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, were to: 1) exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); 2) review the progress since the 36th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; 3) consider meeting arrangements for 2004 and 2005; 4) review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations. The participants made presentations on the status of the respective national programmes on FR and ADS development. A summary of the highlights for the period since the 36th TWG-FR Annual Meeting is included in this proceedings. Annex IV contains the Review of National Programs on Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), and the TWG-FR Activity Report for the Period May 2003-April 2004.

  13. Proceedings of the Fourth Working Meeting on Radiation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The meeting aimed at the exchange of information and experiences both in basic and applied research in radiation chemistry, radiation physics, and radiation biology including radiation processing, irradiation plants and techniques, methods and instrumentation as well as radiation dosimetry. Author and subject indexes are included

  14. Spring meeting of the DPG Working Group 'Solid state physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The volume contains abstracts of the contributions to the Spring Meeting of the Solid State Physics Section with the topics dielectric solids, thin films, dynamics and statistical physics, semiconductor physics, magnetism, metal physics, surface physics, low temperature physics, vacuum physics and engineering, chemical physics. (MM)

  15. Proceedings of the fourth annual participants' information meeting, DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Large, D.E.: Mezga, L.J.; Stratton, L.E.; Rose, R.R. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    The Fourth Annual Participants' Information Meeting of the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in Denver, Colorado, August 31 to September 2, 1982. The purpose of the meeting was to report and evaluate technology development funded by the program and to examine mechanisms for technology transfer. The meeting consisted of an introductory plenary session, followed by two concurrent overview sessions and then six concurrent technical sessions. There were two group meetings to review the findings of the technical sessions. The meeting concluded with a plenary summary session in which the major findings of the meeting were addressed. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  16. Does employee participation in workplace health promotion depend on the working environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Villadsen, Ebbe; Burr, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate if participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) depends on the work environment. METHODS: Questionnaire data on participation in WHP activities (smoking cessation, healthy diet, exercise facilities, weekly exercise classes, contact with health professionals, health...

  17. Predictors of sustainable work participation of young adults with developmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Anja; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; de Boer, Michiel R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    For individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) work participation is a challenge, as shown by their low employment rates. The aim of this study was to investigate which factors predict work participation, finding work as well as maintaining

  18. 75 FR 20352 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9139-3] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION...-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water...

  19. 75 FR 54871 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9198-8] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... final in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National...

  20. 75 FR 35458 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9165-6] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... fourth in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National...

  1. 75 FR 1380 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9101-9] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory...

  2. Effective Emotions The Enactment of a Work Ethic in the Swedish Meeting Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Andersson Cederholm

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The meeting industry – an encompassing term for services related to various kinds of professional meetings, from mega-conventions to the ordinary work meetings – is increasingly consolidated and legitimated as a specific sector in the service in-dustry. New professions such as meeting designers, meeting facilitators and meet-ing consultants are emerging, promoting new knowledge in this field. By focuss-ing on processes and social interaction, and highlighting emotional dimensions of meetings, these professions pave the way for new modes of conceptualising and practising professional relationships. The intangible, emotional and playful di-mensions of social interactions are promoted as effective means to achieve eco-nomic goals, thus highlighting a professional ideal that is here called “effective emotions”. The aim of this article is to show how the work ethic promoted by the meeting industry encourages new intersections, and tensions, between the ideali-sation of the tangible/measurable/rational on the one hand and the intangi-ble/emotional/magical on the other hand, and between working life and intimate spheres. Through a discourse analysis of a Swedish corporate meeting magazine, it is shown how the distinction between work and leisure is dissolved in this spe-cific work culture, and by this, it is discussed how the meeting profession acts as a normative regulator by reinforcing ideal ways of being and interacting with oth-ers. Creativity, personal growth, reflexivity and flexibility are enacted as idealised personal assets as well as moral imperatives in the discourse of the meeting pro-fession and through the practices of various meeting techniques, thus reinforcing not merely a professional ethic but cultural ideals of being as a person as well. It is also suggested that this reinforcement may, under certain circumstances, turn into its opposite and undermine the promoted ideals, thus pointing at the impor-tance to pinpoint the

  3. Technical Working Group on Career and Technical Education Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, September 22, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Judie

    2017-01-01

    On September 22, 2017, the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) and the National Center for Education Research (NCER) at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) convened a group of experts in policy, practice, and research related to Career and Technical Education (CTE). The goal of the meeting was to seek input from…

  4. Ideas of holistic engineering meet engineering work practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This article critically reflects on the viability of the idea that reforming engineering education will result in more holistic engineering work practices. Drawing on an empirical study, the article aims to demonstrate that in order to change existing engineering work practices, it might...... be necessary to change engineers’ knowledge and skills; however, such changes are far from sufficient. Conditions and circumstances external to practitioners’ knowledge and skills are crucial if engineering work is to become more holistic. To illustrate this point, the article outlines an empirical study...... of a small team of professionals who engage in holistic engineering work practices in an engineering consultancy company. The work practices are investigated using a philosophical empirical method that inquires into the doings, sayings, and relatings of the practitioners. The study describes the practice...

  5. Work participation among young adults with spina bifida in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mechelen, M. C.; Verhoef, M.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; Post, M. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to: (1) assess work participation among young adults with spina bifida, (2) identify problems perceived in finding employment, and (3) examine which determinants are related to work participation. This cross-sectional study was a follow-up study to the Adolescents with

  6. Predictors of work participation of young adults with mild intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Anja; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; de Boer, Michiel R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are three to four times less often employed compared to their non-disabled peers. Evidence for factors associated with work participation of young adults with ID is limited. Furthermore, studies on predictors for sustainable work participation among

  7. Predictors of Work Participation of Young Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Anja; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; de Boer, Michiel R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are three to four times less often employed compared to their non-disabled peers. Evidence for factors associated with work participation of young adults with ID is limited. Furthermore, studies on predictors for sustainable work participation among young adults with ID is lacking altogether.…

  8. Predictors of work participation in young adults with mild intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, A.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; de Boer, M.R.; Groothoff, J.W.; Brouwer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are three to four times less often employed compared to their non-disabled peers. Evidence for factors associated with work participation of young adults with ID is limited. Furthermore, studies on predictors for sustainable work participation among

  9. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  10. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  11. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  12. Cohort profile: the lidA Cohort Study-a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-12-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  13. WELFARE REFORM: Progress in Meeting Work-Focused TANF Goals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193) (PRWORA) significantly changed federal welfare policy for low-income families with children, building upon and expanding state-level reforms...

  14. International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants regular meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this meeting is to review the IWG activities in 1992-1993, other relevant activities, national programmes, projects of international organizations and provide recommendations of the Agency's activities, forward programmes in this area, priority scope and content of publications and meetings to be organized and sponsored by the Agency. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Fertility and work-force participation: The experience of Melbourne Wives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, H

    1976-11-01

    Summary Current and retrospective data on the fertility control, work-force participation intentions and practice of Melbourne wives are combined in an examination of the causal link between work-force participation and reduced family size. Stress is laid on the analysis of the interaction between work-force participation and fertility over time, taking into account the proportion of married life spent in the work-force, rather than relying exclusively on a measure of current participation, the only option available in the analysis of census-type data. The wide range of information available makes it possible to study the effects of work-force participation on wives of unimpaired fertility, as well as the different consequences of planned and unplanned participation, and of working in a variety of occupations and for a number of distinct reasons. Examination of the future fertility intentions and current contraceptive practice of the younger wives shows that working wives are not, in these respects, markedly different from their house-wife peers. Overall, the balance of the evidence indicates that in the majority of cases fertility influences work-force participation rather than the converse.

  16. Ninth plenary meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology Vienna, 2-4 October 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The 9th Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held in Vienna from 2 to 4 October 1989. The meeting was attended by 24 participants from 18 Member States and one international organization. This publication is a summary report of this meeting. It contains review of the IWGFPT activities of the period since the 8th meeting. The representatives of the Member States presented information about National Programs and multilateral projects status with emphasis on new results. Summary of the discussion on schedule of IWGFPT activities for the period of 1990-91 is also published in this report. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group... simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users..., and email address) to [email protected]us.af.mil and have your security personnel submit your VAR...

  18. Aristotle Meets Youth Work: A Case for Virtue Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessant, Judith

    2009-01-01

    What ethical framework provides the best guide for contemporary youth work is the central question in this article. An account is provided of why the two dominant ethical frameworks, namely, utilitarianism and deontic ethics, are not appropriate. It is argued that virtue ethics is most relevant because it specifies the nature of social goods, and…

  19. 78 FR 23329 - Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... phases of flight. This AAtS capability is significant in that near real time NAS data will now be... exchange aviation data and services without the restrictive, time consuming and expensive process of... NAS operations. AAtS will work to ensure safe, secure, dependable, and hassle-free travel; while...

  20. Summary Record of the Twenty-Sixth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document is the executive summary of WPEC's 26. meeting held in 2014. It presents a brief review of the 2 days meeting in particular the Reports on experimental activities in Europe, Japan, USA and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL) with the discussion of future plans, the Review of final or near-final subgroup reports, the Status of ongoing subgroups, the Proposals for new subgroups and some information about Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community. A list of participants and a list of reports presented at this meeting are attached in appendix

  1. OSSM2008 Polish Moessbauer Community Meeting: Program, Abstracts and List of Participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Polish Moessbauer Community Meeting - OSSM2008 has been organized by Polish scientists using the Moessbauer spectroscopy in their research. Main subjects of the meeting are investigations of modern materials electronic structure by means of Moessbauer effect (ME), using ME in biological test of tissue diseases and ME investigation of physical properties of different steels

  2. Technical meeting to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    36th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, the IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Review of National Programmes on Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)', hosted by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was attended by TWG-FR Members and Advisers from the following Member States (MS) and International Organizations: Brazil, France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the OECD/NEA. The objectives of the meeting were to: 1) exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); 2) review the progress since the 35th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; 3) consider meeting arrangements for 2003 and 2004; 4) review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations. The participants made presentations on the status of the respective national programmes on FR and ADS development. A summary of the highlights for the period since the 35th TWG-FR Annual Meeting

  3. GeneLab Analysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    Goals to achieve for GeneLab AWG - GL vision - Review of GeneLab AWG charter Timeline and milestones for 2018 Logistics - Monthly Meeting - Workshop - Internship - ASGSR Introduction of team leads and goals of each group Introduction of all members Q/A Three-tier Client Strategy to Democratize Data Physiological changes, pathway enrichment, differential expression, normalization, processing metadata, reproducibility, Data federation/integration with heterogeneous bioinformatics external databases The GLDS currently serves over 100 omics investigations to the biomedical community via open access. In order to expand the scope of metadata record searches via the GLDS, we designed a metadata warehouse that collects and updates metadata records from external systems housing similar data. To demonstrate the capabilities of federated search and retrieval of these data, we imported metadata records from three open-access data systems into the GLDS metadata warehouse: NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), EBI's PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) repository, and the Metagenomics Analysis server (MG-RAST). Each of these systems defines metadata for omics data sets differently. One solution to bridge such differences is to employ a common object model (COM) to which each systems' representation of metadata can be mapped. Warehoused metadata records are then transformed at ETL to this single, common representation. Queries generated via the GLDS are then executed against the warehouse, and matching records are shown in the COM representation (Fig. 1). While this approach is relatively straightforward to implement, the volume of the data in the omics domain presents challenges in dealing with latency and currency of records. Furthermore, the lack of a coordinated has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta

  4. [Fortieth Annual] Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: - Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); - Review the progress since the 39th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; - Consider meeting arrangements for 2007, 2008 and 2009; - Review the Agency’s ongoing information exchange and co-ordinated research activities in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations; - Discuss future joint activities in view of the Agency’s Programme and Budget Cycle 2008–2009 (and beyond)

  5. Patient Participation in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Outcome Research: A Report from the GRAPPA 2013 Annual Meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.T.; Campbell, W.; Fitzgerald, O.; Gladman, D.D.; Helliwell, P.S.; James, J.; Lindsay, C.; MacDonald, R.; McHugh, N.J.; Mease, P.J.; Orbai, A.M.; Palominos, P.; Parkinson, A.; Tillett, W.; Goel, N.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, 8 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) participated as full delegates at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Patients were invited to provide their perspective for different sessions of the conference

  6. Brain and effort: brain activation and effort-related working memory in healthy participants and patients with working memory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eEngstrom

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the interest in the neuroimaging of working memory, little is still known about the neurobiology of complex working memory in tasks that require simultaneous manipulation and storage of information. In addition to the central executive network, we assumed that the recently described salience network (involving the anterior insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex might be of particular importance to working memory tasks that require complex, effortful processing. Method: Healthy participants (n=26 and participants suffering from working memory problems related to the Kleine-Levin syndrome (a specific form of periodic idiopathic hypersomnia; n=18 participated in the study. Participants were further divided into a high and low capacity group, according to performance on a working memory task (listening span. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI study, participants were administered the reading span complex working memory task tapping cognitive effort. Principal findings: The fMRI-derived blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal was modulated by 1 effort in both the central executive and the salience network and 2 capacity in the salience network in that high performers evidenced a weaker BOLD signal than low performers. In the salience network there was a dichotomy between the left and the right hemisphere; the right hemisphere elicited a steeper increase of the BOLD signal as a function of increasing effort. There was also a stronger functional connectivity within the central executive network because of increased task difficulty. Conclusion: The ability to allocate cognitive effort in complex working memory is contingent upon focused resources in the executive and in particular the salience network. Individual capacity during the complex working memory task is related to activity in the salience (but not the executive network so that high-capacity participants evidence a lower signal and possibly hence a larger

  7. Barriers to maternal workforce participation and relationship between paid work and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke-Taylor, H; Howie, L; Law, M

    2011-05-01

    Families of children with disabilities experience extra financial strains, and mothers are frequently unable to participate in paid work because of caregiving obligations. A mailed survey and follow-up phone calls were used to gather data about mother's health, workforce participation and barriers to inclusion in the workplace (n = 152). Verbatim reports of issues that hindered workforce participation were analysed qualitatively to derive themes. Maternal health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured using the Short Form Health Survey Version 2 (SF-36v2). Norm-based conversions were used to compare HRQoL between working and non-working mothers and to compare to population norms. Eighty-two per cent of mothers in the sample wanted and needed to work for pay but indicated over 300 issues that prevent their work participation. Data analysis revealed 26 common issues which prevent work participation. These issues fit into three main categories: mother-related reasons (28%), child-related reasons (29%) and service limitations (43%). Mothers who worked (n = 83) reported significantly better HRQoL than mothers who did not work (n = 69) on five of the eight SF-36v2 dimensions and overall mental health. Compared to other working Australians, mothers in this study had higher education yet reported poorer health, lower family income and lower workforce participation. Respondents reported that service system limitations were the main barriers to participation in the paid workforce. Investigation of service changes such as increased respite care, availability of outside hours school care, improved professional competency and family-centred services is recommended in order to improve maternal participation in paid work. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The Political Participation of Working Youth and College Students. CIRCLE Working Paper 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Sharon E.; Montoya, Lisa; Mulvoy, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Unprecedented attention has gone to researching young voters, and yet one segment of this age group has been largely ignored: non-college (or "working") youth. Because very little is known about them, the following paper advances three fundamental concerns: What types of political activities do young workers engage in? What can be learned about…

  9. Interventions to enhance work participation of workers with a chronic disease: a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vooijs, Marloes; Leensen, Monique C J; Hoving, Jan L; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the available effective interventions that enhance work participation of people with a chronic disease, irrespective of their diagnosis. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library, searching for systematic reviews published between 2004 and February 2015. Systematic reviews were eligible for inclusion if they described an intervention aimed at enhancing work participation and included participants of working age (18-65 years) with a chronic disease. Reviews had to include populations having different chronic diseases. The quality of the included reviews was evaluated using the quality instrument AMSTAR. Results of reviews of medium and high quality were described in this review. The search resulted in 9 reviews, 5 of which were of medium quality. No high quality reviews were retrieved. 1 review reported inconclusive evidence for policy-based return to work initiatives. The 4 other reviews described interventions focused on changes at work, such as changes in work organisation, working conditions and work environment. Of these 4 reviews, 3 reported beneficial effects of the intervention on work participation. Interventions examined in populations having different chronic diseases were mainly focused on changes at work. The majority of the included interventions were reported to be effective in enhancing work participation of people with a chronic disease, indicating that interventions directed at work could be considered for a generic approach in order to enhance work participation in various chronic diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Interactive effects of work psychosocial factors on participation in workplace wellness programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangachin, Mahboobeh Ghesmaty; Cavuoto, Lora A

    2018-01-01

    This study explored concurrent effects of six work psychosocial factors on current participation and the self-reported likelihood of future participation in workplace wellness programs using a cross-sectional survey, an ad hoc focus group, and structured interviews. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to analyze survey responses from 343 employees (194 nonparticipants, 95 participants, and 54 engaged participants). A thematic analysis of focus group ( n = 7) and interview ( n = 5) narratives was also undertaken. In combination with high work control, high superior support was associated with an engaged participant profile. Job demand was the third important variable with low and very high levels associated with participation. With regard to high likelihood of future participation, among respondents with age older than 50, high predictability of occupational activities and control were identified as a significant factor, and among others, high superior support and control. The analysis of narratives revealed peer relations and flexible working hours to be positively linked to participation and general job stress was identified as having a bidirectional relationship. Employees stated that stress led them to take advantage of these programs as a source of relief and that their availability/participation has contributed to lowering their stress. These findings inform practitioners about the importance of addressing poor psychosocial factors as a participation barrier and having a holistic approach to employee well-being.

  11. The social shaping of the participation of employees in entreprises' environmental work - analysis and possible measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Marianne; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    The paper deals with the shaping of the participation of employees in enterprises' environmental work. The paper is based on two case studies on Danish enterprises, which, as part of the development of their environ-mental work, emphazised employee involvement. The cases show that it is difficult...... to maintain the participation of employees in environmental work, even in enterprises with an intention to do so. The cases contribute to the identification of those situations, during the shaping of enterprises' environmental work, where choices concerning employee participation are made: 1) The need...... of management to involve employees in the environ-mental work ; 2) The competence building among employees and local supervisors; and 3) The stabilization of the environmental work into routines and structures. The theoretical approach draws on organizational theory emphasizing the connection between...

  12. Participation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... peoples in decision-making over their own lives' (Guijt and Shah 1998:1). .... facile models of the rational man whose decisions are based purely on self- .... Spaces in the Framing of Poverty Policy (IDS Working Paper No.

  13. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods: A systematic

  14. Barriers to Maternal Workforce Participation and Relationship between Paid Work and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke-Taylor, H.; Howie, L.; Law, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Families of children with disabilities experience extra financial strains, and mothers are frequently unable to participate in paid work because of caregiving obligations. Methods: A mailed survey and follow-up phone calls were used to gather data about mother's health, workforce participation and barriers to inclusion in the workplace…

  15. Client Participation in Managing Social Work Service--An Unfinished Quest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Terry T. F.

    2011-01-01

    "Client participation" is a popular ideal and object of rhetorical commitment in social work service. But the much-touted potential of this concept requires careful and critical scrutiny. This article reports on a study of client-participation initiatives in the Hong Kong welfare sector. The study identified significant differences in…

  16. Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Past Reactors. Summary Report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA-IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendations of the previous Annual Group Meeting, at the Vienna International Centre, Vienna from 31 March to 3 April 1981. All Member States of the group were represented at the meeting: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The meeting was also attended by representatives from the Commission of European Communities, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Atomic Energy Agency and observers from Switzerland. The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: 1. Review of IWGFR activities; 2. Consideration of future method of operation of the IWGFR; 3. Consideration of Conferences on Fast Reactors; 4. Consideration of the major recommendations of some of the IWGFR specialists' meetings for which the support of the IWGFR is requested; 5. Consideration of a schedule for specialists' meetings in 1981-1982; 6. Presentations and discussions on national programmes on fast breeder reactors.; 7. Recommendation of the IWGFR regarding a request of Switzerland concerning participation in the IWGFR; 8. The date and place of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  17. Person-related factors associated with work participation in employees with health problems: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Mariska; Wind, Haije; Hulshof, Carel T J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2018-07-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to explore and provide systematically assessed information about the association between person-related factors and work participation of people with health problems. The research question was: what is the association between selected person-related factors and work participation of workers with health problems? A systematic review was carried out in PubMed and PsycINFO to search for original papers published between January 2007 and February 2017. The risk of bias of the studies included was assessed using quality assessment tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE framework for prognostic studies. In total, 113 studies were included, all of which addressed the association between person-related factors and work participation. The factors positively associated with work participation were positive expectations regarding recovery or return to work, optimism, self-efficacy, motivation, feelings of control, and perceived health. The factors negatively associated with work participation were fear-avoidance beliefs, perceived work-relatedness of the health problem, and catastrophizing. Different coping strategies had a negative or a positive relationship with work participation. The results of this review provide more insight into the associations between different cognitions and perceptions and work participation. The results of this study suggest that person-related factors should be considered by occupational- and insurance physicians when they diagnose, evaluate or provide treatment to employees. Further research is required to determine how these physicians could obtain and apply such information and whether its application leads to a better quality of care.

  18. The relationship between meeting of recommendations on physical activity for health and perceived work ability among white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Garbaciak, Wiesław; Cholewa, Jarosław; Mynarski, Władysław

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between meeting recommendations on physical activity for health in leisure-time and the ability to work among Polish white-collar workers. The study used a cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 360 white-collar workers. Participants recorded 7-day physical activity logs, including form, duration and intensity of leisure-time physical activities. The results were compared to health recommendations. A standardized Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire was used in assessing the ability to work. Participants who met health recommendations achieved higher scores of the WAI (mean score = 41.93) in comparison to those who were not sufficiently physically active (mean score = 39.35) (p health-related physical activity recommendations almost double the odds of reaching at least good work ability (OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.12-3.36). Meeting leisure-time physical activity recommendations (especially the criterion of vigorous physical activity) is significantly related to higher self-assessed ability to work among white-collar workers.

  19. Meeting the concerns of the public through participation. The point of view of the consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, M.

    1993-01-01

    The public participation in nuclear decision making supposes a previous information of this public. It is also necessary to have this participation when it is still possible to do something. Even if that kind of things are not easy to install, public participation in nuclear matter cannot be anything else but favourable

  20. Technical committee meeting on Liquid Metal Fast Reactor (LMFR) developments. 33rd annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWG-FR). Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Over the past 33 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in fast reactor technology. The present publication contains information on the status of fast reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1999/2000, as reported at the 33. annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. It is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFR development in IAEA Member States

  1. The European vocation of the Romanian Atomic Forum. Participation to the FORATOM working groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor

    2004-01-01

    ROMATOM, the Romanian Atomic Forum, participates in the activity of the following FORATOM working groups: Quality Management, Business Excellence, Accession Task Force, Radioactive Waste Management, Civil Liability and Law Aspects, Climatic Changes. Recently, Romania was invited to attend the working groups for Research and Development and Community Waste Management

  2. Business Participation in Welfare-to-Work: Lessons from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jack; Kazis, Richard

    Case studies of 19 U.S. companies involved in welfare-to-work programs found that political and economic factors have accelerated the rate at which employers are hiring welfare recipients. Although participation in welfare-to-work programs is dominated by larger firms in a few industries (such as service and retail sectors), there is potential for…

  3. 77 FR 23668 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of... inform the public that the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate will be hosting an open GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group (SSWG) meeting for manufacturers of GPS constellation simulators utilized...

  4. Making Ends Meet: Insufficiency and Work-Family Coordination in the New Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Penny; Ammons, Samantha K.; Dahlin, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    The "New Economy" features 24/7 employment, varied work schedules, job insecurity, and lower benefits and wages, which lead to disparities in experiences of security and sufficiency. This study investigates sufficiency concerns in the New Economy; who is having trouble making ends meet? Sufficiency concerns are subjective perceptions that work is…

  5. 75 FR 6656 - SFIREG Pesticide Operations and Management Working Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Evaluation Group (SFIREG), Pesticide Operations and Management (POM) Working Committee will hold a 2-day... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0001; FRL-8811-3] SFIREG Pesticide Operations and Management Working Committee Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...

  6. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Participants' Information Meeting: DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The meeting consisted of the following six sessions: (1) plenary session I; (2) disposal technology; (3) characteristics and treatment of low-level waste; (4) environmental aspects and performance prediction; (5) overall summary sessions; and (6) plenary session II. Fifty two papers of the papers presented were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  7. APTWG: The 4th Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Todo, Y.; Kwon, J.M.; Leconte, M.; Ko, W.H.; Inagaki, S.; Kosuga, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 4th Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting held at Kyushu University, Japan, during 10–13 June 2014. The topics of the meeting were organized under five main headings: turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation, effect of magnetic topology on MHD activity and transport, non-diffusive contribution of momentum and particle transport, non-local transport and turbulence spreading and coupling, energetic particles and instability. The Young Researchers' Forum which was held in this meeting is also described in this report. (conference reports)

  8. Tenth working group meeting of representatives of RCA Member States. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The Tenth RCA (Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology) Working Group meeting of representatives of RCA Member States was held at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, between 11-14 April 1988. The report on the meeting consists of a presentation of the seven technical sessions which dealt with topics such as nuclear techniques in industry, agriculture and medicine, nuclear power and of the project reports under RCA

  9. Report of the first interim meeting of the Seabed Working Group Engineering Studies Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1982-02-01

    The first interim meeting of the Engineering Studies Task Group (ESTG) was held at the Delft Soil Mechanics Laboratory, Delft, The Netherlands, on 21-24 September 1981. The main business of the meeting was the development of a network analysis for the ESTG. Significant progress was made; however, substantial further development remains to be accomplished. Other items discussed were (1) progress relevant to engineering studies made in the various national programs since the sixth annual meeting of the Seabed Working Group (SWG) held in Paris, February, 1981; (2) the ESTG Boundary Conditions and Scope of Work as previously defined at the Paris meeting; (3) the Draft II SWG Five-Year Plan; (4) the deep ocean drilling proposal made by the Site Selection Task Group at the Paris meeting and expanded upon at their May, 1981, meeting; and (5) a recent compilation of data from the Nares Abyssal Plain arising from the US Program studies. Finally, consideration was given to a plan for continued work by the ESTG. A brief discussion of the principal items is given. The current state of the network analysis is shown

  10. Proceedings (slides, posters) of the 7. IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition, and Remote Participation for Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this meeting is to present and discuss new developments and perspectives in the areas of control, data acquisition and remote participation for nuclear research around the world. The following topics have been covered: 1) plasma control, 2) machine control, monitoring, safety and remote manipulation, 3) data acquisition and signal processing, 4) database techniques for information storage and retrieval, 5) advanced computing and massive data analysis, 6) remote participation and virtual laboratory, 7) fast network technology and its application, and 8) ITER

  11. Legislative change enabling use of early part-time sick leave enhanced return to work and work participation in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Virta, Lauri J; Kausto, Johanna; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Laaksonen, Mikko; Leinonen, Taina; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Burdorf, Alex; Solovieva, Svetlana

    2017-09-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of part-time sick leave at the early (first 12 weeks) stage of work disability due to mental disorder or musculoskeletal disease on sustained return to work (RTW) and overall work participation. Methods In a nation-wide register-based quasi-experimental study, we compared sustained RTW (ie, ≥28 consecutive days at work) and 2-year work participation between the part- and full-time sickness absence (SA) benefit groups (N=1878 in each group) using propensity-score matching. Persons who received partial or full SA benefit due to musculoskeletal diseases or mental disorders between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 were eligible as cases or controls, respectively. Results A higher proportion showed sustained RTW after part- compared to full-time sick leave [absolute risk difference 8.0%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.3-10.9]. Moreover, the proportion of time at work was at a 10.5% higher level in the part- compared to full-time sick leave group. The prevalence of full disability retirement was almost three-fold among the full- compared to part-time sick leave group, whereas partial disability retirement was 4.5-fold more prevalent in the part- compared to full-time sick leave group. Conclusions The use of part-time sick leave during the first three months of SA enhances RTW and overall work participation during two years among persons with mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. The prescription of part-time sick leave can be recommended at an early stage of work disability.

  12. AER Working Group D on VVER safety analysis minutes of the meeting in Rez, Czech Republic 18-20 May 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    1998-01-01

    AER Working Group D on VVER reactor safety analysis held its seventh meeting in Hotel Vltava in Rez near Prague during the period 18-20 May 1998. There were altogether 11 participants from 8 member organisations. The coordinator for the working group, Mr. P. Siltanen (IVO) served as chairman. In addition to the general information exchange on recent activities, the topics of the meeting included: First review of solutions to the 3-dimensional AER Dynamic Benchmark Problem No. 5 on a steam line break accident. This benchmark involves a break of the main steam header. Safety analysis of reactivity events. Recent code development work and fuel behaviour. Coolant mixing calculations and experiments related to diluted slugs. A list of participants and a list of handouts distributed at the meeting are attached to the minutes. (author)

  13. Local to global: Working together to meet the needs of vulnerable communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Anne; Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Dietrich, Ann; Chirwa, Ellen; Mgawadere, Florence; Kambalametore, Sylvia; Kako, Peninnah

    2017-09-01

    Since 2012, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) faculty from nursing and physical therapy (PT) have been working together towards a common goal: to meet the healthcare needs of vulnerable populations in Malawi and Milwaukee. Sharing valuable knowledge and understanding one another's professions have allowed us to develop interprofessional education (IPE) learning experiences for students to help identify how quality of life could be improved or enhanced for children and their families across two different geographic spaces, one in rural Malawi and the other in urban Milwaukee. IPE learning modules were implemented in UWM's community health-focused short-term study abroad programmes to Malawi. IPE learning modules were also piloted at one of UWM's nurse-managed community health centres, located in a low-income, African American community in the inner city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Based on survey data collected from 10 participating IPE students in Milwaukee, from nursing, occupational therapy, PT, and speech and language pathology, a pilot study yielded a statistically significant change in a positive direction for increased understanding of three interprofessional collaborative practice core competencies: values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, and teams and teamwork. In this article, we discuss the processes used to develop, implement, and evaluate IPE experiences for UWM students, which may enable other professionals to envision the various projects they can embark upon from an interprofessional perspective.

  14. Psychosocial work conditions, social participation and social capital: a causal pathway investigated in a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Social capital is often claimed to be promoted by stable social structures such as low migration rates between neighbourhoods and social networks that remain stable over time. However, stable social structures may also inhibit the formation of social capital in the form of social networks and social participation. One example is psychosocial conditions at work, which may be determined by characteristics such as demand and control in the work situation. The study examines the active workforce subpopulation within the Swedish Malmö Shoulder Neck Study. A total of 7836 individuals aged 45-69 years, were interviewed at baseline between 1992 and 1994, and at a 1-year follow-up. Four groups of baseline psychosocial work conditions categories defined by the Karasek-Theorell model (jobstrain, passive, active, relaxed) were analysed according to 13 different social participation items during the past year reported at the 1-year follow-up. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with the jobstrain group as a reference were estimated. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess differences in different aspects of social participation between the four psychosocial work conditions groups. The results show that the respondents within the active category in particular but also the relaxed category, have significantly higher participation in many of the 13 social participation items, even after multivariate adjustments. The results strongly suggest that psychosocial work conditions may be an important determinant of social capital measured as social participation, a finding of immediate public health relevance because of the well known positive association between social participation and health-related behaviours.

  15. Fifteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Group Meeting, in Obninsk, USSR, Vienna from 30 March to 2 April 1982. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  16. Vulnerable Family Meetings: A Way of Promoting Team Working in GPs’ Everyday Responses to Child Maltreatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Woodman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study uses observations of team meetings and interviews with 17 primary care professionals in four GP practices in England to generate hypotheses about how “vulnerable family” team meetings might support responses by GPs to maltreatment-related concerns and joint working with other professionals. These meetings are also called “safeguarding meetings”. The study found that vulnerable family meetings were used as a way of monitoring children or young people and their families and supporting risk assessment by information gathering. Four factors facilitated the meetings: meaningful information flow into the meetings from other agencies, systematic ways of identifying cases for discussion, limiting attendance to core members of the primary care team and locating the meeting as part of routine clinical practice. Our results generate hypotheses about a model of care that can be tested for effectiveness in terms of service measures, child and family outcomes, and as a potential mechanism for other professionals to engage and support GPs in their everyday responses to vulnerable and maltreated children. The potential for adverse as well as beneficial effects should be considered from involving professionals outside the core primary care team (e.g., police, children’s social care, education and mental health services.

  17. Sixteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-10-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Meeting Group, in Vienna from 12-15 April 1983. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  18. Fifteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-09-01

    The Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Group Meeting, in Obninsk, USSR, Vienna from 30 March to 2 April 1982. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  19. Sixteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Meeting Group, in Vienna from 12-15 April 1983. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  20. The 3rd Asia–Pacific Transport Working Group (APTWG) Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P.H.; Leconte, M.; Kwon, J.M.; Ida, K.; Tamura, N.; Kosuga, Y.

    2014-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to and discussions at the 3rd Asia–Pacific Transport Working Group (APTWG) meeting held in Jeju-island, Korea, on 21–24 May 2013. The main objective of the meeting is to develop a predictive understanding of transport mechanisms in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. In an effort to accomplish this objective, four technical working groups were organized under the headings: (1) transport barrier formation and confinement enhancement, (2) 3D effects and Magnetohydrodynamic–turbulence interaction, (3) momentum transport and non-locality and (4) particle/impurity transport and energetic particles. (conference report)

  1. Do transactive memory and participative teamwork improve nurses' quality of work life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunault, Paul; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Colombat, Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; El-Hage, Wissam; Camus, Vincent; Gaillard, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Improvement in nurses' quality of work life (QWL) has become a major issue in health care organizations. We hypothesized that the level of transactive memory (defined as the way groups collectively encode, store, and retrieve knowledge) and participative teamwork (an organizational model of care based on vocational training, a specific service's care project, and regular interdisciplinary staffing) positively affect nurses' QWL. This cross-sectional study enrolled 84 ward-based psychiatric nurses. We assessed transactive memory, participative teamwork, perceived organizational justice, perceived organizational support, and QWL using psychometrically reliable and valid scales. Participative teamwork and transactive memory were positively associated with nurses' QWL. Perceived organizational support and organizational justice fully mediated the relationship between participative teamwork and QWL, but not between transactive memory and QWL. Improved transactive memory could directly improve nurses' QWL. Improved participative teamwork could improve nurses' QWL through better perceived organizational support and perceived organizational justice.

  2. Homo Politicus meets Homo Ludens: Public participation in serious life science games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchuk, Olga; Kerbe, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Public participation in science and gamification of science are two strong contemporary trends, especially in the area of emerging techno-sciences. Involvement of the public in research-related activities is an integral part of public engagement with science and technologies, which can be successfully achieved through a participatory game design. Focusing on the participatory dimension of educational games, we have reviewed a number of existing participation heuristics in light of their suitability to characterize available mobile and browser science games. We analyzed 87 games with respect to their participatory and motivational elements and demonstrated that the majority of mobile games have only basic participative features. This review of the landscape of participative science games in the domain of life sciences highlights a number of major challenges present in the design of such applications. At the same time, it reveals a number of opportunities to enhance public engagement using science games.

  3. Proceedings of the fourth annual Seabed Working Group Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico USA, March 5-7, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.R.

    1979-08-01

    Objectives of the meeting were: (1) to review the technical status and policies of national programs regarding assessment of deep ocean bed disposal of high-level radioactive wastes; (2) to provide a forum for discussions, information exchange, and planning of future efforts; (3) to identify and coordinate research vessel cruises and experiments, and establish cooperative programs, and (4) to identify one-of-a-kind test facilities and consider multinational use of such facilities. Seven countries (Canada, France, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States) participated. A representative of the Commission of European Communities, Ispra Establishment, was also present. Papers submitted at the meeting, together with the reports of the Seabed Working Group Executive Committee and the individual task groups, are compiled in this document

  4. 'AER working group D on VVER safety analysis' minutes of the meeting in Rossendorf, Germany, 10-12 May 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    1999-01-01

    AER Working Group D on VVER reactor safety analysis held its eighth meeting in Research Centre Rossendorf during the period 10-12 May 1999. There were altogether 14 participants from eight member organizations. In addition to the general information exchange on recent activities, the topics of the meeting included: Final conclusions and lessons from the solution of the AER Dynamic Benchmark Problem No. 5 on a main steam header break accident; Validation of dynamics codes and the definition of a 6th dynamic benchmark; Safety analyses and reactivity issues: approaches and results; Advances in development of models and codes for reactor dynamics applications; Documentation of dynamic benchmark problems and solutions for the AER Benchmark Book; Future activities. (author)

  5. Nurse Managers’ Work Life Quality and Their Participation in Knowledge Management: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Dehnavi, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between quality of work life and participation in knowledge management is unknown. Objectives: This study aimed to discover the association between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management. Materials and Methods: This was a correlational study. All nurse managers (71 people) from 11 hospitals affiliated with the Social Security Organization in Tehran, Iran, were included. They were asked to rate their participation in knowledge management and their quality of work life. Data was gathered by a researcher-made questionnaire (May-June 2012). The questionnaire was validated by content and construct validity approaches. Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate reliability. Finally, 50 questionnaires were analyzed. The answers were scored and analyzed using mean of scores, T-test, ANOVA (or nonparametric test, if appropriate), Pearson’s correlation coefficient and linear regression. Results: Nurse managers’ performance to implement knowledge management strategies was moderate. A significant correlation was found between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management strategies (r = 0.82; P The strongest correlations were found between implementation of knowledge management and participation of nurse managers in decision making (r = 0.82; P knowledge management. PMID:25763267

  6. Nurse managers' work life quality and their participation in knowledge management: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Dehnavi, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    The association between quality of work life and participation in knowledge management is unknown. This study aimed to discover the association between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management. This was a correlational study. All nurse managers (71 people) from 11 hospitals affiliated with the Social Security Organization in Tehran, Iran, were included. They were asked to rate their participation in knowledge management and their quality of work life. Data was gathered by a researcher-made questionnaire (May-June 2012). The questionnaire was validated by content and construct validity approaches. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate reliability. Finally, 50 questionnaires were analyzed. The answers were scored and analyzed using mean of scores, T-test, ANOVA (or nonparametric test, if appropriate), Pearson's correlation coefficient and linear regression. Nurse managers' performance to implement knowledge management strategies was moderate. A significant correlation was found between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management strategies (r = 0.82; P The strongest correlations were found between implementation of knowledge management and participation of nurse managers in decision making (r = 0.82; P knowledge management.

  7. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of... working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA? 667.274 Section 667.274 Employees... working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged in...

  8. Consequences of fathers' participation in family work: parents' role strain and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, G K; Barnett, R C

    1986-11-01

    The relation of fathers' participation in family work (child care and home chores) to parents' role strain and well-being was examined in an interview study of 160 Caucasian middle-class fathers and mothers of kindergarten and fourth-grade children. In half of the families, mothers were employed. Four forms of paternal participation were examined. Role-strain items referred to immediate and specific problems such as time and energy constraints and role conflicts. Well-being measures assessed self-esteem, life satisfaction, and quality of experience in the parental and marital roles. Regression analyses, carried out separately for fathers and for mothers, indicated that, contrary to expectation, when the level of fathers' participation was controlled maternal employment did not condition the relation between participation and the outcome variables. Findings varied for the different forms of participation. For fathers, higher levels of participation were associated with feeling more involved and competent as a parent and with being more critical of wives' patterns and parenting. For mothers, those whose husbands were more participant praised their husbands' parenting, but they were lower in life satisfaction and were more self-critical about their balance of work and family responsibilities.

  9. Operating procedures for nuclear power plants and their presentation. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting held in Vienna, 31 March - 2 April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    With a view to exchanging information on most recent development of technology in the field the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant control and Instrumentation suggested to organize a Specialists` Meeting on ``Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plants and their Presentation``. The meeting was held in Vienna, at IAEA Headquarters from March 31 to April 2, 1992 and provided an opportunity to: share operators experience; discuss the different techniques of presenting the information; identify further trends of technology and needs of the industry. The meeting was attended by 46 participants representing 12 Member States and 3 international organizations. The present volume contains summary of the meeting, session summaries and papers of the national participants. Refs, figs and tabs.

  10. Operating procedures for nuclear power plants and their presentation. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting held in Vienna, 31 March - 2 April 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    With a view to exchanging information on most recent development of technology in the field the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant control and Instrumentation suggested to organize a Specialists' Meeting on ''Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plants and their Presentation''. The meeting was held in Vienna, at IAEA Headquarters from March 31 to April 2, 1992 and provided an opportunity to: share operators experience; discuss the different techniques of presenting the information; identify further trends of technology and needs of the industry. The meeting was attended by 46 participants representing 12 Member States and 3 international organizations. The present volume contains summary of the meeting, session summaries and papers of the national participants. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Hearing loss and work participation: a cross-sectional study in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svinndal, Elisabeth Vigrestad; Solheim, Jorunn; Rise, Marit By; Jensen, Chris

    2018-04-27

    To study work participation of persons with hearing loss, and associations with hearing disabilities, self-reported workability, fatigue and work accommodation. Cross-sectional internet-based survey. A total of 10,679 persons with hearing loss within working-age were invited to answer the survey, where 3330 answered (35.6%). Degree of hearing loss was associated with low workability, fatigue and work place accommodation, while sick leave was associated with fatigue. Degree of hearing loss was positively associated with being unemployed (p part-time work (p < .01) (often combined with disability benefits) for women. Work place accommodation was more frequently provided among respondents working with sedentary postures, high seniority, long-term sick leave or low workability. Additional unfavourable sensory conditions were associated with decreased employment (p < .001) and workability, and an increase in sick leave (p < .01) and fatigue (p < .001). Hearing loss seemed to influence work participation factors negatively; particularly, for moderate hearing loss and for women, even though the degree of employment was high. A lack of work place accommodation when there was a need for such was found. This implies increased attentiveness towards individual needs concerning the experienced disability a hearing loss may produce. A more frequent use of hearing disability assessment is suggested.

  12. Understanding unskilled work as a condition for participation in adult education and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses how to comprehend why people working unskilled jobs are less likely than other groups to position themselves as educable subjects and engage in adult education and training. This article outlines how different research traditions examining recruitment to and participation...... in adult education and training reveal and explain distinctive participation patterns. These traditions are critically reviewed in order to identify how they provide certain understandings and entail certain blind spots. The review reveals a striking absence of research into unskilled work and thus...... a tendency to overlook how engagement in specific kinds of work condition people’s perception of adult education and training. It is finally argued that future research must pay closer attention to people’s specific work-life and examine how engagement in specific historical, social and material (changing...

  13. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental factor...

  14. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods: A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental fact...

  15. Does participative leadership reduce the onset of mobbing risk among nurse working teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Guido; Caporale, Loretta; Palese, Alvisa

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the advancement of knowledge on the impact of an empowering leadership style on the risk of mobbing behaviour among nurse working teams. The secondary aim was to evaluate, along with leadership style, the contribution of other organisational- and individual-related mobbing predictors. The style of leadership in reducing the onset of mobbing risk in nurse working teams still remains a matter of discussion. Nurse working teams are particularly affected by mobbing and studies exploring individual and organisational inhibiting/modulating factors are needed. An empirical study involving 175 nurses of various public hospital corporations in northern Italy. Data were collected via structured and anonymous questionnaires and analysed through a logistic regression. Organisational, individual and participative leadership variables explained 33.5% (P leadership enacted by nursing managers and the nursing shortage as perceived by clinical nurses. Results confirmed that the contribution made by a participative leadership style in attenuating the onset of mobbing risk in working teams was significant. A participative leadership style adopted by the nurse manager allows for the reduction of tensions in nurse working teams. However, mobbing remains a multifaceted phenomenon that is difficult to capture in its entirety and the leadership style cannot be considered as a panacea for resolving this problem in nurse working teams. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. What are the most important factors for work participation in the young disabled? An expert view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, Thea J.; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the most important factors for the work participation of the young disabled according to experts. Method: A Delphi study was conducted with internet questionnaires. Health-related, personal and environmental factors known from literature were presented to insurance physicians and

  17. Predictors for Work Participation in Individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Anja; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    Introduction Research shows that only about 25% of people with autism are employed. Method We conducted a systematic review on factors facilitating or hindering work participation of people with autism in longitudinal studies. An extensive search in biomedical and psychological databases yielded 204

  18. New forms of work organisations, direct and indirect worker participation. Evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drucker, Michiel; Looise, Jan C.; Garibaldo, F.; Telljohan, V.

    2004-01-01

    The paper starts with a brief introduction of the ideas with respect to the connection between the introduction of new forms of work organisation and direct and indirect participation (section 2). To show that these ideas are not just theory, but sometimes are realised in practice, we add to this

  19. Intermediary object for participative design processes based on the ergonomic work analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Duarte, F.; Broberg, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the use of an intermediary object, built from the ergonomic work analysis, in a participative design process. The object was a zoning pattern, developed as a visual representation ‘mapping’ of the interrelations among the functional units of t...

  20. Toward Motivating Participants to Assess Peers' Work More Fairly: Taking Programing Language Learning as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Ai, Wenguo; Liang, Yaowen; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Peer assessment is an efficient and effective learning assessment method that has been used widely in diverse fields in higher education. Despite its many benefits, a fundamental problem in peer assessment is that participants lack the motivation to assess others' work faithfully and fairly. Nonconsensus is a common challenge that makes the…

  1. Participation in Science Practices while Working in a Multimedia Case-Based Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hosun; Lundeberg, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how two female students participated in science practices as they worked in a multimedia case-based environment: interpreting simulated results, reading and writing multiple texts, role-playing, and Internet conferencing. Using discourse analysis, the following data were analyzed: students' published…

  2. Security, Dignity, Caring Relationships, and Meaningful Work: Needs Motivating Participation in a Job-Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Miller-Dyce, Cherrel; Carlone, David

    2008-01-01

    Researchers asked 17 participants in a job-training program to describe their personal struggles following an economic restructuring. Examined through a critical theoretical lens, findings indicate that the learners enrolled in the program to reclaim security, dignity, meaningful work, and caring relationships. Program planners at community…

  3. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  4. 76 FR 21043 - Notice of Public Meeting: Technical Aspects of Mandatory Deposit of Published Electronic Works...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... mandatory deposit requirements of the copyright law. The objective is to identify file submission, packaging... mandatory deposit provisions of the copyright law. Under the interim regulation, certain works available... LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Copyright Office [Docket No. 2011-3] Notice of Public Meeting: Technical...

  5. 78 FR 42799 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... 8:00 a.m. to approximately 1:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Little America Hotel... Year 2013-14 Budget and Work Plan, and to approve the Water Year 2014 Hydrograph operation for Glen...

  6. Work participation among the morbidly obese seeking bariatric surgery: an exploratory study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernæs, Ulrikke J V; Andersen, John R; Norheim, Ole F; Våge, Villy

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the rate of work participation and disability pension, and identify predictors for sickness absence and disability pension, among morbidly obese individuals. The data were collected from the Obesity Surgery Registry at Førde Central Hospital and consists of patients undergoing bariatric surgery between April 2001 and February 2013. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of sickness absence and disability pension. The sample consisted of 576 patients (63.9 % females) with a mean (range, SD) age of 41.7 (18-66, 10.6) and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 47.7 (32.5-80.8, 7.7). Patients working full- or part-time comprised 55.6 % of the sample and 29.7 % received a disability pension; only 46.4 % of the sample received an income from paid work without additional benefits. Having a BMI above 50, lower levels of education, and suffering from four or more comorbidities were significant predictors of sickness absence. Female gender, psychiatric disorders, lower levels of education, asthma, heart failure and suffering from four or more comorbidities were significant predictors of disability pension. The proportion of the work participation and disability pension among this morbidly obese population is of substantial concern, as work participation has proven important for the health-related quality of life. This, combined with the fact that these patients are significantly less educated than the general population, can potentially have grave socioeconomic consequences. Increased knowledge of obesity development and the work history of these patients are needed to implement policies that ensure increased rates of work participation.

  7. Twelfth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-05-01

    The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous AGM,in Vienna from 27 to 30 March 1979. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  8. Twelfth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous AGM,in Vienna from 27 to 30 March 1979. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  9. On the utility of within-participant research design when working with patients with neurocognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingrimsdottir, Hanna Steinunn; Arntzen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Within-participant research designs are frequently used within the field of behavior analysis to document changes in behavior before, during, and after treatment. The purpose of the present article is to show the utility of within-participant research designs when working with older adults with neurocognitive disorders. The reason for advocating for these types of experimental designs is that they provide valid information about whether the changes that are observed in the dependent variable are caused by manipulations of the independent variable, or whether the change may be due to other variables. We provide examples from published papers where within-participant research design has been used with patients with neurocognitive disorders. The examples vary somewhat, demonstrating possible applications. It is our suggestion that the within-participant research design may be used more often with the targeted client group than is documented in the literature at the current date.

  10. Gas-cooled reactor technology safety and siting. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-07-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the Eleventh International Conference on the HTGR and the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Technology, Safety and Siting were held in Dimitrovgrad, USSR, on June 21-23, 1989. The Technical Committee Meeting provided the Soviet delegates with an opportunity to display the breadth of their program on HTGRs to an international audience. Nearly one-half of the papers were presented by Soviet participants. Among the highlights of the meeting were the following: the diverse nature and large magnitude of the Soviet research and development program on high temperature gas-cooled reactors; the Government approval of the budget for the construction of the 30 MWt High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan (The schedule contemplates a start of construction in spring 1990 on a site at the Oarai Research Establishment and about a five year construction period.); disappointment in the announced plans to shutdown both the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant in the United States (US) and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR-300) in Germany (These two reactors presently represent the only operating HTGRs in the world since the AVR plant in Juelich, Germany, was also shutdown at the end of 1988.); the continuing negotiations between Germany and the USSR on the terms of the co-operation between the two countries for the construction of a HTR Module supplemented by joint research and development activities aimed at increasing coolant outlet temperatures from 750 deg. C to 950 deg. C; the continued enthusiasm displayed by both the US and German representatives for the potential of the small modular designs under development in both countries and the ability for these designs to meet the stringent requirements demanded for the future expansion of nuclear power; the combining of the HTGR technology interest of ABB-Atom and Siemens in Germany into a joint enterprise, HTR GmbH, in May 1989

  11. Gas-cooled reactor technology safety and siting. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the Eleventh International Conference on the HTGR and the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Technology, Safety and Siting were held in Dimitrovgrad, USSR, on June 21-23, 1989. The Technical Committee Meeting provided the Soviet delegates with an opportunity to display the breadth of their program on HTGRs to an international audience. Nearly one-half of the papers were presented by Soviet participants. Among the highlights of the meeting were the following: the diverse nature and large magnitude of the Soviet research and development program on high temperature gas-cooled reactors; the Government approval of the budget for the construction of the 30 MWt High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan (The schedule contemplates a start of construction in spring 1990 on a site at the Oarai Research Establishment and about a five year construction period.); disappointment in the announced plans to shutdown both the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant in the United States (US) and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR-300) in Germany (These two reactors presently represent the only operating HTGRs in the world since the AVR plant in Juelich, Germany, was also shutdown at the end of 1988.); the continuing negotiations between Germany and the USSR on the terms of the co-operation between the two countries for the construction of a HTR Module supplemented by joint research and development activities aimed at increasing coolant outlet temperatures from 750 deg. C to 950 deg. C; the continued enthusiasm displayed by both the US and German representatives for the potential of the small modular designs under development in both countries and the ability for these designs to meet the stringent requirements demanded for the future expansion of nuclear power; the combining of the HTGR technology interest of ABB-Atom and Siemens in Germany into a joint enterprise, HTR GmbH, in May 1989

  12. Forty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: • Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); • Review the progress since the 44 th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; • Consider topical technical meeting arrangements for 2012-2013, as well as review FR-related activities included in the IAEA Programme & Budget (P&B) biennium 2012-2013; • Review the IAEA’s concluded, on-going and planned coordinated research projects in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations and international initiatives (GIF, INPRO, NEA, ESNII, etc.). The 45th Meeting of the TWG-FR reached the following conclusions/recommendations: • The participants expressed satisfaction and appreciation for the large amount of new information on on-going activities carried out by the Member States in the field of FR and ADS exchanged during the meeting; • Also the organizations which have participated to the TWG-FR meeting for the first time expressed their appreciation for the lively discussion and the results and thanked the IAEA for inviting them at the meeting; • The meeting was very useful in particular for collecting inputs and advice in view of the preparation of the IAEA Programme & Budget 2014-2015 (and then 2016-2017) in the area of FR and ADS technology development; • The TWG-FR remains an unique international forum for information exchange in the field of fast neutron systems and for promoting RT&D activities in this area; • Due to the increasing interest in FR and in view of the forthcoming realizations, it would be advisable to increase the involvement of industries, regulators and other R&D organizations; • The annual TWG-FR meeting should focused on exchange of information on national and international programmes, avoiding duplications or overlapping’s with other IAEA initiatives in the field;

  13. A Pilot Study on Factors Involved with Work Participation in the Early Stages of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Hiele, Karin; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; Ruimschotel, Rob; Kamminga, Noëlle G. A.; Visser, Leo H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation. Objective To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job. Methods Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years. Results Patients with a paid job (57%) reported better physical functioning (pworking hours. Conclusion Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS. PMID:25153710

  14. Employment and paid work among participants in a randomized controlled trial comparing diacetylmorphine and hydromorphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoo, Mohammadali; Vogel, Marc; Choi, Fiona; Song, Michael J; Burghardt, Jensen; Zafari, Zafar; Tabi, Katarina; Frank, Anastasia; Barbic, Skye; Schütz, Christian; Jang, Kerry; Krausz, Michael

    2018-04-12

    Employment is one of the less studied but a significant outcome of medication-assisted treatment. Thus, we aimed to explore employment outcomes of medication-assisted treatment with hydromorphone (HDM) or diacetylmorphine (DAM). The secondary aim was to estimate characteristics of this population as well as treatment-related factors associated with these outcomes. This was a secondary analysis of a randomized, double blind controlled trial. A total of 102 and 100 participants were randomized to receive injectable DAM or HDM for 6 months respectively. In stage 2, 144 participants were randomized again to receive either oral or injectable forms of the medication they received for another 6 months. Participants were interviewed at 5 timepoints: before and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after treatment assignment. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) with a logit link was fitted to determine factors related to paid work in the past 30 days. Mean age of participants was 44.3 (SD = 9.6) and 59 (29.2%) participants were men. At each timepoint, 6-8 (3.6%-4.1%) participants reported employment in the past 30 days and 40 to 52 (19.7%-26.7%) reported minimum 1 day of paid work. University or college education [OR = 2.12: 95% CI = (1.25, 3.62), P = 0.01] was significantly associated with paid work after adjustment for age, gender, treatment arms, timepoints, days receiving study treatment, physical health, psychological health and crack cocaine use in the past 30 days. The rate of employment was lower among participants of this study compared to similar studies on heroin-assisted treatment. Higher education was associated with increased odds of paid work. A large gap exists between employment rate and the proportion of participants who reported paid work. Supported employment and occupational therapy could optimize the employment outcomes of this population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relation between working memory and self-control capacity in participants with mild intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dučić Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Working memory is activated in situations which require active control of directing attention, processing information and making it available for a short time. Its content is limited in capacity and changes with regard to the context of a performed activity. Self-control is the capacity of a voluntary conscious effort to persist in achieving a previously set goal. The aim of this research was to determine the relation of verbal and visuospatial aspects of working memory with self-control skills in persons with mild intellectual disability (ID. The sample included 40 participants 8-12 years of age (M=10.65, SD=1.19. Memorizing a Maze task, adapted for participants with ID, was used to determine the capacity of visuospatial aspect of working memory. Memorizing Animals task was used to assess verbal aspect of working memory, and Self-Control Rating Scale was used to determine the acquisition level of self-control skills. It was determined that verbal aspects of working memory were significantly related to the acquired level of self-control skills (p=0.002. There was no significant relation between the results of tasks assessing the capacity of visuospatial working memory and the success on the scale assessing self-control capacity (p=0.089. The relation between self-control and verbal aspect of working memory may be explained by close links between using speech and applying self-regulation strategies.

  16. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations

  17. Behaviour of core internals. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists meeting. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This meeting was organized by the IAEA within the framework of its International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants. It was held in Rez near Prague on the 6-8 October 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for discussion on recent results in research and utility experience and to provide recommendations for future developments in NPP life management programmes. 12 papers were presented during 3 sessions. Individual abstracts have been prepared for each of the papers

  18. Record of the third meeting of the working group, Palo Alto, California, 1 February 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The items discussed include the report of WG4 to the November Plenary Conference, the draft chapters I to III of the WG4 final report, the progress reports from sub-group A and sub-group B, the record of the joint meetings of the sub-groups on economic assessment, safeguarding, assessment of proliferation resistance, and alternative institutional arrangements, the matters arising from the sub-group reports and records, the special needs of less developed countries, the TCC meeting, 27-28 February 1979, and the future programme of work

  19. The working mechanism of manual therapy in participants with chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castien, René; Blankenstein, Annette; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Heymans, Martijn W; Dekker, Joost

    2013-10-01

    Prospective longitudinal study. To explore the working mechanism of manual therapy, we investigated whether 3 cervical spine variables were mediators of the effect of manual therapy on headache frequency. Background Manual therapy has been shown to reduce headache frequency in participants with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). To what extent specific elements of treatment contribute to the effectiveness of manual therapy in CTTH is unknown. One hundred eighty-two participants with CTTH participated in a prospective longitudinal study: 142 underwent manual therapy and 40 participants received usual care by their general practitioner. Regression analysis was performed according to the steps described by Baron and Kenny, and the proportion of mediated effect was estimated for 3 potential mediators: (1) cervical range of motion, (2) neck flexor endurance, and (3) forward head posture. Outcome was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in headache days. Neck flexor endurance mediated 24.5% of the effect of manual therapy. Cervical range of motion and forward head posture showed no mediated effect. Increased neck flexor endurance appears to be a working mechanism of manual therapy. This finding supports isometric training of neck flexors in participants with CTTH. Trial registered with Netherlands Trial Register (TR 1074).

  20. The Pennsylvania certified safety committee program: an evaluation of participation and effects on work injury rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hangsheng; Burns, Rachel M; Schaefer, Agnes G; Ruder, Teague; Nelson, Christopher; Haviland, Amelia M; Gray, Wayne B; Mendeloff, John

    2010-08-01

    Since 1994, Pennsylvania, like several other states, has provided a 5% discount on workers' compensation insurance premiums for firms with a certified joint labor management safety committee. This study explored the factors affecting program participation and evaluated the effect of this program on work injuries. Using Pennsylvania unemployment insurance data (1996-2006), workers' compensation data (1998-2005), and the safety committee audit data (1999-2007), we conducted propensity score matching and regression analysis on the program's impact on injury rates. Larger firms, firms with higher injury rates, firms in high risk industries, and firms without labor unions were more likely to join the safety committee program and less likely to drop out of the program. The injury rates of participants did not decline more than the rates for non-participants; however, rates at participant firms with good compliance dropped more than the rates at participant firms with poor compliance. Firm size and prior injury rates are key predictors of program participation. Firms that complied with the requirement to train their safety committee members did experience reductions in injuries, but non-compliance with that and other requirements was so widespread that no overall impact of the program could be detected. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  2. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997

  3. Methodology for pressurized thermal shock evaluation. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The meeting was held within the scope of activities of the International Working Group, recognizing that the importance of the PTS phenomena and advances in the subject require regular information exchange in this field. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to exchange information as well as new results in research and development, concentrating on the total PTS calculation and including PTS evaluation and application in RPV life time and integrity assessment. The papers presented at the meeting covered problems of thermohydraulics, RPV temperature-stress fields calculations, fracture mechanics approach to integrity assessment as well as discussions on PTS modeling, general procedures for RPV life assessment and mitigation methods other than RPV annealing. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Methodology for pressurized thermal shock evaluation. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The meeting was held within the scope of activities of the International Working Group, recognizing that the importance of the PTS phenomena and advances in the subject require regular information exchange in this field. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to exchange information as well as new results in research and development, concentrating on the total PTS calculation and including PTS evaluation and application in RPV life time and integrity assessment. The papers presented at the meeting covered problems of thermohydraulics, RPV temperature-stress fields calculations, fracture mechanics approach to integrity assessment as well as discussions on PTS modeling, general procedures for RPV life assessment and mitigation methods other than RPV annealing. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-24

    Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental factors more work-related and a subdivision of personal factors. For data extraction the method known as qualitative metasummary was used and the manifest frequency effect size (MFES) for each category in the ICF was calculated. From 33 included studies 318 factors have been extracted and classified in the ICF. In the classification the frequency of occurrences and the consistency in direction (i.e., hindering or facilitating) have been made visible. The ICF categories with the highest MFES were mental functions with factors like feelings and emotions about dyslexia; activities like reading or writing/spelling; participation with factors like acquiring and keeping a job; social relationships at work where the attitudes and support of the employer and co-workers are important; working conditions with factors like the availability of assistive technology and accommodations on the job; and personal factors like self-disclosure and coping strategies. In the context of work DD affects nearly all domains of functioning, mostly in a negative way. Within each domain the impact of DD increases over the course of life. To overcome that negative influence, many forms of adaptation, compensation, or coping are mentioned. Also notable is the lack of positive attitudes toward DD of the participants with DD-with the exception of the attitudes of teachers with DD-as well as on the part of colleagues, supervisors, and employers.

  6. Why do Participation in Decision Making Enhance Creativity in Work Groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Thomas; Jønsson, Thomas

    It seems to be an established fact in the organizational psychological literature that participation in decision making leads to creativity and innovation in work groups and organizations. A quite extensive amount of research has claimed that the link exists, although only a somewhat smaller amount...... of research has established that there is a link between the two constructs of participation in decision making and creativity. But although this link has been clearly documented theories with clearly stated causal explanations of why participation in decision making (pdm) would lead to creativity...... factors include such different models as enhanced intrinsic motivation (Amabile, 2001; Conti & Amabile, 1999), reduction in resistance to change (De Dreu & West, 2001), pooling of unshared knowledge (Latham, Winters, & Locke, 1994) and better utilization of individual differences in cognitive style...

  7. Why does Participation in Decision Making Enhance Creativity in Work Groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo T.; Jønsson, Thomas S.

    It seems to be an established fact in the organizational psychological literature that participation in decision making leads to creativity and innovation in work groups and organizations. A quite extensive amount of research has claimed that the link exists, although only a somewhat smaller amount...... of research has established that there is a link between the two constructs of participation in decision making and creativity. But although this link has been clearly documented theories with clearly stated causal explanations of why participation in decision making (pdm) would lead to creativity...... factors include such different models as enhanced intrinsic motivation (Amabile, 2001; Conti & Amabile, 1999), reduction in resistance to change (De Dreu & West, 2001), pooling of unshared knowledge (Latham, Winters, & Locke, 1994) and better utilization of individual differences in cognitive style...

  8. Exploring communication and interaction skills at work among participants in individual placement and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexén, Annika; Bejerholm, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Not all people with severe mental illness who attend Individual Placement and Support (IPS) gain and keep their jobs or work full time. Research has indicated a relationship between social disabilities and work performance in this group, and that support provided is often directed towards the social work environment. However, relationships between social skills performed in an authentic work setting and vocational outcomes have not been explored. To explore relationships between social communication and interaction skills and vocational outcomes among IPS service users in a Swedish context. Twenty-nine participants were appraised with the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills (ACIS-S) instrument, and their vocational data were registered. Correlations were estimated using Spearman's rho test with Bonferroni corrections at item level. Better communication and interaction skills were significantly correlated with increased working hours (rs = 0.64) and higher income (rs = 0.45). Increased working hours were related to assuming postures, asking questions, sharing information, and sustaining conversation in an appropriate manner. The results indicate that occupational therapists need to focus on social skills and accommodation of the social work environment in order to promote sustainable working careers among people with severe mental illness.

  9. Effects of work participation, intergenerational transfers and savings on life satisfaction of older Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sor-Tho; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan

    2013-12-01

    To examine the effects of work participation, intergenerational transfers and savings on the life satisfaction of older community-dwelling Malaysians. Data from the 1999 Survey on Perceptions of Needs and Problems of the Elderly on people aged 60 and over were used. The life satisfaction score was constructed from 10 questions adopted from the Life Satisfaction Inventory-A by Neugarten, Havighurst and Tobin. Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate the expected level of life satisfaction. Controlling for other variables in the model, respondents who provided assistance to and received assistance from children with savings had significantly higher life satisfaction than their counterparts, while work participation did not have any significant effect on life satisfaction. Intergenerational transfers and savings are important predictors of life satisfaction. The interdependence between generations should remain and savings habits need to be cultivated to ensure a higher life satisfaction in old age. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  10. 42 CFR 137.24 - Are there grants available to assist the Indian Tribe to meet the requirements to participate in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... grant to assist it to: (a) Plan to participate in self-governance; and (b) Negotiate the terms of the... Tribe to meet the requirements to participate in self-governance? 137.24 Section 137.24 Public Health... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self...

  11. The Organization of the Work in the School and the Students’ Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Teise de Oliveira Guaranha Garcia

    2007-01-01

    This article intends to present some reflections on the importance of the students' participation in the organization of the work in the school. It is a presupposition that the implementation of the democratic administration in the public school necessarily demand to consider the part that the students occupy in the process of organization of the pedagogic work. The text, based in obtained results from a research accomplished at a school of the from São Paulo state net that assists to the ele...

  12. Perceived reciprocal value of health professionals' participation in global child health-related work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Sarah; Wigle, Jannah; Akseer, Nadia; Barac, Raluca; Barwick, Melanie; Zlotkin, Stanley

    2017-05-22

    Leading children's hospitals in high-income settings have become heavily engaged in international child health research and educational activities. These programs aim to provide benefit to the institutions, children and families in the overseas locations where they are implemented. Few studies have measured the actual reciprocal value of this work for the home institutions and for individual staff who participate in these overseas activities. Our objective was to estimate the perceived reciprocal value of health professionals' participation in global child health-related work. Benefits were measured in the form of skills, knowledge and attitude strengthening as estimated by an adapted Global Health Competency Model. A survey questionnaire was developed following a comprehensive review of literature and key competency models. It was distributed to all health professionals at the Hospital for Sick Children with prior international work experience (n = 478). One hundred fifty six health professionals completed the survey (34%). A score of 0 represented negligible value gained and a score of 100 indicated significant capacity improvement. The mean respondent improvement score was 57 (95% CI 53-62) suggesting improved overall competency resulting from their international experiences. Mean scores were >50% in 8 of 10 domains. Overall scores suggest that international work brought value to the hospital and over half responded that their international experience would influence their decision to stay on at the hospital. The findings offer tangible examples of how global child health work conducted outside of one's home institution impacts staff and health systems locally.

  13. WannaBike - one of the teams that participated in Bike2Work 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Bike2Work is a healthy living initiative involving companies across Switzerland, and in May and June this year it inspired 54 780 participants from 1 885 companies to take to the saddle for their daily commute, while simultaneously promoting a sustainable approach to transport. In the photo one can see the team "WannaBike" from CERN. The members of the team, from left to right, were: Nick Walter, Ludivine Ceard, Cecilia Uribe Estrada and Manuel Silva.

  14. Responses to task 1 questionnaire of INFCE Working Group 6 supplied by participating states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responses to Task 1 Questionnaire of INFCE Working Group 6 supplied by participating states (Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, USSR, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia). Data and information are given on nuclear power forecast, spent fuel requirements for AR and AFR storage, current programmes for storage, future spent fuel disposition plans and transport

  15. The Organization of the Work in the School and the Students’ Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teise de Oliveira Guaranha Garcia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to present some reflections on the importance of the students' participation in the organization of the work in the school. It is a presupposition that the implementation of the democratic administration in the public school necessarily demand to consider the part that the students occupy in the process of organization of the pedagogic work. The text, based in obtained results from a research accomplished at a school of the from São Paulo state net that assists to the elementary school teaching (final series and high school teaching, it examines the theme of the participation in the administration of the public school; the user-students' participation in the organization of the pedagogic work and the results of professionals' actions with views to the democratization of the school administration, especially concerning to the execution of the access and permanence right in the school. It argues, finally, about the importance of the implementation of solid politics that contribute to the democratization of the school practices.

  16. Challenges at work and financial rewards to stimulate longer workforce participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proper, Karin I; Deeg, Dorly J H; van der Beek, Allard J

    2009-08-11

    Because of the demographic changes, appropriate measures are needed to prevent early exit from work and to encourage workers to prolong their working life. To date, few studies have been performed on the factors motivating continuing to work after the official age of retirement. In addition, most of those studies were based on quantitative data. The aims of this study were to examine, using both quantitative and qualitative data: (1) the reasons for voluntary early retirement; (2) the reasons for continuing working life after the official retirement age; and (3) the predictive value of the reasons mentioned. Quantitative data analyses were performed with a prospective cohort among persons aged 55 years and older. Moreover, qualitative data were derived from interviews with workers together with discussions from a workshop among occupational physicians and employers. Results showed that the presence of challenging work was among the most important reasons for not taking early retirement. In addition, this motive appeared to positively predict working status after three years. The financial advantages of working and the maintenance of social contacts were the reasons reported most frequently for not taking full retirement, with the financial aspect being a reasonably good predictor for working status after three years. From the interviews and the workshop, five themes were identified as important motives to prolong working life: challenges at work, social contacts, reward and appreciation, health, and competencies and skills. Further, it was brought forward that each stakeholder can and should contribute to the maintenance of a healthy and motivated ageing workforce. Based on the findings, it was concluded that measures that promote challenges at work, together with financial stimuli, seem to be promising in order to prolong workforce participation.

  17. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  18. Status of national programmes on fast reactors 1998/99. 32nd annual meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Over the past 32 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in fast reactor technology. The present publication contains information on the status of fast reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1998/1999, as reported at the 32. annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. It is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFR development in IAEA Member States.

  19. Status of national programmes on fast reactors 1998/99. 32nd annual meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Over the past 32 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in fast reactor technology. The present publication contains information on the status of fast reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1998/1999, as reported at the 32. annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. It is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFR development in IAEA Member States

  20. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    July 1989 No.19 Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences. 55th Annual. Meeting ... in the world, keeping alive atthe same time his research interests, abreast .... theory made a comeback with many new ideas and with the success of the ...

  1. Employee participation and work environment in hotels. A comparison of patterns of participation in Denmark and New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens; Knudsen, Herman; Markey, Ray

    and management, and a democratic model where employees individually or collectively decides together with management. The article will analyse results from the two research projects and focus on patterns of participation in the hotel industry and discuss reasons for similarities and differences between New...

  2. "Balancing on Skates on the Icy Surface of Work": a metasynthesis of work participation for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, Liv Grethe; Holgersen, Helge; Aas, Randi W; Davidson, Larry

    2014-03-01

    To explore how persons with psychiatric disabilities experience facilitators of and barriers to participation in paid work in transitional, supported, and open employment settings, in order to provide guidance for efforts to attract and retain these persons in gainful employment as a key dimension of recovery and community life. A metasynthesis was conducted using 16 qualitative studies published between 1990 and 2011. Ten themes, two phases, and an overarching metaphor were identified. The first five themes describe facilitators of and impediments to getting a job (getting off the bench): (1) fighting inertia; (2) taking control; (3) encouraging peers; (4) disruptions related to the illness; (5) lack of opportunities and supports. The next five themes represent facilitators of and impediments to working (skating on the ice); (6) going mainstream; (7) social cohesion; (8) clarity in role and responsibilities; (9) environmental factors; (10) managing self-disclosure. We chose as our overarching metaphor "Balancing on Skates on the Icy Surface of Work," as we view both iceskaters and workers with psychiatric disabilities as needing to achieve and maintain their balance while being "on the edge" between various extremities. We have shown that, for persons with psychiatric disabilities to "get off the bench" and "onto the ice" of employment, they may need to be supported in finding and maintaining their balance in new situations through a combination of learning new skills and competencies (learning how to skate) while receiving in vivo assistance from empathic and knowledgeable supporters (being coached while on the ice).

  3. 40 CFR 63.7925 - What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and control... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and control devices? 63.7925 Section 63.7925...

  4. Twenty-eighth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; ); Danon, Yaron; Herman, Mike; ); Dunn, Mike; ); Kahler, Albert Skip; ); Jacqmin, Robert; ); Plompen, Arjan; ); Fukahori, Tokio; ); Harada, Hideo; ); Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; ); Grudzevich, Oleg; ); Ge, Zhigang; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng; Koning, Arjan; ); Mills, Robert; ); Mcnabb, Dennis; ); Palmiotti, Giuseppe; ); Noguere, Gilles; ); Leal, Luiz; ); Cabellos, Oscar; )

    2016-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 28. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document is the summary record of the meeting. It presents: 1 - The reports on experimental activities: Experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects were reviewed. Detailed information about the experimental activities is given in the reports and view-graphs presented at the meeting. 2 - The review of final or near-final subgroup reports. Results and conclusions of completed or near-completed subgroups were discussed. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 3 - The status of ongoing subgroups. Activities of ongoing subgroups were presented. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 4 - The proposals for new subgroups. The subgroup proposal was reviewed by WPEC. Detailed information about this proposal is given in the document. 5 - The forthcoming meetings of interest. The documents presented at the twenty-eight WPEC meeting are presented in the annex 2: Annex 2.1 Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation - WPEC; Annex 2.2 WPEC Long-term mandate (updated and extended) on a 'Expert Group on the High Priority Request

  5. New approaches of organizing care and work: giving way to participation, mobilization, and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Chantal; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Leclerc, Martine Mayrand; Brabant, Louise Hamelin

    2005-01-01

    Quebec's health network has undertaken large-scale organizational changes to ensure the continuity, accessibility, and quality of health care and services for the population. This article describes the optimal approach for making changes to the organization of care and work for patients, health care workers, and organizations. This participative action research was carried out by means of interviews and document analysis. One hundred participants were involved, describing a total of 34 projects for significant organizational change. Results include an optimal approach broken down into 4 phases, each of which includes steps, facilitating factors, and potential difficulties. The phases of this approach are: (1) sharing the vision, mission, and values of the organization and identifying the purpose and need underlying the change; (2) building alliances and validating the involvement of the various players; (3) conceptualizing and planning the project; and (4) implementing changes and continuing evaluation. It is possible to rise to the challenge of finding new approaches to organize care and work by giving way to participation, mobilization, and innovation.

  6. Meeting Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Katzman, Jeffrey W

    2017-12-01

    Although meetings are central to organizational work, considerable time devoted to meetings in Academic Health Centers appears to be unproductively spent. The primary purposes of this article are to delineate and describe Meeting Disorders, pathological processes resulting in these inefficient and ineffective scenarios, and Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD), a clinical syndrome. The paper also offers preliminary approaches to remedies. The authors integrate observations made during tens of thousands of hours in administrative meetings in academic medical settings with information in the literature regarding the nature, causes and potential interventions for dysfunctional groups and meetings. Meeting Disorders, resulting from distinct pathologies of leadership and organization, constitute prevalent subgroups of the bureaucrapathologies, pathological conditions caused by dysfunctional bureaucratic processes that generate excesses of wasted time, effort, and other resources. These disorders also generate frustration and demoralization among participants, contributing to professional burnout. Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD) is a subjective condition that develops in individuals who overdose on these experiences and may reflect one manifestation of burnout. Meeting disorders and Meeting Fatigue Disorder occur commonly in bureaucratic life. Resources and potential remedies are available to help ameliorate their more deleterious effects.

  7. NASA GSFC Science Communication Working Group: Addressing Barriers to Scientist and Engineer Participation in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L.; Hsu, B. C.; Campbell, B. A.; Hess, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Communication Working Group (SCWG) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been in existence since late 2007. The SCWG is comprised of education and public outreach (E/PO) professionals, public affairs specialists, scientists, and engineers. The goals of the SCWG are to identify barriers to scientist and engineer engagement in E/PO activities and to enable those scientists and engineers who wish to contribute to E/PO to be able to do so. SCWG members have held meetings with scientists and engineers across GSFC to determine barriers to their involvement in E/PO. During these meetings, SCWG members presented examples of successful, ongoing E/PO projects, encouraged active research scientists and engineers to talk about their own E/PO efforts and what worked for them, discussed the E/PO working environment, discussed opportunities for getting involved in E/PO (particularly in high-impact efforts that do not take much time), handed out booklets on effective E/PO, and asked scientists and engineers what they need to engage in E/PO. The identified barriers were consistent among scientists in GSFC's four science divisions (Earth science, planetary science, heliophysics, and astrophysics). Common barriers included 1) lack of time, 2) lack of funding support, 3) lack of value placed on doing E/PO by supervisors, 4) lack of training on doing appropriate/effective E/PO for different audiences, 5) lack of awareness and information about opportunities, 6) lack of understanding of what E/PO really is, and 7) level of effort required to do E/PO. Engineers reported similar issues, but the issues of time and funding support were more pronounced due to their highly structured work day and environment. Since the barriers were identified, the SCWG has taken a number of steps to address and rectify them. Steps have included holding various events to introduce scientists and engineers to E/PO staff and opportunities including an E/PO Open House, brown bag seminars on

  8. 76 FR 61719 - Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... Diseases Laboratories at Boston University Medical Center. The meeting will be held Wednesday, November 2... National Research Council Committee on Technical Input will participate in this discussion and provide its... concerning this meeting, contact Ms. Kelly Fennington, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology...

  9. IAEA Technical Meeting on Innovative Heat Exchanger and Steam Generator Designs for Fast Reactors. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The IAEA, within the framework of its Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), assists Member States activities in fast reactors technology development areas by providing an umbrella for information exchange [topical Technical Meetings (TMs), Workshops and large Conferences] and collaborative R&D [Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs)]. The Technical meeting on “Innovative Heat Exchanger and Steam Generator Designs for Fast Reactors” was held from 21 – 22 December 2011 in Vienna, addressing Member States’ expressed needs of information exchange in the field of advanced fast reactor design features, with particular attention to innovative heat exchangers and steam generators. The Objective of the TM is to provide a global forum for in-depth information exchange and discussion on the most advanced concepts of heat exchangers and steam generators for fast reactors. More specifically, the objectives are: · Review of the status of advanced fast reactor development activities with special emphasis on design and performance of heat exchangers and steam generators; · Discuss requirements for innovative heat exchangers and steam generators; · Present results of studies and conceptual designs for innovative heat exchangers and steam generators; · Provide recommendations for international collaboration under the IAEA aegis. The meeting agenda of the meeting is in Annex I

  10. Use of PSA in the regulatory process. Report of the specialist's meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this meeting was to focus on the role of the regulator in relation to PSA, to give a picture of the present status, and near term plans, of the requirements placed on licensees and of the uses, formal and informal, made of PSA in regulatory decision making. One such use, in which there is currently much interest, is known as Risk-Based Regulation. This term has various connotations but essentially refers to a more flexible and efficient application of Technical Specifications in the interests of gains in both economy and safety. The position in many countries is one of change in the use of PSA by regulators, and hence any report can only give a snapshot in time. It has to be noted that a number of countries, with important nuclear power programmes, were not represented at the meeting, and so the overall picture is not as comprehensive as might have been hoped. The field of the discussion in the meeting was divided into three areas, progressed in three working groups, namely: Regulatory requirements related to PSA, Regulatory uses of PSA, and Risk-Based Regulation. The outcomes are covered in the next three sections. The fifth section of this report gives the overall conclusions of the meeting and the final section makes some recommendations for future IAEA activities in these areas. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Total Participation Management: Toward Psychological Determinants of Subjective Well-Being at Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to determine which management practice has the strongest influence on the subjective well-being (SWB of employees, three workplaces were assessed with reference to different levels of total participation management (TPM, an innovative approach to human resource management. The study examined whether the level of TPM is positively related with SWB, defined according to Diener’s (1984 affective and cognitive facets of work. The psychological explanation of the predicted dependence was the level of satisfaction of three basic needs (autonomy, competence and relatedness distinguished by Deci and Ryan (2000a. The hypothesis about a positive relationship between SWB and TPM was confirmed. Results indicate that the least participative company has employees with the lowest subjective well-being and with the lowest satisfaction of basic psychological needs.

  12. Features of categorization of prevention of conducting meetings, rallies, demonstrations, marches, picketing or participation in them as a crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vdovichenko K.G.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Minimum rates of applying article 149 of the RF Criminal Code, caused by crime categorization errors and technical and legal defects of article’s structure are stated. The elements of crime under this article include violating the constitutional right to freedom of meetings as a result of preventing mass actions. The commission of unlawful act by an official should be categorized as a crime according to article 149 when using prevention means stipulated in objective side of this act. Improper use of official position for illegal prevention and use of violence to people form a cumulative crime (articles 149 and 286 of the RF Criminal Code. Signs of violence and threats to use violence, specified by corpus delicti, draw a question on the amount of damage to health which does not demand additional categorization. Damage limits implies beating and slight damage to health. More serious damage forms a cumulative crime. Any threats to use violence are included in the elements of crime under study. Thus, illegal prevention of conducting public mass action can be categorized as a cumulative crime. Gross violation of public order which expresses contempt against public (committed by using means, specified in Art. 213 of the FR Criminal Code and simultaneously prevents conducting a rally, meeting, demonstration, march, picketing or participating in them (ideal cumulative crime complicates the categorization. If such prevention is accompanied with gross violation of public order, the act should be categorized as a cumulative crime according to articles 149 and 213.

  13. Female peers in small work groups enhance women's motivation, verbal participation, and career aspirations in engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Nilanjana; Scircle, Melissa McManus; Hunsinger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    For years, public discourse in science education, technology, and policy-making has focused on the “leaky pipeline” problem: the observation that fewer women than men enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields and more women than men leave. Less attention has focused on experimentally testing solutions to this problem. We report an experiment investigating one solution: we created “microenvironments” (small groups) in engineering with varying proportions of women to identify which environment increases motivation and participation, and whether outcomes depend on students’ academic stage. Female engineering students were randomly assigned to one of three engineering groups of varying sex composition: 75% women, 50% women, or 25% women. For first-years, group composition had a large effect: women in female-majority and sex-parity groups felt less anxious than women in female-minority groups. However, among advanced students, sex composition had no effect on anxiety. Importantly, group composition significantly affected verbal participation, regardless of women’s academic seniority: women participated more in female-majority groups than sex-parity or female-minority groups. Additionally, when assigned to female-minority groups, women who harbored implicit masculine stereotypes about engineering reported less confidence and engineering career aspirations. However, in sex-parity and female-majority groups, confidence and career aspirations remained high regardless of implicit stereotypes. These data suggest that creating small groups with high proportions of women in otherwise male-dominated fields is one way to keep women engaged and aspiring toward engineering careers. Although sex parity works sometimes, it is insufficient to boost women’s verbal participation in group work, which often affects learning and mastery. PMID:25848061

  14. Female peers in small work groups enhance women's motivation, verbal participation, and career aspirations in engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Nilanjana; Scircle, Melissa McManus; Hunsinger, Matthew

    2015-04-21

    For years, public discourse in science education, technology, and policy-making has focused on the "leaky pipeline" problem: the observation that fewer women than men enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields and more women than men leave. Less attention has focused on experimentally testing solutions to this problem. We report an experiment investigating one solution: we created "microenvironments" (small groups) in engineering with varying proportions of women to identify which environment increases motivation and participation, and whether outcomes depend on students' academic stage. Female engineering students were randomly assigned to one of three engineering groups of varying sex composition: 75% women, 50% women, or 25% women. For first-years, group composition had a large effect: women in female-majority and sex-parity groups felt less anxious than women in female-minority groups. However, among advanced students, sex composition had no effect on anxiety. Importantly, group composition significantly affected verbal participation, regardless of women's academic seniority: women participated more in female-majority groups than sex-parity or female-minority groups. Additionally, when assigned to female-minority groups, women who harbored implicit masculine stereotypes about engineering reported less confidence and engineering career aspirations. However, in sex-parity and female-majority groups, confidence and career aspirations remained high regardless of implicit stereotypes. These data suggest that creating small groups with high proportions of women in otherwise male-dominated fields is one way to keep women engaged and aspiring toward engineering careers. Although sex parity works sometimes, it is insufficient to boost women's verbal participation in group work, which often affects learning and mastery.

  15. Delivering health care through community pharmacies: are working conditions deterring female pharmacists' participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidman, Wendy; Day, Jennie; Hassell, Karen; Payne, Katherine

    2009-07-01

    Recent UK government policy has placed community pharmacists at the frontline of health care delivery in order to improve patient access. Community pharmacy has been beset by recruitment and retention problems which potentially threaten health service delivery. This is largely a consequence of an increased demand for pharmacists. Additionally, the proportion of female pharmacists in the profession has risen. Consequently, interrupted career patterns and part-time working practices have increased, shrinking the pool of available workers. This study aimed to examine the importance of factors influencing female community pharmacists' work patterns. Q methodology was used in a sample of 40 female UK-based community pharmacists. Nine distinct factors emerged from a factor analysis of Q sorts: fulfilled pharmacists; family first or pharmacy shelved; low stress altruist; permanent part-time employees; focused on free time and finances; pressurized modernizers; wandering wage slaves; overloaded and under resourced for the new contract; and pin money part-timers. Female community pharmacists often worked below their potential and part-time at a practitioner level in response to a combination of domestic commitments and intensifying work place pressures. Family-friendly flexible work environments, adequate staffing levels and improved management support, might be more effective in increasing workforce participation than enhanced salary levels in this group of workers.

  16. How is the artist role affected when artists are participating in projects in work life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, during the last decade, the artist has come to function as a creative resource in workplaces. There are two organisations, Skiss (Contemporary Artist in the Contemporary Society) and Airis (Artist in Residence), that organise projects for artists and coworkers. These projects are intended to have a positive effect on the well-being of organisations and their employees through artistic means, and the artist often focuses on the social interaction between the employees in their work. The artists' work involves frequent interaction with coworkers. The aim of this article was to describe how visual artists' roles as artists are affected by their engagement in artistic and social projects at workplaces in Sweden. The focus in the article is on the social interaction between artists and employees. The study is a qualitative narrative interview study with fine artists participating in different projects in work life. Since the artist's intervention is usually directed towards social relations in the workplaces, a social perspective on well-being is from a micro-sociological point of view. The categories in the interviews were how the artists worked with the projects, how the social interaction between artists and coworkers worked out, and how the artists evaluated the projects in relation to their ambitions. The results show that, many times, the artistic projects promote well-being in organisations and to some extent benefit the artist, but that the ability of the artists to actually function as artists can be problematic.

  17. International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Meeting of Specialists on the Value of Plutonium Alpha, Winfrich, UK, 30 June - 1 July 1969. Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-15

    The meeting of specialists on the value of plutonium alpha was held at Winfrith in accordance to the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors, and in agreement with the UK authorities. Participants from six countries and two international organizations took part in the meeting. A short review on available data for plutonium alpha received by the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit was presented. Three experiments recently known where the measurements of the alpha-value have been made in the energy range of interest were referred to.

  18. What are the sociodemographic and health determinants for older adults continue to participate in work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Renata Gonçalves; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the sociodemographic and health factors that influence older adults who continue to participate in the workforce. Data were collected and evaluated for 1762 older adults aged 65 years and older who were living in the community and were enrolled in a population-based study (FIBRA Network Study). Older adults who participated in the workforce were compared with those who did not in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, physical and mental health, and physical functioning and performance in advanced and instrumental activities characteristic of daily living. A multivariate hierarchical logistic regression analysis was performed. Factors associated with not participating in the workforce were aged (OR: 1.71, [95% CI: 1.26-2.30], ppoor visual perception (OR: 1.31, [95% CI: 1.00-1.72], p=0.046), using 4 or more medications regularly (OR: 1.41, [95% CI: 1.489-2.247], p=0.034), having 3 or more comorbidities (OR: 1.44, [95% CI: 1.01-2.04], p=0.040), and a handgrip strength below 24.6kg/f (18.1-24.6kg/f (2nd tertile): OR: 1.52, [95% CI: 1.06-2.18], p=0.022; 0-18kg/f (1st tertile): OR: 1.60, [95% CI: 1.08-2.38], p=0.019). The probability estimates of the final model explained 67.9% of the events related to not participating in the workforce, as observed by the area under the ROC curve. Our results highlight that work in later life is influenced by sociodemographic characteristics, intrinsic capacity, and multimorbidity. We suggest that strategies for optimizing healthy and active aging may help older people to continue participating in the workforce and contributing toward their communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Work participation in adults with Marfan syndrome: Demographic characteristics, MFS related health symptoms, chronic pain, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velvin, Gry; Bathen, Trine; Rand-Hendriksen, Svend; Geirdal, Amy Østertun

    2015-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a severe autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that might influence peoples work ability. This cross sectional study aims to investigate work participation in adults with verified MFS diagnosis and to explore how the health related consequences of MFS and other factors might influence work participation. The prevalence of health problems in young adults compared to older adults with MFS was examined in association to work participation. A postal questionnaire including questions about work participation, demographic characteristics, MFS related health problems, chronic pain, and fatigue was sent to 117 adults with verified MFS (Ghent 1), and 62% answered. Fifty-nine percent were employed or students, significantly lower work participation than the General Norwegian Population (GNP), but higher than the Norwegian population of people with disability. Most young adults worked full-time despite extensive health problems, but the average age for leaving work was low. Few had received any work adaptations prior to retiring from work. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only age, lower educational level and severe fatigue were significantly associated with low work participation; not MFS related health problems or chronic pain. Fatigue appears to be the most challenging health problem to deal with in work, but the covariance is complex. Focus on vocational guidance early in life, more appropriate work adaptations, and psychosocial support might improve the possibility for sustaining in work for adults with MFS. More research about work challenges in adults with MFS is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Technical Meeting on Impact of Fukushima Event on Current and Future Fast Reactor Designs. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The overall purpose of the Technical Meeting was to recognize and analyse the implications of the accident occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station on current and future fast neutron systems design and operation. The aim was to provide a global forum for discussing the principal lessons learned from this event, and thus to review safety principles and characteristics of existing and future fast neutron concepts, especially in relation with extreme natural events which potentially may lead to severe accident scenarios. The participants also presented and discussed innovative technical solutions, design features and countermeasures for design extension conditions - including earthquakes, tsunami and other extreme natural hazards - which can enhance the safety level of existing and future fast neutron systems. Furthermore, the meeting gave the opportunity to present advanced methods for the evaluation of the robustness of plants against design extension conditions. Another important goal of this TM was to discuss how to harmonize safety approaches and goals for next generation’s fast reactors. Finally, the meeting was intended to identify areas where further research and development in nuclear safety, technology and engineering in the light of the Fukushima accident are needed. In the frame of the implementation of its Nuclear Safety Action Plan endorsed by all Member States, the IAEA will consider these areas as potential technical topics for new Coordinated Research Projects, to be launched in the near future

  1. Employment participation and work experience of male cancer survivors: a NOCWO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Holmfridur K; Vidarsdottir, Halldora; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Lindbohm, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether employment status and work experiences, assessed in terms of job resources (organizational culture and superiors' and co-workers' support), commitment to organization, work motives, and experiences of discrimination, differ between survivors of prostate or testicular cancer or lymphoma and cancer-free reference subjects. Questionnaires were sent to 1349 male cancer survivors and 2666 referents in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, and Norway. Valid responses were 59% and 45%, respectively. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated with logistic regression models. Compared to the referents, survivors of lymphoma and prostate cancer were less likely to be employed (OR=0.53; CI: 0.30-0.95 and OR=0.50; CI: 0.35-0.73, respectively), but decreased employment was not evident among testicular cancer survivors. Testicular cancer survivors experienced less discrimination at work than did the referents, for example, testicular cancer survivors were less likely to report that their colleagues doubted their ability to carry out their work tasks (OR=0.38; CI: 0.17-0.83). Lymphoma survivors were less likely than the referents to praise their workplace as an enjoyable place to work (OR=0.48; CI: 0.26-0.88). The prostate cancer survivors were more likely than the referents to find the organizational climate competitive, distrustful, and suspicious. Employment participation and work experiences of male cancer survivors varied substantially according to type of cancer. Occupational therapists and other health care personnel should keep this in mind when assisting cancer survivors in identifying their strengths and limitations at work.

  2. The impact of a child's special health care needs on maternal work participation during early motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Lars Johan; Kornstad, Tom; Nes, Ragnhild Bang; Kristensen, Petter; Irgens, Lorentz M; Eskedal, Leif T; Landolt, Markus A; Vollrath, Margarete E

    2013-07-01

    Many women temporarily reduce work hours or stop working when caring for small children. However, mothers of children with special health care needs may face particular challenges balancing childrearing responsibilities and employment demands. This study examines how the work participation among mothers of children with special health care needs compares with that of mothers in general during early motherhood, focusing in particular on the extent of the child's additional health care needs. By linkage of the population-based Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study with national registers on employment, child health care needs, and social background factors, 41,255 mothers employed prior to childbirth were followed until child age 3 years to investigate associations between the child's care needs and mother's dropping out of employment. In total, 16.3% of the formerly employed mothers were no longer employed at child age 3 years. Mothers of children with mild care needs did not differ from mothers in general, whereas mothers of children with moderate [Risk Ratio (RR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 1.80] and severe care needs [RR 2.19; 95% CI 1.67, 2.87] were at substantial risk of not being employed at follow-up. The impact of the child's health care needs remained strong also after adjusting for several factors associated with employment in general. Extensive childhood health care needs are associated with reduced short-term employment prospects and remain a substantial influence on mothers' work participation during early motherhood, irrespective of other important characteristics associated with maternal employment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Development of methodologies for optimization of surveillance testing and maintenance of safety related equipment at NPPs. Report of a research coordination meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of the first meeting of the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Development of Methodologies for Optimization of Surveillance Testing and Maintenance of Safety Related Equipment at NPPs, held at the Agency Headquarters in Vienna, from 16 to 20 December 1996. The purpose of this Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) was that all Chief Scientific Investigators of the groups participating in the CRP presented an outline of their proposed research projects. Additionally, the participants discussed the objective, scope, work plan and information channels of the CRP in detail. Based on these presentations and discussions, the entire project plan was updated, completed and included in this report. This report represents a common agreed project work plan for the CRP. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L; Vermeulen, Marjolein I M; Herenius, Marieke M J; Tak, Paul P; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with respect to work participation. Experiences regarding work participation varied and ranged from fatigue at work, having no job control, not being understood by the work environment or difficulty dealing with emotions as a result of interaction within the work environment. Support by health care professionals for work participation was considered important, especially concerning social or psychological issues. Advice in becoming aware of one's changes in abilities was highly appreciated, as was the availability of professional advice in times of an urgent work issue due to RA. Employees mentioned an increase in social support at work and job control as important facilitating factors for work participation. Although patients with RA report improvement in their work functioning after starting anti-TNF therapy, employees continue facing challenges in working life due to RA. For support concerning work participation, it is recommended that health care professionals are more aware of work-related problems in patients with RA treated with anti-TNF therapy.

  5. Health care voluntourism: addressing ethical concerns of undergraduate student participation in global health volunteer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Daniel; Iltis, Ana S

    2014-12-01

    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in "voluntourism," health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource poor countries, a practice that has become popular among pre-health professions students. We argue that the participation of undergraduate students in global health experiences raises many of the ethical concerns associated with voluntourism and global health experiences for medical students. Some of these may be exacerbated by or emerge in unique ways when undergraduates volunteer. Guidelines and curricula for medical student engagement in global health experiences have been developed. Guidelines specific to undergraduate involvement in such trips and pre-departure curricula to prepare students should be developed and such training should be required of volunteers. We propose a framework for such guidelines and curricula, argue that universities should be the primary point of delivery even when universities are not organizing the trips, and recommend that curricula should be developed in light of additional data.

  6. Factors that promote or hinder young disabled people in work participation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, T J; Wind, H; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to study factors which promote or hinder young disabled people entering the labor market. We systematically searched PubMed (by means of MESH and text words), EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL for studies regarding (1) disabled patients diagnosed before the age of 18 years and (2) factors of work participation. Out of 1,268 retrieved studies and 28 extended studies from references and four from experts, ten articles were included. Promoting factors are male gender, high educational level, age at survey, low depression scores, high dispositional optimism and high psychosocial functioning. Female and low educational level gives high odds of unemployment just like low IQ, inpatient treatment during follow up, epilepsy, motor impairment, wheelchair dependency, functional limitations, co-morbidity, physical disability and chronic health conditions combined with mental retardation. High dose cranial radiotherapy, type of cancer, and age of diagnosis also interfered with employment. Of the promoting factors, education appeared to be important, and several physical obstructions were found to be hindering factors. The last mentioned factors can be influenced in contrast to for instance age and gender. However, to optimize work participation of this group of young disabled it is important to know the promoting or hindering influence for employment.

  7. Does employee participation in workplace health promotion depend on the working environment? A cross-sectional study of Danish workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Villadsen, Ebbe; Burr, Hermann; Punnett, Laura; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) depends on the work environment. Methods Questionnaire data on participation in WHP activities (smoking cessation, healthy diet, exercise facilities, weekly exercise classes, contact with health professionals, health screenings) and the work environment (social support, fatiguing work, physical, quantitative and emotional demands, job control and WHP availability setting) were collected cross-sectionally in 2010 in a representative sample (n=10 605) of Danish workers. Binary regression analyses of the association between work environment characteristics and participation in WHP were conducted and adjusted for age, gender and industry. Results WHP offered during leisure time was associated with lower participation in all measured activities compared with when offered during working hours. Low social support and fatiguing work were associated with low participation in WHP. No associations with participation in WHPs were observed for physical work or quantitative demands, work pace or job strain. However, high physical demands/low job control and high emotional demands/low job control were associated with low participation. Conclusions Lower participation in WHP was associated with programmes during leisure, low social support, very fatiguing work and high physical or emotional demands with low job control. This suggests that to obtain proper effect of health promotion in a workplace setting, a good work environment is essential. PMID:27279474

  8. Does employee participation in workplace health promotion depend on the working environment? A cross-sectional study of Danish workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Villadsen, Ebbe; Burr, Hermann; Punnett, Laura; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-06-08

    To investigate if participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) depends on the work environment. Questionnaire data on participation in WHP activities (smoking cessation, healthy diet, exercise facilities, weekly exercise classes, contact with health professionals, health screenings) and the work environment (social support, fatiguing work, physical, quantitative and emotional demands, job control and WHP availability setting) were collected cross-sectionally in 2010 in a representative sample (n=10 605) of Danish workers. Binary regression analyses of the association between work environment characteristics and participation in WHP were conducted and adjusted for age, gender and industry. WHP offered during leisure time was associated with lower participation in all measured activities compared with when offered during working hours. Low social support and fatiguing work were associated with low participation in WHP. No associations with participation in WHPs were observed for physical work or quantitative demands, work pace or job strain. However, high physical demands/low job control and high emotional demands/low job control were associated with low participation. Lower participation in WHP was associated with programmes during leisure, low social support, very fatiguing work and high physical or emotional demands with low job control. This suggests that to obtain proper effect of health promotion in a workplace setting, a good work environment is essential. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Associations Among Rotating Night Shift Work, Sleep, and Skin Cancer in Nurses’ Health Study II Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J.; Kloss, Jacqueline D.; Feskanich, Diane; Culnan, Elizabeth; Schernhammer, Eva S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Night shift work and sleep duration have been associated with breast and other cancers. Results from the few prior studies of night shift work and skin cancer risk have been mixed and not fully accounted for other potentially important health-related variables (e.g., sleep characteristics). This study evaluated the relationship between rotating night shift work and skin cancer risk and included additional skin cancer risk factors and sleep-related variables. Methods The current study used data from 74,323 Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) II participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for skin cancers across categories of shift work and sleep duration. Results Over 10 years of follow-up, 4308 BCC, 334 SCC and 212 melanoma cases were identified. Longer duration of rotating night shifts was associated with a linear decline in risk of BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.90-0.97 per 5-year increase). Shift work was not significantly associated with either melanoma (HR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.86-1.21) or SCC (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.80-1.06). A short sleep duration (≤6 hours per day) was associated with lower risks of melanoma (HR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.86-1.00) compared with the most common report of 7 hours. SCC was not associated with duration of sleep (HR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.83-1.06). Conclusions Longer duration of rotating night shift work and shorter sleep duration were associated with lower risk of some skin cancers. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the mechanisms underlying these associations. PMID:27663986

  10. International working group on life management of nuclear power plants (IWG-LMNPP). Regular meeting. 30 August - 1 September 1995. Working material. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This meeting of the International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) was organized to review the national programmes of the countries and to advise the IAEA on its technical meetings and activities in the subject areas taking into consideration current progress, problems and operating experience. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. International working group on life management of nuclear power plants (IWG-LMNPP). Regular meeting. 30 August - 1 September 1995. Working material. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This meeting of the International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) was organized to review the national programmes of the countries and to advise the IAEA on its technical meetings and activities in the subject areas taking into consideration current progress, problems and operating experience. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. The MS@Work study: a 3-year prospective observational study on factors involved with work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis A M; Heerings, Marco A P; van Lieshout, Irma; Jongen, Peter J; Reneman, Michiel F; van der Klink, Jac J L; Vosman, Frans; Middelkoop, Huub A M; Visser, Leo H

    2015-08-12

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. At this stage in life most people are in the midst of their working career. The majority of MS patients are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Leading up to unemployment, many may experience a reduction in hours or work responsibilities and increased time missed from work. The MS@Work study examines various factors that may influence work participation in relapsing-remitting MS patients, including disease-related factors, the working environment and personal factors. The MS@Work study is a multicenter, 3-year prospective observational study on work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We aim to include 350 patients through 15-18 MS outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants are 18 years and older, and either currently employed or within three years since their last employment. At baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 years, the participants are asked to complete online questionnaires (including questions on work participation, work problems and accommodations, cognitive and physical ability, anxiety, depression, psychosocial stress, quality of life, fatigue, empathy, personality traits and coping strategies) and undergo cognitive and neurological examinations. After six months, patients are requested to only complete online questionnaires. Patient perspectives on maintaining and improving work participation and reasons to stop working are gathered through semi-structured interviews in a sub-group of patients. Prospective studies with long-term follow-up on work participation in MS are rare, or take into account a limited number of factors. The MS@Work study provides a 3-year follow-up on various factors that may influence work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We aim to identify factors that relate to job loss and to provide information about preventative measures for physicians

  13. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  14. 78 FR 64202 - Meeting To Discuss Lessons Learned From Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    .../csmac . Please direct media inquiries to NTIA's Office of Public Affairs at (202) 482-7002... NTIA and the Federal Communications Commission also participated as observers. \\1\\ See CSMAC, Framework... operations within the two spectrum bands as follows: Working Group 1--1695-1710 MHz Meteorological-Satellite...

  15. Proceedings of the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains 41 contributions presented at the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms. The contributions dealt with the following topics: 1.) mechanical and test fundamentals of crack initiating corrosion processes; 2.) crack formation in water and seawater; 3.) crack formation in the process industry; 4.) hydrogen-induced crack formation; 5.) stress and crack corrosion of rustproof cast alloys; 6.) corrosion-induced crack formation at high temperatures; 7.) experimental and numerical studies on fracture behaviour. 30 contributions were separately integrated in the data base 'ENERGY'. (MM) [de

  16. Fourth natural analogue working group meeting and Pocos de Caldas project final workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the CEC-sponsored natural analogue working group (NAWG) was held in Pitlochry, Scotland, from 18 to 22 June 1990, and also included the final workshop of the Pocos de Caldas (Brazil) natural analogue project, sponsored by Nagra (CH), SKB (S) UK-DOE and US-DOE. About 80 specialists attended this meeting, originating from EC Member States and also Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA. The IAEA and OCDE-NEA were also represented. This plenary meeting was the opportunity to review and discuss five years of progress and activities of natural analogues in central areas of performance assessment: waste forms and engineered barriers, geochemistry and radionuclide speciation, radionuclide migration and the overall geological context of radwaste disposal. In addition, a feedback session provided the opportunity for regulators and those individuals who had advisory roles to give their views and impressions on the significance of natural analogue research. These proceedings, divided into two sessions, contain 32 technical papers and 14 abstracts of published papers

  17. Technical Meeting on Passive Shutdown Systems for Liquid Metal-Cooled Fast Reactors. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A major focus of the design of modern fast reactor systems is on inherent and passive safety. Specific systems to improve reactor safety performance during accidental transients have been developed in nearly all fast reactor programs, and a large number of proposed systems have reached various stages of maturity. This Technical Meeting on Passive Shutdown Systems for Fast Reactors, which was recommended by the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), addressed Member States’ expressed need for information exchange on projects and programs in the field, as well as for the identification of priorities based on the analysis of technology gaps to be covered through R&D activities. This meeting was limited to shutdown systems only, and did not include other passive features such as natural circulation decay heat removal systems etc.; however the meeting catered to passive shutdown safety devices applicable to all types of fast neutron systems. It was agreed to initiate a new study and produce a Nuclear Energy Series (NES) Technical Report to collect information about the existing operational systems as well as innovative concepts under development. This will be a useful source for member states interested in gaining technical expertise to develop passive shutdown systems as well as to highlight the importance and development in this area

  18. Work participation in Q-fever patients and patients with Legionnaires' disease: a 12-month cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenhout, J.A.F. van; Houtvast, J.L.A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Donders, N.C.G.M.; Vercoulen, J.H.; Paget, W.J.; Velden, K. van der

    2015-01-01

    Aims:The aim of the study was to assess long-term work participation of Q-fever patients and patients with Legionnaires’ disease, and to identify which factors are associated with a reduced ork participation in Q-fever patients. Methods: Q-fever patients participated at four time points until 12

  19. 20 CFR 645.260 - What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrative Requirements § 645.260 What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs? 645.260 Section 645.260 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  20. Technical meeting on 'Primary coolant pipe rupture event in liquid metal cooled fast reactors'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In Liquid Metal cooled Fast Reactors (LMFR) or in accelerator driven sub-critical systems (ADS) with LMFR like sub-critical cores, the primary coolant pipes (PCP) connect the primary coolant pumps to the grid plate. A rupture in one of these pipes could cause significant loss of coolant flow to the core with severe consequences. In loop type reactors, all primary pipelines are provided with double envelopes and inter-space coolant leak monitoring systems that permit leak detection before break. Thus, the PCP rupture event can be placed in the beyond design basis event (BDBE) category. Such an arrangement is difficult to incorporate for pool type reactors, and hence it could be argued that the PCP rupture event needs to be analysed in detail as a design basis event (DBE, category 4 event). The primary coolant pipes are made of ductile austenitic stainless steel material and operate at temperatures of the cold pool and at comparatively low pressures. For such low stressed piping with negligible creep and embrittlement effects, it is of interest to discuss under what design provisions, for pool type reactors, the guillotine rupture of PCP could be placed in the BDBE category. The topical Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Primary Coolant Pipe Rupture Event in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors' was called to enable the specialists to present the philosophy and analyses applied on this topic in the various Member States for different LMFRs. The scope of the Technical Meeting was to provide a global forum for information exchange on the philosophy applied in the various participating Member States and the analyses performed for different LMFRs with regard to the primary coolant pipe rupture event. More specifically, the objectives of the Technical Meeting were to review the safety philosophy for the PCP rupture event in pool type LMFR, to assess the structural reliability of the PCP and the probability of rupture under different conditions (with/without in-service inspection), to

  1. Lifelong learning and participation: a pedagogical turn in social work and social policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Krogh; Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles

    2012-01-01

    other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...... in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... and an assumed desire of generativity. Action learning seems to be an appropriate learning concept in relation to keeping older people engaged in the community. The authors thus point at participating and lifelong learning as part of the answers to the demographic challenges, and they suggest what you might call...

  2. Work-Based Curriculum to Broaden Learners' Participation in Science: Insights for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopardikar, Anushree; Bernstein, Debra; Drayton, Brian; McKenney, Susan

    2018-05-01

    Around the globe, science education during compulsory schooling is envisioned for all learners regardless of their educational and career aspirations, including learners bound to the workforce upon secondary school completion. Yet, a major barrier in attaining this vision is low learner participation in secondary school science. Because curricula play a major role in shaping enacted learning, this study investigated how designers developed a high school physics curriculum with positive learning outcomes in learners with varied inclinations. Qualitative analysis of documents and semistructured interviews with the designers focused on the curriculum in different stages—from designers' ideas about learning goals to their vision for enactment to the printed materials—and on the design processes that brought them to fruition. This revealed designers' emphases on fostering workplace connections via learning goals and activities, and printed supports. The curriculum supported workplace-inspired, hands-on design-and-build projects, developed to address deeply a limited set of standards aligned learning goals. The curriculum also supported learners' interactions with relevant workplace professionals. To create these features, the designers reviewed other curricula to develop vision and printed supports, tested activities internally to assess content coverage, surveyed states in the USA receiving federal school-to-work grants and reviewed occupational information to choose unit topics and career contexts, and visited actual workplaces to learn about authentic praxis. Based on the worked example, this paper offers guidelines for designing work-based science curriculum products and processes that can serve the work of other designers, as well as recommendations for research serving designers and policymakers.

  3. Experience in monitoring ageing phenomena for improving nuclear power plant availability. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    For more than thirty years nuclear power plants have been supplying electricity to national grids. Today, the nuclear power community is facing great challenges. The safe, reliable operation of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) must continue to be ensured. From an economic viewpoint, because of the long lead times associated with bringing new plants into service, securing the continued operation of existing plants for their planned lifetimes and possible life extension will be very important in the near term for meeting electrical power demands. The IAEA programmes in nuclear power plant ageing and life extension and in control and instrumentation promote technical information exchange between Member States with new programmes, offers assistance to Member States with an interest in reliability of NPP components, in-service inspection methods and programmes using on-line techniques, component monitoring and special technological topics of nuclear reactors. Significant experience already exists in the nuclear industry in developing and applying the monitoring techniques for different nuclear power plant applications, especially in monitoring of ageing phenomena for improving NPP availability. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to bring together experts from operations, design, research and development and licensing to share their experience in: ageing mechanics of key structural components, methods of monitoring such ageing, tools for cost-effective implementation of the methods and methodologies, life management approaches and examples from current reactors, future direction for monitoring of key structural components in nuclear power plants. The meeting was organized by the IAEA International Working Groups on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (TWG-NPPCI) in co-operation with the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission and Skoda concern. Around 40 participants from 10 countries

  4. Experience in monitoring ageing phenomena for improving nuclear power plant availability. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    For more than thirty years nuclear power plants have been supplying electricity to national grids. Today, the nuclear power community is facing great challenges. The safe, reliable operation of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) must continue to be ensured. From an economic viewpoint, because of the long lead times associated with bringing new plants into service, securing the continued operation of existing plants for their planned lifetimes and possible life extension will be very important in the near term for meeting electrical power demands. The IAEA programmes in nuclear power plant ageing and life extension and in control and instrumentation promote technical information exchange between Member States with new programmes, offers assistance to Member States with an interest in reliability of NPP components, in-service inspection methods and programmes using on-line techniques, component monitoring and special technological topics of nuclear reactors. Significant experience already exists in the nuclear industry in developing and applying the monitoring techniques for different nuclear power plant applications, especially in monitoring of ageing phenomena for improving NPP availability. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to bring together experts from operations, design, research and development and licensing to share their experience in: ageing mechanics of key structural components, methods of monitoring such ageing, tools for cost-effective implementation of the methods and methodologies, life management approaches and examples from current reactors, future direction for monitoring of key structural components in nuclear power plants. The meeting was organized by the IAEA International Working Groups on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (TWG-NPPCI) in co-operation with the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission and Skoda concern. Around 40 participants from 10 countries.

  5. Kazakhstan participation in International Experimental Reactor ITER Construction project. Work status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Tukhvatullin, Sh.T.; Shestakov, V.P.; Kuznetsov, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Kazakhstan takes part in ITER project in partnership with Russian Federation since the year of 1994. At present the technical stage of the project is completed and ITER Council should take a decision on the site for international reactor. Four countries such as Canada, Japan, Spain and France have offered their territories for being used as site for launching ITER construction. ITER partners started preparing new international agreement that will cover activities on construction, operation and decommissioning of ITER. It will also include the list of research and experimental work that is conducted in support of ITER project. Kazakhstan has already made an important contribution into technical stage realization of ITER project due to scientific and technical researches conducted by National Nuclear Center, by Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics and by JSC 'Ulba Metallurgical plant' ('UMP'). Research activity carried out for the support of ITER project is performed in accordance with the following main trends: Tritium safety (permeability and retentin of hydrogen isotopes during in-pile irradiation in various structural materials, co-deposed layers and protective coatings); Verification of computer codes (LOCA type) loss of coolant accidents modeling in ITER reactor; Investigation of liquid metal blanket of thermonuclear reactor (tritium production in lithium containing eutectics Li17Pb83 and ceramics Li 2 TiO 3 , study of tritium permeability). At present the working group of ITER project participants started introducing proposals for cost distribution and for placing the orders on reactor construction. Further Kazakhstan participation in ITER project may be in manufacturing high-tech parts and assemblies from commercial grades of beryllium. They will be used for armouring the reactor first wall, for its thermal protection and for protection of superconductor's components for magnetic systems that are at JSC U MP'. Scientific and technical support of

  6. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  7. 24. annual meeting of the International working group on fast reactors, Tsuruga, Japan, 15-18 April 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The agenda of the meeting included approval of the minutes of the 23rd meeting of the IWGFR, report of the Scientific Secretary regarding the activities of the Working Group, short presentation on national situation in nuclear energy and in the fast reactor field in particular, consideration of conferences on fast breeder reactors, consideration of arrangements for specialists' meetings in 1991, selection of topics for specialists' meetings to be held in 1992, consideration of joint research activities, informal discussion on ''The Economics of Fast Reactors''

  8. Sixth meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, Vienna, 14-15 May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The summary report of the 6th meeting of the IWGFPT had been approved. The review of IWGFPT activities since the last meeting are given in Appendix 3, which is a list of meetings and proceedings publications for that period. Co-ordinated research programmes were discussed in the fields of fuel element cladding interaction with water coolant in power reactors and examination and documentation methodology for water reactor fuel. The main activities for the next three years were settled. The next Working Group meeting will be held at the VIC, November 1985

  9. Associations among rotating night shift work, sleep and skin cancer in Nurses' Health Study II participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J; Kloss, Jacqueline D; Feskanich, Diane; Culnan, Elizabeth; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2017-03-01

    Night shift work and sleep duration have been associated with breast and other cancers. Results from the few prior studies of night shift work and skin cancer risk have been mixed and not fully accounted for other potentially important health-related variables (eg, sleep characteristics). This study evaluated the relationship between rotating night shift work and skin cancer risk and included additional skin cancer risk factors and sleep-related variables. The current study used data from 74 323 Nurses' Health Study (NHS) II participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for skin cancers across categories of shift work and sleep duration. Over 10 years of follow-up, 4308 basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 334 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 212 melanoma cases were identified. Longer duration of rotating night shifts was associated with a linear decline in risk of BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.97 per 5-year increase). Shift work was not significantly associated with either melanoma (HR=1.02, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.21) or SCC (HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.06). A short sleep duration (≤6 hours per day) was associated with lower risks of melanoma (HR=0.68, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.98) and BCC (HR=0.93, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.00) compared with the most common report of 7 hours. SCC was not associated with duration of sleep (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.06). Longer duration of rotating night shift work and shorter sleep duration were associated with lower risk of some skin cancers. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the mechanisms underlying these associations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Work participation of patients with musculoskeletal disorders: is this addressed in physical therapy practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Wiebke; Hutting, Nathan; Engels, Josephine A; Bart Staal, J; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Heerkens, Yvonne F

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the main complaints for visiting a physical therapist (PT) in primary health care; they have a negative effect on an individual's quality of life and result in a major cost to society. Qualitative research has shown that physical therapists (PTs) treating patients with these disorders experience barriers in the integration of occupational factors within their practice, and also revealed a lack of cooperation between PTs and (other) occupational healthcare providers. The aim of this study is to quantitatively investigate how generalist PTs in the Netherlands, who treat patients with musculoskeletal disorders, currently integrate occupational factors within their practice, and to identify their opinions and needs with regard to enhancing the integration of the patient's work within physical therapy practice. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among generalist PTs who treat working-age (18-67 years) patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Generalist PTs were contacted for participation via digital news-mails and asked to fill out an online survey which was developed based on the results of a recent qualitative study. The survey consisted of: i) demographics of the participants, ii) questions on how generalist PTs currently integrate occupational factors within their practice, and iii) asked their opinion about the integration of occupational factors within physical therapy. The PTs were also asked about their needs with regard to the integration of occupational factors and with regard to cooperation with other (occupational) health professionals. All answers (using Likert scales) are presented as the number and percentage of the respondents reporting those specific answers, whereas all other answers are presented as means and standard deviations. Of the 142 respondents, 64% indicated that occupational factors should be addressed to a greater extent within physical therapy. To have the possibility to bill for a workplace assessment

  11. Legitimate Peripheral Participation as a Framework for Conversation Analytic Work in Second Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Rasmussen Hougaard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Conversation Analysis (CA has become not only a framework and a set of methods for studying the generic machinery of talk-in-interaction but also a celebrated, qualitative method for studying a wealth of phenomena and exploring and testing concepts and hypotheses from numerous disciplines, including linguistics, psychology, anthropology and Second Language Acquisition (SLA. CA is often resorted to as the key to resolving knots and dead-ends in these neighboring disciplines. Despite the very interesting results that such work admittedly produces, it is too often not accompanied by focused considerations of how the specific concerns from one field match with the aims that CA procedures have been developed for and hence with the procedures themselves. This paper takes recent applications of CA to the study of SLA as a case in point. It discusses a whether CA can shed light on "learning" as commonly defined in SLA and b whether the resort to a particular model of learning (LAVE & WENGER, 1991, Legitimate Peripheral Participation (LPP helps overcoming some of the problems with which CA work in SLA is confronted. It is hoped that the specific discussions of problems involved in the project, CA-for-SLA, will contribute to the ongoing, general discussion of qualitative research methods and their prospects and problems. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090247

  12. Ninth regular meeting of the International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, Vienna, 18-20 October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The 9th regular meeting of the International Working Group on Reliability of Pressure Components took place from 18-20 October 1988 at the Agency's Headquarters. The meeting was attended by 25 representatives from 19 Member States and International Organizations. The agenda of the meeting included overviews of the national activities in the field of pressure retaining components of PWRs, review of the past IWGRRPC activities and updating of the working plan for years 1989-1992. A great deal of attention was paid to the involvement of the IWGRRPC in the Agency's programme on nuclear power plant ageing and life extension. Members of the IWGRRPC reviewed the long term plan of the activities and proposed a provisional list and scope of the IAEA Specialists' Meetings planned for the period 1989-1992. Seventeen papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Report of second FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting on in vitro techniques for selection of radiation-induced mutants adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The meeting was attended by scientists from nine countries: Bangladesh, China P.R., Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, India, Pakistan, Peru and United States of America. The participants in this Research Coordination Meeting are working on the improvement of potato, sweet potato, garlic, sugarcane, pineapple and alfalfa by combining in vitro techniques with induced mutagenesis to select for resistance to salinity, freezing, heat, drought, and water-logging depending upon adverse condition prevailing in their region. The participants reported results of their experiments on the radio-sensitivity tests on in vitro cultured plant material, such as micropropagated plants and organogenic or embryogenic callus cultures. In addition, reports on the modifications of culture media required to regenerate and multiply local varieties and to carry out in vitro selection for specific stress conditions were presented. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. Report of second FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting on in vitro techniques for selection of radiation-induced mutants adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The meeting was attended by scientists from nine countries: Bangladesh, China P.R., Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, India, Pakistan, Peru and United States of America. The participants in this Research Coordination Meeting are working on the improvement of potato, sweet potato, garlic, sugarcane, pineapple and alfalfa by combining in vitro techniques with induced mutagenesis to select for resistance to salinity, freezing, heat, drought, and water-logging depending upon adverse condition prevailing in their region. The participants reported results of their experiments on the radio-sensitivity tests on in vitro cultured plant material, such as micropropagated plants and organogenic or embryogenic callus cultures. In addition, reports on the modifications of culture media required to regenerate and multiply local varieties and to carry out in vitro selection for specific stress conditions were presented. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. On-the-job training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The topic of this meeting , on-the-job training, was selected by the International Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel, during their most recent meeting in 1994. This International Working Group is made up of representatives from all Member States who have operating nuclear power plants. This Group felt that there was a need to provide a forum for exchange of information among specialists from Member States on the topic of on-the-job training, and further that the Agency should publish the proceedings of this meeting for the use of those specialists who were not able to attend. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Forty-Second Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: - Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); - Review the progress since the 41st TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; - Consider topical technical meetings meeting arrangements for 2009, 2010, 2011 and beyond; - Review the IAEA’s ongoing information exchange and coordinated research activities in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations and international initiatives; - Discuss future joint activities in view of IAEA’s Programme and Budget Cycles beyond 2010-2011

  17. Experiences of participating in return-to-work group programmes for people with musculoskeletal disorders: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnes, Bente; Rønningen, Aud; Skarbø, Åse

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to explore the experiences of individuals with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) who had participated in return-to-work group programmes (RTW-GPs) and to assess whether the programmes had had an impact on their work disability. Three focus group interviews and one individual interview were conducted involving 17 women (mean age = 47) with MSDs who had completed RTW-GPs. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analyses. Participant experiences were categorised into three main themes: changed way of thinking, the importance of being able to work, and a changed lifestyle. The respondents said that participation in the RTW-GPs had enabled them to shift their focus from problems to opportunities. They had become more aware of strategies to enhance their energy levels and continue working. Several participants had reduced their work hours to achieve a better balance between work and daily life. Many participants had also changed their lifestyle habits, which had led to weight reduction, more energy and less pain. The study participants had attained a heightened awareness of what they could do to continue working. Many participants had introduced changes in their daily lives, with consequences for employment, social life and lifestyle. The findings suggest that RTW-GPs can help people with MSDs to remain in employment and prevent absenteeism. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Young Athletes Cleared for Sports Participation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: How Many Actually Meet Recommended Return-to-Sport Criterion Cutoffs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, Allison R; Ithurburn, Matthew P; Rauh, Mitchell J; Hewett, Timothy E; Paterno, Mark V; Schmitt, Laura C

    2017-11-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Background While meeting objective criterion cutoffs is recommended prior to return to sports following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the number of young athletes who meet recommended cutoffs and the impact of cutoffs on longitudinal sports participation are unknown. Objectives To test the hypothesis that a higher proportion of young athletes who meet recommended cutoffs will maintain the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance compared to those who do not meet recommended cutoffs. Methods At the time of return-to-sport clearance, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC), quadriceps and hamstring strength limb symmetry index (LSI), and single-leg hop test LSI were assessed. Proportions of participants who met individual (IKDC score of 90 or greater; strength and hop test LSIs of 90% or greater) and combined cutoffs were calculated. Proportions of participants who continued at the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance (assessed using the Tegner activity scale) were compared between those who met and did not meet cutoffs. Results Participants included 115 young athletes (88 female). The proportions meeting individual cutoffs ranged from 43.5% to 78.3%. The proportions meeting cutoffs for all hop tests, all strength tests, and all combined measures were 53.0%, 27.8%, and 13.9%, respectively. A higher proportion of participants who met cutoffs for both strength tests maintained the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance than those who did not (81.3% versus 60.2%, P = .02). Conclusion The proportions of young athletes after ACL reconstruction recently cleared for return to sports who met the combined criterion cutoffs were low. Those who met the criterion cutoffs for both strength tests maintained the same level of sports

  19. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Second Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: Opening of the meeting. 2. Appraisal of the IWGFB's activity for the period from the first annual meeting of the Group. 3. Comments on national programmes on fast breeder reactors. 4. Presentation of general findings and conclusions of national and regional meetings on fast reactor problems held in represented countries and international organisations last year. 5. Comments on the programmes of international meetings on fast reactors to be held in 1969. 6. Consideration of a schedule for meetings on fast reactors in 1970. 7. Suggestions for the topics and location of specialists' meetings in 1969-1970. 8. Suggestions for reviews and studies in the field of fast reactors. 9. The time and place of the third annual meeting of the IWGFR. 10. Closing of the meeting

  20. Safety challenges after the Fukushima accident. ANCCLI-IRSN work meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demet, Michel; Lheureux, Yves; Sene, Monique; Sene, Raymond; Eimer, Michel; Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Majnoni, Sophia; Marignac, Yves; Revol, Henri; Gilles, Compagnat; Baumont, David; Huet, Cyril; Rebour, Vincent; Besnus, Francois; Le Bars, Igor; Lizot, Marie-Therese; Carre, Christine; Dupuy, Patricia; Jorel, Martial; Lavarenne, Caroline; Rousseau, Jean-Marie; Charron, Sylvie; Gilli, Ludivine

    2011-11-01

    After a synthetic report of the meeting, this document contains Power Point presentations proposed by the different contributors. These presentations proposed: an overview on additional safety assessments (ECS) and an assessment of 'post-Fukushima' inspections performed in basic nuclear installations; the CLI's opinion on the Gravelines ECS report; an analysis and a discussion of ECS reports of nuclear installations in the perspective of the Fukushima accident; the IRSN analysis of ECS as they are performed by operators; a presentation of the IRSN analysis approach to ECS; contributions of different post-Fukushima ECS permanent groups within the IRSN (these work groups address installation condition, external flooding, and seismic risk); a presentation of the 'fusion prevention' aspects of the management of accidental situations in EDF reactors

  1. Evaluation of the Motivation to Consent to and to Refuse Organ Donation Among Participants of Educational Meetings Concerning Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaniak, I; Wilczek-Rużyczka, E; Wierzbicki, K; Sadowski, J; Kapelak, B; Przybyłowski, P

    2016-06-01

    Improvement of the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors is a key component of strategies applied in many countries aiming to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. Attitudes toward living and posthumous donation are favorable. Research shows that the outlook on organ donation and the degree of the willingness to become an organ donor are associated with a wide range of variables. The main objective of this study was to identify factors that influence the willingness to donate organs and the reasons for refusing consent. The study included 191 participants (135 female and 56 male) aged 16 to 61 years (mean age 26.86 ± 12.88). A cross-sectional study was conducted during educational meetings concerning organ donation that was addressed to students, teachers, and nurses. Survey tools included the Individual Questionnaire: Study of attitudes toward transplantation, consisting of 26 closed questions (with the consent of the Statistical Office in Krakow). In all, 97.4% of the respondents accepted transplantation from living donors, and 95.8% accepted deceased donations. Of the respondents, 78.5% agreed to posthumous life-saving organ donation. There was a significant difference between the respondents' sex, age, social group, place of living, and the reasons for their willingness to donate organs both posthumously and during their lifetime, as well as reasons for refusal. Our findings showed that the study group in general had favorable views on treatment involving transplantation and declared willingness to make a posthumous organ donation. These views vary depending on demographic variables. The education on the subject of organ and tissue donation has a positive impact on donation and transplantation rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ leach uranium mining. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    mutual interest between specialists who developed and employ the technology in the two areas. The Technical Committee Meeting on In Situ Leach Uranium Mining was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan in the Hall of Science of the National Academy of Science from 9-12 September 1996. It was attended by 61 participants from 15 countries and one non-governmental international organization (Uranium Institute). Organizational support for the meeting was provided on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Kazakhstan by the National Joint Stock Company of Atomic Energy and Industry 'KATEP', the state enterprise responsible for uranium production in the Republic of Kazakhstan. This meeting provided the first ever opportunity for specialists from throughout the world to meet in central Asia and discuss ISL technology with emphasis on its development and use in the region. The site visit to the Number 6 Mining Company in south central Kazakhstan provided an opportunity for participants to observe and discuss an operating ISL facility

  3. Motivation, values, and work design as drivers of participation in the R open source project for statistical computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Patrick; Hofmann, Eva; Gruber, Kathrin; Hatzinger, Reinhold; Zeileis, Achim; Hornik, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of the R system for statistical computing is the multitude of packages contributed by numerous package authors. This amount of packages makes an extremely broad range of statistical techniques and other quantitative methods freely available. Thus far, no empirical study has investigated psychological factors that drive authors to participate in the R project. This article presents a study of R package authors, collecting data on different types of participation (number of packages, participation in mailing lists, participation in conferences), three psychological scales (types of motivation, psychological values, and work design characteristics), and various socio-demographic factors. The data are analyzed using item response models and subsequent generalized linear models, showing that the most important determinants for participation are a hybrid form of motivation and the social characteristics of the work design. Other factors are found to have less impact or influence only specific aspects of participation. PMID:26554005

  4. Motivation, values, and work design as drivers of participation in the R open source project for statistical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Patrick; Hofmann, Eva; Gruber, Kathrin; Hatzinger, Reinhold; Zeileis, Achim; Hornik, Kurt

    2015-12-01

    One of the cornerstones of the R system for statistical computing is the multitude of packages contributed by numerous package authors. This amount of packages makes an extremely broad range of statistical techniques and other quantitative methods freely available. Thus far, no empirical study has investigated psychological factors that drive authors to participate in the R project. This article presents a study of R package authors, collecting data on different types of participation (number of packages, participation in mailing lists, participation in conferences), three psychological scales (types of motivation, psychological values, and work design characteristics), and various socio-demographic factors. The data are analyzed using item response models and subsequent generalized linear models, showing that the most important determinants for participation are a hybrid form of motivation and the social characteristics of the work design. Other factors are found to have less impact or influence only specific aspects of participation.

  5. Great Expectations - Does worker participation in design enhance the integration of working environment and work life issues into design?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Iben Posniak

    in the design process and the object of design have not been computer artefacts or systems but workplace design and redesign of product series. The design process in the two cases has included physical working environment aspects but contrary to participatory ergonomics, psychosocial working environment...... of political processes. This perspective focuses upon three different spheres which define the learning space: the work and the work organisation; the formal system of negotiation and cooperation; the informal social relations and values. The perspective provides an excellent explanation...... of the interrelationship between the three spheres in the daily work and how these spheres have influence on the possibilities of learning. The role of technology is dismissed in this perspective and as I find that technology is an important factor in the learning space, I extend the perspective to include technology...

  6. Consequences of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain symptoms on women's work participation and income: results from a national household sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Megan K; Elliott, Marc N; Clemens, J Quentin; Ewing, Brett; Berry, Sandra H

    2014-01-01

    We describe differences in work participation and income by bladder symptom impact and comorbidities among women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Cross-sectional data from 2,767 respondents younger than 65 years identified with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome symptoms were analyzed. The data were taken from the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology (RICE) survey, and included retrospective self-reports of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome impact, severity, years since onset, related comorbidities (depressive symptomatology, number of conditions), work participation and income, and personal characteristics. Multiple regressions predicted 5 current work outcomes of works now, kept from working by pain, missed work days, days worked when bothered by symptoms and real income change since symptom onset. Controlling for work status at symptom onset and personal characteristics, greater bladder symptom impact predicted a greater likelihood of not now working, kept more days from working by pain, missed more work days and working more days with symptoms. More depressive symptomatology and greater number of comorbidities predicted reduced work participation. Women experienced no growth in real income since symptom onset. Measures of symptom severity were not associated with any of the economic outcomes. Greater interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome symptom impact, depressive symptomatology and count of comorbidities (but not symptom severity) were each associated with less work participation and leveling of women's long-term earnings. Management of bladder symptom impact on nonwork related activities and depressive symptomatology may improve women's work outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Negative Facial Expressions - But Not Visual Scenes - Enhance Human Working Memory in Younger and Older Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belham, Flávia Schechtman; Tavares, Maria Clotilde H; Satler, Corina; Garcia, Ana; Rodrigues, Rosângela C; Canabarro, Soraya L de Sá; Tomaz, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the influence of emotion on memory processes across the human lifespan. Some results have shown older adults (OA) performing better with positive stimuli, some with negative items, whereas some found no impact of emotional valence. Here we tested, in two independent studies, how younger adults (YA) and OA would perform in a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task with positive, negative, and neutral images. The task consisted of identifying the new location of a stimulus in a crescent set of identical stimuli presented in different locations in a touch-screen monitor. In other words, participants should memorize the locations previously occupied to identify the new location. For each trial, the number of occupied locations increased until 8 or until a mistake was made. In study 1, 56 YA and 38 OA completed the task using images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Results showed that, although YA outperformed OA, no effects of emotion were found. In study 2, 26 YA and 25 OA were tested using facial expressions as stimuli. Data from this study showed that negative faces facilitated performance and this effect did not differ between age groups. No differences were found between men and women. Taken together, our findings suggest that YA and OA's VSWM can be influenced by the emotional valence of the information, though this effect was present only for facial stimuli. Presumably, this may have happened due to the social and biological importance of such stimuli, which are more effective in transmitting emotions than IAPS images. Critically, our results also indicate that the mixed findings in the literature about the influence of aging on the interactions between memory and emotion may be caused by the use of different stimuli and methods. This possibility should be kept in mind in future studies about memory and emotion across the lifespan.

  8. Technical meeting to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors TWG-FR, previously International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWG-FR, created in 1967), was hosted by the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) and was attended by TWG-FR members and advisers from the following Member States: Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States of America. The objectives of the meeting were: to exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); to review the progress since the 34th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; to consider meeting arrangements for 2002 and 2003; to review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations

  9. Technical meeting to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors TWG-FR, previously International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWG-FR, created in 1967), was hosted by the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) and was attended by TWG-FR members and advisers from the following Member States: Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States of America. The objectives of the meeting were: to exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); to review the progress since the 34th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; to consider meeting arrangements for 2002 and 2003; to review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations.

  10. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors. Report of the consultants meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A series of presentations on the assessment of core structural components and materials at their facilities were given by the experts. The different issues related to degradation mechanisms were discussed. The outputs include a more thorough understanding of the specific challenges related to Research Reactors (RRs) as well as proposals for activities which could assist RR organizations in their efforts to address the issues involved. The experts recommend that research reactor operators consider implementation of surveillance programs for materials of core structural components, as part of ageing management program (TECDOC-792 and DS-412). It is recognised by experts that adequate archived structural material data is not available for many RRs. Access to this data and extension of existing material databases could help many operating organisations extend the operation of their RRs. The experts agreed that an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on Assessment of Core Structural Materials should be organised in December 2009 (IAEA HQ Vienna). The proposed objectives of the TM are: (i) exchange of detailed technical information on the assessment and ageing management of core structural materials, (ii) identification of materials of interest for further investigation, (iii) proposal for a new IAEA CRP on Assessment of Core Structural Materials, and (iv) identification of RRs prepared to participate in proposed CRP. Based on the response to a questionnaire prepared for the 2008 meeting of the Technical Working Group for Research Reactors, the number of engineering capital projects related to core structural components is proportionally lower than those related to,for example, I and C or electrical power systems. This implies that many operating research reactors will be operating longer using their original core structural components and justifies the assessment and evaluation programmes and activities proposed in this report. (author)

  11. Diversity in work: The heterogeneity of women's labour market participation patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerkes, M.

    2006-01-01

    Employment patterns are gender-driven, yet analyses of women’s employment often fail to recognize the heterogeneous patterns evident within women’s labour market participation itself. This article examines the variation in women’s labour market participation in light of Hakim’s heterogeneity

  12. Working women worldwide. Age effects in female labor force participation in 117 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Keune, M.; Steinmetz, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the effects of economic conditions, families, education, and gender ideologies on the labor force participation rates of women in eleven age groups in 117 countries. We find that participation rates of young and older women are partly explained by sector sizes and the

  13. Passengers, Participants, Partners and Practitioners. Working with Risk To Empower Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Heather

    2000-01-01

    Participant responsibility in outdoor education programs is placed on a continuum from passenger status through participant and partner to practitioner. Corresponding leader roles are directive, coaching, supporting, and delegating. The disempowering effects of the passenger approach to risk management and the value of teaching a group to manage…

  14. Have Disability Transfers Caused the Decline in Older Male Labor Force Participation? A Work-Status Rational Choice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haveman, Robert H.; Wolfe, Barbara L.

    This paper presents a decision-process model for explaining the growth in transfer recipiency (the receipt by working age people of disability income), the choice of work status, and the reduction in labor force participation of older workers. It is hypothesized that the attractiveness of disability income transfer options has led older male…

  15. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... days that it wishes to count as holidays for those in unpaid activities in its Work Verification Plan... policies and definitions as part of its Work Verification Plan, specified at § 261.62. (c) For unsubsidized... toward the participation rate for a self-employed individual than the number derived by dividing the...

  16. 45 CFR 261.61 - How must a State document a work-eligible individual's hours of participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual who is self-employed, the documentation must comport with standards set forth in the State's approved Work Verification Plan. Self-reporting by a participant without additional verification is not... case file. In accordance with § 261.62, a State must describe in its Work Verification Plan the...

  17. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, engineering oriented work, rather than basic research and development (R&D), has led to significant progress in improving the economics of innovative fast reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities, while maintaining and even enhancing the safety features of these systems. Optimization of plant size and layout, more compact designs, reduction of the amount of plant materials and the building volumes, higher operating temperatures to attain higher generating efficiencies, improvement of load factor, extended core lifetimes, high fuel burnup, etc. are good examples of achievements to date that have improved the economics of fast neutron systems. The IAEA, through its Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) and Technical Working Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), devotes many of its initiatives to encouraging technical cooperation and promoting common research and technology development projects among Member States with fast reactor and advanced fuel cycle development programmes, with the general aim of catalysing and accelerating technology advances in these fields. In particular the theme of fast reactor deployment, scenarios and economics has been largely debated during the recent IAEA International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles: Safe Technologies and Sustainable Scenarios, held in Paris in March 2013. Several papers presented at this conference discussed the economics of fast reactors from different national and regional perspectives, including business cases, investment scenarios, funding mechanisms and design options that offer significant capital and energy production cost reductions. This Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics addresses Member States’ expressed need for information exchange in the field, with the aim of identifying the main open issues and launching possible initiatives to help and

  18. Are performance-based measures predictive of work participation in patients with musculoskeletal disorders? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijer, P P F M; Gouttebarge, V; Brouwer, S; Reneman, M F; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2012-02-01

    Assessments of whether patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can participate in work mainly consist of case history, physical examinations, and self-reports. Performance-based measures might add value in these assessments. This study answers the question: how well do performance-based measures predict work participation in patients with MSDs? A systematic literature search was performed to obtain longitudinal studies that used reliable performance-based measures to predict work participation in patients with MSDs. The following five sources of information were used to retrieve relevant studies: PubMed, Embase, AMA Guide to the Evaluation of Functional Ability, references of the included papers, and the expertise and personal file of the authors. A quality assessment specific for prognostic studies and an evidence synthesis were performed. Of the 1,230 retrieved studies, eighteen fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The studies included 4,113 patients, and the median follow-up period was 12 months. Twelve studies took possible confounders into account. Five studies were of good quality and thirteen of moderate quality. Two good-quality and all thirteen moderate-quality studies (83%) reported that performance-based measures were predictive of work participation. Two good-quality studies (11%) reported both an association and no association between performance-based measures and work participation. One good-quality study (6%) found no effect. A performance-based lifting test was used in fourteen studies and appeared to be predictive of work participation in thirteen studies. Strong evidence exists that a number of performance-based measures are predictive of work participation in patients with MSDs, especially lifting tests. Overall, the explained variance was modest.

  19. Work-family conflict and safety participation of high-speed railway drivers: Job satisfaction as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Guo, Ming; Ye, Long; Liao, Ganli; Yang, Zhehan

    2016-10-01

    Despite the large body of work on the work-family interface, hardly any literature has addressed the work-family interface in safety-critical settings. This study draws from social exchange theory to examine the effect of employees' strain-based work-to-family conflict on their supervisors' rating of their safety participation through job satisfaction. The sample consisted of 494 drivers from a major railway company in China. The results of a structural equation model revealed that drivers' strain-based work-to-family conflict negatively influences safety participation, and the relationship was partially mediated by job satisfaction. These findings highlight the importance of reducing employees' work-to-family conflict in safety-critical organizations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Municipal consultants’ participation in building networks to support science teachers’ work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses particularly on the role of municipal science consultants in developing and maintaining network activities and connections among primary school science teachers. The hypothesis is that consultants play a crucial role in supporting strategic planning, and sustaining contacts...... and activities within professional learning networks. The research is framed by a project that involved 80 primary science teachers in 20 schools. The aim of the project was to develop network activities that facilitate sustainable change of the participating schools’ collective culture and practice of science...... science consultants’ participation in supporting network activities enable the participants to share and develop teaching activities....

  1. Hello pension, goodbye tension? The impact of work and institutions on older workers’ labor market participation in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fleischmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To sustain the welfare state, several EU countries agreed to take measures aimed at increasing the labor market participation of older workers (European Commission 2001. In this study, we developed a framework integrating individual, work, and institutional characteristics in order to explain the labor market participation of older workers. While prior studies focused mainly on individual characteristics, the present analysis investigated the impact of work and institutions more closely using the European Social Survey. Multilevel analyses across 21 countries showed that work characteristics increased the benefits from work, hence increasing the likelihood of participation among older workers, and that the generosity of institutions discouraged older workers to remain in the labor market.

  2. Forty-Fourth Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: - Exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); - Review the progress since the 43rd TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; - Consider topical technical meeting arrangements for 2012-2013, as well as review FR-related activities included in the IAEA Project&Budget (P&B) biennium 2012-2013; - Review the IAEA’s ongoing information exchange and coordinated research projects in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations and international initiatives (GIF, INPRO, NEA, ESNII, etc.)

  3. The association between satisfaction with husband's participation in housework and suicidal ideation among married working women in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Park, Eun-Cheol; Ju, Yeong Jun; Han, Kyu-Tae; Yoon, Hyo Jung; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2018-03-01

    Although married women are increasingly participating in paid labor, housework remains their primary responsibility. This uneven distribution of housework could have a negative impact on their mental health. In this study, we examined the association between satisfaction with husbands' participation in housework and suicidal ideation in married working women. Data were obtained from 3544 participants of the fourth and fifth waves of the Korean Longitudinal Survey of Women and Families. Satisfaction with husbands' participation in housework was classified as satisfactory, less satisfactory, and dissatisfactory. A generalized estimating equations model was used to examine the association. Those who were dissatisfied with their husbands' participation in housework were 2.65 times more likely to think about suicide than those who were satisfied. Subgroup analysis showed that women with an egalitarian gender ideology or low job dissatisfaction were more likely to think about suicide when they were dissatisfied with their husbands' participation in housework. In conclusion, married working women who were dissatisfied with their husbands' participation in housework are more likely to think about suicide than those who are satisfied. Therefore, fostering an environment of fair distribution of housework is necessary for alleviating their stress from the dual burden of work and family. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. User participation in a Municipal Acute Ward in Norway: dilemmas in the interface between policy ideals and work conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Anne-Kari; Tveiten, Sidsel; Werner, Anne

    2017-08-23

    User participation has become an increasingly important principle in health care over the last few decades. Healthcare professionals are expected to involve patients in treatment decisions. Clear guidance as to what this should entail for professionals in clinical work is not accounted for in legislation. In this study, we explore how healthcare professionals in a Municipal Acute Ward perceived, experienced and performed user participation. The ward represents a new short-time service model for emergency assistance in Norway. We focused on the challenges the professionals faced in clinical work and how they dealt with these. Data were drawn from qualitative interviews with 11 healthcare professionals and from 10 observations in relation to previsits and physician's rounds in the ward. Transcripts of interviews and observations were analysed using a method for systematic text condensation. In the analysis, we applied Lipsky's perspective on dilemmas of street-level bureaucrats. The results show that that the professionals perceived user participation as an important and natural part of their work. They experienced difficulties related to collaboration with patients, caregivers, and professionals in other services, and with framework conditions that caused conflicting expectations, responsibility, and priorities. The professionals seemed to take a pragmatic approach to user participation, managing it within narrow perspectives. Our study indicates that the participants dealt with the dilemmas at the cost of user participation. The results demonstrate that there is a gap between the outlined health policy and the professionals' opportunities to fulfil this policy in clinical work regarding user participation. The policy decision-makers should recognise the balancing work required of healthcare professionals to deal with difficulties in clinical work. The knowledge that professionals possess as performers of services and the need for valuing in policy processes should

  5. What works? Flexibility as a Work-Participation Strategy for People with Addiction and Mental-Health Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Vold Hansen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years the education and training of people with addictions and mental-health problems have been a key strategy to assist people to find ordinary jobs. This strategy is largely concerned with adapting people to the requirements of the workplace. An alternative strategy can also be envisaged, where the workplace adapts to the possibilities and resources of the people (Hansen, 2009. In this article, we raise the following question: how is it possible to adapt workplaces for people with addiction and mental-health problems? Here we highlight the experiences of a workplace that focuses on adapting to employees’ capabilities and resources. The data collection consists both of 12 interviews with managers and workers and of participant observation of the workplace. Our answer to our question is that this is possible because the workplace is flexible in the way that they adapt their demands to the workers’ resources.

  6. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting

  7. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The first meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. Part I of the Summary Report contains the minutes of the meeting

  8. Women's participation in high performance work practices: a comparative analysis of Portugal and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Pedro; Porto, Nelida; Portela, Marta

    2010-01-01

    High-performance work systems (HPWS) can be seen as a set of new forms of work organization combined with flexible human resources (HR) practices that enhance organizational performance through employee involvement and empowerment. Although in the past two decades much research has been conducted on the effects that high-performance work practices can have on organizations, there is still much to know about the ideal conditions for the adoption of such practices. According to some research, t...

  9. IAEA Technical Meeting on Status of IAEA Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Initiative. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to needs expressed by Member States and within a broader IAEA-wide effort in nuclear knowledge preservation, the IAEA has been carrying out a dedicated initiative on Fast Reactor Data Knowledge Preservation (FRKP). The main objectives of the FRKP initiative are to: • Halt the on-going loss of information related to Fast Reactors (FR); • Collect, retrieve, preserve and make accessible already existing data and information on FR. These objectives require the implementation of activities supporting digital document archival, exchange, search and retrieval and facilitating, by developing and using suitable standards and IT tools, the knowledge preservation over the next decades. To this purpose the IAEA has developed the Fast Reactor Knowledge Organization System (FRKOS), a web-based application employing IAEA methodology and approach for categorization of FR knowledge domain, which allows creating a comprehensive and well-structured international inventory of fast reactor data and information provided by different Member States. The resulting Web Portal is established and maintained by the IAEA. The IAEA knowledge preservation initiatives and tools in the field of fast neutron systems - which were presented and very well received during the recent IAEA Fast Reactor and Related Fuel Cycles Conference (FR13) - are supposed to be of interest for national nuclear authorities, regulators, scientific and research organizations, commercial companies and all other stakeholders involved in fast reactor activities at national or international level. The objectives of the technical meeting were to: • Exchange information between the member states/international organizations on national and international initiatives addressing knowledge preservation and data retrieval/collection in the field of fast neutron systems; • Present and discuss the member states’/international organizations’ policies and conditions for releasing to the IAEA both publicly

  10. 76 FR 30343 - SFIREG Full Working Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... (SFIREG) Full Committee will hold a 2-day meeting, beginning on June 20, 2011 and ending June 21, 2011. This notice announces the location and times for the meeting and sets forth the tentative agenda topics... on Tuesday, June 21, 2011. To request accommodation of a disability, please contact the person listed...

  11. Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, M.; Jokela, M.; Madsen, I. E.; Magnusson Hanson, L. L.; Lallukka, T.; Nyberg, S. T.; Alfredsson, L.; Batty, D.; Bjorner, J. B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Ferrie, J. E.; Heikkilä, K.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identi...

  12. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to address facilitators and barriers to participation at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Anabela Correia

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was approved by the World Health Assembly in 2001. Ten years later, strong arguments have arisen regarding the added value of ICF to the policies on employment and the outcomes at the workplace. As a conceptual framework, ICF has universality because of its inclusive and comprehensive view of human functioning. At a practical level ICF can be used to quantify the impact of impairment on an individual's ability to act in his/her environment and to assess interventions to minimize the impact of disability and maximize functioning. To explore key indicators of social participation (life habits) of persons with disabilities, particularly related to work, among environmental and personal factors. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires from a convenience sample of 149 working-age persons with disabilities. Social participation is a construct composed by multiple components and employment domain is the strongest indicator of participation. Correlations between social participation and personal factors, such as self-efficacy and attitudes towards disability were moderate. Those who are employed scored higher quality of life in terms of satisfaction with life, more positive attitudes toward disabilities and higher self-efficacy than the ones who are retired or unemployed. Persons using adapted wheelchair and those who were involved in wheelchair selection scored higher in social participation in general, performance at work, and quality of life. Age and disability duration were not associated with participants' employment status. These findings suggest that rehabilitation and vocational agents, like physiotherapists and other professionals, should have knowledge and understanding of the multiple factors that influence persons with disabilities' participation at work. Programs should provide appropriate wheelchairs, skills training, empowerment and problem-solving strategies in

  13. Blended Work and Employment Participation of Older Workers: A Further Discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of population aging and related policy aims to prolong working lives, it is highly important to get a better understanding of factors that may stimulate or rather inhibit prolonged employment. Dropkin and colleagues (Dropkin, J., Moline, J., Kim, H., & Gold, J. E. (2016). Blended work

  14. One Million Bones: Measuring the Effect of Human Rights Participation in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jane; Cheatham, Leah P.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the integration of human rights content and a national arts-activism initiative--One Million Bones--into a bachelor's-level macro practice class as a human rights teaching strategy. Two previously validated scales, the Human Rights Exposure (HRX) in Social Work and the Human Rights Engagement (HRE) in Social Work (McPherson…

  15. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Participants' Information Meeting: DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    The meeting consisted of the following six sessions: (1) plenary session I; (2) disposal technology; (3) characteristics and treatment of low-level waste; (4) environmental aspects and performance prediction; (5) overall summary sessions; and (6) plenary session II. Fifty two papers of the papers presented were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  16. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  17. Labor Force Participation Rates among Working-Age Individuals with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stacy M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzes four consecutive years of monthly labor force participation rates reported by the Current Population Survey that included nationally representative samples of the general U.S. population and nationally representative samples of the U.S. population with specifically identified disabilities. Visual impairment is one of the…

  18. What Makes Young Women More Resilient? Leadership, Work, Independence and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover what variables from the home and the high school may be related to a student having a high resilience score. The participants for the current research were all young women who attended the same all-girls, Catholic high school in the Midwest and were alumnae of the school. Resilience is defined as the…

  19. WORKING AND CARING: THE SIMULTANEOUS DECISION OF LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION AND INFORMAL ELDERLY AND CHILD SUPPORT ACT IVITIES IN MEXICO*

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gameren, Edwin; Velandia Naranjo, Durfari

    2016-01-01

    We analyze factors determining women’s decisions to participate in the labor market and provide elderly care and nonfinancial support to their (grand)children. We use data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study, a survey of people aged 50 and over, applying a three-equation, reduced-form SUR model. Results suggest that care needs are the driving force behind caregiving activities. Traditional roles also appear to be relevant in the labor force participation decision: women with a closer labor market connection when they were young are more likely to work. Simulations of demographic changes illustrate potential effects for future caregiving and participation rates. PMID:26924883

  20. Proceedings of the Workshop on remote participation in fusion experiments. Satellite meeting to the 25th EPS 1998 ICPP, Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piffl, V.; Pichal, J.

    1999-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: (i) Current status of the Garching/Greifswald connection; (ii) Remote participation across national boundaries; (iii) The TEC approach to a remote control room at TEXTOR; (iv) Uniform data access for remote participation; (v) Remote participation in the US transport code collaboration; (vi) Client-server for remote collaboration and remote invocation of analysis applications and application to the national transport code; (vii) Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D national fusion facility; (viii) The collaboration for support of scientific research; and (ix) JET and remote participation. (P.A.)

  1. Proceedings of the Workshop on remote participation in fusion experiments. Satellite meeting to the 25th EPS 1998 ICPP, Prague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffl, V; Pichal, J [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: (i) Current status of the Garching/Greifswald connection; (ii) Remote participation across national boundaries; (iii) The TEC approach to a remote control room at TEXTOR; (iv) Uniform data access for remote participation; (v) Remote participation in the US transport code collaboration; (vi) Client-server for remote collaboration and remote invocation of analysis applications and application to the national transport code; (vii) Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D national fusion facility; (viii) The collaboration for support of scientific research; and (ix) JET and remote participation. (P.A.)

  2. International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants. (IWG-LMNPP). Regular meeting. Working material. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National programs of Hungary, Japan, Korea, Russian Federation, Bulgaria, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom and USA, related to nuclear power plants life management presented at the Technical Committee Meeting are published in this volume. The main features of the reports are oriented towards extension of NPP lifetime and conditions indispensable to achieve in order to fulfil the safety requirements including testing the mechanical properties of relevant reactor components

  3. International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants. (IWG-LMNPP). Regular meeting. Working material. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National programs of Argentina, Brazil, Belgium, Czech Republic, Canada, France and Germany related to nuclear power plants life management presented at the Technical Committee Meeting are published in this volume. Finnish report VTT-TIED-1843 included in this volume was already included separately in the INIS Database. The main features of the reports are oriented towards extension of NPP lifetime and conditions indispensable to achieve in order to fulfil the safety requirements including testing the mechanical properties of relevant reactor components

  4. Diverse cultures at work: ensuring safety and health through leadership and participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starren, A.; Luijters, K.; Drupsteen, L.; Vilkevicius, G.; Stulginskis, A.; Eeckelaert, L.; Elsler, D.

    2013-01-01

    The differences between cultures are helpful in understanding discrepancies when several nationalities are working together. Cross-cultural studies describe characteristics of cultures and differences between different cultures. Therefore, the cross-cultural literature is very helpful in describing

  5. Forty-Sixth Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: • Review the current status and the progress since the 45th TWG-FR meeting of FR and ADS technology development activities in IAEA Member States; • Review the activities (past, present and planned) of the IAEA’s project 1.1.5.3, “Support for fast reactor research, technology development and deployment” to ensure that they remain relevant to the needs of Member States; • Provide the experts group with updates to advise the IAEA on FR and ADS activities, including on proposals for relevant studies and reviews; • Serve as a means for exchanging information on national and international FR and ADS programmes; • Review the main achievements and outcomes of the “International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle: Safe Technologies and Sustainable Scenarios – FR13”, held on 4 – 7 March 2013 in Paris, France; • Promote the exchange of technical information by proposing topics for, and assisting in the organization of, IAEA Workshops and Technical Meetings for 2014-2015 and further, and • Review the IAEA’s concluded, on-going and planned coordinated research projects (CRPs) in the technical fields relevant to the TWG-FR (FRs and ADS), as well as coordination of the TWG-FR’s activities with other organizations and international initiatives (GIF, INPRO, NEA, Euratom, etc.)

  6. 75 FR 16149 - Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-April 26, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-2312-N] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-- April 26, 2010 AGENCIES: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of...

  7. National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU), Meeting Number One (Washington, D.C., October 8, 1975).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    The first meeting of the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) established some basic premises and procedures. Commissioners representing various interests concerned with copyright legislation (librarians, publishers, consumers and lawyers) discussed the responsibility of the Commission to review copyright…

  8. Working with the Fogbow : Design and Reconfiguration of services and Participation in E-Government

    OpenAIRE

    Ekelin, Annelie

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is about the metaphors of the rainbow and the fogbow, investigations and evaluations, public Internet monitors, writing women, reflections and discussions about politics, design and democracy. It is also about the ongoing re-structuring of participation in service design within the development of E-Government. The aim behind the drive towards E-Government is to modernise administration and make it more efficient. The transformation and modernisation of public services are proclaim...

  9. Female peers in small work groups enhance women's motivation, verbal participation, and career aspirations in engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Nilanjana; Scircle, Melissa McManus; Hunsinger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Advances in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics are critical to the American economy and require a robust workforce. The scarcity of women in this workforce is a well-recognized problem, but data-driven solutions to this problem are less common. We provide experimental evidence showing that gender composition of small groups in engineering has a substantial impact on undergraduate women’s persistence. Women participate more actively in engineering groups when members are mostly ...

  10. Participative Work Design in Lean Production: A Strategy for Dissolving the Paradox between Standardized Work and Team Proactivity by Stimulating Team Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Annika; Hansen, Niklas; Antoni, Conny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore job design mechanisms that enhance team proactivity within a lean production system where autonomy is uttermost restricted. We propose and test a model where the team learning process of building shared meaning of work mediates the relationship between team participative decision-making, inter team…

  11. 76 FR 21892 - SFIREG POM Working Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    .... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at The Edgewater Hotel, 2411 Alaskan Way, Pier 67, Seattle, WA. This..., excluding legal holidays. The Docket Facility telephone number is (703) 305-5805. II. Tentative Agenda...

  12. Computerized reactor protection and safety related systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Though the majority of existing control and protection systems in nuclear power plants use old analogue technology and design philosophy, the use of computers in safety and safety related systems is becoming a current practice. The Specialists Meeting on ''Computerized Reactor Protection and Safety Related Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' was organized by IAEA (jointly by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle and the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety), in co-operation with Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary and was held from 27-29 October 1997 in Budapest, Hungary. The meeting focused on computerized safety systems under refurbishment, software reliability issues, licensing experiences and experiences in implemented computerized safety and safety related systems. Within a meeting programme a technical visit to Paks NPP was organized. The objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences in I and C important to safety, backfits and arguments for and reservations against the digital safety systems. The meeting was attended by 70 participants from 16 countries representing NPPs and utility organizations, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. In the course of 4 sessions 25 technical presentations were made. The present volume contains the papers presented by national delegates and the conclusions drawn from the final general discussion

  13. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation With Social Work Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to the class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use of reflective journals as a Flipped Classroom technique to increase reflective thinking and reading adherence. This study surveys 27 students in two practice courses about the use of weekly reflective journaling as a flipped classroom assignment. Findings support that reflective reading journals increase student preparation and engagement, but require more work for students and instructors. Implications are discussed.

  14. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Sixth Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: 1. Review of IWGFR Activities - 1a. Approval of the minutes of the Fifth IWGFR Meeting. 1b. Report by Scientific Secretary regarding the activities of the Group. 2. Comments on National Programmes on Fast Breeder Reactors. 3. International Coordination of the Schedule for Major Fast Reactor Meetings and other major international meetings having a predominant fast reactor interest. 4. Consideration of Conferences on Fast Reactors. 4a. IAEA Symposium on Fuel and Fuel Elements for Fast Reactors, Brussels, Belgium 2-6 July 1973. 4b. International Symposium on Physics of Fast Reactors, Tokyo, Japan, 16 to 23 October 1973. 4c. International Conference on Fast Reactor Power Stations, London, UK, 11 to 14 March 1974 . 4d. Suggestions of the IWGFR members on other conferences. 5. Consideration of a Schedule for Specialists' Meetings in 1973-74. 6. Other Business - 6a. First-aid in Sodium Burns. 6b. Principles of Good Practice for Safe Operation of Sodium Circuits. 6c. Bibliography on Fast Reactors. 7. The Date and Place of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  15. The Impact of Doctoral Study on Educational Leaders' Work for Students' Participation in Education Systems and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines ways educational leaders engaging with doctoral research have worked for students' participation in education systems. Twenty-four interviews were conducted with educational leaders of schools, colleges, and districts in England and the US doing doctoral research. The findings reveal that the leaders identify US and English…

  16. Materials about participation of the Novorossiysky university professors in the Odessa charity organizations work in the ONU Scientific Library funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. С. Грєбцова

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is devotted to the analysis of active participation of the Novorossiysky university professors in the Odessa charity organizations work, which is lighted up on the base of archive funds and materials of the published sources kept in the Scientific Library of the Odessa National University.

  17. National stereotypes of older people's competence are related to older adults' participation in paid and volunteer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Catherine E; Skirbekk, Vegard

    2013-11-01

    Why are older people perceived as more competent in some countries relative to others? In the current study, we investigate the extent to which national variation in perceptions of older people's competence is systematically related to national variation in the extent to which older people participate in paid and volunteer work. We used multilevel regression to analyze data from the European Social Survey and test the relationship between perceptions of older people's competence and older people's participation in paid and volunteer work across 28 countries. We controlled for a number of potentially confounding variables, including life expectancy as well as the gender ratio and average education of the older population in each country. We controlled for the average objective cognitive abilities of the older population in a subsample of 11 countries. Older people were perceived as more competent in countries in which more older people participated in paid or volunteer work, independent of life expectancy and the average education, gender makeup, and average cognitive abilities of the older population. The results suggest that older people's participation in paid and volunteer work is related to perceptions of older people's competence independent of older people's actual competence.

  18. Are performance-based measures predictive of work participation in patients with musculoskeletal disorders? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, P. P. F. M.; Gouttebarge, V.; Brouwer, S.; Reneman, M. F.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    Assessments of whether patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can participate in work mainly consist of case history, physical examinations, and self-reports. Performance-based measures might add value in these assessments. This study answers the question: how well do performance-based

  19. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L.; Vermeulen, Marjolein I. M.; Herenius, Marieke M. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with

  20. Participation in voluntary organizations and volunteer work as a compensation for the absence of work or partnership? Evidence from two German samples of younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Maria K; Silbereisen, Rainer K

    2012-07-01

    We tested whether formal volunteering, in terms of its associations with mental health, compensates for the absence of major work and family roles among older adults or rather complements such roles among both younger and older adults. Two cross-sectional samples of younger (aged 18-42 years, N = 2,346) and older (aged 56-75 years, N = 1,422) German adults were used. We regressed mental health indicators on control variables, 2 indicators of formal volunteering (participation in voluntary organizations and volunteer work), and their interactions with employment/partnership status. Participation in voluntary organizations was associated with higher positive affect, higher life satisfaction, and fewer depressive symptoms in younger adults. In older adults, it was related to higher life satisfaction only among working individuals, although the difference from nonworking individuals was not significant. Volunteer work was associated with higher positive affect in both age groups. In younger adults, it had no relation to life satisfaction and depressive symptoms. In older adults, it was related to higher life satisfaction among nonworking individuals and to fewer depressive symptoms among those without a steady partner. Volunteer work but not participation in voluntary organizations yielded compensatory effects on mental health among older adults.

  1. Work hard, play hard?: A comparison of male and female lawyers' time in paid and unpaid work and participation in leisure activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jean E; Young, Marisa C

    2010-02-01

    There has been a considerable amount of research that documents how women and men spend their time in different work and home tasks. We examine how much time professional women and men spend in paid and unpaid work and how this relates to their participation in different leisure activities. We also explore whether time in paid and unpaid work has gender-specific effects on leisure participation. In examining these issues, we rely on data from lawyers working in different legal settings. Our results show that, as hypothesized, men report more time in paid work and leisure whereas women devote more time to housework and childcare. An unexpected finding is that the time men spend in housework or childcare is either unrelated or positively related to their leisure participation. These results suggest that men's greater overall opportunities for leisure compared with women's appear to stem from the unanticipated relationships between men's involvement in housework and childcare and their leisure activities. We raise several possible explanations for these findings.

  2. Students' Participation in Social Networking Sites: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Dhrubodhi; Clark, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Social work students have few guidelines to help them evaluate the implication of their posted information on Internet-based social networking sites (SNSs). There is a national trend among employers of human services to cross-check publicly available online information on applicants. Based on data from a survey of 105 baccalaureate and master's…

  3. The working mechanism of manual therapy in participants with chronic tension-type headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castien, R.F.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van der Windt, D.; Heijmans, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study.OBJECTIVE: To explore the working mechanism of manual therapy, we investigated whether 3 cervical spine variables were mediators of the effect of manual therapy on headache frequency.BACKGROUND: Manual therapy has been shown to reduce headache frequency

  4. Implementation of Compressed Work Schedules: Participation and Job Redesign as Critical Factors for Employee Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latack, Janina C.; Foster, Lawrence W.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of an implementation of a three-day/thirty-eight hour (3/38) work schedule among information systems personnel (N=84). Data showed that 18 months after implementation, 3/38 employees still strongly favor the compressed schedule. Data also suggest substantial organizational payoffs including reductions in sick time, overtime,…

  5. Work, Life and VET Participation amongst Lower-Paid Workers. NCVER Monograph Series 05/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Barbara; Skinner, Natalie; McMahon, Catherine; Pritchard, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This monograph is the culmination of a three-year research program undertaken by the University of South Australia's Centre for Work+Life. It considers the barriers, support and benefit of vocational education and training (VET) for workers in the low-paid occupations (that is, those earning around $17 per hour). The research considered a wide…

  6. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation with Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use…

  7. Tenth meeting of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation, Vienna, 3-5 March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The meeting of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI) was organized in order to summarize operating experience of NPP control systems, gain a general overview of activities in development of modern control systems and receive recommendations on the further directions and particular measures within the Agency's programme. The papers and discussions mostly dealt with practical experience and described actual problems encountered. Emphasis was placed on the technical, industrial and economic aspects of the introduction of modern, highly automated control systems and on the improvement of plant availability and safety. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 20 presentations of the meeting

  8. Proceedings of the second FY87 meeting of the National Working Group for Reduction in Transuranic Waste Arisings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The Second FY87 Meeting of the National Working Group for Reduction in Transuranic Waste Arisings (NWGRTWA) was held at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Tuesday and Wednesday, July 28--29, 1987. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss (1) modeling programs for waste reduction, (2) proposed FY88 and out-year tasks including the SRL Pu incineration, immobilization improvement, erbia coating technology, and (3) improvements in up-stream recovery operations to effect waste reduction. In addition, tours were made of the LLNL Waste Operations, the Laser Fusion (NOVA), and the Magnetic Fusion (MFTF)

  9. Consultants Group Meeting on Genetic Sexing and Population Genetics of Screwworms. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A Thematic Plan on SIT for Screwworms developed in 1999 by IPC and TC identified certain R and D bottlenecks to the expansion of this technology into new agricultural areas. This consultant's meeting was held to review these conclusions and to advise the Agency on the need, or otherwise, of initiating a CRP to address the bottlenecks identified in the Thematic Plan. In 2001 it is expected that the New World Screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, will have been eradicated from all of Central America, including Panama where a sterile release barrier will be established to prevent re-invasion from South America. This barrier will need to be maintained indefinitely with its associated costs. The use of an all-male strain in the production facility would have very positive impact on the cost/benefit analysis of the programme. The Director of the Screwworm Programme in Central America made this point very strongly during the Thematic Plan discussions and at a subsequent technical meeting in Tuxtla Gutierrez. Interest to expand the programme into South America is now being shown by certain countries in the region where the economic feasibility of implementing an SIT programme might depend on producing sterile flies more economically and here again the use of a genetic sexing strain could play an important role. For the Old World Screwworm, Chrysomya bezziana the Australian authorities have just completed a successful small field trial of the SIT in Malaysia and it is proposed that more extensive field tests be carried out in the region. For both the New World Screwworm in South America and the Old World Screwworm, in Asia there is virtually no information regarding the population structure in relation to the implementation of an SIT programme. Is the Old World Screwworm a single species over its very wide distribution and are the populations of New World Screwworm in South America the same as in Central America and related to each other? Are the populations isolated? These

  10. [Impact of the labour market on vocational retraining centre participants' return to work: a study on employment agencies level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, C; Flach, T; Schmidt, C

    2012-08-01

    This paper is aimed at identifying labour market factors impacting vocational retraining centre participants' return to work on Employment Agencies level and at comparing results to unemployed people's return to work (Social Code Book III). Databases are regional return to work rates of 2006 graduates, selected labour market indicators 2007, and the 2007 labour market classification of the Institute for Employment Research (IAB). The n = 75 Employment Agency districts where 74.5 % of the participants followed-up lived were analyzed using analyses of variance and multiple loglinear regression. Compared to the unemployment context (Social Code Book III), the impact of the labour market is much lower and less complex. In the multiple model, the regional unemployment rate and the regional tertiarization rate (size of the service sector) are found to be significant and superior to the IAB-classification. Hence, participants' return to work is less dependent on labour market conditions than unemployed people's return to work (Social Code Book III). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Mini-Proceedings, 18th Meeting of the Working Group on Radiative Corrections and MC Generators for Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Masjuan, P; Venanzoni, G

    2016-01-01

    The mini-proceedings of the 18$^{\\mathrm{th}}$ Meeting of the "Working Group on Radiative Corrections and MonteCarlo Generators for Low Energies" held in Frascati, 19$^{\\mathrm{th}}$ - 20$^{\\mathrm{st}}$ May, are presented. These meetings, started in 2006, have as aim to bring together experimentalists and theoreticians working in the fields of meson transition form factors, hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the leptons, and the effective fine structure constant. The development of MonteCarlo generators and Radiative Corrections for precision $e^+e^-$ and $\\tau$-lepton physics are also covered, with emphasis on meson production. At this workshop, a documentary entitled {\\it Bruno Touschek with AdA in Orsay} commemorating the first observation of electron-positron collisions in a laboratory was also presented. With this edition, the working group reaches 10 years of continuous activities.

  12. Work participation and health-related characteristics of sickness absence beneficiaries with multiple somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Nielsen, M B D

    2016-01-01

    unemployed was higher for this group than for those with a low score. Adjusting for general health reduced the association between symptoms and unemployment, whereas problems with social relations only affected it marginally. Conclusions: Sick-listed individuals reporting high levels of symptoms were more......Objectives: The primary aim was to study whether high levels of multiple symptoms influenced sick-listed individuals' employment status or desire to return to work (RTW) and whether this was associated with social relations at work. Study design: A cross-sectional study nested in a clinical trial......-listing, and use of health care were register-data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses with adjustments were performed. Results: Beneficiaries with high SCL-SOM score (n = 218, 33%) reported poorer health, job satisfaction, a lower desire to RTW and more problems with supervisors. The risk of being...

  13. Report on the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on 188Re and 90Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of 188 W/ 188 Re and 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators for eluting 188 Re and 90 Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different participating groups, and formulated the work plan of

  14. Report on the 2{sup nd} Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generators for eluting {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different

  15. Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Madsen, Ida Eh; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Lallukka, Tea; Nyberg, Solja T; Alfredsson, Lars; Batty, G David; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Ferrie, Jane E; Heikkilä, Katriina; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lahelma, Eero; Nielsen, Martin L; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rahkonen, Ossi; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Schupp, Jürgen; Shipley, Martin J; Siegrist, Johannes; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Wagner, Gert G; Wang, Jian Li; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Westerlund, Hugo; Kivimäki, Mika

    2018-05-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identified ten published cohort studies and included unpublished individual-participant data from 18 studies. In the majority of cohorts, long working hours was defined as working ≥55 hours per week. In multivariable-adjusted meta-analyses of 189 729 participants from 35 countries [96 275 men, 93 454 women, follow-up ranging from 1-5 years, 21 747 new-onset cases), there was an overall association of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.25] between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms, with significant evidence of heterogeneity (I 2 =45.1%, P=0.004). A moderate association between working hours and depressive symptoms was found in Asian countries (1.50, 95% CI 1.13-2.01), a weaker association in Europe (1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and no association in North America (0.97, 95% CI 0.70-1.34) or Australia (0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.29). Differences by other characteristics were small. Conclusions This observational evidence suggests a moderate association between long working hours and onset of depressive symptoms in Asia and a small association in Europe.

  16. Work-Family Conflict: The Effects of Religious Context on Married Women’s Participation in the Labor Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Griebel Rogers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Past work shows religion’s effect on women’s career decisions, particularly when these decisions involve work-family conflict. This study argues that the religious context of a geographic area also influences women’s solutions to work-family conflict through more or less pervasive normative expectations within the community regarding women’s roles and responsibilities to the family. We use the American Community Survey linked with community-level religious proportions to test the relationship between religious contexts and women’s participation in the labor force in the contiguous United States–2054 census geographic areas. Using spatial analysis, we find that community religious concentration is related to the proportion of women who choose not to work. Communities with a higher proportion of the population belonging to conservative religious traditions also have a greater proportion of married women choosing not to work outside the home.

  17. INCREASED LIFE EXPECTANCY OF WORKING WOMEN THROUGH PARTICIPATION IN REGULAR PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES/ YOGIC EXERCISE

    OpenAIRE

    Jahanavee Ichchhaporia

    2017-01-01

    In today’s fast and globalized life style Women hold a key position in the shaping of the next generation, plays such an important part in the life of the family. Their value is beyond measure. The changing life style demands more financial steadiness, that’s why the percentage of women in the active work population has increased rapidly in many countries around the world, including ours. As a consequence, we have seen the proliferation of dual-income families where role expectations toward m...

  18. Work participation in spondyloarthritis across countries: analysis from the ASAS-COMOSPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Manica, Santiago; Sepriano, Alexandre; Ramiro, Sofia; Pimentel Santos, Fernando; Putrik, Polina; Nikiphorou, Elena; Norton, Sam; Molto, Anna; Dougados, Maxime; van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert B M; van den Bosch, Filip E; Boonen, Annelies

    2018-06-02

    To explore the role of individual and country level socioeconomic (SE) factors on employment, absenteeism and presenteeism in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) across 22 countries worldwide. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of SpA fulfilling the ASAS classification criteria and in working age (≤65 years) from COMOSPA were included. Outcomes of interest were employment status, absenteeism and presenteeism, assessed by the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Specific General Health questionnaire. Three multivariable models were built (one per outcome) using mixed-effects binomial (for work status) or ordinal regressions (for absenteeism and presenteeism), with country as random effect. The contribution of SE factors at the individual-level (eg, gender, education, marital status) and country-level (healthcare expenditure (HCE) per capita, Human Development Index (HDI) and gross domestic product per capita) SE factors, independent of clinical factors, was assessed. In total, 3114 patients with SpA were included of which 1943 (62%) were employed. Physical function and comorbidities were related to all work outcomes in expected directions and disease activity also with absenteeism and presenteeism. Higher education (OR 4.2 (95% CI 3.1 to 5.6)) or living in a country with higher HCE (OR 2.3 (1.5 to 3.6)) or HDI (OR 1.9 (1.2 to 3.3)) was positively associated with being employed. Higher disease activity was associated with higher odds for absenteeism (OR 1.5 (1.3 to 1.7)) and presenteeism (OR 2.1 (1.8 to 2.4)). No significant association between individual-level and country-level SE factors and absenteeism or presenteeism was found. Higher education level and higher country SE welfare are associated with a higher likelihood of keeping patients with SpA employed. Absenteeism and presenteeism are only associated with clinical but not with individual-level or country-level SE factors. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text

  19. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting, NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 27. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document brings together the available documents of the meeting: 1 - The Proposed agenda, the list of participants and the Summary record of the previous meeting, May 2014 (Report NEA-SEN-NSC-WPEC--2014-2); 2 - The Reports on experimental activities: Europe (NEA DB), Japan, USA, Russia, China; 3 - Some Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, BROND/ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, and TENDL; 4 - The Status of some subgroups: Subgroup 35 (Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range); Subgroup 36 (Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region); Subgroup 37 (Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies); Subgroup 38 (A modern nuclear database structure beyond the ENDF format); Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files); Subgroup 40 (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) Pilot Project); Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections); Subgroup C (High

  20. Irradiation effects and mitigation. Proceedings of the IAEA Specialists Meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The IAEA Specialists Meeting on Irradiation Effects and Mitigation organised in co-operation with the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' was held at Vladimir, Russian Federation from 15 to 19 September 1997. Topics of the Meeting covered a number of problems including mechanisms of radiation damage, results of surveillance programmes and their analysis, effects of operating parameters, fracture mechanics tests and evaluation, annealing and optimisation of the process and reembrittlement after annealing. Specialists from 17 countries presented 31 paper, published in this proceedings each with a separate abstract

  1. Malaysia/Singapore: Where Asian Cultures Meet. Participants' Papers. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program, 2001 (Malaysia and Singapore).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    The general objective of the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program is to help U.S. educators enhance their international understanding and increase their knowledge of the people and culture of other countries. This particular program offered participants an overview of life in Malaysia and Singapore through seminars and other activities.…

  2. Continuous Inquiry Meets Continued Critique: The Professional Learning Community in Practice and the Resistance of (Un)Willing Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbousty, Youness; Bratt, Kirstin

    2010-01-01

    The term Professional Learning Community is commonplace, and it holds many meanings and suggestions. For the purpose of this essay, however, we discuss a specific Professional Learning Community (PLC) that was established in a high school, fifteen months prior to the application of a survey instrument to evaluate participants' perceptions on the…

  3. Works made by the working group on the division by four by 2050 of France's greenhouse gas emissions, named 'factor 4'. January 19, 2006 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A working group was created on September 8, 2005 by the French minister of ecology and sustainable development and the French minister of industry with the aim of exploring all possible paths allowing to reach the long term goal of dividing by a factor 4 the French greenhouse gas emissions from now to 2050. This paper gathers the transparencies of three presentations given at the January 19, 2006 meeting of the 'Factor 4' working group: behaviour of energy consumers; which public policies to reach the factor 4; macro-economics of the factor 4. (J.S.)

  4. Long working hours and alcohol use: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T; Madsen, Ida E H; Lallukka, Tea; Ahola, Kirsi; Alfredsson, Lars; Batty, G David; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Ferrie, Jane E; Fransson, Eleonor I; Hamer, Mark; Heikkilä, Katriina; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lunau, Thorsten; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Schupp, Jürgen; Siegrist, Johannes; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Wagner, Gert G; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; Kivimäki, Mika

    2015-01-13

    To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were obtained with random effects meta-analysis. Sources of heterogeneity were examined with meta-regression. Cross sectional analysis was based on 61 studies representing 333,693 participants from 14 countries. Prospective analysis was based on 20 studies representing 100,602 participants from nine countries. The pooled maximum adjusted odds ratio for the association between long working hours and alcohol use was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.18) in the cross sectional analysis of published and unpublished data. Odds ratio of new onset risky alcohol use was 1.12 (1.04 to 1.20) in the analysis of prospective published and unpublished data. In the 18 studies with individual participant data it was possible to assess the European Union Working Time Directive, which recommends an upper limit of 48 hours a week. Odds ratios of new onset risky alcohol use for those working 49-54 hours and ≥ 55 hours a week were 1.13 (1.02 to 1.26; adjusted difference in incidence 0.8 percentage points) and 1.12 (1.01 to 1.25; adjusted difference in incidence 0.7 percentage points), respectively, compared with working standard 35-40 hours (incidence of new onset risky alcohol use 6.2%). There was no difference in these associations between men and women or by age or socioeconomic groups, geographical regions, sample type (population based v occupational cohort), prevalence of risky alcohol use in the cohort, or sample attrition rate

  5. The net effects of the Project NetWork return-to-work case management experiment on participant earnings, benefit receipt, and other outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, R; Rupp, K

    2000-01-01

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) initiated Project NetWork in 1991 to test case management as a means of promoting employment among persons with disabilities. The demonstration, which targeted Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) beneficiaries and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applicants and recipients, offered intensive outreach, work-incentive waivers, and case management/referral services. Participation in Project NetWork was voluntary. Volunteers were randomly assigned to the "treatment" group or the "control" group. Those assigned to the treatment group met individually with a case or referral manager who arranged for rehabilitation and employment services, helped clients develop an individual employment plan, and provided direct employment counseling services. Volunteers assigned to the control group could not receive services from Project NetWork but remained eligible for any employment assistance already available in their communities. For both treatment and control groups, the demonstration waived specific DI and SSI program rules considered to be work disincentives. The experimental impact study thus measures the incremental effects of case and referral management services. The eight demonstration sites were successful in implementing the experimental design roughly as planned. Project NetWork staff were able to recruit large numbers of participants and to provide rehabilitation and employment services on a substantial scale. Most of the sites easily reached their enrollment targets and were able to attract volunteers with demographic characteristics similar to those of the entire SSI and DI caseload and a broad range of moderate and severe disabilities. However, by many measures, volunteers were generally more "work-ready" than project eligible in the demonstration areas who did not volunteer to receive NetWork services. Project NetWork case management increased average annual earnings by $220 per year over the first 2 years following

  6. Meeting the Needs of Travel Clientele: Tried and True Strategies That Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessing, Kathy; Whitney, Cherine

    This paper describes sources for meeting the information needs of travel clientele. Topics addressed include: (1) U.S. government Web sites; (2) collection development tools, including review journals, online bookstores, travel Web sites, and sources of point-by-point comparisons of guide books; (3) prominent guidebook series and publisher Web…

  7. Technical meeting on decommissioning of fast reactors after sodium draining. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the technical meeting was to provide a forum for in-depth scientific and technical exchange on topics related to the decommissioning experience with fast reactors, in particular with regard to the decommissioning of components after sodium draining. Accordingly, the scope of the meeting covers the review and analyses of the experience gained from the decommissioning of both active sodium loops and sodium cooled fast reactors (e.g., KNK II, Superphenix, RAPSODIE, EBR-II, FERMI, BN-350, BR-10). It is expected that the outcome of the meeting will contribute to the Agency initiative to preserve fast reactor data and knowledge. The main focus of the technical meeting was given on the decommissioning of both active loop and reactor components (e.g., the primary vessel of a sodium-cooled reactor) that have been drained of sodium, but that still conserve some residual amounts of sodium (e.g., films covering the entire surface of the component, or particular sodium heels that cannot be drained)

  8. Perspectives on chemical oceanography in the 21st century: Participants of the COME ABOARD Meeting examine aspects of the field in the context of 40 years of DISCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Palevsky, Hilary I.; Martz, Todd R.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Gledhill, Martha; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Brandes, Jay; Aluwihare, Lihini; Anderson, Robert M.; Bender, Sara; Boyle, Ed; Bronk, Debbie; Buesseler, Ken; Burdige, David J.; Casciotti, Karen; Close, Hilary; Conte, Maureen; Cutter, Greg; Estapa, Meg; Fennel, Katja; Ferron, Sara; Glazer, Brian; Goni, Miguel; Grand, Max; Guay, Chris; Hatta, Mariko; Hayes, Chris; Horner, Tristan; Ingall, Ellery; Johnson, Kenneth G.; Juranek, Laurie; Knapp, Angela; Lam, Phoebe; Luther, George; Matrai, Paty; Nicholson, David; Paytan, Adina; Pellenbarg, Robert; Popendorf, Kim; Reddy, Christopher M.; Ruttenberg, Kathleen; Sabine, Chris; Sansone, Frank; Shaltout, Nayrah; Sikes, Liz; Sundquist, Eric T.; Valentine, David; Wang, Zhao (Aleck); Wilson, Sam; Barrett, Pamela; Behrens, Melanie; Belcher, Anna; Biermann, Lauren; Boiteau, Rene; Clarke, Jennifer; Collins, Jamie; Coppola, Alysha; Ebling, Alina M.; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Goldman, Johanna; Guallart, Elisa F.; Haskell, William; Hurley, Sarah; Janssen, David; Johnson, Winn; Lennhartz, Sinikka; Liu, Shuting; Rahman, Shaily; Ray, Daisy; Sarkar, Amit; Steiner, Zvika; Widner, Brittany; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The questions that chemical oceanographers prioritize over the coming decades, and the methods we use to address these questions, will define our field's contribution to 21st century science. In recognition of this, the U.S. National Science Foundation and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration galvanized a community effort (the Chemical Oceanography MEeting: A BOttom-up Approach to Research Directions, or COME ABOARD) to synthesize bottom-up perspectives on selected areas of research in Chemical Oceanography. Representing only a small subset of the community, COME ABOARD participants did not attempt to identify targeted research directions for the field. Instead, we focused on how best to foster diverse research in Chemical Oceanography, placing emphasis on the following themes: strengthening our core chemical skillset; expanding our tools through collaboration with chemists, engineers, and computer scientists; considering new roles for large programs; enhancing interface research through interdisciplinary collaboration; and expanding ocean literacy by engaging with the public. For each theme, COME ABOARD participants reflected on the present state of Chemical Oceanography, where the community hopes to go and why, and actionable pathways to get there. A unifying concept among the discussions was that dissimilar funding structures and metrics of success may be required to accommodate the various levels of readiness and stages of knowledge development found throughout our community. In addition to the science, participants of the concurrent Dissertations Symposium in Chemical Oceanography (DISCO) XXV, a meeting of recent and forthcoming Ph.D. graduates in Chemical Oceanography, provided perspectives on how our field could show leadership in addressing long-standing diversity and early-career challenges that are pervasive throughout science. Here we summarize the COME ABOARD Meeting discussions, providing a synthesis of reflections and perspectives on the

  9. Equal Opportunity, Equal Work: Increasing Women's Participation in the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative Africa Indoor Residual Spraying Project

    OpenAIRE

    Donner, Abigail; Belemvire, Allison; Johns, Ben; Mangam, Keith; Fiekowsky, Elana; Gunn, Jayleen; Hayden, Mary; Ernst, Kacey

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the primary control measures for malaria transmission is indoor residual spraying (IRS). Historically, few women have worked in IRS programs, despite the income-generating potential. Increasing women's roles in IRS requires understanding the barriers to women's participation and implementing measures to address them. The U.S. President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) Africa Indoor Residual Spraying (AIRS) Project is the largest implementer of IRS globally. To address gender ineq...

  10. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin van der Hiele

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed. Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53=2.76, p=0.008 and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1=6.3, p=0.012, higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03 and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30 than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28. Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  11. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis; Ruimschotel, Rob; Kamminga, Noëlle; Visser, Leo; Middelkoop, Huub

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed). Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53)=2.76, p=0.008) and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1)=6.3, p=0.012), higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03) and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30) than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28). Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  12. Seventh regular meeting of the International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, Vienna, 3-5 September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The seventh regular meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components was held at the Agency's Headquarters in Vienna from 3 to 5 September 1985. The representatives of Member States and of the Commission of the European Communities reported the status of the research programmes in this field (12 presentations). A separate abstract was prepared for each of the presentations

  13. Proceedings of the spring meeting of the Working Group for Electronic Instrumentation, Berlin, March 21 - 23, 1994. Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, F.

    1994-07-01

    The SEI, working group for electronic instrumentation, is a platform for exchange of information and experience among electronics engineers from universities and research labs, particularly on subjects of interest in high-energy physics and nuclear electronics engineering. The abstracts of the 12 papers presented to the meeting cover aspects of current interest ranging from technology transfer to hardware description language to data processing to specific measuring and control instruments. (DG) [de

  14. The influence of 'significant others' on persistent back pain and work participation: A qualitative exploration of illness perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual illness perceptions have been highlighted as important influences on clinical outcomes for back pain. However, the illness perceptions of 'significant others' (spouse/partner/close family member are rarely explored, particularly in relation to persistent back pain and work participation. The aim of this study was to initiate qualitative research in this area in order to further understand these wider influences on outcome. Methods Semi-structured interviews based on the chronic pain version of the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised were conducted with a convenience sample of UK disability benefit claimants, along with their significant others (n = 5 dyads. Data were analysed using template analysis. Results Significant others shared, and perhaps further reinforced, claimants' unhelpful illness beliefs including fear of pain/re-injury associated with certain types of work and activity, and pessimism about the likelihood of return to work. In some cases, significant others appeared more resigned to the permanence and negative inevitable consequences of the claimant's back pain condition on work participation, and were more sceptical about the availability of suitable work and sympathy from employers. In their pursuit of authenticity, claimants were keen to stress their desire to work whilst emphasising how the severity and physical limitations of their condition prevented them from doing so. In this vein, and seemingly based on their perceptions of what makes a 'good' significant other, significant others acted as a 'witness to pain', supporting claimants' self-limiting behaviour and statements of incapacity, often responding with empathy and assistance. The beliefs and responses of significant others may also have been influenced by their own experience of chronic illness, thus participants lives were often intertwined and defined by illness. Conclusions The findings from this exploratory study reveal how

  15. How Science and Hollywood Can Work Together Is Focus of Fall Meeting Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Jon Amiel, director of the 2003 science fiction blockbuster movie The Core, told a room packed with geophysicists at the recent AGU Fall Meeting that he had a confession to make. The confession had nothing to do with what he called the “preposterous premises” of the movie, including that humans could start or stop the spinning of Earth's core. Rather, he told the crowd at the Tuesday evening presentation “Science and the Cinema: AGU Sciences Meet Hollywood” about his recurring dream of being on stage wearing nothing but a skimpy T-shirt. “This dream now has come true. Here I am, I'm talking to a whole room of geophysicists about The Core. I've never felt like the T-shirt was this short,” he said.

  16. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists` meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ``training centre``, as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ``design of training centres`` was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs.

  17. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ''training centre'', as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ''design of training centres'' was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Indiscipline in schools: working with class meetings in developing morally autonomous children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lúcia Dias

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems with discipline and violence in their several manifestations in classrooms in both public and private schools have been a major challenge for educators. Regarding the classroom environment, the purpose of this study was to propose class meetings as a coping mechanism, aiming to build morally autonomous subjects. From the description of situations experienced within the school context by children between seven and eight years old who study in a public elementary school, we tried to emphasize its importance through the analysis of thoughts and the moral development in this group, involving real dilemmas emerging from the familiarity between teacher-student and student-student. The importance of using resources such as class meetings is evidenced in this study which may result in the building of moral autonomy

  19. Technical Meeting on the Implementation of Fast Reactor Data Retrieval and Knowledge Preservation Activities. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The current Technical Meeting was convened to foster the development of the FRKP initiative, in general, and, more specifically, to advance the development of the FRKP Portal. Its objectives were therefore: 1. To review the implementation status of the FRKP Portal prototype; 2. To review the availability of FR-related document collections made accessible through the FRKP Portal; 3. To locate sources of FR-related digital items to be made accessible through the FRKP portal

  20. Use of probabilistic safety assessment in the regulatory process. Report of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was organized between 5-8 December 1994 to discuss and review the international situation in connection with the use made, whether formally or informally, by regulatory bodies of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in the course of their work, and the related question of the use and value of adopting probabilistic safety criteria (PSC) as an aid to judging the results of PSAs. The document includes the output from the four working groups, as well as 11 papers from the 12 papers presented to the TCM. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    You were hundreds of persons to participate in our information meetings of October 3 and 6 2014, and we thank you for your participation! The full presentation is available here. A summary of the topics is available here (in french).

  2. Intercomparison of analysis methods for seismically isolated nuclear structures. Papers and working materials presented at the 3. research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Coordinated research program on Intercomparison of analysis methods for seismically isolated nuclear structures involved participants from Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russia, United Kingdom, USA, EC. The purpose of the meeting was to review the progress on the finite element prediction of the force-deformation behaviour of seismic isolators and to discuss the first set of analytical results for the prediction of the response of base-oscillated structures to earthquake inputs. The intercomparison of predictions of bearing behaviour has identified important unexpected issues requiring deeper investigation

  3. Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC), NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Danon, Yaron; Dunn, Mike; Herman, Mike; Kahler, Albert; Fischer, Ulrich; Jacqmin, Robert; Koning, Arjan; Plompen, Arjan; Fukahori, Tokio; Harada, Hideo; Igashira, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Golashvili, Tengiz; Ignatiev, Victor; Ignatyuk, Anatoly; Oleynik, Dimitry S.; Sinitsa, Valentin; Ge, Zhigang; Trkov, Andrej; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Kawano, Toshihiko; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Mills, Robert; Mcnabb, Dennis; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Cabellos, Oscar; ); Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Do Heon; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document brings together the available documents and presentations relative to this meeting: the agenda, the Summary record of the previous meeting held on May 2014, the Reports (slides) on experimental activities from Europe, Japan, USA, Russia and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL), the presentation from Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files) and from Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections). The document ends with a preliminary proposal for a New Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(α,β): Measurement, Evaluation and Application)

  4. Informal care, employment and quality of life: Barriers and facilitators to combining informal care and work participation for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitink, Eveline; Heerkens, Yvonne; Engels, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    In The Netherlands, one out of six Dutch employees has informal care tasks; in the hospital and healthcare sector, this ratio is one out of four workers. Informal carers experience problems with the combination of work and informal care. In particular, they have problems with the burden of responsibility, a lack of independence and their health. These problems can reveal themselves in a variety of mental and physical symptoms that can result in absenteeism, reduction or loss of (work) participation, reduction of income, and even social isolation. The aim of the study was to describe the factors that informal carers who are employed in healthcare organizations identify as affecting their quality of life, labour participation and health. We conducted an exploratory study in 2013-2014 that included desk research and a qualitative study. Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare employees who combine work and informal care. Data were analyzed with Atlas-TI. We identified five themes: 1. Fear and responsibility; 2. Sense that one's own needs are not being met; 3. Work as an escape from home; 4. Health: a lack of balance; and 5. The role of colleagues and managers: giving support and understanding. Respondents combine work and informal care because they have no other solution. The top three reasons for working are: income, escape from home and satisfaction. The biggest problems informal carers experience are a lack of time and energy. They are all tired and are often or always exhausted at the end of the day. They give up activities for themselves, their social networks become smaller and they have less interest in social activities. Their managers are usually aware of the situation, but informal care is not a topic of informal conversation or in performance appraisals. Respondents solve their problems with colleagues and expect little from the organization.

  5. Linking primary study data with administrative and claims data in a German cohort study on work, age, health and work participation: is there a consent bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallmann, C; Swart, E; Robra, B-P; March, S

    2017-09-01

    We analysed the degree and impact of consent bias in the prospective study 'leben in der Arbeit (lidA)' after linking primary interview data with claims data from German statutory health insurance funds as well as with administrative data provided by the German Federal Employment Agency. Prospective cohort study. Within two study waves (2011, 2014) primary data were collected based on computer-assisted personal interviews. During interview informed consent to data linkage was obtained. We used binary logistic regression analyses with participants' consent for record linkage as the dependent variable calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for independent variables. Several sociodemographic, socio-economic and work-related factors were modelled as potential determinants of consent. A total of 4244 participants took part in both waves. After excluding invalid consent, 4178 participants were included in the analysis. About 3918 (93.8%) of these participants gave their consent to link their primary data with data from at least one source. Within regression analyses only moderate bias was found due to region of residence, apprenticeship, professional affiliations, income and number of diseases. Participants from former West Germany were less likely to have their study data linked with both data sources (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.42-0.96]) than those from the former East Germany. Participants with no information on income were more likely to refuse consent to both data sources compared to the reference group (net income: under EUR 1000; OR 0.15 [95% CI 0.08-0.30]). Respondents with two (OR 1.37 [95% CI 1.06-1.77]) or three and more diseases (OR 1.30 [95% CI 1.02-1.66]) diagnosed by a doctor agreed more frequently to linking both data sources than participants without disease. There is just a small proportion of variance in consenting explained by the models (R 2 : 0.063-0.085). Also, only small changes of factors' prevalence were observed in

  6. The importance of age composition of 12-step meetings as a moderating factor in the relation between young adults' 12-step participation and abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Allison K; Greene, Claire; Bergman, Brandon G; Hoeppner, Bettina; Kelly, John F

    2013-12-01

    Participation in 12-step mutual help organizations (MHO) is a common continuing care recommendation for adults; however, little is known about the effects of MHO participation among young adults (i.e., ages 18-25 years) for whom the typically older age composition at meetings may serve as a barrier to engagement and benefits. This study examined whether the age composition of 12-step meetings moderated the recovery benefits derived from attending MHOs. Young adults (n=302; 18-24 years; 26% female; 94% White) enrolled in a naturalistic study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, and 3, 6, and 12 months later on 12-step attendance, age composition of attended 12-step groups, and treatment outcome (Percent Days Abstinent [PDA]). Hierarchical linear models (HLM) tested the moderating effect of age composition on PDA concurrently and in lagged models controlling for confounds. A significant three-way interaction between attendance, age composition, and time was detected in the concurrent (p=0.002), but not lagged, model (b=0.38, p=0.46). Specifically, a similar age composition was helpful early post-treatment among low 12-step attendees, but became detrimental over time. Treatment and other referral agencies might enhance the likelihood of successful remission and recovery among young adults by locating and initially linking such individuals to age appropriate groups. Once engaged, however, it may be prudent to encourage gradual integration into the broader mixed-age range of 12-step meetings, wherein it is possible that older members may provide the depth and length of sober experience needed to carry young adults forward into long-term recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 25. meeting, NEA Headquarters, 23-24 May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JEFF (Data Bank member countries), JENDL (Japan) and RUSFOND/BROND (Russia). The participation from projects in non-NEA Member countries, such as CENDL, is channelled through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 25. meeting of the working party was held on 23-24 May 2013 at the NEA Headquarters, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. This document brings together the available presentations (slides and reports) given at this meeting Presentations (slides) on experimental activities are available for: NEA DB, Japan, USA, Russia and China (slides + report). Brief progress reports (slides) from the evaluation projects are available for: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL (slides + Report), BROND + slides on Rosatom Standard Reference Data System, CENDL, IAEA and TENDL. Presentations (slides) about the Status of subgroups are available for the following subgroups: - Subgroup 31: Meeting nuclear data needs for advanced reactors (slides + report); - Subgroup C: High Priority Request List (HPRL); - Subgroup 33: Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data (slides + report); - Subgroup 34: Coordinated evaluation of 239 Pu in the resonance region; - Subgroup 35: Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range; - Subgroup 36: Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region; - Subgroup 37: Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies

  8. Specialists' meeting on cavitation criteria for designing mechanisms working in sodium: Application to pumps. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for discussions and exchanges of views on cavitation phenomena in sodium, cavitation tests on pump models in water and sodium, application of test results to LMFBR plants, impact on sodium pump design. Topics of interest were also detection methods for cavitation during tests and cavitation problems in electro-magnetic pumps. Two categories of papers were presented: national position papers and specialised topical papers. The main topics discussed, in three sessions were the following: National papers on cavitation; cavitation tests, performance, measuring methods and results; application of test results and implications on the future programmes

  9. NanoCarbon 2011. Selected works from the Brazilian carbon meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avellaneda, Cesar (ed.) [Univ. Federal de Pelotas (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico

    2013-02-01

    This book presents eight selected papers from the Brazilian Carbon Meeting 2011. It contains the following topics: Review of field emission from carbon Nanotubes: Highlighting measuring energy spread. - Synthesis and characterisation of carbon nanocomposites. - Performance of Ni/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalyst obtained by a metal-chitosan complex method in methane decomposition reaction with production of carbon nanotubes. - The use of nanostructures for DNA transfection. - Applications of carbon nanotubes in oncology. - CNTs/TiO2 composites. - Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by CVD Technique: A review. - Thermoset three-component composite systems using carbon nantubes.

  10. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer in reactor components cooled by liquid metal coolants in single/two phase. 11. meeting of the International Association for Hydraulic Research (IAHR) Working Group. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    facility IFMIF with lithium target. Also, the results of research work performed with the purpose of supporting innovative technologies aimed at the use of liquid metals, e.g., heat pipe applied to nuclear power facilities, lyophobic-capillary porous systems, and others are presented here. As part of the technical program, meeting participants visited test facilities for thermal hydraulics research with liquid metal coolants (sodium, NaK, lead-bismuth, lithium) in the SSC RF IPPE

  11. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer in reactor components cooled by liquid metal coolants in single/two phase. 11. meeting of the International Association for Hydraulic Research (IAHR) Working Group. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    facility IFMIF with lithium target. Also, the results of research work performed with the purpose of supporting innovative technologies aimed at the use of liquid metals, e.g., heat pipe applied to nuclear power facilities, lyophobic-capillary porous systems, and others are presented here. As part of the technical program, meeting participants visited test facilities for thermal hydraulics research with liquid metal coolants (sodium, NaK, lead-bismuth, lithium) in the SSC RF IPPE.

  12. [Meeting the needs of the European working time directive in german medical profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, M; Popov, A F; Schmitto, J D; Bireta, C; Emmert, A; Tirilomis, T

    2011-06-01

    The legal obligation of the European Working Time Directive with its implementation into a German Working Hours Act requires German hospitals to give up old structures and requires the implementation of new working time models. The failure of the revision of the European Working Time Directive in April 2009 prevented that any changes of status quo might happen in the near future. Fundamental terms of the working law for the medical area have been elucidated and have been implemented into concrete calculation formulas. The planned working time has been clearly determined. Particularly, on-call duties and a signed "OptOut-declaration" have huge effects on the upper limit of the working time that is to be determined. Shift duty leads to the greatest limitations of the upper limit of the working time. The Working Hours Act defines the maximal, available, individual working time budget and thus the working time budget of a hospital and it limits the maximal availability of the service providers of a hospital as well as defining the maximal personnel costs. Transparency in this area lays the foundation for an effective time management and the creation of new working time models in accordance with the European Working Time Directive as well as the Working Hours Act and the "TVÄ" (labour contract for doctors at municipal hospitals). It is possible, with the knowledge of the maximal working time budget and the thereof resulting personnel costs, to calculate the economical revenues better. The reallocation of the working time of doctors enables efficiency enhancement. It is necessary to demand a clear definition of the tasks of doctors with the consequential discharge of tasks that should not/do not belong to the responsibilities of a doctor. This would lead to a more attractive working environment for doctors at hospitals and thus to an improvement of the care of the patients. The implementation of the European Time Directive is not to be seen as unrealizable, as has been

  13. When policy meets physiology: the challenge of reducing resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Steven W; Landrigan, Christopher P; Barger, Laura K; Czeisler, Charles A

    2006-08-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding optimal work hours for physicians and surgeons in training. In a series of studies, we assessed the effect of extended work hours on resident sleep and health as well as patient safety. In a validated nationwide survey, we found that residents who had worked 24 hours or longer were 2.3 times more likely to have a motor vehicle crash following that shift than when they worked hours, and that the monthly risk of a crash increased by 16.2% after each extended duration shift. We also found in a randomized trial that interns working a traditional on-call schedule slept 5.8 hours less per week, had twice as many attentional failures on duty overnight, and made 36% more serious medical errors and nearly six times more serious diagnostic errors than when working on a schedule that limited continuous duty to 16 hours. While numerous opinions have been published opposing reductions in extended work hours due to concerns regarding continuity of patient care, reduced educational opportunities, and traditionally-defined professionalism, there are remarkably few objective data in support of continuing to schedule medical trainees to work shifts > 24 hours. An evidence-based approach is needed to minimize the well-documented risk that current work hour practices confer on resident health and patient safety while optimizing education and continuity of care.

  14. Illness perceptions in the context of differing work participation outcomes: exploring the influence of significant others in persistent back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated that the significant others of individuals with persistent back pain may have important influences on work participation outcomes. The aim of this study was to extend previous research by including individuals who have remained in work despite persistent back pain in addition to those who had become incapacitated for work, along with their significant others. The purpose of this research was to explore whether the illness beliefs of significant others differed depending on their relative’s working status, and to make some preliminary identification of how significant others may facilitate or hinder work participation for those with persistent back pain. Methods Interviews structured around the Illness Perception Questionnaire (chronic pain version were conducted with back pain patients recruited from a hospital pain management clinic along with their significant others. Some patients had remained in work despite their back pain; others had ceased employment. Data were analysed using template analysis. Results There were clear differences between beliefs about, and reported responses to, back pain symptoms amongst the significant others of individuals who had remained in employment compared with the significant others of those who had ceased work. Three overarching themes emerged: perceived consequences of back pain, specific nature of employment and the impact of back pain on patient identity. Conclusions Significant others of employed individuals with back pain focused on the extent to which activity could still be undertaken despite back pain symptoms. Individuals out of work due to persistent back pain apparently self-limited their activity and were supported in their beliefs and behaviours by their significant others. To justify incapacity due to back pain, this group had seemingly become entrenched in a position whereby it was crucial that the individual with back pain was perceived

  15. As Public Relationship Application Countinability of Participated Art Projects via Distance Education Method: A Case of "Women's Are Meeting with Literature Project"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskaya, Merih

    2013-01-01

    Observations of artistic activities' transformative influence in social sphere by social scientists have played an essential role in the rise of "participative art" works worldwide. Within the scope of the public relations practices performed by municipal administrations particularly in order to promote the cultural development of…

  16. 28th annual meeting of the European Society for New Methods in Agricultural Research and International Union of Radioecology (IUR) Working Group Soil-to-Plant Transfer annual meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Forty-three contributions presented at the Meeting were input to INIS; these fall largely in the working groups Radiation Technology, Advanced Methods in Animal Sciences, and Soil-Plant Relationships. (P.A.)

  17. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  18. Properties and working of special metals - meeting held in Essen in March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lison, R.

    1977-01-01

    Metals of the groups IVa, Va and VIa of the periodic system were chosen as subjects for the papers since there are already established fields of application for these metals. Apart from these, beryllium (group IIa) was dealt with due to the special processing problems it presents. All papers were structured along the same lines: First the production process from raw material to metal was outlined followed by a discussion of the main types of alloys and the further working to obtain marketable products. Emphasis was put on working by various production techniques (cutting, cold-working, hot-working, etc.) and on the explanation of flaws induced by working which have an adverse effect on the performance of these materials. Welding and soldering were treated in a separate paper. (orig.) [de

  19. WS-004- EPR- First responders. Minimum national capacities for First Response. Work meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this exercise is that the participants can apply their knowledge in a radiological emergency such as: Responsibilities assigned, availability of information from fire fighters and police about the radioactive contamination risks, know the transport routes in the emergency as well the contact points and phones

  20. Meeting the needs of vulnerable patients: The need for team working across general practice and community nursing services

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners and district nurses have a long history of providing care outside the hospital setting. With health care increasingly moving out of the hospital setting, there are more opportunities for general practitioners and district nurses to work together to meet the health needs of the local population. However, the reduction in qualified specialist practitioner district nurses over the last decade is concerning. The need for an effective district nursing service has been recognised by the Department of Health in their own model – the nature of district nursing work, often over a long period, enables relationships to develop with the patient, family and informal carers as a basis for anticipatory care to manage long-term conditions. Communication and understanding of the role are central to enhance effective working between general practitioners and district nurses, which can be fostered by engagement in community-oriented integrated care and case management. PMID:25949736

  1. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: - To identify the main issues and technical features that affect capital and energy production costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present fast reactor concepts and designs with enhanced economic characteristics, as well as innovative technical solutions (components, subsystems, etc.) that have the potential to reduce the capital costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present energy models and advanced tools for the cost assessment of innovative fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles; - To discuss the results of studies and on-going R&D activities that address cost reduction and the future economic competitiveness of fast reactors; and - To identify research and technology development needs in the field, also in view of new IAEA initiatives to help and support Member States in improving the economic competitiveness of fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles

  2. Technical meeting on 'Review of solid and mobile fuels for partitioning and transmutation systems'. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The topics covered during the Meeting were divided into two Sessions. Session 1 - Qualification of Solid and Mobile Fuels delt with: Neutronic, fuel and material properties of a molten salt transmuter; and Preliminary analysis of transmutation fuels for KALIMER. Session 2 - Reactor Physics and Safety Characteristics of Transmutation Systems based on Solid and Mobile Fuel Types included the following: Activity in NEA for P and T area; IAEA activities in the area of partitioning and transmutation; The R and D activity in Brazil: A conceptual fast energy amplifier ADS cooled by helium double stata Th/U fuel cycle; Closed fuel cycle and contemporary tendencies of the nuclear facilities development; Current Russian activities in P and T area; Pyrochemical reprocessing and nuclear spent fuel disposal project; Fuel selection criteria specific for double stratum minor actinide burners.

  3. Diagnostic systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear power industry has a quite long tradition in on-line diagnostic of mechanical components and a considerable effort was put in developing diagnostic systems which are able to detect arising mechanical problems at an early stage. Computers are increasingly exploited to provide higher level information on process behaviour such as: early indication of the process deviation from normal conditions; rapid identification of the cause of any disturbance; prediction of the evolution of a disturbance; operator aid through computerized help. Following the recommendation of Several Member States to strengthen the activity in this field two divisions of IAEA established in 1995 the International Task Force on Nuclear Power Plant Diagnostics. The scope of the task force cover both technological developments and safety/licensing aspects of diagnostics. This report contains papers presented at the last in the series of Technical Committee Meetings on the Diagnostic Systems in Nuclear Power Plants organized in the framework of International Task Force

  4. Diagnostic systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Nuclear power industry has a quite long tradition in on-line diagnostic of mechanical components and a considerable effort was put in developing diagnostic systems which are able to detect arising mechanical problems at an early stage. Computers are increasingly exploited to provide higher level information on process behaviour such as: early indication of the process deviation from normal conditions; rapid identification of the cause of any disturbance; prediction of the evolution of a disturbance; operator aid through computerized help. Following the recommendation of Several Member States to strengthen the activity in this field two divisions of IAEA established in 1995 the International Task Force on Nuclear Power Plant Diagnostics. The scope of the task force cover both technological developments and safety/licensing aspects of diagnostics. This report contains papers presented at the last in the series of Technical Committee Meetings on the Diagnostic Systems in Nuclear Power Plants organized in the framework of International Task Force Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Biographical disruption, adjustment and reconstruction of everyday occupations and work participation after mild traumatic brain injury. A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Unni; Søberg, Helene Lundgaard; Østensjø, Sigrid

    2016-11-01

    To explore traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a biographical disruption and to study the reconstruction of everyday occupations and work participation among individuals with mild TBI. Seven focus groups were conducted with 12 women and 8 men (22-60 years) who had sustained mild TBI and participated in a return-to-work program. Interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Four interrelated themes emerged: disruption of occupational capacity and balance; changes in self-perceptions; experience of time; and occupational adjustment and reconstruction. The meaning of the impairments lies in their impact on the individual's everyday occupations. The abandonment of meaningful daily occupations and the feeling of not recognizing oneself were experienced as threats to the sense of self. Successful integration of the past, present and future was paramount to continuing life activities. The unpredictability of the future seemed to permeate the entire process of adjustment and reconstruction of daily life. Our findings show that the concept of time is important in understanding and supporting the reconstruction of daily life after TBI. The fundamental work of rehabilitation is to ameliorate the disruptions caused by the injury, restoring a sense of personal narrative and supporting the ability to move forward with life. Implications for Rehabilitation Individuals with a protracted recovery after a mild traumatic brain injury must reconstruct a new way of being and acting in the world to achieve biographical continuity. The perceived anxiety regarding changes in self and occupational identity, as well as loss of control over the future, can be attenuated through informational sessions during the hospital stay and at follow-up visits. The significant personal costs of returning to full-time employment too early indicate the need for early and ongoing vocational support in achieving a successful return to work.

  6. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The First Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. The Summary Report (Pt. 2) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs

  7. Ergonomic development work: co-education as a support for user participation at a car assembly plant. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmer, K; Dahlman, S; Sperling, L

    1995-12-01

    This study deals with the design, trials and evaluation of a co-education programme at the Volvo Uddevalla plant in Sweden. Involving operators, manufacturing engineers and managers, the programme served as a support for the creation of a participatory ergonomics process, intended for continuous use at the plant. It consisted of a basic ergonomics knowledge package, and a dialogue model defining the roles and relations of actors involved. As a practical part of the programme, trial development projects were also carried out by the participants. The main and long term objective of the project was to start the participants cooperating in a continuous change and development process on the shop-floor. The outcome of the co-education programme was evaluated immediately after the first two regular courses, and, as a longterm follow-up, after seven subsequent courses shortly after the closing of the Uddevalla plant. The co-education programme was shown to be successful. Later on, the expertize of both operators and manufacturing engineers became obvious to everyone at the plant, and the cooperation between operators and manufacturing engineers increased steadily. The main conclusion drawn was that the co-education programme is a good starting point for a process of participation and industrial change work. However, in order to get a permanent impact, the whole organization must nurse and nourish the further development, and implementation of the process.

  8. International society of blood transfusion working party on red cell immunogenetics and terminology: report of the Seoul and London meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storry, J. R.; Castilho, L.; Chen, Q.; Daniels, G.; Denomme, G.; Flegel, W. A.; Gassner, C.; de Haas, M.; Hyland, C.; Keller, M.; Lomas-Francis, C.; Moulds, J. M.; Nogues, N.; Olsson, M. L.; Peyrard, T.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Tani, Y.; Thornton, N.; Wagner, F.; Wendel, S.; Westhoff, C.; Yahalom, V.

    2017-01-01

    The Working Party has met twice since the last report: in Seoul, South Korea 2014, and in London, UK 2015, both in association with the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) Congress. As in previous meetings, matters pertaining to blood group antigen nomenclature were discussed. Eleven new blood group antigens were added to seven blood group systems. This brings the current total of blood group antigens recognized by the ISBT to 346, of which 308 are clustered within 36 blood groups systems. The remaining 38 antigens are currently unassigned to a known blood group system. PMID:29093749

  9. Proceedings of the ILC Physics Working Group Meeting at KEK in the period from May 2007 to June 2009

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080137; Ono, Hiroaki; Kanemura, Shinya; Suehara, Taikan; Takubo, Yosuke; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Fujii, Keisuke

    2010-01-01

    The ILC physics working group is a mixture of experimentalists and theorists mainly working in Japan. It has its origin in the previous LC physics study group and has been reformed with the initiative of a JSPS Creative Scientific Research project: "Research and Development of a Novel Detector System for the International Linear Collider". The working group is, however, formally independent of the JSPS project and is open to everybody who is interested in ILC physics. The primary task of the working group is to reexamine the ILC physics in the context of the expected LHC outcome and to further strengthen the physics case for the ILC project. The topics covered in the working group activities range from key measurements such as those of the Higgs self-coupling and the top Yukawa coupling to uncover the secrets of the electroweak symmetry breaking to various new physics scenarios like supersymmetry, large extra dimensions, and other models of terascale physics. The working group has held ten General Meetings in...

  10. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Gas-Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. 25 CFR 256.22 - How can I be sure that the work that is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can I be sure that the work that is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction standards? 256.22 Section 256.22 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction standards? (a) At various stages of...

  12. Report of the 6th International Exchange Mission on visit to the U.S. Centering on participation in the ASHRAE Winter Meeting; Dai 6 kai kokusai koryu shisatsudan hobei hokoku (ASHRAE Winter Meeting sanka wo chushin to shite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. [Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-05

    This paper describes a summary of the ASHRAE Winter Meeting and other tours in which 18 members of the Society of Heating, Air-Conditioning and Sanitary Engineers of Japan have participated. The Winter Meeting adopted five patterns of publication: a technical session, symposia, seminars, forums and a poster session. The number of reports given in respective patterns were 20, 57, 131, 34 and 20. In the technical session, Professor Murakami from Japan presented a report titled `flow and temperature field around a human body in a room - a thermal mannequin using CFD`. At the same time, the International Airconditioning, Heating, Refrigerating Exposition was held. Interesting exhibitions included a data communication protocol, BACnet, for a network of automation and control of buildings, software for technical drawings presented by Visio Corporation, the Metasys FMS of Jonson Controls Corporation, and a single-stage screw freezing machine using a coolant having zero ozonosphere destruction coefficient exhibited by Mcquay Corporation. The visiting members attended an environmental preservation seminar by Walt Disney World Corporation. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Expressing and responding to self-efficacy in meetings between clients and social work professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneris, Sophie; Dall, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a pivotal element when the long-term unemployed are to increase their chances of labour market participation, making the ways in which clients’ beliefs in their capabilities are reflected in the delivery of public employment services particularly relevant. While existing research......-efficacy is important is not enough; knowing how to support self-efficacy becomes crucial. Based on observational data material from a qualitative study following 14 Danish vulnerable welfare recipients, we find that employability self-efficacy can be expressed by clients in strong, weak or ambiguous ways...

  14. Record of the fourth meeting of the working group, Vienna, 6 April 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The items discussed include the report by the Co-Chairmen on the February TCC, the progress report from the joint sub-groups, matters arising from the progress report of the joint sub-groups, the draft chapter II of the final report, the future programme of work, and a discussion of the draft summary (chapter 12) of the draft final report

  15. Meeting the Other : Why Working with People Living with Dementia is So Important for Musicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop Boele, Evert

    2013-01-01

    Paper presented at international symposium ‘Dementia and Music. Research and Practice’. University of Vechta, Vechta, Germany, 21/9/2013. Paper argues that working with dementia for musicians and music students is important because it demands them to focus on the 'other' rather then on themselves

  16. Experiences of the return to work process after stroke while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öst Nilsson, Annika; Eriksson, Gunilla; Johansson, Ulla; Hellman, Therese

    2017-09-01

    In Sweden, less than 50% of those getting stroke in working age return to work (RTW). Effective rehabilitation programmes need to be developed and therapeutic aspects understood. To explore and describe how persons with stroke experience their RTW process while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme focusing on RTW. Seven persons with mild or moderate stroke were interviewed twice during the intervention in the vocational training phase using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using grounded theory. Having a coordinator by their side gave support and guidance during the RTW process. Knowledge of stroke, strategies and a straightforward communication created a structure for the RTW process. Expressing one's own wishes increased opportunities to influence and decide which path to follow in order to reach the goal. Straightforward, open and recurring communication facilitated the possibility to adapt to the situation. These aspects increased insight and awareness which facilitated the RTW process. The findings indicate that a precondition for a fruitful RTW process was that suitable platforms at work were created in which the actors involved could cooperate. This knowledge might also be valuable in the RTW process for people with other diagnosis.

  17. 20 CFR 645.265 - What safeguards are there to ensure that participants in Welfare-to-Work employment activities do...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... participants in Welfare-to-Work employment activities do not displace other employees? 645.265 Section 645.265 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING WELFARE... ensure that participants in Welfare-to-Work employment activities do not displace other employees? (a) An...

  18. Work Participation and Health Status in Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip and/or Knee : A Comparison Between the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee and the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieleman, H. J.; Oosterveld, F. G. J.; Oostveen, J. C. M.; Reneman, M. F.; Groothoff, J. W.

    Objective. To examine the work participation of Dutch people with early osteoarthritis (OA) in hips or knees and compare this with data from the American Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. The influence of health status and personal factors on work participation was analyzed. Methods. In the

  19. Report of the 1997 annual meeting of the INES national officers. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Fifty nine countries are now formally participating in the use of INES. This includes all member countries who operate power reactors. Representatives of 35 countries attended the 1997 TCM. Overall, it was judged that the use of the scale was proceeding well without major technical problems in its application. Generally, public and media understanding of the scale was improving, although progress in some countries in this respect was greater than in others. A major theme of the TCM was that technical development of the scale has generally reached a satisfactory state. Further major effort should not be invested in seeking marginal improvements although the need to make some further improvements in specific areas (e.g. transport was recognized). The main area on which to concentrate effort in future was its use as a prompt and effective tool for communication

  20. When work and satisfaction with life do not go hand in hand: health barriers and personal resources in the participation of people with chronic physical disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Campen, C. van; Cardol, M.

    2009-01-01

    People with chronic physical disabilities participate less in both paid and voluntary work and are less satisfied with their lives than people without health problems. Governments and scientists have suggested that participation in employment is the main road to well-being. We analysed national survey data on the participation in work and satisfaction with life, comparing people with a chronic illness and a physical disability (n=603) to people with a chronic illness but without a physical di...

  1. Mini-Proceedings of the 15th Meeting of the Working Group on Rad : Corrections and MC Generators for Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Venanzoni, G

    2014-01-01

    The mini-proceedings of the 15th Meeting of the "Working Group on Rad. Corrections and MC Generators for Low Energies" held in Mainz on April 11, 2014, are presented. These meetings, started in 2006, have as aim to bring together experimentalists and theorists working in the fields of meson transition form factors, hadronic contributions to $(g-2)_\\mu$ and the effective fine structure constant, and development of Monte Carlo generators and Radiative Corrections for precision e+e- and tau physics.

  2. Participation in regular leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes not meeting Canadian guidelines: the influence of intention, perceived behavioral control, and moral norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, François; Godin, Gaston

    2014-12-01

    Most people with type 2 diabetes do not engage in regular leisure-time physical activity. The theory of planned behavior and moral norm construct can enhance our understanding of physical activity intention and behavior among this population. This study aims to identify the determinants of both intention and behavior to participate in regular leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes who not meet Canada's physical activity guidelines. By using secondary data analysis of a randomized computer-tailored print-based intervention, participants (n = 200) from the province of Quebec (Canada) completed and returned a baseline questionnaire measuring their attitude, perceived behavioral control, and moral norm. One month later, they self-reported their level of leisure-time physical activity. A hierarchical regression equation showed that attitude (beta = 0.10, P norm (beta = 0.45, P norm on behavior was mediated by intention and perceived behavioral control. The determinants investigated offered an excellent starting point for designing appropriate counseling messages to promote leisure-time physical activity among individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Meeting the challenge of the work-life balance in the South African workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GF Mageni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work-life balance (WLB construct as a business imperative has been of growing concern in organisations outside South Africa for the past two decades, particularly given the pressure to create a sustainable global competitive advantage through human capital. Within the last decade this aspect has been prominent in various forums. However, no studies as yet provide insight into the applicability of WLB models to the South African workplace. The present article therefore explores the composition of a WLB system, and analyses constraints on its application under the conditions of the South African labour market.

  4. Annual change in the rate of participation in breast cancer screening through active encouragement of sports participation. A survey of women participants at the annual meetings of the Pink Ribbon Ladies' Tennis Tournament organized by the Japan Women's Tennis Players' League

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Naoko; Nozue; Etsuko; Fukuda, Mamoru; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Kasumi, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    In March 2002, an initial attempt was made to decrease breast cancer mortality by the Japan Society of Breast Health, by means of encouraging participation in sports. This was followed by other similar events. The present study was designed to examine whether these kinds of sport-associated events are actually effective for increasing the screening participation rate. We hoped that the results would reveal practical ways of organizing such programs. One of these activities, the All Japan Women's Tennis Players' League, has called for amateur players to participate in an annual meeting of the Pink Ribbon Ladies' Tennis Tournament since 2003. A survey of their knowledge about breast cancer and their will to participate in breast cancer screening has been carried out annually in 2003, 2004 and 2005, by asking the participants to respond to our questionnaires. As a result, the number of participants has increased: from 7,201 women in 2003, to 7,846 in 2004 and to 8,572 in 2005. The questionnaires included items about participation in breast cancer screening, performance of self-examination, and participation in mammography screening. The participation rate increased year by year. The participation rate at mammography screening was 21% in 2003, and this increased to 26% in 2005. Thus this kind of sports event appears to promote knowledge about breast cancer screening and to increase the participation rate. On the other hand, it was found that the rate of self-examination decreased from 53% to 22%. Therefore problems that need to be addressed in the future include not only increasing women's motivation to undergo screening, but also the selection of appropriate screening methods, their combination, and distribution of accurate information. (author)

  5. Exploring quality of life as an intervention outcome among women with stress-related disorders participating in work rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Findings from quality of life studies are often inconclusive for reasons such as: i) estimates may address different aspects of quality of life and thus produce different outcomes; ii) quality of life is largely determined by self-factors; and iii) people with a long-term condition rate their quality of life better than those who have had their condition for a short duration. This makes quality of life a complex phenomenon to measure. The above explanations served as hypotheses for this methodologically oriented paper, based on a longitudinal study on women with stress-related disorders receiving work rehabilitation. Eighty-four women participating in a lifestyle intervention or care as usual were compared. Self-ratings of "general quality of life" and a summarized "satisfaction with different life domains" index (according to Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life) and two self-factors (self-esteem and self-mastery) were administered at admission and a 6-month follow-up. Participant age and amount of months on sick leave prior to rehabilitation were used as two proxies of duration of the condition. General quality of life distinguished between the groups, whereas satisfaction with life domains did not. Self-esteem and self-mastery were related to both quality of life aspects. Age was related to both estimates of quality of life, whereas duration of sick leave was unrelated to both. General quality of life and satisfaction with life domains produced different results. Outcome studies should apply more than one operationalization of quality of life and self-factors should be considered as important determinants of quality of life. Duration of the condition needs to be acknowledged as well when interpreting levels of quality of life, although the current study could not present any clear-cut findings in this respect.

  6. Advances in fast reactor technology. Proceedings of the 30. meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    Individual States were largely responsible for early developments in experimental and prototype liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). However, for development of advanced LMFRs, international co-operation plays an important role. The IAEA seeks to promote such co-operation. For R and D incorporating innovative features, international co-operation allows pooling of resources and expertise in areas of common interest. Information on experience gained from R and D, and from the operation and construction of fast reactors, has been reviewed periodically by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). These proceedings contain updated a new information on the status of LMFR development, as reported at the 30th meeting of the IWGFR, held in Beijing, China, from 13 to 16 May 1997

  7. Advances in fast reactor technology. Proceedings of the 30. meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Individual States were largely responsible for early developments in experimental and prototype liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). However, for development of advanced LMFRs, international co-operation plays an important role. The IAEA seeks to promote such co-operation. For R and D incorporating innovative features, international co-operation allows pooling of resources and expertise in areas of common interest. Information on experience gained from R and D, and from the operation and construction of fast reactors, has been reviewed periodically by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). These proceedings contain updated a new information on the status of LMFR development, as reported at the 30th meeting of the IWGFR, held in Beijing, China, from 13 to 16 May 1997. Refs,figs,tabs.

  8. Equal Opportunity, Equal Work: Increasing Women's Participation in the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative Africa Indoor Residual Spraying Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Abigail; Belemvire, Allison; Johns, Ben; Mangam, Keith; Fiekowsky, Elana; Gunn, Jayleen; Hayden, Mary; Ernst, Kacey

    2017-12-28

    One of the primary control measures for malaria transmission is indoor residual spraying (IRS). Historically, few women have worked in IRS programs, despite the income-generating potential. Increasing women's roles in IRS requires understanding the barriers to women's participation and implementing measures to address them. The U.S. President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) Africa Indoor Residual Spraying (AIRS) Project is the largest implementer of IRS globally. To address gender inequity in IRS operations, PMI AIRS assessed the barriers to the participation of women and developed and implemented policies to address these barriers. The PMI AIRS Project initially identified barriers through a series of informal assessments with key stakeholders. PMI AIRS then implemented a series of gender-guided policies, starting in 2015, in Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The policies included adapting physical work environments to ensure privacy for women; ensuring the safety of women in the workplace; guaranteeing safety and job security of women during pregnancy; and encouraging qualified women to apply for supervisory positions. The project collected routine programmatic data on staff, spray quality, and spray efficiency; data from 2012 through the end of 2015 were analyzed (up through 1 year after implementation of the gender policies). In addition, PMI AIRS conducted surveys in 2015, 2016, and 2017 before and after the spray campaigns in 4 countries to determine changes in gender norms among spray operators through questions about decision making and agency. The PMI AIRS Project increased women's employment with the program. Specifically, women's employment increased overall from 23% in 2012 to 29% in 2015, with a 2015 range from 16% (Mali) to 40% (Madagascar). Growth among supervisor roles was even stronger, with the percentage of women in supervisory roles increasing from 17% in 2012 to 46% in 2015, with a 2015

  9. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the numerator of the overall rate? 261.31 Section 261.31 Public Welfare... Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31 How many hours must a work-eligible individual...

  10. When work and satisfaction with life do not go hand in hand: health barriers and personal resources in the participation of people with chronic physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Campen, Cretien; Cardol, Mieke

    2009-07-01

    People with chronic physical disabilities participate less in both paid and voluntary work and are less satisfied with their lives than people without health problems. Governments and scientists have suggested that participation in employment is the main road to well-being. We analysed national survey data on the participation in work and satisfaction with life, comparing people with a chronic illness and a physical disability (n=603) to people with a chronic illness but without a physical disability (n=1199) and the general population (n=6128) in the Netherlands. The results show that the relationship between happiness and work is different for people with a chronic illness and a physical disability, as compared to the other two populations. Fewer people with a chronic illness and disability were categorized as 'satisfied people with work' (i.e. participating in work and satisfied with their life), while most people belonged to a group of 'satisfied people without work' and, surprisingly, not to the expected group of 'dissatisfied people without work'. In order to explain this exceptional distribution we modelled satisfied participation in work as an outcome of a balance between personal resources and barriers. By means of discriminant regression analysis, we identified the severity of motor disability as the main barrier, and education level and age, as the main resource factors that distinguish between 'satisfied people with work' and others among the group of people with a chronic illness and a physical disability.

  11. Vulnerability to sexual violence and participation in sex work among high-end entertainment centre workers in Hunan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Sun, Xiaoming; Mantell, Joanne E; Zhou, Jianfang; Mao, Jingshu; Peng, Yanhui

    2013-11-01

    China has seen a proliferation of entertainment centres that are frequented by business people. Employees at these centres often are young, female rural-to-urban migrants who may be vulnerable to sexual violence and exploitation. Data for this study were collected using a self-administered survey among male and female employees in two high-end entertainment centres in Changsha, Hunan Province, China. We used logistic regression to examine predictors of violent and potentially exploitative experiences (partner violence, forced sex and transactional sex). Predictors included gender, ever having a same-sex partner, migration variables and employment characteristics. Participants reported high levels of partner violence (16.0% ever and 9.0% in the past 3 months) and forced sex (13.9% ever and 5.5% in the past 3 months). Nineteen percent reported sex work in the past 3 months. In the multivariate regressions, ever having had a same-sex partner was associated with higher odds of ever having experienced partner violence (odds ratio (OR)=7.8, Pgender nor migration status was associated with any of the outcomes. High-end entertainment centre workers in China are at risk for sexual violence and should be targeted with employment-based interventions.

  12. Summary reports on the meetings held in the period May 1999 - April 2000, background material, and some room documents in preparation of the 33rd IWG-FR annual meeting, IAEA Headquarters, Vienna 16-18 May 2000. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains a brief overview of the activities performed in the period May 1999-April 2000 in the Nuclear Power Technology Development Section relating to the work scope of the International Working Group (IWG) on Fast Reactors. It includes the following reports as well: report on the 32nd Annual Meeting of the IWG on Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Reactor Developments; report on the Advisory Group Meeting on National Accelerator Driven System Programs; report on the Research Coordination Meeting of the CRP on Use of Thorium-Based Fuel Cycle in Accelerator Driven Systems to incinerate Plutonium and to reduce Long-term Waste Toxicities; report on Advisory Group Meeting on Evaluation of Fast Reactor Core Physics test; report on the Research Coordination Meeting of CRP on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Reactor Reactivity Effects; report on the Consultancy on Proposals for New CRP on Accelerator Driven Systems; report on the Peer review meeting on the Performance and Assessment System Evaluation of Sub-Program A.2; and a list of IAEA documents of the IWG on fast reactors published since 1968

  13. Where do ethno-linguistic groups meet? How copresence during free-time is related to copresence at home and at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toomet, O.; Silm, S.; Saluveer, E.; Ahas, R.; Tammaru, T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes ethnic segregation across the whole activity space—at place of residence, place of work, and during free-time. We focus on interethnic meeting potential during free-time, measured as copresence, and its relationship to copresence at place of residence and work. The study is based

  14. Exploring quality of life as an intervention outcome among women with stress-related disorders participating in work rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eklund M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mona Eklund Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Background: Findings from quality of life studies are often inconclusive for reasons such as: i estimates may address different aspects of quality of life and thus produce different outcomes; ii quality of life is largely determined by self-factors; and iii people with a long-term condition rate their quality of life better than those who have had their condition for a short duration. This makes quality of life a complex phenomenon to measure. Aims: The above explanations served as hypotheses for this methodologically oriented paper, based on a longitudinal study on women with stress-related disorders receiving work rehabilitation. Methods: Eighty-four women participating in a lifestyle intervention or care as usual were compared. Self-ratings of “general quality of life” and a summarized “satisfaction with different life domains” index (according to Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life and two self-factors (self-esteem and self-mastery were administered at admission and a 6-month follow-up. Participant age and amount of months on sick leave prior to rehabilitation were used as two proxies of duration of the condition. Results: General quality of life distinguished between the groups, whereas satisfaction with life domains did not. Self-esteem and self-mastery were related to both quality of life aspects. Age was related to both estimates of quality of life, whereas duration of sick leave was unrelated to both. Conclusion: General quality of life and satisfaction with life domains produced different results. Outcome studies should apply more than one operationalization of quality of life and self-factors should be considered as important determinants of quality of life. Duration of the condition needs to be acknowledged as well when interpreting levels of quality of life, although the current study could not present any clear-cut findings in this respect

  15. Status of national programmes on fast reactors 1997/98. 31. annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the meeting was to co-ordinate the exchange of information on the status of fast reactor development and operational experience, including experience with experimental types of reactor; to consider meeting arrangements for 1998 and 1999; and to review the IAEA co-ordinated research activities in the field of fast reactor, as well as co-ordination of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors activities with other organizations

  16. When work and satisfaction with life do not go hand in hand: health barriers and personal resources in the participation of people with chronic physical disabilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, C. van; Cardol, M.

    2009-01-01

    People with chronic physical disabilities participate less in both paid and voluntary work and are less satisfied with their lives than people without health problems. Governments and scientists have suggested that participation in employment is the main road to well-being. We analysed national

  17. Interprofessional simulation to improve patient participation in transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Storm, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Educating and training healthcare professionals is known to improve the quality of transitional care for older adults. Arranging interprofessional meetings for healthcare professionals might be useful to improve patient participation skills in transitional care. To describe the learning activities used in The Meeting Point programme, focusing on patient participation in transitional care, and assess whether they increase healthcare professionals' awareness of and competencies relating to patient participation in the transitional care of older patients. Data were collected as part of an educational intervention programme, The Meeting Point, including three seminars on 'Patient participation in the transitional care of older patients' and four follow-up meetings. Participants were nurses, care assistants, doctors, physiotherapists, patient coordinators and administrative personnel from hospital, nursing homes and home-based care services. The Meeting Point was organised around four pillars: introduction, teaching session, group work activity and plenary discussion. Qualitative data included log reports, summaries of meetings, notes from group work activities, and reports from participants and from follow-up meetings. Feedback from participants shows that they were satisfied with meeting healthcare professionals from other units of care. A film scenario was perceived relevant for group work activity and useful in focusing participants' attention to patient participation. Follow-up meetings show that some nursing home wards, the emergency department and one medical ward at the hospital continued with ongoing work to improve quality of care. Efforts included implementation of an observational waiting room with comfortable chairs, planning for discharge in hospital admission, a daily patient flow registration system and motivational interviewing during admission to nursing home. The description of the learning activities used at The Meeting Point seminars shows that they

  18. Summary of the 11-th session of the AER Working Group F - 'Spent Fuel transmutations' and 2nd meeting of INPRO Project RMI - 'Meeting energy needs in the period of raw materials insufficiency during the 21st century'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.

    2009-01-01

    There was concluded on the session during discussion, that we must be very cautious in giving forecast of particular form of energy demand and that any longer development in energy is no more possible without taking into account boundary conditions in oil and gas external supply. It was recommended in the discussion to prepare publication based on works, which were published, and try to give into it formulation of new tasks as in nuclear technologies so from nonnuclear branches, including possible society feedbacks. There were several works on the meeting concerning fluoride technology application for future more effective and cleaner reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It must be noted that participants expect that it will be part of new technology development, which of course must be done in greater capacities and in more direct connections with new preindustrial project. Such development is expected. It was also discussed how to proceed with INPRO publication 'Task 3 - Global vision of nuclear energy in the 21st century' - up to now the text is prepared in different ways - our position that expected troubles and at least qualitative recommendations for future steps should be there reflected. The technical program covered also the following topics: System energy research in RRC Kurchatov Institute; Results of program SPHINX; Energy forecasts: Methods and computer codes; Preliminary results of analysis of energy situation in the Central Europe; Perspectives of Molten Salt Reactor development in Czech Republic; Calculations of operation states of packed distillation column for uranium hexafluoride; Neutronic Analysis of Two-Fluid Thorium Molten Salt Reactor; Cross-section Measurements of (n,xn) Reactions in the Energy Range 20-100 MeV; The Czech Geological Repository Reference Design 2011: impacts on the strategy of the fuel cycle back end ect.

  19. Nordic system for data and information exchange. Report from meetings with the authorities, and proposal for further work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walderhaug, T.; Rikisins, G.

    1996-11-01

    The EKO-4.2 project involves investigating approaches to setting up a new reliable system based on computer internet technology for exchange of information between the Nordic countries. According to the project plans this information exchange is to be based on bulletin board systems in the different countries. It was required that the system should not set any restriction of type of data or information to be exchanged, nor should it involve any standardization of data, and above all, it was not intended as an alert system. A bulletin board system is passive in the sense that no information is actually sent, instead it is the receiver who is responsible for approaching the information and transferring it to own system. This feature makes the system unsuitable for alert purposes. Since a potential system will have to be implemented by the authorities in the respective countries, the first part of the project was to survey their interest and emphasis. This was done in meetings in the different countries. The conclusion from those meetings was an overall interest in establishing a system as described, and several requirements concerning security and reliability of the system were proposed. The implication of the requirements by the authorities is discussed and a practical solution of an information exchange system based on the World Wide Web (WWW), the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), and the Internet is outlined. The continuation of the project must be based on operable servers in the different countries, whose configuration and connection with the local network are the responsibility of the institution owning the server. The selected system will depend on hardware and on the overall security policy of the institution involved. It is proposed that further work concentrates on a general testing of the system, standardizing of server user interfaces and testing of encryption software for transfer of passwords. (au)

  20. Information Meeting- Working Hours

    CERN Multimedia

    Maurin

    1972-01-01

    Mons. Maurin préside la séance et fait part des résultats aux questionnaires pour définir une ligne de conduite de l'association- ramener et harmoniser les horaires- changer les contrats de 44 à 40 heures- des gens travaillent en partie encore 48 h

  1. Cystic fibrosis: Beyond the airways. Report on the meeting of the basic science working group in Loutraki, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Margarida D; Boj, Sylvia F; Shaw, James; Leipziger, Jens; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2018-06-01

    The European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) Basic Science Working Group (BSWG) organized a session on the topic "Cystic Fibrosis: Beyond the Airways", within the 15th ECFS Basic Science Conference which gathered around 200 researchers working in the basic science of CF. The session was organized and chaired by Margarida Amaral (BioISI, University of Lisboa, Portugal) and Jeffrey Beekman (University Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands) as Chair and Vice-Chair of the BSWG and its purpose was to bring attention of participants of the ECFS Basic Science Conference to "more forgotten" organs in CF disease. In this report we attempt to review and integrate the ideas that emerged at the session. Copyright © 2018 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Negative Facial Expressions – But Not Visual Scenes – Enhance Human Working Memory in Younger and Older Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Schechtman Belham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have investigated the influence of emotion on memory processes across the human lifespan. Some results have shown older adults (OA performing better with positive stimuli, some with negative items, whereas some found no impact of emotional valence. Here we tested, in two independent studies, how younger adults (YA and OA would perform in a visuospatial working memory (VSWM task with positive, negative, and neutral images. The task consisted of identifying the new location of a stimulus in a crescent set of identical stimuli presented in different locations in a touch-screen monitor. In other words, participants should memorize the locations previously occupied to identify the new location. For each trial, the number of occupied locations increased until 8 or until a mistake was made. In study 1, 56 YA and 38 OA completed the task using images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS. Results showed that, although YA outperformed OA, no effects of emotion were found. In study 2, 26 YA and 25 OA were tested using facial expressions as stimuli. Data from this study showed that negative faces facilitated performance and this effect did not differ between age groups. No differences were found between men and women. Taken together, our findings suggest that YA and OA’s VSWM can be influenced by the emotional valence of the information, though this effect was present only for facial stimuli. Presumably, this may have happened due to the social and biological importance of such stimuli, which are more effective in transmitting emotions than IAPS images. Critically, our results also indicate that the mixed findings in the literature about the influence of aging on the interactions between memory and emotion may be caused by the use of different stimuli and methods. This possibility should be kept in mind in future studies about memory and emotion across the lifespan.

  3. Leopold Fellows meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    Communicating the results of environmental science research to nonscientists was the focus of a week-long meeting of fellows of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (ALLP) in June. Participating were 20 mid-career university facultymembers, the first group of ALLP fellows to be selected.Discussions were held on the role of scientists in society, techniques for effective leadership, improving communications skills, and working productively with news media. The training program considers both print and broadcast media as well as other outreach vehicles. The meeting was held at Kah Nee Ta Resort on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Warm Springs, Oregon, June 15-21, 1999.

  4. Status of National Programmes on Fast Breeder Reactors. International Working Group on Fast Reactors, Twentieth Annual Meeting, Vienna, 24-27 March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The Agenda of the meeting was as follows: 1. Approval of the Agenda. 2. Approval of the minutes of the 19th meeting of the IWGFR. 3. Report of the Scientific Secretary regarding the WD activities of the Working Group. 4. Presentations and discussions on national programmes on fast breeder reactors. 5. Consideration of conferences on fast breeder reactors. a. ANS-ENS International Conference on Fast Breeder Systems Experience Gained and Path to Economical Power Generation, Richland, Washington, USA, 13-17 September 1987. b. International Conference on Liquid Metal Engineering and Technology, Avignon, France, 17-20 October 1988. c. Other meetings of interest to IWGFR members. 6. Consideration of major recommendations of some of the WD IWGFR Specialists' Meetings. 7. Consideration of arrangements for Specialists' Meetings in 1987. a. Specialists' Meeting on Fission and Corrosion Products Behaviour in Primary Circuits of LMFBRs, Karlsruhe, Fed. Rep. of Germany, May 1987. b. Specialists' Meeting on LMFBR Reactor Block Antiseismic Design and Verification, Bologna, Italy, October 1987. 8. Selection of topics for Specialists' Meetings to be held in 1988 and suggestions of the IWGFR on other Specialists' Meetings and their justifications. 9. Consideration of joint research activities: a. Coordinated Research Programme on a Comparative Assessment of Processing Techniques for Analysis of Sodium Boiling Noise Detection Data. b. Coordinated Research Programme on Intercomparison of LMFBR Core Mechanics Codes. c. New Topics of CRP. d. Other Activities. 10. Updating of ''LMFBR Plant Parameters''. 11. Informal discussion on ''Safety Criteria for Fast Reactors in IWGFR Countries''. 12. The date and place of the 21th Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  5. 20 CFR 645.255 - What nondiscrimination protections apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... funds, shall not be discriminated against because of gender. Participants alleging gender discrimination... subpart (section 403(a)(5)(J)(iii)) of the Act). Participants alleging gender discrimination in WtW... under all applicable Federal, State and local laws prohibiting discrimination, and their implementing...

  6. Overall approaches and experiences of first-time participants in the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group's Fourth Collaborative Material Exercise (CMX-4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.M.L.; Nelwamondo, A.N.; Hancke, J.J.; Ramebaeck, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    The Fourth Collaborative Material Exercise (CMX-4) of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG) registered the largest participation for this exercise in nuclear forensics, with seven of the 17 laboratories participating for the first time. Each of the laboratories had their strategic role to play in its respective country, analyzing real-world samples using their in-house resources. The scenario was fictitious but was thoughtfully crafted to engage participants in nuclear forensic investigations. In this paper, participants from five of the first-time laboratories shared their individual experience in this exercise, from preparation to analysis of samples. (author)

  7. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work... SERVICES TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS Tribal TANF Plan Content and Processing § 286.90 How many hours per week...

  8. Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 2009 Australian Work and Life Index, this report examines how work-life pressures influence the capacity and motivation of individuals, particularly low-paid workers, to engage in education and training. This report is part of a larger project, "Low-paid workers and VET: Increasing VET participation amongst lower-paid…

  9. Influence of Response Prepotency Strength, General Working Memory Resources, and Specific Working Memory Load on the Ability to Inhibit Predominant Responses: A Comparison of Young and Elderly Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Julien; Collette, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    One conception of inhibitory functioning suggests that the ability to successfully inhibit a predominant response depends mainly on the strength of that response, the general functioning of working memory processes, and the working memory demand of the task (Roberts, Hager, & Heron, 1994). The proposal that inhibition and functional working memory…

  10. The relationship between health promoting resources and work participation in a sample reporting musculoskeletal pain from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is one of the most frequent causes of sick leave from work, and is a common and potentially disabling condition. This study is based on the salutogenic perspective and investigates the relationship between personal, social, and functional health resources and work participation in a population reporting MSP. Method Analysis was performed on cross sectional data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, in Norway. The sample of n= 6702 was extracted from HUNT 3, including a total of N= 50807 participants. Self-reported health (SRH) and, personal, social, and functional resources were assessed by a questionnaire. Reported sick leave was collected by interview at the point of time when the data were collected, from October 2006 until June 2008. Results Logistic regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences between the work group and sick leave group in self-rated health, work support, work control, work load, and feeling strong, and the model predicted 68% of the cases correctly. Females had a lower statistically significant probability (B= −.53) to be in the work group then men when suffering from MSP, with odds of 41%. Conclusion There was a statistically significant relationship between health promoting resources such as SRH, feeling strong, absence of neuroticism, work load, work control, and work participation in MSP population. PMID:23509959

  11. Meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenkov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board took place in Toronto, Canada on 7 November 2001, on the occasion of the first Negotiations Meeting. Twelve participants, representing PB members and experts from Canada, the EU, Japan, the RF and the international Team (IT), attended the meeting chaired by Acad. E. Velikhov. Discussions on the preliminary work programme for the CTA and organizational arrangements for the IT and PT took most of the time of the meeting. The Project Board approved the preliminary work programme as presented by the IT leader

  12. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  13. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the numerator of the two-parent rate? 261.32 Section 261.32 Public... What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32 How many hours must work-eligible...

  14. 75 FR 51827 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) at Boston University Medical Campus. The meeting will be... between the Blue Ribbon Panel and the National Research Council Committee on Technical Input (NRC... concerning this meeting, contact Ms. Kelly Fennington, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology...

  15. It participates in the 97th learning lecture, social meeting; Dai 97 kai Gakujitsu koenkai{center_dot}konshinkai ni sankashite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, T.; Moriya, M.; Izumi, K.

    1999-01-01

    An inorganic material academic meeting the 97th learning lecture, a social meeting and a study tour meeting were held for both days of (Thu) for 5 days in November 4 (Wed), the 10th year of Heisei. Contents of a lecture go into the large area to the thing that that method analysis technique structure analysis formation response thing materiality side was examined, the spot in the construction, building field like contents. A problem such as CO{sub 2} is an especially important problem as a negative legacy due to the industrial development, the diffusion of the car, and so on. (NEDO)

  16. ESCAP/POPIN Working Group on Development of Population Information Centres and Network: report on the meeting held from 20 to 23 June 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    The Expert Working Group on the Development of Population Information Centers and Networks met in June 1984 to consider the organizational and technical aspects of the development of national population information centers in the countries in the Bangkok region, as well as national, regional and global networking. Representatives from China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, the philippines, the Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam participated in the meeting. POPIN was represented by its coordinator. Among the major issues considered by the Working Group were the role and functions of population information centers with special reference to the positioning of centers in national population programs user-oriented products to facilitate the utilization of research findings for policy formulation and program implementation, and the possible approaches to be developed by population centers in facilitating in-country networking to extend population information services beyond capital cities to the local level. The mandate and responsibilities of national population information centers should be explicitly stated by the highest authority. Centers should contribute to the national population programs by collecting, processing and disseminating population information effectively. Greater flexibility in performing activities should be given to centers. Training of staff should be expanded; external funding should be continued; and research and evaluation techniques should be developed. Surveys of users and their needs should be periodically undertaken to determine needs. Systematic user education programs should be provided and policy makers should be informed of current research findings and policy implications. Automation of bibliographic information should be undertaken. The Asia-Pacific POPIN Newsletter produced by ESCAP should be institutionalized as a channel of information centers in the region. ESCAP should take the initiative in establishing a South Asian

  17. Age-Related Change in Visual Working Memory: A study of 55,753 Participants Aged 8 to 75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Brockmole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual working memory abilities of 55,753 individuals between the ages of 8 and 75 were assessed to provide the most fine-grain analysis of age-related change in visual working memory to date. Results showed that visual working memory changes throughout the lifespan, peaking at age 20. A sharp linear decline follows that is so severe that by age 55, adults possess poorer immediate visual memory than 8 and 9 year olds. These developmental changes were largely explained by changing visual working memory capacity coupled with small short-term visual feature binding difficulties among children and older adults.

  18. Maternity leave duration and full-time/part-time work status are associated with US mothers’ ability to meet breastfeeding intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Kelsey R.; Perrine, Cria G.; Scanlon, Kelley S.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding provides numerous health benefits for infants and mothers; however, many infants are not breastfed as long as recommended or desired by mothers. Maternal employment is frequently cited as a barrier to breastfeeding. Objectives To assess whether maternity leave duration and return-status (full-time [FT], part-time [PT]) were associated with not meeting a mother’s intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Methods We used data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a cohort study. Analyses were limited to women employed prenatally who intended to breastfeed 3 months or longer (n=1172). Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between maternity leave duration and return to work-status (<6 weeks/FT, <6 weeks/PT, 6 weeks – 3 months/FT, 6 weeks – 3 months/PT, not working by 3 months) and meeting a mother’s intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Results Overall, 28.8% of mothers did not meet their intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Odds of not meeting intention to breastfeed at least 3 months were higher among mothers who returned to work FT before 3 months (<6 weeks/FT: aOR = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.23 – 4.12; 6 weeks – 3 months/FT: aOR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.30 – 2.56), compared with mothers not working at 3 months. Conclusions Returning to work full-time before 3 months may reduce a mother’s ability to meet her intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Employer support for flexible work scheduling may help more women achieve their breastfeeding goals. PMID:25034868

  19. Maternity leave duration and full-time/part-time work status are associated with US mothers' ability to meet breastfeeding intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Kelsey R; Perrine, Cria G; Scanlon, Kelley S; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M

    2014-11-01

    Breastfeeding provides numerous health benefits for infants and mothers; however, many infants are not breastfed as long as recommended or desired by mothers. Maternal employment is frequently cited as a barrier to breastfeeding. This study aimed to assess whether maternity leave duration and return status (full-time [FT], part-time [PT]) were associated with not meeting a mother's intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. We used data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a cohort study. Analyses were limited to women employed prenatally who intended to breastfeed 3 months or longer (n = 1172). Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between maternity leave duration and return-to-work status (< 6 weeks/FT, < 6 weeks/PT, 6 weeks-3 months/FT, 6 weeks-3 months/PT, not working by 3 months) and meeting a mother's intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Overall, 28.8% of mothers did not meet their intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Odds of not meeting intention to breastfeed at least 3 months were higher among mothers who returned to work FT before 3 months (< 6 weeks/FT: adjusted odds ratio = 2.25, 95% confidence interval, 1.23-4.12; 6 weeks-3 months/FT: adjusted odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval, 1.30-2.56), compared with mothers not working at 3 months. Returning to work full-time before 3 months may reduce a mother's ability to meet her intention to breastfeed at least 3 months. Employer support for flexible work scheduling may help more women achieve their breastfeeding goals. © International Lactation Consultant Association 2014.

  20. Seventh meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, Beckum, Federal Republic of Germany, 29-30 October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The document contains a summary report on the seventh meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors and 8 reports describing the national GCR programmes of Austria, China, France, Japan, Switzerland, USSR, UK and Commission of European Communities. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs and tabs

  1. Welfare Reform: Progress in Meeting Work-Focused TANF Goals. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnoni, Cynthia M.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined progress in meeting work-focused goals of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. The following issues were considered: (1) states' progress in implementing TANF; (2) the status of families who have left welfare; (3) the characteristics of adults currently receiving TANF; (4) states'…

  2. EOS Aqua: Mission Status at the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) Mission Operations Working Group (MOWG) Meeting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guit, Bill

    2017-01-01

    This presentation at the Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting at KSC in December 2017 to discuss EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua Earth Science Constellation status. Reviewed and approved by Eric Moyer, ESMO (Earth Science Mission Operations) Deputy Project Manager.

  3. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in forests and natural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.M. Goheen; S.J. Frankel

    2009-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09, Phytophthoras in Forests and Natural Ecosystems provided a forum for current research on Phytophthora species worldwide. Seventy-eight submissions describing papers and posters on recent developments in Phytophthora diseases of trees and natural ecosystems in...

  4. Continuing Education for Early Primary School Leavers. Report of a Technical Working Group Meeting (Chiang Mai, Thailand, October 4-11, 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This report summarizes discussions of a working group meeting on the continuing education needs of early primary school leavers in Asia and the Pacific. An introduction summarizes the welcoming addresses. Chapter 1 presents highlights of experiences of these countries in providing continuing education to school leavers: Bangladesh, China, India,…

  5. The radiat ion-epidemiological and cytogenetic study in group of participants of planned working on liquidation consequences Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'omyina, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Data of radiation anamnesis (beginning and duration of staying in zone of the Chernobyl radiation accident, kind of fulfilled works) as factors of risk are specific in relation to the basic classes of diseases. Works on burial of atomic pile, deactivation, evacuation and all dates of entrance into the one of radiation injury were recognized as hazardous factors for the development of malignant growth

  6. Researching College- and Career Ready Standards to Improve Student Outcomes: Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 19-20, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In August, IES worked with the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to convene a technical working group to discuss research objectives related to college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics. Forty people (including researchers,…

  7. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  8. Why participation works : the role of employee involvement in the implementation of the customer relationship management type of organizational change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation adds insights in two research areas: human resource management (HRM) and customer relationship management (CRM). In the HRM research area employees influencing organizations are usually described using the label participation. The CRM research area focuses on how to improve

  9. Review of Meeting Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the 21st meeting of the International Atomic and Molecular Data Centres Network. The traditional DCN meeting objectives are: to exchange information about activities in the Centres and review progress; to coordinate work in the Centres; to assess priorities in data evaluation and data production; to make plans for specific evaluations; and to evaluate and revise procedures for collection and exchange of bibliographical and numerical data. All of these are objectives for the present meeting too. In addition to the presentations from DCN and prospective DCN members we have two participants from outside the field of fusion data: Dr N. Mason will tell us about coordination of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre and Dr S. Simakov will describe the manner in which nuclear structure and cross-section database development is coordinated by our colleagues in the Nuclear Data Section. In the discussions on Thursday and Friday there are two topics that need special attention this year: the future of our bibliographical data compilation and ways in which we can strengthen data evaluation activities, all with emphasis on collision processes and plasma-material interaction. The first 3 Data Centre Network meetings were held in 1977, 1980 and 1982 and the reports of those meetings make interesting reading and can still provide inspiration for the present meeting. I show some excerpts in the presentation. In 1977 the emphasis was on the coordination of the bibliographical database, AMBDAS, and a collision data index, CIAMDA, as the initial activities of the Network and of the newly formed IAEA A+M Data Unit. In 1980 the central topic of discussion at the meeting shifted to the numerical database and to data evaluation. The Network recommended that numerical data be reviewed by a selected group of scientists and that no unevaluated numerical A+M collision data should be distributed by the IAEA. The report of the meeting in 1982 shows that the bibliographical

  10. The fourth research co-ordination meeting (RCM) on 'Updated codes and methods to reduce the calculational uncertainties of liquid metal fast reactors reactivity effects'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effect' was held during 19-23 May, 2003 in Obninsk, Russian Federation. The general objective of the CRP is to validate, verify and improve methodologies and computer codes used for the calculation of reactivity coefficients in fast reactors aiming at enhancing the utilization of plutonium and minor actinides. The first RCM took place in Vienna on 24 - 26 November 1999. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 7 Member States and one from an international organization (France, Germany, India, Japan, Rep. of Korea, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and IAEA). The participants from two Member States (China and the U.S.A.) provided their results and presentation materials even though being absent at the meeting. The results for several relevant reactivity parameters obtained by the participants with their own state-of-the-art basic data and codes, were compared in terms of calculational uncertainty, and their effects on the ULOF transient behavior of the hybrid BN- 600 core were evaluated. Contributions of the participants in the benchmark analyses is shown. This report first addresses the benchmark definitions and specifications given for each Phase and briefly introduces the basic data, computer codes, and methodologies applied to the benchmark analyses by various participants. Then, the results obtained by the participants in terms of calculational uncertainty and their effect on the core transient behavior are intercompared. Finally it addresses some conclusions drawn in the benchmarks

  11. Ninth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors, Oak Ridge, USA, 8-9 November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This report contains the minutes of the meeting, the papers presented as overview of the national programmes in the field of gas-cooled reactors and the main results from discussions on the different items of the agenda. The meeting was attended by 20 members and/or alternates from 9 countries and 2 international organizations. 8 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Associations between work stress and suicidal ideation: Individual-participant data from six cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Cho, Sung-Il; Dollard, Maureen F; Zou, Jianfang; Fischer, Joachim E; Jiang, Yueying; Angerer, Peter; Herr, Raphael M; Li, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that work stress is associated with suicidal ideation (SI). However, only few studies in this area have drawn on well-established theoretical work stress models (i.e., the job-demand-control [JDC] model, the effort-reward-imbalance [ERI] model, and the model of organizational injustice [OJ]). Utilization of such models allows though for theory-based assessments and workplace interventions. Since evidence on those models' relationship with suicide-related outcomes is currently inconclusive (with regard to JDC), markedly sparse (OJ) or lacking (ERI), we aimed to provide additional or initial evidence. We drew on original data from six cross-sectional studies, which were conducted in four countries (i.e., South Korea, China, Australia, and Germany). Work stress was measured by established questionnaires and was categorized into tertiles. In each study, SI was assessed by either one or two items taken from validated scales. Associations of work stress with SI were estimated for each study and were pooled across studies using multivariate random-effects logistic modeling. In the pooled analyses (n=12,422) all three work stress models were significantly associated with SI with odds ratios fluctuating around 2. For instance, the pooled odds ratios for highest versus lowest work stress exposure in terms of job strain, OJ, and ERI equalled 1.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.52, 2.41), 1.98 (95% CI=1.48, 2.65), and 2.77 (95% CI=1.57, 4.88), respectively. Patterns of associations were largely consistent across the individual studies. Our study provides robust evidence of a positive association between work stress and SI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Report of the consultancy meeting for the coordinated research project on comparative analysis of methods and tools for nuclear knowledge preservation. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    countries; and identify institutions to be surveyed. Participants appreciated the opportunity to discuss the topic and felt that they had learned a lot from the discussions. Valuable information was exchanged, and, as a result, some consultants will revise their proposals to better reflect the desired outcomes of the CRP. The participants to this Consultants Meeting believe that work products developed during the consultancy will be helpful in gaining additional CRP participation and in focusing the CRP to advance the understanding and capabilities of nuclear knowledge preservation. They concluded that the CRP should have as an initial focus area the 'nuclear power and related sciences' mainly because other applications or more basic R and D can be connected to the knowledge needed by nuclear power organizations. Steps in the knowledge preservation life cycle and other factors will be considered that are essential for the successful implementation of nuclear knowledge preservation. The recommendations made by the consultancy should form the basis for the 1st CRP Meeting on 'Comparative Analysis of Methods and Tools for Nuclear Knowledge Preservation' which will be held in November 2006

  14. Partner meeting place is significantly associated with gonorrhea and chlamydia in adolescents participating in a large high school sexually transmitted disease screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Felicia M T; Newman, Daniel R; Anschuetz, Greta L; Mettey, Aaron; Asbel, Lenore; Salmon, Melinda E

    2014-10-01

    From 2003 to 2012, the Philadelphia High School STD Screening Program screened 126,053 students, identifying 8089 Chlamydia trachomatis (CT)/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) infections. We examined sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with CT/GC diagnoses among a sample of this high-risk population. Standardized interviews were given to infected students receiving in-school CT/GC treatment (2009-2012) and to uninfected students calling for results (2011-2012). Sex-stratified multivariable logistic models were created to examine factors independently associated with a CT/GC diagnosis. A simple risk index was developed using variables significant on multivariable analysis. A total of 1489 positive and 318 negative students were interviewed. Independent factors associated with a GC/CT diagnosis among females were black race (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.27; confidence interval, 1.12-4.58), history of arrest (AOR, 2.26; 1.22-4.21), higher partner number (AOR, 1.75; 1.05-2.91), meeting partners in own neighborhood (AOR, 1.92; 1.29-2.86), and meeting partners in venues other than own school, neighborhood, or through friends ("all other"; AOR, 9.44; 3.70-24.09). For males, factors included early sexual debut (AOR, 1.99; 1.21-3.26) and meeting partners at "all other" venues (AOR, 2.76; 1.2-6.4); meeting through friends was protective (AOR, 0.63; 0.41-0.96). Meeting partners at own school was protective for both sexes (males: AOR, 0.33; 0.20-0.55; females: AOR, 0.65; 0.44-0.96). Although factors associated with a GC/CT infection differed between males and females in our sample, partner meeting place was associated with infection for both sexes. School-based screening programs could use this information to target high-risk students for effective interventions.

  15. The MS@Work study : a 3-year prospective observational study on factors involved with work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis A. M.; Heerings, Marco A. P.; van Lieshout, Irma; Jongen, Peter J.; Reneman, Michiel F.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Vosman, Frans; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; Visser, Leo H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. At this stage in life most people are in the midst of their working career. The majority of MS patients are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Leading

  16. The MS@Work study : A 3-year prospective observational study on factors involved with work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hiele, K.; van Gorp, D.A.; Heerings, M.A.; van Lieshout, I.; Jongen, P.J.; Reneman, M.F.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Vosman, F.; Middelkoop, H.A.; Visser, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. At this stage in life most people are in the midst of their working career. The majority of MS patients are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Leading

  17. Rheumatic patients at work : a study of labour force participations and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis at the University of Maastricht, defended at May 7, 2004, yields several important and new findings with regard to work related quality of life, participation in the labour force and its determinants of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile

  18. Advanced control systems to improve nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency. Working material. Report of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 13-17 March, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Advisory Group Meeting as a consequence of the recommendations of the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation to produce a practical guidance on the application of the advanced control systems available for nuclear power plant operation. The objective of the IAEA advisory group meeting were: To provide an international forum of exchange of ideas and views for the purpose of enhancement of nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency by adopting advanced control technologies; to develop a scope, table of content, and extended outlines for an IAEA technical document on the subject. The present volume contains summary report, materials prepared by the meeting, and reports presented by national delegates. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation 1991. Working material. Proceedings of the regular meeting held in Vienna, 6-8 May 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The meeting of the IWG-NPPCI was organized in order to summarize operating experience of nuclear power plant control systems, gain a general overview of activities in development of modern control systems and receive recommendations on the further directions and particular measures within the Agency's programme. The meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna and was attended by twenty four national delegates and observers from 19 countries. The present volume contains: report on the meeting of the IWG-NPPCI, Vienna, 6 to 8 May 1991; report of the scientific secretary on th major activities of IAEA during 1989-91 in the NPPCI area; and reports of the national representatives to the International Working Group on NPPCI. The papers and discussions with practical experience and described actual problems encountered. Emphasis was placed on technical, industrial and economic aspects of the introduction of modern control systems and on the improvement of plant availability and safety. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Report on the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Dunaeva, S.; Otsuka, N.

    2010-07-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. (author)