WorldWideScience

Sample records for meet minimum requirements

  1. 12 CFR 567.2 - Minimum regulatory capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum regulatory capital requirement. 567.2... Regulatory Capital Requirements § 567.2 Minimum regulatory capital requirement. (a) To meet its regulatory capital requirement a savings association must satisfy each of the following capital standards: (1) Risk...

  2. 12 CFR 932.8 - Minimum liquidity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum liquidity requirements. 932.8 Section... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS § 932.8 Minimum liquidity requirements. In addition to meeting the deposit liquidity requirements contained in § 965.3 of this chapter, each Bank...

  3. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1...

  4. 45 CFR 2522.100 - What are the minimum requirements that every AmeriCorps program, regardless of type, must meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., socioeconomic backgrounds, educational levels, both men and women and individuals with disabilities; (f) Agree..., programs are required to ensure that they do not displace any existing paid employees as provided in part...

  5. Minimum Energy Requirements in Complex Distillation Arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Ivar J.

    2001-07-01

    Distillation is the most widely used industrial separation technology and distillation units are responsible for a significant part of the total heat consumption in the world's process industry. In this work we focus on directly (fully thermally) coupled column arrangements for separation of multicomponent mixtures. These systems are also denoted Petlyuk arrangements, where a particular implementation is the dividing wall column. Energy savings in the range of 20-40% have been reported with ternary feed mixtures. In addition to energy savings, such integrated units have also a potential for reduced capital cost, making them extra attractive. However, the industrial use has been limited, and difficulties in design and control have been reported as the main reasons. Minimum energy results have only been available for ternary feed mixtures and sharp product splits. This motivates further research in this area, and this thesis will hopefully give some contributions to better understanding of complex column systems. In the first part we derive the general analytic solution for minimum energy consumption in directly coupled columns for a multicomponent feed and any number of products. To our knowledge, this is a new contribution in the field. The basic assumptions are constant relative volatility, constant pressure and constant molar flows and the derivation is based on Underwood's classical methods. An important conclusion is that the minimum energy consumption in a complex directly integrated multi-product arrangement is the same as for the most difficult split between any pair of the specified products when we consider the performance of a conventional two-product column. We also present the Vmin-diagram, which is a simple graphical tool for visualisation of minimum energy related to feed distribution. The Vmin-diagram provides a simple mean to assess the detailed flow requirements for all parts of a complex directly coupled arrangement. The main purpose in

  6. Minimum Energy Requirements in Complex Distillation Arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Ivar J

    2001-07-01

    Distillation is the most widely used industrial separation technology and distillation units are responsible for a significant part of the total heat consumption in the world's process industry. In this work we focus on directly (fully thermally) coupled column arrangements for separation of multicomponent mixtures. These systems are also denoted Petlyuk arrangements, where a particular implementation is the dividing wall column. Energy savings in the range of 20-40% have been reported with ternary feed mixtures. In addition to energy savings, such integrated units have also a potential for reduced capital cost, making them extra attractive. However, the industrial use has been limited, and difficulties in design and control have been reported as the main reasons. Minimum energy results have only been available for ternary feed mixtures and sharp product splits. This motivates further research in this area, and this thesis will hopefully give some contributions to better understanding of complex column systems. In the first part we derive the general analytic solution for minimum energy consumption in directly coupled columns for a multicomponent feed and any number of products. To our knowledge, this is a new contribution in the field. The basic assumptions are constant relative volatility, constant pressure and constant molar flows and the derivation is based on Underwood's classical methods. An important conclusion is that the minimum energy consumption in a complex directly integrated multi-product arrangement is the same as for the most difficult split between any pair of the specified products when we consider the performance of a conventional two-product column. We also present the Vmin-diagram, which is a simple graphical tool for visualisation of minimum energy related to feed distribution. The Vmin-diagram provides a simple mean to assess the detailed flow requirements for all parts of a complex directly coupled arrangement. The main purpose in the first

  7. 9 CFR 147.51 - Authorized laboratory minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized laboratory minimum requirements. 147.51 Section 147.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Authorized Laboratories and Approved Tests § 147.51 Authorized laboratory minimum requirements. These minimum...

  8. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84... Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container...

  10. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it contains...

  12. 42 CFR 84.74 - Apparatus containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Apparatus containers; minimum requirements. 84.74...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.74 Apparatus containers; minimum requirements. (a) Apparatus may be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  13. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves (lineman's gloves) worn while handling high-voltage trailing cables shall be rated at least 20,000 volts and shall...

  14. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial...

  15. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... applicable to the variety and destination specified: (a) Any such variety for export to destinations in Japan... requirements. (b) Any such variety for export to any foreign destination, other than destinations in Japan...

  16. 30 CFR 18.97 - Inspection of machines; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of machines; minimum requirements... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Field Approval of Electrically Operated Mining Equipment § 18.97 Inspection of machines; minimum...

  17. 42 CFR 403.304 - Minimum requirements for State systems-discretionary approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum requirements for State systems..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Recognition of State... the system meets the requirements in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section and, if applicable...

  18. 76 FR 23208 - Alternative to Minimum Days Off Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... Language X. Voluntary Consensus Standards XI. Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact XII. Paperwork... the Current Fitness for Duty Requirements On September 3, 2010, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI... to the minimum days off requirements considered the collective advantages and disadvantages of having...

  19. 42 CFR 86.31 - Eligibility; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility; minimum requirements. 86.31 Section 86.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES GRANTS FOR EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH Occupational Safety and Health Direct...

  20. 49 CFR 236.0 - Applicability, minimum requirements, and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... persons, or has caused death or injury, a penalty not to exceed $100,000 per violation may be assessed... state law seeking damages for personal injury, death, or property damage alleging that a party has... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability, minimum requirements, and penalties...

  1. Minimum weight passive insulation requirements for hypersonic cruise vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for two representative cases of the transient heat conduction equation to determine the minimum weight requirements for passive insulation systems of hypersonic cruise vehicles. The cases discussed are the wet wall case with the interior wall temperature held to that of the boiling point of the fuel throughout the flight, and the dry wall case where the heat transferred through the insulation is absorbed by the interior structure whose temperature is allowed to rise.

  2. The minimum work required for air conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhazmy, Majed M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis based on the second law of thermodynamics to estimate the minimum work required for the air conditioning process. The air conditioning process for hot and humid climates involves reducing air temperature and humidity. In the present analysis the inlet state is the state of the environment which has also been chosen as the dead state. The final state is the human thermal comfort fixed at 20 o C dry bulb temperature and 60% relative humidity. The general air conditioning process is represented by an equivalent path consisting of an isothermal dehumidification followed by a sensible cooling. An exergy analysis is performed on each process separately. Dehumidification is analyzed as a separation process of an ideal mixture of air and water vapor. The variations of the minimum work required for the air conditioning process with the ambient conditions is estimated and the ratio of the work needed for dehumidification to the total work needed to perform the entire process is presented. The effect of small variations in the final conditions on the minimum required work is evaluated. Tolerating a warmer or more humid final condition can be an easy solution to reduce the energy consumptions during critical load periods

  3. [Storage of plant protection products in farms: minimum safety requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutto, Moreno; Alfonzo, Santo; Rubbiani, Maristella

    2012-01-01

    Failure to comply with requirements for proper storage and use of pesticides in farms can be extremely hazardous and the risk of accidents involving farm workers, other persons and even animals is high. There are still wide differences in the interpretation of the concept of "securing or making safe", by workers in this sector. One of the critical points detected, particularly in the fruit sector, is the establishment of an adequate storage site for plant protection products. The definition of "safe storage of pesticides" is still unclear despite the recent enactment of Legislative Decree 81/2008 regulating health and work safety in Italy. In addition, there are no national guidelines setting clear minimum criteria for storage of plant protection products in farms. The authors, on the basis of their professional experience and through analysis of recent legislation, establish certain minimum safety standards for storage of pesticides in farms.

  4. 77 FR 5454 - Modifications to Minimum Present Value Requirements for Partial Annuity Distribution Options...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Modifications to Minimum Present Value Requirements for Partial Annuity Distribution Options Under Defined... guidance relating to the minimum present value requirements applicable to certain defined benefit pension plans. These proposed regulations would change the regulations regarding the minimum present value...

  5. The Vital Minimum Amount of Drinking Water Required in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Martínez Moscoso

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2017, the government of Ecuador established the minimum quantity of water required to be provided for free by drinking water utilities. Ecuador recognized the access to water as a fundamental human right because it guarantees the good living, known as “Sumak kawsay”, an indigenous Andean concept, in the Ecuadorian Constitution. This represents a novel approach to water rights in the world, as it is the first attempt to establish a minimum quantity of water under a constitutional guarantee by legislation, rather than regulation or judicial decision. However, this novel legislative approach raises the question of how this minimum amount of free water will impact the most vulnerable members of the Ecuadorian community. This paper provides the results of the first comprehensive research of the minimum required water provision in Ecuador. In order to measure the impact on the income of households, we built a methodology integrating: doctrinaire analyses, normative studies, and economic analyses. According to the Ecuadorian legislation, over-consumption of raw water generates additional costs that must be paid by water companies to the central government. In that regard, there is an inevitable relationship between the efficiency of the service and those additional costs. Efficiency, on this case, is the capacity of water companies (public or private to provide water services at an adequate price, observing the following parameters: quantity, quality and sufficiency. Our research found that with this legislation in three Ecuadorian local governments (Cuenca, Gualaceo and Suscal, the most vulnerable households (i.e., low-income and/or indigenous households will be affected the most. This means that and those families will spend the most part of their income on water services otherwise they would have to reduce their water consumption.

  6. Notification: EPA Progress on Meeting Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Statutory Mandate for Minimum Frequency of Inspections at Hazardous Waste Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY15-0018, January 20, 2015. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on EPA’s progress in meeting minimum inspection requirements under the RCRA at treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs).

  7. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B; Schroeder, T V

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease. Prospective and blinded comparative study. 100 limbs in 100 consecutive patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease, 74% suffering critical limb ischemia, were enrolled during a 9 months period. One physician with limited ultrasound experience performed all the ultrasound examinations of the arteries of the most symptomatic limb. Before enrolling any patients 15 duplex ultrasound examinations were performed supervised by an experienced vascular technologist. All patients had a digital subtraction arteriography performed by an experienced vascular radiologist, unaware of the ultrasound result. The number of insufficiently insonated segments (non-diagnostic segments) was significantly reduced during the study; from 9% among the initial 50 limbs to 2% among the last 50 limbs (Pultrasound and arteriography from the initial 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66, (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72); supragenicular Kappa=0.73 (95%-CI: 0.64-0.82); infragenicular Kappa=0.61 (95%-CI: 0.54-0.69)) to the last 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72), supragenicular Kappa=0.67 (95%-CI: 0.57-0.76); infragenicular Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.58-0.73)). The minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease appears to be less than 50 ultrasound examinations (probably only 15 examinations) for the supragenicular segments and 100 examinations for the infragenicular segments.

  8. Meeting Quay 2k30's requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnants, G.H.; Toorn, A. van der; Schuylenburg, M.; Heijnen, H.P.J.; Gijt, J.G. de; Molenaar, W.F.; Ligteringen, H.; Krom, A.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The requirements that a quay design should meet in order to yield a viable port infrastructure, vary widely from flexibility due to future customers requirements to durability due to owners requirements. In a Port of Rotterdam backed project, current and future requirements have been aggregated by

  9. Meeting Ecologists Requirements with Adaptive Data Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Marcus; Bonnet, Philippe

    their potential if they meet the scientists requirements. In an ideal world, an ecologist expresses requirements in terms of a target dataset, which the sensor network then actually collects and stores. In fact, failures occur and interesting events happen making uniform, systematic ecosys- tem sampling neither...

  10. The minimum price required by investors in IPOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Jeribi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With regard to purchasing Tunisian IPOs shares, the current paper aims at considering two types of investors: a non-institutional investor and an institutional one. Each is concerned with placing a purchase order at the offer price during the subscription period. In line with the literature on IPOs, we attempted to determine the minimum price required by an investor allowing for recovering the initial investment, information costs, transaction costs, and the offsetting of shortfall. We expect that the initial return of an IPO share in the Tunisian market is positively related to the following factors: the number of non-institutional investors participating during the subscription period, the subscription ratio of institutional investors, the expected rate of return by investors, the gap between the closing date of the subscription period and the day following the announcement of the subscription result, the gap between the announcement of the subscription result and the first listing day, the number of trading days, the cost of information and the transaction costs. However, it is negatively related to other determinants, such as the discount level, the number of shares allocated for a non-institutional investor and the number of offered shares, which are allocated to non-institutional investors.

  11. Modeling the minimum enzymatic requirements for optimal cellulose conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Haan, R; Van Zyl, W H; Van Zyl, J M; Harms, T M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of cellulose is achieved by the synergistic action of endoglucanases, exoglucanases and β-glucosidases. Most cellulolytic microorganisms produce a varied array of these enzymes and the relative roles of the components are not easily defined or quantified. In this study we have used partially purified cellulases produced heterologously in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase our understanding of the roles of some of these components. CBH1 (Cel7), CBH2 (Cel6) and EG2 (Cel5) were separately produced in recombinant yeast strains, allowing their isolation free of any contaminating cellulolytic activity. Binary and ternary mixtures of the enzymes at loadings ranging between 3 and 100 mg g −1 Avicel allowed us to illustrate the relative roles of the enzymes and their levels of synergy. A mathematical model was created to simulate the interactions of these enzymes on crystalline cellulose, under both isolated and synergistic conditions. Laboratory results from the various mixtures at a range of loadings of recombinant enzymes allowed refinement of the mathematical model. The model can further be used to predict the optimal synergistic mixes of the enzymes. This information can subsequently be applied to help to determine the minimum protein requirement for complete hydrolysis of cellulose. Such knowledge will be greatly informative for the design of better enzymatic cocktails or processing organisms for the conversion of cellulosic biomass to commodity products. (letter)

  12. 29 CFR 783.26 - The section 6(b)(2) minimum wage requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The section 6(b)(2) minimum wage requirement. 783.26... The section 6(b)(2) minimum wage requirement. Section 6(b), with paragraph (2) thereof, requires the... prescribed by” paragraph (1) of the subsection is the minimum wage rate applicable according to the schedule...

  13. Minimum Requirements for Core Competency in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Elizabeth A; Burke, Margaret M; Johnson, Peter N; Klein, Kristin C; Miller, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Colleges of pharmacy provide varying amounts of didactic and clinical hours in pediatrics resulting in variability in the knowledge, skills, and perceptions of new graduates toward pediatric pharmaceutical care. The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the application of a minimum set of core competencies for all pharmacists involved in the care of hospitalized children.

  14. Use of prioritization in meeting regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, M.L.; Sommers, D.A.; Girvin, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of prioritization in the allocation of resources is certainly not a new idea. However, the degree to which prioritization must now be used is much greater than ever before. In the past, utilities generally allocated the necessary resources to meet all regulatory requirements and commitments. Prioritization was then applied to the remaining nonregulatory but required needs. This approach to resource allocation is no longer appropriate for the current and projected economic and operating environment. Key reasons for this conclusion are discussed in this paper by staff from Virginia Power

  15. 78 FR 2797 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles; Draft Environmental Assessment for Rulemaking To Establish Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles; Proposed Rules #0;#0;Federal Register...-0148] RIN 2127-AK93 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and...

  16. 12 CFR 567.3 - Individual minimum capital requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... association's directors, officers, and senior management as well as the internal control and internal audit... associations; has management deficiencies, including failure to adequately monitor and control financial and... capital requirement for a savings association that varies from the risk-based capital requirement, the...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1706 - First aid training program; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First aid training program; minimum... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 77.1706 First aid training program; minimum requirements. (a) All first aid training programs required under the provisions of §§ 77.1703 and 77.1704 shall...

  18. 77 FR 14321 - Modifications to Minimum Present Value Requirements for Partial Annuity Distribution Options...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-110980-10] RIN 1545-BJ55 Modifications to Minimum Present Value Requirements for Partial Annuity Distribution Options Under Defined... FR 5454), providing guidance relating to the minimum present value requirements applicable to certain...

  19. 48 CFR 852.219-9 - VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VA Small business... Provisions and Clauses 852.219-9 VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements. As prescribed in subpart 819.709, insert the following clause: VA Small Business Subcontracting Plan Minimum Requirements...

  20. 13 CFR 108.210 - Minimum capital requirements for NMVC Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.210 Minimum capital requirements for NMVC Companies. You must have Regulatory Capital of at... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital requirements for...

  1. 42 CFR 84.145 - Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements... Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.145 Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements. (a) Motor-operated... connection between the motor and the blower shall be so constructed that the motor may be disengaged from the...

  2. 40 CFR 1045.415 - What happens if in-use engines do not meet requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if in-use engines do not... VESSELS In-Use Testing § 1045.415 What happens if in-use engines do not meet requirements? (a) Determine... families showing that you designed them to exceed the minimum requirements for controlling emissions. We...

  3. 40 CFR 1048.415 - What happens if in-use engines do not meet requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if in-use engines do not... Testing In-use Engines § 1048.415 What happens if in-use engines do not meet requirements? (a) Determine... families showing that you designed them to exceed the minimum requirements for controlling emissions. We...

  4. 17 CFR 31.9 - Minimum financial requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... term “customer” means customer as defined in § 31.4(d); (ii) The term “proprietary account” means a... the definition of customer (as defined in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section) or proprietary account... demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Commission that it complies with the financial requirements of this...

  5. Tuning Linux to meet real time requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Richard S.; Le, Dang N.

    2007-04-01

    There is a desire to use Linux in military systems. Customers are requesting contractors to use open source to the maximal possible extent in contracts. Linux is probably the best operating system of choice to meet this need. It is widely used. It is free. It is royalty free, and, best of all, it is completely open source. However, there is a problem. Linux was not originally built to be a real time operating system. There are many places where interrupts can and will be blocked for an indeterminate amount of time. There have been several attempts to bridge this gap. One of them is from RTLinux, which attempts to build a microkernel underneath Linux. The microkernel will handle all interrupts and then pass it up to the Linux operating system. This does insure good interrupt latency; however, it is not free [1]. Another is RTAI, which provides a similar typed interface; however, the PowerPC platform, which is used widely in real time embedded community, was stated as "recovering" [2]. Thus this is not suited for military usage. This paper provides a method for tuning a standard Linux kernel so it can meet the real time requirement of an embedded system.

  6. Minimum power requirement for environmental control of aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, Juan Carlos; Bejan, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses two basic issues in the thermodynamic optimization of environmental control systems (ECS) for aircraft: realistic limits for the minimal power requirement, and design features that facilitate operation at minimal power consumption. Four models are proposed and optimized. In the first, the ECS operates reversibly, the air stream in the cabin is mixed to one temperature, and the cabin experiences heat transfer with the ambient, across its insulation. The cabin temperature is fixed. In the second model, the fixed cabin temperature is assigned to the internal solid surfaces of the cabin, and a thermal resistance separates these surfaces from the air mixed in the cabin. In the third model, the ECS operates irreversibly, based on the bootstrap air cycle. The fourth model combines the ECS features of the third model with the cabin-environment interaction features of the second model. It is shown that in all models the temperature of the air stream that the ECS delivers to the cabin can be optimized for operation at minimal power. The effect of other design parameters and flying conditions is documented. The optimized air delivery temperature is relatively insensitive to the complexity of the model; for example, it is insensitive to the size of the heat exchanger used in the bootstrap air cycle. This study adds to the view that robustness is a characteristic of optimized complex flow systems, and that thermodynamic optimization results can be used for orientation in the pursuit of more complex and realistic designs

  7. Single Stage To Orbit Minimum Requirements Through Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, E.

    It is widely known that producing a single stage to orbit spacecraft is no easy task. It is also understood that it will be the first steady step towards spacecraft that operate in much the same way as today's airliners. This, in turn is believed to decrease the economical cost of reaching space through more efficient use of a single vehicle and higher launch rates. Space is then open to the common man, either through tourism or as a transportation medium. This paper is yet another study on the physical requirements of a SSTO spacecraft. It will begin with simple assumptions and gradually build up accuracy until reaching the use of a numerical simulation tool, so as to provide the necessary insight into it. The curvature of the Earth, its gravitational field, the exhaust pressure loss and atmospheric drag are a few of the considerations that the simulation takes into account. No attention was give to the actual details of the spacecraft such as propulsion type(s), winged or lifting body (aerodynamics), active or passive cooling (thermodynamics), stability and control. All these subsystems are considered to be included into the construction mass. The drag model is a simple textbook approximation and the propulsion force is given by a hypothetical propellant and engine so as to produce the assumed range of specific impulse. Even the construction mass is supposed to be futuristic so as to reach the lowest specified values. Not only vertical take-off will be simulated but also horizontal launching from altitude (from a towing aircraft, for example). The result of the paper shows the relationship between the construction mass and the specific impulse of a given spacecraft if it is to reach low earth orbit. This paper thus aims at bringing some light to the controversial discussion of how to make these vehicles a reality. The simulation program (Matlab) is available to students.

  8. 30 CFR 77.1707 - First aid equipment; location; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First aid equipment; location; minimum... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 77.1707 First aid equipment; location; minimum requirements. (a) Each operator of a surface coal mine shall maintain a supply of the first aid equipment set forth...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1713-6 - First-aid training program; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First-aid training program; minimum... § 75.1713-6 First-aid training program; minimum requirements. (a) All first-aid training programs... course of instruction similar to that outlined in “First Aid, A Bureau of Mines Instruction Manual.” (b...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1713-7 - First-aid equipment; location; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First-aid equipment; location; minimum... § 75.1713-7 First-aid equipment; location; minimum requirements. (a) Each operator of an underground coal mine shall maintain a supply of the first-aid equipment set forth in paragraph (b) of this § 75...

  11. 30 CFR 77.804 - High-voltage trailing cables; minimum design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.804 High-voltage trailing cables; minimum design requirements. (a) High-voltage trailing cables used in resistance grounded systems shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-voltage trailing cables; minimum design...

  12. Minimum requirements for predictive pore-network modeling of solute transport in micromodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-10-01

    Pore-scale models are now an integral part of analyzing fluid dynamics in porous materials (e.g., rocks, soils, fuel cells). Pore network models (PNM) are particularly attractive due to their computational efficiency. However, quantitative predictions with PNM have not always been successful. We focus on single-phase transport of a passive tracer under advection-dominated regimes and compare PNM with high-fidelity direct numerical simulations (DNS) for a range of micromodel heterogeneities. We identify the minimum requirements for predictive PNM of transport. They are: (a) flow-based network extraction, i.e., discretizing the pore space based on the underlying velocity field, (b) a Lagrangian (particle tracking) simulation framework, and (c) accurate transfer of particles from one pore throat to the next. We develop novel network extraction and particle tracking PNM methods that meet these requirements. Moreover, we show that certain established PNM practices in the literature can result in first-order errors in modeling advection-dominated transport. They include: all Eulerian PNMs, networks extracted based on geometric metrics only, and flux-based nodal transfer probabilities. Preliminary results for a 3D sphere pack are also presented. The simulation inputs for this work are made public to serve as a benchmark for the research community.

  13. 78 FR 2868 - Draft Environmental Assessment for Rulemaking To Establish Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... require hybrid and electric passenger cars, light trucks, medium and heavy duty trucks and buses, low... Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety... minimum sound requirements for hybrid and electric vehicles. DATES: Comments must be received on or before...

  14. Beyond ADA Accessibility Requirements: Meeting Seniors' Needs for Toilet Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Sanford, Jon; Calkins, Margaret; Melgen, Sarah; Endicott, Sarah; Phillips, Anjanette

    2018-04-01

    To identify the optimal spatial and dimensional requirements of grab bars that support independent and assisted transfers by older adults and their care providers. Although research has demonstrated that toilet grab bars based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Standards do not meet the needs of older adults, the specific dimensional requirements for alternative configurations are unknown. A two-phased study with older adults and care providers in residential facilities was conducted to determine the optimal requirements for grab bars. Seniors and caregivers in skilled nursing facilities performed transfers using a mock-up toilet. In Phase 1, participants evaluated three grab bar configurations to identify optimal characteristics for safety, ease of use, comfort, and helpfulness. These characteristics were then validated for using ability-matched samples in Phase 2. The optimal configuration derived in Phase 1 included fold-down grab bars on both sides of the toilet (14" from centerline [CL] of toilet, 32" above the floor, and extended a minimum of 6" in front of the toilet) with one side open and a sidewall 24" from CL of toilet on the other. Phase 2 feedback was significantly positive for independent and one-person transfers and somewhat lower, albeit still positive, for two-person transfers. The study provides substantial evidence that bilateral grab bars are significantly more effective than those that comply with current ADA Accessibility Standards. Findings provide specific spatial and dimensional attributes for grab bar configurations that would be most effective in senior facilities.

  15. 45 CFR 263.1 - How much State money must a State expend annually to meet the basic MOE requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How much State money must a State expend annually... State's Maintenance of Effort? § 263.1 How much State money must a State expend annually to meet the... historic State expenditures. (2) However, if a State meets the minimum work participation rate requirements...

  16. 40 CFR 1603.6 - Business requiring a meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business requiring a meeting. 1603.6... THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1603.6 Business requiring a meeting. The Board may, by majority vote of its Members, determine that particular items or classes of Board business cannot be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1107-7 - Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water spray devices; capacity; water supply... Water spray devices; capacity; water supply; minimum requirements. (a) Where water spray devices are... square foot over the top surface area of the equipment and the supply of water shall be adequate to...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1107-4 - Automatic fire sensors and manual actuators; installation; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors and manual actuators... § 75.1107-4 Automatic fire sensors and manual actuators; installation; minimum requirements. (a)(1... sensors or equivalent shall be installed for each 50 square feet of top surface area, or fraction thereof...

  19. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be designed and...

  20. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.75 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be...

  1. 13 CFR 106.202 - What are the minimum requirements applicable to Cosponsored Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the minimum requirements applicable to Cosponsored Activities? 106.202 Section 106.202 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... constitute or imply an endorsement by SBA of any Cosponsor or any Cosponsor's products or services; (c) Any...

  2. 78 FR 30782 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Change in Minimum Grade Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ..., regardless of market destination. However, maintaining the current minimum grade requirement for avocados... Service 7 CFR Part 915 [Doc. No. AMS-FV-12-0067; FV13-915-1 PR] Avocados Grown in South Florida; Change in... prescribed under the Florida avocado marketing order (order). The order regulates the handling of avocados...

  3. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... Miscellaneous § 1.52 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit for Commission approval, rules...

  4. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  5. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  6. Managing engineering to meet construction requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.F.; Houchen, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The San Onofre Units 2 and 3 Project schedule is compared with Bechtel's Generic Nuclear Power Plant schedule. This comparison shows that the major delays experienced on the San Onofre Project have resulted from the regulatory process. To date, Engineering has met Construction's requirements and the Project has not experienced any Engineering related delays. The San Onofre Project has been faced with many uncertainties, such as limited site area, high seismic design criteria, new and changing Federal and State regulations, shifts in supplier market conditions and unpredictable supplier performance. Each of these uncertainties has impacted the Engineering effort and jeopardized project schedule goals. The SCE-Bechtel Engineering Management team has acted to mitigate the impact of these uncertainties through use of a cost trend program, simplification of SCE-Bechtel interfaces, close Engineering-Construction coordination, the use of task forces to handle critical supplier problems and the use of additional Engineering personnel, etc. so that Construction requirements have been met

  7. Meeting the maglev system's safety requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierick, K

    1983-12-01

    The author shows how the safety requirements of the maglev track system derive from the general legal conditions for the safety of tracked transport. It is described how their compliance beyond the so-called ''development-accompanying'' and ''acceptance-preparatory'' safety work can be assured for the Transrapid test layout (TVE) now building in Emsland and also for later application as public transport system in Germany within the meaning of the General Railway Act.

  8. 25 CFR 256.22 - How can I be sure that the work that is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can I be sure that the work that is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction standards? 256.22 Section 256.22 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... is being done on my dwelling meets minimum construction standards? (a) At various stages of...

  9. MOV refurbishment program cuts costs, meets requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a motor operated valve (MOV) rebuild program at Peach Bottom Atomic power station began in October, 1986 with what is known internally as Modification (MOD) 1915. The Engineering the Research Department developed this modification to address requirements in NRC Bulletin 85-03. The MOD consisted of As found/As left testing of MOVs in the HPCI (high pressure coolant injection) and RCIC (reactor core isolation cooling) systems; six minor motor operator enhancements to facilitate maintenance and testing, and to increase reliability, and installation of a data acquisition network to support differential pressure testing of a select number of valves in Unit 2. Twenty-four valves were involved. Modification plans incorporated the work into the outage that was scheduled for December, 1986 to February, 1987. The plans took into account other preventive and corrective MOV maintenance tasks to be performed by the Maintenance Department. In addition, modifications of control circuits to satisfy separation criteria for Appendix R had to be integrated into the schedule. To facilitate testing, adjustments to the standard test methods under the Permits and Blocking System were necessary. The normal method of testing a piece of equipment after maintenance was to clear or temporarily clear the permit (red tag) and have a plant operator operate the equipment for the test group. This method for setting up the testing an MOV was considered unacceptable because it could occupy a plant operator for an entire shaft or longer

  10. Is shade for horses a comfort resource or a minimum requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, K E

    2017-09-01

    Shade or shelter as protection from extremes of weather is required for horses at agricultural research and teaching facilities and is recommended or required by many states, professional organizations, and industry groups. The focus of this paper is the recent research on the responses of horses to hot, sunny weather, which has begun to provide scientific evidence that characterizes how and when shade is used and any benefits shade confers on horses. These behavioral and physiological findings support provision of shade as a resource for thermal comfort and the expression of normal behavior that should be included as a standard of best care practices for healthy adult horses living in the environmental conditions reviewed, rather than an absolute minimum care requirement. Additional research is required for horses living under other environmental conditions, for very young or old horses, horses in very poor body condition, or those with compromised health to determine if their responses to hot, sunny weather differ from those presented here.

  11. 5 CFR 532.205 - The use of Federal, State, and local minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing rates. 532.205 Section 532.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.205 The use of Federal, State, and local minimum wage requirements in determining prevailing...

  12. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall not... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...

  13. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. Devices providing either short circuit protection or protection against overload shall conform to the...

  14. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... short circuit protection; minimum requirements. A device to provide either short circuit protection or...

  15. Minimum area requirements for an at-risk butterfly based on movement and demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Leone M; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-02-01

    Determining the minimum area required to sustain populations has a long history in theoretical and conservation biology. Correlative approaches are often used to estimate minimum area requirements (MARs) based on relationships between area and the population size required for persistence or between species' traits and distribution patterns across landscapes. Mechanistic approaches to estimating MAR facilitate prediction across space and time but are few. We used a mechanistic MAR model to determine the critical minimum patch size (CMP) for the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton), a locally abundant species in decline along its southern range, and sister to several federally listed species. Our CMP is based on principles of diffusion, where individuals in smaller patches encounter edges and leave with higher probability than those in larger patches, potentially before reproducing. We estimated a CMP for the Baltimore checkerspot of 0.7-1.5 ha, in accordance with trait-based MAR estimates. The diffusion rate on which we based this CMP was broadly similar when estimated at the landscape scale (comparing flight path vs. capture-mark-recapture data), and the estimated population growth rate was consistent with observed site trends. Our mechanistic approach to estimating MAR is appropriate for species whose movement follows a correlated random walk and may be useful where landscape-scale distributions are difficult to assess, but demographic and movement data are obtainable from a single site or the literature. Just as simple estimates of lambda are often used to assess population viability, the principles of diffusion and CMP could provide a starting place for estimating MAR for conservation. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Determining the minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, Jacob W.; Lindemer, Terrence B.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Reif, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert N.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels is calculated. • More nuclear and chemical factors have been included for more useful predictions. • The effect of transmutation products, like Pu and Np, on the oxygen distribution is included for the first time. - Abstract: Three important failure mechanisms that must be controlled in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel for certain higher burnup applications are SiC layer rupture, SiC corrosion by CO, and coating compromise from kernel migration. All are related to high CO pressures stemming from O release when uranium present as UO 2 fissions and the O is not subsequently bound by other elements. In the HTGR kernel design, CO buildup from excess O is controlled by the inclusion of additional uranium apart from UO 2 in the form of a carbide, UC x and this fuel form is designated UCO. Here general oxygen balance formulas were developed for calculating the minimum UC x content to ensure negligible CO formation for 15.5% enriched UCO taken to 16.1% actinide burnup. Required input data were obtained from CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) chemical thermodynamic models and the Serpent 2 reactor physics and depletion analysis tool. The results are intended to be more accurate than previous estimates by including more nuclear and chemical factors, in particular the effect of transmuted Pu and Np oxides on the oxygen distribution as the fuel kernel composition evolves with burnup.

  17. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Eusebio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy, it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable.

  18. Quality control of brachytherapy equipment in the Netherlands and Belgium: current practice and minimum requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfrink, Robert J.M.; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Kleffens, Herman J. van; Rijnders, Alex; Schaeken, Bob; Aalbers, Tony H.L.; Dries, Wim J.F.; Venselaar, Jack L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is applied in 39 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium. Each institution has its own quality control (QC) programme to ensure safe and accurate dose delivery to the patient. The main goal of this work is to gain insight into the current practice of QC of brachytherapy in The Netherlands and Belgium and to reduce possible variations in test frequencies and tolerances by formulating a set of minimum QC-requirements. Materials and methods: An extensive questionnaire about QC of brachytherapy was distributed to and completed by the 39 radiotherapy institutions. A separate smaller questionnaire was sent to nine institutions performing intracoronary brachytherapy. The questions were related to safety systems, physical irradiation parameters and total time spent on QC. The results of the questionnaires were compared with recommendations given in international brachytherapy QC reports. Results: The answers to the questionnaires showed large variations in test frequencies and test methods. Furthermore, large variations in time spent on QC exist, which is mainly due to differences in QC-philosophy and differences in the available resources. Conclusions: Based on the results of the questionnaires and the comparison with the international recommendations, a set of minimum requirements for QC of brachytherapy has been formulated. These guidelines will be implemented in the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium

  19. SP-100 multimegawatt scaleup to meet electric propulsion mission requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, D.W.; Salamah, S.A.; Stewart, S.L.; Pluta, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    The SP-100 space power nuclear reactor nuclear heat source technology, utilizing uranium nitride fuel clad in PWC-11 in a fast reactor with lithium coolant circulated by an electromagnetic pump, is shown in this paper to be directly extrapolatable to thermal power levels that meet NASA nuclear electric propulsion requirements using different power conversion techniques. The SP-100 nuclear technology can be applied for missions with NEP requirements as low as 10's of kWe to 10's of MWe

  20. Minimum Lateral Bone Coverage Required for Securing Fixation of Cementless Acetabular Components in Hip Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the minimum lateral bone coverage required for securing stable fixation of the porous-coated acetabular components (cups in hip dysplasia. Methods. In total, 215 primary total hip arthroplasties in 199 patients were reviewed. The average follow-up period was 49 months (range: 24–77 months. The lateral bone coverage of the cups was assessed by determining the cup center-edge (cup-CE angle and the bone coverage index (BCI from anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. Further, cup fixation was determined using the modified DeLee and Charnley classification system. Results. All cups were judged to show stable fixation by bone ingrowth. The cup-CE angle was less than 0° in 7 hips (3.3% and the minimum cup-CE angle was −9.2° (BCI: 48.8%. Thin radiolucent lines were observed in 5 hips (2.3%, which were not associated with decreased lateral bone coverage. Loosening, osteolysis, dislocation, or revision was not observed in any of the cases during the follow-up period. Conclusion. A cup-CE angle greater than −10° (BCI > 50% was acceptable for stable bony fixation of the cup. Considering possible errors in manual implantation, we recommend that the cup position be planned such that the cup-CE angle is greater than 0° (BCI > 60%.

  1. Radiation therapists' perceptions of the minimum level of experience required to perform portal image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybovic, Michala; Halkett, Georgia K.; Banati, Richard B.; Cox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Our aim was to explore radiation therapists' views on the level of experience necessary to undertake portal image analysis and clinical decision making. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed to determine the availability of portal imaging equipment in Australia and New Zealand. We analysed radiation therapists' responses to a specific question regarding their opinion on the minimum level of experience required for health professionals to analyse portal images. We used grounded theory and a constant comparative method of data analysis to derive the main themes. Results: Forty-six radiation oncology facilities were represented in our survey, with 40 questionnaires being returned (87%). Thirty-seven radiation therapists answered our free-text question. Radiation therapists indicated three main themes which they felt were important in determining the minimum level of experience: 'gaining on-the-job experience', 'receiving training' and 'working as a team'. Conclusions: Radiation therapists indicated that competence in portal image review occurs via various learning mechanisms. Further research is warranted to determine perspectives of other health professionals, such as radiation oncologists, on portal image review becoming part of radiation therapists' extended role. Suitable training programs and steps for implementation should be developed to facilitate this endeavour

  2. Defining the minimum anatomical coverage required to protect the axilla and arm against penetrating ballistic projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Johno; Fryer, R; Lewis, E A; Clasper, J

    2016-08-01

    Defining the minimum anatomical structural coverage required to protect from ballistic threats is necessary to enable objective comparisons between body armour designs. Current protection for the axilla and arm is in the form of brassards, but no evidence exists to justify the coverage that should be provided by them. A systematic review was undertaken to ascertain which anatomical components within the arm or axilla would be highly likely to lead to either death within 60 min or would cause significant long-term morbidity. Haemorrhage from vascular damage to the axillary or brachial vessels was demonstrated to be the principal cause of mortality from arm trauma on combat operations. Peripheral nerve injuries are the primary cause of long-term morbidity and functional disability following upper extremity arterial trauma. Haemorrhage is managed through direct pressure and the application of a tourniquet. It is therefore recommended that the minimum coverage should be the most proximal extent to which a tourniquet can be applied. Superimposition of OSPREY brassards over these identified anatomical structures demonstrates that current coverage provided by the brassards could potentially be reduced. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Pharmacovigilance in India, Uganda and South Africa with Reference to WHO’s Minimum Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Maigetter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Pharmacovigilance (PV data are crucial for ensuring safety and effectiveness of medicines after drugs have been granted marketing approval. This paper describes the PV systems of India, Uganda and South Africa based on literature and Key Informant (KI interviews and compares them with the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s minimum PV requirements for a Functional National PV System. Methods A documentary analysis of academic literature and policy reports was undertaken to assess the medicines regulatory systems and policies in the three countries. A gap analysis from the document review indicated a need for further research in PV. KI interviews covered topics on PV: structure and practices of the system; current regulatory policy; capacity limitations, staffing, funding and training; availability and reporting of data; and awareness and usage of the systems. Twenty interviews were conducted in India, 8 in Uganda and 11 in South Africa with government officials from the ministries of health, national regulatory authorities, pharmaceutical producers, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs, members of professional associations and academia. The findings from the literature and KI interviews were compared with WHO’s minimum requirements. Results All three countries were confronted with similar barriers: lack of sufficient funding, limited number of trained staff, inadequate training programs, unclear roles and poor coordination of activities. Although KI interviews represented viewpoints of the respondents, the findings confirmed the documentary analysis of the literature. Although South Africa has a legal requirement for PV, we found that the three countries uniformly lacked adequate capacity to monitor medicines and evaluate risks according to the minimum standards of the WHO. Conclusion A strong PV system is an important part of the overall medicine regulatory system and reflects on the stringency and competence of the regulatory

  4. 78 FR 61445 - Seventy-Sixth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 147, Minimum Operational Performance Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... of FAA TCAS Program Office ACAS X Functional Architecture Verification & Validation Activities... Other Business Action Items Time and Place of Next Meeting Plenary Adjourn Attendance is open to the... September 25, 2013. Paige Williams, Management Analyst, NextGen, Business Operations Group, Federal Aviation...

  5. Minimum Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Pit Manufacturing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moy, Ming M.; Leasure, Craig S.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical chemistry is one of several capabilities necessary for executing the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analytical chemistry capabilities reside in the Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility and Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These analytical capabilities support plutonium recovery operations, plutonium metallurgy, and waste management. Analytical chemistry capabilities at both nuclear facilities are currently being configured to support pit manufacturing. This document summarizes the minimum analytical chemistry capabilities required to sustain pit manufacturing at LANL. By the year 2004, approximately$16 million will be required to procure analytical instrumentation to support pit manufacturing. In addition,$8.5 million will be required to procure glovebox enclosures. An estimated 50% increase in costs has been included for installation of analytical instruments and glovebox enclosures. However, no general and administrative (G and A) taxes have been included. If an additional 42.5/0 G and A tax were to be incurred, approximately$35 million would be required over the next five years to prepare analytical chemistry to support a 50-pit-per-year manufacturing capability by the year 2004

  6. SB certification handout material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels for mixture-based specification for flexible base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    A handout with tables representing the material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels mixture-based specification for flexible base and details on aggregate and test methods employed, along with agency and co...

  7. Benchmarking the minimum Electron Beam (eBeam) dose required for the sterilization of space foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sohini S.; Wall, Kayley R.; Kerth, Chris R.; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2018-02-01

    As manned space missions extend in length, the safety, nutrition, acceptability, and shelf life of space foods are of paramount importance to NASA. Since food and mealtimes play a key role in reducing stress and boredom of prolonged missions, the quality of food in terms of appearance, flavor, texture, and aroma can have significant psychological ramifications on astronaut performance. The FDA, which oversees space foods, currently requires a minimum dose of 44 kGy for irradiated space foods. The underlying hypothesis was that commercial sterility of space foods could be achieved at a significantly lower dose, and this lowered dose would positively affect the shelf life of the product. Electron beam processed beef fajitas were used as an example NASA space food to benchmark the minimum eBeam dose required for sterility. A 15 kGy dose was able to achieve an approximately 10 log reduction in Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria, and a 5 log reduction in Clostridium sporogenes spores. Furthermore, accelerated shelf life testing (ASLT) to determine sensory and quality characteristics under various conditions was conducted. Using Multidimensional gas-chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry (MDGC-O-MS), numerous volatiles were shown to be dependent on the dose applied to the product. Furthermore, concentrations of off -flavor aroma compounds such as dimethyl sulfide were decreased at the reduced 15 kGy dose. The results suggest that the combination of conventional cooking combined with eBeam processing (15 kGy) can achieve the safety and shelf-life objectives needed for long duration space-foods.

  8. Minimum Stocking Requirements for Retailers in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children: Disparities Across US States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E; Schreiber, Liana R N; Laska, Melissa N

    2017-07-01

    To examine state variation in minimum stocking requirements for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)-authorized small food retailers. We obtained minimum stocking requirements for 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2017 from WIC Web pages or e-mail from the state WIC agency. We developed a coding protocol to compare minimum quantities and varieties required for 12 food and beverage categories. We calculated the median, range, and interquartile range for each measure. Nearly all states set minimum varieties and quantities of fruits and vegetables, 100% juice, whole grain-rich foods, breakfast cereal, milk, cheese, eggs, legumes, and peanut butter. Fewer states set requirements for canned fish, yogurt, and tofu. Most measures had a large range in minimum requirements (e.g., $8-$100 of fruits and vegetables, 60-144 oz of breakfast cereal). WIC-participating retailers must adhere to very different minimum stocking requirements across states, which may result in disparities in food and beverage products available to WIC recipients. Public Health Implications. The results provide benchmarks that can inform new local, state, and federal program and policy efforts to increase healthy food availability in retail settings.

  9. Cost-optimal levels of minimum energy performance requirements in the Danish Building Regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggerholm, S.

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of the report is to analyse the cost optimality of the energy requirements in the Danish Building Regulations 2010, BR10 to new building and to existing buildings undergoing major renovation. The energy requirements in the Danish Building Regulations have by tradition always been based on the cost and benefits related to the private economical or financial perspective. Macro economical calculations have in the past only been made in addition. The cost optimum used in this report is thus based on the financial perspective. Due to the high energy taxes in Denmark there is a significant difference between the consumer price and the macro economical for energy. Energy taxes are also paid by commercial consumers when the energy is used for building operation e.g. heating, lighting, ventilation etc. In relation to the new housing examples the present minimum energy requirements in BR 10 all shows gaps that are negative with a deviation of up till 16 % from the point of cost optimality. With the planned tightening of the requirements to new houses in 2015 and in 2020, the energy requirements can be expected to be tighter than the cost optimal point, if the costs for the needed improvements don't decrease correspondingly. In relation to the new office building there is a gap of 31 % to the point of cost optimality in relation to the 2010 requirement. In relation to the 2015 and 2020 requirements there are negative gaps to the point of cost optimality based on today's prices. If the gaps for all the new buildings are weighted to an average based on mix of building types and heat supply for new buildings in Denmark there is a gap of 3 % in average for the new building. The excessive tightness with today's prices is 34 % in relation to the 2015 requirement and 49 % in relation to the 2020 requirement. The component requirement to elements in the building envelope and to installations in existing buildings adds up to significant energy efficiency

  10. 30 CFR 939.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 939.784 Section 939.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  11. 30 CFR 941.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 941.784 Section 941.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  12. 30 CFR 933.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 933.784 Section 933.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  13. 30 CFR 921.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 921.784 Section 921.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  14. The minimum area requirements (MAR) for giant panda: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Jing; Yang, Zhisong; He, Ke; Zhang, Zejun; Gu, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuyu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Biao; Qi, Dunwu; Dai, Qiang

    2016-12-08

    Habitat fragmentation can reduce population viability, especially for area-sensitive species. The Minimum Area Requirements (MAR) of a population is the area required for the population's long-term persistence. In this study, the response of occupancy probability of giant pandas against habitat patch size was studied in five of the six mountain ranges inhabited by giant panda, which cover over 78% of the global distribution of giant panda habitat. The probability of giant panda occurrence was positively associated with habitat patch area, and the observed increase in occupancy probability with patch size was higher than that due to passive sampling alone. These results suggest that the giant panda is an area-sensitive species. The MAR for giant panda was estimated to be 114.7 km 2 based on analysis of its occupancy probability. Giant panda habitats appear more fragmented in the three southern mountain ranges, while they are large and more continuous in the other two. Establishing corridors among habitat patches can mitigate habitat fragmentation, but expanding habitat patch sizes is necessary in mountain ranges where fragmentation is most intensive.

  15. 30 CFR 937.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 937.784 Section 937.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  16. 30 CFR 903.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 903.784 Section 903.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, applies to any person who submits an application...

  17. 30 CFR 910.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 910.784 Section 910.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  18. 30 CFR 942.780 - Surface mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 942.780 Section 942.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  19. 30 CFR 947.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 947.784 Section 947.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  20. 30 CFR 942.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 942.784 Section 942.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  1. 30 CFR 912.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 912.780 Section 912.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  2. 30 CFR 921.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 921.780 Section 921.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  3. 30 CFR 939.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operations plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operations plan. 939.780 Section 939.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operations plan. (a) Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  4. 30 CFR 905.780 - Surface mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 905.780 Section 905.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  5. 30 CFR 922.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 922.784 Section 922.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  6. 30 CFR 947.780 - Surface mining permit application-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 947.780 Section 947.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Application—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  7. 30 CFR 933.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 933.780 Section 933.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  8. 30 CFR 910.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 910.780 Section 910.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirement for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  9. 30 CFR 922.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 922.780 Section 922.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  10. 30 CFR 905.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 905.784 Section 905.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  11. 30 CFR 903.780 - Surface mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 903.780 Section 903.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, applies to any person who submits an application to conduct...

  12. 30 CFR 912.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 912.784 Section 912.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  13. 30 CFR 937.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 937.780 Section 937.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirement for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  14. 30 CFR 941.780 - Surface mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 941.780 Section 941.780 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 780 of this chapter, Surface Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  15. Requirements for a minimum standard of care for phenylketonuria: the patients’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, ORPHA716) is an inherited disorder that affects about one in every 10,000 children born in Europe. Early and continuous application of a modified diet is largely successful in preventing the devastating brain damage associated with untreated PKU. The management of PKU is inconsistent: there are few national guidelines, and these tend to be incomplete and implemented sporadically. In this article, the first-ever pan- European patient/carer perspective on optimal PKU care, the European Society for Phenylketonuria and Allied Disorders (E.S.PKU) proposes recommendations for a minimum standard of care for PKU, to underpin the development of new pan-European guideline for the management of PKU. New standards of best practice should guarantee equal access to screening, treatment and monitoring throughout Europe. Screening protocols and interpretation of screening results should be standardised. Experienced Centres of Expertise are required, in line with current European Union policy, to guarantee a defined standard of multidisciplinary treatment and care for all medical and social aspects of PKU. Women of childbearing age require especially intensive management, due to the risk of severe risks to the foetus conferred by uncontrolled PKU. All aspects of treatment should be reimbursed to ensure uniform access across Europe to guideline-driven, evidence-based care. The E.S.PKU urges PKU healthcare professionals caring for people with PKU to take the lead in developing evidence based guidelines on PKU, while continuing to play an active role in serving as the voice of patients and their families, whose lives are affected by the condition. PMID:24341788

  16. Implications of Microwave Holography Using Minimum Required Frequency Samples for Weakly- and Strongly-Scattering Indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, M.; Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques, an integral component of nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDTE), have received significant attention in the past decade. These techniques have included the implementation of synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) algorithms for obtaining high spatial resolution images. The next important step in these developments is the implementation of 3-D holographic imaging algorithms. These are well-known wideband imaging technique requiring a swept-frequency (i.e., wideband), which unlike SAF that is a single frequency technique, are not easily performed on a real-time basis. This is due to the fact that a significant number of data points (in the frequency domain) must be obtained within the frequency band of interest. This not only makes for a complex imaging system design, it also significantly increases the image-production time. Consequently in an attempt to reduce the measurement time and system complexity, an investigation was conducted to determine the minimum required number of frequency samples needed to image a specific object while preserving a desired maximum measurement range and range resolution. To this end the 3-D holographic algorithm was modified to use properlyinterpolated frequency data. Measurements of the complex reflection coefficient for several samples were conducted using a swept-frequency approach. Subsequently, holographical images were generated using data containing a relatively large number of frequency samples and were compared with images generated by the reduced data set data. Quantitative metrics such as average, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio were used to evaluate the quality of images generated using reduced data sets. Furthermore, this approach was applied to both weakly- and strongly-scattering indications. This paper presents the methods used and the results of this investigation.

  17. Using geospatial solutions to meet distribution integrity management requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, Robert A. [New Century Software, Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In the United States, incidents on gas distribution pipelines kill on average 10 persons per year in addition to causing 40 serious injuries and millions of dollars of property damage. In order to remedy to this situation, the US Department of Transportation/Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration enacted new regulations requiring operators to develop distribution integrity management programs (DIMP) which must include: knowledge and identification of threats, evaluation of risk, identification and implementation of measures to address risks, performance measuring, periodic evaluation and improvement and results reporting. The aim of this paper is to show how geographic information systems (GIS) can help operators meet each requirement of the DIMP regulations. This discussion showed that GIS can help in identifying and quantifying the threats to the distribution system and in assessing the consequences of an incident. Investing in GIS will not only help operators in complying with the regulations but will also help them make economically sound, risk-based decisions.

  18. Westinghouse AP1000 Electrical Generation Costs - Meeting Marketplace Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The re-emergence of nuclear power as a leading contender for new base-load electrical generation is not an occurrence of happenstance. The nuclear industry, in general, and Westinghouse, specifically, have worked diligently with the U.S. power companies and other nuclear industry participants around the world to develop future plant designs and project implementation models that address prior problem areas that led to reduced support for nuclear power. In no particular order, the issues that Westinghouse, as an engineering and equipment supply company, focused on were: safety, plant capital costs, construction schedule reductions, plant availability, and electric generation costs. An examination of the above criteria quickly led to the conclusion that as long as safety is not compromised, simplifying plant designs can lead to positive progress of the desired endpoints for the next and later generations of nuclear units. The distinction between next and later generations relates to the readiness of the plant design for construction implementation. In setting requirement priorities, one axiom is inviolate: There is no exception, nor will there be, to the Golden Rule of business. In the electric power generation industry, once safety goals are met, low generation cost is the requirement that rules, without exception. The emphasis in this paper on distinguishing between next and later generation reactors is based on the recognition that many designs have been purposed for future application, but few have been able to attain the design pedigree required to successfully meet the requirements for next generation nuclear units. One fact is evident: Another generation of noncompetitive nuclear plants will cripple the potential for nuclear to take its place as a major contributor to new electrical generation. Only two plant designs effectively meet the economic tests and demonstrate both unparalleled safety and design credibility due to extensive progress toward engineering

  19. 29 CFR 516.11 - Employees exempt from both minimum wage and overtime pay requirements under section 13(a) (2), (3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees exempt from both minimum wage and overtime pay... Exemptions Under the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.11 Employees exempt from both minimum wage and.... With respect to each and every employee exempt from both the minimum wage and overtime pay requirements...

  20. 29 CFR 520.200 - What is the legal authority for payment of wages lower than the minimum wage required by section...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the minimum wage required by section 6(a) of the Fair Labor Standards Act? 520.200 Section 520.200... lower than the minimum wage required by section 6(a) of the Fair Labor Standards Act? Section 14(a) of..., for the payment of special minimum wage rates to workers employed as messengers, learners (including...

  1. 75 FR 77561 - Regulations Issued Under the Export Grape and Plum Act; Revision to the Minimum Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... amount of product sold and an increase in returns to producers, shippers, exporters, and carriers... additional 2 percent tolerance for sealed berry cracks on the Exotic grape variety. This action was... minimum size and quality requirements for export shipments of any variety of vinifera species table grapes...

  2. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements. 84.149 Section 84.149 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.149 Type C supplied-air respirator...

  3. 30 CFR 71.402 - Minimum requirements for bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonirritating cleansing agent shall be provided for use at each shower. (2) Sanitary flush toilet facilities. (i..., change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities. 71.402 Section 71.402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.402 Minimum requirements for...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces...

  5. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall...

  6. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.198 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces...

  7. 42 CFR 84.175 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods....175 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be designed and constructed to fit persons with...

  8. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Administration of FHWA Planning and Research Funds § 420.107 What is the... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107...

  9. Total Sulfur Amino Acid Requirements Are Not Altered in Children with Chronic Renal Insufficiency, but Minimum Methionine Needs Are Increased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Rajavel; Humayun, Mohammad A; Turner, Justine M; Rafii, Mahroukh; Langos, Veronika; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2017-10-01

    Background: The total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) and minimum Met requirements have been previously determined in healthy children. TSAA metabolism is altered in kidney disease. Whether TSAA requirements are altered in children with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is unknown. Objective: We sought to determine the TSAA (Met in the absence of Cys) requirements and minimum Met (in the presence of excess Cys) requirements in children with CRI. Methods: Five children (4 boys, 1 girl) aged 10 ± 2.6 y with CRI were randomly assigned to receive graded intakes of Met (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 35 mg · kg -1 · d -1 ) with no Cys in the diet. Four of the children (3 boys, 1 girl) were then randomly assigned to receive graded dietary intakes of Met (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg · kg -1 · d -1 ) with 21 mg · kg -1 · d -1 Cys. The mean TSAA and minimum Met requirements were determined by measuring the oxidation of l-[1- 13 C]Phe to 13 CO 2 (F 13 CO 2 ). A 2-phase linear-regression crossover analysis of the F 13 CO 2 data identified a breakpoint at minimal F 13 CO 2 Urine samples collected from all study days and from previous studies of healthy children were measured for sulfur metabolites. Results: The mean and population-safe (upper 95% CI) intakes of TSAA and minimum Met in children with CRI were determined to be 12.6 and 15.9 mg · kg -1 · d -1 and 7.3 and 10.9 mg · kg -1 · d -1 , respectively. In healthy school-aged children the mean and upper 95% CI intakes of TSAA and minimum Met were determined to be 12.9 and 17.2 mg · kg -1 · d -1 and 5.8 and 7.3 mg · kg -1 · d -1 , respectively. A comparison of the minimum Met requirements between healthy children and children with CRI indicated significant ( P < 0.05) differences. Conclusion: These results suggest that children with CRI have a similar mean and population-safe TSAA to that of healthy children, suggesting adequate Cys synthesis via transsulfuration, but higher minimum Met requirement, suggesting reduced

  10. 25 CFR 47.9 - What are the minimum requirements for the local educational financial plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION UNIFORM DIRECT FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR BUREAU-OPERATED SCHOOLS § 47.9 What are the minimum..., including each program funded through the Indian School Equalization Program; (2) A budget showing the costs...) Certification by the chairman of the school board that the plan has been ratified in an action of record by the...

  11. EPR meets the next generation PWR safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouteille, Francois; Czech, Juergen; Sloan, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    At the origin was the common decision in 1989 of Framatome and Siemens to cooperate to design a Nuclear Island which meets the future needs of utilities. EDF and a group of main German Utilities joined this effort in 1991 and from that point were completely involved in the progress of the work. Compliance of the EPR with the European Utility Requirements (EUR) was verified to ensure a large acceptability of the design by other participating utilities. In addition, the entire process was backed up to the end of 1998 by the French and the German Safety Authorities which engaged into a long-lasting cooperation to define common requirements applicable to future Nuclear Power Plants. Upon signature of the Olkiluoto 3 contract, STUK, the Finnish safety and radiation authority, began reviewing the design of the EPR. Upon the favorable recommendation of STUK, the Finnish government delivered a Construction License for the Olkiluoto 3 NPP on February 17, 2005. Following the positive conclusion of the political debate in France with regard to nuclear energy, EDF will also submit a request to start the construction of an EPR on the Flamanville site. In the US, the first steps in view of a Design Certification by the NRC have been taken. These three independent decisions make the EPR the leading first generation 3+ design under construction. Important safety functions are assured by separate systems in a straightforward operating mode. Four separate, redundant trains for all safety systems are installed in four separate layout division for which a strict separation is ensured so that common mode failure, for example due to internal hazards, can be ruled out. A reduction in common mode failure potential is also obtained by design rules ensuring the systematic application of functional diversity. A four train-redundancy for the major safety systems provides flexibility in adapting the design to maintenance requirements, thus contributing to reduce the outage duration. Additional

  12. Meeting embryonic requirements of broilers throughout incubation: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Molenaar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available During incubation of chicken embryos, environmental conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentration, must be controlled to meet embryonic requirements that change during the different phases of embryonic development. In the current review, the effects of embryo temperature, egg weight loss, and CO2 concentration on hatchability, hatchling quality, and subsequent performance are discussed from an embryonic point of view. In addition, new insights related to the incubation process are described. Several studies have shown that a constant eggshell temperature (EST of 37.5 to 38.0°C throughout incubation results in the highest hatchability, hatchling quality, and subsequent performance. Egg weight loss must be between 6.5 and 14.0% of the initial egg weight, to obtain an adequate air cell size before the embryo internally pips. An increased CO2 concentration during the developmental phase of incubation (first 10 days can accelerate embryonic development and hatchability, but the physiological mechanisms of this acceleration are not completely understood. Effects of ar increased CO2 concentration during late incubation also need further investigation. The preincubation warming profile, thermal manipulation, and in ovo feeding are new insights related to the incubation process and show that the optimal situation for the embryo during incubation highly depends on the conditions of the eggs before (storage duration and during incubation (environmental conditions and on the conditions of the chickens after hatching (environmental temperature.

  13. Towards an automated TLD system that meets international requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetter-Jensen, L.; Vanamo, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new recently introduced fully automated TLD system developed by Alnor OY on the basis of the Riso prototype, is intended to meet draft IEC/ISO proposals and ANSI requirements. Part of the system is a personal dosemeter badge and an environmental dosemeter package following ICRU recommendations. The overall system consists of a software-controlled automated reader, a programable irradiator/calibrator, a computer, and dosemeters for environmental, whole body, extremity and clinical applications. The personal TLD badge that contains four TLD pellets is designed to agree with ICRU H p (10) and H s (0.07) quantities for determining dose equivalent. The badge can accommodate a large variety of the most commonly used solid TL dosemeter products. A special effort was put into the evaluation of skin dose by considering the use of graphite-mixed hot-sintered LiF pellets. The TLD system is described and results from a performance test that comprised measurements of photon energy response, angular dependence, and reproducibility are presented

  14. Measures for interoperability of phenotypic data: minimum information requirements and formatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwiek-Kupczyńska, Hanna; Altmann, Thomas; Arend, Daniel; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Chen, Dijun; Cornut, Guillaume; Fiorani, Fabio; Frohmberg, Wojciech; Junker, Astrid; Klukas, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Mazurek, Cezary; Nafissi, Anahita; Neveu, Pascal; van Oeveren, Jan; Pommier, Cyril; Poorter, Hendrik; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scholz, Uwe; van Schriek, Marco; Seren, Ümit; Usadel, Björn; Weise, Stephan; Kersey, Paul; Krajewski, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Plant phenotypic data shrouds a wealth of information which, when accurately analysed and linked to other data types, brings to light the knowledge about the mechanisms of life. As phenotyping is a field of research comprising manifold, diverse and time-consuming experiments, the findings can be fostered by reusing and combining existing datasets. Their correct interpretation, and thus replicability, comparability and interoperability, is possible provided that the collected observations are equipped with an adequate set of metadata. So far there have been no common standards governing phenotypic data description, which hampered data exchange and reuse. In this paper we propose the guidelines for proper handling of the information about plant phenotyping experiments, in terms of both the recommended content of the description and its formatting. We provide a document called "Minimum Information About a Plant Phenotyping Experiment", which specifies what information about each experiment should be given, and a Phenotyping Configuration for the ISA-Tab format, which allows to practically organise this information within a dataset. We provide examples of ISA-Tab-formatted phenotypic data, and a general description of a few systems where the recommendations have been implemented. Acceptance of the rules described in this paper by the plant phenotyping community will help to achieve findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable data.

  15. 12 CFR 713.5 - What is the required minimum dollar amount of coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... coverage required, but a federal credit union's board of directors should purchase additional or enhanced... its own internal risk assessment, its fraud trends and loss experience, and factors such as its cash...

  16. 26 CFR 1.410(b)-1 - Minimum coverage requirements (before 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Nonresident aliens. Under section 410(b)(2)(C) and this paragraph, there may be excluded from consideration employees who are nonresident aliens and who receive no earned income (within the meaning of section 911(b... case of a cash and deferred profit-sharing plan, in existence on June 27, 1974, the requirements of...

  17. Minimum Colour Differences Required To Recognise Small Objects On A Colour CRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Peter L.

    1985-05-01

    Data is required to assist in the assessment, evaluation and optimisation of colour and other displays for both military and general use. A general aim is to develop a mathematical technique to aid optimisation and reduce the amount of expensive hardware development and trials necessary when introducing new displays. The present standards and methods available for evaluating colour differences are known not to apply to the perception of typical objects on a display. Data is required for irregular objects viewed at small angular subtense ((1°) and relating the recognition of form rather than colour matching. Therefore laboratory experiments have been carried out using a computer controlled CRT to measure the threshold colour difference that an observer requires between object and background so that he can discriminate a variety of similar objects. Measurements are included for a variety of background and object colourings. The results are presented in the CIE colorimetric system similar to current standards used by the display engineer. Apart from the characteristic small field tritanopia, the results show that larger colour differences are required for object recognition than those assumed from conventional colour discrimination data. A simple relationship to account for object size and background colour is suggested to aid visual performance assessments and modelling.

  18. 76 FR 22802 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Minimum Days Off Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... work hours that an individual can work by using a comparable but simpler and more flexible requirement... having only one in every nine days off or consistently working the maximum allowable hours, which would...-based objective, consisting of an average of 54 hours worked per week, averaged over a calendar quarter...

  19. Minimum iron requirements of marine phytoplankton and the implications for the biogeochemical control of new production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Fe:PO 4 ratio at which nutrient limitation of final cell yield shifts from one nutrient to the other was determined for 22 species of marine phytoplankton. Among eucaryotic phytoplankton, coastal species have subsistence optimum Fe:P molar ratios of 10 -2 to 10 -3.1 , but most oceanic species have ratios of -4 , indicating that oceanic species have been able to adapt their biochemical composition to the low availability of Fe in the open ocean. In contrast, both coastal and oceanic species of cyanobacteria have relatively high Fe:P molar ratio requirements, ranging from 10 -1.4 to 10 -2.7 . A simple comparison of these requirement ratios with the ratios of the Fe and PO 4 fluxes to the photic zone from deep water and the atmosphere indicates that new production of cyanobacterial biomass is Fe limited, but new production of eucaryotic algal biomass is not. Because of the large differences among species in their Fe requirements, especially between procaryotes and eucaryotes, changes in the relative inputs of Fe and PO 4 to the photic zone are expected to lead to changes in the species composition of phytoplankton communities. Indeed, the ratio of atmospheric to deep-water inputs of nutrients and the resulting Fe:P input ratios appear to influence the relative abundance of unicellular cyanobacteria and Trichodesmium and their vertical and biogeographic distributions. Because some phytoplankton species have adaptations that reduce their dependence on combined N and Fe but not on P, it is concluded that PO 4 is the ultimate limiting nutrient of new production of organic C on a geochemical and evolutionary time scale, even though N and Fe are important growth rate-limiting nutrients on an ecological time scale

  20. 33 CFR 157.156 - COW operations: Meeting manual requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false COW operations: Meeting manual... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.156 COW operations... COW system under §§ 157.10(e), 157.10a(a)(2), or 157.10c(b)(2) that has the Crude Oil Washing...

  1. 40 CFR 35.4045 - What requirements must my group meet as a TAG recipient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for the purpose of participating in decision making at the Superfund site for which we provide a TAG... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must my group meet as... Responsibilities As A Tag Recipient § 35.4045 What requirements must my group meet as a TAG recipient? Your group...

  2. 49 CFR 40.213 - What training requirements must STTs and BATs meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What training requirements must STTs and BATs meet? 40.213 Section 40.213 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.213 What training requirements must STTs and BATs meet? To be...

  3. 29 CFR 4.174 - Meeting requirements for holiday fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Meeting requirements for holiday fringe benefits. 4.174... Compensation Standards Compliance with Compensation Standards § 4.174 Meeting requirements for holiday fringe benefits. (a) Determining eligibility for holiday benefits—in general. (1) Most fringe benefit...

  4. Reality Check: OK Extension Helps Teachers Meet Financial Education Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pierre, Eileen; Simpson, Mickey; Moffat, Susan; Cothren, Phillis

    2011-01-01

    According to the Jump$tart Coalition, Oklahoma is one of 24 states to adopt financial education requirements for students (Jump$tart Coalition, 2010). The Passport to Financial Literacy Act of 2007, Oklahoma House Bill 1476, requires Oklahoma students in grades 7 through 12 to fulfill established financial literacy requirements to graduate with a…

  5. Minimum standard guidelines of care on requirements for setting up a laser room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhepe Niteen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Lasers are now becoming an integral part of dermatological practice in India, with more and more dermatologists starting laser dermatology practice. Lasers, when are used with care, by properly trained operators, in carefully designed environment, can deliver a range of useful aesthetic and dermatologic treatments. Facility: Laser treatment is an office procedure, hence it does not require hospital set-up. The laser room facility requires careful planning keeping in mind safety of both patient and operator, convenience of operating, and optimum handling of costly equipments. The facility should be designed to handle procedures under local anesthesia and sedation. Facilities, staff and equipment to handle any emergencies should be available. Location: A room in existing dermatology clinic can be adequately converted to a laser room. Dimensions of laser room, its door and patient′s table should be such that it should facilitate easy movement of patient, machine trolley, operator and assistant in case of routine procedures and in emergency. Physician Qualification: Any dermatologist with MD or diploma in dermatology can do laser procedures, provided he/ she has acquired necessary skills by virtue of training, observing a competent dermatologist. Such training may be obtained during post graduation or later in specified workshops or courses under a competent dermatologist or at centre which routinely performs such procedures. Electricity and uninterrupted power supply: Laser equipments should be connected to stabilizer or UPS circuits only. Preferably an on line UPS as recommended by the laser company should be installed. Earthing of the equipment is essential to avoid damage to the equipment and electrical shocks to the operator. Sufficient power back up to complete the procedure if power is off midway, is essential. Air-conditioning: Laser machines should be operated in low ambient temperature, with

  6. Minimum energy requirements for desalination of brackish groundwater in the United States with comparison to international datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahdab, Yvana D.; Thiel, Gregory P.; Böhlke, John Karl; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Lienhard, John H.

    2018-01-01

    This paper uses chemical and physical data from a large 2017 U.S. Geological Surveygroundwater dataset with wells in the U.S. and three smaller international groundwater datasets with wells primarily in Australia and Spain to carry out a comprehensive investigation of brackish groundwater composition in relation to minimum desalinationenergy costs. First, we compute the site-specific least work required for groundwater desalination. Least work of separation represents a baseline for specific energy consumptionof desalination systems. We develop simplified equations based on the U.S. data for least work as a function of water recovery ratio and a proxy variable for composition, either total dissolved solids, specific conductance, molality or ionic strength. We show that the U.S. correlations for total dissolved solids and molality may be applied to the international datasets. We find that total molality can be used to calculate the least work of dilute solutions with very high accuracy. Then, we examine the effects of groundwater solute composition on minimum energy requirements, showing that separation requirements increase from calcium to sodium for cations and from sulfate to bicarbonate to chloride for anions, for any given TDS concentration. We study the geographic distribution of least work, total dissolved solids, and major ions concentration across the U.S. We determine areas with both low least work and high water stress in order to highlight regions holding potential for desalination to decrease the disparity between high water demand and low water supply. Finally, we discuss the implications of the USGS results on water resource planning, by comparing least work to the specific energy consumption of brackish water reverse osmosisplants and showing the scaling propensity of major electrolytes and silica in the U.S. groundwater samples.

  7. Radiation therapists' perceptions of the minimum level of experience required to perform portal image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybovic, Michala [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: mryb6983@mail.usyd.edu.au; Halkett, Georgia K. [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care, Curtin University of Technology, Health Research Campus, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)], E-mail: g.halkett@curtin.edu.au; Banati, Richard B. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute - Ramaciotti Centre for Brain Imaging, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: r.banati@usyd.edu.au; Cox, Jennifer [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.cox@usyd.edu.au

    2008-11-15

    Background and purpose: Our aim was to explore radiation therapists' views on the level of experience necessary to undertake portal image analysis and clinical decision making. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed to determine the availability of portal imaging equipment in Australia and New Zealand. We analysed radiation therapists' responses to a specific question regarding their opinion on the minimum level of experience required for health professionals to analyse portal images. We used grounded theory and a constant comparative method of data analysis to derive the main themes. Results: Forty-six radiation oncology facilities were represented in our survey, with 40 questionnaires being returned (87%). Thirty-seven radiation therapists answered our free-text question. Radiation therapists indicated three main themes which they felt were important in determining the minimum level of experience: 'gaining on-the-job experience', 'receiving training' and 'working as a team'. Conclusions: Radiation therapists indicated that competence in portal image review occurs via various learning mechanisms. Further research is warranted to determine perspectives of other health professionals, such as radiation oncologists, on portal image review becoming part of radiation therapists' extended role. Suitable training programs and steps for implementation should be developed to facilitate this endeavour.

  8. The contribution of material control to meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) is in the process of implementing a set of performance requirements for material control and accountability (MC ampersand A). These graded requirements set a uniform level of performance for similar materials at various facilities with respect to the threat of an insider adversary stealing special nuclear material (SNM). These requirements are phrased in terms of detecting the theft of a goal quantity of SNM within a specified time period and with a probability greater than or equal to a specified value and include defense in-depth requirements

  9. Minimum quality requirements for water reuse in agricultural irrigation and aquifer recharge - Towards a water reuse regulatory instrument at EU level Réédition

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALDE SANZ LAURA; GAWLIK BERND

    2017-01-01

    As an input to the design of a Legal Instrument on Water Reuse in Europe, this report recommends minimum quality requirements for water reuse in agricultural irrigation and aquifer recharge based on a risk management approach.

  10. Minimum forest cover required for sustainable water flow regulation of a watershed: a case study in Jambi Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tarigan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many tropical regions, the rapid expansion of monoculture plantations has led to a sharp decline in forest cover, potentially degrading the ability of watersheds to regulate water flow. Therefore, regional planners need to determine the minimum proportion of forest cover that is required to support adequate ecosystem services in these watersheds. However, to date, there has been little research on this issue, particularly in tropical areas where monoculture plantations are expanding at an alarming rate. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the influence of forest cover and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis plantations on the partitioning of rainfall into direct runoff and subsurface flow in a humid, tropical watershed in Jambi Province, Indonesia. To do this, we simulated streamflow with a calibrated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model and observed several watersheds to derive the direct runoff coefficient (C and baseflow index (BFI. The model had a strong performance, with Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency values of 0.80–0.88 (calibration and 0.80–0.85 (validation and percent bias values of −2.9–1.2 (calibration and 7.0–11.9 (validation. We found that the percentage of forest cover in a watershed was significantly negatively correlated with C and significantly positively correlated with BFI, whereas the rubber and oil palm plantation cover showed the opposite pattern. Our findings also suggested that at least 30 % of the forest cover was required in the study area for sustainable ecosystem services. This study provides new adjusted crop parameter values for monoculture plantations, particularly those that control surface runoff and baseflow processes, and it also describes the quantitative association between forest cover and flow indicators in a watershed, which will help regional planners in determining the minimum proportion of forest and the maximum proportion of plantation to ensure that a

  11. Minimum forest cover required for sustainable water flow regulation of a watershed: a case study in Jambi Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, Suria; Wiegand, Kerstin; Sunarti; Slamet, Bejo

    2018-01-01

    In many tropical regions, the rapid expansion of monoculture plantations has led to a sharp decline in forest cover, potentially degrading the ability of watersheds to regulate water flow. Therefore, regional planners need to determine the minimum proportion of forest cover that is required to support adequate ecosystem services in these watersheds. However, to date, there has been little research on this issue, particularly in tropical areas where monoculture plantations are expanding at an alarming rate. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the influence of forest cover and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations on the partitioning of rainfall into direct runoff and subsurface flow in a humid, tropical watershed in Jambi Province, Indonesia. To do this, we simulated streamflow with a calibrated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model and observed several watersheds to derive the direct runoff coefficient (C) and baseflow index (BFI). The model had a strong performance, with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values of 0.80-0.88 (calibration) and 0.80-0.85 (validation) and percent bias values of -2.9-1.2 (calibration) and 7.0-11.9 (validation). We found that the percentage of forest cover in a watershed was significantly negatively correlated with C and significantly positively correlated with BFI, whereas the rubber and oil palm plantation cover showed the opposite pattern. Our findings also suggested that at least 30 % of the forest cover was required in the study area for sustainable ecosystem services. This study provides new adjusted crop parameter values for monoculture plantations, particularly those that control surface runoff and baseflow processes, and it also describes the quantitative association between forest cover and flow indicators in a watershed, which will help regional planners in determining the minimum proportion of forest and the maximum proportion of plantation to ensure that a watershed can provide

  12. Proposed minimum requirements for the operational characteristics and testing of closed circuit life support system control electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J C

    1998-01-01

    The popularization and transformation of scuba diving into a broadly practiced sport has served to ignite the interest of technically oriented divers into ever more demanding areas. This, along with the gradual release of military data, equipment, and techniques of closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus, has resulted in a virtual explosion of semiclosed and closed circuit systems for divers. Although many of these systems have been carefully thought out by capable designers, the impulse to rush to market with equipment that has not been fully developed and carefully tested is irresistible to marketers. In addition, the presence of systems developed by well-intentioned and otherwise competent designers who are, nonetheless, inexperienced in the field of life support can result in the sale of failure-prone equipment to divers who lack the knowledge and skills to identify deficiencies before disaster occurs. For this reason, a set of industry standards establishing minimum requirements and testing is needed to guide the designers of this equipment, and to protect the user community from incomplete or inadequate design. Many different technologies go into the development of closed circuit scuba. One key area is the design of electronics to monitor and maintain the critical gas mixtures of the closed circuit loop. Much of the system reliability and inherent danger is resident in the design of the circuitry and the software (if any) that runs it. This article will present a set of proposed minimum requirements, with the goal of establishing a dialog for the creation of guidelines for the classification, rating, design, and testing of embedded electronics for life support systems used in closed circuit applications. These guidelines will serve as the foundation for the later creation of a set of industry specifications.

  13. Meeting blood requirements following terrorist attacks: the Israeli experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Eilat; Yahalom, Vered; Silverman, Barbara G

    2006-11-01

    Blood services worldwide must be prepared to meet surges in demand for blood components needed by casualties of domestic disasters and acts of terrorism. Israel's National Blood Services, operated by Magen David Adom, has extensive experience in managing blood collections and supply in emergencies. This review summarizes the structure and function of Magen David Adom's national blood program, and relates its experience to other practices that have been reported in the medical literature. Between 2000 and 2005, 7497 victims (85% civilians) were involved in 1645 terrorist attacks in Israel. On-site triage resulted in 967 (13%) deaths at the scene, 615 (8%) with severe injuries, 897 (12%) with moderate injuries and 5018 (67%) with mild injuries. Requests for blood averaged 1.3 blood units and 0.9 components per casualty, or 6.7 units and 4.5 components per severe and moderately injured patient. Public appeals for blood donations were managed centrally to match supply with demand and prevent wastage. This experience illustrates the advantages of a comprehensive program for managing blood operations in emergency situations. A coordinated national program can stabilize in-hospital inventories during routine activities, ensure instant access to precisely defined inventories, facilitate sufficient supply in times of disasters, and minimize outdating and wastage.

  14. Heat treatment of firewood : meeting the phytosanitary requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard Bergman; Brian K. Brashaw; Scott Myers; Marc Joyal

    2011-01-01

    The movement of firewood within emerald ash borer- (EAB-) infested states and into adjoining states has been a major contributor to the spread of EAB throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to stop the further spread of EAB from infested areas and to facilitate interstate commerce, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has required and...

  15. DO LISTED COMPANIES IN PSE MEET IFRS DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEREZA MIKOVÁ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Strong international integration and globalization affects the contemporary world´s economy which has influence in development of movement of capital, financial markets and decision making of each business entity. Because of increased force to comparability between companies, the idea of one single-setting globally accepted financial reporting standards was started in 1973 in London by International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC as a standards setter of International Accounting Standards (IAS. In the year 2000 the International Organization of Securities Commission (IOSCO recommended to use IFRS for all their members. The paper states about Prague Stock Exchange (PSE as a member of IOSCO, its index PX and companies which create the index PX. The index base is composed of 14 companies which reported their financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS, earlier IAS. The aim of the paper is to briefly introduce Prague Stock Exchange and index PX and to evaluate the chosen disclosure requirements of companies which create the index. The disclosure requirements, which are assessed are chosen from IAS 1: Presentation of Financial Statements and IFRS 8: Segments reporting. Research of disclosure requirements has been done by gathering the financial statements from years: 2011 and 2012 and assessment of chosen question is based on disclosure requirements of IAS 1 and IFRS 8. Those standards were chosen because of the wide range of companies. The next part of research is to assess the development between the compared years.

  16. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  17. High performance sealing - meeting nuclear and aerospace requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.; Metcalfe, R.

    1994-11-01

    Although high performance sealing is required in many places, two industries lead all others in terms of their demand-nuclear and aerospace. The factors that govern the high reliability and integrity of seals, particularly elastomer seals, for both industries are discussed. Aerospace requirements include low structural weight and a broad range of conditions, from the cold vacuum of space to the hot, high pressures of rocket motors. It is shown, by example, how a seal can be made an integral part of a structure in order to improve performance, rather than using a conventional handbook design. Typical processes are then described for selection, specification and procurement of suitable elastomers, functional and accelerated performance testing, database development and service-life prediction. Methods for quality assurance of elastomer seals are summarized. Potentially catastrophic internal dejects are a particular problem for conventional non-destructive inspection techniques. A new method of elastodynamic testing for these is described. (author)

  18. Supporting the design of office layout meeting ergonomics requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritis, Spyros; Marmaras, Nicolas

    2007-11-01

    This paper proposes a method and an information technology tool aiming to support the ergonomics layout design of individual workstations in a given space (building). The proposed method shares common ideas with previous generic methods for office layout. However, it goes a step forward and focuses on the cognitive tasks which have to be carried out by the designer or the design team trying to alleviate them. This is achieved in two ways: (i) by decomposing the layout design problem to six main stages, during which only a limited number of variables and requirements are considered and (ii) by converting the ergonomics requirements to functional design guidelines. The information technology tool (ErgoOffice 0.1) automates certain phases of the layout design process, and supports the design team either by its editing and graphical facilities or by providing adequate memory support.

  19. Meeting cross-section requirements for nuclear-energy design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisbin, C.R.; de Saussure, G.; Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Gilai, T. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel))

    1982-01-01

    Current requirements in cross-section data that are essential to nuclear-energy programmes are summarized and explained and some insight into how these data might be obtained is provided. The six sections of the paper describe: design parameters and target accuracies; data collection, evaluation and analysis; determination of high-accuracy differential nuclear data for technological applications; status of selected evaluated nuclear data; analysis of benchmark testing; identification of important cross sections and inferred needs.

  20. 29 CFR 4.175 - Meeting requirements for health, welfare, and/or pension benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Meeting requirements for health, welfare, and/or pension... health, welfare, and/or pension benefits. (a) Determining the required amount of benefits. (1) Most fringe benefit determinations containing health and welfare and/or pension requirements specify a fixed...

  1. Meeting Hanford's Infrastructure Requirements - 12505

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Karen [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Hanford, by all accounts, is an enormous and complex project, with thousands of disparate, but co-mingled activities in motion on any given day. The primary target of the mission at Hanford is cleanup of the 586 square-mile site, but there is the equally vital mission of site services and infrastructure. Without functions like the well-maintained site roads, electricity, water, and emergency management services, not a single cleanup project could be undertaken. As the cleanup projects evolve - with new work-scope emerging, while existing projects are completed - there becomes a very real need to keep projects integrated and working to the same 'blueprint'. And the Hanford blueprint extends for years and includes myriad variables that come with meeting the challenges and complexities associated with Hanford cleanup. Because of an innovative and unique contracting strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) found a way to keep the cleanup projects un-encumbered from the side task of having to self-provide their individual essential site services, thus allowing the cleanup contractors to concentrate their efforts on their primary mission of cleaning up the site. These infrastructure and support services also need to be provided efficiently and cost effectively - done primarily through 'right-sizing' efforts. The real innovation came when DOE had the foresight to include a second provision in this contract which specifically asked for a specialized role of site integrator and innovator, with a special emphasis placed on providing substantial cost savings for the government. The need for a true site integrator function was necessitated by the ever-increasing complexity of projects at Hanford and the progression of cleanup at others. At present, there are two main DOE offices overseeing the cleanup work and six primary contractors performing that work. Each of these contractors works to separate schedules and cleanup milestones, and the nature of the

  2. 29 CFR 520.403 - What information is required when applying for authority to pay less than the minimum wage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pay less than the minimum wage? 520.403 Section 520.403 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF... than the minimum wage? (a) A separate application must be made for each plant or establishment...

  3. The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project: sample preparation guidelines for reliable reporting of glycomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struwe, Weston B; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P; Costello, Catherine E; Dell, Anne; Ten Feizi; Haslam, Stuart M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Kolarich, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Novotny, Milos V; Packer, Nicolle H; Paulson, James C; Rapp, Erdmann; Ranzinger, Rene; Rudd, Pauline M; Smith, David F; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wells, Lance; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Kettner, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project was established in 2011 to provide guidelines to aid in data reporting from all types of experiments in glycomics research including mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography, glycan arrays, data handling and sample preparation. MIRAGE is a concerted effort of the wider glycomics community that considers the adaptation of reporting guidelines as an important step towards critical evaluation and dissemination of datasets as well as broadening of experimental techniques worldwide. The MIRAGE Commission published reporting guidelines for MS data and here we outline guidelines for sample preparation. The sample preparation guidelines include all aspects of sample generation, purification and modification from biological and/or synthetic carbohydrate material. The application of MIRAGE sample preparation guidelines will lead to improved recording of experimental protocols and reporting of understandable and reproducible glycomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A study of the minimum number of slices required for quantification of pulmonary emphysema by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitsuda, Yutaka; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    We attempted to determine the minimum number of slices required for quantification of overall emphysema by computed tomography (CT). Forty-nine patients underwent CT scanning with a 15-mm slice interval, and 13 to 18 slices per patient were obtained. The percentage of low attenuation area (LAA%) per slice was measured with a method that we reported on previously, utilizing a CT program and NIH image. The average LAA% values for 1, 2, 3, and 6 slices evenly spaced through the lungs [LAA% (1), LAA% (2), LAA% (3), and LAA% (6)] were compared with those for all slices [LAA% (All)]. The correlation coefficients for LAA% (1), LAA% (2), LAA% (3), and LAA% (6) with LAA% (All) were 0.961, 0.981, 0.993, and 0.997, respectively. Mean differences ±SD were -3.20±4.21%, -2.32±3.00, -0.20±1.84, and -0.16±1.26, respectively. From these results, we concluded that overall emphysema can be quantified by using at least three slices: one each of the upper, middle, and lower lung. (author)

  5. Assessment of patch quality by aphidophagous ladybirds: laboratory study on the minimum density of aphids required for oviposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Das

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that there is a density of aphids below which ladybirds are unlikely to lay eggs. This is adaptive as theory indicates that a certain minimum population density of aphids is required if hatchling larvae are to survive. The responses of gravid females of the two spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata (L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, recorded over a period of an hour, to colonies of 5 and 50 pea aphids on bean plants and similar plants each previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours were determined. Proportionally more of the ladybirds on plants with 50 aphids or that were previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours laid eggs and larger clusters of eggs, and were less active than those on plants that were infested with or had previously been infested with five aphids. That is, gravid females showed similar oviposition and activity responses to aphid abundance and different levels of honeydew contamination. This indicates that honeydew contamination may be an important cue used by ladybirds when locating and assessing the abundance of prey in aphid colonies.

  6. The Financial Education Tool Kit: Helping Teachers Meet State- Mandated Personal Finance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pierre, Eileen; Richert, Charlotte; Routh, Susan; Lockwood, Rachel; Simpson, Mickey

    2012-01-01

    States are recognizing the need for personal financial education and have begun requiring it as a condition for high school graduation. Responding to teacher requests to help them meet state-mandated financial education requirements, FCS educators in the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service developed a financial education tool kit. This article…

  7. Proceedings of the meeting for coordinating precision machining of optics research and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.T.

    1975-12-01

    The meeting for ''Coordinating Precision Machining of Optics Research and Requirements'' on September 18, 1975, was sponsored by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory at Kirtland AFB, NM. These proceedings contain an introduction to the meeting including a brief description of the participants and the objectives. The developments and capabilities of Union Carbide Y-12 plant are described in detail. A short summary of the new Moore no. 5 machine at Bendix, Kansas City, Mo. is included as well as a description of using light scattering for roughness characterization at Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado. The executive summary of the meeting mentions some of the discussions that also followed. Important conclusions of the meeting were that a 5 y lead time is required to obtain a machine and acquire the necessary skills for precision machining, and that demands for diamond turning optics will be increasing

  8. Analysis of transport logistics and routing requirements for radioactive waste management systems with respect to a minimum power scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.A.

    1984-10-01

    This report assesses the transport logistics associated with disposal of intermediate-level radioactive waste, as generated by CEGB, SSEB, UKAEA and BNFL, in accordance with a 'Minimum Power Scenario'. Transport by road and rail is analysed, as in previous reports; use of coastal shipping however has not been included but has been replaced with a combined road/rail option. (author)

  9. 76 FR 14275 - Regulations Issued Under the Export Grape and Plum Act; Revision to the Minimum Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... of the Internet and other information technologies to provide increased opportunities for citizen... shipment. \\1\\ Kadar, A.A., Postharvest Technology of Horticultural Crops, University of California..., Romania, Scotland, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales), or Greenland shall meet each...

  10. Technical Meeting on Grading of the Application of Management System Requirements. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this Technical Meeting are threefold: - to share international experiences and lessons learned, as well as exchange views on best practices and strategies to overcome the difficulties encountered; - to review and discuss the draft technical report on 'Grading the Application of Management System Requirements, to allow the participants to contribute to the improvement of the document and to enrich it with practical examples; and - to strengthen the international networking of specialists in the field. The topics covered during the meeting will include: - Examples and case studies presented by participants from countries with nuclear facilities (mainly focused on NPPs, and, where appropriate, from research reactors, fuel cycle and waste management facilities) on grading the application of management system requirements and lessons learned. - Reviewing and improving the final draft of a technical report on 'Grading the Application of Management System Requirements', which will supersede the previous guidance: Grading of Quality Assurance Requirement: A Manual (Technical Reports Series No. 328)

  11. 40 CFR 267.174 - What special requirements must I meet for ignitable or reactive waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special requirements must I meet for ignitable or reactive waste? 267.174 Section 267.174 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE...

  12. 40 CFR 267.175 - What special requirements must I meet for incompatible wastes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special requirements must I meet for incompatible wastes? 267.175 Section 267.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE...

  13. 40 CFR 267.203 - What special requirements must I meet for incompatible wastes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special requirements must I meet for incompatible wastes? 267.203 Section 267.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE...

  14. Supporting Intrinsic Motivation for Special Education Students to Meet Graduation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Robert Sipplin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how teachers use instructional practices and family reinforcement interventions to support intrinsic motivation for special education students as a means to meet graduation requirements. Purposeful sampling of highly qualified special education teachers certified in language arts was used in this study. The data…

  15. 40 CFR 267.202 - What special requirements must I meet for ignitable or reactive wastes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... material no longer meets the definition of ignitable or reactive waste under § 261.21 or § 261.23 of this... requirements for the maintenance of protective distances between the waste management area and any public ways... for ignitable or reactive wastes? 267.202 Section 267.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  16. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care that... contain an approved current home study. (c) An off-reservation foster home, or residential care facility...

  17. 29 CFR 4.172 - Meeting requirements for particular fringe benefits-in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Meeting requirements for particular fringe benefits-in... particular fringe benefits—in general. Where a fringe benefit determination specifies the amount of the..., as such costs are properly a business expense of the employer. If prevailing fringe benefits for...

  18. 49 CFR 40.33 - What training requirements must a collector meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Collection Personnel § 40.33 What training... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What training requirements must a collector meet...-3784, or on the ODAPC web site (http://www.dot.gov/ost/dapc). (b) Qualification training. You must...

  19. Assessment of patch quality by aphidophagous ladybirds: Laboratory study on the minimum density of aphids required for oviposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Das, B. C.; Dixon, Anthony F. G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2011), s. 57-60 ISSN 1805-0174 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Adalia bipunctata * Aphididae * arrestant * Coccinellidae * cues for oviposition * honeydew * minimum aphid density * patch quality * predator Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  20. The Journey to Meet Emerging Community Benefit Requirements in a Rural Hospital: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Allison V; Levin, Pamela F

    2015-10-22

    The Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to collaborate with public health agencies and community stakeholders to identify and address community health needs. As a rural organization, Wabash County (Indiana) Hospital pursued new approaches to achieve these revised requirements of the community benefit mandate. Using a case study approach, the authors provide a historical review of governmental relationships with nonprofit community hospitals, offer a case study application for implementing legislative mandates and community benefit requirements, share the insights they garnered on their journey to meet the mandates, and conclude that drawing upon the existing resources in the community and using current community assets in novel ways can help conserve time, and also financial, material, and human resources in meeting legislative mandates.

  1. 13 CFR 120.425 - What are the minimum elements that SBA will require before consenting to a securitization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the accuracy of the data used to make the Currency Rate calculation. [64 FR 6508, Feb. 10, 1999, as... compliance with this section if it meets the definition of “well capitalized” used by its bank regulator. SBA... used to make the Loss Rate calculation. (c) PLP Privilege Suspension. (1) Suspension: If a securitizer...

  2. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (b) Accounting records. The financial management system shall maintain records sufficiently detailed... Principles for Educational Institutions.” (f) Source documentation. The financial management system shall... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section...

  3. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... capital and reserve requirements to be issued by order or regulation with respect to a product or activity... minimum capital requirements. Section 1362(a) establishes a minimum capital level for the Enterprises... entities required under this section.\\6\\ \\3\\ The Bank Act's current minimum capital requirements apply to...

  4. Meeting the International Health Regulations (2005) surveillance core capacity requirements at the subnational level in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziemann, Alexandra; Rosenkötter, Nicole; Riesgo, Luis Garcia-Castrillo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The revised World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005) request a timely and all-hazard approach towards surveillance, especially at the subnational level. We discuss three questions of syndromic surveillance application in the European context for assessing...... public health emergencies of international concern: (i) can syndromic surveillance support countries, especially the subnational level, to meet the International Health Regulations (2005) core surveillance capacity requirements, (ii) are European syndromic surveillance systems comparable to enable cross...... effect of different types of public health emergencies in a timely manner as required by the International Health Regulations (2005)....

  5. Identification of Evidence for Key Parameters in Decision-Analytic Models of Cost Effectiveness: A Description of Sources and a Recommended Minimum Search Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, Suzy

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes recommendations for a minimum level of searching for data for key parameters in decision-analytic models of cost effectiveness and describes sources of evidence relevant to each parameter type. Key parameters are defined as treatment effects, adverse effects, costs, resource use, health state utility values (HSUVs) and baseline risk of events. The recommended minimum requirement for treatment effects is comprehensive searching according to available methodological guidance. For other parameter types, the minimum is the searching of one bibliographic database plus, where appropriate, specialist sources and non-research-based and non-standard format sources. The recommendations draw on the search methods literature and on existing analyses of how evidence is used to support decision-analytic models. They take account of the range of research and non-research-based sources of evidence used in cost-effectiveness models and of the need for efficient searching. Consideration is given to what constitutes best evidence for the different parameter types in terms of design and scientific quality and to making transparent the judgments that underpin the selection of evidence from the options available. Methodological issues are discussed, including the differences between decision-analytic models of cost effectiveness and systematic reviews when searching and selecting evidence and comprehensive versus sufficient searching. Areas are highlighted where further methodological research is required.

  6. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 380 - Minimum Filing Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act A Appendix A to Part 380 Conservation of Power... Filing Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act. Resource Report 1—General Project Description 1. Provide a detailed description and...

  7. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  8. Does a new steam meal catering system meet patient requirements in hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, M; Fearnley, L; Thomas, J; Evans, S

    2007-10-01

    It has been consistently observed that a significant proportion of hospital inpatients are malnourished and many actually develop malnutrition in hospital. The NHS provides over 300 million meals each year at a cost of pound 500 million, yet there is relatively little research evaluating how well different catering systems provide for the needs of hospital inpatients. The aim of the study was to: (i) evaluate whether a new steam meal catering system (Steamplicity) enables patients in theory to meet their energy requirements in hospital and (ii) compare energy and protein intake using Steamplicity with a traditional bulk cook-chill system. Patients not at nutritional risk had their food intake at one lunchtime assessed. Energy intake was compared with the patients' energy requirements and energy and protein intake were compared with previous data from a bulk system. Fifty-seven patients had a median daily energy requirement of 7648 kJ (1821 kcal) [inter-quartile range (IQR): 6854-9164 kJ]. Assuming 30% [2293 kJ (546 kcal)] should be supplied by the lunch meal the average intake of 1369 kJ (326 kcal) fell short by 40%. Patients served meals from Steamplicity ate less energy [1369 kJ versus 1562 kJ (326 kcal versus 372 kcal) P = 0.04] but similar protein (18 g versus 19 g P = 0.34) to the bulk system. The largest difference was the energy provided by the dessert since the bulk system served more hot high-calorie desserts. Patient intakes did not meet their estimated requirements. The patients in this study were eating well and not at nutritional risk, thus patients with a poor appetite will be even less likely to meet their nutritional requirements. Steamplicity meals result in a lower energy intake than meals from a bulk cook-chill system, but similar protein intakes.

  9. Apparent Minimum Free Energy Requirements for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Anoxic Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the most fundamental constraints governing the distribution of microorganisms in the environment is the availability of chemical energy at biologically useful levels. To assess the minimum free energy yield that can support microbial metabolism in situ, we examined the thermodynamics of H2-consuming processes in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA. Depth distributions of H2 partial pressure, along with a suite of relevant concentration data, were determined in sediment cores collected in November (at 14.5 C) and August (at 27 C) and used to calculate free energy yields for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. At both times of year, and for both processes, free energy yields gradually decreased (became less negative) with depth before reaching an apparent asymptote. Sulfate reducing bacteria exhibited an asymptote of -19.1 +/- 1.7 kj(mol SO4(2-)(sup -1) while methanogenic archaea were apparently supported by energy yields as small as -10.6 +/- 0.7 kj(mol CH4)(sup -1).

  10. Air sampling in the workplace to meet the new part 20 requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.; Hickey, E.E.; Knox, W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is developing a Regulatory Guide on air sampling in the workplace to meet the requirements of the revised Part 20. The guide will be accompanied by a technical manual describing and giving examples of how to meet the recommendations in the guide. Draft versions of the guide and manual are scheduled to be published for public comment this year. A final guide and manual, revised to consider the public comments, are scheduled to be published in 1992. This talk will summarize some of the more important features of the guide and manual. In particular, the talk will discuss how to demonstrate that samples taken to estimate worker intakes are representative of the air inhaled by workers and what measurements are necessary if a licensee wants to adjust derived air concentrations to account for particle size

  11. Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knick, Steven T; Hanser, Steven E; Preston, Kristine L

    2013-06-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors. However, developing a species distribution model that incorporates the diversity of habitats used by sage-grouse across their widespread distribution has statistical and logistical challenges. We first identified the ecological minimums limiting sage-grouse, mapped similarity to the multivariate set of minimums, and delineated connectivity across a 920,000 km(2) region. We partitioned a Mahalanobis D (2) model of habitat use into k separate additive components each representing independent combinations of species-habitat relationships to identify the ecological minimums required by sage-grouse. We constructed the model from abiotic, land cover, and anthropogenic variables measured at leks (breeding) and surrounding areas within 5 km. We evaluated model partitions using a random subset of leks and historic locations and selected D (2) (k = 10) for mapping a habitat similarity index (HSI). Finally, we delineated connectivity by converting the mapped HSI to a resistance surface. Sage-grouse required sagebrush-dominated landscapes containing minimal levels of human land use. Sage-grouse used relatively arid regions characterized by shallow slopes, even terrain, and low amounts of forest, grassland, and agriculture in the surrounding landscape. Most populations were interconnected although several outlying populations were isolated because of distance or lack of habitat corridors for exchange. Land management agencies currently are revising land-use plans and designating critical habitat to conserve sage-grouse and avoid endangered

  12. Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steven E.; Preston, Kristine L.

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors. However, developing a species distribution model that incorporates the diversity of habitats used by sage-grouse across their widespread distribution has statistical and logistical challenges. We first identified the ecological minimums limiting sage-grouse, mapped similarity to the multivariate set of minimums, and delineated connectivity across a 920,000 km2 region. We partitioned a Mahalanobis D2 model of habitat use into k separate additive components each representing independent combinations of species–habitat relationships to identify the ecological minimums required by sage-grouse. We constructed the model from abiotic, land cover, and anthropogenic variables measured at leks (breeding) and surrounding areas within 5 km. We evaluated model partitions using a random subset of leks and historic locations and selected D2 (k = 10) for mapping a habitat similarity index (HSI). Finally, we delineated connectivity by converting the mapped HSI to a resistance surface. Sage-grouse required sagebrush-dominated landscapes containing minimal levels of human land use. Sage-grouse used relatively arid regions characterized by shallow slopes, even terrain, and low amounts of forest, grassland, and agriculture in the surrounding landscape. Most populations were interconnected although several outlying populations were isolated because of distance or lack of habitat corridors for exchange. Land management agencies currently are revising land-use plans and designating critical habitat to conserve sage-grouse and avoid endangered

  13. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    July 1989 No.19 Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences. 55th Annual. Meeting ... in the world, keeping alive atthe same time his research interests, abreast .... theory made a comeback with many new ideas and with the success of the ...

  14. Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

  15. Meeting United States re-licensing requirements related to environmental protection using innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taft, E.P.; Winchell, F.C.; Cook, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    Procedure for meeting re-licensing requirements related to environmental protection and an overview of several new and emerging technologies regarding the development of ways to prevent fish passage through hydraulic turbines at hydroelectric power dams is described. Fish mortality and injury has long been a concern in the hydroelectric industry and research and development efforts have been ongoing since the 1970s to prevent fish passage through turbines. Several new and emerging technologies are examined that have the potential for wide-spread cost-effective applications

  16. Multi-component nuclear energy system to meet requirement of self-consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir; Shmelev, Anotolii; Korovin, Yorii

    2000-01-01

    Environmental harmonization of nuclear energy technology is considered as an absolutely necessary condition in its future successful development for peaceful use. Establishment of Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System, that simultaneously meets four requirements - energy production, fuel production, burning of radionuclides and safety, strongly relies on the neutron excess generation. Implementation of external non-fission based neutron sources into fission energy system would open the possibility of approaching Multicomponent Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System with unlimited fuel resources, zero radioactivity release and high protection against uncontrolled proliferation of nuclear materials. (author)

  17. Computer-aided design of control systems to meet many requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schy, A. A.; Adams, W. M., Jr.; Johnson, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for using nonlinear programing in the computer-aided design of airplane control systems. It is assumed that the quality of such systems depends on many criteria. These criteria are included in the constraints vector (instead of attempting to combine them into a single scalar criterion, as is usually done), and the design proceeds through a sequence of nonlinear programing solutions in which the designer varies the specification of sets of requirements levels. The method is applied to design of a lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) for a fighter airplane, in which the requirements vector is chosen from the official handling qualities specifications. Results are shown for several simple SAS configurations designed to obtain desirable handling qualities over all design flight conditions with minimum feedback gains. The choice of the final design for each case is not unique but depends on the designer's decision as to which achievable set of requirements levels represents the best for that system. Results indicate that it may be possible to design constant parameter SAS which can satisfy the most stringent handling qualities requirements for fighter airplanes in all flight conditions. The role of the designer as a decision maker, interacting with the computer program, is discussed. Advantages of this type of designer-computer interaction are emphasized. Desirable extensions of the method are indicated.

  18. 14 CFR 61.311 - What flight proficiency requirements must I meet to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... meet to apply for a sport pilot certificate? 61.311 Section 61.311 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.311 What flight proficiency requirements must I meet to apply for a sport pilot certificate? Except as specified in § 61.329, to apply for a sport pilot...

  19. 31 CFR 30.11 - Q-11: Are TARP recipients required to meet any other standards under the executive compensation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... meet any other standards under the executive compensation and corporate governance standards in section... TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.11 Q-11: Are TARP recipients required to meet any other standards under the executive compensation and corporate governance standards in section...

  20. A technical basis for meeting waste form stability requirements of 10 CFR 61

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.Y.; Skoski, L.; Eng, R.; Tuite, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    To assure that solidified low level waste forms meet the stability requirements of 10 CFR 61 regulations, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published Branch Technical Positions (BTPs) and draft Regulatory Guide on waste form stability. These guidance documents describe the test procedures and acceptance criteria for six stability parameters: leachability, compressive strength, immersion effect, radiation effect, thermal stability and biodegradability. The most recent set of recommended tests and acceptance criteria are presented in the November 1986 Preliminary Draft Regulatory Guide Low Level Waste Form Stability. The objective of this study was to: (1) investigate the regulatory and technical bases for the required stability tests, (2) evaluate the relevance of these tests and acceptance criteria based on actual test results, and (3) recommended alternatives to the testing and acceptance criteria. The latter two objectives are discussed in this paper

  1. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: 1) analysis techniques, 2) testing, 3) subsystem and component development, 4) packaging systems development support, and 5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  2. Meeting Vitamin D Requirements in White Caucasians at UK Latitudes: Providing a Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann R. Webb

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The body gains vitamin D through both oral intake (diet/supplementation and synthesis in skin upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR. Sun exposure is the major source for most people even though sun exposure is complex and limited by climate and culture. We aimed to quantify the sun exposure required to meet vitamin D targets year-round and determine whether this can be safely achieved in a simply defined manner in the UK as an alternative to increasing vitamin D oral intake. Data from observation (sun exposure, diet, and vitamin D status and UVR intervention studies performed with white Caucasian adults were combined with modeled all-weather UVR climatology. Daily vitamin D effective UVR doses (all-weather were calculated across the UK based on ten-year climatology for pre-defined lunchtime exposure regimes. Calculations then determined the time necessary to spend outdoors for the body to gain sufficient vitamin D levels for year-round needs without being sunburnt under differing exposure scenarios. Results show that, in specified conditions, white Caucasians across the UK need nine minutes of daily sunlight at lunchtime from March to September for 25(OHD levels to remain ≥25 nmol/L throughout the winter. This assumes forearms and lower legs are exposed June-August, while in the remaining, cooler months only hands and face need be exposed. Exposing only the hands and face throughout the summer does not meet requirements.

  3. Nutrient fertilizer requirements for sustainable biomass supply to meet U.S. bioenergy goal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fengxiang X.; King, Roger L.; Lindner, Jeffrey S.; Monts, David L.; Su, Yi; Luthe, John C. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology, Mississippi State University, 205 Research Blvd., Starkville, MS 39759 (United States); Yu, Tzu-Yi [Department of Information Management, National Chi-Nan University, 470 University Rd., Puli, Nantou, 54561 Taiwan (China); Durbha, Surya S.; Younan, Nicolas H. [GeoResources Institute, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States); Plodinec, M. John [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg 773-A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The U.S. Biomass Roadmap set forth a goal that, by the year 2030, biomass will supply energy approximately equivalent to 30% of current petroleum consumption. Here we report on the amount of nutrient fertilizers required to meet the proposed 1-billion tons of sustainable bioenergy biomass production annually. To meet this goal, U.S. agriculture (assuming a scenario with high yield increase and land use change) will have net removals of 40.3, 12.7, and 36.2 Tg (million tons) of N, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and K{sub 2}O, respectively. The 1-billion tons of bioenergy biomass production alone will remove 16.9, 5.2, and 18.2 Tg of N, P{sub 2}O{sub 5,} and K{sub 2}O, respectively, from U.S. agricultural land. Considering the efficiencies of fertilizers in soils and the contribution of biomass residuals in fields, the overall bioenergy-focused agriculture would require 58.2, 27.3, and 31.7 Tg of N, P{sub 2}O{sub 5,} and K{sub 2}O fertilizers, respectively; this corresponds to an overall nutrient fertilizer application increase by a factor of 5.5 over the base line (1997). This study indicates an increased need for domestic and/or international production facilities for fertilizers if the goal of the Biomass Roadmap is to be attained. (author)

  4. Innovative nuclear reactor - Indian approach to meet user requirements for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of key issues are to be addressed. It should be economically competitive; it must address the issues related to nuclear safety, proliferation resistance, environmental impact, waste disposal and cross cutting issues like social and infra-structural aspects. To compete successfully in the long term, in the highly competitive energy market and to overcome other challenges, it is necessary to introduce innovative reactor and fuel cycle concepts. Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is one such innovative reactor. To guide the research and development activities related to innovative concepts, user requirements are to be formulated. User requirements covering various aspects of sustainable development are being formulated at both national and international levels. One such international project involved in the formulation of user requirements is the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). This paper deals with INPRO user requirements for safety and Indian approach to meet these requirements through AHWR

  5. METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINATION OF SOUND INSULATION OF APARTMENTS’ ENCLOSING STRUCTURES TO MEET NOISE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Subject: an important task in the design of internal enclosing structures of apartments is the establishment of their required soundproofing ability. At present, there is no reliable method for determining the required sound insulation and in this regard internal enclosures are designed without proper justification for noise protection. Research objectives: development of a technique for determining the required sound insulation of apartment’s internal enclosures to ensure an acceptable noise regime in the apartments’ rooms under the action of intra-apartment noise sources. Materials and methods: the methodology was developed on the basis of a statistical method for noise calculation in the apartments, treated as systems of acoustically coupled proportionate rooms, and with the help of a computer program that implements this method. Results: the technique makes it possible to generate, with the use of computer technologies, a targeted selection of internal enclosures of the apartment to meet their soundproofing requirements. Conclusions: the technique proposed in the article can be used at the design stage of apartments when determining the required soundproofing of partitions and doors. Using this technique, it is possible to harmonize the sound insulation ratio of individual elements among themselves and thereby guarantee a selection of internal structures for their acoustic and economic efficiency.

  6. Ecologically justified regulatory provisions for riverine hydroelectric power plants and minimum instream flow requirements in diverted streams; Oekologisch begruendete, dynamische Mindestwasserregelungen bei Ausleitungskraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorde, K.

    1997-12-31

    The study was intended to develop a model versatile enough to permit quantification of various water demand scenarios in connection with operation of riverine hydroelectric power plants. Specific emphasis was to be placed on defining the minimum instream flow to be maintained in river segments because of the elementary significance to flowing water biocinoses. Based on fictitious minimum water requirements, various scenarious were simulated for flow regimes depending on power plant operation, so as to establish a system for comparative analysis and evaluation of resulting economic effects on power plant efficiency on the one hand, and the ecologic effects on the aquatic habitat. The information derived was to serve as a basis for decision-making for regulatory purposes. For this study, the temporal and spatial variability of the flow regime at the river bed in a river segment was examined for the first time. Based on this information, complemented by information obtained from habitat simulations, a method was derived for determination of ecologic requirements and their incorporation into regulatory water management provisions. The field measurements were carried out with the FST hemisphere as a proven and most efficient and reliable method of assessing flow regimes at river beds. Evaluation of the measured instream flow data characterising three morphologically different segments of diverted rivers was done with the CASIMIR computer code. The ASS models derived were used for comparative assessment of existing regulatory provisions and recommended amendments determining required minimum instream flow in diverted rivers. The requirements were defined taking as a basis data obtained for three different years. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel der Arbeit war die Entwicklung eines Modellverfahrens, das flexibel die Quantifizierung unterschiedlicher Nutzansprueche an Laufwasserkraftanlagen ermoeglicht. Insbesondere der Erhalt einer gewissen Dynamik, die fuer

  7. Ecologically justified regulatory provisions for riverine hydroelectric power plants and minimum instream flow requirements in diverted streams; Oekologisch begruendete, dynamische Mindestwasserregelungen bei Ausleitungskraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorde, K

    1998-12-31

    The study was intended to develop a model versatile enough to permit quantification of various water demand scenarios in connection with operation of riverine hydroelectric power plants. Specific emphasis was to be placed on defining the minimum instream flow to be maintained in river segments because of the elementary significance to flowing water biocinoses. Based on fictitious minimum water requirements, various scenarious were simulated for flow regimes depending on power plant operation, so as to establish a system for comparative analysis and evaluation of resulting economic effects on power plant efficiency on the one hand, and the ecologic effects on the aquatic habitat. The information derived was to serve as a basis for decision-making for regulatory purposes. For this study, the temporal and spatial variability of the flow regime at the river bed in a river segment was examined for the first time. Based on this information, complemented by information obtained from habitat simulations, a method was derived for determination of ecologic requirements and their incorporation into regulatory water management provisions. The field measurements were carried out with the FST hemisphere as a proven and most efficient and reliable method of assessing flow regimes at river beds. Evaluation of the measured instream flow data characterising three morphologically different segments of diverted rivers was done with the CASIMIR computer code. The ASS models derived were used for comparative assessment of existing regulatory provisions and recommended amendments determining required minimum instream flow in diverted rivers. The requirements were defined taking as a basis data obtained for three different years. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel der Arbeit war die Entwicklung eines Modellverfahrens, das flexibel die Quantifizierung unterschiedlicher Nutzansprueche an Laufwasserkraftanlagen ermoeglicht. Insbesondere der Erhalt einer gewissen Dynamik, die fuer

  8. Meeting the latest qualification requirements for Class 1E protection system equipment: a practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daigle, R.P.; Breen, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The requirements for qualifying Class 1E equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations were significantly revised in 1974 and 1975. These new requirements reflect the desire of the industry to provide improved methods of determining the qualification of this vital equipment. The revised standards do, in fact, meet these industry goals in a generally acceptable manner. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is presently requiring utilities to comply with these revised standards and regulatory guides in order to obtain the necessary permits. Manufacturers are developing and implementing programs to comply with the new requirements. One of the more difficult new requirements of qualification is aging to achieve advanced life condition. The objectives and methods described for aging are difficult for much of the equipment within the Protection System. The use of thermal and vibrational techniques to simulate aging is valid for some components (i.e., capacitors, transistors, cable and/or motor insulation) but may be neither valid nor practical for many items (e.g., complete instrument systems, etc.). A seemingly obvious approach, although rarely followed, in regarding new or revised standards is to refrain from making any type of commitment until the standards are thoroughly understood. Often too hasty a decision is made by a utility (concerned about licensing) or a manufacturer (concerned about being competitive) to commit to new requirements. Consequently, the broad range of interpretations that usually develops for a given set of requirements may result in difficult relations between organizations. This paper deals with solutions for qualification in a practical sense, with emphasis on the aging issue and does not elaborate on seismic qualification

  9. U.S. petroleum refining: Meeting requirements for cleaner fuels and refineries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warden, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    A review is presented of a study carried out by the National Petroleum Council that assessed the ability of the U.S. oil industry to manufacture and supply the quantity and quality of products required in the 1990s and beyond. The competitiveness of domestic supply vs product imports was analyzed and the investment requirements and other costs associated with meeting new environmental legislation and regulations on petroleum products and refineries were addressed. In particular, the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and other environmental, health, and safety initiatives, both current and prospective, were evaluated. Refineries and the logistics system were studied but not crude oil supply or service stations. The costs of stationary source health, safety and environmental regulations and requirements were evaluated for the years 1995, 2000 and 2010, and sources of U.S. light products and U.S. refinery utilization were modelled for these years. Three demand scenarios were considered: growth, no-growth, and decline. Annual expenditures for health, safety and environment programs inside refineries are expected to double in the 1990s. Expenditures of $106 billion are projected over the period 1990-2010 for new facilities and programs necessary for current and anticipated stationary source regulations. Refining and logistics costs will increase substantially. Other conclusions related to capital expenditures, refining capability, product compatibility, oxygenates and foreign product supply cost are drawn. 26 figs

  10. Proposed combination of training and education to meet the bachelor of science requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The basic similarities and differences of the education and training which, in the author's opinion, are actually needed by reactor operators are outlined and compared with the NRC requirements. Examples of engineering degree programs are presented to demonstrate that they are NOT the appropriate educational goal for a senior reactor operator. A possible program of study which could be implemented jointly by a utility and a nearby college or university is presented. The program combines both education and training to complete the requirements for a bachelors degree. Those student-operators entering the program should be able to work as auxiliary operators while pursuing the degree part time and qualify for the NRC Reactor Operator exam in five years. Then, while working as RO's, they should complete the degree requirements in another year. After an additional year of RO experience, they should meet the NRC requirements for Senior Operator. Finally, some of the possible pitfalls of such a program are discussed. These include such things as drop-outs, union agreements, inflexibility of educational institutions and, of course, cost

  11. On meeting capital requirements with a chance-constrained optimization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta Mills, Ebenezer Fiifi Emire; Yu, Bo; Gu, Lanlan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a capital to risk asset ratio chance-constrained optimization model in the presence of loans, treasury bill, fixed assets and non-interest earning assets. To model the dynamics of loans, we introduce a modified CreditMetrics approach. This leads to development of a deterministic convex counterpart of capital to risk asset ratio chance constraint. We pursue the scope of analyzing our model under the worst-case scenario i.e. loan default. The theoretical model is analyzed by applying numerical procedures, in order to administer valuable insights from a financial outlook. Our results suggest that, our capital to risk asset ratio chance-constrained optimization model guarantees banks of meeting capital requirements of Basel III with a likelihood of 95 % irrespective of changes in future market value of assets.

  12. Using Simulation-Based Medical Education to Meet the Competency Requirements for the Single Accreditation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Bernadette

    2015-08-01

    Simulation-based medical education can provide medical training in a nonjudgmental, patient-safe, and effective environment. Although simulation has been a relatively new addition to medical education, the aeronautical, judicial, and military fields have used simulation training for hundreds of years, with positive outcomes. Simulation-based medical education can be used in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, medical schools, and simulation training centers. As the author describes in the present article, residencies currently accredited by the American Osteopathic Association can use a simulation-based medical education curriculum to meet training requirements of the 6 competencies identified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The author also provides specific guidance on providing training and assessment in the professionalism competency.

  13. Analysis of clinical data to determine the minimum number of sensors required for adequate skin temperature monitoring of superficial hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Akke; Holman, Rebecca; Rodrigues, Dario B; Dobšíček Trefná, Hana; Stauffer, Paul R; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Rasch, Coen R N; Crezee, Hans

    2018-04-27

    Tumor response and treatment toxicity are related to minimum and maximum tissue temperatures during hyperthermia, respectively. Using a large set of clinical data, we analyzed the number of sensors required to adequately monitor skin temperature during superficial hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer patients. Hyperthermia treatments monitored with >60 stationary temperature sensors were selected from a database of patients with recurrent breast cancer treated with re-irradiation (23 × 2 Gy) and hyperthermia using single 434 MHz applicators (effective field size 351-396 cm 2 ). Reduced temperature monitoring schemes involved randomly selected subsets of stationary skin sensors, and another subset simulating continuous thermal mapping of the skin. Temperature differences (ΔT) between subsets and complete sets of sensors were evaluated in terms of overall minimum (T min ) and maximum (T max ) temperature, as well as T90 and T10. Eighty patients were included yielding a total of 400 hyperthermia sessions. Median ΔT was 50 sensors were used. Subsets of sensors result in underestimation of T max up to -2.1 °C (ΔT 95%CI), which decreased to -0.5 °C when >50 sensors were used. Thermal profiles (8-21 probes) yielded a median ΔT 50 stationary sensors or thermal profiles. Adequate coverage of the skin temperature distribution during superficial hyperthermia treatment requires the use of >50 stationary sensors per 400 cm 2 applicator. Thermal mapping is a valid alternative.

  14. Upgrades to meet LANL SF, 121-2011, hazardous waste facility permit requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Sean B.; Johns-Hughes, Kathryn W.

    2011-01-01

    Members of San IIdefonso have requested information from LANL regarding implementation of the revision to LANL's Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (the RCRA Permit). On January 26, 2011, LANL staff from the Waste Disposition Project and the Environmental Protection Division will provide a status update to Pueblo members at the offices of the San IIdefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural Preservation. The Waste Disposition Project presentation will focus on upgrades and improvements to LANL waste management facilities at TA-50 and TA-54. The New Mexico Environment Department issued LANL's revised Hazardous Waste Facility permit on November 30, 2010 with a 30-day implementation period. The Waste Disposition Project manages and operates four of LANL's permitted facilities; the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) at TA-SO, and Area G, Area L and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing facility (RANT) at TA-54. By implementing a combination of permanent corrective action activities and shorter-term compensatory measures, WDP was able to achieve functional compliance on December 30, 2010 with new Permit requirements at each of our facilities. One component of WOP's mission at LANL is centralized management and disposition of the Laboratory's hazardous and mixed waste. To support this mission objective, WOP has undertaken a project to upgrade our facilities and equipment to achieve fully compliant and efficient waste management operations. Upgrades to processes, equipment and facilities are being designed to provide defense-in-depth beyond the minimum, regulatory requirements where worker safety and protection of the public and the environment are concerned. Upgrades and improvements to enduring waste management facilities and operations are being designed so as not to conflict with future closure activities at Material Disposal Area G and Material Disposal Area L.

  15. 49 CFR 40.15 - May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... drug and alcohol testing requirements? 40.15 Section 40.15 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Employer Responsibilities § 40.15 May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements? (a...

  16. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C.; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C.; Wu, H. Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP‐accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)‐MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU‐MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two‐year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for‐profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs. PACS numbers: 01.40.Fk, 01.40.gb PMID:24710434

  17. Improvement of uranium production efficiency to meet China's nuclear power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.

    1997-01-01

    Recently China put the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, with an installed capacity of 300 MW, in the province of Zhejiang and the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant, with a total installed capacity of 2 x 900 MW, in commercial operation. China plans a rapid growth in nuclear power from 1995 to 2010. China's uranium production will therefore also enter a new period with nuclear power increasing. In order to meet the demand of nuclear power for uranium special attention has been paid to both technical progress improvement using management with the aim of reducing the cost of uranium production. The application of the trackless mining technique has enhanced the uranium mining productivity significantly. China has produced a radiometric sorter, model 5421-2 for pre-concentrating uranium run-of-mine ore. This effectively increases the uranium content in mill feed and decreases the operating cost of hydrometallurgical treatment. The in situ leach technique after blasting is applied underground in the Lantian Mine, in addition to the surface heap leaching, and has obtained a perfect result. The concentrated acid-curing, and ferric sulphate trickle leaching process, will soon be used in commercial operation for treating uranium ore grading -5 to -7 mm in size. The annual production capability of the Yining Mine will be extended to 100 tonnes U using improving in situ leaching technology. For the purpose of improving the uranium production efficiency much work has been done optimizing the distribution of production centres. China plans to expand its uranium production to meet the uranium requirements of the developing nuclear power plants. (author). 4 tabs

  18. Mobile/Modular BSL-4 Facilities for Meeting Restricted Earth Return Containment Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; McCubbin, F. M.; Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; Pace, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    NASA robotic sample return missions designated Category V Restricted Earth Return by the NASA Planetary Protection Office require sample containment and biohazard testing in a receiving laboratory as directed by NASA Procedural Requirement (NPR) 8020.12D - ensuring the preservation and protection of Earth and the sample. Currently, NPR 8020.12D classifies Restricted Earth Return for robotic sample return missions from Mars, Europa, and Enceladus with the caveat that future proposed mission locations could be added or restrictions lifted on a case by case basis as scientific knowledge and understanding of biohazards progresses. Since the 1960s, sample containment from an unknown extraterrestrial biohazard have been related to the highest containment standards and protocols known to modern science. Today, Biosafety Level (BSL) 4 standards and protocols are used to study the most dangerous high-risk diseases and unknown biological agents on Earth. Over 30 BSL-4 facilities have been constructed worldwide with 12 residing in the United States; of theses, 8 are operational. In the last two decades, these brick and mortar facilities have cost in the hundreds of millions of dollars dependent on the facility requirements and size. Previous mission concept studies for constructing a NASA sample receiving facility with an integrated BSL-4 quarantine and biohazard testing facility have also been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars. As an alternative option, we have recently conducted an initial trade study for constructing a mobile and/or modular sample containment laboratory that would meet all BSL-4 and planetary protection standards and protocols at a faction of the cost. Mobile and modular BSL-2 and 3 facilities have been successfully constructed and deployed world-wide for government testing of pathogens and pharmaceutical production. Our study showed that a modular BSL-4 construction could result in approximately 90% cost reduction when compared to

  19. 17 CFR 147.3 - General requirement of open meetings; grounds upon which meetings may be closed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., creed, national origin, ancestry, religion or sex. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section... Freedom of Information Act, as amended, 5 U.S.C. 552), provided that such statute (i) requires that the...

  20. Beware of Geeks Bearing Gifts - Are we Meeting the Requirements of our User Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.

    2007-12-01

    The 20th century brought about an "information revolution" that has forever altered the way we work, communicate, and live. The way science has been conducted for the past 200 years has been challenged by new media of communication and for the dissemination of data. We now have the tools at hand, commonly called cyberinfrastructure, that enable new forms of global collaboration. But are we fully realising the potential of cyberinfrastructure? Has it become an integral part of our scientific culture? Tools developed in Earth and Space Science Informatics projects suffer the same effects like informatics developments in other fields. Many of the projects fail to meet user requirements, and they do so for a number of reasons. Besides a certain reluctance on the side of scientists to adopt new tools for conducting their research, many cyberinfrastructure projects suffer from "marketing myopia" (Levitt, 1960) in the way they try to "sell" their applications. According to Levitt, the difference between selling and marketing is that the former fulfils the needs of the seller and the latter the needs of the buyer. Cyberinfrastructure projects must stop trying to sell their achievements to the scientific community, and instead market them by considering the scientists" needs right at the beginning of their endeavours. Admittedly, the requirements of scientific user communities are "moving targets", because scientific workflows are often subject to ad-hoc changes, depending on the outcome of the preceding step. Another important risk factor, faced by many cyberinfrastructure projects, is that the designated user community is not aware of the availability of this new resource. This is where training and outreach are essential, especially to draw in early adopters of new technology and multipliers among researchers. Only cyberinfrastructure tools that truly serve their designated user community will eventually become part of the scientific infrastructure. This presentation

  1. 40 CFR 63.2475 - What requirements must I meet for transfer racks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... transfer racks? 63.2475 Section 63.2475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... must I meet for transfer racks? (a) You must comply with each emission limit and work practice standard in table 5 to this subpart that applies to your transfer racks, and you must meet each applicable...

  2. Establishment of an unrelated umbilical cord blood bank qualification program: ensuring quality while meeting Food and Drug Administration vendor qualification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Fran; Kadidlo, Diane; Van Orsow, Lisa; McKenna, David

    2013-10-01

    Qualification of a cord blood bank (CBB) is a complex process that includes evaluation of multiple aspects of donor screening and testing, processing, accreditation and approval by professional cell therapy groups, and results of received cord blood units. The University of Minnesota Medical Center Cell Therapy Laboratory has established a CBB vendor qualification process to ensure the CBB meets established regulatory and quality requirements. The deployed qualification of CBBs is based on retrospective and prospective review of the CBB. Forty-one CBBs were evaluated retrospectively: seven CBBs were disqualified based on failed quality control (QC) results. Eight CBBs did not meet the criteria for retrospective qualification because fewer than 3 cord blood units were received and the CBB was not accredited. As of March 2012, three US and one non-US CBBs have been qualified prospectively. One CBB withdrew from the qualification process after successful completion of the comprehensive survey and subsequent failure of the provided QC unit to pass the minimum criteria. One CBB failed the prospective qualification process based on processing methods that were revealed during the paper portion of the evaluation. A CBB qualification process is necessary for a transplant center to manage the qualification of the large number of CBBs needed to support a umbilical cord blood transplantation program. A transplant center that has utilized cord blood for a number of years before implementation of a qualification process should use a retrospective qualification process along with a prospective process. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. ARE EXCESSIVE LEGISLATIVE RESTRICTIONS OF PENSION FUND’S INVESTMENTS REQUIRED TO ENSURE THESE FUNDS’ OPERATIONAL STABILITY AND MINIMUM GUARANTED RETURN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANJA MARKOVIC HRIBERNIK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is investigated whether government, when promises pension fund’s members a so-calledminimum guaranteed return, to reduce the exposure of members to financial risks , should at the same timehinders portfolio diversification process of pension funds. We provide a detailed analysis of the connectionbetween the requirements for providing a minimum guaranteed return and managing financial risks on the onehand and the investment structure of pension funds on the other. We intend to demonstrate with an illustrativecase, using the simulation technique and a combination of actual data and some hypothetical one, that byprecisely matching the investments' characteristics to the characteristics of the pension fund's liabilities, someimportant financial risks can even be hedged entirely. We also intend to demonstrate that with theimplementation of a proper policy of risk measurement and management, complemented with stress testingpractices, excessive legislative restrictions for investments are no longer necessary. At the very least,governments should avoid implementing legislation that hinders the portfolio diversification process andtherefore makes pension fund risk management more difficult.

  4. 26 CFR 1.856-7 - Certain corporations, etc., that are considered to meet the gross income requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain corporations, etc., that are considered to meet the gross income requirements. 1.856-7 Section 1.856-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment...

  5. E-learning as a technological tool to meet the requirements of occupational standards in training of it specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, N. A.; Tyatyushkina, O. Y.; Cheremisina, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss issues of updating educational programs to meet requirements of the labor market and occupational standards of IT industry. We suggest the technology of e-learning that utilizes an open educational resource to provide the employers' participation in the development of educational content and the intensification of practical training.

  6. 13 CFR 127.200 - What are the requirements a concern must meet to qualify as an EDWOSB or WOSB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements a concern must meet to qualify as an EDWOSB or WOSB? 127.200 Section 127.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL CONTRACT ASSISTANCE PROCEDURES...

  7. The contribution of nuclear energy to the meeting of Italy's electric power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses ENEL's policy in the development of nuclear energy, which assigns to this source the role of meeting almost all of Italy's additional future power requirements. This is a position taken some time ago and already outlined on the occasion of the Geneva Conference of 1971. The policy is based on a number of factors, reviewed in the paper, which differentiate, at least in quantitative terms, Italy's situation from that of most industrialized countries. Among these factors stand out the scarcity of natural resources, including energy sources available in Italy. An extensive recourse to nuclear energy is the best way to achieve that diversification of energy supplies vital to the Italian economy which, because of the very lack of natural resources, is predominantly based on processing. While the Caorso Nuclear Power Plant (840 MW) is due to go into service soon, ENEL's nuclear plan, recently approved by the Government, calls for the construction of the four 1,000-MW units already on order and of 16 additional units, of the same size, divided into two 8-units blocks, to be decided on respectively in the very near future and before the end of 1977. The necessary flexibility of the plan concerning the nuclear units that will go into service by the 1986 is ensured by the subdivision into blocks, with provision for the postponement of the second, 8-units block in the country's economy development requires a revision in electric power forecasts. The paper then considers in particular the integration between the nuclear plan and ENEL's extensive plan for pumped-storage hydro-electric power plants and the related technical and economic advantages which also extend to an international scope. The paper concludes the review of Italy's nuclear plan by stressing two essential problems: financing and the availability of sites for nuclear power plants. Upon their timely and satisfactory solution depends the actual construction of the plants by the scheduled dates

  8. Proceedings of the IAEA consultants' meeting on data requirements for medical radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.

    1988-01-01

    The papers presented at the meeting have been grouped in four sessions: General (2 papers), Experimental techniques and status of data (9 papers), Theoretical calculation (3 papers), Compilation and evaluation (5 papers), plus a post-meeting contribution. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. The summary conclusions and recommendations of the three Working Groups are included in the Proceedings. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Protocol for the verification of minimum criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaggiano, M.; Spiccia, P.; Gaetano Arnetta, P.

    2014-01-01

    This Protocol has been prepared with reference to the provisions of article 8 of the Legislative Decree of May 26, 2000 No. 187. Quality controls of radiological equipment fit within the larger 'quality assurance Program' and are intended to ensure the correct operation of the same and the maintenance of that State. The pursuit of this objective guarantees that the radiological equipment subjected to those controls also meets the minimum criteria of acceptability set out in annex V of the aforementioned legislative decree establishing the conditions necessary to allow the functions to which each radiological equipment was designed, built and for which it is used. The Protocol is established for the purpose of quality control of radiological equipment of Cone Beam Computer Tomography type and reference document, in the sense that compliance with stated tolerances also ensures the subsistence minimum acceptability requirements, where applicable.

  10. 20 CFR 652.207 - How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act? 652.207 Section 652.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT... exercising this discretion, a State must meet the Act's requirements. (b) These requirements are: (1) Labor...

  11. Minimum requirements on implementation of the greenhouse gases ordinance. EU ordinance on fluorinated greenhouse gases; Mindestanforderungen zur Implementierung der F-Gase-Verordnung. Die EG-Verordnung zu fluorierten Treibhausgasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preisegger, E. [Solvay Fluor GmbH, Hannover (Germany). Environmental and Public Affairs Fluorochemicals

    2008-04-15

    On 4 July 2006, the EU ordinance 842/2006 on fluorinated greenhouse gases came into force. Since 4 July 2007, it has been in effect with the exception of article 9 and appendix II both of which had been effective since 4 July 2006. However, some articles of the ordinance necessitate the definition of minimum requirements resp. of form and contents by the EU commission. The minimum requirements for training and certification will provide a basis for national implementation of these measures in the EU member states. (orig.)

  12. Report of the consultants meeting on good manufacturing practices and clean room requirements for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    be carried out in special facilities often with shielding and remote handling to protect the operators from radiation exposure. There are international norms for radiation exposure allowed for radiation workers and strong national organizations for monitoring and implementing radiation protection measures. Being part of the national nuclear programmes, radiopharmaceutical production has been from the very beginning subjected to regulations of radioactive material handling, transportation and use. However, the systems of surveillance and control for pharmaceutical products have not been implemented in many places to the same extent as for radiation protection. There are also technical difficulties in harmonizing the requirements of radiation safety and pharmaceutical safety. Simultaneously, there have been several technical developments in the field of Quality Assurance of pharmaceuticals. The concepts of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and the requirements for clean rooms define quality of air for pharmaceutical production areas. Efforts have been made in recent years to apply these concepts also to radiopharmaceutical production. Significant progress appears to have been made in the developed countries and in the technology needed to fulfil these standards. The technical problems in upgrading the facilities of radioisotope laboratories to conform with the clean air requirements and the cost involved are still to be clearly understood in many developing countries. In many countries the regulatory authorities apply the same set of regulations for radiopharmaceuticals as for other pharmaceuticals. Some guidelines for radiopharmaceuticals have been published, e.g. Scandinavian, US FDA, Australian, Canadian and EU guidelines. No such guidelines are yet available from international agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or World Health Organization (WHO). A guideline from an international body of this nature would be very useful for institutions

  13. Study of the operation and maintenance of computer systems to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 73.55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.R.; Byers, K.R.; Fluckiger, J.D.; McBride, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the operation and maintenance of computer-managed systems that can help nuclear power plant licensees to meet the physical security requirements of 10 CFR 73.55 (for access control, alarm monitoring, and alarm recording). This report of that study describes a computer system quality assurance program that is based on a system of related internal controls. A discussion of computer system evaluation includes verification and validation mechanisms for assuring that requirements are stated and that the product fulfills these requirements. Finally, the report describes operator and security awareness training and a computer system preventive maintenance program. 24 refs

  14. 33 CFR 96.240 - What functional requirements must a safety management system meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a safety management system meet? 96.240 Section 96.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY VESSEL OPERATING REGULATIONS RULES FOR THE SAFE OPERATION OF VESSELS AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.240 What functional...

  15. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... submitting comments regarding this public meeting is April 20, 2010, by 5 p.m. EST. Regardless of attendance...) medications and other substances that interfere with the technologies the devices employ. Each session will... there is no evidence to support the need for higher standards. Other factors affecting the performance...

  16. [Hospitals failing minimum volumes in 2004: reasons and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraedts, M; Kühnen, C; Cruppé, W de; Blum, K; Ohmann, C

    2008-02-01

    In 2004 Germany introduced annual minimum volumes nationwide on five surgical procedures: kidney, liver, stem cell transplantation, complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions. Hospitals that fail to reach the minimum volumes are no longer allowed to perform the respective procedures unless they raise one of eight legally accepted exceptions. The goal of our study was to investigate how many hospitals fell short of the minimum volumes in 2004, whether and how this was justified, and whether hospitals that failed the requirements experienced any consequences. We analysed data on meeting the minimum volume requirements in 2004 that all German hospitals were obliged to publish as part of their biannual structured quality reports. We performed telephone interviews: a) with all hospitals not achieving the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions, and b) with the national umbrella organisations of all German sickness funds. In 2004, one quarter of all German acute care hospitals (N=485) performed 23,128 procedures where minimum volumes applied. 197 hospitals (41%) did not meet at least one of the minimum volumes. These hospitals performed N=715 procedures (3.1%) where the minimum volumes were not met. In 43% of these cases the hospitals raised legally accepted exceptions. In 33% of the cases the hospitals argued using reasons that were not legally acknowledged. 69% of those hospitals that failed to achieve the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal and pancreatic interventions did not experience any consequences from the sickness funds. However, one third of those hospitals reported that the sickness funds addressed the issue and partially announced consequences for the future. The sickness funds' umbrella organisations stated that there were only sparse activities related to the minimum volumes and that neither uniform registrations nor uniform proceedings in case of infringements of the standards had been agreed upon. In spite of the

  17. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report Air Force Officer Accession Planning Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements...potential performance, and how to include these quality measures in the classification process. The research sponsor asked us to focus on academic ...Andrew P., and James K. Lowe, “Decision Support for the Career Field Selection Process at the US Air Force Academy,” European Journal of Operational

  18. Screening computer-assisted dosage programs for anticoagulation with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists: minimum safety requirements for individual programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Roberts, C; Ibrahim, S

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate non...

  19. Analysis of Marine Corps renewable energy planning to meet installation energy security requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Chisom, Christopher M.; Templenton, Jack C., II

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze Marine Corps installation energy consumption and the pursuit of increased renewable energy generation goals across Marine Corps installations. The main objective of this report is to determine the cost of interruption and the net present value (NPV) of renewable energy generation needed to meet the Marine Corps energy security objectives. First, we determine installation-specific energy consump...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  1. Meeting the requirements of specialists and generalists in Version 3 of the Read Codes: Two illustrative "Case Reports"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Sinclair

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The Read Codes have been recognised as the standard for General Practice computing since 1988 and the original 4-byte set continues to be extensively used to record primary health care data. Read Version 3 (the Read Thesaurus is an expanded clinical vocabulary with an enhanced file structure designed to meet the detailed requirements of specialist practitioners and to address some of the limitations of previous versions. A recent phase of integration of the still widely-used 4-byte set has highlighted the need to ensure that the new Thesaurus continues to support generalist requirements.

  2. Meeting the measurement uncertainty and traceability requirements of ISO/AEC standard 17025 in chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B

    2001-11-01

    The new laboratory accreditation standard, ISO/IEC 17025, reflects current thinking on good measurement practice by requiring more explicit and more demanding attention to a number of activities. These include client interactions, method validation, traceability, and measurement uncertainty. Since the publication of the standard in 1999 there has been extensive debate about its interpretation. It is the author's view that if good quality practices are already in place and if the new requirements are introduced in a manner that is fit for purpose, the additional work required to comply with the new requirements can be expected to be modest. The paper argues that the rigour required in addressing the issues should be driven by customer requirements and the factors that need to be considered in this regard are discussed. The issues addressed include the benefits, interim arrangements, specifying the analytical requirement, establishing traceability, evaluating the uncertainty and reporting the information.

  3. Development of world energy requirements and ways of meeting the demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valvoda, Z.

    1977-01-01

    The development is described of the past and future energy demand and the possibility is discussed of using fossil and non-fossil energy sources in meeting the needs of population. The use of alternative energy sources is recommended to reduce the fossil fuel demand, such as solar energy, water energy, geothermal energy, tidal energy, wind energy, sea wave energy, ocean temperature gradients, photosynthesis, glacier energy and nuclear fission energy. The comparison of the possible use of the respective types of energy sources shows that only geothermal energy, tidal energy and the nuclear energy produced by thermal reactors have undergone the whole developmental stage and are industrially applicable. (Oy)

  4. The Department of Defense's Civilian Human Capital Strategic Plan Does Not Meet Most Statutory Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Brenda S

    2008-01-01

    To examine the extent to which DOD's civilian human capital strategic plan addresses congressional reporting requirements, we obtained and analyzed the "Department of Defense Civilian Human Capital...

  5. Meeting the nutritional requirements of hospitalized patients: an interdisciplinary approach to hospital catering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iff, S; Leuenberger, M; Rösch, S; Knecht, G; Tanner, B; Stanga, Z

    2008-12-01

    The study served to assure the quality of our catering, to locate problems, and to define further optimization measures at the Bern University Hospital. The main objective was to investigate whether the macronutrient and energy content of the hospital food complies with the nutritional value calculated from recipes as well as with the recommendations issued by the German Nutrition Society (DGE). Prospective, randomized, single-center quality study. Complete standard meals were analyzed over seven consecutive days for each seasonal menu plan in one year. The quantitative and qualitative chemical content of a randomly chosen menu was determined by an external laboratory. Sixty meals were analyzed. The amount of food served and the ratio of macronutrients contained in the food satisfactorily reflected all recipes. Not surprisingly, the energy and carbohydrate content of our meals was lower than in the German recommendations, because the report of the DGE is based on the sum of meals, snacks and beverages consumed over the whole day and not only on the main meals, as we analyzed. Periodic quality control is essential in order to meet recommendations and patients' expectations in hospital catering. Members of the catering service should undergo regularly repeated skills training, and continuous efforts should be made to ensure portion size for all delivered meals. Food provision in the hospital setting needs to be tailored to meet the demands of the different patient groups, to optimize nutritional support, and to minimize food waste.

  6. 34 CFR 350.30 - What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.30 What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research...

  7. 12 CFR 567.10 - Consequences of failure to meet capital requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; and (5) The savings association's ratio of core capital to total assets is not less than the ratio..., the leverage ratio requirement, or the tangible capital requirement established under this part, the... expenditures to specified levels; (9) Increase liquid assets and maintain such increased liquidity at specified...

  8. Do school classrooms meet the visual requirements of children and recommended vision standards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpa Negiloni

    Full Text Available Visual demands of school children tend to vary with diverse classroom environments. The study aimed to evaluate the distance and near Visual Acuity (VA demand in Indian school classrooms and their comparison with the recommended vision standards.The distance and near VA demands were assessed in 33 classrooms (grades 4 to 12 of eight schools. The VA threshold demand relied on the smallest size of distance and near visual task material and viewing distance. The logMAR equivalents of minimum VA demand at specific seating positions (desk and among different grades were evaluated. The near threshold was converted into actual near VA demand by including the acuity reserve. The existing dimensions of chalkboard and classroom, gross area in a classroom per student and class size in all the measured classrooms were compared to the government recommended standards.In 33 classrooms assessed (35±10 students per room, the average distance and near logMAR VA threshold demand was 0.31±0.17 and 0.44±0.14 respectively. The mean distance VA demand (minimum in front desk position was 0.56±0.18 logMAR. Increased distance threshold demand (logMAR range -0.06, 0.19 was noted in 7 classrooms (21%. The mean VA demand in grades 4 to 8 and grades 9 to 12 was 0.35±0.16 and 0.24±0.16 logMAR respectively and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.055. The distance from board to front desk was greater than the recommended standard of 2.2m in 27 classrooms (82%. The other measured parameters were noted to be different from the proposed standards in majority of the classrooms.The study suggests the inclusion of task demand assessment in school vision screening protocol to provide relevant guidance to school authorities. These findings can serve as evidence to accommodate children with mild to moderate visual impairment in the regular classrooms.

  9. Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies to Meet Near-Term and Transition Period Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Felker, L.K.; Benker, D.E.; Campbell, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    A scenario that very likely fits conditions in the U.S. nuclear power industry and can meet the goals of cost minimization, waste minimization, and provisions of engineered safeguards for proliferation resistance, including no separated plutonium, to close the fuel cycle with full actinide recycle is evaluated. Processing aged fuels, removed from the reactor for 30 years or more, can provide significant advantages in cost reduction and waste minimization. The UREX+3 separations process is being developed to separate used fuel components for reuse, thus minimizing waste generation and storage in geologic repositories. Near-term use of existing and new thermal spectrum reactors can be used initially for recycle actinide transmutation. A transition period will eventually occur, when economic conditions will allow commercial deployment of fast reactors; during this time, recycled plutonium can be diverted into fast reactor fuel and conversion of depleted uranium into additional fuel material can be considered. (authors)

  10. Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies to Meet Near-Term and Transition Period Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E.D.; Felker, L.K.; Benker, D.E.; Campbell, D.O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6152 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A scenario that very likely fits conditions in the U.S. nuclear power industry and can meet the goals of cost minimization, waste minimization, and provisions of engineered safeguards for proliferation resistance, including no separated plutonium, to close the fuel cycle with full actinide recycle is evaluated. Processing aged fuels, removed from the reactor for 30 years or more, can provide significant advantages in cost reduction and waste minimization. The UREX+3 separations process is being developed to separate used fuel components for reuse, thus minimizing waste generation and storage in geologic repositories. Near-term use of existing and new thermal spectrum reactors can be used initially for recycle actinide transmutation. A transition period will eventually occur, when economic conditions will allow commercial deployment of fast reactors; during this time, recycled plutonium can be diverted into fast reactor fuel and conversion of depleted uranium into additional fuel material can be considered. (authors)

  11. Policy Capacity Meets Politics; Comment on “Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Fafard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to disagree with the general argument that successful health reform requires a significant degree of policy capacity or that all players in the policy game need to move beyond self-interested advocacy. However, an overly broad definition of policy capacity is a problem. More important perhaps, health reform inevitably requires not just policy capacity but political leadership and compromise.

  12. Policy Capacity Meets Politics: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafard, Patrick

    2015-07-22

    It is difficult to disagree with the general argument that successful health reform requires a significant degree of policy capacity or that all players in the policy game need to move beyond self-interested advocacy. However, an overly broad definition of policy capacity is a problem. More important perhaps, health reform inevitably requires not just policy capacity but political leadership and compromise. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  13. Minimum dipole moment required to bind an electron--molecular theorists rediscover phenomenon mentioned in Fermi--Teller paper on another subject twenty years earlier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1976-07-01

    Work leading to the discovery of the minimum dipole moment for electron binding, D/sub min/ = 0.639 ea 0 (atomic units), by several groups in 1967-68 is described. It was subsequently learned that this number had been published in 1947 by Fermi and Teller, who did not, however, indicate how they derived it. The author has found a numerical solution in Fermi's notebooks from 1946-50 at the University of Chicago Library. Fermi's work is described and presented here with relevant material from his notebooks

  14. Minimum dipole moment required to bind an electron: molecular theorists rediscover phenomenon mentioned in Fermi-Teller paper twenty years earlier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Work leading to the discovery of the minimum dipole moment for electron binding, D/sub min/=0.639 ea 0 (atomic units), by several groups in 1967--1968 is described. It was subsequently learned that this number had been published in 1947 by Fermi and Teller, who did not, however, indicate how they derived it. The author has found a numerical solution in Fermi's notebooks from 1946--1950 at the University of Chicago Library. Fermi's work is described and presented here with relevant material from his notebooks

  15. Meeting the requirements for a DOE environmental restoration project. The Fernald strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanoss, R.L.; Risenhoover, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental Restoration (ER) of five Operable Units (OU) at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) includes compliance with the requirements of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE Orders. Each regulatory driver has differing procedural requirements for documenting calculations, decisions, and actions involved in site cleanup. Integration of documentation and avoidance of duplication can save time and money. Such savings are being achieved by OU specific application of supporting studies, revised procedures, and guidance documents. Each OU is seeking appropriate opportunities to produce single documents that simultaneously fulfill the important requirements of the other regulations and DOE orders. These opportunities are evaluated at all phases of decision making, remedial design, and remedial action. Three essential processes precede environmental restoration/remedial action at a DOE site/project: 1. Completion of decision-making documents required by governing or applicable statutes. 2. Completion of important scientific and engineering analyses of remedial alternatives, and design and implementation of the remedial solution established in the CERCLA Record of Decision (ROD). 3. Preparation of DOE-mandated documentation to record engineering evaluations and cost estimates required for budgeting, decision making, and project management. Methodology and requirements for each process have developed from long, successful practice, but independently of each other. FERMCO, as new DOE contractor at Fernald and first Environmental Restoration Management Contractor (ERMC), is committed to a process of Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI). A major reevaluation of documentation and processes for support of environmental decision-making and design of cleanup activities to remediate the five OUs at the FEMP is being undertaken

  16. Meeting up-to-date safety requirements in the Russian NPP projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepkyan, G. O.; Yashkin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Safety features in Russian NPP designs are implemented by the combination of active and passive safety systems • Russian NPP designs are in compliance with up-to-date international and European safety requirements and refer to Generation III+ • Russian state-of-the-art designs have already implemented some design solutions, which take into account “post-Fukushima” requirements. Russian NPP design principles have been approved during the European discussions in spring 2012, including the IAEA extraordinary session addressed to Fukushima NPP accident

  17. Design of a modular digital computer system, DRL 4. [for meeting future requirements of spaceborne computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The design is reported of an advanced modular computer system designated the Automatically Reconfigurable Modular Multiprocessor System, which anticipates requirements for higher computing capacity and reliability for future spaceborne computers. Subjects discussed include: an overview of the architecture, mission analysis, synchronous and nonsynchronous scheduling control, reliability, and data transmission.

  18. Use of fuel cells to meet military requirements for mobile power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukaitis, E.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The use of fuel cell technology in military applications will depend on safe, high energy density systems being developed. An important part of using this technology is also the development of alternative hydrogen producing fuels with high energy densities and are easy to transport. Fuel cells are now a very large R and D effort for several military applications around the world. The major reason is because of the high power demands needed requires electrical energy sources that far exceed the capabilities of batteries currently being fielded for portable applications. Fuel cells are regarded as highly efficient, tactical energy converters that can be adapted for wide range of power requirements. They are potentially the lowest weight power source when coupled with batteries or capacitors to form hybrid systems. Generally electrical power is needed to support a number of applications from ultra-high power for electrical pulses (radios, sensors) to reliable, conditioned power for command and control systems. In the future, sustained power for electric drive systems, will also be required. Some of the promising applications in the military and the R and D challenges that remain to reach performance and reliability targets suitable for military requirements will be discussed. (author)

  19. High School Diploma Options That Meet Federal Graduation Rate Calculation Requirements. Education Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Federal requirements stipulate that states and local education agencies annually calculate and report an Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate, disaggregated by student group. The ACGR includes all students who graduate from high school in four years with a regular high school diploma, plus all students with the most significant cognitive disabilities…

  20. Design Of Measurements For Evaluating Readiness Of Technoware Components To Meet The Required Standard Of Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Ilham; Muharram Hasby, Fariz; Irianto, Dradjad

    2018-03-01

    Although government is able to make mandatory standards that must be obeyed by the industry, the respective industries themselves often have difficulties to fulfil the requirements described in those standards. This is especially true in many small and medium sized enterprises that lack the required capital to invest in standard-compliant equipment and machineries. This study aims to develop a set of measurement tools for evaluating the level of readiness of production technology with respect to the requirements of a product standard based on the quality function deployment (QFD) method. By combining the QFD methodology, UNESCAP Technometric model [9] and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), this model is used to measure a firm’s capability to fulfill government standard in the toy making industry. Expert opinions from both the governmental officers responsible for setting and implementing standards and the industry practitioners responsible for managing manufacturing processes are collected and processed to find out the technological capabilities that should be improved by the firm to fulfill the existing standard. This study showed that the proposed model can be used successfully to measure the gap between the requirements of the standard and the readiness of technoware technological component in a particular firm.

  1. 29 CFR 4.173 - Meeting requirements for vacation fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vacation benefits, it would place the incumbent contractor at a distinct competitive disadvantage as well... service. Rather, as illustrated below, the reason(s) for an employee's absence from work is the primary... the full amount of the employee's vacation benefit. (2) The requirements for furnishing data relative...

  2. Improving workplace expertise to meet increasing customer requirements: The impact of training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streumer, Jan; Calon, Marie-José

    1997-01-01

    This article focuses upon the training of engineers at a factory producing integrated circuits. Inadequate use of statistical process techniques by the engineers meant that the production process was not being optimised in the context of increasing customer requirements. A training needs analysis

  3. 26 CFR 1.857-4 - Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet certain source-of-income requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.857-4 Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet certain source-of-income requirements. Section 857... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet...

  4. Optimizing desalinated sea water blending with other sources to meet magnesium requirements for potable and irrigation waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Noa; Eben-Chaime, Moshe; Oron, Gideon

    2013-05-01

    Sea water desalination provides fresh water that typically lacks minerals essential to human health and to agricultural productivity. Thus the rising proportion of desalinated sea water consumed by both the domestic and agricultural sectors constitutes a public health risk. Research on low-magnesium water irrigation showed that crops developed magnesium deficiency symptoms that could lead to plant death, and tomato yields were reduced by 10-15%. The World Health Organization (WHO) reported on a relationship between sudden cardiac death rates and magnesium intake deficits. An optimization model, developed and tested to provide recommendations for Water Distribution System (WDS) quality control in terms of meeting optimal water quality requirements, was run in computational experiments based on an actual regional WDS. The expected magnesium deficit due to the operation of a large Sea Water Desalination Plant (SWDP) was simulated, and an optimal operation policy, in which remineralization at the SWDP was combined with blending desalinated and natural water to achieve the required quality, was generated. The effects of remineralization costs and WDS physical layout on the optimal policy were examined by sensitivity analysis. As part of the sensitivity blending natural and desalinated water near the treatment plants will be feasible up to 16.2 US cents/m(3), considering all expenses. Additional chemical injection was used to meet quality criteria when blending was not feasible. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic document management meets environmental restoration recordkeeping requirements: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts at migrating records management at five Department of Energy sites operated under management by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. for Environmental Restoration (ER) business activities are described. The corporate environment, project definition, records keeping requirements are described first. Then an evaluation of electronic document management technologies and of internal and commercially available systems are provided. Finally adopted incremental implementation strategy and lessons learned are discussed

  6. Changing the Army’s Weapon Training Strategies to Meet Operational Requirements More Efficiently and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    psycho -motor skills. Other major weapon systems are more supported by technology and require crews or units collectively applying procedures rapidly and...Army can take to improve its train- ing and leader development management processes and architectures . The directions for improvement outlined in this...activity; (4) enhance ATLD and Army-wide information technology architectures to improve data collection and analysis; and (5) evolve emerging ATLD

  7. Force Structure. DOD Needs to Integrate Data into Its Force Identification Process and Examine Options to Meet Requirements for High-Demand Support Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    ...) will continue to meet its requirements using an all-volunteer force. The Army, in particular, has faced continuing demand for large numbers of forces, especially for forces with support skills...

  8. Retail Sugar From One Zambian Community Does Not Meet Statutory Requirements for Vitamin A Fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Matthew D; Kabaghe, Gladys; Musonda, Mofu; Palmer, Amanda C

    2017-12-01

    Industrial food fortification is a major strategy to improve dietary micronutrient intakes and prevent deficiencies. Zambia introduced mandatory sugar fortification with vitamin A, at a target of 10 mg/kg, in 1998. Representative surveys conducted since that time do not support marked improvement in vitamin A status. To describe vitamin A concentrations in retail sugar, as well as vendor practices, perceptions of fortified foods, and sugar use practices. We conducted a census of sugar vendors in one Zambian community, capturing information on vendors, available brands and packaging options, and storage conditions. We purchased all brands and package types of sugar available at each vendor. In a 15% subsample, we conducted semi-structured interviews with vendor-consumer pairs. We tested 50% of sugar samples at random for vitamin A using an iCheck portable fluorimeter. The distribution of vitamin A in sugar in market samples was highly skewed, with a median of 3.1 mg/kg (25th-75th percentiles: 1.8-5.5) and a range from 0.2 to 29.9 mg/kg. Only 11.3% of samples met the 10 mg/kg statutory requirement. Sugar was primarily repackaged and sold in small quantities, with rapid turnover of stocks. Perceptions of fortification by vendors and consumers were generally positive. Vitamin A in fortified sugar fell well below statutory requirements. Our data point to challenges at regional depot and/or poor adherence to fortification standards at the factory level. A renewed commitment to monitoring and enforcement will be required for Zambia to benefit from a food fortification strategy.

  9. Load following operation of nuclear power plants for meeting power system requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Hachiro

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a calculating program on the availability factors of nuclear, thermal and pumed storage hydro power stations and some calculated results for typical three load factors, 55 %, 60 % and 71 %, are provided when the share of the nuclea power station in the generation facilities is increased. The load following requirement of the nuclear power station is also provided. Load following requirement: If there is a 10 % pumped storage hydro power station, the nuclear power station enables to be operated with its rated output up to 30 % - 35 % of its share. Its daily load following operation for 40 % and 50 % nuclear power station needs every weekend and every day respectively. Availability factor: The availability factor of the nuclear power station manages to get 80 % (maximum availability factor of the nuclear power station in this study) up to 30 % share of it with 10 % pumpued storage hydro power station. When the nuclear power station shares 40 % and 50 %, its availability factor decreases down 1 % and 5 % respectively. (author)

  10. 75 FR 34724 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    .... The purpose of this notice is to permit attendance by representatives of U.S. company members of the... meeting among company representatives at the same location at 8:30 a.m. on June 30. The agenda for this... stocks in a crisis? How are industry emergency stocks related to minimum operating requirements? 4...

  11. Evaluation Of Supplemental Pre-Treatment Development Requirements To Meet TRL 6: Rotary Microfiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S

  12. Can the proton injectors meet the HL-LHC requirements after LS2?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, B.; Bartosik, H.; Bracco, C.; Bruening, O.; Carli, C.; Cornelis, K.; Damerau, H.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hancock, S.; Hanke, K.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; Mikulec, B.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Rumolo, G.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Steerenberg, R.; Vretenar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The LIU project has as mandate the upgrade of the LHC injector chain to match the requirements of HL-LHC. The present planning assumes that the upgrade work will be completed in LS2, for commissioning in the following operational year. The known limitations in the different injectors are described, together with the various upgrades planned to improve the performance. The expected performance reach after the upgrade with 25 and 50 ns beams is examined. The project planning is discussed in view of the present LS1 and LS2 planning. The main unresolved questions and associated decision points are presented, and the key issues to be addressed by the end of 2012 are detailed in the context of the machine development programs and hardware construction activities. (authors)

  13. Discrepancy between the composition of some commercial cat foods and their package labelling and suitability for meeting nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosper, E C; Raubenheimer, D; Machovsky-Capuska, G E; Chaves, A V

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if the label information and nutrient composition of commercial cat foods are accurate and compliant with the Australian Standard (AS 5812-2011) and if they meet the nutritional requirements of an adult cat. A chemical analysis of 10 wet and 10 dry commercial cat foods labelled as 'nutritionally complete' for the adult cat was performed. The results were compared with the package composition values, the Australian Standard and the unique dietary requirements of the cat. In addition, the results of the chemical analysis were compared with the nutrient requirements published by the Association of the American Feed Control Officials and the National Research Council. When compared with the Australian Standard, 9 of the 20 cat foods did not adhere to their 'guaranteed analysis' and 8 did not adhere to the standards for nutrient composition. Also, various deficiencies and excesses of crude protein, crude fat, fatty acid and amino acid were observed in the majority of the cat foods. The results of this study highlight a need for an improved method of ensuring that label information and nutrient composition are accurate and comply with the Australian Standard (AS 5812-2011) to ensure the adult cat's unique dietary requirements are being met by commercial adult cat food. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Customizable orthopaedic oncology implants: one institution's experience with meeting current IRB and FDA requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alexander R; Ippolito, Joseph A; Patterson, Francis R; Benevenia, Joseph; Beebe, Kathleen S

    2016-01-01

    Customizable orthopaedic implants are often needed for patients with primary malignant bone tumors due to unique anatomy or complex mechanical problems. Currently, obtaining customizable orthopaedic implants for orthopaedic oncology patients can be an arduous task involving submitting approval requests to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). There is great potential for the delay of a patient's surgery and unnecessary paperwork if the submission pathways are misunderstood or a streamlined protocol is not in place. The objective of this study was to review the existing FDA custom implant approval pathways and to determine whether this process was improved with an institutional protocol. An institutional protocol for obtaining IRB and FDA approval for customizable orthopaedic implants was established with the IRB at our institution in 2013. This protocol was approved by the IRB, such that new patients only require submission of a modification to the existing protocol with individualized patient information. During the two-year period of 2013-2014, eight patients were retrospectively identified as having required customizable implants for various orthopaedic oncology surgeries. The dates of request for IRB approval, request for FDA approval, and total time to surgery were recorded, along with the specific pathway utilized for FDA approval. The average patient age was 12 years old (7-21 years old). The average time to IRB approval of a modification to the pre-approved protocol was 14 days (7-21 days). Average time to FDA approval after submission of the IRB approval to the manufacturer was 12.5 days (7-19 days). FDA approval was obtained for all implants as compassionate use requests in accordance with Section 561 of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act's expanded access provisions. Establishment of an institutional protocol with pre-approval by the IRB can expedite the otherwise time-consuming and complicated

  15. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future.

  16. Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect and required reductions to meet the 550 ppmv target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Lina; Nilsson, Kristina

    2002-11-01

    According to the Swedish Parliament, the Swedish international climate strategy should focus on a stabilisation of the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. An equilibrium concentration lower than 550 ppmv CO 2 -equivalents should be achieved by the end of this century. As an interim target, the yearly emissions should not exceed 4.5 tonnes CO 2 -equivalents per capita by 2050. In this study an inventory of Swedish emissions from 1834 until 2000, for the six greenhouse gases regulated by the Kyoto Protocol, is carried out. Future emission scenarios for carbon dioxide during the time period 2000-2050 are also defined. This data is used for estimating the contribution to the greenhouse effect both today and in the future. Further it is investigated if the 2050-target is sufficient for not exceeding an atmospheric concentration of 550 ppmv. The required reduction for 2100 to reach an equilibrium concentration below this level is also estimated. The Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect today is about 30 % larger than it should be according to the fairness factor used in this study. The Swedish emission target set for 2050 is sufficient for not exceeding 550 ppmv by that year. However, to reach a stabilisation of the concentration below this level the emissions have to be reduced to 1.0-1.5 tonnes CO 2 -equivalents per capita by 2100

  17. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled

  18. Holistic approach for overlay and edge placement error to meet the 5nm technology node requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkens, Jan; Slachter, Bram; Kubis, Michael; Tel, Wim; Hinnen, Paul; Maslow, Mark; Dillen, Harm; Ma, Eric; Chou, Kevin; Liu, Xuedong; Ren, Weiming; Hu, Xuerang; Wang, Fei; Liu, Kevin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the metrology methods and error budget that describe the edge placement error (EPE). EPE quantifies the pattern fidelity of a device structure made in a multi-patterning scheme. Here the pattern is the result of a sequence of lithography and etching steps, and consequently the contour of the final pattern contains error sources of the different process steps. EPE is computed by combining optical and ebeam metrology data. We show that high NA optical scatterometer can be used to densely measure in device CD and overlay errors. Large field e-beam system enables massive CD metrology which is used to characterize the local CD error. Local CD distribution needs to be characterized beyond 6 sigma, and requires high throughput e-beam system. We present in this paper the first images of a multi-beam e-beam inspection system. We discuss our holistic patterning optimization approach to understand and minimize the EPE of the final pattern. As a use case, we evaluated a 5-nm logic patterning process based on Self-Aligned-QuadruplePatterning (SAQP) using ArF lithography, combined with line cut exposures using EUV lithography.

  19. Design of fuelling machine bridge and carriage to meet seismic qualification requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghare, A.B.; Chhatre, A.G.; Vyas, A.K.; Bhambra, H.S.

    1996-01-01

    During each refuelling operation, the boundary of Primary heat transport system is extended up to Fuelling Machines. A breach in the pressure boundary of Fuelling Machine in this condition would cause a loss of coolant accident. Fuelling Machines are also used for transit storage of spent fuel bundles till discharged to fuel transfer system. Therefore, a fuelling machine, including its support structures, is required to be seismically qualified for both on-reactor ( coupled ) mode and off-reactor (uncoupled) mode. The fuelling machine carriage used in the first generation of Indian PHWRs is a mobile equipment on wheels moving over fixed rails. As this configuration was found unsuitable for withstanding strong seismic disturbances, a bridge type design with fixed columns was evolved for the next generation of reactors. Initially, the seismic analysis of the fuelling machine bridge and carriage was done using static structural analysis and values of natural frequencies for various structures were computed. The structures were suitably modified based on the results of this analysis. Subsequently, a detailed dynamic seismic analysis using finite element model has been completed for both coupled and uncoupled conditions. The qualification of the structure has been carried out as per ASME section 111 Division 1, sub section NF. Details of the significant design features, static and dynamic analysis, results and conclusions are given in the presentation. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs

  20. Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect and required reductions to meet the 550 ppmv target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, Lina; Nilsson, Kristina [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). School of Engineering

    2002-11-01

    According to the Swedish Parliament, the Swedish international climate strategy should focus on a stabilisation of the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. An equilibrium concentration lower than 550 ppmv CO{sub 2}-equivalents should be achieved by the end of this century. As an interim target, the yearly emissions should not exceed 4.5 tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents per capita by 2050. In this study an inventory of Swedish emissions from 1834 until 2000, for the six greenhouse gases regulated by the Kyoto Protocol, is carried out. Future emission scenarios for carbon dioxide during the time period 2000-2050 are also defined. This data is used for estimating the contribution to the greenhouse effect both today and in the future. Further it is investigated if the 2050-target is sufficient for not exceeding an atmospheric concentration of 550 ppmv. The required reduction for 2100 to reach an equilibrium concentration below this level is also estimated. The Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect today is about 30 % larger than it should be according to the fairness factor used in this study. The Swedish emission target set for 2050 is sufficient for not exceeding 550 ppmv by that year. However, to reach a stabilisation of the concentration below this level the emissions have to be reduced to 1.0-1.5 tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents per capita by 2100.

  1. Monitoring Conformance and Containment for Geological Carbon Storage: Can Technology Meet Policy and Public Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, D. C.; Osadetz, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Province of Alberta, Canada identified carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a key element of its 2008 Climate Change strategy. The target is a reduction in CO2 emissions of 139 Mt/year by 2050. To encourage uptake of CCS by industry, the province has provided partial funding to two demonstration scale projects, namely the Quest Project by Shell and partners (CCS), and the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line Project (pipeline and CO2-EOR). Important to commercial scale implementation of CCS will be the requirement to prove conformance and containment of the CO2 plume injected during the lifetime of the CCS project. This will be a challenge for monitoring programs. The Containment and Monitoring Institute (CaMI) is developing a Field Research Station (FRS) to calibrate various monitoring technologies for CO2 detection thresholds at relatively shallow depths. The objective being assessed with the FRS is sensitivity for early detection of loss of containment from a deeper CO2 storage project. In this project, two injection wells will be drilled to sandstone reservoir targets at depths of 300 m and 700 m. Up to four observation wells will be drilled with monitoring instruments installed. Time-lapse surface and borehole monitoring surveys will be undertaken to evaluate the movement and fate of the CO2 plume. These will include seismic, microseismic, cross well, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, gravity, geodetic and geomechanical surveys. Initial baseline seismic data from the FRS will presented.

  2. Design of fuelling machine bridge and carriage to meet seismic qualification requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghare, A B; Chhatre, A G; Vyas, A K; Bhambra, H S [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-31

    During each refuelling operation, the boundary of Primary heat transport system is extended up to Fuelling Machines. A breach in the pressure boundary of Fuelling Machine in this condition would cause a loss of coolant accident. Fuelling Machines are also used for transit storage of spent fuel bundles till discharged to fuel transfer system. Therefore, a fuelling machine, including its support structures, is required to be seismically qualified for both on-reactor ( coupled ) mode and off-reactor (uncoupled) mode. The fuelling machine carriage used in the first generation of Indian PHWRs is a mobile equipment on wheels moving over fixed rails. As this configuration was found unsuitable for withstanding strong seismic disturbances, a bridge type design with fixed columns was evolved for the next generation of reactors. Initially, the seismic analysis of the fuelling machine bridge and carriage was done using static structural analysis and values of natural frequencies for various structures were computed. The structures were suitably modified based on the results of this analysis. Subsequently, a detailed dynamic seismic analysis using finite element model has been completed for both coupled and uncoupled conditions. The qualification of the structure has been carried out as per ASME section 111 Division 1, sub section NF. Details of the significant design features, static and dynamic analysis, results and conclusions are given in the presentation. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  3. Relative Economic Merits of Storage and Combustion Turbines for Meeting Peak Capacity Requirements under Increased Penetration of Solar Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Diakov, Victor [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Batteries with several hours of capacity provide an alternative to combustion turbines for meeting peak capacity requirements. Even when compared to state-of-the-art highly flexible combustion turbines, batteries can provide a greater operational value, which is reflected in a lower system-wide production cost. By shifting load and providing operating reserves, batteries can reduce the cost of operating the power system to a traditional electric utility. This added value means that, depending on battery life, batteries can have a higher cost than a combustion turbine of equal capacity and still produce a system with equal or lower overall life-cycle cost. For a utility considering investing in new capacity, the cost premium for batteries is highly sensitive to a variety of factors, including lifetime, natural gas costs, PV penetration, and grid generation mix. In addition, as PV penetration increases, the net electricity demand profile changes, which may reduce the amount of battery energy capacity needed to reliably meet peak demand.

  4. Meeting report: Ocean ‘omics science, technology and cyberinfrastructure: current challenges and future requirements (August 20-23, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Dick, Gregory J.; Jenkins, Bethany; Heidelberg, John; Allen, Eric; Mackey, Katherine R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Science Foundation’s EarthCube End User Workshop was held at USC Wrigley Marine Science Center on Catalina Island, California in August 2013. The workshop was designed to explore and characterize the needs and tools available to the community that is focusing on microbial and physical oceanography research with a particular emphasis on ‘omic research. The assembled researchers outlined the existing concerns regarding the vast data resources that are being generated, and how we will deal with these resources as their volume and diversity increases. Particular attention was focused on the tools for handling and analyzing the existing data, on the need for the construction and curation of diverse federated databases, as well as development of shared, interoperable, “big-data capable” analytical tools. The key outputs from this workshop include (i) critical scientific challenges and cyber infrastructure constraints, (ii) the current and future ocean ‘omics science grand challenges and questions, and (iii) data management, analytical and associated and cyber-infrastructure capabilities required to meet critical current and future scientific challenges. The main thrust of the meeting and the outcome of this report is a definition of the ‘omics tools, technologies and infrastructures that facilitate continued advance in ocean science biology, marine biogeochemistry, and biological oceanography. PMID:25197495

  5. Meeting report: Ocean 'omics science, technology and cyberinfrastructure: current challenges and future requirements (August 20-23, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Dick, Gregory J; Jenkins, Bethany; Heidelberg, John; Allen, Eric; Mackey, Katherine R M; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-06-15

    The National Science Foundation's EarthCube End User Workshop was held at USC Wrigley Marine Science Center on Catalina Island, California in August 2013. The workshop was designed to explore and characterize the needs and tools available to the community that is focusing on microbial and physical oceanography research with a particular emphasis on 'omic research. The assembled researchers outlined the existing concerns regarding the vast data resources that are being generated, and how we will deal with these resources as their volume and diversity increases. Particular attention was focused on the tools for handling and analyzing the existing data, on the need for the construction and curation of diverse federated databases, as well as development of shared, interoperable, "big-data capable" analytical tools. The key outputs from this workshop include (i) critical scientific challenges and cyber infrastructure constraints, (ii) the current and future ocean 'omics science grand challenges and questions, and (iii) data management, analytical and associated and cyber-infrastructure capabilities required to meet critical current and future scientific challenges. The main thrust of the meeting and the outcome of this report is a definition of the 'omics tools, technologies and infrastructures that facilitate continued advance in ocean science biology, marine biogeochemistry, and biological oceanography.

  6. Committed emissions from existing and planned power plants and asset stranding required to meet the Paris Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Alexander; Hepburn, Cameron; Vogt-Schilb, Adrien; Caldecott, Ben

    2018-05-01

    Over the coming decade, the power sector is expected to invest ~7.2 trillion USD in power plants and grids globally, much of it into CO2-emitting coal and gas plants. These assets typically have long lifetimes and commit large amounts of (future) CO2 emissions. Here, we analyze the historic development of emission commitments from power plants and compare the emissions committed by current and planned plants with remaining carbon budgets. Based on this comparison we derive the likely amount of stranded assets that would be required to meet the 1.5 °C–2 °C global warming goal. We find that even though the growth of emission commitments has slowed down in recent years, currently operating generators still commit us to emissions (~300 GtCO2) above the levels compatible with the average 1.5 °C–2 °C scenario (~240 GtCO2). Furthermore, the current pipeline of power plants would add almost the same amount of additional commitments (~270 GtCO2). Even if the entire pipeline was cancelled, therefore, ~20% of global capacity would need to be stranded to meet the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement. Our results can help companies and investors re-assess their investments in fossil-fuel power plants, and policymakers strengthen their policies to avoid further carbon lock-in.

  7. ALSTOM supercritical steam plants meet Polish market challenges and power generator's requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twardowski, A.

    2007-07-01

    From the early 1990s the age and technical performance of most of the Polish power plants required urgent investment including rehabilitation and/or replacement. This was necessary as power demand was increasing continuously in parallel with country GDP growth. Poland's joining the EU in May 2005 caused additional obligations related to limitation of emissions by Poland as a country and specifically by the Polish power sector. The first big project focussed on replacement of old equipment, improvement of electricity production efficiency and reduction of environmental impact by rehabilitation of Units 1-6 in Turow power plant. This is briefly described in the presentation. The latest and the biggest project is the construction of a new supercritical, lignite fired 833 MW unit in BOT Belchatow PP awarded to ALSTOM in December 2004 as a full term key contract. In addition to a new power block the project included: a new desulfurisation plant; a complete close circle cooling system; a new electrical system control system, and water treatment system; a coal handling system connecting the new unit with lignite transportation system from the open mine to the existing plant; hydraulic ash and slug systems; and an electrostatic precipitator. The unit has reduced NOx emissions to the level below 200 mg/Nm{sup 3} thanks to low emission burners. Particulate emissions are below 30 mg/Nm{sup 3}, SOx emissions are below 220 mg/Nm{sup 3}; CO{sub 2} emissions are lowered and cooling water consumption reduced. Special noise protection systems and special design of some systems has greatly reduced the noise level. 2 photos.

  8. Estimation of the minimum dose required to measure ventricular width in follow-up cranial computed tomography (CCT) in children with hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhof, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Berlis, A. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To estimate the minimum dose needed at follow-up cranial computed tomography (CCT) to reliably determine ventricular width in children with hydrocephalus. Materials and Methods: For the study, a phantom was created using the calvarium of an infant which was filled with gelatin and the shaped inner cones of two carrots serving as lateral ventricles. The phantom was scanned ten times with two multi-slice CTs (LightSpeed Ultra, GE, and Somatom Sensation, Siemens), using a tube current of 400, 350, 300, 250, 200, 150, and 100 mA, and a tube voltage of 140, 120, 100, and 80 kV. The width of both lateral ventricles was measured at 4 sites. The values derived from scans performed at 380 / 400 mA and 140 kV (LightSpeed/Somatom) served as a reference. Measurements scored 1 point if they did not differ by more than 0.5 mm from the reference values. Results: The radiation dose can be reduced from 61.0 mGy to 9.2 mGy (15.1 %) with LightSpeed and from 55.0 mGy to 8.0 mGy (14.6 %) with Somatom without impairing the reliability of ventricular width measurements. However, in the case of both scanners, certain combinations of tube voltage and current yielded less reliable measurements although the dose was higher and the pixel noise was lower. Conclusion: There is no single cut-off dose or setting for tube voltage and current which guarantees reliable ventricular width measurements with the least radiation exposure for both scanners. As a guideline, it is safe to use the standard protocols with a reduced tube current of 100 kV. (orig.)

  9. Constraints and challenges of meeting the water requirements of livestock in Ethiopia: cases of Lume and Siraro districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenu, Kebede; Markemann, André; Roessler, Regina; Siegmund-Schultze, Marianna; Abebe, Girma; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Compared to the total water use in livestock production systems, water for livestock drinking is small in amount but is an important requirement for health and productivity of animals. This study was carried out to assess constraints and challenges of meeting drinking water requirements of livestock in rural mixed smallholder crop-livestock farming districts in the Ethiopian Rift Valley area. Data was collected by individual interviews with randomly selected respondents and farmer group discussions. Farmers ranked feed and water scarcity as the two most important constraints for livestock husbandry, although the ranking order differed between districts and villages. Poor quality water was a concern for the communities in proximity to urban settlements or industrial establishments. Water provision for livestock was challenging during the dry season, since alternative water sources dried up or were polluted. Though rainwater harvesting by dugout constructions was practiced to cope with water scarcity, farmers indicated that mismanagement of the harvested water was posing health risks on both livestock and people. A sustainable water provision for livestock in the area, thus, depends on use of different water sources (intermittent or perennial) that should be properly managed. Industrial establishments should adopt an environment-friendly production to minimize pollution of water resources used for livestock consumption. Technical support to farmers is required in proper design and use of existing rainwater harvesting systems. Further investigations are recommended on effect of poor quality water (perceived by farmers) on performance of livestock.

  10. Organic market gardening around the Paris agglomeration: agro-environmental performance and capacity to meet urban requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglade, Juliette; Medina, Michael Ramos; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette

    2016-05-04

    Organic market gardening is often promoted by urban municipalities as a way to resource part of the food supply, creating new social links and protecting groundwater resources. The agronomical and environmental performance of six commercial organic market gardening farms supplying vegetables in Paris were evaluated and compared with other vegetable production systems. When expressed in terms of protein production, the yield of these systems appears rather low compared with the productive capacity of open-field organic cropping systems where vegetable production is inserted into rotation with other crops. Moreover, the requirement of producing infiltrated water meeting the drinking water standards seriously limits the allowable rate of fertilisation, thus limiting production. The data reported herein show that to supply the amount of vegetables required by the Paris agglomeration (12 million inhabitants) only by organic market gardening, 160,000-205,000 ha, i.e. 28-36 % of the agricultural area of the surrounding Ile-de-France region, would be required. We conclude that organic market gardening is only one of several other farming systems which can contribute to a re-localised supply of vegetables to large cities.

  11. Finite Element Models Development of Car Seats With Passive Head Restraints to Study Their Meeting Requirements for EURO NCAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Solopov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In performing calculations to evaluate passive safety of car seats by computer modelling methods it is desirable to use the final element models (FEM thereby providing the greatest accuracy of calculation results. Besides, it is expedient to use FEM, which can be calculated by computer for a small period of time to give preliminary results for short terms.The paper describes the features to evaluate a passive safety, which is ensured by the developed KEM of seats with passive head restraints according to requirements of the EURO NCAP.Besides, accuracy of calculated results that is provided by the developed KEM was evaluated. Accuracy evaluation was accomplished in relation to the results obtained the by specialists of the organization conducting similar researches (LSTC.This work was performed within the framework of a technique, which allows us to develop effectively the car seat designs both with passive, and active head restraints, meeting requirements for passive safety.By results of made calculations and experiments it was found that when evaluating by the EURO NCAP technique the "rough" KEM (the 1st and 2nd levels can be considered as rational ones (in terms of labour costs for its creation and problem solving as well as by result errors and it is expedient to use them for preliminary and multivariate calculations. Detailed models (the 3rd level provide the greatest accuracy (the greatest accuracy is reached with the evaluated impact of 16km/h speed under the loading conditions "moderate impact". A relative error of full head acceleration is of 12%.In evaluation by EURO NCAP using NIC criterion a conclusion can be drawn that the seat models of the 2nd level (467 936 KE and the 3rd level (1 255 358 KE meet the passive safety requirements according to EURO NCAP requirements under "light", "moderate", and "heavy" impacts.In evaluation by EURO NCAP for preliminary and multivariate calculations a model of the middle level (consisting of 467

  12. Guidelines on how to meet the requirement to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable. Regulatory guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of Regulatory Guide G-129 (E) is to provide Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) licensees with guidelines on how to meet the forthcoming AECB regulatory requirement to keep doses received by workers and members of the public As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), social and economic factors taken into account. it is realized that the scope for realistic dose reductions will vary depending on the nature of the licensed activity. Therefore, criteria are given in section D for determining if doses can be deemed to be as low as reasonably achievable without further evaluation. The elements that the AECB considers to be essential in the approach to ALARA are described in section E and are summarized as follows: a demonstrated management commitment to the ALARA principle; the implementation of ALARA through a licensee's organization and management, provision of resources, training, establishment of action levels, documentation and other measures; and regular operational reviews. The above elements will be the focus of any AECB assessment to verify compliance with the requirement to keep radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  13. 5 CFR 330.208 - Qualification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... perform the duties and responsibilities of the position. (c) The sex of an individual may not be... qualified for a position if he or she: (1) Meets OPM-established or approved qualification standards and requirements for the position, including any minimum educational requirements, and any selection placement...

  14. Fermat and the Minimum Principle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arguably, least action and minimum principles were offered or applied much earlier. This (or these) principle(s) is/are among the fundamental, basic, unifying or organizing ones used to describe a variety of natural phenomena. It considers the amount of energy expended in performing a given action to be the least required ...

  15. Report of a consultants meeting on impact of ageing on human energy, macro- and micronutrient metabolism and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna convened a Consultants' Meeting from 9-13 December, 2002, to provide the Agency with current insights into the application of nuclear and isotopic techniques as a means to support research on the impact of ageing on human energy and macro-nutrient metabolism and requirements. The Consultants were: Dr. Anura Kurpad, Dr. Victoria Lambert, Dr. June Stevens, Dr. Benjamin Torun and Dr. Mauro Valencia-Juillerat. Dr. Pirjo Pietinen, from the World Health Organization, and Dr. Barry Popkin, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, were present as Observers during the initial part of the Meeting. Given the Consultants' areas of expertise and the topics covered in the discussions, the scope of the Meeting was modified as 'The Application of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques to improve Research on Body Composition, Energy Expenditure, Non-communicable Chronic Diseases, and the Ageing Process, with particular emphasis on Developing Countries'. The objectives of the Meeting were to: i) Evaluate the overall scope of a new Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) and suggest options for specific areas of research within that scope; ii) Suggest approaches to improve the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques for the evaluation of energy and macro-nutrient requirements of older adults in diverse populations of the developing world; iii) Discuss and make recommendations for the use of these techniques in the measurement of energy expenditure, physical activity, total body fat and body fat distribution; and, iv) Propose a harmonization of methods for direct use or for validation of field measurements aimed at obtaining a better understanding of the ageing process and its relation to the incidence of obesity and non-communicable chronic diseases in communities in transition. This meeting benefited from the broad areas of experience of scientists from both developed and developing countries. Their expertise in the use of

  16. What are the minimum requirements for ketogenic diet services in resource-limited regions? Recommendations from the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force for Dietary Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Al-Macki, Nabil; Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kim, Heung D; Liao, Jianxiang; Megaw, Katherine; Nathan, Janak K; Raimann, Ximena; Rivera, Rocio; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Williams, Emma; Zupec-Kania, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of dietary therapies for children and adults with refractory epilepsy, the availability of these treatments in developing countries with limited resources remains suboptimal. One possible contributory factor may be the costs. There is often reported a significant perceived need for a large ketogenic diet team, supplements, laboratory studies, and follow-up visits to provide this treatment. The 2009 Epilepsia Consensus Statement described ideal requirements for a ketogenic diet center, but in some situations this is not feasible. As a result, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Dietary Therapy was asked to convene and provide practical, cost-effective recommendations for new ketogenic diet centers in resource-limited regions of the world. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Interaction of cationic porphyrins with DNA: Importance of the number and position of the charges and minimum structural requirements for intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, M.A.; Battioni, J.P.; Dupre, D.; Mansuy, D.; Le Pecq, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-three porphyrins or metalloporphyrins corresponding to the general formula [meso-[N-methyl-4(or 3 or 2)-pyridiniumyl] n (aryl) 4-n porphyrin]M (M = H 2 , Cu II , or ClFe III ), with n = 2-4, have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible and 1 H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These porphyrins differ not only in the number (2-4) and position of their cationic charges but also in the steric requirements to reach even temporarily a completely planar geometry. Interaction of these porphyrins or metalloporphyrins with calf thymus DNA has been studied and their apparent affinity binding constants have been determined by use of a competition method with ethidium bromide which was applicable not only for all the free base porphyrins but also for their copper (II) or iron (III) complexes. Whatever their mode of binding may be, their apparent affinity binding constants were relatively high and a linear decrease of log K app with the number of porphyrin charges was observed. Studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosimetry, and fluorescence energy transfer experiments showed that not only the tetracationic meso-tetrakis[N-methyl-4(or 3)-pyridiniumyl]porphyrins, which both involved four freely rotating meso-aryl groups, but also the corresponding tri- and dicationic porphyrins were able to intercalate into calf thymus DNA. These results show that only half of the porphyrin ring is necessary for intercalation to occur

  18. Minimum Requirements of Flagellation and Motility for Infection of Agrobacterium sp. Strain H13-3 by Flagellotropic Bacteriophage 7-7-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jiun Y.; Broadway, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The flagellotropic phage 7-7-1 specifically adsorbs to Agrobacterium sp. strain H13-3 (formerly Rhizobium lupini H13-3) flagella for efficient host infection. The Agrobacterium sp. H13-3 flagellum is complex and consists of three flagellin proteins: the primary flagellin FlaA, which is essential for motility, and the secondary flagellins FlaB and FlaD, which have minor functions in motility. Using quantitative infectivity assays, we showed that absence of FlaD had no effect on phage infection, while absence of FlaB resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in infectivity. A flaA deletion strain, which produces straight and severely truncated flagella, experienced a significantly reduced infectivity, similar to that of a flaB flaD strain, which produces a low number of straight flagella. A strain lacking all three flagellin genes is phage resistant. In addition to flagellation, flagellar rotation is required for infection. A strain that is nonmotile due to an in-frame deletion in the gene encoding the motor component MotA is resistant to phage infection. We also generated two strains with point mutations in the motA gene resulting in replacement of the conserved charged residue Glu98, which is important for modulation of rotary speed. A change to the neutral Gln caused the flagellar motor to rotate at a constant high speed, allowing a 2.2-fold-enhanced infectivity. A change to the positively charged Lys caused a jiggly motility phenotype with very slow flagellar rotation, which significantly reduced the efficiency of infection. In conclusion, flagellar number and length, as well as speed of flagellar rotation, are important determinants for infection by phage 7-7-1. PMID:22865074

  19. Minimum Wages and Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Gary S.; Kanbur, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Textbook analysis tells us that in a competitive labor market, the introduction of a minimum wage above the competitive equilibrium wage will cause unemployment. This paper makes two contributions to the basic theory of the minimum wage. First, we analyze the effects of a higher minimum wage in terms of poverty rather than in terms of unemployment. Second, we extend the standard textbook model to allow for incomesharing between the employed and the unemployed. We find that there are situation...

  20. Both Mother and Infant Require a Vitamin D Supplement to Ensure That Infants' Vitamin D Status Meets Current Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajafari, Fariba; Field, Catherine J; Weinberg, Amy R; Letourneau, Nicole

    2018-03-29

    We examined the association between maternal vitamin D intake during breastfeeding with their infants' vitamin D status in infants who did or did not receive vitamin D supplements to determine whether infant supplementation was sufficient. Using plasma from a subset of breastfed infants in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition) cohort, vitamin D status was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal and infants' dietary data were obtained from APrON's dietary questionnaires. The median maternal vitamin D intake was 665 International Units (IU)/day, while 25% reported intakes below the recommended 400 IU/day. Of the 224 infants in the cohort, 72% were exclusively breastfed, and 90% were receiving vitamin D supplements. Infants' median 25(OH)D was 96.0 nmol/L (interquartile ranges (IQR) 77.6-116.2), and 25% had 25(OH)D < 75 nmol/L. An adjusted linear regression model showed that, with a 100 IU increase in maternal vitamin D intake, infants' 25(OH)D increased by 0.9 nmol/L controlling for race, season, mid-pregnancy maternal 25(OH)D, birthweight, and whether the infant received daily vitamin D supplement (β = 0.008, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.002, 0.13). These results suggest that, to ensure infant optimal vitamin D status, not only do infants require a supplement, but women also need to meet current recommended vitamin D intake during breastfeeding.

  1. Both Mother and Infant Require a Vitamin D Supplement to Ensure That Infants’ Vitamin D Status Meets Current Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Aghajafari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the association between maternal vitamin D intake during breastfeeding with their infants’ vitamin D status in infants who did or did not receive vitamin D supplements to determine whether infant supplementation was sufficient. Using plasma from a subset of breastfed infants in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition cohort, vitamin D status was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal and infants’ dietary data were obtained from APrON’s dietary questionnaires. The median maternal vitamin D intake was 665 International Units (IU/day, while 25% reported intakes below the recommended 400 IU/day. Of the 224 infants in the cohort, 72% were exclusively breastfed, and 90% were receiving vitamin D supplements. Infants’ median 25(OHD was 96.0 nmol/L (interquartile ranges (IQR 77.6–116.2, and 25% had 25(OHD < 75 nmol/L. An adjusted linear regression model showed that, with a 100 IU increase in maternal vitamin D intake, infants’ 25(OHD increased by 0.9 nmol/L controlling for race, season, mid-pregnancy maternal 25(OHD, birthweight, and whether the infant received daily vitamin D supplement (β = 0.008, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.002, 0.13. These results suggest that, to ensure infant optimal vitamin D status, not only do infants require a supplement, but women also need to meet current recommended vitamin D intake during breastfeeding.

  2. Both Mother and Infant Require a Vitamin D Supplement to Ensure That Infants’ Vitamin D Status Meets Current Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Amy R.; Letourneau, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    We examined the association between maternal vitamin D intake during breastfeeding with their infants’ vitamin D status in infants who did or did not receive vitamin D supplements to determine whether infant supplementation was sufficient. Using plasma from a subset of breastfed infants in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition) cohort, vitamin D status was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal and infants’ dietary data were obtained from APrON’s dietary questionnaires. The median maternal vitamin D intake was 665 International Units (IU)/day, while 25% reported intakes below the recommended 400 IU/day. Of the 224 infants in the cohort, 72% were exclusively breastfed, and 90% were receiving vitamin D supplements. Infants’ median 25(OH)D was 96.0 nmol/L (interquartile ranges (IQR) 77.6–116.2), and 25% had 25(OH)D < 75 nmol/L. An adjusted linear regression model showed that, with a 100 IU increase in maternal vitamin D intake, infants’ 25(OH)D increased by 0.9 nmol/L controlling for race, season, mid-pregnancy maternal 25(OH)D, birthweight, and whether the infant received daily vitamin D supplement (β = 0.008, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.002, 0.13). These results suggest that, to ensure infant optimal vitamin D status, not only do infants require a supplement, but women also need to meet current recommended vitamin D intake during breastfeeding. PMID:29596362

  3. The role of quality function deployment in meeting customers’ requirements: A case study on the Egyptian tire manufacturing company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mehelmi Heba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the use of QFD within the Egyptian public sector. Thus, there is a need to examine the role of QFD as an improvement approach within the Egyptian public sector organizations. Where QFD had consistently been claimed in the Western world and Europe. This study aimed to extend the knowledge of choosing an appropriate TQM tool for the Egyptian PSOs. Where it serves as an extension to previous studies carried out in the Western world but within the Egyptian context. This study is based on two sources of data collection, semi structured interviews from customers which were analyzed using content analysis and focus groups with managers to construct the QFD model. A purposive sample targeting the company's customers and managers were selected who had the requisite information. Semi-structured interviews helped to identify the factors affecting customers' purchase preferences, customers' opinions, perception, requirements, and problems. Moreover, it served the purpose to identify the 'WHATs' that are an essential part of the proposed QFD framework. Two focus group sessions were conducted to construct the QFD model. The findings of the study indicate that QFD is a generic framework that is appropriate and feasible for application within the public sector tire manufacturing company in Egypt. It was quite a good scientific exercise to demonstrate how customers' requirements were identified, the technical specifications needed and finally constructing the QFD framework to meet customers' requirements. The current study is a single case study which might limit the ability to generalize the research findings, although it identified powerful context and specific insights into QFD implementation. Yet, generalization of findings could be applied to other public sector companies in Egypt facing almost the same problems and having the same surrounding context and environment. Another limitation of this study is the sample

  4. Documentation of medical findings in radiation workers in the GDR to meet the requirements of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.R.; Neumeister, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on ICRP Publication 26, the future organization of the medical surveillance system for radiation workers in the GDR is considered in this paper. These radiation workers will also in future be medically supervised by means of pre-employment and routine examinations. It is considered necessary to have as extensive a registration as possible of information on medical examinations, working place analyses and incidents. Such data have to be collected and stored to be compared with other national and international projects (e.g. in the field of occupational health). In addition, they should permit epidemiological studies to be internationally co-ordinated. For this purpose, a documentation system has been prepared in the German Democratic Republic which is based on GDR experiences and makes it possible to specify the requirements of ICRP Publication 26. This system forms a new basis for mass examinations of occupationally exposed persons. Uniform examination methods tailored to meet the task of assuring occupational health in the GDR will be introduced. The documentation cards are meant to be used as clear-text cards suited for automatic reading by optical character recognition. The examination form consists of ten parts and comprises all details from working place situation to medical findings to laboratory results. It is felt that this new documentation system permits registration of all relevant data required for the effective radiation protection of man. On the basis of this documentation of findings, participation is scheduled in the respective international IAEA programmes and the studies proposed by the ICRP for problems of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and radiogenetics

  5. Nutrient Intake and Contribution of Home Enteral Nutrition to Meeting Nutritional Requirements after Oesophagectomy and Total Gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie L; Halliday, Vanessa; Robinson, Pauline; Smith, Karen; Bowrey, David J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study evaluated nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection and the influence of home jejunostomy feeding in the six months after surgery. Subjects/Methods Data on nutritional intake and physiologic measures were collected as part of a randomised trial with measurements taken before and up to six months after surgery. Results 41 participants (32 oesophagectomy, 9 total gastrectomy) received home jejunostomy feeding (n=18) or usual care without feeding (n=23). At hospital discharge, oral intakes were adequate for energy and protein in 9% and 6% respectively. By three and six months, these values had increased to 61% & 55%, 94% & 77% respectively. Six participants (26%) who received usual care required rescue feeding. Six weeks after hospital discharge, energy intakes were met in those who received jejunal feeding due to the contribution of enteral nutrition. Jejunal feeding did not affect oral intake, being similar in both groups (fed: 77% estimated need, usual care: 79%). At three months, inadequate micronutrient intakes were seen in over one third. Compared to baseline values, six weeks after surgery, weight loss exceeding 5% was seen in 5/18 (28%) who received feeding, 14/17 (82%) who received usual care and 5/6 (83%) of those who required rescue feeding, p=0.002. Weight loss averaged 4.1% (fed), 10.4% (usual care) and 9.2% (rescue fed), p=0.004. These trends persisted out to six months. Conclusions Supplementary jejunostomy feeding made an important contribution to meeting nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection. Importantly, oral nutritional intake was not compromised dispelling the assertion that jejunal feeding deincentivises patients from eating. PMID:28656968

  6. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11087 What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  7. 34 CFR 380.20 - What requirements must a grantee meet before it provides for the transition of an individual in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE MOST SEVERE DISABILITIES AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROJECTS What Post-Award Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 380.20 What requirements must a grantee meet before...

  8. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency CI stationary RICE with a site rating of more than 300 brake HP...

  9. 42 CFR 137.24 - Are there grants available to assist the Indian Tribe to meet the requirements to participate in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... grant to assist it to: (a) Plan to participate in self-governance; and (b) Negotiate the terms of the... Tribe to meet the requirements to participate in self-governance? 137.24 Section 137.24 Public Health... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self...

  10. A Pareto-Improving Minimum Wage

    OpenAIRE

    Eliav Danziger; Leif Danziger

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that a graduated minimum wage, in contrast to a constant minimum wage, can provide a strict Pareto improvement over what can be achieved with an optimal income tax. The reason is that a graduated minimum wage requires high-productivity workers to work more to earn the same income as low-productivity workers, which makes it more difficult for the former to mimic the latter. In effect, a graduated minimum wage allows the low-productivity workers to benefit from second-degree pr...

  11. Minimum critical mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented of thermal systems with minimum critical mass, based on the use of materials with optimum neutron moderating and reflecting properties. The optimum fissile material distributions in the systems are obtained by calculations with standard computer codes, extended with a routine for flat fuel importance search. It is shown that in the minimum critical mass configuration a considerable part of the fuel is positioned in the reflector region. For 239 Pu a minimum critical mass of 87 g is found, which is the lowest value reported hitherto. (author)

  12. Designing from minimum to optimum functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannova, Olga; Bell, Larry

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses a multifaceted strategy to link NASA Minimal Functionality Habitable Element (MFHE) requirements to a compatible growth plan; leading forward to evolutionary, deployable habitats including outpost development stages. The discussion begins by reviewing fundamental geometric features inherent in small scale, vertical and horizontal, pressurized module configuration options to characterize applicability to meet stringent MFHE constraints. A proposed scenario to incorporate a vertical core MFHE concept into an expanded architecture to provide continuity of structural form and a logical path from "minimum" to "optimum" design of a habitable module. The paper describes how habitation and logistics accommodations could be pre-integrated into a common Hab/Log Module that serves both habitation and logistics functions. This is offered as a means to reduce unnecessary redundant development costs and to avoid EVA-intensive on-site adaptation and retrofitting requirements for augmented crew capacity. An evolutionary version of the hard shell Hab/Log design would have an expandable middle section to afford larger living and working accommodations. In conclusion, the paper illustrates that a number of cargo missions referenced for NASA's 4.0.0 Lunar Campaign Scenario could be eliminated altogether to expedite progress and reduce budgets. The plan concludes with a vertical growth geometry that provides versatile and efficient site development opportunities using a combination of hard Hab/Log modules and a hybrid expandable "CLAM" (Crew Lunar Accommodations Module) element.

  13. Minimum entropy production principle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maes, C.; Netočný, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2013), s. 9664-9677 ISSN 1941-6016 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : MINEP Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Minimum_entropy_production_principle

  14. Summary report of consultants' meeting to review the requirements to improve and extend the IRDF library (International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Nichols, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Presentations, recommendations and conclusions of a Consultants' Meeting to 'Review the Requirements to Improve and Extend the IRDF library (International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002))' are summarized is this report. The main aims of this meeting were to discuss scientific and technical matters related to reactor dosimetry and to consider the needs for improvements to the existing data in IRDF-2002 and possible extensions to other higher neutron energy applications. Specific tasks were assigned and deadlines agreed. The requirements for fusion studies are particularly challenging (up to 60 MeV) and should include adequate covariance data - the provision of these neutron cross sections will require additional effort and assessment prior to initiating any work programme, and specific participants agreed to undertake preliminary exercises. (author)

  15. 40 CFR 63.7113 - What are my monitoring installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... continuity, and all mechanical connections for leakage. (d) For each bag leak detection system (BLDS), you... mechanical connections for leakage. (c) For each pressure measurement device, you must meet the requirements...) Use a gauge with a minimum tolerance of 0.5 inch of water or a transducer with a minimum tolerance of...

  16. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  17. Determining minimum lubrication film for machine parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1978-01-01

    Formula predicts minimum film thickness required for fully-flooded ball bearings, gears, and cams. Formula is result of study to determine complete theoretical solution of isothermal elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication of fully-flooded elliptical contacts.

  18. 29 CFR 783.43 - Computation of seaman's minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of seaman's minimum wage. 783.43 Section 783.43...'s minimum wage. Section 6(b) requires, under paragraph (2) of the subsection, that an employee...'s minimum wage requirements by reason of the 1961 Amendments (see §§ 783.23 and 783.26). Although...

  19. Meeting Earth Observation Requirements for Global Agricultural Monitoring: An Evaluation of the Revisit Capabilities of Current and Planned Moderate Resolution Optical Earth Observing Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa K. Whitcraft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a highly dynamic process in space and time, with many applications requiring data with both a relatively high temporal resolution (at least every 8 days and fine-to-moderate (FTM < 100 m spatial resolution. The relatively infrequent revisit of FTM optical satellite observatories coupled with the impacts of cloud occultation have translated into a barrier for the derivation of agricultural information at the regional-to-global scale. Drawing upon the Group on Earth Observations Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM Initiative’s general satellite Earth observation (EO requirements for monitoring of major production areas, Whitcraft et al. (this issue have described where, when, and how frequently satellite data acquisitions are required throughout the agricultural growing season at 0.05°, globally. The majority of areas and times of year require multiple revisits to probabilistically yield a view at least 70%, 80%, 90%, or 95% clear within eight days, something that no present single FTM optical observatory is capable of delivering. As such, there is a great potential to meet these moderate spatial resolution optical data requirements through a multi-space agency/multi-mission constellation approach. This research models the combined revisit capabilities of seven hypothetical constellations made from five satellite sensors—Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager and Thermal Infrared Sensor (Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS, Resourcesat-2 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (Resourcesat-2 AWiFS, Sentinel-2A Multi-Spectral Instrument (MSI, and Sentinel-2B MSI—and compares these capabilities with the revisit frequency requirements for a reasonably cloud-free clear view within eight days throughout the agricultural growing season. Supplementing Landsat 7 and 8 with missions from different space agencies leads to an improved capacity to meet requirements, with Resourcesat-2 providing the largest

  20. Meetings and meeting modeling in smart surroundings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nishida, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real-time or off-line. Intelligent real-time and off-line generation requires understanding of what is going on during a meeting. The

  1. 77 FR 76979 - Pesticides; Revisions to Minimum Risk Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... industries such as animal feed (NAICS code 311119), cosmetics (NAICS code 325620), and soap and detergents... reporting of production to EPA. To meet the criteria for the minimum risk exemption, a pesticide must...

  2. 40 CFR 141.550 - Is my system required to meet subpart T combined filter effluent turbidity limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Combined Filter... utilize filtration other than slow sand filtration or diatomaceous earth filtration must meet the combined...

  3. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... case of motor vehicles so constructed that requirement for a 381 mm (15-inch) minimum height above the... used in lieu of reflex reflectors if the material as used on the vehicle, meets the performance... motor vehicle. (3) Such surfaces shall be at least 3 inches from any required lamp or reflector unless...

  4. A Jehovah’s Witness with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Successfully Treated with an Epigenetic Drug, Azacitidine: A Clue for Development of Anti-AML Therapy Requiring Minimum Blood Transfusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy for acute leukemia in Jehovah’s Witnesses patients is very challenging because of their refusal to accept blood transfusions, a fundamental supportive therapy for this disease. These patients are often denied treatment for fear of treatment-related death. We present the first Jehovah’s Witness patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML treated successfully with azacitidine. After achieving complete remission (CR with one course of azacitidine therapy, the patient received conventional postremission chemotherapy and remained in CR. In the case of patients who accept blood transfusions, there are reports indicating the treatment of AML patients with azacitidine. In these reports, azacitidine therapy was less toxic, including hematoxicity, compared with conventional chemotherapy. The CR rate in azacitidine-treated patients was inadequate; however, some characteristics could be useful in predicting azacitidine responders. The present case is useful for treating Jehovah’s Witnesses patients with AML and provides a clue for anti-AML therapy requiring minimum blood transfusions.

  5. On the Minimum Cable Tensions for the Cable-Based Parallel Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the minimum cable tension distributions in the workspace for cable-based parallel robots to find out more information on the stability. First, the kinematic model of a cable-based parallel robot is derived based on the wrench matrix. Then, a noniterative polynomial-based optimization algorithm with the proper optimal objective function is presented based on the convex optimization theory, in which the minimum cable tension at any pose is determined. Additionally, three performance indices are proposed to show the distributions of the minimum cable tensions in a specified region of the workspace. An important thing is that the three performance indices can be used to evaluate the stability of the cable-based parallel robots. Furthermore, a new workspace, the Specified Minimum Cable Tension Workspace (SMCTW, is introduced, within which all the minimum tensions exceed a specified value, therefore meeting the specified stability requirement. Finally, a camera robot parallel driven by four cables for aerial panoramic photographing is selected to illustrate the distributions of the minimum cable tensions in the workspace and the relationship between the three performance indices and the stability.

  6. Meeting Overlapping Requirements of the Quality Management System and Act 304 at SINAGAMMA, ALURTRON and RAYMINTEX: An Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Nurul Huda Mudri; Rohaizah Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Sinagama, Alurtron and Raymintex are three facilities at Nuclear Malaysia using high radiation sources to provide irradiation service to customers. These three facilities have to fulfill both the requirements of the MS ISO 9001:2008 standard and the legal requirements of Act 304. To fulfill the requirements of the applicable Act 304, scheduled radiation monitoring on personnel, work place and environment should be carried out. This paper will discuss the effectiveness of the management in fulfilling the requirements of ISO 9001 standard and Act 304 regarding the safety of workers and the environment. (author)

  7. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  8. 29 CFR 505.3 - Prevailing minimum compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevailing minimum compensation. 505.3 Section 505.3 Labor... HUMANITIES § 505.3 Prevailing minimum compensation. (a)(1) In the absence of an alternative determination...)(2) of this section, the prevailing minimum compensation required to be paid under the Act to the...

  9. 24 CFR 891.145 - Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... General Program Requirements § 891.145 Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment). As a Minimum Capital... Investment shall be one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the HUD-approved capital advance, not to exceed $25,000. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Owner deposit (Minimum Capital...

  10. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a) A Bank shall require each member to maintain a minimum investment in the capital stock of the Bank, both...

  11. Review of data requirements for groundwater flow and solute transport modelling and the ability of site investigation methods to meet these requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.J.; Chapman, N.A.; Robinson, P.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the data requirements for the codes that may be used in the modelling of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport during the assessment of a Nirex site for the deep disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste and also the site investigation methods that exist to supply the data for these codes. The data requirements for eight codes are reviewed, with most emphasis on three of the more significant codes, VANDAL, NAMMU and CHEMTARD. The largest part of the report describes and discusses the site investigation techniques and each technique is considered in terms of its ability to provide the data necessary to characterise the geological and hydrogeological environment around a potential repository. (author)

  12. Design of pharmaceutical products to meet future patient needs requires modification of current development paradigms and business models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, S; Baeyens, J-P; Becker, R; Maio, M; Bresciani, M; Shreeves, T; Ecker, F; Gogol, M

    2014-06-01

    Drugs represent the most common intervention strategy for managing acute and chronic medical conditions. In light of demographic change and the increasing age of patients, the classic model of drug research and development by the pharmaceutical industry and drug prescription by physicians is reaching its limits. Different stakeholders, e.g. industry, regulatory authorities, health insurance systems, physicians etc., have at least partially differing interests regarding the process of healthcare provision. The primary responsibility for the correct handling of medication and adherence to treatment schedules lies with the recipient of a drug-based therapy, i.e. the patient. It is thus necessary to interactively involve elderly patients, as well as the other stakeholders, in the development of medication and medication application devices, and in clinical trials. This approach will provide the basis for developing a strategy that better meets patients' needs, thus resulting in improved adherence to treatment schedules and better therapeutic outcomes.

  13. Minimum Error Entropy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Marques de Sá, Joaquim P; Santos, Jorge M F; Alexandre, Luís A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the minimum error entropy (MEE) concept applied to data classification machines. Theoretical results on the inner workings of the MEE concept, in its application to solving a variety of classification problems, are presented in the wider realm of risk functionals. Researchers and practitioners also find in the book a detailed presentation of practical data classifiers using MEE. These include multi‐layer perceptrons, recurrent neural networks, complexvalued neural networks, modular neural networks, and decision trees. A clustering algorithm using a MEE‐like concept is also presented. Examples, tests, evaluation experiments and comparison with similar machines using classic approaches, complement the descriptions.

  14. Do Minimum Wages Fight Poverty?

    OpenAIRE

    David Neumark; William Wascher

    1997-01-01

    The primary goal of a national minimum wage floor is to raise the incomes of poor or near-poor families with members in the work force. However, estimates of employment effects of minimum wages tell us little about whether minimum wages are can achieve this goal; even if the disemployment effects of minimum wages are modest, minimum wage increases could result in net income losses for poor families. We present evidence on the effects of minimum wages on family incomes from matched March CPS s...

  15. 14 CFR 382.69 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of videos, DVDs, and other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... concerning the accessibility of videos, DVDs, and other audio-visual presentations shown on-aircraft to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing? 382.69 Section 382.69 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.69 What requirements must carriers...

  16. 45 CFR 263.2 - What kinds of State expenditures count toward meeting a State's basic MOE expenditure requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Cash assistance, including the State's share of the assigned child support collection that is... technology and computerization needed for tracking or monitoring required by or under part IV-A of the Act do... used for tracking and monitoring. (B) It also covers the costs of contracts for the development...

  17. E072/ST-HM - A dynamic maintenance strategie to meet the requirements of the LHC installation

    OpenAIRE

    Böttcher, O

    2003-01-01

    The new ST-HM contract E072 for the maintenance of transport and handling equipment is designed to obtain the high operating reliability as required for the LHC installation and to respect the situation of limited resources at CERN at the same time. The contract is based on a dynamic maintenance strategy. It contains a flexible maintenance contingent that is essential to prepare the equipment for extremely important and critical utilization phases that will come up during the LHC installation...

  18. Employment effects of minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Neumark, David

    2014-01-01

    The potential benefits of higher minimum wages come from the higher wages for affected workers, some of whom are in low-income families. The potential downside is that a higher minimum wage may discourage employers from using the low-wage, low-skill workers that minimum wages are intended to help. Research findings are not unanimous, but evidence from many countries suggests that minimum wages reduce the jobs available to low-skill workers.

  19. Defense Health Care. Reimbursement of Hospitals Not Meeting CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services) Copayment Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    8217JntedState* General AccouýLg Office __ Rteport to Congmesoa Commitee A,""FILE COPYAD-A197 876 DF7-EANSE HEF.ALTHl L’W Reimbur emen--t Of I...Secretary of Defense grant a waiver from CHAMPUS copayment requirements and be approved, tuader certain criteria, to be reimbursed for care to...that a provider waives patient copayments, it denies the provider’s claim for reimbursement . . In fiscal year 1987, cHAmpus payments to civilian

  20. Approximating the minimum cycle mean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Chatterjee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider directed graphs where each edge is labeled with an integer weight and study the fundamental algorithmic question of computing the value of a cycle with minimum mean weight. Our contributions are twofold: (1 First we show that the algorithmic question is reducible in O(n^2 time to the problem of a logarithmic number of min-plus matrix multiplications of n-by-n matrices, where n is the number of vertices of the graph. (2 Second, when the weights are nonnegative, we present the first (1 + ε-approximation algorithm for the problem and the running time of our algorithm is ilde(O(n^ω log^3(nW/ε / ε, where O(n^ω is the time required for the classic n-by-n matrix multiplication and W is the maximum value of the weights.

  1. Efficient system modules to meet the communication requirements in the mining industry; Leistungsfaehige Systembausteine zur Erfuellung der Kommunikationsanforderungen des Bergbaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, F. [Becker Mining Systems GmbH, Friedrichsthal (Germany)

    2006-11-07

    Communication technology has become an important module of efficient operation of a mine. The exchange of information with technical aids takes place between man and machines as participants in communication. The diversity of the requirements associated with the need for communication in a mine can be mastered only by a wide portfolio of suitable technical components. In addition to the technical serviceability of the individual components the ergonomic handling and economic efficiency of the entire production operation must also be ensured. For this purpose it is necessary to design the individual technical modules in such a way that despite their different appearance they interact as a system and thus make available an integrated and transparent communication network to the mine. (orig.)

  2. A comparison of energy conversion systems for meeting the power requirements of manned rover for Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.; Cataldo, R.; Bloomfield, H.

    1990-01-01

    Minimizing system mass for interplanetary missions is of utmost importance in order to keep launch cost within reasonable bounds. For a manned Mars rover, powered by a nuclear reactor power system, the choice of the energy conversion system can play a significant role in lowering the overall system mass. Not only is the mass of the conversion unit affected by the choice, but also the masses of the reactor core, waste heat rejection system, and the radiation shield which are strongly influenced by the system conversion efficiency and operating condition. Several types of conversion systems are of interest for a nuclear reactor Mars manned application. These conversion systems include: free piston Stirling engines, He/XE closed Brayton cycle (CBC), CO 2 open Brayton, and SiGe/GaP thermoelectric. Optimization studies are conducted to determine the impact of the conversion system on the overall mass of the nuclear power system as well as the mobility power requirement of the Rover vehicle

  3. Meeting current requirements. Data security in the smart metering; Den heutigen Anforderungen gerecht werden. Datensicherheit im Smart Metering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayer, Peter [VOLTARIS GmbH, Maxdorf (Germany); Wolf, Frank [VOLTARIS GmbH, Merzig (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    The requirements for the smart metering are extremely complex. On the one hand, the network operators and the suppliers need unadulterated data on consumption or supply. On the other hand, consumers see their privacy jeopardized because the individual user behavior can be read from the specific energy profile. Furthermore, according to the will of the legislator the smart meter or the measuring system is an active component of a smart grid and smart-market system. Right here it is important to eliminate the threat of hacker attacks. For the industry this results in the task of guaranteeing both the maximum data security as well as to provide a maximum nutritive value to the customer.

  4. MINIMUM AREAS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Public Instruction, Harrisburg.

    MINIMUM AREA SPACE REQUIREMENTS IN SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING FACILITIES ARE PRESENTED, INCLUDING FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTIONAL USE, GENERAL USE, AND SERVICE USE. LIBRARY, CAFETERIA, KITCHEN, STORAGE, AND MULTIPURPOSE ROOMS SHOULD BE SIZED FOR THE PROJECTED ENROLLMENT OF THE BUILDING IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROJECTION UNDER THE…

  5. Fuel requirements for isotope production and reasearch reactors: Possible alternative ways of meeting non-proliferation objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a continuing need for access to medium-to-high flux research reactors of intermediate power level (5-50 MW) for the production of industrial and medical radioisotopes, for the provision of neutron beams and for materials research. The construction of further reactors of this type is likely. To obtain the required flux levels in adequate volumes and at the lowest capital cost, past practice has been to design a small-core reactor around a fuel element concept using fully enriched uranium, that is, uranium enriched to 80% U-235 or greater. In recent years, however, it has been recognised that the use of fully enriched uranium in research reactors could give rise to significant risks of nuclear weapons proliferation. Accordingly, there would be advantage if research reactors could be operated on low enriched fuel, that is, enrichment levels of 20% or less. It is the purpose of this paper to explore the implications for proliferation of the enrichment level of research reactor fuel and to draw attention to possible options for reducing proliferation concerns which warrant further study. It does not, however, consider research reactors using very low enriched or natural uranium fuel. The paper is offered to stimulate discussion of the issues and the views expressed do not necessarily represent any formal Australian position

  6. New strategies of the LHC experiments to meet the computing requirements of the HL-LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the ongoing Run 2 is above expectations both concerning the delivered luminosity and the LHC live time. This resulted in a volume of data much larger than originally anticipated. Based on the current data production levels and the structure of the LHC experiment computing models, the estimates of the data production rates and resource needs were re-evaluated for the era leading into the High Luminosity LHC (HLLHC), the Run 3 and Run 4 phases of LHC operation. It turns out that the raw data volume will grow 10 times by the HL-LHC era and the processing capacity needs will grow more than 60 times. While the growth of storage requirements might in principle be satisfied with a 20 per cent budget increase and technology advancements, there is a gap of a factor 6 to 10 between the needed and available computing resources. The threat of a lack of computing and storage resources was present already in the beginning of Run 2, but could still be mitigated, e.g....

  7. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan [Berkeley Lab MS 90R4000 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The first major paradigm shift in electricity generation, delivery, and control is emerging in the developed world, notably Europe, North America, and Japan. This shift will move electricity supply away from the highly centralised universal service quality model with which we are familiar today towards a more dispersed system with heterogeneous qualities of service. One element of dispersed control is the clustering of sources and sinks into semi-autonomous {mu}grids (microgrids). Research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) of {mu}grids are advancing rapidly on at least three continents, and significant demonstrations are currently in progress. This paradigm shift will result in more electricity generation close to end-uses, often involving combined heat and power application for building heating and cooling, increased local integration of renewables, and the possible provision of heterogeneous qualities of electrical service to match the requirements of various end-uses. In Europe, microgrid RD3 is entering its third major round under the 7th European Commission Framework Programme; in the U.S., one specific microgrid concept is undergoing rigorous laboratory testing, and in Japan, where the most activity exists, four major publicly sponsored and two privately sponsored demonstrations are in progress. This evolution poses new challenges to the way buildings are designed, built, and operated. Traditional building energy supply systems will become much more complex in at least three ways: 1. one cannot simply assume gas arrives at the gas meter, electricity at its meter, and the two systems are virtually independent of one another; rather, energy conversion, heat recovery and use, and renewable energy harvesting may all be taking place simultaneously within the building energy system; 2. the structure of energy flows in the building must accommodate multiple energy processes in a manner that permits high overall efficiency; and 3. multiple qualities

  8. Impact assessment of ionising radiation on wildlife: meeting the requirements of the EU birds and habitat directives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Wood, M.D.; Bielby, S.; Jones, S.R.; Vives, J.; Beresford, N.A.; Zinger, I.

    2004-01-01

    In the UK, research funded by the Environment Agency/English Nature has provided a tool for calculating doses received by biota in coastal, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The approach uses the reference organism concept where the organism of interest (feature organism) is equated to a particular reference organism (based on its physical geometry and ecology). The exposure of the reference organism, and consequently the feature organism, to different radionuclides and dose rates can be assessed using a spreadsheet-based mathematical tool. This assessment tool was developed in 2001 and provided an internationally recognised starting point from which more refined assessment tools could develop. As the need for conducting specific assessments under the UK Habitat Regulations became apparent, it was recognised that some targeted refinement of the assessment tool was required. One of the major problems with the tool related to a lack of species-specific data and a lack of information on certain radionuclides appearing in discharges that may be impacting on sites/species to be protected. A second research and development project was therefore undertaken to reduce the uncertainties associated with the assessment tool by collating additional species-specific data, developing a mathematical system for ensuring that the most appropriate reference organism was selected and extending the range of radionuclides included in the assessment. This specific expansion to the assessment tool was directed towards ensuring that species at Natura 2000 sites (Special Protection Areas (SPAs) and Special Areas of Conservation (SACs)) were adequately protected. The species targeted (feature species) for this assessment were species protected under the EC Habitats Directive and those that are characteristic of habitats protected under the Directive. The paper will show how typical dimensions of each feature species are collated and each feature species mathematically aligned with the

  9. Recording Information on Architectural Heritage Should Meet the Requirements for Conservation Digital Recording Practices at the Summer Palace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Cong, Y.; Wu, C.; Bai, C.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    The recording of Architectural heritage information is the foundation of research, conservation, management, and the display of architectural heritage. In other words, the recording of architectural heritage information supports heritage research, conservation, management and architectural heritage display. What information do we record and collect and what technology do we use for information recording? How do we determine the level of accuracy required when recording architectural information? What method do we use for information recording? These questions should be addressed in relation to the nature of the particular heritage site and the specific conditions for the conservation work. In recent years, with the rapid development of information acquisition technology such as Close Range Photogrammetry, 3D Laser Scanning as well as high speed and high precision Aerial Photogrammetry, many Chinese universities, research institutes and heritage management bureaux have purchased considerable equipment for information recording. However, the lack of understanding of both the nature of architectural heritage and the purpose for which the information is being collected has led to several problems. For example: some institutions when recording architectural heritage information aim solely at high accuracy. Some consider that advanced measuring methods must automatically replace traditional measuring methods. Information collection becomes the purpose, rather than the means, of architectural heritage conservation. Addressing these issues, this paper briefly reviews the history of architectural heritage information recording at the Summer Palace (Yihe Yuan, first built in 1750), Beijing. Using the recording practices at the Summer Palace during the past ten years as examples, we illustrate our achievements and lessons in recording architectural heritage information with regard to the following aspects: (buildings') ideal status desired, (buildings') current status

  10. 30 CFR 285.526 - What instruments other than a surety bond may I use to meet the financial assurance requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with: (i) Minimum net assets of $500,000,000; and (ii) Minimum Bankrate.com Safe & Sound rating of 3 Stars, and Capitalization, Assets, Equity and Liquidity (CAEL) rating of 3 or less; (4) Negotiable U.S... insured trust account by a licensed securities brokerage firm for the benefit of the MMS; (5) Investment...

  11. Minimum Wage in the RMG Sector of Bangladesh: Definition, Determination Method and Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Khondaker Golam Moazzem; Saifa Raz

    2014-01-01

    Minimum wage in the RMG sector of Bangladesh is a debated issue, mainly due to lack of operational definition and method for calculation. This study is undertaken to come up with a definition and method for calculation of the minimum wage based on the ILO Minimum Wage Fixing Convention, 1970 (No. 131). The underlying principle of this definition is that minimum wage should be sufficient enough to meet the basic needs of workers and their families, and should provide some discretionary income....

  12. The minimum agreed upon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stella Hoff; Corinne van Gaalen; Arjan Soede; Albert Luten; Cok Vrooman; Sanne Lamers

    2010-01-01

    What does the concept of poverty mean? What kind of shelter, diet, clothing, participation and recreation does one need in order not to be poor? And what monthly budget is currently required to afford these necessities in the Netherlands? Four focus groups met several times to discuss such

  13. Risk control and the minimum significant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Risk management implies that the risk manager can, by his actions, exercise at least a modicum of control over the risk in question. In the terminology of control theory, a management action is a control signal imposed as feedback on the system to bring about a desired change in the state of the system. In the terminology of risk management, an action is taken to bring a predicted risk to lower values. Even if it is assumed that the management action taken is 100% effective and that the projected risk reduction is infinitely well known, there is a lower limit to the desired effects that can be achieved. It is based on the fact that all risks, such as the incidence of cancer, exhibit a degree of variability due to a number of extraneous factors such as age at exposure, sex, location, and some lifestyle parameters such as smoking or the consumption of alcohol. If the control signal is much smaller than the variability of the risk, the signal is lost in the noise and control is lost. This defines a minimum controllable risk based on the variability of the risk over the population considered. This quantity is the counterpart of the minimum significant risk which is defined by the uncertainties of the risk model. Both the minimum controllable risk and the minimum significant risk are evaluated for radiation carcinogenesis and are shown to be of the same order of magnitude. For a realistic management action, the assumptions of perfectly effective action and perfect model prediction made above have to be dropped, resulting in an effective minimum controllable risk which is determined by both risk limits. Any action below that effective limit is futile, but it is also unethical due to the ethical requirement of doing more good than harm. Finally, some implications of the effective minimum controllable risk on the use of the ALARA principle and on the evaluation of remedial action goals are presented

  14. 36 CFR 223.61 - Establishing minimum stumpage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Timber Sale Contracts Appraisal and Pricing.... No timber may be sold or cut under timber sale contracts for less than minimum stumpage rates except... amounts of material not meeting utilization standards of the timber sale contract. For any timber sale...

  15. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and the right-hand column lists (for informational purposes only) the minimum distance necessary for...) Within 320 km of the Mexican border, LP100 stations must meet the following separations with respect to any Mexican stations: Mexican station class Co-channel (km) First-adjacent channel (km) Second-third...

  16. 42 CFR 422.382 - Minimum net worth amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that CMS considers appropriate to reduce, control or eliminate start-up administrative costs. (b) After... section. (c) Calculation of the minimum net worth amount—(1) Cash requirement. (i) At the time of application, the organization must maintain at least $750,000 of the minimum net worth amount in cash or cash...

  17. 77 FR 43196 - Minimum Internal Control Standards and Technical Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION 25 CFR Parts 543 and 547 Minimum Internal Control Standards [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Part 543 addresses minimum internal control standards (MICS) for Class II gaming operations. The regulations require tribes to establish controls and implement...

  18. 12 CFR 615.5330 - Minimum surplus ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum surplus ratios. 615.5330 Section 615.5330 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5330 Minimum...

  19. Tracking simulation and wire chamber requirements for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1988-11-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Lubricants trying to meet the diverging requirements of environmental compatibility and efficient performance; Schmierstoffe im Spannungsfeld zwischen Umweltvertraeglichkeit und technischem Leistungsanspruch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornscheidt, G.A. [Carl Bechem GmbH, Hagen (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The article addresses the political goal, to substitute lubricants on a mineral oil basis by biologically degradable oils, primarily from renewable sources as e.g. rapeseed or sunflower oils, but animal oils as well. These products can be further processed by oleochemical treatment to synthetic esters which meet the high performance requirements of technical applications. The Federal Government supports research and development activities and thus has given attractive incentives for a reorientation towards biological oils. This will not heal the hole in the ozone layer, nor will it halt destruction of the rainforests, but nevertheless enhances the chances for active environmental protection through application of new, less hazardous substances. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wie es im Vortrag dargestellt wird, ist es ein erklaertes Ziel der Bundesregierung, problematische mineraloelbasische Schmierstoffe durch den Einsatz biologisch schnell abbaubarer Grundfluessigkeiten, vorrangig nachwachsender Rohstoffe wie Raps- und Sonnenblumenoele, aber auch tierischer Oele, zu ersetzen. Fuer technisch anspruchsvolle Anwendungen koennen diese Produkte von der Oleochemie zu synthetischen Estern weiterverarbeitet werden. Durch die Foerderung von Forschungs- und Entwicklungsmassnahmen fuer Bio-Schmieroele setzt die Bundesregierung hier deutliche Akzente. Kein Schmierstoff dieser Welt kann die Umwelt verbessern. Weder laesst sich mit Bio-Oel das Ozonloch `stopfen`, noch das Problem der sterbenden Regenwaelder loesen. Dennoch kann mit den neuen innovativen Schmierstoffen aktiv Umweltschutz betrieben werden. (orig.)

  1. radiation safety culture for developing country: Basis for s minimum operational radiation protection programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozental, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a methodology for an integrated strategy aiming at establishing an adequate radiation Safety infrastructure for developing countries, non major power reactor programme. Its implementation will allow these countries, about 50% of the IAEA's Member States, to improve marginal radiation safety, specially to those recipients of technical assistance and do not meet the Minimum radiation Safety Requirements of the IAEA's Basic Safety Standards for radiation protection Progress in the implementation of safety regulations depends on the priority of the government and its understanding and conviction about the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. There is no doubt to conclude that the reasons for the deficiency of sources control and dose limitation are related to the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework, specially considering the establishment of an adequate legislation; A minimum legal infrastructure; A minimum operational radiation safety programme; Alternatives for a Point of Optimum Contact, to avoid overlap and conflict, that is: A 'Memorandum of Understanding' among Regulatory Authorities in the Country, dealing with similar type of licensing and inspection

  2. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes

  3. Calculation of Appropriate Minimum Size of Isolation Rooms based on Questionnaire Survey of Experts and Analysis on Conditions of Isolation Room Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, An-Na; Song, Hae-Eun; Yang, Young-Kwon; Park, Jin-Chul; Hwang, Jung-Ha

    2017-07-01

    After the outbreak of the MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) epidemic, issues were raised regarding response capabilities of medical institutions, including the lack of isolation rooms at hospitals. Since then, the government of Korea has been revising regulations to enforce medical laws in order to expand the operation of isolation rooms and to strengthen standards regarding their mandatory installation at hospitals. Among general and tertiary hospitals in Korea, a total of 159 are estimated to be required to install isolation rooms to meet minimum standards. For the purpose of contributing to hospital construction plans in the future, this study conducted a questionnaire survey of experts and analysed the environment and devices necessary in isolation rooms, to determine their appropriate minimum size to treat patients. The result of the analysis is as follows: First, isolation rooms at hospitals are required to have a minimum 3,300mm minor axis and a minimum 5,000mm major axis for the isolation room itself, and a minimum 1,800mm minor axis for the antechamber where personal protective equipment is donned and removed. Second, the 15 ㎡-or-larger standard for the floor area of isolation rooms will have to be reviewed and standards for the minimum width of isolation rooms will have to be established.

  4. MINIMUM BRACING STIFFNESS FOR MULTI-COLUMN SYSTEMS: THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    ARISTIZÁBAL-OCHOA, J. DARÍO

    2011-01-01

    A method that determines the minimum bracing stiffness required by a multi-column elastic system to achieve non-sway buckling conditions is proposed. Equations that evaluate the required minimum stiffness of the lateral and torsional bracings and the corresponding “braced" critical buckling load for each column of the story level are derived using the modified stability functions. The following effects are included: 1) the types of end connections (rigid, semirigid, and simple); 2) the bluepr...

  5. Highlight: Ankara workshop puts minimum wage on the G-20 radar ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... A recent JustJobs Network workshop, held before the meetings of G-20 ... Network), and Nguyen Thang (Vietnam's Academy of Social Sciences) ... In all three cases, setting a minimum wage has also had negative effects.

  6. Amendment of the administrative skeleton provision for minimum requirements to be met by waste water discharged into bodies of water. Administrative skeleton provision on waste water of 25 November, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This provision applies to waste water to be discharged into bodies of water and whose pollution load stems mainly from the sectors indicated in appendices. Without prejudice to stricter requirements governing the execution of the Water Resources Act, the requirements to be met by the discharge of waste water, as indicated in appendices, are defined in accordance with section 7a, subsection 1, number 3 of the Water Resources Act. - The maximum concentrations indicated in appendices, for instance for waste water from brown coal briquetting plant, black coal treatment plant, petroleum refineries and flue gas scrubbers at combustion plant, relate to waste water in the discharge pipe of the waste water treatment plant. Contrary to technical rules that may apply in each instance, these concentrations must not be attained by dilution or mixing. (orig.) [de

  7. 78 FR 12427 - Medicare Program; Medical Loss Ratio Requirements for the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    .... In essence, a Cost HMO/CMP or an HCPP that did not meet the minimum MLR requirement on the Part D... MLR provisions. Note that there also are terms defined in other sections of the Part 422 Subpart X and Part 423 Subpart X (for example, ``incurred claims'' is defined in Sec. 422.2420(b) and Sec. 423.2420(b...

  8. 40 CFR 63.8450 - What are my monitoring installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement sensitivity of 0.5 inch of water or a transducer with a minimum measurement sensitivity of 1... electrical connections for continuity, and all mechanical connections for leakage. (d) For each pH... bag leak detection system, you must meet the requirements in paragraphs (e)(1) through (11) of this...

  9. Minimum Q Electrically Small Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretically, the minimum radiation quality factor Q of an isolated resonance can be achieved in a spherical electrically small antenna by combining TM1m and TE1m spherical modes, provided that the stored energy in the antenna spherical volume is totally suppressed. Using closed-form expressions...... for a multiarm spherical helix antenna confirm the theoretical predictions. For example, a 4-arm spherical helix antenna with a magnetic-coated perfectly electrically conducting core (ka=0.254) exhibits the Q of 0.66 times the Chu lower bound, or 1.25 times the minimum Q....

  10. New Materials Developed To Meet Regulatory And Technical Requirements Associated With In-Situ Decommissioning Of Nuclear Reactors And Associated Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-01

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m 3 (250,000 yd 3 ) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker exposure to

  11. Minimum analytical quality specifications of inter-laboratory comparisons: agreement among Spanish EQAP organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricós, Carmen; Ramón, Francisco; Salas, Angel; Buño, Antonio; Calafell, Rafael; Morancho, Jorge; Gutiérrez-Bassini, Gabriella; Jou, Josep M

    2011-11-18

    Four Spanish scientific societies organizing external quality assessment programs (EQAP) formed a working group to promote the use of common minimum quality specifications for clinical tests. Laboratories that do not meet the minimum specifications are encouraged to make immediate review of the analytical procedure affected and to implement corrective actions if necessary. The philosophy was to use the 95th percentile of results sent to EQAP (expressed in terms of percentage deviation from the target value) obtained for all results (except the outliers) during a cycle of 1 year. The target value for a number of analytes of the basic biochemistry program was established as the overall mean. However, because of the substantial discrepancies between routine methods for basic hematology, hormones, proteins, therapeutic drugs and tumor markers, the target in these cases was the peer group mean. The resulting specifications were quite similar to those established in the US (CLIA), and Germany (Richtlinie). The proposed specifications stand for the minimum level of quality to be attained for laboratories, to assure harmonized service performance. They have nothing to do with satisfying clinical requirements, which are the final level of quality to be reached, and that is strongly recommended in our organizations by means of documents, courses, symposiums and all types of educational activities.

  12. Coupling between minimum scattering antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Lessow, H; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Coupling between minimum scattering antennas (MSA's) is investigated by the coupling theory developed by Wasylkiwskyj and Kahn. Only rotationally symmetric power patterns are considered, and graphs of relative mutual impedance are presented as a function of distance and pattern parameters. Crossed...

  13. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on the need for Hinkley Point 'C' to help meet capacity requirement and the non-fossil-fuel proportion economically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, F.P.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. The purpose of this evidence to the Inquiry is to show why there is a need now to go ahead with the construction of Hinkley Point ''C'' generating station to help meet the non-fossil-fuel proportion of generation economically and also to help meet future generating capacity requirement. The CEGB submits that it is appropriate to compare Hinkley Point ''C'' with other non-fossil-fuel alternatives under various bases. Those dealt with by this proof of evidence are as follows: i) ability to contribute to capacity need and in assisting the distribution companies to meet their duty to supply electricity; ii) ability to contribute to the non-fossil-fuel proportion; iii) relative economic merit. (author)

  14. Setting a national minimum standard for health benefits: how do state benefit mandates compare with benefits in large-group plans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Allison; Mika, Stephanie; Nuzum, Rachel; Schoen, Cathy

    2009-06-01

    Many proposed health insurance reforms would establish a federal minimum benefit standard--a baseline set of benefits to ensure that people have adequate coverage and financial protection when they purchase insurance. Currently, benefit mandates are set at the state level; these vary greatly across states and generally target specific areas rather than set an overall standard for what qualifies as health insurance. This issue brief considers what a broad federal minimum standard might look like by comparing existing state benefit mandates with the services and providers covered under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) Blue Cross and Blue Shield standard benefit package, an example of minimum creditable coverage that reflects current standard practice among employer-sponsored health plans. With few exceptions, benefits in the FEHBP standard option either meet or exceed those that state mandates require-indicating that a broad-based national benefit standard would include most existing state benefit mandates.

  15. State cigarette minimum price laws - United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Cigarette price increases reduce the demand for cigarettes and thereby reduce smoking prevalence, cigarette consumption, and youth initiation of smoking. Excise tax increases are the most effective government intervention to increase the price of cigarettes, but cigarette manufacturers use trade discounts, coupons, and other promotions to counteract the effects of these tax increases and appeal to price-sensitive smokers. State cigarette minimum price laws, initiated by states in the 1940s and 1950s to protect tobacco retailers from predatory business practices, typically require a minimum percentage markup to be added to the wholesale and/or retail price. If a statute prohibits trade discounts from the minimum price calculation, these laws have the potential to counteract discounting by cigarette manufacturers. To assess the status of cigarette minimum price laws in the United States, CDC surveyed state statutes and identified those states with minimum price laws in effect as of December 31, 2009. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which determined that 25 states had minimum price laws for cigarettes (median wholesale markup: 4.00%; median retail markup: 8.00%), and seven of those states also expressly prohibited the use of trade discounts in the minimum retail price calculation. Minimum price laws can help prevent trade discounting from eroding the positive effects of state excise tax increases and higher cigarette prices on public health.

  16. 40 CFR 63.2465 - What requirements must I meet for process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? 63.2465 Section 63.2465 Protection... and halogen HAP or HAP metals? (a) You must meet each emission limit in Table 3 to this subpart that... section. (b) If any process vents within a process emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP, you must...

  17. The Learning Outcomes of Students Meeting Their International Dimension Requirement through Courses Offered in a College of Agriculture: Did Student Learning Differ Depending on Mode of Instruction Delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriba, Samba; Edwards, M. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Many online courses have been developed in an effort to meet the needs of students who are either unable or less inclined to attend face-to-face classes. The College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) at Oklahoma State University has been preparing its students to attain international awareness and become globally competent…

  18. Realistic minimum accident source terms - Evaluation, application, and risk acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation, application, and risk acceptance for realistic minimum accident source terms can represent a complex and arduous undertaking. This effort poses a very high impact to design, construction cost, operations and maintenance, and integrated safety over the expected facility lifetime. At the 2005 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD) Meeting in Knoxville Tenn., two papers were presented mat summarized the Y-12 effort that reduced the number of criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) detectors originally designed for the new Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) from 258 to an eventual as-built number of 60. Part of that effort relied on determining a realistic minimum accident source term specific to the facility. Since that time, the rationale for an alternate minimum accident has been strengthened by an evaluation process that incorporates realism. A recent update to the HEUMF CAAS technical basis highlights the concepts presented here. (authors)

  19. Energy and environmental norms on Minimum Vital Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maran, S.

    2008-01-01

    By the end of the year will come into force the recommendations on Minimum Vital flow and operators of hydroelectric power plants will be required to make available part of water of their derivations in order to protect river ecosystems. In this article the major energy and environmental consequences of these rules, we report some quantitative evaluations and are discusses the proposals for overcoming the weaknesses of the approach in the estimation of Minimum Vital Flux [it

  20. Quantum mechanics the theoretical minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, an accessible introduction to the math and science of quantum mechanicsQuantum Mechanics is a (second) book for anyone who wants to learn how to think like a physicist. In this follow-up to the bestselling The Theoretical Minimum, physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman offer a first course in the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum Mechanics presents Susskind and Friedman’s crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics. An accessible but rigorous introduction to a famously difficult topic, Quantum Mechanics provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.

  1. Minimum resolvable power contrast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuai; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio and MTF are important indexs to evaluate the performance of optical systems. However,whether they are used alone or joint assessment cannot intuitively describe the overall performance of the system. Therefore, an index is proposed to reflect the comprehensive system performance-Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast (MRP) model. MRP is an evaluation model without human eyes. It starts from the radiance of the target and the background, transforms the target and background into the equivalent strips,and considers attenuation of the atmosphere, the optical imaging system, and the detector. Combining with the signal-to-noise ratio and the MTF, the Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast is obtained. Finally the detection probability model of MRP is given.

  2. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  3. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for all...

  4. The Effect of the Minimum Compensating Cash Balance on School District Investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Frederick L.

    Banks are usually reimbursed for their checking account services either by a fixed service charge or by requiring a minimum or minimum-average compensating cash balance. This paper demonstrates how to determine the optimal minimum balance for a school district to maintain in its account. It is assumed that both the bank and the school district use…

  5. 29 CFR 552.100 - Application of minimum wage and overtime provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application of minimum wage and overtime provisions. 552... § 552.100 Application of minimum wage and overtime provisions. (a)(1) Domestic service employees must receive for employment in any household a minimum wage of not less than that required by section 6(a) of...

  6. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ''Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:'' a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs

  7. 13 CFR 120.472 - Higher individual minimum capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... capital level, and the performance of its SBA loan portfolio; (e) The management views of the SBLC's directors and senior management; and (f) Other risk-related factors, as determined by SBA. [73 FR 75516, Dec... those circumstances or potential problems; (c) Overall condition, management strength, and future...

  8. 45 CFR 303.20 - Minimum organizational and staffing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... any person who has decision-making authority over individual cases on a day-to-day basis and includes... such as legal, interviewer, investigative, accounting, clerical, and other supportive staff. (g) If it...; 64 FR 6250, Feb. 9, 1999; 68 FR 25304, May 12, 2003] Effective Date Note: At 73 FR 56443, Sept. 26...

  9. 42 CFR 84.205 - Facepiece test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; (ii) Two minutes, calisthenic arm movements; (iii) Two minutes, running in place; and (iv) Two minutes, pumping with a tire pump into a 28-liter (1 cubic-foot) container. (4) Each wearer shall not detect the...

  10. 42 CFR 84.124 - Facepiece tests; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and turning head; (ii) Two minutes, calisthenic arm movements; (iii) Two minutes, running in place; and (iv) Two minutes, pumping with a tire pump into a 28 liter (1 cubic foot) container. (4) Each...

  11. 21 CFR 205.5 - Minimum required information for licensure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., corporation, or sole proprietorship); and (5) The name(s) of the owner and/or operator of the licensee... director, the corporate names, and the name of the State of incorporation; and (iv) If a sole proprietorship, the full name of the sole proprietor and the name of the business entity. (b) The State licensing...

  12. 42 CFR 84.85 - Breathing bags; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sufficient volume to prevent gas waste during exhalation and to provide an adequate reserve for inhalation. (b) Breathing bags shall be constructed of materials which are flexible and resistant to gasoline...

  13. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P R [Louisville Univ., Louisville, KY (United States). J.G. Brown Cancer Center

    1996-08-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ``Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:`` a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs.

  14. 12 CFR 325.3 - Minimum leverage capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... depository institution making application to the FDIC) shall consist of a ratio of Tier 1 capital to total..., excellent asset quality, high liquidity, good earnings and in general is considered a strong banking... application to the FDIC) shall consist of a ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of not less than 4 percent...

  15. 76 FR 43534 - Alternative to Minimum Days Off Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... individual's shift schedule (i.e., whether the individual was working 8-, 10- or 12-hour shifts). The NEI... officers working 12-hour shifts from an average of 3 days per week to an average of 2.5 or 2 days per week... method for computing work hours and allowing licensees to be more flexible in how they schedule...

  16. 12 CFR 1750.4 - Minimum capital requirement computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... current market value of posted qualifying collateral, computed in accordance with appendix A to this subpart; (ii) 1.50 percent of the market value of qualifying collateral posted to secure interest rate and... differences in the credit risk of such obligations in relation to mortgage-backed securities. (b) Any asset or...

  17. Potential Impact of Fulfilment of Minimum Essential Force (MEF to The Regional Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Tri Haryanto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As with other aspects, the element of meeting the needs of national defence and security becomes very crucial aspect. These elements are not only coming from the domestic, but also related to the system of inter-state relations. To ensure the creation of the defence system and optimal security, policy will require minimum essential forces (MEF, which will outline the major components of the minimum requirements of national defence should be prepared to face any threats. The fulfilment of MEF must also provide welfare impacts for the region. For this reason this study was conducted with the purpose of calculating the impact of compliance with the MEF on the welfare of the region, especially in West Java province. IRIO using spatial approach, it can be concluded that the domestic defence industry is projected to have a role that is quite high, especially for the regional economy. To the West Java region, industrial goods of metal, in which there is the defence industry, encourage the creation of outputs and increase the income of workers. Although most of the economy and its impact enjoyed by workers in the territory, region or other provinces also continue to enjoy the effects of the increase in output and labour income.

  18. Fruitful meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont

    2010-01-01

    The annual meeting for the LHC Performance Workshop was held in Chamonix from 25 to 29 January 2010 in the Centre de Congrès Le Majestic. The Workshop focused on how to reach the maximum operating energy.   The LHC Performance Workshop took place between 25 and 29 January 2010 in a rather chilly Chamonix. Following the successful start of beam commissioning last year, there remain a number of important questions about the near future of the machine. Topics discussed included the maximum operational energy that will be possible in 2010 and the steps need to go above the planned 2010 start-up energy of 3.5 TeV. Of particular importance were the required splice and magnet consolidation measures that would be demanded by an increase above this energy.  The energy in the magnets and beams will always represent a considerable threat, and the possible impact of an incident and the potential measures required to speed up a recovery were put on the table. Safety is critical and there were...

  19. The art of leading meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, C B

    1987-05-01

    The ability to skillfully lead meetings can contribute to a manager's effectiveness. There are four types of meetings, each serving different needs and requiring different leadership. A manager must know when to hold meetings, what leadership style is appropriate, how and when to use participative management, and how to facilitate a consensus. Considerable planning must be done before a meeting is held. Various leadership and communication skills are required to effectively open, conduct, and close a meeting. Finally, the leader needs to know how to deal with participants who become problems.

  20. The minimum yield in channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uguzzoni, A.; Gaertner, K.; Lulli, G.; Andersen, J.U.

    2000-01-01

    A first estimate of the minimum yield was obtained from Lindhard's theory, with the assumption of a statistical equilibrium in the transverse phase-space of channeled particles guided by a continuum axial potential. However, computer simulations have shown that this estimate should be corrected by a fairly large factor, C (approximately equal to 2.5), called the Barrett factor. We have shown earlier that the concept of a statistical equilibrium can be applied to understand this result, with the introduction of a constraint in phase-space due to planar channeling of axially channeled particles. Here we present an extended test of these ideas on the basis of computer simulation of the trajectories of 2 MeV α particles in Si. In particular, the gradual trend towards a full statistical equilibrium is studied. We also discuss the introduction of this modification of standard channeling theory into descriptions of the multiple scattering of channeled particles (dechanneling) by a master equation and show that the calculated minimum yields are in very good agreement with the results of a full computer simulation

  1. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwee, Regina

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.2 < |η| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presented. We also highlight the advantage of these triggers for particle correlation analyses. (author)

  2. Harmonized Constraints in Software Engineering and Acquisition Process Management Requirements are the Clue to Meet Future Performance Goals Successfully in an Environment of Scarce Resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reich, Holger

    2008-01-01

    This MBA project investigates the importance of correctly deriving requirements from the capability gap and operational environment, and translating them into the processes of contracting, software...

  3. A comparison of the time required by radiologists for the preparation of clinico-radiological meetings when film and PACS are used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherburn, G.; Bryan, S.; Cousins, C.

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis was that when a hospital-wide Picture Archive and Communications System (PACS) is used, preparation for clinico-radiological meetings is faster, and more images are available, than when a conventional film system is used. This paper reports a study which compared the preparation time by radiologists when film was used with the time for the same activity when a hospital-wide PACS was used at Hammersmith Hospital for the preparation of the respiratory medicine and hepato-biliary meetings. It was found that when PACS was used the time per patient to prepare for the respiratory medicine session was reduced by 11.1 min and that similarly, 16 min per patient was saved in the preparation of the hepato-biliary sessions. The number of images which were unavailable for the session was reduced when PACS was in operation, but this reduction was not shown to be statistically significant. The introduction of PACS at Hammersmith Hospital has significantly reduced the time spent by radiologists in preparing for the two clinico-radiological sessions studied and, if this is extended to the other numerous sessions held each week, contributes to a considerable saving of staff time within the radiology department. (orig.)

  4. Feedback brake distribution control for minimum pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernini, Davide; Velenis, Efstathios; Longo, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    The distribution of brake forces between front and rear axles of a vehicle is typically specified such that the same level of brake force coefficient is imposed at both front and rear wheels. This condition is known as 'ideal' distribution and it is required to deliver the maximum vehicle deceleration and minimum braking distance. For subcritical braking conditions, the deceleration demand may be delivered by different distributions between front and rear braking forces. In this research we show how to obtain the optimal distribution which minimises the pitch angle of a vehicle and hence enhances driver subjective feel during braking. A vehicle model including suspension geometry features is adopted. The problem of the minimum pitch brake distribution for a varying deceleration level demand is solved by means of a model predictive control (MPC) technique. To address the problem of the undesirable pitch rebound caused by a full-stop of the vehicle, a second controller is designed and implemented independently from the braking distribution in use. An extended Kalman filter is designed for state estimation and implemented in a high fidelity environment together with the MPC strategy. The proposed solution is compared with the reference 'ideal' distribution as well as another previous feed-forward solution.

  5. Meeting Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Katzman, Jeffrey W

    2017-12-01

    Although meetings are central to organizational work, considerable time devoted to meetings in Academic Health Centers appears to be unproductively spent. The primary purposes of this article are to delineate and describe Meeting Disorders, pathological processes resulting in these inefficient and ineffective scenarios, and Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD), a clinical syndrome. The paper also offers preliminary approaches to remedies. The authors integrate observations made during tens of thousands of hours in administrative meetings in academic medical settings with information in the literature regarding the nature, causes and potential interventions for dysfunctional groups and meetings. Meeting Disorders, resulting from distinct pathologies of leadership and organization, constitute prevalent subgroups of the bureaucrapathologies, pathological conditions caused by dysfunctional bureaucratic processes that generate excesses of wasted time, effort, and other resources. These disorders also generate frustration and demoralization among participants, contributing to professional burnout. Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD) is a subjective condition that develops in individuals who overdose on these experiences and may reflect one manifestation of burnout. Meeting disorders and Meeting Fatigue Disorder occur commonly in bureaucratic life. Resources and potential remedies are available to help ameliorate their more deleterious effects.

  6. Minimum Plate Thickness in High-Speed Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The minimum plate thickness requirements specified by the classification societies for high-speed craft are supposed to ensure adequate resistance to impact loads such as collision with floating objects and objects falling on the deck. The paper presents analytical methods of describing such impact...... phenomena and proposes performance requirements instead of thickness requirements for hull panels in high-speed craft made of different building materials....

  7. Providing for organizational memory in computer supported meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Schwabe, Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Meeting memory features are poorly integrated into current group support systems (GSS). In this article, I discuss how to introduce meeting memory functionality into a GSS. The article first introduces the benefits of effective meetings and organizational memory to an organization. Then, the following challenges to design are discussed: How to store semantically rich output, how to build up the meeting memory with a minimum of additional effort, how to integrate meeting memory into organizati...

  8. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and

  9. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-11-09

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  10. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  11. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  12. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    I should like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 25th June 2003 at 11.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 to give a report on the outcome of the June Meetings of Council and its Committees. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the AB Auditorium (Meyrin - bldg. 6), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). Luciano Maiani Director General

  13. Youth minimum wages and youth employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marimpi, Maria; Koning, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This paper performs a cross-country level analysis on the impact of the level of specific youth minimum wages on the labor market performance of young individuals. We use information on the use and level of youth minimum wages, as compared to the level of adult minimum wages as well as to the median

  14. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  15. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  16. Minimum income protection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peijpe, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the Dutch legal system of minimum income protection through collective bargaining, social security, and statutory minimum wages. In addition to collective agreements, the Dutch statutory minimum wage offers income protection to a small number of workers. Its

  17. The Capability of Virtual Reality to Meet Military Requirements (la Capacite de la rea1ite virtuelle a repondre aux besoins militaires)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to examine military requirements for Virtual Reality technology, consider human factors issues in the use of Virtual Reality and review recent research in development...

  18. Defense Logistics: Army and Marine Corps Cannot Be Assured That Equipment Reset Strategies Will Sustain Equipment Availability While Meeting Ongoing Operational Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solis, William M; Schmitt, David A; Brown, Renee; Cristinzio, Frank; Hartig, Luke; Helt, Brent; Rogers, Donna M; Song, Yong; Storts, Maria

    2007-01-01

    .... Because of the potential for equipment reset costs to affect the Department of Defense's (DoD) future budget requirements and related readiness concerns, GAO initiated this review under the Comptroller General's authority...

  19. Food fortification improves the intake of all fortified nutrients, but fails to meet the estimated dietary requirements for vitamins A and B6, riboflavin and zinc, in lactating South African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathakis, Peggy C; Pearson, Kerry E

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the impact of fortification by comparing food records and selected biochemical indicators of nutritional status pre- and post-fortification. Mean intake from 24 h recalls (n 142) was compared with the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) to determine the proportion with inadequate intake. In a subsample (n 34), diet and serum retinol, folate, ferritin and Zn were compared pre- and post-fortification for fortified nutrients vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid, Fe and Zn. South Africa. Breast-feeding women (ninety-four HIV-infected, forty eight HIV-uninfected) measured at ~6, 14, 24 weeks, and 9 and 12 months postpartum. Pre-fortification, >80 % of women did not meet the EAR for vitamins A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, B12 and folate and minerals Zn, iodine and Ca. Dietary intake post-fortification increased for all fortified nutrients. In post-fortification food records, >70 % did not meet the EAR for Zn and vitamins A, riboflavin and B6. Serum folate and Zn increased significantly post-fortification (P 93 % were retinol replete. There was no change in Fe deficiency (16.7 % pre v. 19.4 % post; P = 0.728). Micronutrient intake improved with fortification, but >70 % of lactating women did not meet the EAR for Zn, vitamins A, riboflavin and B6. Although 100 % exceeded the EAR for Fe after fortification, Fe status did not improve.

  20. Minimum wage development in the Russian Federation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsheva, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the effectiveness of the minimum wage policy at the national level in Russia and its impact on living standards in the country. The analysis showed that the national minimum wage in Russia does not serve its original purpose of protecting the lowest wage earners and has no substantial effect on poverty reduction. The national subsistence minimum is too low and cannot be considered an adequate criterion for the setting of the minimum wage. The minimum wage d...

  1. Logic Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Tugué, Tosiyuki; Slaman, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings include the papers presented at the logic meeting held at the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, in the summer of 1987. The meeting mainly covered the current research in various areas of mathematical logic and its applications in Japan. Several lectures were also presented by logicians from other countries, who visited Japan in the summer of 1987.

  2. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may provide... commission on sales. An exempt employee also may receive a percentage of the sales or profits of the employer...

  3. Minimum-link paths among obstacles in the plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, J.S.B.; Rote, G.; Woeginger, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    Given a set of nonintersecting polygonal obstacles in the plane, thelink distance between two pointss andt is the minimum number of edges required to form a polygonal path connectings tot that avoids all obstacles. We present an algorithm that computes the link distance (and a corresponding

  4. Researching the Minimum Wage: A Moral Economy for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverow-Turk, Vara

    1991-01-01

    Describes a writing assignment that requires students to research and report on what it would be like to live on minimum wage. Explains that this assignment is not really any different than the traditional assignment, it is simply more obvious about its political content because it involves an inquiry into economics rather than literature or…

  5. 5 CFR 792.220 - What are the requirements that child care providers must meet in order to participate in this...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., where applicable, by local authorities where the child care service is delivered. Outside of the United States, agencies may adopt or create criteria to ensure a child care center or family child care home is... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements that child care...

  6. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-03-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  7. 40 CFR 60.4242 - What other requirements must I meet if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or equipment containing stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines? 60.4242... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Compliance Requirements for Manufacturers § 60.4242 What other...

  8. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  9. Minimum acceptable face velocities of laboratory fume hoods and guidelines for their classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, N.E.; Porter, W.E.; Alcorn, S.P.; Everett, W.S.; Hunt, J.B.; Morehead, J.F.; Higdon, H.F.

    1978-06-01

    Data developed to support the requirement of a 100 LFM minimum face velocity requirement for laboratory fume hoods are summarized. Also included is a description of the Y-12 test hood as well as guidelines for a hood classification scheme

  10. Minimum alcohol pricing policies in practice: A critical examination of implementation in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kara; Stockwell, Tim; Wettlaufer, Ashley; Giesbrecht, Norman; Thomas, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    There is an interest globally in using Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) of alcohol to promote public health. Canada is the only country to have both implemented and evaluated some forms of minimum alcohol prices, albeit in ways that fall short of MUP. To inform these international debates, we describe the degree to which minimum alcohol prices in Canada meet recommended criteria for being an effective public health policy. We collected data on the implementation of minimum pricing with respect to (1) breadth of application, (2) indexation to inflation and (3) adjustments for alcohol content. Some jurisdictions have implemented recommended practices with respect to minimum prices; however, the full harm reduction potential of minimum pricing is not fully realised due to incomplete implementation. Key concerns include the following: (1) the exclusion of minimum prices for several beverage categories, (2) minimum prices below the recommended minima and (3) prices are not regularly adjusted for inflation or alcohol content. We provide recommendations for best practices when implementing minimum pricing policy.

  11. August Meeting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... rural hometowns, where they unite with their rural-based colleagues for ... extent have they empowered the women-folk in the public sphere? ...... It would be safe, therefore, for one to conceptualise the 'August Meeting'.

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    You were hundreds of persons to participate in our information meetings of October 3 and 6 2014, and we thank you for your participation! The full presentation is available here. A summary of the topics is available here (in french).

  13. Increased vitamin D intake differentiated according to skin color is needed to meet requirements in young Swedish children during winter: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlund, Inger; Lind, Torbjörn; Hernell, Olle; Silfverdal, Sven-Arne; Karlsland Åkeson, Pia

    2017-07-01

    Background: Dark skin and low exposure to sunlight increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency in children. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the amount of vitamin D needed to ascertain that most children >4 y of age attain sufficient serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH)D; i.e., ≥50 nmol/L] during winter regardless of latitude and skin color. Design: In a longitudinal, double-blind, randomized, food-based intervention study, 5- to 7-y-old children from northern (63°N) and southern (55°N) Sweden with fair ( n = 108) and dark ( n = 98) skin were included. Children, stratified by skin color by using Fitzpatrick's definition, were randomly assigned to receive milk-based vitamin D 3 supplements that provided 2 (placebo), 10, or 25 μg/d during 3 winter months. Results: Mean daily vitamin D intake increased from 6 to 17 μg and 26 μg in the intervention groups supplemented with 10 and 25 μg, respectively. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 90.2% (95% CI: 81.1%, 99.3%) of fair-skinned children randomly assigned to supplementation of 10 μg/d attained sufficient concentrations, whereas 25 μg/d was needed in dark-skinned children to reach sufficiency in 95.1% (95% CI: 88.5%, 100%). In children adherent to the study product, 97% (95% CI: 91.3%, 100%) and 87.9% (95% CI: 76.8%, 99%) of fair- and dark-skinned children, respectively, achieved sufficient concentrations if supplemented with 10 μg/d. By using 95% prediction intervals for 30 and 50 nmol S-25(OH)D/L, intakes of 6 and 20 μg/d are required in fair-skinned children, whereas 14 and 28 μg/d are required in children with dark skin. Conclusion: Children with fair and dark skin require vitamin D intakes of 20 and 28 μg/d, respectively, to maintain S-25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L, whereas intakes of 6 and 14 μg/d, respectively, are required to maintain concentrations ≥30 nmol/L during winter. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01741324. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Adapting veterinary infrastructures to meet the challenges of globalisation and the requirements of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiermann, A

    2004-04-01

    To maximise the benefits of globalisation, countries and their stakeholders must become familiar with and adhere to the rights and obligations set out by the World Trade Organization under the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. Furthermore, for trade in animals and animal products, they must adhere to the standards, guidelines and recommendations established by the OIE (World organisation for animal health), which also encourages participation of countries in the standard-setting process. Only after implementing these requirements and strengthening veterinary infrastructures and surveillance and monitoring systems, will countries be able to fully benefit from the new international trade rules.

  15. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  16. The BD Onclarity HPV assay on SurePath collected samples meets the International Guidelines for Human Papillomavirus Test Requirements for Cervical Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejegod, Ditte; Bottari, Fabio; Pedersen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a validation of the BD Onclarity HPV (Onclarity) assay using the international guidelines for HPV test requirements for cervical cancer screening of women 30 years and above using Danish SurePath screening samples. The clinical specificity (0.90, 95% CI: 0.88-0.91) and sensit......This study describes a validation of the BD Onclarity HPV (Onclarity) assay using the international guidelines for HPV test requirements for cervical cancer screening of women 30 years and above using Danish SurePath screening samples. The clinical specificity (0.90, 95% CI: 0.......88-0.91) and sensitivity (0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.0) of the Onclarity assay were shown to be non-inferior to the reference assay (specificity 0.90, 95% CI: 0.88-0.92, sensitivity 0.98, 95% CI: 0.91-1.0). The intra-laboratory reproducibility of Onclarity was 97% with a lower confidence bound of 96% (kappa value: 0...

  17. Minimum emittance of three-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyu; Xu Gang

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of the minimum emittance of three-bend achromats (TBAs) made by Mathematical software can ignore the actual magnets lattice in the matching condition of dispersion function in phase space. The minimum scaling factors of two kinds of widely used TBA lattices are obtained. Then the relationship between the lengths and the radii of the three dipoles in TBA is obtained and so is the minimum scaling factor, when the TBA lattice achieves its minimum emittance. The procedure of analysis and the results can be widely used in achromats lattices, because the calculation is not restricted by the actual lattice. (authors)

  18. The minimum wage in the Czech enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Lajtkepová

    2010-01-01

    Although the statutory minimum wage is not a new category, in the Czech Republic we encounter the definition and regulation of a minimum wage for the first time in the 1990 amendment to Act No. 65/1965 Coll., the Labour Code. The specific amount of the minimum wage and the conditions of its operation were then subsequently determined by government regulation in February 1991. Since that time, the value of minimum wage has been adjusted fifteenth times (the last increase was in January 2007). ...

  19. Upgrade and optimization of control systems help E.ON's Scholven plant to increase plant lifecycle and meet new market requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Frick; Joerg Orth

    2006-07-01

    A large percentage of Germany's installed base of power stations will continue to operate well into the next decade. E.ON therefore continues to focus on optimizing and maintaining its operating plants. A key component is the process control system - the data, information and nerve center of these plants. Parts shortages related to outdated technology and new, added process and operational requirements demand focused capital investment. E.ON has therefore implemented a program to upgrade a large part of the process control infrastructure at the Scholven facility. An important step was the successful replacement of the Unit C process control system during a ten-week maintenance outage in fall 2005. The new power station control system selected was ABB's System 800xA. 7 figs.

  20. Meeting the future metro network challenges and requirements by adopting programmable S-BVT with direct-detection and PDM functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laia; Svaluto Moreolo, Michela; Fàbrega, Josep M.; Vílchez, F. Javier

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an advanced programmable sliceable-bandwidth variable transceiver (S-BVT) with polarization division multiplexing (PDM) capability as a key enabler to fulfill the requirements for future 5G networks. Thanks to its cost-effective optoelectronic front-end based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) technology and direct-detection (DD), the proposed S-BVT becomes suitable for next generation highly flexible and scalable metro networks. Polarization beam splitters (PBSs) and controllers (PCs), available on-demand, are included at the transceivers and at the network nodes, further enhancing the system flexibility and promoting an efficient use of the spectrum. 40G-100G PDM transmission has been experimentally demonstrated, within a 4-node photonic mesh network (ADRENALINE testbed), implementing a simplified equalization process.

  1. Minerals Intake Distributions in a Large Sample of Iranian at-Risk Population Using the National Cancer Institute Method: Do They Meet Their Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Zahra; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2015-01-01

    Minerals are required for the body's normal function. The current study assessed the intake distribution of minerals and estimated the prevalence of inadequacy and excess among a representative sample of healthy middle aged and elderly Iranian people. In this cross-sectional study, the second follow up to the Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS), 1922 generally healthy people aged 40 and older were investigated. Dietary intakes were collected using 24 hour recalls and two or more consecutive food records. Distribution of minerals intake was estimated using traditional (averaging dietary intake days) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) methods, and the results obtained from the two methods, were compared. The prevalence of minerals intake inadequacy or excess was estimated using the estimated average requirement (EAR) cut-point method, the probability approach and the tolerable upper intake levels (UL). There were remarkable differences between values obtained using traditional and NCI methods, particularly in the lower and upper percentiles of the estimated intake distributions. A high prevalence of inadequacy of magnesium (50 - 100 %), calcium (21 - 93 %) and zinc (30 - 55 % for males > 50 years) was observed. Significant gender differences were found regarding inadequate intakes of calcium (21 - 76 % for males vs. 45 - 93 % for females), magnesium (92 % vs. 100 %), iron (0 vs. 15 % for age group 40 - 50 years) and zinc (29 - 55 % vs. 0 %) (all; p < 0.05). Severely imbalanced intakes of magnesium, calcium and zinc were observed among the middle-aged and elderly Iranian population. Nutritional interventions and population-based education to improve healthy diets among the studied population at risk are needed.

  2. Meeting Mid-Year Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    23 Newsletter of the Indian Academy of ScienCE. 57th Annual. Meeting ... Srinivas, Institute for Social and Economic. Change ... "Quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics of anyons" .... Special Issue on Geomagnetic Methods and.

  3. Medicare program; appeals of CMS or CMS contractor determinations when a provider or supplier fails to meet the requirements for Medicare billing privileges. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-27

    This final rule implements a number of regulatory provisions that are applicable to all providers and suppliers, including durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) suppliers. This final rule establishes appeals processes for all providers and suppliers whose enrollment, reenrollment or revalidation application for Medicare billing privileges is denied and whose Medicare billing privileges are revoked. It also establishes timeframes for deciding enrollment appeals by an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) or the Departmental Appeals Board (DAB), or Board, within the DHHS; and processing timeframes for CMS' Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) contractors. In addition, this final rule allows Medicare FFS contractors to revoke Medicare billing privileges when a provider or supplier submits a claim or claims for services that could not have been furnished to a beneficiary. This final rule also specifies that a Medicare contractor may establish a Medicare enrollment bar for any provider or supplier whose billing privileges have been revoked. Lastly, the final rule requires that all providers and suppliers receive Medicare payments by electronic funds transfer (EFT) if the provider or supplier, is submitting an initial enrollment application to Medicare, changing their enrollment information, revalidating or re-enrolling in the Medicare program.

  4. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illuminati, F.; Viola, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova Univ. (Italy)

    1995-05-21

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schroedinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. (author)

  5. Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barioli, F.; Barrett, W.; Fallat, S.M.; Hall, H.T.; Hogben, L.; Shader, B.L.; Driessche, van den P.; Holst, van der H.

    2010-01-01

    The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity/minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero

  6. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum royalty...

  7. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  8. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  9. Locally Minimum Storage Regenerating Codes in Distributed Cloud Storage Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Wei Luo; Wei Liang; Xiangyang Liu; Xiaodai Dong

    2017-01-01

    In distributed cloud storage sys-tems, inevitably there exist multiple node fail-ures at the same time. The existing methods of regenerating codes, including minimum storage regenerating (MSR) codes and mini-mum bandwidth regenerating (MBR) codes, are mainly to repair one single or several failed nodes, unable to meet the repair need of distributed cloud storage systems. In this paper, we present locally minimum storage re-generating (LMSR) codes to recover multiple failed nodes at the same time. Specifically, the nodes in distributed cloud storage systems are divided into multiple local groups, and in each local group (4, 2) or (5, 3) MSR codes are constructed. Moreover, the grouping method of storage nodes and the repairing process of failed nodes in local groups are studied. The-oretical analysis shows that LMSR codes can achieve the same storage overhead as MSR codes. Furthermore, we verify by means of simulation that, compared with MSR codes, LMSR codes can reduce the repair bandwidth and disk I/O overhead effectively.

  10. Minimum Leakage Condenser Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results and analysis of tests performed on four critical areas of large surface condensers: the tubes, tubesheets, tube/tubesheet joints and the water chambers. Significant changes in operation, service duty and the reliability considerations require that certain existing design criteria be verified and that improved design features be developed. The four critical areas were treated analytically and experimentally. The ANSYS finite element computer program was the basic analytical method and strain gages were used for obtaining experimental data. The results of test and analytical data are compared and recommendations made regarding potential improvement in condenser design features and analytical techniques

  11. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department The CERN Ombuds The new account management system Crèche progress + Restaurants Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  13. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN The new account management system Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium ...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Summer Student program Bringing Library services to users Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  15. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department CERN Global Network An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) ...

  16. How NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, M.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements. The ASDC is actively working to provide their mission essential datasets as ArcGIS Image Services, Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Services (WMS), OGC Web Coverage Services (WCS) and leveraging the ArcGIS multidimensional mosaic dataset structure. Science teams and ASDC are utilizing these services, developing applications using the Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS and ArcGIS API for Javascript, and evaluating restructuring their data production and access scripts within the ArcGIS Python Toolbox framework and Geoprocessing service environment. These capabilities yield a greater usage and exposure of ASDC data holdings and provide improved geospatial analytical tools for a mission critical understanding in the areas of the earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.

  17. Staff meeting

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 18 January 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg.. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2006 and to present the perspectives for this special year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg.. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg.. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  18. Scientific meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    One of the main aims of the IAEA is to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information and one of the main ways of doing this is to convene international scientific meetings. They range from large international conferences bringing together several hundred scientists, smaller symposia attended by an average of 150 to 250 participants and seminars designed to instruct rather than inform, to smaller panels and study groups of 10 to 30 experts brought together to advise on a particular programme or to develop a set of regulations. The topics of these meetings cover every part of the Agency's activities and form a backbone of many of its programmes. (author)

  19. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Robert Aymar

    2005-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 12 January 2006 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2005 and to present the perspectives for this coming year. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season Robert AYMAR

  20. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  1. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  2. Development of a Minimum Data Set (MDS) for C-Section Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhotayefeh, Mostafa; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Khademi, Seyed Hossein; Seyed Farajolah, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Maserat, Elham; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Torabi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Caesarean section, also known as C-section, is a very common procedure in the world. Minimum data set (MDS) is defined as a set of data elements holding information regarding a series of target entities to provide a basis for planning, management, and performance evaluation. MDS has found a great use in health care information systems. Also, it can be considered as a basis for medical information management and has shown a great potential for contributing to the provision of high quality care and disease control measures. The principal aim of this research was to determine MDS and required capabilities for Anesthesia information management system (AIMS) in C-section in Iran. Data items collected from several selected AIMS were studied to establish an initial set of data. The population of this study composed of 115 anesthesiologists was asked to review the proposed data elements and score them in order of importance by using a five-point Likert scale. The items scored as important or highly important by at least 75% of the experts were included in the final list of minimum data set. Overall 8 classes of data (consisted of 81 key data elements) were determined as final set. Also, the most important required capabilities were related to airway management and hypertension and hypotension management. In the development of information system (IS) based on MDS and identification, because of the broad involvement of users, IS capabilities must focus on the users' needs to form a successful system. Therefore, it is essential to assess MDS watchfully by considering the planned uses of data. Also, IS should have essential capabilities to meet the needs of its users.

  3. 40 CFR 262.104 - What are the minimum performance criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... words “laboratory waste” or with the chemical name of the contents. If the container is too small to...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE University Laboratories... criteria? The Minimum Performance Criteria that each University must meet in managing its Laboratory Waste...

  4. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary for... officials that it meets implicit standards of safety and quality adopted by the industry or as later...

  5. Minimum Benefits for HIV/AIDS in South African Medical Schemes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the Minister of Health in respect of the extent of prescribed minimum benefits for HIV/AIDS. Medical schemes are required to provide the PMBs to their members without limits or co-payments. Keywords: Medical schemes; HIV; AIDS; benefits; prescribed minimum benefits. South African Actuarial Journal: 2003 3: 77-112 ...

  6. 50 CFR 259.34 - Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... B objective. A time longer than 10 years, either by original scheduling or by subsequent extension... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND...) Minimum annual deposit. The minimum annual (based on each party's taxable year) deposit required by the...

  7. CATEGORY MANAGEMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MINIMUM ASSORTMENT OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Samoshchenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main principle of the category management is the management of product category as a separate business unit. Category management directs the activities of the pharmaceutical organization to meet the consumer requirements and to provide customers with maximum benefits, which are expressed in the improved assortment,the attractive prices, the reduction of cases of lack of necessary goods, the simplifiedpurchase process. In article the structure of the category management and its role inthe minimum pharmaceutical assortment, a complex of the theoretical and practical issues affecting interrelation of the list of vital and essential medicines and the minimum range of medicines are considered. A number of the new elements supplementing the concept of category management is offered, and the corresponding generalizations are made. The objective of the research is to study the influence of category management on the structure in management of the minimum assortment of medicines of the pharmaceutical organization. Materials and methods. In the course of the solution of the set tasks, the methods of marketing and economic-mathematical analysis were used. Results and discussion. In the analysis of the assortment list of medicines for medical application, which is obligatory for the pharmaceutical enterprises of all forms of ownership, it was revealed that this assortment list is based on the List of Vital Essential and Necessary (VEN Drugs. The results of the analysis of the obligatory assortment list from the position of internal category management showed that 77.45% are medicines of the list of VEN Drugs; 46.08% are medicines of non-prescription dispensing. Proceeding from this it follows that the worthy, profitable price policy can be conducted only with 22.55% of the list; to develop standards of merchandising with 46.05%. The category management gives an opportunity to the pharmaceutical organization to specify its competitive strategy and to

  8. Estimasi kebutuhan spektrum untuk memenuhi target rencana pita lebar Indonesia di wilayah perkotaan [The estimation of spectrum requirements to meet the target of Indonesia broadband plan in urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasmad Ariansyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pemerintah Indonesia telah mengesahkan Rencana Pita Lebar Indonesia menjelang akhir tahun 2014. Dokumen tersebut berisi panduan dan arah pembangunan pita lebar nasional dan berisi berisi target-target pencapaian berkelanjutan antara tahun 2014-2019. Terkait target capaian pita lebar nirkabel, ketersediaan dan kecukupan spektrum frekuensi merupakan salah satu hal yang sangat penting.  Studi ini dilakukan untuk mengestimasi kebutuhan spektrum frekuensi dalam rangka memenuhi target capaian Rencana Pita Lebar Indonesia khususnya layanan pita lebar nirkabel di wilayah perkotaan. DKI Jakarta dipilih sebagai sampel wilayah perkotaan. Analisis dilakukan dengan menghitung luas cakupan BTS, mengestimasi jumlah potensi pengguna, mengestimasi kebutuhan spektrum dan membandingkannya dengan spektrum yang sudah dialokasikan untuk mendapatkan jumlah kekurangan spektrum. 3G dan 4G diasumsikan sebagai teknologi yang digunakan untuk memenuhi sasaran pita lebar bergerak. Hasil analisis menunjukkan pada rentang tahun 2016-2019 akan terjadi kekurangan spektrum di wilayah perkotaan sebesar 2x234,5 MHz sampai dengan 2x240,5MHz (untuk mode FDD atau sebesar 313 MHz sampai dengan 321 MHz (untuk mode TDD. Spektrum frekuensi merupakan sumber daya yang reusable, dengan mengasumsikan kebutuhan spektrum di perdesaan lebih rendah dibanding kebutuhan di perkotaan, maka estimasi ini dapat pula digunakan untuk menggambarkan kebutuhan spektrum di Indonesia secara keseluruhan.*****Indonesian government has issued Indonesia Broadband Plan (IBP at the end of 2014. IBP provides guidance and direction for the development of national broadband and contains targets in the period of 2014 to 2019. Relating to wireless broadband target, the availability and the adequacy of spectrum is very important. This study was conducted to estimate the spectrum requirements to meet the Indonesia broadband plan target especially the target of mobile broadband in urban area. DKI Jakarta was taken as

  9. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  10. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Fellows, Associates and Summer Student Programmes Particle Data Book distribution Revoking Computer accounts Equipment insurance on site Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Dates for meetings in 2003 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (74837...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria  W. Adam  (71661) Belgium  G. Wilquet  (74664) Bulgaria  R. Tzenov  (77958) Czech Republic  P. Závada&am...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) Fr...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :   Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Re...

  16. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 15 June 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) b. IT Service Review Meeting (ITSRM) c. GS User Commission Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in bra...

  17. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Smith, Susan [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. M. [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  18. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  19. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Peng Yuemei

    2015-01-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 3 1/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design. (authors)

  20. Who Benefits from a Minimum Wage Increase?

    OpenAIRE

    John W. Lopresti; Kevin J. Mumford

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how a minimum wage increase affects the wages of low-wage workers. Most studies assume that there is a simple mechanical increase in the wage for workers earning a wage between the old and the new minimum wage, with some studies allowing for spillovers to workers with wages just above this range. Rather than assume that the wages of these workers would have remained constant, this paper estimates how a minimum wage increase impacts a low-wage worker's wage...

  1. Wage inequality, minimum wage effects and spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates possible spillover effects of the UK minimum wage. The halt in the growth in inequality in the lower half of the wage distribution (as measured by the 50:10 percentile ratio) since the mid-1990s, in contrast to the continued inequality growth in the upper half of the distribution, suggests the possibility of a minimum wage effect and spillover effects on wages above the minimum. This paper analyses individual wage changes, using both a difference-in-differences estimat...

  2. Runge-Kutta methods with minimum storage implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2010-03-01

    Solution of partial differential equations by the method of lines requires the integration of large numbers of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In such computations, storage requirements are typically one of the main considerations, especially if a high order ODE solver is required. We investigate Runge-Kutta methods that require only two storage locations per ODE. Existing methods of this type require additional memory if an error estimate or the ability to restart a step is required. We present a new, more general class of methods that provide error estimates and/or the ability to restart a step while still employing the minimum possible number of memory registers. Examples of such methods are found to have good properties. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The power of reordering for online minimum makespan scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Englert, Matthias; Özmen, Deniz; Westermann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In the classic minimum makespan scheduling problem, we are given an input sequence of jobs with processing times. A scheduling algorithm has to assign the jobs to m parallel machines. The objective is to minimize the makespan, which is the time it takes until all jobs are processed. In this paper, we consider online scheduling algorithms without preemption. However, we do not require that each arriving job has to be assigned immediately to one of the machines. A reordering buffer with limited...

  4. Can households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia afford a nutritious diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia L; Johnson, Christine P; Kratzmann, Meredith L V; Johnson, C Shanthi Jacob; Anderson, Barbara J; Chenhall, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    To assess the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia. Food costing data were collected in 43 randomly selected grocery stores throughout NS in 2002 using the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB). To estimate the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage, average monthly costs for essential expenses were subtracted from overall income to see if enough money remained for the cost of the NNFB. This was calculated for three types of household: 1) two parents and two children; 2) lone parent and two children; and 3) single male. Calculations were also made for the proposed 2006 minimum wage increase with expenses adjusted using the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The monthly cost of the NNFB priced in 2002 for the three types of household was 572.90 dollars, 351.68 dollars, and 198.73 dollars, respectively. Put into the context of basic living, these data showed that Nova Scotians relying on minimum wage could not afford to purchase a nutritious diet and meet their basic needs, placing their health at risk. These basic expenses do not include other routine costs, such as personal hygiene products, household and laundry cleaners, and prescriptions and costs associated with physical activity, education or savings for unexpected expenses. People working at minimum wage in Nova Scotia have not had adequate income to meet basic needs, including a nutritious diet. The 2006 increase in minimum wage to 7.15 dollars/hr is inadequate to ensure that Nova Scotians working at minimum wage are able to meet these basic needs. Wage increases and supplements, along with supports for expenses such as childcare and transportation, are indicated to address this public health problem.

  5. Estimation of Minimum DNBR Using Cascaded Fuzzy Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yeong; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenon of boiling crisis is called a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB). The DNB phenomena can influence the fuel cladding and fuel pellets. The DNB ratio (DNBR) is defined as the ratio of the expected DNB heat flux to the actual fuel rod heat flux. Since it is very important to monitor and predict the minimum DNBR in a reactor core to prevent the boiling crisis and clad melting, a number of researches have been conducted to predict DNBR values. The aim of this study is to estimate the minimum DNBR in a reactor core using the measured signals of the reactor coolant system (RCS) by applying cascaded fuzzy neural networks (CFNN) according to operating conditions. Reactor core monitoring and protection systems require minimum DNBR prediction. The CFNN can be used to optimize the minimum DNBR value through the process of adding fuzzy neural networks (FNN) repeatedly. The proposed algorithm is trained by using the data set prepared for training (development data) and verified by using another data set different (independent) from the development data. The developed CFNN models were applied to the first fuel cycle of OPR1000. The RMS errors are 0.23% and 0.12% for the positive and negative ASI, respectively

  6. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition.

  7. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  8. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  9. Does Saudi school furniture meet ergonomics requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Zaki

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to study the effect of adjustable imported desk and chair combinations available in the market on student performance. Six sets of chairs and tables within three different activities (reading, writing, and looking to the blackboard) were the independent variables. Evaluation of back force at 5th lumbar vertebrae and the 1st sacrum (L5/S1), subjective measures of discomfort, and the mismatch between student body dimension and classroom furniture analysis were measured. A total of 124 young male students (first through sixth-grade) participated in this experiment. The results revealed too low or too high chair and table heights relative to the students' body dimensions increased the stresses acting at L5/S1 as well as discomfort ratings. This study indicated there was a high level of body mismatch in desk-chair combinations even with the adjustable imported furniture available in the local market. Anthropometric data of Saudi students should be collected from different regions in the Kingdom and then design and development of desk-chair combinations could follow the development of a standard procedure to adapt to the needs of Saudi school children.

  10. Meeting the government renewable portfolio standard requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, M.

    2004-01-01

    This Power Point presentation reviewed renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) from the perspective of AIM PowerGen Corp, an Ontario based wind power development company. Details of AIM's wind projects and wind projects development team were presented and details of the Erie Shores Wind Farm were discussed. New power supply needs in Ontario were evaluated, and challenges with the current energy mix were examined. It was noted that Ontario has significant low-cost, large-scale hydro assets and proven private sector nuclear operational success, as well as an aging transmission system connecting coal-fired assets. Wind, hydro and natural gas generation options were reviewed. Details of Ontario's objectives for enabling renewable energy sources were presented. Challenges with 2007 deadlines, European feed-in tariffs and negotiated contracts were discussed. The Federal government's role in stimulating resource and energy sectors was evaluated. Renewable energy policies were discussed, including the recent wind power production incentive (WPPI) expansion. It was recommended that Ontario stick with current targets and move quickly to the next procurement phase. A review of targets based on the success of earlier projects was recommended. tabs., figs

  11. Military Leadership Preparedness to Meet Counterinsurgency Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svystak, Oleh

    2008-01-01

    .... Today we are so far removed from the classical form of warfare, such as World War II, that we cannot compare the role of the military leader in those conflicts with the situation leaders face in Iraq...

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  13. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  14. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H.L.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2017-12-15

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory. (orig.)

  15. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H. L. C.

    2017-12-01

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory.

  16. participatory development of a minimum dataset for the khayelitsha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This dataset was integrated with data requirements at ... model for defining health information needs at district level. This participatory process has enabled health workers to appraise their .... of reproductive health, mental health, disability and community ... each chose a facilitator and met in between the forum meetings.

  17. Meeting information

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 1986 Ocean Sciences Meeting of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) will be held January 13-17, 1986, in New Orleans, La., at the Fairmont Hotel. Co-sponsoring societies are the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Marine Technology Society (MTS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Oceanic Engineering Society (OES).

  18. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 6. The PH Department 2. Adoption of the agenda 7. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. News from the CERN Management 9. Any Other Business 5. Matters arising 10. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic P. Závada ...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Matters arising The PH Department Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions/EP (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising EP Space management Cars Housing EDH from the User's point of view VRVS Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) France M. Déj...