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Sample records for medium-term chemical carcinogenesis

  1. Chemically induced immunotoxicity in a medium-term multiorgan bioassay for carcinogenesis with Wistar rats

    Spinardi-Barbisan, Ana Lucia Tozzi; Kaneno, Ramon; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Viana de Camargo, Joao Lauro; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2004-01-01

    A variety of chemicals can adversely affect the immune system and influence tumor development. The modifying potential of chemical carcinogens on the lymphoid organs and cytokine production of rats submitted to a medium-term initiation-promotion bioassay for carcinogenesis was investigated. Male Wistar rats were sequentially initiated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N-butyl-N-(4hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN), dihydroxy-di-n-propylnitrosamine (DHPN), and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) during 4 weeks. Two initiated groups received phenobarbital (PB) or 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) for 25 weeks and two noninitiated groups received only PB or 2-AAF. A nontreated group was used as control. Lymphohematopoietic organs, liver, kidneys, lung, intestines, and Zymbal's gland were removed for histological analysis. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) levels were determined by ELISA in spleen cell culture supernatants. At the fourth week, exposure to the initiating carcinogens resulted in cell depletion of the thymus, spleen and bone marrow, and impairment of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ production. However, at the 30th week, no important alterations were observed both in lymphoid organs and cytokine production in the different groups. The results indicate that the initiating carcinogens used in the present protocol exert toxic effects on the lymphoid organs and affect the production of cytokines at the initiation step of carcinogenesis. This early and reversible depression of the immune surveillance may contribute to the survival of initiated cells facilitating the development of future neoplasia

  2. Enhancement of preneoplastic lesion yield by Chios Mastic Gum in a rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay

    Doi, Kenichiro; Wei, Min; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Uematsu, Naomi; Inoue, Masayo; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) tree is native throughout the Mediterranean region and has long proved a source of food additives and medical treatments. To investigate the modifying effects of Chios Mastic Gum on rat liver carcinogenesis, 6-week-old male F344 rats were subjected to the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay (Ito-test). At the commencement, rats (groups 1-4) were intraperitoneally injected with 200 mg/kg body weight of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). After two weeks, mastic was added to CRF (Charles River Formula)-1 powdered basal diet at doses of 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1% in groups 1-4, respectively. At week 3, all rats were underwent two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The experiment was terminated at week 8. As results show, liver weights were significantly increased in a mastic dose-dependent manner among groups 1-4. The numbers (/cm 2 ) and the areas (mm 2 /cm 2 ) of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive cell foci (≥ 0.2 mm in diameter) were significantly increased in the DEN-1% group compared to the DEN-alone group, along with the average areas per foci and larger-sized foci (≥ 0.4 mm). 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) + GST-P double-immunohistochemistry showed the highest BrdU-labeling indices within GST-P foci in the DEN-1% group. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in liver DNA did not vary, while real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of livers revealed many up- or down-regulated genes in the DEN-1% group. In conclusion, this is the first report to display a promotion potential of Chios Mastic Gum on the formation of preneoplastic lesions in the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay

  3. Free radicals in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Clemens, M R

    1991-12-15

    During the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of cancer-causing agents, mechanisms of cancer formation and the behavior of cancer cells. Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, and lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). It has been estimated that about 75-80% of all human cancers are environmentally induced, 30-40% of them by diet. Only a small minority, possibly no more than 2% of all cases, result purely from inherent genetic changes. Several lines of evidence confirm that the fundamental molecular event or events that cause a cell to become malignant occur at the level of the DNA and a variety of studies indicate that the critical molecular event in chemical carcinogenesis is the interaction of the chemical agent with DNA. The demonstration that DNA isolated from tumor cells can transfect normal cells and render them neoplastic provides direct proof that an alteration of the DNA is responsible for cancer. The transforming genes, or oncogenes, have been identified by restriction endonuclease mapping. One of the characteristics of tumor cells generated by transformation with viruses, chemicals, or radiation is their reduced requirement for serum growth factors. A critical significance of electrophilic metabolites of carcinogenes in chemical carcinogenesis has been demonstrated. A number of "proximate" and "ultimate" metabolites, especially those of aromatic amines, were described. The "ultimate" forms of carcinogens actually interact with cellular constituents to cause neoplastic transformation and are the final metabolic products in most pathways. Recent evidence indicates that free radical derivatives of chemical carcinogens may be produced both metabolically and nonenzymatically during their metabolism. Free radicals carry no

  4. Aberrant crypt foci and colon cancer: comparison between a short- and medium-term bioassay for colon carcinogenesis using dimethylhydrazine in Wistar rats

    Rodrigues M.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant crypt foci (ACF in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents are considered to be the earliest hallmark of colon carcinogenesis. In the present study the relationship between a short-term (4 weeks and medium-term (30 weeks assay was assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis induced by dimethylhydrazine (DMH in the rat. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (40 mg/kg twice a week for 2 weeks and killed at the end of the 4th or 30th week. ACF were scored for number, distribution pattern along the colon and crypt multiplicity in 0.1% methylene-blue whole-mount preparations. ACF were distinguished from normal crypts by their larger size and elliptical shape. The incidence, distribution and morphology of colon tumors were recorded. The majority of ACF were present in the middle and distal colon of DMH-treated rats and their number increased with time. By the 4th week, 91.5% ACF were composed of one or two crypts and 8.5% had three or more crypts, while by the 30th week 46.9% ACF had three or more crypts. Thus, a progression of ACF consisting of multiple crypts was observed from the 4th to the 30th week. Nine well-differentiated adenocarcinomas were found in 10 rats by the 30th week. Seven tumors were located in the distal colon and two in the middle colon. No tumor was found in the proximal colon. The present data indicate that induction of ACF by DMH in the short-term (4 weeks assay was correlated with development of well-differentiated adenocarcinomas in the medium-term (30 weeks assay.

  5. Carcinogenesis

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies at the molecular, biochemical, and immunological level of carcinogenesis induced in mice by viruses, radiation, or environmental chemicals alone or in combinations. Emphasis was placed on the identification and assessments of cocarcinogens and studies on their mechanisms of action. Data are included on mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the liver, thyroid, Harderian glands, skin, and lungs. The effects of the food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), phenobarbitol, DDT, uv irradiation, the herbicide 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole(AT), the pituitary hormone prolactin, topically applied 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and benzo(a) pyrene(BaP) on tumor induction or enhancement were studied

  6. Short- and medium-term effects of three fire fighting chemicals on the properties of a burnt soil

    Couto-Vazquez, A.; Gonzalez-Prieto, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of three fire fighting chemicals (FFC) on 11 chemical soil properties and on soil recovery (0-2 cm depth) was evaluated 1, 30, 90 and 365 days after a prescribed fire. Five treatments were considered: unburnt soil (United States) and burnt soil with 2 l m -2 of water alone (BS) or mixed with the foaming agent Auxquimica RFC-88 at 1% (BS + Fo), Firesorb at 1.5% (BS + Fi) and FR Cross ammonium polyphosphate at 20% (BS + Ap). At t = 1 day, soil pH increases in the order US 15 N decreased in all burnt soils (significatively in BS + Ap) due to the inputs of 15 N depleted ashes from leguminous vegetation. Compared with US, soil δ 15 N increased significantly in all burnt plots between t = 90 days (30 days in BS + Ap) and t = 365 days, suggesting a medium-term fire-triggered increment of N outputs ( 15 N depleted). As is habitually the case, there was a transient post-fire increase of NH 4 + -N levels (significative for BS + FFC plots) that lasted for 30 (BS, BS + Fo and BS + Fi) to 90 days (BS + Ap). The high initial NH 4 + -N levels in BS + Ap (200x that of US; 9-18x those of BS, BS + Fo and BS + Fi), and its persistence can delay the post-fire vegetation recovery due to the toxicity of NH 4 + to seeds and seedlings. NO 3 -N levels changed significantly only in BS + Ap between t = 30 and t = 90 days due to the nitrification of its large NH 4 + -N pool. Except in BS + Ap, whose soil P levels were 70-140x (t = 1 days) and 10-20x (t = 365 days) higher than in the other treatments, available P content in BS and BS + FFC was not significatively higher than in US. The concentrations of available cations in BS and BS + FFC were higher (not always significatively, except for K) than in US until t = 90 days, likely due to ashes- and FFC-derived cations. Contrarily to divalent cations, monovalent cations (more soluble and easily leached) decreased slowly until t = 90 days

  7. Alpha-linolenic acid-enriched diacylglycerol oil does not promote tumor development in tongue and gastrointestinal tract tissues in a medium-term multi-organ carcinogenesis bioassay using male F344 rat.

    Honda, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Doi, Yuko; Matsumura, Shoji; Ito, Yuichi; Imai, Norio; Ikeda, Naohiro; Mera, Yukinori; Morita, Osamu

    2017-08-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)-enriched diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is an edible oil enriched with DAG (>80%) and ALA (>50%). The present study investigated whether ALA-DAG oil promotes tumorigenesis in the tongue and gastrointestinal tract, using a rat medium-term multi-organ carcinogenesis bioassay model. Rats were treated with five genotoxic carcinogens to induce multi-organ tumorigenesis until week 4, and from 1 week after withdrawal, fed a semi-synthetic diet (AIN-93G) containing ALA-DAG oil at concentrations of 0, 13,750, 27,500, and 55,000 ppm. Rats fed AIN-93G containing 55,000 ppm ALA-triacylglycerol or a standard basal diet served as reference and negative control groups, respectively. Animals were euthanized at week 30. ALA-DAG oil was shown to have no effects on survival, general condition, body weight, food consumption, or organ weight. More discolored spots were observed in the stomachs of the 13,750- and 55,000-ppm ALA-DAG groups than in those of the control groups; however, there were no differences in the frequency of histopathological findings across groups. There were no meaningful increases in the incidence of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the tongue and gastrointestinal tract among the groups. We therefore conclude that ALA-DAG oil does not promote tumor development in the digestive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rodent models. What's different from chemical carcinogenesis?

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Daino, Kazuhiro; Takabatake, Takashi; Okamoto, Mieko; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of a few well-characterized etiologic factors of human breast cancer. Laboratory rodents serve as useful experimental models for investigating dose responses and mechanisms of cancer development. Using these models, a lot of information has been accumulated about mammary gland cancer, which can be induced by both chemical carcinogens and radiation. In this review, we first list some experimental rodent models of breast cancer induction. We then focus on several topics that are important in understanding the mechanisms and risk modification of breast cancer development, and compare radiation and chemical carcinogenesis models. We will focus on the pathology and natural history of cancer development in these models, genetic changes observed in induced cancers, indirect effects of carcinogens, and finally risk modification by reproductive factors and age at exposure to the carcinogens. In addition, we summarize the knowledge available on mammary stem/progenitor cells as a potential target of carcinogens. Comparison of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis models on these topics indicates certain similarities, but it also indicates clear differences in several important aspects, such as genetic alterations of induced cancers and modification of susceptibility by age and reproductive factors. Identification of the target cell type and relevant translational research for human risk management may be among the important issues that are addressed by radiation carcinogenesis models. (author)

  9. Carcinogenesis

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The long-term aims are concerned with various aspects of the natural history and biology of cancer, the mechanism of induction and of the advancement of time of appearance of tumors, the development of systems suitable for the assay of oncogenesis and cocarcinogenesis, and the elucidation of some of the factors important to the problem of extrapolation of estimates of risk made in experimental systems to the estimate of risk in man. It is necessary to have a number of test systems in order to study the various factors related to cocarcinogenesis; some of these are clearly tissue specific. The liver tumor system is clearly useful for certain compounds, and the liver is an excellent tissue for the study of the mechanisms of cocarcinogenesis. This year we report on the relatively rapid induction of what appears histologically to be carcinoma of the thyroid by aminotriazole. In a collaborative study with the Neutron and Gamma-Ray Toxicity Group, we have established a new example of synergism in carcinogenesis, namely between radiation and pituitary hormone(s) in the production of Harderian gland tumors. Not only does a synergistic effect on incidence occur, but also on the degree of malignancy of the tumor induced. We thus have three different model systems for the study of various aspects of cocarcinogenesis: various chemicals, including nononcogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, in liver tumorigenesis; ionizing radiation and aminotriazole in thyroid tumorigenesis; and in conjunction with the JANUS Program, the interaction of radiation and hormones in the production of Harderian gland, mammary gland, and other tumors

  10. Chemical carcinogenesis and chemoprevention: Scientific priority ...

    Occupational cancers are now a serious concern in industrializing developing countries where exposure levels to hazardous chemicals considerably exceed regulatory limits established in industrialized countries. The association between increasing use of chemicals and associated disorders and chemoprevention or ...

  11. Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CCRIS database contains chemical records with carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, tumor promotion, and tumor inhibition test results. CCRIS provides historical...

  12. Chemical carcinogenesis and chemoprevention: Scientific priority ...

    Administrator

    substances beside coal tar. Industrial chemicals .... induced cell signaling and transcriptional activation. Chro- nic alteration ... well known that both oil soluble and water-soluble .... vention and treatment strategies might be applied to these risk ...

  13. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    Farber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  14. Is radiation an appropriate model for chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show why the quadratic, or ''linear quadratic,'' relationship holds for organ dose-single cell radiation effects, and to explore the extension of this relationship to chemical exposures in general. Demonstrates that although the ''αD + βD 2 relationship'' may be unexpected for normal pharmacologicalmedical dose-response relationships, a linear, no-threshold curve of this kind is expected for all stochastic-type (accidental or risk) situations with health consequences (e.g. all common accidents) including exposure to ''low-level radiation'' (LLR). Discusses the stochastic or risk approach, relevant radiobiology, and the stochastic for chemicals. Assumes that even though actual mutational rates cannot be expected to apply to the relevance of Tradescantia or any other single cell system as a predictor for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in animals and man, the cardinal principles of genetics largely transcend species and the particular environment in which the cell is located. Concludes that with regard to LLR, the curve shapes and other relationships developed for Tradescantia would be expected to apply in principle to animal and human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

  15. Carcinogenesis

    Buess, E.M.; Cerny, E.A.; Chan, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    The first section deals with the assessment of carcinogens and cocarcinogens and the underlying mechanisms of their actions. The second concerns cancer induction by bone-seeking radionuclides and seeks to provide a firm foundation for estimating cancer risks to human populations in the event of accidental incorporation of radionuclides. The third is aimed at defining the role of oncornavirus activation in tumor induction by radiation and other environmental pollutants. The other two sections describe the new studies, one dealing with the development of an in vitro cell system (murine teratocarcinoma cells) to screen chemicals rapidly for carcinogenic and mutagenic capacity, and the other investigating the potential use of plasma isozymes as indicators of mutagenesis in mammals. Accomplishments and projections for each of these studies follow

  16. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women’s health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  17. Screening of anticarcinogens by medium-term carcinogenesis method

    Yun, Taik Koo; Kim, Sung Ho

    1988-02-01

    According to the many surveys, cancer is one of the major causes of death in most developed countries and the incidence of cancer appears to be on the increase. Therefore, many studies on carcinogens and anticarcinogens are urgently needed in order to establish efficient preventive measures for cancer. From this viewpoint, this experiment was performed with a view to verifying the anticarcinogenicity of spinach, Sesamum indicum, and Ganoderma lucidum. The mice were divided into 8 groups; 1% gelatin group, benzo-(a)pyrene (BP) injected group, spinach alone group, BP combined with spinach group, Sesamum indicum alone group, BP combined with Sesamum indicum group, Ganoderma lucidum alone group, BP combined with Ganoderma lucidum group. To verify the anti-carcinogenicity of these vegetables, NIH(GP) newborn mice, after injection of 0.5mg of BP in subscapular region, were administered spinach (25% in diet), Sesamum indicum (5% in diet) or Ganoderma lucidum (25% in diet) for six weeks after they were weaned. Each group of mice was sacrificed of 9th week to observe the incidence of lung adenoma. Major organs were examined grossly and histopathologically. This experiment was carried out to evaluate the anti-carcinogenic effect of spinach, Sesamum indicum, and Ganoderma lucidum. (Author)

  18. Chemical Carcinogenesis of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Rodents: An Overview with Emphasis on NTP Carcinogenesis Bioassays

    Chandra, Sundeep A.; Nolan, Michael W.; Malarkey, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Cancers of the stomach and large intestine (LI) are the second and fourth leading causes of human cancer mortality. A review of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database and the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) reveals that chemically induced neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are relatively common. Within the GIT, epithelial tumors of the forestomach in mice and rats and LI of the rat are most common. Generally, there is a high species concordance for forestomach with at ...

  19. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Y.; Aoki, K.; Matsudaira, H.

    1982-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  20. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA

  1. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

  2. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  3. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures

  4. Medium-Term Oil Market Report 2006

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    How much oil will the world consume in 2011? What role will OPEC play in global oil production? Will biofuels become an important part of the oil market? The International Energy Agencys (IEA) Medium-Term Oil Market Report tackles these questions, adopting a perspective that goes beyond the traditional short-term market analysis provided in the IEAs monthly Oil Market Report. Drawing on current futures curves and the investment threshold for upstream projects, the Medium-Term Oil Market Report analyses how global demand and supply balances may develop in the next five years. The forecasts look in detail at product demand and the supply potential from all the firmly planned individual upstream and downstream projects around the world. The results provide invaluable insights on vital issues such as surplus production capacity and product supply. The rapid pace of change in the oil market means that forecasts can become outdated very quickly. This interim update provides the opportunity to rebase the data and forecasts in the annual Medium-Term Oil Market Report and to discuss and analyse new issues affecting the oil industry. Policymakers, market analysts, energy experts and anyone interested in understanding and following trends in the oil market should find this report extremely useful.

  5. Medium-Term Oil Market Report 2007

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    How much oil will the world consume in 2012? What role will OPEC play in global oil production? Will biofuels become an important part of the oil market? How will the refinery sector cope? The International Energy Agency (IEA) Medium-Term Oil Market Report tackles these questions, adopting a perspective that goes beyond the traditional short-term market analysis provided in the IEA Oil Market Report. Drawing on current futures curves and the investment threshold for upstream projects, the Medium-Term Oil Market Report analyses how global demand and supply balances may develop. By assessing all firmly planned upstream and downstream projects worldwide, this report forecasts supply and demand potential for crude and petroleum products over the next five years. The results provide an invaluable insight into vital issues such as surplus production capacity and product supply. An essential report for all policymakers, market analysts, energy experts and anyone interested in understanding and following oil market trends, the Medium-Term Oil Market Report is a further element of the strong commitment of the IEA to improving and expanding the quality, timeliness and accuracy of energy data and analysis.

  6. Role of environmental chemicals, processed food derivatives, and nutrients in the induction of carcinogenesis.

    Persano, Luca; Zagoura, Dimitra; Louisse, Jochem; Pistollato, Francesca

    2015-10-15

    In recent years it has been hypothesized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the actual driving force of tumor formation, highlighting the need to specifically target CSCs to successfully eradicate cancer growth and recurrence. Particularly, the deregulation of physiological signaling pathways controlling stem cell proliferation, self-renewal, differentiation, and metabolism is currently considered as one of the leading determinants of cancer formation. Given their peculiar, slow-dividing phenotype and their ability to respond to multiple microenvironmental stimuli, stem cells appear to be more susceptible to genetic and epigenetic carcinogens, possibly undergoing mutations resulting in tumor formation. In particular, some animal-derived bioactive nutrients and metabolites known to affect the hormonal milieu, and also chemicals derived from food processing and cooking, have been described as possible carcinogenic factors. Here, we review most recent literature in this field, highlighting how some environmental toxicants, some specific nutrients and their secondary products can induce carcinogenesis, possibly impacting stem cells and their niches, thus causing tumor growth.

  7. The effect of chemical carcinogenesis on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene transcriptional regulation.

    Liu, D; Liao, M; Zuo, J; Henner, W D; Fan, F

    2001-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms of rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (rGSTP1) expression regulation during chemical carcinogenesis. we studied enhancer elements located in the region between -2.5 kb to -2.2 kb. The region was upstream from the start site of transcription and was divided into two major fragments, GPEI and GPEII. The GPEII fragment was further divided into two smaller fragments, GPEII- I and GPEII-2. Using a luciferase reporter system, we identified a strong enhancer of GPEI and a weak enhancer of GPEII in HeLa and a rat hepatoma cell line CBRH79 19 cell. The enhancer of GPEII was located within the GPEII-I region. Chemical stimulation by glycidyl methatylate (GMA) and phorbol 12-o-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA) analysis revealed that induction of rGSTP1 expression was mainly through GPEI. Although H2O2 could enhance GPEII enhancer activity, the enhancement is not mediated by the NF-kappaB factor that bound the NF-kappaB site in GPEII. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and the UV cross-linking assays, we found that HeLa and CBRH7919 cells had proteins that specifically bound GPEI core sequence and a 64 kDa protein that interacted with GPEII-1. The cells from normal rat liver did not express the binding proteins. Therefore, the trans-acting factors seem to be closely related to GPEI, GPEII enhancer activities and may play an important role in high expression of rGSTPI gene.

  8. Serum Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as an Index of Chemical Hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    Abdelgawad, M.R.; Fekry, A.E.; Edrees, G.; Ali, M.A.; Ghareeb, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF β1) is an important mediator which controls liver cell proliferation and replication. The relation between TGF β1, Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and clinically thought hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats were investigated to clarify the clinical value of measuring peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP in evaluation of HCC. Peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP were measured during chemically induced hepato carcinogenesis. Male rats were given a genotoxic compound diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water for 149 days with control receiving drinking water only. Animals were killed at different times intervals 54, 86 and 149 days, serum TGF β1 levels were measured by, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and AFP levels were assayed by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). In DEN treated rats 54 days, there was mild portal tract inflammatory cellular infiltrate, serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were both significantly elevated above control (P>0.05 and P<0.001). At 86 days there were moderate inflammation (portal and peri portal), serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were significantly increased, (P<0.001). At 149 days typical HCC were present in ten of ten rats and serum TGF β1 and AFP were both significantly elevated compared with controls, (P<0.001). It can be concluded that serum TGF β1 and AFP levels are elevated during chemically induced HCC and have roles during the stages of process (initiation, promotion and progression); both serum TGF β1 and AFP levels can be used in parallel as a non invasive tumor markers for early diagnosis and prognosis of HCC

  9. Chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish: uptake, activation, and detoxication of organic xenobiotics

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E.; Nishimoto, M.; Reichert, W.L.; Collier, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    The high prevalance of liver neoplasms in English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and substantially lower prevalence of neoplasms in a closely related species, starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) captured from industrialized waterways, provide a unique opportunity to compare biochemical processes involved in chemical carcinogenesis in feral fish species. Because levels of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) in urban sediments are correlated with prevalences of liver neoplasms in English sole, the authors have initiated detailed studies to evaluate the effects of endogenous and exogenous factors on uptake, activation and detoxication of carcinogenic AHs, such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), using spectroscopic, chromatographic, and radiometric techniques. The results obtained thus far show that sole readily takes up AHs associated with sediment from urban areas and that the presence of other xenobiotics, such as PCBs, in sediment increases tissue concentrations of BaP metabolites. Extensive metabolism of BaP occurred whether sole was exposed to this AH via sediment, per os, or intraperitoneally. Substantial modification of hepatic DNA occurred and persisted for a period of 2-4 weeks after a single exposure to BaP. The level of covalent binding of BaP intermediates to hepatic DNA was 10-fold higher in juvenile than adult sole and 90-fold higher in juvenile sole than in Sprague-Dawley rat, a species which is resistant to BaP-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. These results, along with the authors findings that hepatic GST activity in flounder was two times higher than in sole, demonstrate that microsomal metabolism of BaP does not accurately reflect the differences in the ability of these fish to form BaP-DNA adducts in vivo and also suggest that detoxication of reactive intermediates is an important factor in determining the levels of DNA modification by AHs and resulting toxic effects in feral fish

  10. Apoptotic role of natural isothiocyanate from broccoli (Brassica oleracea italica) in experimental chemical lung carcinogenesis.

    Kalpana Deepa Priya, D; Gayathri, R; Gunassekaran, G R; Murugan, S; Sakthisekaran, D

    2013-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli [Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck. (Brassicaceae)]. Since it is among the most potent bioactive components with antioxidant and antitumor properties, it has received intense attention in the recent years for its chemopreventive properties. The present work determined the rehabilitating role in alleviating the oxidative damage caused by benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] to biomolecules and the apoptotic cascade mediated by orally administered isothiocyanate-SFN (9 µmol/mouse/day) against B(a)P (100 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Oxidative damage was assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, glycoprotein components, protein carbonyl levels and DNA-protein crosslinks. DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis and caspase-3 activity by ELISA proved apoptotic induction by SFN along with the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Cyt c. SFN treatment was found to decrease the H2O2 production (p < 0.001) in cancer induced animals, proving its antioxidant potential. Apoptosis was induced by increasing the release of Cyt c (p < 0.001) from mitochondria, decreasing and increasing the expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.01) and Bax (p < 0.001), respectively. Caspase-3 activity was also enhanced (p < 0.001) which leads to DNA fragmentation in SFN treated groups. Our results reflect the rehabilitating role of SFN in B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis.

  11. Medium-Term Results After Treatment of Recalcitrant Lateral Epicondylitis

    Meknas, Khaled; Al Hassoni, Thabit N.; Odden-Miland, Åshild; Castillejo, Miguel; Kartus, Jüri

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis (elbow extensor–origin tendinosis) is a common cause of elbow pain with many treatment options. In the present study, the medium-term results after open release and radiofrequency microtenotomy are reported. Hypothesis: Microtenotomy would provide long-term pain relief that was as good as the open release method. Study Design: Prospective, randomized trial. Methods: Twenty-four patients randomized to either open release or microtenotomy were assessed after 5 to 7 years. Clinical examination and dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT) of both elbows were performed preoperatively and at the medium-term follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both elbows was performed at the medium-term follow-up. Results: Significant pain reduction was found using a visual analog scale (VAS) at the medium-term follow-up in both groups compared with the preoperative assessment (P lateral epicondylitis. The hypothesis was thus verified. PMID:26535247

  12. Radiation carcinogenesis

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram deals with all aspects of radiation carcinogenesis. The term radiation here includes U-V radiation and the entire electromagnetic spectrum, electron and other charged particle beams, neutrons, and alpha and beta radiation from radioactive substances. Abstracts included concern relationships between radiation and carcinogenesis in humans, experimental induction of tumors in animals by irradiation, studies on the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level, studies of RBE, dose response or dose threshold in relation to radiation carcinogenesis, and methods and policies for control of radiation exposure in the general population. In general, this Cancergram excludes abstracts on radio-therapy, radiologic diagnosis, radiation pathology, and radiation biology, where these articles have no bearing on radiation carcinogenesis

  13. In vitro Perturbations of Targets in Cancer Hallmark Processes Predict Rodent Chemical Carcinogenesis

    Thousands of untested chemicals in the environment require efficient characterization of carcinogenic potential in humans. A proposed solution is rapid testing of chemicals using in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for targets in pathways linked to disease processes ...

  14. A role of low dose chemical mixtures in adipose tissue in carcinogenesis.

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Jacobs, David R; Park, Ho Yong; Carpenter, David O

    2017-11-01

    The Halifax project recently hypothesized a composite carcinogenic potential of the mixture of low dose chemicals which are commonly encountered environmentally, yet which are not classified as human carcinogens. A long neglected but important fact is that adipose tissue is an important exposure source for chemical mixtures. In fact, findings from human studies based on several persistent organic pollutants in general populations with only background exposure should be interpreted from the viewpoint of chemical mixtures because serum concentrations of these chemicals can be seen as surrogates for chemical mixtures in adipose tissue. Furthermore, in conditions such as obesity with dysfunctional adipocytes or weight loss in which lipolysis is increased, the amount of the chemical mixture released from adipose tissue to circulation is increased. Thus, both obesity and weight loss can enhance the chance of chemical mixtures reaching critical organs, however paradoxical this idea may be when fat mass is the only factor considered. The complicated, interrelated dynamics of adipocytes and chemical mixtures can explain puzzling findings related to body weight among cancer patients, including the obesity paradox. The contamination of fat in human diet with chemical mixtures, occurring for reasons similar to contamination of human adipose tissue, may be a missing factor which affects the association between dietary fat intake and cancer. The presence of chemical mixtures in adipose tissue should be considered in future cancer research, including clinical trials on weight management among cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phyto chemical Protection against Diethylnitrosoamine Induced Hepato carcinogenesis by Trigonella foenum graecum in Female Rats

    Abdelgawad, M R; Mustafa, M M.M.; Kottb, M K.I. [Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Research Center, Biological Applications Department, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-05-15

    Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) is traditionally used to treat. Recent studies suggest that fenugreek and its active constituents may possess anti carcinogenic potential. The preventive efficacy of dietary fenugreek seed 2% and 4% (w/w feed) on diethylnitrosamine-induced rat liver carcinogenesis were evaluated. Rats were sacrificed when rats became very weak with unstable shelf live were chosen as an end point. Egypt is an Islamic country alcoholic prohibition so the possible use of ethanol extraction may be accepted with high restriction towards its applications in human, that it may affect the active constituents of fenugreek seeds. Whereby, fenugreek seeds contain >8% oil, many valuable phenolic compounds, protein and amino acids, etc ... with different concentrations according to the extraction method. So, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of fenugreek powder on adult female rats fed experimental diets containing 2% or 4% (w/w) fenugreek seed powder (FSP) for 2 weeks and have phenobarbital in a dose of 200 mg/L ad lib. before and after a single injection with diethylnitrosamine (200 mg/kg body weight). Rats were sacrificed 20 weeks after intra-peritoneal (i.p) diethylnitrosamine injection and their livers, spleens, kidneys and lungs were excised washed well with cold saline, weighted and processed through paraffin wax preparation, staining and pathological changes were examined. It was found that, by comparison with control, continuous feeding of FSP 2% and 4% suppressed hepatocarcinogensity up to 20% and 50%, respectively. In addition, on the basis of these findings, the invaluable and precious fenugreek constituents are diosgenin [(25 R)-5-spirosten-3h-ol] and [5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-6-(3,4,5-trihydroxy-6(hydroxymethyl) tetra- hydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)chroman-4-one] besides, others. Finally, fenugreek seeds seem to have potential role as a novel cancer preventive agent and that needs further investigations

  16. Medium-term load forecasting and wholesale transaction profitability

    Selker, F.K.; Wroblewski, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The volume of wholesale transactions quoted at firm prices is increasing. The cost, and thus profitability, of serving these contracts strongly depends upon native load during the time of delivery. However, transactions extend beyond load forecasts based on weather information, and long-term resource planning forecasts of load peaks and energy provide inadequate detail. To address this need, Decision Focus Inc. (DFI) and Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) developed a probabilistic, medium-term load forecasting capability. In this paper the authors use a hypothetical utility to explore the impact of uncertain medium-term loads on transaction profitability

  17. Medium-term marginal costs in competitive generation power markets

    Reneses, J.; Centeno, E.; Barquin, J.

    2004-01-01

    The meaning and significance of medium-term marginal costs for a generation company in a competitive power market in analysed. A methodology to compute and decompose medium-term generation marginal costs in a competitive environment is proposed. The methodology is based on a market equilibrium model. The aim is to provide a useful tool for generation companies so that they can manage their resources in an optimal way, helping them with their operation, decision-making processes, asset valuations or contract assessments. (author)

  18. Medium term results of Avon patellofemoral joint replacement

    Praveen K Sarda

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The Avon patellofemoral joint replacement provides predictably good results and excellent survivorship in the medium term, for isolated patellofemoral arthritis. However, progression of tibiofemoral arthritis remains unpredictable and therefore patient selection is crucial to ensure success. Clicking remains a potential problem and can compromise the postoperative results in upto 15% of the cases.

  19. Chemical Carcinogen (Hydrazine et al.) Induced Carcinogenesis of Human Diploid Cells in Vitro

    1982-09-07

    untreated cell popula- pared from the stock solutions in complete growth tions were seeded onto CES in vitro. The CES medium (CIM). Thee solutions were added...time from induction pared to metastases IFig. IBl. We want to imply to neoplasia of 6 to 10 wk instead of 1 to 1.5 yr. that these chemical carcinogen...This definition was used because the pathologist was ds:b celular invasion Into CE,, an organ culture, In vitro. Thw two Interpretations am not

  20. Panorama 2007: Medium-Term Prospects for the Gas Industry

    Chabrelie, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    In the nineties, natural gas was the fastest growing energy source in the world energy mix. However, recent developments on the energy scene, particularly in terms of prices, have strongly impacted the growth of the various energies to the detriment of natural gas. Beyond this inter-energy competition, which could intensify, medium-term prospects for the gas industry evolve in an environment beset with uncertainties. (author)

  1. Medium-term dynamics of a middle Adriatic barred beach

    M. Postacchini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, attention has been paid to beach protection by means of soft and hard defenses. Along the Italian coast of the Adriatic Sea, sandy beaches are the most common landscape feature and around 70 % of the Marche region's coast (central Adriatic is protected by defense structures. The longest free-from-obstacle nearshore area in the region includes the beach of Senigallia, frequently monitored in the last decades and characterized by a multiple bar system, which represents a natural beach defense. The bathymetries surveyed in 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 show long-term stability, confirmed by a good adaptation of an analyzed stretch of the beach to the Dean-type equilibrium profile, though a strong short- to medium-term variability of the wave climate has been observed during the monitored periods. The medium-term dynamics of the beach, which deal with the evolution of submerged bars and are of the order of years or seasons, have been related to the wave climate collected, during the analyzed temporal windows, by a wave buoy located about 40 km off Senigallia. An overall interpretation of the hydrodynamics, sediment characteristics and seabed morphology suggests that the wave climate is fundamental for the morphodynamic changes of the beach in the medium term. These medium-term time ranges during which waves mainly come from NNE/ESE are characterized by a larger/smaller steepness and by a larger/smaller relative wave height, and seem to induce seaward/shoreward bar migration as well as bar smoothing/steepening. Moving southeastward, the bar dimension increases, while the equilibrium profile shape suggests the adaptation to a decreasing sediment size in the submerged beach. This is probably due to the presence of both the harbor jetty and river mouth north of the investigated area.

  2. Transformation assay in Bhas 42 cells: a model using initiated cells to study mechanisms of carcinogenesis and predict carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Umeda, Makoto; Sakai, Ayako; Yamazaki, Shojiro; Tanaka, Noriho

    2015-01-01

    Transformation assays using cultured cells have been applied to the study of carcinogenesis. Although various cell systems exist, few cell types such as BALB/c 3T3 subclones and Syrian hamster embryo cells have been used to study chemically induced two-stage carcinogenesis. Bhas 42 cells were established as a clone by the transfection with the v-Ha-ras gene into mouse BALB/c 3T3 A31-1-1 cells and their subsequent selection based on their sensitivity to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Using Bhas 42 cells, transformed foci were induced by the treatment with nongenotoxic carcinogens, most of which act as tumor promoters. Therefore, Bhas 42 cells were considered to be a model of initiated cells. Subsequently, not only nongenotoxic carcinogens but also genotoxic carcinogens, most of which act as tumor initiators, were found to induce transformed foci by the modification of the protocol. Furthermore, transformation of Bhas 42 cells was induced by the transfection with genes of oncogenic potential. We interpret this high sensitivity of Bhas 42 cells to various types of carcinogenic stimuli to be related to the multistage model of carcinogenesis, as the transfection of v-Ha-ras gene further advances the parental BALB/c 3T3 A31-1-1 cells toward higher transforming potential. Thus, we propose that Bhas 42 cells are a novel and sensitive cell line for the analysis of carcinogenesis and can be used for the detection of not only carcinogenic substances but also gene alterations related to oncogenesis. This review will address characteristics of Bhas 42 cells, the transformation assay protocol, validation studies, and the various chemicals tested in this assay.

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Adams, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this contribution about carcinogenesis induced by ionizing radiation some radiation dose-response relationships are discussed. Curves are shown of the relation between cell survival and resp. low and high LET radiation. The difference between both curves can be ascribed to endogenous repair mechanisms in the cell. The relation between single-gen mutation frequency and the surviving fractions of irradiated cells indicates that these repairing mechanisms are not error free. Some examples of reverse dose-response relationships are presented in which decreasing values of dose-rate (LET) correspond with increasing radiation induced cell transformation. Finally some molecular aspects of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed. (H.W.). 22 refs.; 4 figs

  4. Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) 2008

    NONE

    2008-07-15

    Why have oil prices hit US$140 per barrel? How strong will oil demand be in the upcoming years? Will supply of crude oil, natural gas liquids and biofuels be sufficient to meet this future demand? And, no less crucially, what investments in refining capacity and technology can we expect and will these help ease some of the imbalance in strained oil product markets? The Medium-Term Oil Market Report (now in its third year) published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) has become a new benchmark, complementing the short-term market analysis provided in the IEA Oil Market Report. This year's edition reappraises all upstream and downstream projects worldwide, setting them against a revised demand forecast and expanding the time horizon to 2013. Special features this year include in-depth analyses of price formation, transport trends, non-OECD economies, non-OPEC production decline, project slippage, key crude export pipeline developments and a stronger emphasis on product supply bottlenecks. An essential report for all policy makers, market analysts, energy experts and anyone interested in understanding and following oil market trends, the Medium-Term Oil Market Report is a further element of the strong commitment of the IEA to improving and expanding the quality, timeliness and accuracy of energy data and analysis.

  5. Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) 2008

    NONE

    2008-07-15

    Why have oil prices hit US$140 per barrel? How strong will oil demand be in the upcoming years? Will supply of crude oil, natural gas liquids and biofuels be sufficient to meet this future demand? And, no less crucially, what investments in refining capacity and technology can we expect and will these help ease some of the imbalance in strained oil product markets? The Medium-Term Oil Market Report (now in its third year) published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) has become a new benchmark, complementing the short-term market analysis provided in the IEA Oil Market Report. This year's edition reappraises all upstream and downstream projects worldwide, setting them against a revised demand forecast and expanding the time horizon to 2013. Special features this year include in-depth analyses of price formation, transport trends, non-OECD economies, non-OPEC production decline, project slippage, key crude export pipeline developments and a stronger emphasis on product supply bottlenecks. An essential report for all policy makers, market analysts, energy experts and anyone interested in understanding and following oil market trends, the Medium-Term Oil Market Report is a further element of the strong commitment of the IEA to improving and expanding the quality, timeliness and accuracy of energy data and analysis.

  6. Medium-term cryopreservation of rabies virus samples

    Tereza D'avila de Freitas Aguiar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The cryopreservation of rabies virus has been described in detail in the literature. To date, little information is available on the use of cryoprotective agents for cold preservation of this virus, and the available data focus only on short-term virus preservation. In this study, we investigated the medium-term cryopreservation of samples of rabies virus using different cryopreservation protocols. Methods The cryopreservation protocols for the rabies virus samples were performed at -20°C and were divided according to the variables of time and cryoprotectant type used. The laboratory tests (intracerebral inoculation of mice, viral titration and direct immunofluorescence were performed at regular intervals (360 and 720 days to assess the viability of the viral samples according to the different preservation techniques used. Results After 1 year of cryopreservation, the fluorescence intensity of intracellular corpuscles of the rabies virus and the median survival time of the mice differed between the positive controls and the treatments with the cryoprotectants. After 2 years, most of the samples subjected to the cryopreservation protocols (including the controls did not produce fluorescence. However, the virus samples exposed to the cryoprotectant sucrose (68% solution responded positively in the direct immunofluorescence assay and in the intracerebral inoculation of the mice. Conclusions Medium-term cryopreservation of the rabies virus inactivates the viral sample. However, the cryoprotectant agent sucrose (68% produces a preservative effect in cryopreserved rabies virus samples.

  7. Local timber firm looking forward to develop on medium term

    BUCS Lorant

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to outline the challenges faced by a local timber company in struggle to resist on medium-term on the market. There will be revealed the challenges the company is facing, and also the ways to adapt to the changing world of timber industry. There will be presented a short history of the founding and the evolution of the company on the local and international market, pointing out the relevant events which have marked the life of the company during the years. There will also be presented a short review of the competition on the market and the marketing strategy and policies which the company is using to be able to face the new challenges.

  8. Medium-term perspectives of the natural gas industry

    Chabrelie, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    During the 1990's, natural gas was the energy source with the fastest rate of growth in the world energy balance. Nevertheless, recent evolutions of the energy context, in particular in terms of prices, have had a rather strong impact on the progress of the different energy sources penalizing gas a little. Beyond this competition between energies, which may increase, the medium-term perspectives of natural gas development is in keeping with an environment full of uncertainties. This article presents: the world supply and demand prospects for 2010-2015 (impact of high gas prices on other energy sources, occurrence of production constraints, political decisions of producing countries and world gas industry balance), trends on main markets (North America, Europe, Asia-Oceania), and international trade. (J.S.)

  9. Gas Markets: Review of 2012 and medium term perspectives

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides present a review of the 2012 gas markets and of their medium term perspectives. A moderate gas activity is expected worldwide in the short-term (supply risks). The globalization process has been slowing down but a rebound in world gas and LNG demand is expected from the middle of this decade (+ 2.5%/year up to 2020). A new wave of projects and investments is required (40 Mt of new FIDs from non-US projects in the next two years, Market conditions will loosen after 2017). A more globalized and liquid gas market is much-needed by 2020. Oil indexing will be supported by Australian LNG projects and Asian prices will support high levels of European spot prices

  10. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    Waalkes, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis

  11. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    Waalkes, Michael P

    2003-12-10

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis.

  12. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis resulting from environment pollution

    Dimitrov, B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews different ways of environmental contamination with natural and artificial harmful substances (chemical and radioactive) and their role in the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. The recent studies of the mechanism of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis due to environmental pollution are discussed

  13. Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) 2009

    NONE

    2009-06-29

    This fourth edition of the IEA Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) confronts an economic landscape unrecognisable from that seen at the time of the release of the summer 2008 edition. Crude prices are now 55% lower as financial and economic meltdown have slashed demand, with worldwide contraction in oil use at levels not seen since the early 1980s. But how long will the downturn last, and what is the likely profile of global and regional demand recovery when economic rebound eventually takes root? Has almost a decade of rising prices and costs changed the demand-side blueprint and forced the world onto a lower oil intensity path for the period through 2014? Equally importantly, the report identifies the impact that weaker demand, low prices and a credit squeeze are having on supply-side investment - in upstream OPEC/non-OPEC supply, biofuels capacity and refining infrastructure alike. The 2009 edition of the MTOMR also delves into the issues of diversifying FSU crude exports, evolving crude and product qualities, the importance of petrochemical markets and perceptions on oil price formation in the down-cycle. Two demand scenarios are presented based on differing economic growth assumptions, with a lower non-OPEC supply scenario also accompanying the lower GDP case. Summary oil balances highlight how OPEC spare capacity could develop during 2008-2014. This year, the MTOMR also consolidates analysis of future crude availability and trade flows, refining capacity and oil products supply implications under one cover. The MTOMR remains required reading for policy makers, market analysts, industry participants and anyone with an interest in oil market trends. It contains detailed statistical appendices and a wealth of insightful graphics. Alongside its monthly sister publication, the Oil Market Report, the MTOMR is a cornerstone of the IEA commitment to enhancing oil market transparency.

  14. Surgical treatment of congenital mitral stenosis: medium-term results

    Atik Fernando A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: For a cohort of patients with congenital mitral stenosis (CMS, to determine: patient outcomes, predictors of valve repairability and predictors of durability of valve repair. METHODS: From 1989 and 2002, 23 patients underwent surgical treatment of CMS, excluding those with common atrioventricular canal, and univentricular forms. The median age at operation was 15.5 months (range 2-204, and the median body weight was 11 Kg (range 4.5-51.6. Seventeen patients (73.9% had associated anomalies, including Shone's complex in nine (39.1% and pulmonary hypertension in 14 (60.9%. Mitral stenosis was severe in 14 patients (60.9% and moderate in the remaining (median trans-mitral gradient of 16 mmHg, range 8.5-32. Mitral valve repair was performed in 18 patients (78.3%, and valve replacement in five (21.7%. Repair techniques included papillary muscle splitting (n=10, excision of supravalvular ring (n=9 and commissurotomy (n=8. Twelve patients (52.2% required associated procedures. RESULTS: There were no early and late deaths at a mean follow-up of 58.5 ± 46.7 months (range 1-156. Mean hospital stay was 12.7 ± 8.2 days. There were no significant factors associated with unsuccessful valve repair. Actuarial freedom from reoperation at five years was 67.1% (CI 95%: 56.8% to 77.4%. The mitral valve repair group required reoperation in eight patients (44.4% (two early and six late, as opposed to one (20% in the replacement group. The presence of preoperative pulmonary hypertension was significantly related (p<0.005 to higher reoperation rates. All but two the followed patients are presently in functional class I and the echocardiography has shown less than 2+ mitral stenosis and/or regurgitation. CONCLUSION: Reoperations were the most important cause of morbidity at the medium-term follow-up of CMS. Preoperative pulmonary hypertension may predict the need for reoperation after mitral valve repair, which is the procedure of choice in CMS.

  15. Medium-term fluctuations and the "Great Ratios" of economic growth

    Groth, Christian; Madsen, Jakob B.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for the OECD countries show that the “great ratios”, such as the unemployment rate, factor shares, Tobin’s q and the investment-capital ratio, fluctuate significantly on medium-term frequencies of 10-40 years duration. To explain these medium-term fluctuations, we establish a macro...

  16. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens

  17. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  18. Effect of dietary supplementation on the prognostic value of urinary and serum 8-isoprostaglandin F2α in chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat

    Białek Sławomir

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of zinc or copper and polyphenolic compounds on the 8-isoprostaglandin F2α concentration in the serum and urine of rats with mammary cancer (adenocarcinoma induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]antracene. The research focused on the kinetics of alterations in urinary 8-isoPGF2α at the early stage of carcinogenesis as well as the influence of dietary factors on the process. The impact of selected compounds on the intensity of DMBA - induced carcinogenesis was also assessed. Result and conclusions Administration of DMBA, a compound that inducers mammary tumors in experimental animals, increased the serum and urinary 8-isoPGF2α levels in study rats. In the rat model, diet supplementation with zinc, combined with selected polyphenolic compounds (resveratrol or genistein yielded a statistically significant decrease in the rat serum and urinary biomarker concentration with a simultaneously significant stimulation of carcinogenesis. The results indicate that there is an inverse correlation between the intensity of DMBA-induced carcinogenicity and the level of 8-isoPGF2α in urine and serum of rats.

  19. Effect of rofecoxib on colon chemical carcinogenesis at colonic anastomotic area in the rat Influencia del rofecoxib en la carcinogénesis cólica perianastomótica inducida en ratas

    J. F. Noguera Aguilar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the effect of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib on the incidence of perianastomotic colonic tumors in a model of chemical carcinogenesis in the rat. Experimental design: experimental study with 45 male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of three groups: control (n = 15 with colocolic anastomosis and chemical carcinogenesis with 1-2 dimethylhydrazine (1-2 DMH; rofecoxib 0.0027% (n = 15 with colonic anastomosis, chemical carcinogenesis and the addition of dietary rofecoxib at doses of 27 parts per million (ppm, and rofecoxib 0.0058% (n = 15 with colonic anastomosis, chemical carcinogenesis and the addition of dietary rofecoxib at doses of 58 ppm. Carcinogenic induction was performed with 1-2 DMH at a weekly dose of 25 mg/kg of weight for 18 weeks, and colonic tumors induced were analyzed in postoperative week 20. The main parameter evaluated was the percentage of colonic neoplastic tissue, which relates tumor surface area to the colon's surface area. Results: rofecoxib at doses of 2.5 mg/kg or 0.0058 ppm significantly reduced chemical colon carcinogenesis in rats, both in the perianastomotic area and the rest of the colon (p Objetivo: investigar el efecto de un inhibidor selectivo de la ciclooxigenasa-2, rofecoxib, en la incidencia de tumores cólicos perianastomóticos en un modelo de carcinogénesis farmacológica en ratas. Diseño experimental: estudio experimental con 45 ratas Sprague-Dawley macho, asignadas aleatoriamente a uno de los tres grupos: control (n = 15, con anastomosis colo-cólica y carcinogénesis con 1-2 dimetilhidracina; rofecoxib 0,0027% (n = 15, con anastomosis cólica y carcinogénesis farmacológica y adición de rofecoxib en la dieta a dosis de 27 partes por millón, y rofecoxib 0,0058% (n = 15, con anastomosis, carcinogénesis y adición de rofecoxib en la dieta a dosis de 58 ppm. La inducción carcinogénica se realizó con 1-2 DMH a dosis semanal de 25 mg/kg de peso

  20. Mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis

    Bekkum, D.W. van

    1975-01-01

    This speculative review on radiation carcinogenesis deals mainly with its immunological aspects. It need not be emphasized that the role of immunology in carcinogenesis is not yet well understood. Immunological aspects of radiation carcinogenesis comprise a large number of different parameters on the part of the host as well as on the part of the tumor itself. Only two aspects, both related to radiation, will be discussed here. One is the way in which the carcinogenic exposure to ionizing radiation may affect the immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, thereby perhaps changing its responses against the malignant cells. The second aspect is the immunological properties of cells transformed by ionizing irradiation, which may provide the targets for a host-anti-tumor reaction

  1. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    R Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Indian men and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. It is considered as a multistep and multifactorial disease. Besides accumulation of genetic mutations, numerous other carcinogens are involved. In this category, viral and chemical carcinogens are well studied and documented. However, in the oral cavity, the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites, and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies, but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways, and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. This review presents possible carcinogenesis pathway involved in bacterial carcinogenesis, commonly implicated bacteria in oral carcinogenesis, and their role in cancer therapeutics as well.

  2. Influence of market factors on the pricing of exchange traded metals in the medium term

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of comparison of the influence of the stock exchange factors on the pricing of nonferrous metals for medium term with similar results for short term, it has been established that the main attention should be paid to the changes in the pricing environment on the metal market as a function of the prices of exchange traded metals. The situation on the market of energy carriers (hydrocarbons) and the European, American, and Asian stock exchanges can be based on parity and even significantly influence the variation of the metal prices. In the medium term, constructive development of metal trade should be reasonably promoted by changing the elasticity of supply with regard to prices for exchange traded metals and by applying the stock exchange factors that positively influence the pricing on commodity and stock markets.

  3. Medium-term energy hub management subject to electricity price and wind uncertainty

    Najafi, Arsalan; Falaghi, Hamid; Contreras, Javier; Ramezani, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model for medium-term energy hub management is proposed. • Risk aversion is considered in medium-term energy hub management. • Stochastic programing is used to solve the medium-term energy hub management problem. • Electricity price and wind uncertainty are considered. - Abstract: Energy hubs play an important role in implementing multi-carrier energy systems. More studies are required in both their modeling and operating aspects. In this regard, this paper attempts to develop medium-term management of an energy hub in restructured power systems. A model is presented to manage an energy hub which has electrical energy and natural gas as inputs and electrical and heat energy as outputs. Electricity is procured in various ways, either purchasing it from a pool-based market and bilateral contracts, or producing it from a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) unit, a diesel generator unit and Wind Turbine Generators (WTGs). Pool prices and wind turbine production are subject to uncertainty, which makes energy management a complex puzzle. Heat demand is also procured by a furnace and a CHP unit. Energy hub managers should make decisions whether to purchase electricity from the electricity market and gas from the gas network or to produce electricity using a set of generators to meet the electrical and heat demands in the presence of uncertainties. The energy management objective is to minimize the total cost subject to several technical constraints using stochastic programming. Conditional Value at Risk (CVaR), a well-known risk measure, is used to reduce the unfavorable risk of costs. In doing so, the proposed model is illustrated using a sample test case with actual prices, load and wind speed data. The results show that the minimum cost is obtained by the best decisions involving the electricity market and purchasing natural gas for gas facilities. Considering risk also increases the total expected cost and decreases the CVaR.

  4. Photovoltaic systems: state of the art and short-medium term perspectives

    Brofferio, Sergio C.; Rota, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses, from a technology and economic point of view, the characteristics, performances, issues and perspectives of the thin films and the solar concentrating photovoltaic systems in the short and medium terms. Both have well based motivations to be an evolutionary step of current wafer based Silicon systems: the former as Building Integrated Photovoltaic and the latter as high density and high power photovoltaic systems [it

  5. Short term and medium term power distribution load forecasting by neural networks

    Yalcinoz, T.; Eminoglu, U.

    2005-01-01

    Load forecasting is an important subject for power distribution systems and has been studied from different points of view. In general, load forecasts should be performed over a broad spectrum of time intervals, which could be classified into short term, medium term and long term forecasts. Several research groups have proposed various techniques for either short term load forecasting or medium term load forecasting or long term load forecasting. This paper presents a neural network (NN) model for short term peak load forecasting, short term total load forecasting and medium term monthly load forecasting in power distribution systems. The NN is used to learn the relationships among past, current and future temperatures and loads. The neural network was trained to recognize the peak load of the day, total load of the day and monthly electricity consumption. The suitability of the proposed approach is illustrated through an application to real load shapes from the Turkish Electricity Distribution Corporation (TEDAS) in Nigde. The data represents the daily and monthly electricity consumption in Nigde, Turkey

  6. In Vitro Chemical Carcinogenesis and Co-Carcino-genesis in Human Cells Initiated by Hydrazine and Polynuclear Components of Jet Fuel

    1980-09-01

    cats exposed to methylnitrosourea, Cancer Res., 38, 996, 1978. 12. Prehn, R.T’, Function of depressed immunologic reactivity during carcinogenesis, 3...4/8 UDH 50.0 N.D. 5.1 4/8 MAMA 3.6 N.D. 900.0 2/16 B(a)P 10.0 39 1.0 6/10 MMS 0.1 2500 0 0/6 U.V. 40 J.m-2 78 20.0 4/6 137Cs 100 r 39 13.1 3/7...intracellular distribution and binding of benzo(a)pyrene in human dysloid fibroblasts. Cancer Letters 10:57-65. 2. G. Milo, G.A. Ackerman, and I

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis, laboratory studies

    Shellabarger, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory studies on radioinduced carcinogenesis are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: radioinduced neoplasia in relation to life shortening; dose-response relationships; induction of skin tumors in rats by alpha particles and electrons; effects of hormones on tumor response; effects of low LET radiations delivered at low dose-rates; effects of fractionated neutron radiation; interaction of RBE and dose rate effects; and estimates of risks for humans from animal data. (U.S.)

  8. Medium-term generation programming in competitive environments: a new optimisation approach for market equilibrium computing

    Barquin, J.; Centeno, E.; Reneses, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper proposes a model to represent medium-term hydro-thermal operation of electrical power systems in deregulated frameworks. The model objective is to compute the oligopolistic market equilibrium point in which each utility maximises its profit, based on other firms' behaviour. This problem is not an optimisation one. The main contribution of the paper is to demonstrate that, nevertheless, under some reasonable assumptions, it can be formulated as an equivalent minimisation problem. A computer program has been coded by using the proposed approach. It is used to compute the market equilibrium of a real-size system. (author)

  9. Medium-Term Gas Market Report 2013: Market Trends and Projections to 2018

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Global growth in natural gas use slowed measurably in 2012, although it still exceeded that of oil and total energy use. Among the headwinds facing gas are continuing weak demand in Europe, resilience of coal in North America as well as persistent bottlenecks and disruptions in the LNG value chain that in 2012 caused an exceptional global decline of LNG supply. At the same time, Asian demand for gas remains red-hot, and gas is beginning to gain traction as a transport fuel. The IEA new Medium-Term Gas Market Report provides a detailed analysis of demand, upstream investment and trade developments through 2018 that will shape the gas industry and the role of gas in the global energy system. Its special sections investigate the economic viability of gas-fired power generation in Europe, the prospects for an LNG trading hub in Asia as well as the potentially transformational role of natural gas in transport. Amid a continuous regional divergence between North American abundance, European weakness and Asian thirst for LNG, the 2013 Medium Term Gas Market Report will investigate the key questions that the gas industry faces. These include the prospect of the United States becoming a major gas exporter, the challenges of securing enough gas to meet China’s growth, and the ability of Russian gas – spurred both by weak EU demand and resurgent domestic production – to find its manifest destiny in Asia.

  10. The electricity supply industry in England and Wales. Medium term development plan 1986-93

    1986-09-01

    The main objective of the Electricity Supply Industry in England and Wales is to develop and maintain electricity supplies to meet customers' needs as cheaply as possible. Over the medium term, 1986 - 1993, the goal is to reduce the real average price per kWh sold, whilst maintaining high standards of service and meeting financial obligations. The strategy set out comprises reducing controllable costs per kWh sold to 1992/3, pursuing a vigorous and selective marketing strategy so that an expected sales increase of 10% is achieved, securing a long term supply of coal at minimum cost by developing the commercial relationship with British Coal, increasing the proportion of electrical energy supplied by nuclear energy to 25% by 1992/3 and being environmentally concerned. The introduction outlines the medium term business, energy and economic environment, financial targets and price prospects. Plans to support the strategy outlined are presented. Each section sets out the objectives and the plans to achieve these. The strategy for new power stations is to develop fossil-fueled and nuclear as well as to develop alternative technologies. (UK)

  11. Medium-Term Health of Seniors Following Exposure to a Natural Disaster.

    Labra, Oscar; Maltais, Danielle; Gingras-Lacroix, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    The article aims to describe the medium-term impacts of a major earthquake event (Chile, February 27, 2010) on 26 seniors. The authors adopted a qualitative study approach. Data obtained using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) show the presence of manifestations of posttraumatic stress in the majority of respondents. In addition, data collected in interviews demonstrated a progressive deterioration of the health of respondents over a period of 4 years following the disaster. Seniors are particularly vulnerable to the effects of material loss, emotional stress, and postdisaster health complications. These impacts are exacerbated by low economic status. Furthermore, broader research is necessary involving elderly living in poverty who have survived natural disasters and others without such experiences, in order to better identify and differentiate between health complications associated with exposure to disaster events and those linked more strictly with natural aging processes.

  12. Accurate Medium-Term Wind Power Forecasting in a Censored Classification Framework

    Dahl, Christian M.; Croonenbroeck, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We provide a wind power forecasting methodology that exploits many of the actual data's statistical features, in particular both-sided censoring. While other tools ignore many of the important “stylized facts” or provide forecasts for short-term horizons only, our approach focuses on medium......-term forecasts, which are especially necessary for practitioners in the forward electricity markets of many power trading places; for example, NASDAQ OMX Commodities (formerly Nord Pool OMX Commodities) in northern Europe. We show that our model produces turbine-specific forecasts that are significantly more...... accurate in comparison to established benchmark models and present an application that illustrates the financial impact of more accurate forecasts obtained using our methodology....

  13. Lagoon Sediment Dynamics: A Coupled Model to Study a Medium-Term Silting of Tidal Channels

    Marco Petti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The silting of tidal channels is a natural process that affects several shallow lagoons and makes it difficult to navigate, requiring regular maintenance interventions. This phenomenon is the result of the complex non-linear interaction between tidal currents and wave motion. In this work, the morphodynamic evolution of the Marano and Grado lagoon is investigated by means of a two-dimensional horizontal (2DH morphological-hydrodynamic and a spectral coupled model. An innovative procedure to reproduce the overall bathymetric changes in the medium term and, in particular, the volumes deposited inside channels, is presented. An average year with a sequence of winds and tides acting over that time was reconstructed, carrying out cross correlation techniques and spectral analyses of measured data. The predicted morphological evolution matches the annual dredged volumes in the lagoon critical branches and shows the distribution of erosion and deposition of cohesive sediments according to spatially variable values of critical shear stress.

  14. Speed regulating Effects of Incentive-based Intelligent Speed Adaptation in the short and medium term

    Agerholm, Niels

    Speed regulating Effects of Incentive-based Intelligent Speed Adaptation in the short and medium term Despite massive improvements in vehicles’ safety equipment, more information and safer road network, inappropriate road safety is still causing that more than 250 people are killed and several...... thousands injured each year in Denmark. Until a few years ago the number of fatalities in most countries had decreased while the amount of traffic increased. However, this trend has been replaced by a more uncertain development towards a constant or even somewhat increasing risk. Inappropriate speeding...... is a central cause for the high number of fatalities on the roads. Despite speed limits, speed limit violating driving behaviour is still widespread in Denmark. Traditional solutions to prevent speed violation have been enforcement, information, and enhanced road design. It seems, however, hard to achieve...

  15. Short and medium term outcomes after rollerball endometrial ablation for menorrhagia.

    Fraser, I S; Angsuwathana, S; Mahmoud, F; Yezerski, S

    1993-04-05

    To review prospectively the intraoperative, short and medium term outcomes of patients treated by rollerball endometrial ablation during the learning curve for this relatively new procedure. Seventy-seven women with menorrhagia (71 with dysfunctional bleeding; six with additional small intramural myomas) underwent hysteroscopic rollerball endometrial ablation by coagulation diathermy during 1.5% glycine irrigation, after a two-month period of hormonal suppression. OPERATIVE AND SHORT-TERM EFFECTS: These were recorded at operation and six-week follow-up. No serious short-term complications were recorded. Objective measurement of intraoperative blood loss was always less than 20 mL. One woman experienced uterine perforation with a narrow cervical dilator which did not interfere with the ablation, and two patients had mild postoperative uterine infections. One patient experienced persistent postoperative pain. MEDIUM-TERM OUTCOME: This was recorded at each visit, or by telephone, and confirmed by questionnaire at one year. Twenty-five per cent achieved complete amenorrhoea, 29% staining only, 30% light periods, 10% "normal" or erratic periods and 6% were unchanged. Five patients underwent a second ablation, and three of these later underwent hysterectomy. Measured menstrual blood loss fell from 104 +/- 19 mL (mean +/- standard error of mean) to 1.7 +/- 1.1 mL at six months in 18 women. Other menstrual symptoms were also often dramatically reduced. Of those women with dysmenorrhoea, 33% were cured and 43% markedly improved; of those with midcycle pain, 28% were cured and 53% markedly improved; of those with significant premenstrual symptoms, 13% were cured, 47% markedly improved, 11% unchanged, and 6% were worse. This new procedure is a safe and effective treatment for menorrhagia caused by dysfunctional uterine bleeding, with impressive ancillary benefits for dysmenorrhoea, midcycle pain and premenstrual tension. It is often called minimally invasive surgery, but it

  16. Carcinogenesis. Genetics and circumstances

    Hino, Okio

    2005-01-01

    Described are the author's study and aspect concerning carcinogenesis and radiation carcinogenesis, where he thinks cancer is not automatic, has a process and takes time. For radiation carcinogenic studies, he has used a model of the rat with genetically determined kidney cancer which is highly radiosensitive. That is, mutation by the so-called 2nd-hit of the causal gene (tumor suppressing gene Tsc2) is studied in the animal where the 1st-hit has been done by retrotransposon insertion, with and without exposure to radiations (X-ray, heavy particle beam and cosmic ray) for elucidating the mutation spectrum of the causal gene, the carcinogenic target, for the ultimate aim to prevent human cancer. He discusses the drama-type molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, gene abnormality and disease crisis, discontinuity in continuity in cancer formation, and importance of the timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy, and concludes the present age is becoming such one as that the nature of cancer even if genetic can be controlled by circumstances like timely and appropriate intervention. (S.I.)

  17. Radiation and multistage carcinogenesis

    Day, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiological data are insufficient at present to define with much precision the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation carcinogenesis at low or moderate dose levels, for different organs. The available data have to be supplemented with theoretical models for the mode of action. These models, however, often seem not to take into account the complex nature of the process of carcinogenesis. They relate more to mutational events, rather than the long process of cancer induction. In addition, they ignore the fact that in the human situation radiation is one among a large number of exposures, and even the basic form of the dose response may be dependent on the presence or absence of other factors. Information on modes of action usually comes from experimental results, where the requisite combination of exposures can be chosen in advance. Epidemiology, however, also provides information on mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the information that epidemiology provides on the role of radiation in increasing cancer risk in humans

  18. Introduction to Genetic Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis

    Yang, W.K.

    1983-01-01

    Recent technical advances in nucleic acid research and molecular biology have made it possible to explore the complicated genetic systems of eukaryotic cells. One of the fields showing rapid progress concerns genes and gene regulatory functions related to neoplastic processes. Thus, the 35th Annual Conference of the Biology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, held at Gatlinburg, April 12-15, 1982, was organized with the intention to bring together investigators working on seemingly diverse fields of cancer research to discuss and exchange their views on the genetic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The meeting was attended by workers from chemical, physical as well as biological carcinogenesis fields, by classical geneticists as well as by molecular biologists, and by researchers interested in experimental as well as in human cancers. Included in this volume are papers by the invited speakers of the symposium as well as by those presenting poster papers at the meeting

  19. External radiation carcinogenesis

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    There have been many reviews of the subject of radiation carcinogenesis in general and of specific radiation-induced cancers. The aim of this article is not to give an exhaustive, and perhaps exhausting, review of all that has been published since the thorough treatise of Walburg in volume 4 of this series but rather to concentrate on the questions that still remain of importance and recent contributions to the answers. In the years since 1974 a vast amount of information has been reported, and the authors assess what gain there has been in knowledge. For example, it is in the 13 years since the last review that the great majority of data for the carcinogenic effects of neutrons has appeared. It is over 50 years since the discovery of the neutron, and yet knowledge of the carcinogenic effects of neutrons is far from adequate

  20. Short- and medium-term response to storms on three Mediterranean coarse-grained beaches

    Grottoli, Edoardo; Bertoni, Duccio; Ciavola, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    The storm response of three Italian coarse-grained beaches was investigated to better understand the morphodynamics of coarse-clastic beaches in a microtidal context. Two of the studied sites are located on the eastern side of the country (Portonovo and Sirolo) and the third one (Marina di Pisa) is on the western side. Portonovo and Sirolo are mixed sand and gravel beaches where the storms approach from two main directions, SE and NE. Marina di Pisa is a coarse-grained, gravel-dominated beach, exposed to storms driven by SW winds. Gravel nourishments were undertaken in recent years on the three sites. Beach topography was monitored measuring the same network of cross sections at a monthly (i.e. short-term) to seasonal frequency (i.e. medium-term). Geomorphic changes were examined before and after storm occurrences by means of profile analyses and shoreline position evaluations. The beach orientation and the influence of hard structures are the main factors controlling the transport and accumulation of significant amount of sediments and the consequent high variability of beach morphology over the medium-term. For Marina di Pisa, storms tend to accumulate material towards the upper part of the beach with no shoreline rotation and no chance to recover the initial configuration. Sirolo and Portonovo showed a similar behaviour that is more typical of pocket beaches. Both beaches show shoreline rotation after storms in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction according to the incoming wave direction. The wider and longer beach at Sirolo allows the accumulation of a thin layer of sediment during storms, rather than at Portonovo where, given its longshore and landward boundaries, the beach material tends to accumulate in greater thickness. After storms, Sirolo and especially Portonovo can quickly recover the initial beach configuration, as soon as another storm of comparable energy approaches from the opposite direction of the previous one. Large morphological

  1. Medium-Term Oil Market Report 2013: Market Trends and Projections to 2018

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The global oil market will undergo sweeping changes over the next five years. The 2013 Medium-Term Oil Market Report evaluates the impact of these changes on the global oil system by 2018 based on all that we know today – current expectations of economic growth, existing or announced policies and regulations, commercially proven technologies, field decline rates, investment programmes (upstream, midstream and downstream), etc. The five-year forecast period corresponds to the length of the typical investment cycle and as such is critical to policymakers and market participants. This Report shows, in detailed but concise terms, why the ongoing North American hydrocarbon revolution is a ''game changer''. The region’s expected contribution to supply growth, however impressive, is only part of the story: Crude quality, infrastructure requirements, current regulations, and the potential for replication elsewhere are bound to spark a chain reaction that will leave few links in the global oil supply chain unaffected. While North America is expected to lead medium-term supply growth, the East-of- Suez region is in the lead on the demand side. Non-OECD oil demand, led by Asia and the Middle East, looks set to overtake the OECD for the first time as early as 2Q13 and will widen its lead afterwards. Non-OECD economies are already home to over half global refining capacity. With that share only expected to grow by 2018, the non-OECD region will be firmly entrenched as the world’s largest crude importer. These and other changes are carefully laid out in this Report, which also examines recent and future changes in global oil storage, shifts in OPEC production capacity and crude and product trade, and the consequences of the ongoing refinery construction boom in emerging markets and developing economies. It is required reading for anyone engaged in policy or investment decision-making in the energy sphere, and those more broadly interested in the oil

  2. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: Results of medium-term follow-up.

    Ellenbogen, Jonathan R; Waqar, Mueez; Kinshuck, Andrew J; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lesser, Tristram H J; Husband, David; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    To examine tumour control, via volume changes, and the complications of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs) on medium-term follow-up. Between September 2003 and November 2009 fifty consecutive patients with VSs treated with SRS using a marginal dose of 12.5 Gy utilizing a LINAC equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator were identified. Evaluation included serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neurological and hearing examinations. The median tumour volume at treatment was 2.4 (range: 0.24-10.59) cm3. The intracranial diameter of the tumours ranged between 7.7 and 28.7 (median: 15.8) mm. Follow-up MRI was available for analysis on 49 patients. The median radiological follow-up period was 5.8 (range: 1.4-9.2) years. The median tumour volume at last follow-up was 1.1 (range: 0.03-5.3) cm3. VS decreased in size in 45 (90%) patients, with a median reduction in tumour volume of 1.46 (range: 0.06-9.29) cm3 or a median tumour size reduction of 59% of the baseline (range: 6-90%) in these patients. VS remained stable in 2 patients and increased in size in 2 patients. Only 1 patient (2%) required additional intervention (surgery). 15 patients had useful hearing pre-treatment; 10 post-treatment pure-tone audiograms of these patients were available. 5 (50%) patients still had useful hearing post treatment. Non-auditory adverse radiation effects included new (House-Brackmann grade II) or worsened facial nerve palsy (House-Brackmann grade II to grade V) in 2 (4%) patients and trigeminal sensory disturbance in 2 (4%) patients. At medium term, the vast majority of VSs treated with LINAC-based SRS exhibit tumour shrinkage. The slightly higher rate of facial nerve palsy compared with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) results may be related to the learning curve. Other complications were similar to reported GKS results for VSs of comparable sizes.

  3. Energy Efficiency Market Report 2013: Market Trends and Medium-Term Prospects

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy efficiency has been referred to as a ''hidden fuel'', one that extends energy supplies, increases energy security, lowers carbon emissions and generally supports sustainable economic growth. Yet it is hiding in plain sight: in 2011, investments in the energy efficiency market globally were at a similar scale to those in renewable energy or fossil-fuel power generation. The Energy Efficiency Market Report provides a practical basis for understanding energy efficiency market activities, a review of the methodological and practical challenges associated with measuring the market and its components, and statistical analysis of energy efficiency and its impact on energy demand. It also highlights a specific technology sector in which there is significant energy efficiency market activity, in this instance appliances and ICT. The report presents a selection of country case studies that illustrate current energy efficiency markets in specific sectors, and how they may evolve in the medium term. The energy efficiency market is diffuse, varied and involves all energy-consuming sectors of the economy. A comprehensive overview of market activity is complicated by the challenges associated with quantifying the components of the market and the paucity of comparable reported data. This report underscores how vital high-quality and timely energy efficiency data is to understanding this market.

  4. Climate change and States security: an operational link to develop locally and on the medium term

    Taithe, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    The author first notices that climate change and environmental degradations induce new logics in international relationships, and then discusses how consequences of climate change can be factors of instability for States, and how to address them. He recalls and comments the main effects of climate change as they have been described in IPCC reports. He outlines limitations of conventional approaches in terms of direct and indirect impacts on States. Direct effects concern territories (for example, a modification of borders due to sea level rise or to erosion), populations (impact of extreme events on housing, on health) and the economy (more particularly the primary sector and high levels of adaptation costs). The author outlines the limitations of these global models, and proposes additional and corrective approaches: hybrid (regional and global) approaches, local and medium term-based approach (some natural resource management can be assessed and organised only locally). An appendix proposes a contribution of an IPCC work-group in which impacts, adaptation and vulnerabilities of the different regions of the world in front of climate changes are summarized

  5. Clinical and Radiological Results over the Medium Term of Isolated Acetabular Revision

    Nicola Piolanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular cup loosening is associated with pain, reduced function, and instability of the implant. If such event happens while the femoral implant is in a satisfactory position and is well fixed to the bone, isolated acetabular revision surgery is indicated. The aim of this single-center retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results over the medium term (12-month follow-up mean 36, max 60 of isolated acetabular revisions surgery using a porous hemispheric revision shell matched with a cemented all-poly cup and large diameter femoral head (>32. 33 patients were enrolled. We collect any relevant data from the clinical board. Routine clinical and radiographic examinations were performed preoperatively; the postoperative follow-up was made at 1, 3, and 6 months and yearly thereafter. At the last available follow-up, we report satisfactory improvement of functional scores in all the patients; 2 patients (6.1% showed thigh pain and only 4 hips (12.11% presented mild groin pain; all the femoral components are well fixed and there were no potential or pending rerevisions. With bias due to the follow-up and to the retrospective design of the study, we report clinical, functional, and radiological satisfactory results.

  6. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF.

  7. Case Studies on Newly-emerging Long- and Medium-term Strategic Planning and Its Reference to Beijing

    2011-01-01

    Responding to the significant impacts brought by social, political, economic and environmental changes, some countries, regions and cities in the world have introduced new forms of long- and medium-term strategic planning since 2000, so as to promote the sustainable development of the cities or regions through a higher-level thoughts and a wider-perspective exploration. Taking America 2050, Future Ruhr 2030, New York 2030 and some other long- and medium-term strategic plans as examples, the paper analyzes the evolution of long- and medium-term strategic planning from the aspects of plan-making methods, analyzing techniques, research contents development trends etc. at the state, regional, and city levels. Based on international experience, this paper puts forward the necessity for Beijing to launch a new long-term strategic planning study "Beijing 2049." The innovation, challenges and development direction of "Beijing 2049" is also expounded in the paper.

  8. Lymphotoxin prevention of diethylnitrosamine carcinogenesis in vivo

    Ransom, J.H.; Evans, C.H.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Development of intervention measures to control cancer would be facilitated by being able to monitor in vivo carcinogenesis by in vitro quantitation of early indices of neoplastic transformation to assess the in vivo effectiveness of preventive-therapeutic measures. Pregnant Syrian golden hamsters were used in an in vivo-in vitro transplacental model of carcinogenesis to determine the extent that in vivo administration of immunologic hormone preparations along with chemical carcinogen would prevent morphologic transformation assessed in vitro. Pregnant hamsters at 10-11 days of gestation were given injections ip of 3 mg diethylnitrosamine (DENA)/100 g body weight and were killed 2 days later when fetal cells were seeded for colony formation. The frequency of morphologically transformed colonies was assessed after 7 days of growth. Cloning efficiency and mean transformation frequency after DENA exposure were 3.6% and 1 X 10(-4) per cell seeded, respectively. The ip injection of an immunologic hormone preparation reduced the transformation frequency by 46%. The hormone preparation, containing 10,000 U of lymphotoxin but no detectable interferon, was the ultrafiltered lymphokines (greater than 10,000 mol wt) from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated hamster peritoneal leukocytes. The effect of lymphotoxin on cocarcinogenic exposure of fetal cells to DENA in vivo followed by X-irradiation in vitro was also determined. Cells exposed to 250 rad in vitro had a cloning efficiency of 0.5% and a transformation frequency of 0.4 X 10(-4) per cell seeded. After DENA injection and X-irradiation, the transformation frequency increased to 1 X 10(-4) and was inhibited 64% by lymphotoxin in vivo. Thus immunologic hormones (e.g., lymphotoxin) can prevent carcinogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro quantitation of transformation is a rapid means for evaluating therapeutic and autochthonous effector mechanisms for their ability to prevent or otherwise modulate carcinogenesis in vivo

  9. Diuron-induced rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis: mode of action and human relevance evaluations using the International Programme on Chemical Safety framework.

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Arnold, Lora L; De Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Catalano, Shadia M Ihlaseh; Cardoso, Ana Paula Ferragut; Pontes, Merielen G N; Ferrucio, Bianca; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Cohen, Samuel M; De Camargo, João Lauro V

    2014-05-01

    Diuron, a high volume substituted urea herbicide, induced high incidences of urinary bladder carcinomas and low incidences of kidney pelvis papillomas and carcinomas in rats exposed to high doses (2500 ppm) in a 2-year bioassay. Diuron is registered for both occupational and residential uses and is used worldwide for more than 30 different crops. The proposed rat urothelial mode of action (MOA) for this herbicide consists of metabolic activation to metabolites that are excreted and concentrated in the urine, leading to cytotoxicity, urothelial cell necrosis and exfoliation, regenerative hyperplasia, and eventually tumors. We show evidence for this MOA for diuron using the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) conceptual framework for evaluating an MOA for chemical carcinogens, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and IPCS framework for assessing human relevance.

  10. Homologous Recombination Repair Signaling in Chemical Carcinogenesis: Prolonged Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure Suppresses the Rad51 Response in Human Lung Cells

    Qin, Qin; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S.; Browning, Cynthia L.; Thompson, Kelsey N.; Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on hexavalent chromium, [Cr(VI)], a chemical carcinogen and major public health concern, and consider its ability to impact DNA double strand break repair. We further focused on particulate Cr(VI), because it is the more potent carcinogenic form of Cr(VI). DNA double strand break repair serves to protect cells against the detrimental effects of DNA double strand breaks. For particulate Cr(VI), data show DNA double strand break repair must be overcome for neoplastic transformation to occur. Acute Cr(VI) exposures reveal a robust DNA double strand break repair response, however, longer exposures have not been considered. Using the comet assay, we found longer exposures to particulate zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in DNA double strand breaks indicating breaks were occurring throughout the exposure time. Acute (24 h) exposure induced DNA double strand break repair signaling by inducing Mre11 foci formation, ATM phosphorylation and phosphorylated ATM foci formation, Rad51 protein levels and Rad51 foci formation. However, longer exposures reduced the Rad51 response. These data indicate a major chemical carcinogen can simultaneously induce DNA double strand breaks and alter their repair and describe a new and important aspect of the carcinogenic mechanism for Cr(VI). PMID:25173789

  11. contribution to carcinogenesis

    Aneta Białkowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centrosomes are subcellular organelles composed of two centrioles surrounded by a pericentriolar material. In animal cells they are responsible for the organization of the interphase microtubule cytoskeleton including microtubule nucleation and elongation, their attachment and release. The centrosomes are also involved in the construction of the mitotic spindle and chromosome segregation. More than a century ago it was suggested that these structures might be involved in human diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells show a high frequency of centrosome aberrations, especially amplification. Centrosome defects may increase the incidence of multipolar mitoses that lead to chromosomal segregation abnormalities and aneuploidy, which is the predominant type of genomic instability found in human solid tumors. The number of these organelles in cells is strictly controlled and is dependent on the proper process of centrosome duplication. Multiple genes that are frequently found mutated in cancers encode proteins which participate in the regulation of centrosome duplication and the numeral integrity of centrosomes. In recent years there has been growing interest in the potential participation of centrosomes in the process of carcinogenesis, especially because centrosome abnormalities are observed in premalignant stages of cancer development. The common presence of abnormal centrosomes in cancer cells and the role these organelles play in the cells suggest that the factors controlling the number of centrosomes may be potential targets for cancer therapy.

  12. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  13. International Mechanisms to Support Records, Knowledge and Memory Preservation Over the Short and Medium Term

    Schneider, Thierry; Andresz, Sylvain; Reaud, Cynthia; Dumont, Jean-Noel

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this analysis is to investigate the potential usefulness of mechanisms that have international influence, scope or support and are based on international cooperation, for the preservation of records, knowledge and memory (RK and M) about radioactive waste in the short and medium term. Eleven international mechanisms set up through the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission (EC) were analysed following two main objectives: identifying the key characteristics of the organisations coordinating the international mechanisms and analysing the contribution of those mechanisms to the preservation of records, memory and knowledge. This analysis points out that the link with international organisations provides international mechanisms with important technical and administrative support as well as with fora for dialogue. The voluntary involvement of contracting parties to join the individual mechanisms for a common goal and their declaration of adhesion to the objectives constitute the driving force of various international conventions. Nevertheless, the efficacy of these mechanisms can be limited in case of conflict. Most of these mechanisms are based on the recognition of individual and societal rights for protection issues, and entail that each contracting party assumes the mechanism's responsibilities. The mechanisms provide a platform for establishing an 'evolving' convention. The prime objective of the conventions examined in this document lies on economic development, while the international mechanisms associated with them also emphasise the necessity to take into account societal and environmental issues. The link with more general frameworks allows the mobilisation of regular funds. Beyond the funds, it is important to mention that the efficiency also relies on the capacity of the various

  14. Medium-Term Oil Market Report 2012: Market Trends and Projections to 2017

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Supply shortfalls – from the Libyan civil war in 2011 and international sanctions on Iran in 2012 to a swathe of unplanned non-OPEC output stoppages – have buffeted the oil market, sending prices near 2008 highs and rekindling debate on the role of speculation in fuelling volatility. There have also been success stories. Growth in North American light, tight oil and non-conventional supply has reached game-changing levels. Iraqi production has scaled new heights, the Libyan production recovery in 2012 defied expectations and Saudi output surged to 30-year highs. On the demand front, the economic recovery has lost momentum. Market share continues to shift from mature to newly industrialised economies, but amid persistent concerns about the health of the former; China, the leading engine of oil demand growth of the last 15 years, is giving signs of slowdown. Those developments have challenged earlier assumptions and significantly changed the oil market outlook for the next five years. The IEA Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) – companion to the monthly OMR – draws their implications for the future. It provides detailed projections for oil supply at field level, crude quality trends, demand by product, refined product output and oil investments through 2017. It examines oil price formation, regulatory changes, OPEC dynamics and the future of spare capacity – while also reviewing the contribution of new supplies from deepwater, light tight oil, biofuel and natural gas liquids. It explores how market changes are reshaping the refining industry – and what that means for trade flows. At a time of heightened economic and geopolitical risk, MTOMR is essential reading for anyone interested in oil market dynamics and in understanding the oil market context in which these risks are playing out.

  15. Modeling and Optimization of the Medium-Term Units Commitment of Thermal Power

    Shengli Liao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Coal-fired thermal power plants, which represent the largest proportion of China’s electric power system, are very sluggish in responding to power system load demands. Thus, a reasonable and feasible scheme for the medium-term optimal commitment of thermal units (MOCTU can ensure that the generation process runs smoothly and minimizes the start-up and shut-down times of thermal units. In this paper, based on the real-world and practical demands of power dispatch centers in China, a flexible mathematical model for MOCTU that uses equal utilization hours for the installed capacity of all thermal power plants as the optimization goal and that considers the award hours for MOCTU is developed. MOCTU is a unit commitment (UC problem with characteristics of large-scale, high dimensions and nonlinearity. For optimization, an improved progressive optimality algorithm (IPOA offering the advantages of POA is adopted to overcome the drawback of POA of easily falling into the local optima. In the optimization process, strategies of system operating capacity equalization and single station operating peak combination are introduced to move the target solution from the boundary constraints along the target isopleths into the feasible solution’s interior to guarantee the global optima. The results of a case study consisting of nine thermal power plants with 27 units show that the presented algorithm can obtain an optimal solution and is competent in solving the MOCTU with high efficiency and accuracy as well as that the developed simulation model can be applied to practical engineering needs.

  16. Early and medium term results of the sleeve valve-sparing procedure for aortic root ectasia.

    Gamba, Amando; Tasca, Giordano; Giannico, Floriana; Lobiati, Elisabetta; Skouse, Douglas; Galanti, Andrea; Martino, Antonello Stefano; Triggiani, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our experience of using a simplified aortic valve sleeve procedure to treat aortic root ectasia and aneurysms with or without aortic regurgitation. In experienced hands, 2 aortic valve-sparing procedures, ie, Yacoub and David, have yielded excellent long-term results in the treatment of aortic root aneurysms, with or without aortic regurgitation. However, these techniques are demanding and not widely used. Recently, a new and simplified valve-sparing technique, named "sleeve procedure," has been proposed, and has yielded encouraging early results. Ninety consecutive patients with aortic root aneurysms underwent sleeve procedures from October 2006 to October 2012. Follow-up data (clinical 100% complete and echocardiographic 93% complete) were acquired from our outpatient clinic or from the referring cardiologist. The mean age of the patients was 61.5 ± 12.5 years, 79% were male, 16 (18%) had a bicuspid valve, 3 had Marfan syndrome, and 2 had aortic dissection. Over a mean clinical follow-up of 34 ± 19 months, 2 patients died from noncardiac causes and 1 was reoperated on for the recurrence of aortic regurgitation. On follow-up echocardiography after a mean of 18 ± 9 months, aortic regurgitation was absent/negligible, mild or moderate in 62%, 37%, and 1% of patients, respectively, and the diameters of the annulus, Valsalva sinuses, and sinotubular junction were 27.3 + 2.2, 37.0 + 3.4, and 30.6 + 3.1 mm, respectively. Our encouraging early and medium term results suggest that the sleeve procedure is a safe and effective aortic valve-sparing technique for the treatment of aortic root ectasia and aneurysm. However, longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report 2013: Market trends and projections to 2018

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Renewable electricity generation increased strongly worldwide in 2012, and deployment is occurring in a greater number of markets. However, the story of renewable energy development is becoming more complex. Short-term indicators in some regions of the globe have pointed to increased challenges. Despite remaining high, global new investment in renewable energy fell in 2012. Policy uncertainties, economic challenges, incentive reductions and competition from other energy sources clouded the investment outlook for some markets. Some countries and regions have faced difficulties in integrating variable renewables in their power grids. The renewable manufacturing industry, particularly solar and wind, entered a deeper period of restructuring and consolidation. Nevertheless, despite economic, policy and industry turbulence, the underlying fundamentals for renewable deployment remain robust. Even with challenges in some countries, more positive developments elsewhere continue to drive global growth. Competitive opportunities for renewables are emerging across traditional and new markets. While OECD countries remain a driver of renewable power development, non-OECD countries are increasingly accounting for overall growth. The roles of biofuels for transport and renewable heat are also increasing, though at somewhat slower rates than renewable electricity. The Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report 2013 assesses market trends for the renewable electricity, biofuels for transport and renewable heat sectors, identifying drivers and challenges to deployment, and making projections through 2018. The analysis features in-depth renewable electricity market analysis and forecasts for a slate of countries in the OECD and non-OECD. The report also presents an outlook for renewable electricity technologies, global biofuels supply, final energy use of renewables for heat and prospects for renewable investment.

  18. Economic Sanctions Against Russia: Short and Medium Term Consequences for the Oil and Gas Industry

    Rustem M. Nureev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth in production and exports of oil and gas from the United States and other OECD countries led to pressure on energy prices, and posed the problem of redistribution of the structure of oil and gas market shares. The aggravation of competition contributed to the selection of measures to modernize the industry in Russia as the main measures of economic sanctions, as well as restrictions on the supply of Russian oil and gas to Europe, which jeopardized the implementation of the South Stream and North Stream-2 projects. The oil and gas industry continues to play a significant role in the formation of the revenue base of the federal budget of the Russian Federation. As a result of the imposition of sanctions, the export of Western equipment to Russia was banned, it could be a serious blow to the industry, which potential could be fully realized in the next 3–5 years. Oil and gas companies are most dependent on the pumping equipment (import share is 50%, catalysts (80% share of imports, applied software (the share of imports is more than 80%. Currently, Russian companies purchase equipment in China and South Korea, but the quality is much lower than the US, and the equipment often fails, so it is associated with the high costs of repairs. The import substitution should revive the domestic production of oil and gas equipment, but how this policy is implemented is difficult to predict, as enterprises have to overcome a significant technological gap and lag behind foreign developments. Russia managed to survive the short-term period of economic sanctions with significant, but not extremely large losses. Much more acute consequences can affect in the medium term, unless vigorous steps are taken to import substitution and modernization of oil and gas production and processing.

  19. Short- and medium-term efficacy of specific hydrotherapy in inherited ichthyosis.

    Bodemer, C; Bourrat, E; Mazereeuw-Hautier, J; Boralevi, F; Barbarot, S; Bessis, D; Blanchet-Bardon, C; Bourdon-Lanoy, E; Stalder, J-F; Ribet, V; Guerrero, D; Sibaud, V

    2011-11-01

    Management of inherited ichthyoses is symptomatic. Despite treatment, skin symptoms have a major impact on patients' quality of life (QoL). To assess the short- and medium-term efficacy of hydrotherapy on QoL and clinical symptoms of patients with inherited ichthyosis. In this 9-month prospective, open-label, multicentre study, 20 children and 24 adults with ichthyosis were enrolled in several French reference and competence centres, 2 months before undergoing a 3-week treatment with specific hydrotherapeutic management at Avène Hydrotherapy Centre. At baseline (2 months before hydrotherapy), beginning (D0) and end of hydrotherapy (D18), and 3 and 6 months later at the reference and competence centres, patients self-assessed QoL using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) or its paediatric version (Children's DLQI), and investigators evaluated ichthyosis severity using a specific clinical ichthyosis score. The DLQI scores were significantly improved not only at the end of the hydrotherapy treatment (-56% vs. baseline; mean ± SD 3·59 ± 4·30 at D18 vs. 8·35 ± 5·71 at D0; P hydrotherapy (-26% vs. baseline; mean ± SD 5·21 ± 5·11 vs. 6·89 ± 5·38; P = 0·03) (primary criterion). Clinical symptoms were also significantly improved at all post-treatment visits, with a decrease of the mean clinical ichthyosis score by -38% between D0 and D18, by -30% at 3 months and by -31% at 6 months vs. baseline. A 3-week treatment at Avène Hydrotherapy Centre provided significant and persisting improvement of QoL and clinical symptoms in patients with inherited ichthyoses. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. The impact of uncertainties on the UK's medium-term climate change targets

    Watson, Jim; Gross, Rob; Ketsopoulou, Ioanna; Winskel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The UK is committed to ambitious medium- and long-term climate change targets, including a commitment to an 80% reduction in emissions from 1990 levels by 2050. Whilst emissions have fallen significantly since 1990, further reductions will be increasingly difficult to achieve. The government has agreed carbon budgets to the late 2020s that are consistent with the long-term 80% target. However, increasing energy prices since the mid-2000s and the 2008 financial crisis have led to cracks in the political consensus in support of these budgets and targets. This paper carries out an assessment of the feasibility of the UK's agreed low carbon pathway over the medium term, with a particular focus on the fourth carbon budget (2023–27). It analyses the uncertainties associated with the specific changes that may be necessary to comply with this carbon budget – including measures to decarbonise electricity, heat and transport. This analysis focuses on ‘instrumental’ uncertainties associated with specific areas of the energy system (e.g. the decarbonisation of heat in households) and ‘systemic’ uncertainties that tend to have more pervasive implications for the energy system as a whole (e.g. uncertainties associated with public attitudes). A framework is developed that sets out and analyses the key uncertainties under those two broad categories, in terms of their complexity and their potential impact on the fourth carbon budget. Through the application of this framework the paper also considers strategies to mitigate or manage these uncertainties, and which actors could help develop and implement these strategies. - Highlights: • Many uncertainties remain about the achievability of UK emissions reduction targets. • This paper assesses uncertainties that could have the greatest impact on compliance with the 4th carbon budget (2023–2027). • The paper also suggests strategies that could help to manage or mitigate these uncertainties.

  1. Chemical carcinogenesis in the nervous system. Preferential accumulation of O6-methylguanine in rat brain deoxyribonucleic acid during repetitive administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Margison, G P; Kleihues, P

    1975-01-01

    The alkylation of purine bases in DNA of several rat tissues was determined during weekly injections (10 mg/kg) of N-[3H]methyl-N-nitrosourea, a dose schedule known to selectively induce tumours of the nervous system. Each group of animals was killed 1 week after the final injection, and the DNA hydrolysates were analysed by chromatography on Sephadex G-10. After five weekly applications, O6-methylguanine had accumulated in brain DNA to an extent which greatly exceeded that in kidney, spleen and intestine. In the liver, the final O6-methylguanine concentration was less than 1% of that in brain. Between the first and the fifth injection, the O6-methylguanine/7-methylguanine ratio in cerebral DNA increased from 0.28 to 0.68. In addition, 3-methylguanine was found to accumulate in brain DNA whereas in the other organs no significant quantities of this base were detectable. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that O6-alkylation of guanine in DNA plays a major role in the induction of tumours by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and related carcinogens. The kinetics of the increase of O6-methylguanine in cerebral DNA suggest that there is no major cell fraction in the brain which is capable of excising chemically methylated bases from DNA. This repair deficiency could be a determining factor in the selective induction of nervous-system tumours by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and other neuro-oncogenic compounds. PMID:1200992

  2. Short- and Medium-term Atmospheric Effects of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Labow, Gordon J.; Randall, Cora E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. In particular, the humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone from chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. These anthropogenic effects on ozone are most important in polar regions and have been significant since the 1970s. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the short- and medium-term (days to a few months) influences of solar proton events between 1963 and 2005 on stratospheric ozone. The four largest events in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October-November 2003) caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen- containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The hydrogen-containing compounds have very short lifetimes and lasted for only a few days (typically the duration of the solar proton event). On the other hand, the nitrogen-containing compounds lasted much longer, especially in the Winter. The nitrogen oxides were predicted

  3. Short- and medium-term atmospheric constituent effects of very large solar proton events

    C. H. Jackman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptions sometimes produce protons, which impact the Earth's atmosphere. These solar proton events (SPEs generally last a few days and produce high energy particles that precipitate into the Earth's atmosphere. The protons cause ionization and dissociation processes that ultimately lead to an enhancement of odd-hydrogen and odd-nitrogen in the polar cap regions (>60° geomagnetic latitude. We have used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM3 to study the atmospheric impact of SPEs over the period 1963–2005. The very largest SPEs were found to be the most important and caused atmospheric effects that lasted several months after the events. We present the short- and medium-term (days to a few months atmospheric influence of the four largest SPEs in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October–November 2003 as computed by WACCM3 and observed by satellite instruments. Polar mesospheric NOx (NO+NO2 increased by over 50 ppbv and mesospheric ozone decreased by over 30% during these very large SPEs. Changes in HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2, HOCl, and ClO were indirectly caused by the very large SPEs in October–November 2003, were simulated by WACCM3, and previously measured by Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. WACCM3 output was also represented by sampling with the MIPAS averaging kernel for a more valid comparison. Although qualitatively similar, there are discrepancies between the model and measurement with WACCM3 predicted HNO3 and ClONO2 enhancements being smaller than measured and N2O5 enhancements being larger than measured. The HOCl enhancements were fairly similar in amounts and temporal variation in WACCM3 and MIPAS. WACCM3 simulated ClO decreases below 50 km, whereas MIPAS mainly observed increases, a very perplexing difference. Upper stratospheric

  4. Epigenetic mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenic action of radiations has long been thought to be due to its mutagenic activity. Since DNA damage is induced and distributes in a stochastic fashion, radiation induction of cancers was also assumed to follow a stochastic kinetics. However, recent progress in radiation research has revealed that some features of radiation carcinogenesis are not explainable by the simple action of radiation as a DNA damaging and mutagenic agent. Firstly, frequencies of radiation-induced transformation in vitro and radiation-induced mammary cancers in rats are too high to be accounted for by the frequency of radiation-induced mutation. Secondly, trans-generation carcinogenesis among F1 mice born to irradiated parents occurs also much more frequently than to be predicted by the frequency of radiation induced germline mutation. Thirdly, multistage carcinogenesis theory predicts that carcinogens give hits to the target cells so as to shorten the latency of cancers. However, latencies of radiation induced solid cancers among atomic bomb survivors are similar to those of the control population. Fourthly, although radiation elevates the frequency of cancers, the induced cancers seem to share the same spectrum of cancer types as in the unirradiated control populations. This suggests that radiation induces cancer by enhancement of the spontaneous carcinogenesis process. These data suggest that the first step of radiation carcinogenesis may not be the direct induction of mutation. Radiation may induce genetic instability which increases the spontaneous mutation rate in the cells to produce carcinogenic mutations. Growth stimulatory effect of radiation may also contribute to the process. Thus, epigenetic, but not genetic effect of radiation might better contribute in the process of carcinogenesis. (author)

  5. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report

    1983-07-01

    Gamma radiation, as a quantitative perturbation reference, has been related to oxygen toxicity as the unavoidable background risk due to living in an oxygen atmosphere. The basic mechanisms shared by gamma irradiation and oxygen toxicity have been studied. The response to these two perturbations has been characterized at the molecular level through DNA chemistry and monoclonal antibodies, and by cellular biological responses. The investigation of cellular responses is being extended to the molecular level through a study of alteration of gene arrangement and gene expression. Concentration has been on the study of the involvement of the evolutionally conserved repetitive DNA sequences shared by hamster and man. Such sequences were found and some have been isolated in plasmids. Two cellular systems were chosen for investigation, the embryonic/adult mesenchymal system and the hematopoietic tissues system. Concentration has been on the isolation, properties, and response to perturbation of the progenitor cells and the stem cell populations

  6. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis is studies at NIRS

    Sado, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Experimental radiation carcinogenesis studies conducted during the past decade at NIRS are briefly reviewed. They include the following: 1) Age dependency of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. 2) Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. 3) Mechanism of fractionated X-irradiation (FX) induced thymic lymphomas. 4) Significance of radiation-induced immunosuppression in radiation carcinogenesis in vivo. 5) Other ongoing studies. (author)

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer

  8. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  9. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    An array of epidemiological results and databases on test animal indicate that risk of cancer and atherosclerosis can be up- or down-regulated by diet through a range of 200%. Other factors contribute incrementally and include the natural terrestrial environment and various human activities that jointly produce complex exposures to endotoxin-producing microorganisms, ionizing radiations, and chemicals. Ordinary personal habits and simple physical irritants have been demonstrated to affect the immune response and risk of disease. There tends to be poor statistical correlation of long-term risk with single agent exposures incurred throughout working careers. However, Agency recommendations for control of hazardous exposures to humans has been substance-specific instead of contextually realistic even though there is consistent evidence for common mechanisms of toxicological and carcinogenic action. That behavior seems to be best explained by molecular stresses from cellular oxygen metabolism and phagocytosis of antigenic invasion as well as breakdown of normal metabolic compounds associated with homeostatic- and injury-related renewal of cells. There is continually mounting evidence that marrow stroma, comprised largely of monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts, is important to phagocytic and cytokinetic response, but the complex action of the immune process is difficult to infer from first-principle logic or biomarkers of toxic injury. The many diverse database studies all seem to implicate two important processes, i.e., the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen and breakdown of aginuine, an amino acid, by hydrolysis or digestion of protein which is attendant to normal antigen-antibody action. This behavior indicates that protection guidelines and risk coefficients should be context dependent to include reference considerations of the composite action of parameters that mediate oxygen metabolism. A logic of this type permits the realistic common-scale modeling of

  10. Acute and medium term effects of a ten-week running intervention on mood state in apprentices

    Katrin eWalter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise and physical activity have proven benefits for physical and psychological well-being. However, it is not clear if healthy young adults can enhance mood in everyday life through regular exercise. Earlier studies mainly showed positive effects of acute exercise and exercise programs on psychological well-being in children, older people and in clinical populations. Few studies controlled participants´ physical activity in daily life, performed besides the exercise program, which can impact results. In addition the transition from mood enhancement induced by acute exercise to medium or long-term effects due to regular exercise is not yet determined.The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the acute effects of an aerobic running training on mood and trends in medium term changes of mood in everyday life of young adults. We conducted a 10-week aerobic endurance training with frequent mood assessments and continuous activity monitoring. 23 apprentices, separated into experimental and control group, were monitored over 12 weeks.To control the effectiveness of the aerobic exercise program, participants completed a progressive treadmill test pre and post the intervention period. The three basic mood dimensions energetic arousal, valence and calmness were assessed via electronic diaries. Participants had to rate their mood state frequently on three days a week at five times of measurement within twelve weeks. Participants´ physical activity was assessed with accelerometers. All mood dimensions increased immediately after acute endurance exercise but results were not significant. The highest acute mood change could be observed in valence (p=.07; η2=.27. However, no medium term effects in mood states could be observed after a few weeks of endurance training.Future studies should focus on the interaction between acute and medium term effects of exercise training on mood. The decreasing compliance over the course of the study requires the

  11. Radiation carcinogenesis in scid mice

    Ishii, Hiroko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Tsuji, Hideo; Shimada, Yoshiya; Ogiu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Fumio; Sado, Toshihiko

    1999-06-01

    Scid mice which have the defect of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalitic subunit, exhibit the limited activities of repair from DNA double strand breaks, and are sensitive to ionizing radiation. In order to study the relationship between repair capacity for DNA double strand breaks and carcinogenesis, the effects of ionizing radiation were studied using scid homozygotes (scid/scid), scid heterozygotes (scid/+) and CB-17 (+/+) mice. Both the Scid bone marrow cells and fibroblast cell lines from Scid embryos were highly sensitivity to acute effects of ionizing radiation. Carcinogenesis experiments showed the high incidence of thymic lymphomas (80 to 90%) in 1 to 3 Gy {sup 137}Cs-{gamma}-ray-irradiated Scid mice. (author)

  12. Medium-Term Function of a 3D Printed TCP/HA Structure as a New Osteoconductive Scaffold for Vertical Bone Augmentation: A Simulation by BMP-2 Activation

    Mira Moussa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 3D-printed construct made of orthogonally layered strands of tricalcium phosphate (TCP and hydroxyapatite has recently become available. The material provides excellent osteoconductivity. We simulated a medium-term experiment in a sheep calvarial model by priming the blocks with BMP-2. Vertical bone growth/maturation and material resorption were evaluated. Materials and methods: Titanium hemispherical caps were filled with either bare- or BMP-2 primed constructs and placed onto the calvaria of adult sheep (n = 8. Histomorphometry was performed after 8 and 16 weeks. Results: After 8 weeks, relative to bare constructs, BMP-2 stimulation led to a two-fold increase in bone volume (Bare: 22% ± 2.1%; BMP-2 primed: 50% ± 3% and a 3-fold decrease in substitute volume (Bare: 47% ± 5%; BMP-2 primed: 18% ± 2%. These rates were still observed at 16 weeks. The new bone grew and matured to a haversian-like structure while the substitute material resorbed via cell- and chemical-mediation. Conclusion: By priming the 3D construct with BMP-2, bone metabolism was physiologically accelerated, that is, enhancing vertical bone growth and maturation as well as material bioresorption. The scaffolding function of the block was maintained, leaving time for the bone to grow and mature to a haversian-like structure. In parallel, the material resorbed via cell-mediated and chemical processes. These promising results must be confirmed in clinical tests.

  13. Mulching and seeding treatments for post-fire stabilization techniques in Laza (NW Spain: medium-term effects on soil quality and effectiveness

    M. Díaz-Raviña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of fire and different post-fire stabilisation treatments like mulching and seeding on some selected physical, chemical biochemical and microbiological properties as well as the efficacy of these treatments on control of post-fire erosion was evaluated in a burnt area affected by a high severity wildfire located in Laza (NW Spain. Soil samples were collected from the A horizon (0-2 cm of the burnt soil 8 and 12 months after the wildfire as well as from the unburnt soil located in an adjacent plot used as control; sediments were periodically collected after precipitation events in the burnt soil with and without different post-fire stabilisation treatments. The results clearly showed that a significant medium-term impact of the wildfire on most soil properties analyzed was still observed 12 months after the fire event and that mulching and seeding treatments did not affect the overall soil quality (physical, chemical, biochemical and microbiological properties of this burned soil. Sediments data indicated that both stabilisation treatments were effective to control post-fire erosion since, compared to the burnt control, soil losses were reduced by 85% in the mulching treatment and by 30% in the seeding treatment.

  14. [Medium-term strategy for the specific management of pneumology hospitals and wards after the decentralization of the sanitary system].

    Muşat, Simona Nicoleta; Ioniţa, Diana; Paceonea, Mirela; Chiriac, Nona Delia; Stoicescu, Ileana Paula; Mihălţan, F D

    2011-01-01

    Identifying and promoting new management techniques for the descentralized pneumology hospitals or wards was one of the most ambitious objectives of the project "Quality in the pneumology medical services through continuous medical education and organizational flexibility", financed by the Human Resourses Development Sectorial Operational Programme 2007-2013 (ID 58451). The "Medium term Strategy on the specific management of the pneumology hospitals or wards after the descentralization of the sanitary system" presented in the article was written by the project's experts and discussed with pneumology managers and local authorities representatives. This Strategy application depends on the colaboration of the pneumology hospitals with professional associations, and local and central authorities.

  15. Institutional Ownership, Board of Directors and Yield Spreads in Long- and Medium-term Corporate Bonds and Sukuk

    Noriza Mohd Saad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies documented that type of investor significantly affects the performance of bonds and sukuk. These studies showed that the yield to maturity (YTM of bonds and sukuk are significantly associated with institutional investors. This association is because institutional investors actively monitor the performance of bonds and sukuk. Apart from the type of investor, the roles played by the board of directors (BOD in decision making significantly influence the performance of bonds and sukuk, especially the YTM. This study aims to investigate the relationship between institutional ownerships and the BOD and yield spreads of long- and medium-term corporate bonds and sukuk. Data are obtained from firm issuers’ annual reports, Bond Info Hub of Malaysia Central Bank, Department of Malaysia Statistics and Bloomberg from 2000 to 2014. The study employed unbalanced panel data approach for multivariate robust regression, OLS, fixed-effect, and random-effect models. Results revealed that the presence of top-six institutional investors and characteristics of the BOD exert a significant negative effect on the yield spreads. The findings are also consistent with the agency cost of debt theory, which suggests that long-term bonds carry a lower cost of defaults than medium-term bonds.

  16. Comfrey (Symphytum officinale. L. and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-Term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L. (Boraginaceae is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM. In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po, and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2 were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05, the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001 and mitotic figures (P = 0.007, as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA positive cells (P = 0.0001 and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05. On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001 and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001 was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  17. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study.

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2010-06-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the 'resistant hepatocyte model' (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1-2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann-Whitney and χ(2)) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  18. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  19. Short/Medium-Term Macroeconomic Impact of Investment Associated with 'Grenelle de l'Environnement' Investments on Growth and Employment

    Guillerminet, Marie-Laure; Briard, Philippe; Fery, Pierre; Galko, Elodie; Klein, Caroline; Ollivier, Timothee

    2016-01-01

    The 'Grenelle de l'Environnement' is a French policy aimed at achieving the objectives defined in the EU climate and energy package. This study evaluates the short- to medium-term impact of the main economic measures of 'Grenelle' on employment and growth. The simulations run with the macro-econometric model Mesange show a positive impact of these measures on GDP and employment in the short run, mainly via the investment multiplier. The impact turns negative from 2020 on because investment slows and taxes increase to finance the latter. These results are robust to different assumptions on oil prices, household saving behaviour, public funding, and productivity gains associated with new transport projects. However, they do not factor in the impact of 'Grenelle' on the environment, competitiveness, and well-being

  20. The strategies of European energy operators. Which strategic and capitalistic evolutions for the sector on a medium term?

    2012-11-01

    This article presents the content of a market study which aimed at describing the current regulatory context of energy markets in Europe and the degree of openness to competition, at analysing all figures concerning electricity and natural gas in different countries (production, consumption, balance of trade), at analysing development strategies of electricity providers and gas operators and at assessing their strengths and weaknesses, at comparing financial performance of leader groups and at assessing their financial flexibility, and at anticipating the reconfiguration of the sector on a medium term. Fifteen energy companies or operators have been analysed: Centrica, CEZ, E.ON, EDF, EDP, Enel, ENI, Fortum, Gas Natural, GDF Suez, Iberdrola, RWE, SSE, Vattenfall, Verbund

  1. Carcinogenesis

    Reilly, C.A. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This section contains summaries of research in the following areas: use of liver for mechanistic studies of multistage hepatocarcinogenesis and for screening of environmental contaminants for tumor initiating and promoting activity; molecular properties of rat liver ornithine aminotransferase; regulation of gene expression in rat liver; methods of tumor detection; mechanisms of radiation and viral oncogenesis; biphenyl metabolism by rat liver microsomes; and studies on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity

  2. A medium-term coalition-forming model of heterogeneous DERs for a commercial virtual power plant

    Shabanzadeh, Morteza; Sheikh-El-Eslami, Mohammad-Kazem; Haghifam, Mahmoud-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A medium-term coalition-forming scheme is proposed for commercial VPPs. • Decision making on the optimal selection of VPP coalition members, bilateral and forward contracting, and pool involvement. • VPP acts as an arbitrageur by exercising arbitrage between diverse energy trading floors. • Stochastic programming approach applied to characterize the uncertainty and to derive informed decisions. - Abstract: Within a medium-term market horizon, this research work provides a methodology that allows a commercial virtual power plant (CVPP) to form an optimal coalition of heterogeneous distributed energy resources (DERs) based on weekly bilateral contracting, futures-market involvement, and pool participation. The established model aims at composing an optimal portfolio of available DERs and jointly takes into account the risk associated with the energy trading strategy of the CVPP. Perceiving the fact that pool prices have highly uncertain nature, a framework based on stochastic programming approach is utilized to model this decision-making problem. The proposed framework consists of two stages. The first stage deals with decisions regarding DERs optimal selection for the VPP coalition, the amount of agreed quantity in the bilateral negotiation, and the type and quantity selection of futures-market contracts as well. In the second stage, decisions are made based on the most plausible realizations of the stochastic prices in the day-ahead market. For a given pre-specified risk level on profit volatility, the main objective is to maximize the expected profit for the VPP manager over the planning horizon. The efficiency and applicability of the developed model is illustrated and analyzed by its implementation in a system with few heterogeneous DERs and through different scenarios, and finally thereby meaningful conclusions are duly drawn.

  3. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis.

    Evie H Carchman

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV-encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1.HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7 and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N, both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62 in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM. To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins.Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic, syngeneic FVB/N background control mice

  4. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  5. Mutiple simultaneous event model for radiation carcinogenesis

    Baum, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical Radiobiology and Risk Estimates includes reports on: Multiple Simultaneous Event Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis; Cancer Risk Estimates and Neutron RBE Based on Human Exposures; A Rationale for Nonlinear Dose Response Functions of Power Greater or Less Than One; and Rationale for One Double Event in Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis

  6. Environmental carcinogenesis and genetic variability

    Knudsen, A.G. Jr

    1977-01-01

    It was found that carcinogenesis in man may involve the interaction of genetic and environmental forces, and that mutation, whether germinal or somatic, seems to be involved in the origin of many, perhaps all cancers. The cancers of man may be visualized as occurring in four groups of individuals according to whether (1) neither genetic nor environmental factors are dominant, i.e. 'background' or 'spontaneous' cancer, (2) heredity alone is dominant, (3) environment alone is important, or (4) both are operating (Knudsen, 1977). The last two groups together are widely thought to contribute 70-80% of cancer cases in the United States; the relative contribution of each group is a major question to be answered

  7. Time factors in radiation carcinogenesis

    Sasaki, Shunsaku

    1995-01-01

    Results of experiments using B6C3F 1 female mice were made subject of analysis on the time factors in radiation carcinogenesis. In the experiment for examination of influence of age at irradiation on the lifetime risk and on distribution of ages at death, mice were irradiated at day 12, 14 or 17 of the prenatal period, or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 of the postnatal period with doses ranging from 0.48 to 5.7 Gy gamma-rays from 137 Cs. In the experiment to examine the reduction factor for carcinogenic effect by multiple fractionation of gamma-rays dose 1.9 or 3.8 Gy was divided into 10 fractions, which were delivered once a week during period from 5 to 15 weeks of age. All mice were allowed to live out their life spans under a specific pathogen free condition. The cumulative relative risk for mortality from all causes except lymphoma and leukemia was shown to decrease with age when mice were irradiated at the fetal, neonatal, suckling, adolescent or young adult period, whereas, the decrease in the cumulative relative risk was very little when gamma-rays were given at the intermediate adult period. The lifetime risk for the increase in mortality and for the induction of solid tumors was highest in mice irradiated during neonatal, suckling or adolescent period. Age-dependence of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis was different for each type of neoplasm. However, the most susceptible period for induction of each type of neoplasm concentrated in the age from neonatal to adolescent period. Radiation-induced late effects were apparently reduced by multiple fractionation of radiation dose, but the reduction factor for the increase in the long-term mortality did not exceed 2.0. (author)

  8. Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach in comparison: Medium-term effects on learning external chest compression – a pilot study

    Münster, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The external chest compression is a very important skill required to maintain a minimum of circulation during cardiac arrest until further medical procedures can be taken. Peyton’s 4-Steps-Approach is one method of skill training, the four steps being:Based on CPR skill training, this method is widely, allegedly predominantly used, although there are insufficient studies on Peyton’s 4-Steps-Approach for skill training in CPR in comparison with other methods of skill training. In our study, we compared the medium- term effects on learning external chest compression with a CPR training device in three different groups: PEY (Peyton’s 4-Steps-Approach, PMOD (Peyton’s 4-Steps-Approach without Step 3 and STDM, the standard model, according to the widely spread method “see one, do one” (this is equal to Peyton’s step 1 and 3.Material and Methods: This prospective and randomised pilot study took place during the summer semester of 2009 at the SkillsLab and Simulation Centre of the University of Cologne (Kölner interprofessionelles Skills Lab und Simulationszentrum - KISS. The subjects were medical students (2 and 3 semester. They volunteered for the study and were randomised in three parallel groups, each receiving one of the teaching methods mentioned above. One week and 5/6 months after the intervention, an objective, structured single assessment was taken. Compression rate, compression depth, correct compressions, and the sum of correct checklist items were recorded. Additionally, we compared cumulative percentages between the groups based on the correct implementation of the resuscitation guidelines during that time.Results: The examined sample consisted of 134 subjects (68% female; age 22±4; PEY: n=62; PMOD: n=31; STDM: n=41. There was no difference between the groups concerning age, gender, pre-existing experience in CPR or time of last CPR course. The only significant difference between the groups was the mean

  9. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Saha, Prakash; Hughes, John; Patel, Ashish S.; Donati, Tommaso; Sallam, Morad; Patel, Sanjay D.; Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan; Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  10. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  11. Medium-term effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease.

    Wu, Haiting; Pang, Qingjiang; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare the medium-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Fifty-seven patients with multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease underwent Dynesys stabilization (n = 26) or PLIF (n = 31) from December 2008 to February 2010. The mean follow-up period was 50.3 (range, 46-65) months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic evaluations included disc height and range of motion (ROM) of the operative segments and proximal adjacent segment on lumbar flexion-extension X-rays. The intervertebral disc signal change was defined by magnetic resonance imaging, and disc degeneration was classified by the Pfirrmann grade. Results The clinical outcomes including the VAS score and ODI were significantly improved in both groups at 3 months and the final follow-up, but the difference between the two was not significant. At the final follow-up, the disc height of stabilized segments in both groups was significantly increased; the increase was more notable in the Dynesys than PLIF group. The ROM of stabilized segments at the final follow-up decreased from 6.20° to 2.76° and 6.56° to 0.00° in the Dynesys and PLIF groups, respectively. There was no distinct change in the height of the proximal adjacent segment in the two groups. The ROM of the proximal adjacent segment in both groups increased significantly at the final follow-up; the change was significantly greater in the PLIF than Dynesys group. Only one case of adjacent segment degeneration occurred in the PLIF group, and this patient underwent a second operation. Conclusions Both Dynesys stabilization and PLIF can improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Compared with PLIF, Dynesys stabilization can maintain the mobility of the

  12. Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach in comparison: Medium-term effects on learning external chest compression - a pilot study.

    Münster, Tobias; Stosch, Christoph; Hindrichs, Nina; Franklin, Jeremy; Matthes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The external chest compression is a very important skill required to maintain a minimum of circulation during cardiac arrest until further medical procedures can be taken. Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach is one method of skill training, the four steps being: Demonstration, Deconstruction, Comprehension and Execution. Based on CPR skill training, this method is widely, allegedly predominantly used, although there are insufficient studies on Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach for skill training in CPR in comparison with other methods of skill training. In our study, we compared the medium- term effects on learning external chest compression with a CPR training device in three different groups: PEY (Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach), PMOD (Peyton's 4-Steps-Approach without Step 3) and STDM, the standard model, according to the widely spread method "see one, do one" (this is equal to Peyton's step 1 and 3). This prospective and randomised pilot study took place during the summer semester of 2009 at the SkillsLab and Simulation Centre of the University of Cologne (Kölner interprofessionelles Skills Lab und Simulationszentrum - KISS). The subjects were medical students (2(nd) and 3(rd) semester). They volunteered for the study and were randomised in three parallel groups, each receiving one of the teaching methods mentioned above. One week and 5/6 months after the intervention, an objective, structured single assessment was taken. Compression rate, compression depth, correct compressions, and the sum of correct checklist items were recorded. Additionally, we compared cumulative percentages between the groups based on the correct implementation of the resuscitation guidelines during that time. The examined sample consisted of 134 subjects (68% female; age 22±4; PEY: n=62; PMOD: n=31; STDM: n=41). There was no difference between the groups concerning age, gender, pre-existing experience in CPR or time of last CPR course. The only significant difference between the groups was the mean

  13. Acid production potentials of massive sulfide minerals and lead-zinc mine tailings: a medium-term study.

    Çelebi, Emin Ender; Öncel, Mehmet Salim; Kobya, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    Weathering of sulfide minerals is a principal source of acid generation. To determine acid-forming potentials of sulfide-bearing materials, two basic approaches named static and kinetic tests are available. Static tests are short-term, and easily undertaken within a few days and in a laboratory. In contrast, kinetic tests are long-term procedures and mostly carried out on site. In this study, experiments were conducted over a medium-term period of 2 months, not as short as static tests and also not as long as kinetic tests. As a result, pH and electrical conductivity oscillations as a function of time, acid-forming potentials and elemental contents of synthetically prepared rainwater leachates of massive sulfides and sulfide-bearing lead-zinc tailings from abandoned and currently used deposition areas have been determined. Although the lowest final pH of 2.70 was obtained in massive pyrite leachate, massive chalcopyrite leachate showed the highest titrable acidity of 1.764 g H 2 SO 4 /L. On the other hand, a composite of currently deposited mine tailings showed no acidic characteristic with a final pH of 7.77. The composite abandoned mine tailing leachate had a final pH of 6.70, close to the final pH of massive galena and sphalerite leachates, and produced a slight titrable acidity of 0.130 g H 2 SO 4 /L.

  14. Surface Aging Effect on Tire/Pavement Noise Medium-Term Evolution in a Medium-Size City

    Víctor F. Vázquez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the geo-referenced acoustical results obtained throughout the close proximity noise (CPX technique carried out on different urban sections included within the 2017 strategic noise mapping (Directive 2002/49/CE in Ciudad Real, a Spanish medium-sized city. The employed methodology quantifies the tire/pavement noise generated in the contact between the tire and the surface of the studied sections. Measurements were carried out in different research campaigns between 2008 and 2015 (medium-term evolution. They give valuable information about the pavement-aging effect on its surface characteristics. Throughout these years, the acoustic situation of these sections has worsened mainly due to surface damage and higher mean profile depth (MPD values, although the performance does not follow the same pattern in every section. The relationships between measured tire/pavement noise and theoretical environmental noise, just due to the geometric spreading of sound energy, is also studied in order to elaborate a simple rolling noise mapping and to assess the environmental noise evolution. Traffic noise plays the main role in the noise registered within the assessed sections, therefore, CPX assessment could be used by local authorities to take decisions regarding urban planning and traffic management, with the aim of reducing noise exposure from traffic.

  15. Medium-Term Probabilistic Forecasting of Extremely Low Prices in Electricity Markets: Application to the Spanish Case

    Antonio Bello

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most relevant challenges that have arisen in electricity markets during the last few years is the emergence of extremely low prices. Trying to predict these events is crucial for market agents in a competitive environment. This paper proposes a novel methodology to simultaneously accomplish punctual and probabilistic hourly predictions about the appearance of extremely low electricity prices in a medium-term scope. The proposed approach for making real ex ante forecasts consists of a nested compounding of different forecasting techniques, which incorporate Monte Carlo simulation, combined with spatial interpolation techniques. The procedure is based on the statistical identification of the process key drivers. Logistic regression for rare events, decision trees, multilayer perceptrons and a hybrid approach, which combines a market equilibrium model with logistic regression, are used. Moreover, this paper assesses whether periodic models in which parameters switch according to the day of the week can be even more accurate. The proposed techniques are compared to a Markov regime switching model and several naive methods. The proposed methodology empirically demonstrates its effectiveness by achieving promising results on a real case study based on the Spanish electricity market. This approach can provide valuable information for market agents when they face decision making and risk-management processes. Our findings support the additional benefit of using a hybrid approach for deriving more accurate predictions.

  16. Medium-term results of Mini-arc for urinary stress incontinence in ambulatory patients under local anesthesia

    Almog Levi

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the medium-term outcome and patient's satisfaction after Single-incision mini-sling (SIMS procedure done under local anesthesia in ambulatory set up for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including all patients submitted to SIMS procedure for SUI with MiniArc (AMS, U.S.A without concomitant surgery between January 2011 and March 2013. Patients were followed up during 12 months after surgery and once a year subsequently. Telephone interviews were conducted to evaluate patient satisfaction. Outcome masseurs included: SUI cure rate, urinary urge incontinence (UUI cure rate in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, intra and post-operative complications and patient satisfaction. Results Ninety-three patients were included with mean follow-up of 23 months. Fifty percent had MUI with predominant SUI. The cure rates of SUI (objective and subjective were 89%. UUI was cured in 40% of patients. No major complications occur, neither voiding obstruction or groin pain. Telephone interviews conducted after 26 months on average revealed high satisfaction rate from the procedure (8.8 out of 10 and from the local anesthesia. Visual analog scale (VAS rating was low during and after the procedure (2.38 and 2.69 respectively. Conclusions The SIMS procedure is safe and highly effective for SUI and it can be performed successfully under local anesthesia in an ambulatory setup.

  17. Statistical modeling and extrapolation of carcinogenesis data

    Krewski, D.; Murdoch, D.; Dewanji, A.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, including pharmacokinetic models for metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances. Maximum likelihood procedures for fitting these models to epidemiological data are discussed, including situations where the time to tumor occurrence is unobservable. The plausibility of different possible shapes of the dose response curve at low doses is examined, and a robust method for linear extrapolation to low doses is proposed and applied to epidemiological data on radiation carcinogenesis

  18. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for...

  19. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Corynybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 4 tables.

  20. Expression Patterns of Cancer Stem Cell Markers During Specific Celecoxib Therapy in Multistep Rat Colon Carcinogenesis Bioassays.

    Salim, Elsayed I; Hegazi, Mona M; Kang, Jin Seok; Helmy, Hager M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) during chemicallyinduced rat multi-step colon carcinogenesis with or without the treatment with a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor drug (celecoxib). Two experiments were performed, the first, a short term 12 week colon carcinogenesis bioassay in which only surrogate markers for colon cancer, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) lesions, were formed. The other experiment was a medium term colon cancer rat assay in which tumors had developed after 32 weeks. Treatment with celecoxib lowered the numbers of ACF, as well as the tumor volumes and multiplicities after 32 weeks. Immunohistochemical proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes LI (%) were downregulated after treatment by celecoxib. Also different cell surface antigens known to associate with CSCs such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD44 and CD133 were compared between the two experiments and showed differential expression patterns depending on the stage of carcinogenesis and treatment with celecoxib. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the numbers of CD133 cells were increased in the colonic epithelium after 12 weeks while those of CD44 but not CD133 cells were increased after 32 weeks. Moreover, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity levels in the colonic epithelium (a known CSC marker) detected by ELISA assay were found down-regulated after 12 weeks, but were up-regulated after 32 weeks. The data have also shown that the protective effect of celecoxib on these specific markers and populations of CSCs and on other molecular processes such as apoptosis targeted by this drug may vary depending on the genetic and phenotypic stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, uncovering these distinction roles of CSCs during different phases of carcinogenesis and during specific treatment could be useful for targeted therapy.

  1. Medium-term effectiveness of online behavioral training in migraine self-management: A randomized trial controlled over 10 months.

    Sorbi, M J; Kleiboer, A M; van Silfhout, H G; Vink, G; Passchier, J

    2015-06-01

    This randomized, controlled trial examined the medium-term effectiveness of online behavioral training in migraine self-management (oBT; N = 195) versus waitlist control (WLC; N = 173) on attack frequency, indicators of self-management (primary outcomes), headache top intensity, use of rescue medications, quality of life and disability (secondary outcomes). An online headache diary following the ICHD-II and questionnaires were completed at baseline (T0), post-training (T1) and six months later (T2). Missing data (T1: 24%; T2: 37%) were handled by multiple imputation. We established effect sizes (ES) and tested between-group differences over time with linear mixed modelling techniques based on the intention-to-treat principle. At T2, attack frequency had improved significantly in oBT (-23%, ES = 0.66) but also in WLC (-19%; ES = 0.52). Self-efficacy, internal and external control in migraine management--and triptan use--improved only in oBT, however. This indicates different processes in both groups and could signify (the start of) active self-management in oBT. Also, only oBT improved migraine-specific quality of life to a sizable extent. oBT produced self-management gains but could not account for improved attack frequency, because WLC improved as well. The perspective that BT effects develop gradually, and that online delivery will boost BT outreach, justifies further research. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Medium term outcome of bipolar plasma vaporization in prostate cancer patients--a palliative modality of preserving spontaneous voiding.

    Geavlete, B; Moldoveanu, C; Niţă, Gh; Stănescu, F; Jecu, M; Geavlete, P

    2012-12-15

    This retrospective analysis evaluated the efficiency, safety, and medium term postoperative results of bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) in prostate cancer (PCa) cases associating complete urinary retention. A series of 40 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic PCa and complete urinary retention requiring a Foley catheter indwelling underwent BPV aiming to restore spontaneous voiding. A total of 35 patients completed the one year evaluation protocol consisting of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life score (QoL), maximum flow rate (Q(max)) and post-voiding residual urinary volume (PVR), measured at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. BPV was successfully performed in all cases with satisfactory efficiency, as confirmed by the mean operation time (42.8 minutes) and hemoglobin drop (0.7 g/dl). A fast and safe postoperative recovery period was described in this series (hematuria rate--7.5%; mean catheterization period--36 hours; mean hospital stay--2.5 days; early-irritative symptoms' rate--15%). At 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, satisfactory values were determined in terms of IPSS, Qmax, QoL and PVR. These parameters emphasized a stable evolution throughout the entire follow-up, as 88.6% of the patients maintained spontaneous voiding. The present trial confirmed the plasma-button vaporization as a promising therapeutic approach in PCa cases associating complete urinary retention. The technique displayed good efficacy, low perioperative morbidity, short convalescence, and satisfactory urodynamics and symptom score parameters during the one-year follow-up period.

  3. [Medium-term outcome, follow-up, and quality of life in children treated for type III esophageal atresia].

    Lepeytre, C; De Lagausie, P; Merrot, T; Baumstarck, K; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the medium-term outcome (health status, medical and surgical French National Health Authority-recommended follow-up, and quality of life) of children born with type III esophageal atresia (EA). Previous events (during the perinatal period, associated abnormalities, respiratory and digestive complications) of children treated for type III EA at the Marseille university hospitals between 1999 and 2009 were noted. Parents completed a standardized questionnaire concerning the health of their children during the previous year, and a quality-of-life questionnaire (PedsQL 4.0) was also completed by children aged more than 8 years. Among the 68 children treated, 44 responded to our solicitation (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 3-12.8 years). Previous important events were : pneumonia(s) (65%), asthma before the age of 3 years (66%), hospitalization for a respiratory event (45%), fundoplication (20%), and esophageal dilatation (45%). We noted current chronic cough (16%), asthma (30%), dysphagia (39%), and symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (9%). National guidelines were not respected, except for the surgical indications in children aged less than 6 years. The quality-of-life scores (n=43 children) were similar to healthy controls but were negatively influenced by a gastrostomy procedure (P=0.020), pneumonia (P=0.013), and hospitalization due to a respiratory event (P=0.006) or a digestive event (P=0.010), and also by current asthma (P=0.004). In conclusion, despite recurrent respiratory or digestive symptoms and inadequate recommended follow-up, the quality of life of children treated for type III of EA is good. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Open tension-free hernioplasty using a novel lightweight self-gripping mesh: medium-term experience from two institutions.

    Pedano, Nicolás; Pastor, Carlos; Arredondo, Jorge; Poveda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Jaime; Montón, Soledad; Molina, María; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis

    2012-02-01

    The process of mesh fixation and the potential risk of associated chronic pain are always surgeon's main concerns in hernia surgery. A wide variety of lightweight mesh models are currently available on the market to overcome some of these problems showing good preliminary results, but no data representing the medium- or long-term results. The present study aims to report the clinical outcomes of two institutional series of patients who underwent hernia repair using a partially absorbable auto adherent mesh (Parietene™ Progrip™--PP). A prospective analysis was performed including unselected patients with primary groin hernia who underwent a standardized Lichtenstein procedure using the PP mesh at two tertiary institutions. During the 2-year study period, 181 patients (167 males; 14 females) with a median age of 63 years (19-85 years) were operated on at both centers. Short-term complications occurred in 27 patients (15%), the most commonly seen being urinary retention (6%) followed by hematoma (5%) and acute orchitis (2%). With a median follow-up of 17 months (12-29 months), 4 patients (2%) had a feeling of a foreign body in the groin, and 7 (4%) developed chronic pain. A total of four patients (2%) developed recurrence. In our experience, the use of the PP mesh for hernioplasties offers a potential benefit not only in the short-term period but also in a medium-term follow-up with low recurrence and late chronic pain rates. However, this particular mesh does not fully prevent all complications and chronic pain and recurrent hernias have been reported for the first time.

  5. Prosthesis-patient mismatch in bovine pericardial aortic valves: evaluation using 3 different modalities and associated medium-term outcomes.

    Chacko, Satish Jacob; Ansari, Asimul H; McCarthy, Patrick M; Malaisrie, S Chris; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Li, Zhi; Lee, Richard; McGee, Edwin; Bonow, Robert O; Puthumana, Jyothy J

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on survival after aortic valve replacement have not been clearly defined. Historically, the presence of PPM was identified from postoperative echocardiograms or preoperative manufacturer-provided charts, resulting in wide discrepancies. The 2009 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) guidelines proposed an algorithmic approach to calculate PPM. This study compared PPM prevalence and its impact on survival using 3 modalities: (1) the ASE guidelines-suggested algorithm (ASE PPM); (2) the manufacturer-provided charts (M PPM); and (3) the echocardiographically measured, body surface area-indexed, effective orifice area (EOAi PPM) measurement. A total of 614 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with bovine pericardial valves from 2004 to 2009 and had normal preoperative systolic function. EOAi PPM was severe if EOAi was ≤ 0.60 cm(2)/m(2), moderate if EOAi was 0.60 to 0.85 cm(2)/m(2), and absent (none) if EOAi was ≥ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2). ASE PPM was severe in 22 (3.6%), moderate in 6 (1%), and absent (none) in 586 (95.4%). ASE PPM was similar to manufacturer-provided PPM (P=1.00). ASE PPM differed significantly from EOAi PPM (P<0.001), which identified severe mismatch in 170 (29.7%), moderate in 191 (33.4%), and absent (none) in 211 patients (36.9%). Irrespective of the PPM classification method, PPM did not adversely affect midterm survival (average follow-up, 4.1 ± 1.8 years; median, 3.9 years; range, 0.01-8 years). There were no reoperations for PPM. In patients with normal systolic function undergoing bovine pericardial aortic valve replacement, the prevalence of PPM using the algorithmic-ASE approach was low and correlated well with manufacturer-provided PPM. Independent of the method of PPM assessment, PPM was not associated with medium-term mortality.

  6. Effects of sub-seabed CO2 leakage: Short- and medium-term responses of benthic macrofaunal assemblages.

    Amaro, T; Bertocci, I; Queiros, A M; Rastelli, E; Borgersen, G; Brkljacic, M; Nunes, J; Sorensen, K; Danovaro, R; Widdicombe, S

    2018-03-01

    The continued rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) levels is driving climate change and temperature shifts at a global scale. CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies have been suggested as a feasible option for reducing CO 2 emissions and mitigating their effects. However, before CCS can be employed at an industrial scale, any environmental risks associated with this activity should be identified and quantified. Significant leakage of CO 2 from CCS reservoirs and pipelines is considered to be unlikely, however direct and/or indirect effects of CO 2 leakage on marine life and ecosystem functioning must be assessed, with particular consideration given to spatial (e.g. distance from the source) and temporal (e.g. duration) scales at which leakage impacts could occur. In the current mesocosm experiment we tested the potential effects of CO 2 leakage on macrobenthic assemblages by exposing infaunal sediment communities to different levels of CO 2 concentration (400, 1000, 2000, 10,000 and 20,000 ppm CO 2 ), simulating a gradient of distance from a hypothetic leakage, over short-term (a few weeks) and medium-term (several months). A significant impact on community structure, abundance and species richness of macrofauna was observed in the short-term exposure. Individual taxa showed idiosyncratic responses to acidification. We conclude that the main impact of CO 2 leakage on macrofaunal assemblages occurs almost exclusively at the higher CO 2 concentration and over short time periods, tending to fade and disappear at increasing distance and exposure time. Although under the cautious perspective required by the possible context-dependency of the present findings, this study contributes to the cost-benefit analysis (environmental risk versus the achievement of the intended objectives) of CCS strategies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of diuron in a rat mammary two-stage carcinogenesis model.

    Grassi, Tony Fernando; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Barbisan, Luís Fernando

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the herbicide Diuron in a two-stage rat medium-term mammary carcinogenesis model initiated by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Female seven-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were allocated to six groups: groups G1 to G4 received intragastrically (i.g.) a single 50 mg/kg dose of DMBA; groups G5 and G6 received single administration of canola oil (vehicle of DMBA). Groups G1 and G5 received a basal diet, and groups G2, G3, G4, and G6 were fed the basal diet with the addition of Diuron at 250, 1250, 2500, and 2500 ppm, respectively. After twenty-five weeks, the animals were euthanized and mammary tumors were histologically confirmed and quantified. Tumor samples were also processed for immunohistochemical evaluation of the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cleaved caspase-3, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), p63, bcl-2, and bak. Diuron treatment did not increase the incidence or multiplicity of mammary tumors (groups G2 to G4 versus Group G1). Also, exposure to Diuron did not alter tumor growth (cell proliferation and apoptosis indexes) or immunoreactivity to ER-α, p63 (myoephitelial marker), or bcl-2 and bak (apoptosis regulatory proteins). These findings indicate that Diuron does not have a promoting potential on mammary carcinogenesis in female SD rats initiated with DMBA.

  8. Altered DNA methylation: a secondary mechanism involved in carcinogenesis.

    Goodman, Jay I; Watson, Rebecca E

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on the role that DNA methylation plays in the regulation of normal and aberrant gene expression and on how, in a hypothesis-driven fashion, altered DNA methylation may be viewed as a secondary mechanism involved in carcinogenesis. Research aimed at discerning the mechanisms by which chemicals can transform normal cells into frank carcinomas has both theoretical and practical implications. Through an increased understanding of the mechanisms by which chemicals affect the carcinogenic process, we learn more about basic biology while, at the same time, providing the type of information required to make more rational safety assessment decisions concerning their actual potential to cause cancer under particular conditions of exposure. One key question is: does the mechanism of action of the chemical in question involve a secondary mechanism and, if so, what dose may be below its threshold?

  9. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    Waalkes, Michael P.; Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-01-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  10. Bacterionomics and vironomics in carcinogenesis

    Pratiwi Sudarmono

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Virus and bacteria are microbes which are very common cause human infection. Most of the bacterial infection can be eradicated by antibiotics and infection symptoms disappear. But for virus infection, once infected, the virus will persistently stay in the host, even undergo not only a lytic cycle but also integrated into host genome. Nowadays, at least 6 virus type are consistently related to human cancer, such as EBV,HPV,HTLV,HBV,HCV,HKSV, and the new one Merkel Virus (MCV. Although not every infected people will get cancer, but around 20% of the whole cancer in human are caused by viral oncogene. Class one oncogenic bacterial is Helicobacter pylori. Infection with this bacteria can cause persistent gastro duodenal inflammation which cause some alteration in gastric cell growth into transformation. Expression of Cag gene and Vac gene and some expression of OMP protein usually link to gastric cancer. Molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis for every virus which cause infection  is a very complex , which include several processes caused by cell transformation. Besides, other host and environmental factors are also play a significant role in cancer development. Some scientist put a Hallmark analysis as a model to quickly summarize what pathobiology process will happen and what gene or protein caused the process. The Hallmark analysis comprise of several process which may happen simultaneously because some of the Hallmark is caused by the same protein. The Hallmark consists of various virus strategies in oncogenesis such as promoting angiogenesis, avoiding immune destruction, genome instability and mutation, deregulating cellular energetic, resisting cell death, sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, enabling cellular immortality, promoting inflammation and activation metastasis. For example, infection by HPV, will cause low grade dysplasia which can continue to invasive cervical cancer. After host cell transformation, in

  11. Medium-term response of microbial community to rhizodeposits of white clover and ryegrass and tracing of active processes induced by 13C and 15N labelled exudates

    Kusliene, Gedrime; Rasmussen, Jim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    and actinomycetes was unaffected by plant species, but pool of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was greater under white clover at the 10 percent significance level. In the short term, microorganisms more actively utilised fresh exudates (13C-labelled) of ryegrass than of white clover. We expected ryegrass...... microbial groups in soil under white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following leaf-labelling with 13C-bicarbonate and 15N-urea. In this way microbial N and 15N and the composition of PLFAs reflect the medium-term (two months) response of microorganisms to rhizodeposits......, whereas the 13C-label of the PLFAs reflects the short-term (one week) utilisation of root exudates following labelling of shoots. In the medium term, microbial biomass N and 15N were greater under the ryegrass, whereas total PLFA was higher under white clover. The relative abundance of fungi...

  12. Diet, lifestyle, and molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis

    Diergaarde, B.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors have been repeatedly implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, and much is known about the molecular events involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The relationships between environmental risk factors and the molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis are

  13. Chemical and Petrochemical Sector

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This publication is a background document on the global chemical and petrochemical sector for the IEA publication Energy Technology Transitions in Industry (IEA, 2009). It provides further, more detailed information on the methodology and data issues for energy efficiency indicators for the sector. The indicators discussed offer insight regarding the energy efficiency improvement potential in the short- to medium-term (by proven technologies).

  14. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    1980-01-01

    The special listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; Experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  15. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  16. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides

  17. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    Setlow, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  18. In vitro studies of human lung carcinogenesis.

    Harris, C C; Lechner, J F; Yoakum, G H; Amstad, P; Korba, B E; Gabrielson, E; Grafstrom, R; Shamsuddin, A; Trump, B F

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the methodology to culture normal human lung cells have provided opportunities to investigate fundamental problems in biomedical research, including the mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis. Using the strategy schematically shown in Figure 1, we have initiated studies of the effects of carcinogens on the normal progenitor cells of the human cancers caused by these carcinogens. Extended lifespans and aneuploidy were found after exposure of mesothelial cells to asbestos and bronchial epithelial cells to nickel sulfate. These abnormal cells may be considered to be preneoplastic and at an intermediate position in the multistage process of carcinogenesis. Human bronchial epithelial cells can also be employed to investigate the role of specific oncogenes in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Using the protoplast fusion method for high frequency gene transfection, vHa-ras oncogene initiates a cascade of events in the normal human bronchial cells leading to their apparent immortality, aneuploidy, and tumorigenicity in athymic nude mice. These results suggest that oncogenes may play an important role in human carcinogenesis.

  19. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity. It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation

  20. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation using a single double-button device: Medium-term clinical and radiological outcomes.

    Issa, S-P; Payan, C; Le Hanneur, M; Loriaut, P; Boyer, P

    2018-02-01

    Double-button devices for endoscopic management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACJD) provide satisfactory short-term functional and radiological results. However, little exists in the literature regarding the long- and medium-term results of these implants, especially regarding the evolution of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). Satisfactory and steady long- and medium-term outcomes can be achieved in patients with acute ACJD undergoing endoscopically assisted ACJ repair using a single double-button device. A retrospective single-center study was conducted in patients with acute Rockwood III and IV ACJD treated endoscopically with a single double-button device from October 2008 to October 2010, allowing a minimum 5-year follow-up. Functional evaluation used Constant and Quick-DASH scores. Clinical evidence of dislocation recurrence was combined with bilateral Zanca views to assess coracoclavicular distance. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis was evaluated on the Paxinos test and Zanca views. Nineteen of the 25 operated patients were seen at a mean 76.9±8.5 months' follow-up. Mean age was 34.4±8.3 years. Mean Constant and Quick-DASH scores were 96.2±5.1 and 0.9±1.6 points, respectively. Four patients had a recurrence of their initial dislocation, 3 of whom had positive Paxinos test, whereas the 15 patients without recurrence had a negative test (p=0.004). Five patients had radiological evidence of ACJ osteoarthritis: all 4 patients with recurrence and 1 without (p=0.001). Long- and medium-term radioclinical outcome of endoscopically assisted management of acute ACJD using a single double-button device seems to be satisfactory and steady over time. Recurrence of the initial dislocation appears to be related to onset of degenerative ACJ arthropathy. Therapeutic type IV-Retrospective case series. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Tissue misrepair hypothesis for radiation carcinogenesis

    Kondo, Sohei

    1991-01-01

    Dose-response curves for chronic leukemia in A-bomb survivors and liver tumors in patients given Thorotrast (colloidal thorium dioxide) show large threshold effects. The existence of these threshold effects can be explained by the following hypothesis. A high dose of radiation causes a persistent wound in a cellrenewable tissue. Disorder of the injured cell society partly frees the component cells from territorial restraints on their proliferation, enabling them to continue development of their cellular functions toward advanced autonomy. This progression might be achieved by continued epigenetic and genetic changes as a result of occasional errors in the otherwise concerted healing action of various endogeneous factors recruited for tissue repair. Carcinogenesis is not simply a single-cell problem but a cell-society problem. Therefore, it is not warranted to estimate risk at low doses by linear extrapolation from cancer data at high doses without knowledge of the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. (author) 57 refs

  2. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    1978-01-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) program of the National Cancer Institute. Each listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The descriptions are provided by cancer scientists in about 50 different countries. Research areas covered in this listing are: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  4. Time and dose in carcinogenesis

    Mayneord, W.V.; Clarke, R.H.

    1978-05-01

    Previous work on the implications of different forms of dose response relationships is extended to include time as a variable, not only in time of irradiation but also in the time of appearance of effects following irradiation. The forms of relationships for time distribution of tumours revealed experimentally for both radiation and chemical carcinogens are first considered. It appears that much data may be correlated in terms of a log-normal distribution of tumour yield following the insult. Further, it is noted, that there is evidence that the median time of tumour appearance may be a function of total dose received or even of dose rate for protracted exposure. Using numerical values of these parameters derived from the biological literature speculative studies have been made of the effects on dose response relationships of using a time distribution of tumour yield, considering both uniform irradiation and point sources. In addition the effects of using dose rate rather than dose to define the log-normal distribution to tumour appearance have been investigated. It is assumed that biological response is directly proportional to dose but that effect is distributed in time. From this linear assumption the appearance of non-linear dose response relationships and apparent thresholds are continually seen. Finally, both the importance of attempting analyses of biological data in terms of stochastic concepts and the need for biological data to test our hypotheses is emphasised. (author)

  5. Genetic alterations during radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    Kodama, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews radiation-induced genetic alterations and its carcinogenesis, focusing on the previous in vitro assay outcome. A colony formation assay using Syrian hamster fetal cells and focus formation assay using mouse C3H10T1/2 cells are currently available to find malignant transformation of cells. Such in vitro assays has proposed the hypothesis that radiation-induced carcinogenesis arises from at least two-stage processes; i.e., that an early step induced by irradiation plays an important role in promoting the potential to cause the subsequent mutation. A type of genetic instability induced by radiation results in a persistently elevated frequency of spontaneous mutations, so-called the phenomenon of delayed reproductive death. One possible mechanism by which genetic instability arises has been shown to be due to the development of abnormality in the gene group involved in the maintenance mechanism of genome stability. Another possibility has also been shown to stem from the loss of telomere (the extremities of a chromosome). The importance of search for radiation-induced genetic instability is emphasized in view of the elucidation of carcinogenesis. (N.K.)

  6. Prevention of mammary carcinogenesis by short-term estrogen and progestin treatments

    Rajkumar, Lakshmanaswamy; Guzman, Raphael C; Yang, Jason; Thordarson, Gudmundur; Talamantes, Frank; Nandi, Satyabrata

    2004-01-01

    Women who have undergone a full-term pregnancy before the age of 20 have one-half the risk of developing breast cancer compared with women who have never gone through a full-term pregnancy. This protective effect is observed universally among women of all ethnic groups. Parity in rats and mice also protects them against chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. Seven-week-old virgin Lewis rats were given N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Two weeks later the rats were treated with natural or synthetic estrogens and progestins for 7–21 days by subcutaneous implantation of silastic capsules. In our current experiment, we demonstrate that short-term sustained exposure to natural or synthetic estrogens along with progestins is effective in preventing mammary carcinogenesis in rats. Treatment with 30 mg estriol plus 30 mg progesterone for 3 weeks significantly reduced the incidence of mammary cancer. Short-term exposure to ethynyl estradiol plus megesterol acetate or norethindrone was effective in decreasing the incidence of mammary cancers. Tamoxifen plus progesterone treatment for 3 weeks was able to confer only a transient protection from mammary carcinogenesis, while 2-methoxy estradiol plus progesterone was effective in conferring protection against mammary cancers. The data obtained in the present study demonstrate that, in nulliparous rats, long-term protection against mammary carcinogenesis can be achieved by short-term treatments with natural or synthetic estrogen and progesterone combinations

  7. Effects of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter on the short and medium-term prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Cui Kejian; Gu Shuiming; Ding Yueyou; Zheng Hongchao; Zhang Yachen; Li Yigang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influnce of atrial fibrillation(AF)/atrial flutter on the mortality and prognosis of patients with AMI. Methods: A total of 297 consecutive patients were studied from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2005 and were categorized into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of AF/atrial flutter. The 30 d and 6 mo mortalities, Killip Grades, cardiogenic shock, arrhythmia and left ventricular ejectory functional (LVEF) 6 months after AMI with Doppler US between the 2 groups were compared. Results: The incidence of AF/atrial fluttler was 12.5% with older age, higher Killip Gorade, higher CPK peak, higher rates of previous myocardial infarction and multivascular involvement than those without AF/ atrial flutter. The short and medium-term mortalities in AF/atriat flutter group were both significantly higher than those of non-AF/atrial flutter group (P<0.05). Conclusions: The short and medium-term mortalities increase obviously in AMI complicated with AF/atrial flutter, probably related to the severity of atherosclerosis. (authors)

  8. The scientific basis for the establishment of threshold levels and dose response relationships of carcinogenesis

    1975-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency hosted a two day Symposium from 2-3 December 1974 at its Headquarters, organized by the 'International Academy for Environmental Safety and the Forum fur Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Politik' on the subject 'Scientific Basis for the Establishment of Threshold. Levels and Dose Response Relationships of Carcinogenesis'. Following an introductory paper by the Radiation Biology Section of the Agency on 'Radiation Carcinogenesis - Dose Response Relationship, Threshold and Risk Estimates', a series of papers dealt with this problem in chemical carcinogenesis.It was suggested that more experiments should be done using non-human primates for tests of carcinogens, especially chemicals. Preliminary experiments using monkeys with a potent carcinogen - nitrosoamine - indicate that there could possibly be a dose where no effect can be observed during the 5 year period of study. It was also pointed out that the overall cost/benefit and risk/ benefit relationships should be taken into consideration in determining limits for chemicals which are potentially carcinogenic but are used routinely by the public and industries; these considerations have been weighed in setting exposure limits for radiation

  9. Interaction Between Dietary Factors and Inflammation in Prostate Carcinogenesis

    De Marzo, Angelo M

    2007-01-01

    We are investigating whether inflammation can enhance prostate carcinogenesis in a rat model of dietary charred meat carcinogen induced cancers, and, whether antioxidant and other chemopreventative...

  10. Interactions between Dietary Factors and Inflammation in Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DeMarzo, Angelo M

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating whether inflammation can enhance prostate carcinogenesis in a rat model of dietary charred meat carcinogen induced cancers, and, whether antioxidant and other chemopreventative...

  11. Relevance of CCL3/CCR5 axis in oral carcinogenesis.

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Sobral, Lays Martin; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Russo, Remo Castro; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-08-01

    The chemokine CCL3 is a chemotactic cytokine crucial for inflammatory cell recruitment in homeostatic and pathological conditions. CCL3 might stimulate cancer progression by promoting leukocyte accumulation, angiogenesis and tumour growth. The expression of CCL3 and its receptors CCR1 and CCR5 was demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but their role was not defined. Here, the functions of CCL3 were assessed using a model of chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Lineages of OSCC were used to analyse the effects of CCL3 in vitro . The 4NQO-induced lesions exhibited increased expression of CCL3, CCR1 and CCR5. CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice presented reduced incidence of tongue tumours compared to wild-type (WT) and CCR1 -/- mice. Consistently, attenuated cytomorphological atypia and reduced cell proliferation were observed in lesions of CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice. OSCC from CCL3 -/- mice exhibited lower infiltration of eosinophils and reduced expression of Egf, Fgf1, Tgf-β1, Vegfa, Vegfb, Itga-4, Vtn, Mmp-1a, Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 than WT mice. In vitro , CCL3 induced invasion and production of CCL5, IL-6, MMP -2, -8, -9. Blockage of CCL3 in vitro using α-CCL3 or Evasin-1 (a CCL3-binding protein) impaired tumour cell invasion. In conclusion, CCL3/CCR5 axis has pro-tumourigenic effects in oral carcinogenesis. The induction of inflammatory and angiogenic pathways and eosinophils recruitment appear to be the underlying mechanism explaining these effects. These data reveal potential protective effects of CCL3 blockade in oral cancer.

  12. Application of evolutionary games to modeling carcinogenesis.

    Swierniak, Andrzej; Krzeslak, Michal

    2013-06-01

    We review a quite large volume of literature concerning mathematical modelling of processes related to carcinogenesis and the growth of cancer cell populations based on the theory of evolutionary games. This review, although partly idiosyncratic, covers such major areas of cancer-related phenomena as production of cytotoxins, avoidance of apoptosis, production of growth factors, motility and invasion, and intra- and extracellular signaling. We discuss the results of other authors and append to them some additional results of our own simulations dealing with the possible dynamics and/or spatial distribution of the processes discussed.

  13. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis prevention by flavonoids

    G. A. Belitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of anticancerogenic effects of flavanoids and isocyanates from the plants widely consumed in the midland belt of Russia were reviewed. Data of studies both in vitro and in vivo were analyzed. Special attention was paid to inhibition of targets responsible for carcinogen metabolic activation, carcinogenesis promotion and tumor progression as well as neoangiogenesis. Besides that the antioxidant properties of flavonoids and their effects on cell cycle regulation, apoptosis initiation and cell mobility were considered.

  14. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 2. Medium term extracorporeal circulation without and with extracorporeal irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Medium term (6-8 h) extracorporeal irradiation without and with irradiation of blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs to reveal the changes of blood leukocytes including CFU-C. A regular but transitory decrease of granulocytes and a longer lasting diminution of lymphocytes in the blood were observed. The CFU-C level became and mostly remained very low during the procedure. Splenectomy did not influence significantly the changes of peripheral leukocyte counts. No marked difference of leukocytes was seen in the blood samples taken from the arterial or venous side of the shunt or even from the cubital vein. Also, the irradiation did not produce any difference in the alterations of blood cell counts compared to those without irradiation. The possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  15. Changes in the host lymphocyte subsets during chemical carcinogenesis

    Brodt, P.; Lala, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in small lymphocyte subsets in the lymphoid organs of young C3H mice were studied following i.m. injection of a carcinogenic dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (mc). Using monoclonal anti-Lyt antibodies and a sandwich radiolabeling method with 125 I-labeled rabbit anti-mouse Immunoglobulin, the lymphocyte subpopulations in the thymus, spleen, and draining lymph node were examined by radioautography. During the fifth week following the administration of the carcinogen a sharp decrease in the level of Ly-1,2+ small lymphocyte population in the thymus was noted which coincided with a considerable increase (10-fold) in the Ly-2+. During the same period, a similar increase in the Ly-2+ population was also observed in the draining. The high levels of Ly-2+ cells lasted for more than 4 weeks in the thymus while, in the draining node, they lasted for 2 weeks and dropped to normal levels (0 to 2%) simultaneously with the appearance of tumor cells identified in histological preparations. These systemic increases coincided with the appearance of macroscopic tumor nodules. The mixed lymphocyte reaction response of the draining node cells, but not of the spleen, was suppressed during the period of increased level of Ly-2+ cells. Furthermore, during this period, s.c. transplantation of a syngeneic mammary tumor in the same leg resulted in enhanced local growth as well as metastatic spread of the tumor to the lungs in mc treated mice. These findings suggest that a localized immunosuppression associated with the rise in the Ly-2+ cells may be of functional significance during carcinogen-induced tumor development

  16. The challenges of long-term ecological research in springs in the northern and southern Alps: indicator groups, habitat diversity, and medium-term change

    Sofia WIEDENBRUG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available After extensive exploratory investigations into crenic habitats at the beginning of the 1990s, a number of springs were selected and long-term ecological research programmes independently initiated in the Berchtesgaden National Park (north-eastern Alps, Bavaria and the Adamello-Brenta Nature Park (south-eastern Alps, Trentino. Following more than a decade of standardized work, this paper presents a selection of results from both sides of the Alps, with a focus on zoobenthos in Bavaria and on pro- and eukaryotic algae in Trentino. In order to test the assumption that permanent springs are particularly suitable habitats for long-term ecological research, the following topics are addressed: (1 taxonomic diversity and relationships between diversity and spring typology; (2 transverse gradients in crenic habitats, hygrophilous terrestrial invertebrates and xerotolerant algae; (3 possibilities of documenting changes in species composition over decadal time scales ("medium-term" based on emergence traps, benthos, and benthic algae. The data obtained show that: (1 crenic habitats support particularly high biological diversity (but a thorough documentation of insect diversity is impossible without emergence studies; (2 helocrenes are the most species-rich habitats, for both invertebrates and diatoms; (3 dynamic (unstable and occasionally-impacted springs show identifiable signs of medium-term change, whilst particularly complex and stable crenic habitats seem to be controlled by internal processes. Our results suggest that: (1 the meiofauna is likely to react directly to environmental change, while emergers and the hygrophilous terrestrial fauna are indirectly affected, and (2 diatoms react both to direct effects of environmental change, e.g. discharge and hydrochemistry, and to indirect effects on the surroundings of the spring. Based on our results, long-term research strategies are discussed. For long-term studies, we propose a focus on meiofauna and

  17. [Clinical characteristics and medium-term prognosis of patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function. Do they differ in systolic dysfunction?].

    Ojeda, Soledad; Anguita, Manuel; Muñoz, Juan F; Rodríguez, Marcos T; Mesa, Dolores; Franco, Manuel; Ureña, Isabel; Vallés, Federico

    2003-11-01

    To assess the prevalence, clinical profile and medium-term prognosis in patients with heart failure and preserved systolic ventricular function compared to those with systolic dysfunction. 153 patients were included, 62 with preserved systolic ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction > or = 45%) and 91 with impaired systolic ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction < 45%). The mean follow-up period was 25 10 months. Mean age was similar (66 10 vs. 65 10; p = 0.54). There was a higher proportion of women among patients with preserved systolic function (53% vs. 28%; p < 0.01). Ischemic and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common causes of heart failure in patients with systolic dysfunction, whereas valvular disease and hypertensive cardiopathy were the most common in patients with preserved systolic function. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were more often prescribed in patients with impaired systolic ventricular function (86% vs. 52%; p < 0.01 and 33% vs. 11%; p < 0.01, respectively). There were no differences between the groups in terms of mortality rate (37% vs. 29%), readmission rate for other causes (29% vs. 23%), readmission rate for heart failure (45% vs. 45%), cumulative survival (51% vs. 62%) and the likelihood of not being readmitted for heart failure (50% vs. 52%). In the multivariate analysis, left ventricular ejection fraction was not a predictor of death or readmission because of heart failure. In a large proportion of patients with heart failure, systolic ventricular function is preserved. Despite the clinical differences between patients with preserved and impaired systolic ventricular function, the medium-term prognosis was similar in both groups.

  18. Medium-Term Stability of the Photon Beam Energy of An Elekta CompactTM Linear Accelerator Based on Daily Measurements of Beam Quality Factor

    Mohammad Amin Mosleh-Shirazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to assess the medium-term energy stability of a 6MV Elekta CompactTM linear accelerator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published article to evaluate this linear accelerator in terms of energy stability. As well as investigating the stability of the linear accelerator energy over a period of several weeks, the results will be useful for estimation of the required tolerance values for the beam quality factor (BQF of the PTW QUICKCHECK weblineTM (QCW daily checking device. Materials and Methods Over a 13 week period of routine clinical service, 52 daily readings of BQF were taken and then analyzed for a 10×10 cm2 field. Results No decreasing or increasing trend in BQF was observed over the study period. The mean BQF value was estimated at 5.4483 with a standard deviation (SD of 0.0459 (0.8%. The mean value was only 0.1% different from the baseline value. Conclusion The results of this medium-term stability study of the Elekta Compact linear accelerator energy showed that 96.2% of the observed BQF values were within ±1.3% of the baseline value. This can be considered to be within the recommended tolerance for linear accelerator photon beam energy. If an approach of applying ±3 SD is taken, the tolerance level for BQF may be suggested to be set at ±2.5%. However, further research is required to establish a relationship between BQF value and the actual changes in beam energy and penetrative quality.

  19. Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change

    Juha M. Alatalo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-term responses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years. The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both, different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity–diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant–plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the

  20. Curcumin: the spicy modulator of breast carcinogenesis.

    Banik, Urmila; Parasuraman, Subramani; Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2017-07-19

    Worldwide breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. For many years clinicians and the researchers are examining and exploring various therapeutic modalities for breast cancer. Yet the disease has remained unconquered and the quest for cure is still going on. Present-day strategy of breast cancer therapy and prevention is either combination of a number of drugs or a drug that modulates multiple targets. In this regard natural products are now becoming significant options. Curcumin exemplifies a promising natural anticancer agent for this purpose. This review primarily underscores the modulatory effect of curcumin on the cancer hallmarks. The focus is its anticancer effect in the complex pathways of breast carcinogenesis. Curcumin modulates breast carcinogenesis through its effect on cell cycle and proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, cancer spread and angiogenesis. Largely the NFkB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, MAPK and JAK/STAT are the key signaling pathways involved. The review also highlights the curcumin mediated modulation of tumor microenvironment, cancer immunity, breast cancer stem cells and cancer related miRNAs. Using curcumin as a therapeutic and preventive agent in breast cancer is perplexed by its diverse biological activity, much of which remains inexplicable. The information reviewed here should point toward potential scope of future curcumin research in breast cancer.

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis: Epidemiology and biological significance

    Boice, J.D.; Fraumeni, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of populations exposed to radiation have led to the identification of a preventable cause of cancer, but in the long run perhaps the most important contribution of radiation studies will be to provide insights into the basic processes of human carcinogenesis. In this volume, key investigators of major epidemiologic projects summarize their observations to date, including information to help assess the effects of low-level exposures. Experimentalists and theorists emphasize the relevance of laboratory and epidemiologic data in elucidating carcinogenic risks and mechanisms in man. This volume was prepared with several objectives in mind: (a) organize and synthesize knowledge on radiation carcinogenesis through epidemiologic and experimental approaches; (b) illustrate and explore ways of utilizing this information to gain insights into the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development; (c) stimulate the formation of hypotheses suited to experimental or epidemiologic testing, theoretical modeling, and multidisciplinary approaches; and (d) identify recent advances that clarify dose-response relationships and the influence of low-dose exposures, provide leads to carcinogenic mechanisms and host-environmental interactions, and suggest strategies for future research and preventive action

  2. Mast cells are dispensable for normal and activin-promoted wound healing and skin carcinogenesis.

    Antsiferova, Maria; Martin, Caroline; Huber, Marcel; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Förster, Anja; Hartmann, Karin; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Hohl, Daniel; Werner, Sabine

    2013-12-15

    The growth and differentiation factor activin A is a key regulator of tissue repair, inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis. However, the cellular targets, which mediate the different activin functions, are still largely unknown. In this study, we show that activin increases the number of mature mast cells in mouse skin in vivo. To determine the relevance of this finding for wound healing and skin carcinogenesis, we mated activin transgenic mice with CreMaster mice, which are characterized by Cre recombinase-mediated mast cell eradication. Using single- and double-mutant mice, we show that loss of mast cells neither affected the stimulatory effect of overexpressed activin on granulation tissue formation and reepithelialization of skin wounds nor its protumorigenic activity in a model of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. Furthermore, mast cell deficiency did not alter wounding-induced inflammation and new tissue formation or chemically induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis in mice with normal activin levels. These findings reveal that mast cells are not major targets of activin during wound healing and skin cancer development and also argue against nonredundant functions of mast cells in wound healing and skin carcinogenesis in general.

  3. Initiation-promotion skin carcinogenesis and immunological competence.

    Curtis, G L; Stenbäck, F; Ryan, W L

    1975-10-01

    The immune competence of mice during initiation-promotion skin carcinogenesis was determined by skin allograft rejection and lymphocyte mitogenesis. The carcinogen 7, 12-dimethylbenzanthracene inhibited the cellular immune competence of mice while lymphocytes from croton oil treated mice had enhanced PWM response. Chlorphenesin, a stimulator of cellular immunity, was found to inhibit tumorigenesis in initiation-promotion skin carcinogenesis when injected during promotion.

  4. CHEMICALS

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  5. Information dynamics in carcinogenesis and tumor growth.

    Gatenby, Robert A; Frieden, B Roy

    2004-12-21

    The storage and transmission of information is vital to the function of normal and transformed cells. We use methods from information theory and Monte Carlo theory to analyze the role of information in carcinogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that, during somatic evolution of the malignant phenotype, the accumulation of genomic mutations degrades intracellular information. However, the degradation is constrained by the Darwinian somatic ecology in which mutant clones proliferate only when the mutation confers a selective growth advantage. In that environment, genes that normally decrease cellular proliferation, such as tumor suppressor or differentiation genes, suffer maximum information degradation. Conversely, those that increase proliferation, such as oncogenes, are conserved or exhibit only gain of function mutations. These constraints shield most cellular populations from catastrophic mutator-induced loss of the transmembrane entropy gradient and, therefore, cell death. The dynamics of constrained information degradation during carcinogenesis cause the tumor genome to asymptotically approach a minimum information state that is manifested clinically as dedifferentiation and unconstrained proliferation. Extreme physical information (EPI) theory demonstrates that altered information flow from cancer cells to their environment will manifest in-vivo as power law tumor growth with an exponent of size 1.62. This prediction is based only on the assumption that tumor cells are at an absolute information minimum and are capable of "free field" growth that is, they are unconstrained by external biological parameters. The prediction agrees remarkably well with several studies demonstrating power law growth in small human breast cancers with an exponent of 1.72+/-0.24. This successful derivation of an analytic expression for cancer growth from EPI alone supports the conceptual model that carcinogenesis is a process of constrained information degradation and that malignant

  6. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis in mouse thymic lymphomas

    Kominami, Ryo; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen for various human tissues and a complete carcinogen that is able to initiate and promote neoplastic progression. Studies of radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas, one of the classic models in radiation carcinogenesis, demonstrated that even the unirradiated thymus is capable of developing into full malignancy when transplanted into the kidney capsule or subcutaneous tissue of irradiated mice. This suggests that radiation targets tissues other than thymocytes to allow expansion of cells with tumorigenic potential in the thymus. The idea is regarded as the ''indirect mechanism'' for tumor development. This paper reviews the indirect mechanism and genes affecting the development of thymic lymphomas that we have analyzed. One is the Bcl11b/Rit1 tumor suppressor gene and the other is Mtf-1 gene affecting tumor susceptibility. (author)

  8. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  9. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  10. Effect of complex polyphenols on colon carcinogenesis.

    Caderni, G; Remy, S; Cheynier, V; Morozzi, G; Dolara, P

    1999-06-01

    Complex polyphenols and tannins from wine (WCPT) are being considered increasingly as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, since epidemiological studies suggest that populations consuming a high amount of polyphenols in the diet may have a lower incidence of some types of cancer. We studied the effect of WCPT on a series of parameters related to colon carcinogenesis in rats. WCPT were administered to F344 rats at a dose of 14 or 57 mg/kg/d, mixed with the diet. The higher dose is about ten times the exposure to polyphenols of a moderate drinker of red wine. In rats treated with WCPT, we measured fecal bile acids and long chain fatty acids, colon mucosa cell proliferation, apoptosis and, after administration of colon carcinogens, the number and size of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and nuclear aberrations. Colon mucosa proliferation was not varied by chronic administration (90 d) of WCPT (14 or 57 mg/kg/d). The highest dose of WCPT decreased the number of cells in the colon crypts, but did not increase apoptosis. WCPT (57 mg/kg) administered before or after the administration of azoxymethane (AOM) did not vary the number or multiplicity of ACF in the colon. The number of nuclear aberrations (NA) in colon mucosa was studied after administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4,5-f)quinoline (IQ), colon-specific carcinogens which require metabolic activation. The effect of DMH and IQ was not varied by pre-feeding WCPT (57 mg/kg) for 10 d. Similarly, the levels of total, secondary bile acids and long chain fatty acids did not varied significantly in animals fed WCPT for 90 d. WCPT administration does not influence parameters related to colon carcinogenesis in the rat.

  11. High incidence of osteochondral lesions after open reduction and internal fixation of displaced ankle fractures: Medium-term follow-up of 100 cases.

    Regier, Marc; Petersen, Jan Philipp; Hamurcu, Ahmet; Vettorazzi, Eik; Behzadi, Cyrus; Hoffmann, Michael; Großterlinden, Lars G; Fensky, Florian; Klatte, Till Orla; Weiser, Lukas; Rueger, Johannes M; Spiro, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of osteochondral lesions (OCLs) in association with displaced ankle fractures has only been examined in two previous studies. In both studies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed prior to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Because MRI may overdiagnose or overestimate the extent of OCLs in an acute trauma setting the aim of this study was to determine the incidence of OCLs after ORIF of displaced ankle fractures using MRI at medium-term follow-up, and to analyse if the severity of fracture or the clinical outcome correlates with the incidence of OCLs. Following institutional review board approval a total of 100 patients (mean age, 41.3 years; range, 17.9-64.3 years) with a displaced ankle fracture who had undergone ORIF according to the AO principles were included in this study. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score was used to quantify the clinical outcome and MR images were evaluated for OCLs of the talus and distal tibia after a mean of 34.5 months (range, 17.5-54.1 months). OCLs were found in 40.4% of the patients. Logistic regression revealed a significant correlation between the severity of fracture and the incidence of OCLs. Patients with a trimalleolar fracture (p=0.04) or an ankle fracture dislocation (p=0.003) had a significantly higher risk for developing an OCL compared to those with a type B fracture. Logistic regression also demonstrated a significant correlation between the clinical outcome (AOFAS score) and the incidence of OCLs (p=0.01). The risk for developing an OCL increases up to 5.6% when the AOFAS score decreases by one point. OCLs were frequently found in association with acute ankle fractures at medium-term follow-up, and the severity of fracture was associated with an increased number of OCLs. Considering the disadvantages of MRI including the high cost and limited availability, the results of this study may help to explain why anatomic surgical realignment of displaced

  12. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment.

  13. Low Fat Loss Response after Medium-Term Supervised Exercise in Obese Is Associated with Exercise-Induced Increase in Food Reward

    Graham Finlayson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine exercise-induced changes in the reward value of food during medium-term supervised exercise in obese individuals. Subjects/Methods. The study was a 12-week supervised exercise intervention prescribed to expend 500 kcal/day, 5 d/week. 34 sedentary obese males and females were identified as responders (R or non-responders (NR to the intervention according to changes in body composition relative to measured energy expended during exercise. Food reward (ratings of liking and wanting, and relative preference by forced choice pairs for an array of food images was assessed before and after an acute exercise bout. Results. 20 responders and 14 non-responders were identified. R lost 5.2 kg ± 2.4 of total fat mass and NR lost 1.7 kg ± 1.4. After acute exercise, liking for all foods increased in NR compared to no change in R. Furthermore, NR showed an increase in wanting and relative preference for high-fat sweet foods. These differences were independent of 12-weeks regular exercise and weight loss. Conclusion. Individuals who showed an immediate post-exercise increase in liking and increased wanting and preference for high-fat sweet foods displayed a smaller reduction in fat mass with exercise. For some individuals, exercise increases the reward value of food and diminishes the impact of exercise on fat loss.

  14. A comparison of the medium-term impact and recovery of the Pakistan floods and the Haiti earthquake: objective and subjective measures.

    Weiss, William M; Kirsch, Thomas D; Doocy, Shannon; Perrin, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The 2010 Haiti earthquake and Pakistan floods were similar in their massive human impact. Although the specific events were very different, the humanitarian response to disasters is supposed to achieve the same ends. This paper contrasts the disaster effects and aims to contrast the medium-term response. In January 2011, similarly structured population-based surveys were carried out in the most affected areas using stratified cluster designs (80×20 in Pakistan and 60×20 in Haiti) with probability proportional to size sampling. Displacement persisted in Haiti and Pakistan at 53% and 39% of households, respectively. In Pakistan, 95% of households reported damage to their homes and loss of income or livelihoods, and in Haiti, the rates were 93% and 85%, respectively. Frequency of displacement, and income or livelihood loss, were significantly higher in Pakistan, whereas disaster-related deaths or injuries were significantly more prevalent in Haiti. Given the rise in disaster frequency and costs, and the volatility of humanitarian funding streams as a result of the recent global financial crisis, it is increasingly important to measure the impact of humanitarian response against the goal of a return to normalcy.

  15. The concept of oversight, its connection to memory keeping and its relevance for the medium term: The findings of the RK and M initiative

    Hotzel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The medium term was introduced as the period of indirect oversight after repository closure, with timescales in the order of a few hundred years. While the importance of intrinsic control or 'passive' safety features in the post-closure phase of a geological repository has been recognised and stressed before, the role of oversight, by providing the capability to reduce or avoid some exposures, has come to the fore only recently. Oversight for the time being generally refers to 'watchful care' and society 'keeping an eye' on the technical system and the actual implementation of plans and decisions. In some regulatory frameworks oversight is indirectly required, for instance when mandating the creation of a land exclusion zone. In other frameworks, oversight is directly required, as illustrated, for instance, by the long-term stewardship concept of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although sheer memory of the presence of the facility cannot be enough to constitute oversight, oversight and RK and M preservation do go hand in hand. For example, monitoring after repository closure fosters RK and M preservation, and vice versa. The presenter focused on terminology, potential oversight measures, and on roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders

  16. Recurrent somatic embryogenesis in long-term cultures of Gentiana lutea L. as a source for synthetic seed production for medium-term preservation

    Holobiuc Irina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to establish an efficient and reproducible system for producing synthetic seeds from recurrent somatic embryogenesis in long-term cultures of Gentiana lutea L. This species is a vulnerable medicinal plant, protected both at the national and international levels, and is included in different Red Lists and Books. In vitro culture, as an alternative to classical methods of preservation, allows for the cyclic multiplication of plant material and short-, medium- and long-term preservation of tissue collections. Biotechnological approaches allow for maintenance of the plant material in a confined space and protection against biotic and abiotic factors. Somatic embryogenesis (SE is the most efficient way to regenerate plants, ensuring material for preservation and fundamental research. In our experiment, recurrent somatic embryogenesis was developed in long-term cultures in the presence of sugar alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol and in the absence of growth factors. This process proceeded at a high rate, with adventive somatic embryos being generated in a continuous process, followed by maturation, germination and development into plants. To follow the somatic embryogenesis process, histological samples were made. We used these embryogenic cultures for synthetic seed production and medium-term conservation. The viability of somatic embryos after moderate osmotic stress treatment was tested using TTC. Our methodology relied on the induction of somatic embryogenesis in the presence of auxins in the first cycle of in vitro cultures, long-term high embryogenic culture maintenance in the presence of sugar alcohols and synthetic seed production.

  17. Short- and medium-term effects of experimental nitrogen fertilization on arthropods associated with Calluna vulgaris heathlands in north-west Spain

    Cuesta, D.; Taboada, A.; Calvo, L.; Salgado, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the short- and medium-term effects of experimental nitrogen fertilization (3 and 15 months after the treatment) on the arthropods of Calluna vulgaris heathlands in NW Spain. Three heathland sites were selected with two permanent plots per site: control and fertilized. Ammonium nitrate fertilizer (56 kg N ha -1 yr -1 ) was applied monthly and insects were caught using pitfall traps. We found mainly species-level responses to nitrogen addition. Seven species (e.g. Lochmaea suturalis) showed a consistent trend (benefited or harmed) in both periods and were proposed as possible reliable indicators of the effects of nitrogen deposition in these ecosystems. We also found variable arthropod trophic-group responses: (a) herbivores (leaf beetles, true bugs) increased in abundance on a short-term scale; (b) predators (carabid beetles, true bugs) showed opposite and less clear responses in both periods. Further long-term studies are needed to determine the mechanisms underlying the observed arthropod responses. - We observed consistent species-level and variable trophic-group responses to nitrogen addition in one of the southern-most locations for Calluna vulgaris heathlands within Europe

  18. Trapezoidal osteochondral autologous plug singleblock graft for treating chondral lesions of the knee: clinical and functional medium-term results in an observational study

    Cezar Teruyuki Kawano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and functional results of autologous trapezoidal plug single-block grafts fixed with absorbable chondral darts in patients with osteochondral knee lesions of varying sizes. METHODS: Twenty-five patients underwent surgery from February 2000 to June 2008. Seventy-two percent of the patients were male, and the mean age was 29 years. RESULTS: The right side (56% and the medial condyle (92% were most affected. The lesions had an average area of 5.28 cm², and the mean follow-up was 59 months. All of the variables other than instability showed significant improvements (p<0.05, as shown by the increase in the mean Lysholm score from 55 points preoperatively to 92 points (p<0.001 postoperatively. There was no loosening or collapse of the osteochondral graft. All of the patients had patellofemoral crepitation and pain for an average of six months. CONCLUSION: Autologous trapezoidal plug single-block grafts are a therapeutic option for defects of varying sizes and provide good clinical results and low morbidity at the donor site in the medium term.

  19. Effects of Medium-Term Amendment with Diversely Processed Sewage Sludge on Soil Humification—Mineralization Processes and on Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn Bioavailability

    Gabriella Rossi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic fraction of sewage sludge administered to agricultural soil can contribute to slowing down the loss of soil’s organic carbon and, in some cases, can improve the physical and mechanical properties of the soil. One of the main constraints to the agricultural use of sewage sludge is its heavy metals content. In the long term, agricultural administration of sewage sludge to soil could enhance the concentration of soil heavy metals (as total and bioavailable fractions. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of medium-term fertilization with diversely processed sewage sludge on the soil’s organic carbon content and humification–mineralization processes, on the physical–mechanical properties of soil and their influence on the pool of potentially bioavailable heavy metals, in order to assess their effectiveness as soil organic amendments. After eight years of sludge administration; an increase in the concentrations of bioavailable form was evidenced in all the heavy metals analyzed; independently of the type of sludge administered. The form of sludge administration (liquid, dehydrated, composted has differently influenced the soil humification–mineralization processes and the physical–mechanical properties of soil. The prolonged amendment with composted sewage sludge contributed to keeping the soil humification–mineralization process in equilibrium and to improving the physical and mechanical qualities of the treated soil.

  20. The medium-term effects of diadynamic currents in chronic low back pain; TENS versus diadynamic currents: A randomised, follow-up study.

    Sayilir, Selcuk; Yildizgoren, Mustafa Turgut

    2017-11-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the medium-term effects of diadynamic (DD) currents on relieving symptoms/improving physical functionality in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) and to compare the efficacy of DD versus TENS. The patients were divided into two groups as the TENS group (n = 26) and the DD group (n = 29). Additional treatment of hot pack + therapeutic ultrasound was applied to all patients. The therapy programs were administered as a total of 10 sessions over a period of 2 weeks. Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) values were recorded. Both groups showed significant improvements in VAS and RDQ scores after one month of the therapies (all p TENS and DD currents in chronic LBP can lead to reduced pain, and improved physical functions. Hence, DD currents can be used as an adjuvant therapy for rehabilitation of chronic LBP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development Framework for Agro-Based Industries in Secondary Cities of Sindh Province, Pakistan: SWOT Analysis of Ten-Year Perspective and Medium-Term Development Framework Plans

    Saima Kalwar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study intended to explore planning strategies gaps in ten-year perspective and medium-term development framework plans for agro-based industrial development in secondary cities of Sindh Province, Pakistan. Document review and key informant interviews survey techniques were used for data collection. A total of 30 interviews were conducted from agro-based officials. The SWOT analysis technique was applied for data analysis. The results revealed the weaknesses of high priority for textile and sugar industries, lack of planning strategies for agro-based development in secondary cities, dependency on federal government for development funds and absence of finances to implement plans. The threats were unavailability of strategic agro-based infrastructure facilities in secondary cities, centralized planning system, cross border threats such as the war in Afghanistan and migration of Afghan refugees, weak law and order situation and diversion of development budget for defense activities. The study suggests decentralization of powers and robust planning strategies in the development plans to strengthen secondary cities of Sindh Province economically.

  2. [Viability of 7 kinds of medicinal plant seeds stored in medium-term gene bank of the National Medicinal Plant Gene Bank].

    Jin, Yue; Yang, Cheng-Min; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate seed viability of Platycodon grandiflorum, Schizonepeta tenuifolia, Andrographis paniculat, Codonopsis pilosula, Scutellaria baicalensis, Leonurus japonicus, Rabdosia rubescens, stored in the medium-term gene bank of the National Medicinal Plant Gene Bank for 4 years, we tested seed germination rate of 7 species of medicinal plant and analyzed the change of significance of levels of the germination rate in pre and post store. Seed germination rates of 7 species of medicinal plants were all decreased after 4 years, and the decrease of S. tenuifolia and S. baicalensis germination rates were much smaller than other species. The higher initial germination rate of P. grandiflorum, C. pilosula, R. rubescens seed has the smaller decline of germination rate, but the data of A. paniculata showed the opposite trend. The rate decline of the germination of S. tenuifolia and S. baicalensis was roughly the same in different germination rate interval. The results showed that low temperature storage could effectively prolong the seed longevity, and maintain the seed vigor. Moreover, it is necessary to study on the storage characteristics of the main medicinal plant seeds, and establish the monitoring plan and regeneration standard. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. Lineage fate of ductular reactions in liver injury and carcinogenesis.

    Jörs, Simone; Jeliazkova, Petia; Ringelhan, Marc; Thalhammer, Julian; Dürl, Stephanie; Ferrer, Jorge; Sander, Maike; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schmid, Roland M; Siveke, Jens T; Geisler, Fabian

    2015-06-01

    Ductular reactions (DRs) are observed in virtually all forms of human liver disease; however, the histogenesis and function of DRs in liver injury are not entirely understood. It is widely believed that DRs contain bipotential liver progenitor cells (LPCs) that serve as an emergency cell pool to regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes and may eventually give rise to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we used a murine model that allows highly efficient and specific lineage labeling of the biliary compartment to analyze the histogenesis of DRs and their potential contribution to liver regeneration and carcinogenesis. In multiple experimental and genetic liver injury models, biliary cells were the predominant precursors of DRs but lacked substantial capacity to produce new hepatocytes, even when liver injuries were prolonged up to 12 months. Genetic modulation of NOTCH and/or WNT/β-catenin signaling within lineage-tagged DRs impaired DR expansion but failed to redirect DRs from biliary differentiation toward the hepatocyte lineage. Further, lineage-labeled DRs did not produce tumors in genetic and chemical HCC mouse models. In summary, we found no evidence in our system to support mouse biliary-derived DRs as an LPC pool to replenish hepatocytes in a quantitatively relevant way in injury or evidence that DRs give rise to HCCs.

  4. In vivo cell kinetics in breast carcinogenesis

    Bai, Maria; Agnantis, Niki J; Kamina, Sevasti; Demou, Asimina; Zagorianakou, Panayiota; Katsaraki, Aphroditi; Kanavaros, Panayiotis

    2001-01-01

    Disruption of the balance between apoptosis and proliferation is considered to be an important factor in the development and progression of tumours. In the present study we determined the in vivo cell kinetics along the spectrum of apparently normal epithelium, hyperplasia, preinvasive lesions and invasive carcinoma, in breast tissues affected by fibrocystic changes in which preinvasive and/or invasive lesions developed, as a model of breast carcinogenesis. A total of 32 areas of apparently normal epithelium and 135 ductal proliferative and neoplastic lesions were studied. More than one epithelial lesion per case were analyzed. The apoptotic index (AI) and the proliferative index (PI) were expressed as the percentage of TdT-mediated dUTP-nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively. The PI/AI (P/A index) was calculated for each case. The AIs and PIs were significantly higher in hyperplasia than in apparently normal epithelium (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0005, respectively), in atypical hyperplasia than in hyperplasia (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively) and in invasive carcinoma than in in situ carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The two indices were similar in atypical hyperplasia and in in situ carcinoma. The P/A index increased significantly from normal epithelium to hyperplasia (P = 0.01) and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma (P = 0.04) whereas it was decreased (non-significantly) from hyperplasia to preinvasive lesions. A strong positive correlation between the AIs and the PIs was found (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). These findings suggest accelerating cell turnover along the continuum of breast carcinogenesis. Atypical hyperplasias and in situ carcinomas might be kinetically similar lesions. In the transition from normal epithelium to hyperplasia and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma the net growth of epithelial cells results from a growth imbalance in favour of proliferation. In the transition from hyperplasia

  5. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  6. Effect of Dendrobium officinale Extraction on Gastric Carcinogenesis in Rats

    Yi Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrobium officinale (Tie Pi Shi Hu in Chinese has been widely used to treat different diseases in China. Anticancer effect is one of the important effects of Dendrobium officinale. However, the molecular mechanism of its anticancer effect remains unclear. In the present study, gastric carcinogenesis in rats was used to evaluate the effect of Dendrobium officinale on cancer, and its pharmacological mechanism was explored. Dendrobium officinale extracts (4.8 and 2.4 g/kg were orally administered to the rats of the gastric carcinogenesis model. Compared with the cancer model group, the high dose of Dendrobium officinale extracts significantly inhibited the rate of carcinogenesis. Further analysis revealed that Dendrobium officinale extracts could regulate the DNA damage, oxidative stress, and cytokines related with carcinogenesis and induce cell apoptosis in order to prevent gastric cancer.

  7. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  8. Horseradish extract promotes urinary bladder carcinogenesis when administered to F344 rats in drinking water.

    Cho, Young-Man; Hasumura, Mai; Imai, Toshio; Takami, Shigeaki; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2017-07-01

    Horseradish extract (HRE), consisting mainly of a mixture of allyl isothiocyanate and other isothiocyanates, has been used as a food additive. To evaluate the potential hazards of HRE, a 104-week chronic study, a 2-week analysis of cell proliferation in the urinary bladder and a medium-term promotion bioassay of HRE were conducted with administration at concentrations of up to 0.04% HRE in the drinking water to male F344 rats. In the 104-week chronic study with 32 male rats per group, no treatment-related increases in the incidences of neoplastic lesions in any organ, including urinary bladder, were observed, except for simple hyperplasia in the urinary bladder in rats treated with HRE at concentrations of more than 0.01% (5.0 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ). In the promotion study, HRE treatment after N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine initiation caused a clear increase in papillary or nodular hyperplasia, papilloma, and urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in the groups given HRE for 13 weeks at doses higher than 0.005%, 0.01%, and 0.04% (2.7, 5.4 and 20.5 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ), respectively. In the 2-week cell proliferation analysis, treatment with HRE at concentrations greater than 0.005% (3.9 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ) caused transient increases in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling indices in the urothelium. Although clear tumor induction was not observed, administration of relatively low-dose HRE increased cell proliferation in the urothelium and exerted obvious promoting effects on rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mode of action of HRE in the rat urinary bladder to facilitate data extrapolation from the present study and provide insights into risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Successful return to sports in athletes following non-operative management of acute isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries: medium-term follow-up.

    Agolley, D; Gabr, A; Benjamin-Laing, H; Haddad, F S

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of the non-operative treatment of high-grade posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries, particularly Hughston grade III injuries, which have not previously been described. This was a prospective study involving 46 consecutive patients who were athletes with MRI-confirmed isolated PCL injuries presenting within four weeks of injury. All had Hughston grade II (25 athletes) or III (21 athletes) injuries. Our non-operative treatment regimen involved initial bracing, followed by an individualised rehabilitation programme determined by the symptoms and physical signs. The patients were reviewed until they had returned to sports-specific training, and were reviewed again at a mean of 5.2 years (3 to 9). The mean time to return to sports-specific training was 10.6 weeks and the mean time to return to full competitive sport was 16.4 weeks (10 to 40). A total of 42 patients (91.3%) were playing at the same or higher level of sport two years after the injury, with a mean Tegner activity score of 9 (5 to 10). At five years, 32 patients (69.5%) were playing at the same or higher level of sport, and 38 patients (82.6%) were playing at a competitive level, with a mean Tegner activity score of 9 (5 to 10). Medium-term review of a series of athletes suggests that commencing the non-operative management of isolated, Hughston grade II and III PCL injuries within four weeks of injury gives excellent functional outcomes with a high proportion returning to the same or higher level of sport. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:774-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Safety of radiofrequency treatment over human skin previously injected with medium-term injectable soft-tissue augmentation materials: a controlled pilot trial.

    Alam, Murad; Levy, Ross; Pajvani, Urvi; Pavjani, Urvi; Ramierez, James A; Guitart, Joan; Veen, Heather; Gladstone, Hayes B

    2006-03-01

    Several soft-tissue augmentation materials are now available for reduction of nasolabial fold creases and perioral rhytides. Nasolabial folds and perioral rhytides can also be improved by skin tightening delivered by non-ablative radiofrequency (RF) treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of RF treatment over skin areas recently injected with medium-term injectable soft-tissue augmentation materials. Five subjects were assigned to the experimental arm (augmentation materials plus RF) and one to the control arm (augmentation materials alone). Each subject received injections of 0.3 mL of hyaluronic acid derivative (Restylane) and calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) 3 cm apart on the upper inner arm. Two weeks later, two non-overlapping passes of RF (Thermage ThermaCool TC) were delivered at 63.5 setting with medium-fast 1.5 cm2 tip over injected sites in all of the experimental subjects. Punch skin biopsies were obtained 3 days later from each of the two injection sites on each subject. Light microscopy and digital photomicrographs obtained at low, medium, and high power showed no difference between filler materials in experimental and control subjects. In both cases filler was evident at the deep dermal-subcutaneous junction. Nodule formation, foreign body extravasation, or hemorrhage/clot was not observed grossly or histologically. Subjects and physicians did not report any difference in signs and symptoms between the experimental and control arms. Slightly increased transitory pain was noted when RF was delivered over filler versus over normal skin. Applying RF treatment over the same area 2 weeks after deep dermal injection with hyaluronic acid derivatives or calcium hydroxylapatite does not appear to cause gross morphological changes in the filler material or surrounding skin. Further studies with different parameters are necessary to confirm these findings. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  12. Dysbiosis of the microbiome in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Goh, Khean-Lee; Fock, Kwong Ming; Mitchell, Hazel M; Kaakoush, Nadeem O

    2017-11-21

    The gastric microbiome has been proposed as an etiological factor in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared the gastric microbiota in subjects presenting with gastric cancer (GC, n = 12) and controls (functional dyspepsia (FD), n = 20) from a high GC risk population in Singapore and Malaysia. cDNA from 16S rRNA transcripts were amplified (515F-806R) and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq 2 × 250 bp chemistry. Increased richness and phylogenetic diversity but not Shannon's diversity was found in GC as compared to controls. nMDS clustered GC and FD subjects separately, with PERMANOVA confirming a significant difference between the groups. H. pylori serological status had a significant impact on gastric microbiome α-diversity and composition. Several bacterial taxa were enriched in GC, including Lactococcus, Veilonella, and Fusobacteriaceae (Fusobacterium and Leptotrichia). Prediction of bacterial metabolic contribution indicated that serological status had a significant impact on metabolic function, while carbohydrate digestion and pathways were enriched in GC. Our findings highlight three mechanisms of interest in GC, including enrichment of pro-inflammatory oral bacterial species, increased abundance of lactic acid producing bacteria, and enrichment of short chain fatty acid production pathways.

  13. Pulmonary carcinogenesis from plutonium-containing particles

    Thomas, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Anderson, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Induction of lung tumors by various types of radiation is of paramount concern to the nuclear industry. The data presented were obtained by exposing the pulmonary system of Syrian hamsters to particles of zirconium oxide containing various amounts of either plutonium-238 or -239 as the alpha radiation source. These particles were injected intravenously and lodged permanently in the capillary bed of the lung. When less than 20% of the lung tissue was irradiated, simulating the ''hot particle'' mode, tumors were not evident with lung burdens up to 500 nCi plutonium. More diffuse irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence, with lung burdens of 50 to 150 nCi. When plutonium-laden microspheres were administered intratracheally, tumor production was considerably increased and the addition of 3 mg of iron oxide intratracheally further increased the incidence. Using the zirconium oxide matrix for the carrier of plutonium in aerosol particles produced tumor incidences of up to 50% in Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation. Initial pulmonary (alveolar) burdens reached 100 nCi of plutonium. Similar inhalation studies using plutonium dioxide alone (no matrix) failed to produce any increase in lung tumorigenesis. The results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms necessary for lung carcinogenesis. (H.K.)

  14. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy.

    van Tong, Hoang; Brindley, Paul J; Meyer, Christian G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-02-01

    Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    Trosko, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The role of ionizing radiation in carcinogenesis is discussed. Every cell contains proto-oncogenes, which if damaged may lead to cell transformation. Every cell also contains tumor suppressor genes, which guard against transformation. Thus, transformation would seem to require a double injury to the DNA in a cell. Ionizing radiation is known to be a relatively weak mutagen, but a good clastogen (inducer of chromosome breaks, deletions and rearrangements). Ionizing radiation may therefore be a 'promoter' of cancer, i.e. a stimulant of the clonal expansion of transformed cells, if it kills enough cells to induce compensatory hyperplasia - i.e. rapid growth of cells. Ionizing radiation may be a 'progressor', if it deactivates tumor suppressor genes tending to suppress the growth of existing clones of transformed cells resulting from any of numerous causes. It may therefore be an oversimplification to say that radiation causes cancer; rather, it seems to be a weak initiator, an indirect promoter, and a late-stage progressor. 2 figs

  16. Experimental carcinogenesis induced by incorporated plutonium

    Oghiso, Yoichi

    1999-01-01

    The carcinogenic effects of an alpha-emitter, 239 Pu, were investigated by animal experiments as focused on both pulmonary tumors after inhalation exposures to insoluble oxide aerosols and tumor spectra induced by injection of soluble citrate. The life-span study using Wistar strain rats exposed to Pu dioxide aerosols has shown differential dose-related responses of malignancies and histopathological phenotypes of lung tumors, suggesting a threshold dose around 1.0 Gy of the lung dose. As abnormality of tumor-related genes could be supposed for the background of pulmonary carcinogenesis, the mutations of p53 tumor suppressor gene were examined by PCR-SSCP analysis using DNA fragments extracted from lung tumors. While mutations were detected in 23 cases (about 28%) among 82 lung tumors, their relations to either malignancies, histological phenotypes, dose, or oncogenesis are not yet to be elucidated. The life-span study using C3H strain mice injected with Pu citrate has shown contrast dose responses between osteosarcomas and lymphoid tumors around 10 Gy of the skeletal dose, and further indicated specific tumor spectra differed from low LET radiation exposures as shown by much more frequency of B cell type leukemic lymphomas and none of myeloid leukemias. (author)

  17. Radiation carcinogenesis from a membrane perspective

    Petkau, A

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage in phospholipid membranes involves free radical chain reactions which propagate on their own. These reactions oxidize the constituent fatty acids (LH) to alkyl radicals (L) which upon oxygenation, form lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), some of which absorb light at 232 nm. The response (R) of these membranes to irradiation from tritium (/sup 3/H) in tritiated water increases with dose (D) in accordance with R = aD/sup m/, where m = 1.44 +- 0.30 in the absence of superoxide dismutase and 0.80 +- 0.14 in its presence. The parameter a is expressible in terms of dose rate (..delta..D/..delta..t) by a = c (..delta..D/..delta..t)/sup -n/, where n = 1.18 +- 0.05 in the absence of superoxide dismutase and 0.82 +- 0.02 in its presence. Thus, R = cD/sup m/..delta..D/..delta..t)/sup -n/ where the values of m, n depend on the presence or absence of the free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase. From this composite relationship, the response per annum for 100 to 250 millirem/y is calculable and found to differ qualitatively, that is, in the absence of superoxide dismutase the response increases whereas in the enzyme's presence it decreases. The latter trend is reminiscent of the correlation between radiation dose rate and the per annum malignant mortality rate in humans. This coincidence is interesting in that LOOH are linked in the literature to several forms of carcinogenesis.

  18. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H 2 O 2 and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H 2 O 2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis

  19. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  20. Collective studies on carcinogenesis due to exposure to radiation

    Yamashita, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    Carcinogenesis was found in 150 of 25,692 patients who had received radiotherapy for benign diseases. Of primary diseases subjected to radiotherapy, skin diseases were the most. Carcinogenesis was found in 26 of 7,230 patients with skin diseases (0.36%) and 18 in 2286 patients with tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis (0.79%). The sites of carcinogenesis was the skin in 51 patients, the hypopharynx in 43, and the larynx in 18. Carcinogenesis was also found in 140 of 220,361 patients who had received radiotherapy for malignant tumors. As primary cancer, cancer of the cervix uteri was found in 59 of 48,662 patients, and breast cancer was found in 20 of 27,967 patients. As radiation-induced cancer, leukemia was found in 18 patients, soft tissue sarcoma in 18, skin cancer in 10, osteosarcoma in 6, cancer of the hypopharynx in 6, and cancer of the cervical esophagus in 6. It is necessary to differentiate cancer due to exposure to radiation from delayed recurrent cancer and double cancer. Irradiation fields should be restricted as small as possible in order to reduce carcinogenesis. As leukemia and carcinoma were found in a-bomb survivors exposed to very small dose of a-bomb radiation, carcinogenic mechanisms by chromosome aberrations, carcinogenic rates from a viewpoint of epidemiology, and other factors which influenced carcinogenesis are being investigated. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Is the role of the environment in carcinogenesis overestimated. [Individual health status, modifying factor

    Calabrese, E J

    1979-01-01

    The dominant role of the physical and chemical environment in the development of cancer is challenged. Analyses of the etiology of skin, bladder, respiratory and gastric cancers are presented which demonstrate the considerable extent to which one's health status may modify the initiation and promotion of environmentally asociated cancers. It is concluded that although environmental factors may initiate and/or promote 85 to 90 percent of all cancers this is misleading since it neglects the critical role of the individual's health status as a factor modifying carcinogenesis.

  2. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 in experimental oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna Moreira; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Fernandes de Oliveira, Ana Laura; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Russo, Remo Castro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2018-03-14

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are critical in oral tumourigenesis. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a scavenger of CC chemokines controlling the availability of these molecules at tumour sites, but the role of ACKR2 in the context of oral carcinogenesis is unexplored. In this study, wild-type (WT) and ACKR2 deficient mice (ACKR2 -/- ) were treated with chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) for induction of oral carcinogenesis. Tongues were collected for macro and microscopic analysis and to evaluate the expression of ACKRs, CC chemokines and its receptors, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. An increased expression of ACKR2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions of 4NQO-treated WT mice was observed. No significant differences were seen in the ACKR1, ACKR3 and ACKR4 mRNA expression comparing SCC lesions from WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. Significantly higher expression of CCL2, IL-6 and IL-17 was detected in ACKR2 -/- treated mice. In contrast, the expression of other CC-chemokines, and receptors, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components were similarly increased in SCC lesions of both groups. Clinical and histopathological analysis revealed no differences in inflammatory cell recruitment and in the SCC incidence comparing WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. The results suggest that ACKR2 expression regulates inflammation in tumour-microenvironment but the absence of ACKR2 does not impact chemically-induced oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  5. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants.

    Carini, Francesco; Mazzola, Margherita; Rappa, Francesca; Jurjus, Abdo; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Al Kattar, Sahar; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Damiani, Provvidenza; Leone, Angelo; Tomasello, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    One of the contributory causes of colon cancer is the negative effect of reactive oxygen species on DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, there is a growing support for the concept that oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis and to highlight the potential protective role of antioxidants. Several studies have documented the importance of antioxidants in countering oxidative stress and preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. However, there are conflicting data in the literature concerning its proper use in humans, since these studies did not yield definitive results and were performed mostly in vitro on cell populations, or in vivo in experimental animal models. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Initiator of carcinogenesis selectively and stably inhibits stem cell differentiation: a concept that initiation of carcinogenesis involves multiple phases

    Scott, R.E.; Maercklein, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    A concept of carcinogenesis was recently devised in our laboratory that suggests the development of defects in the control of cell differentiation is associated with an early phase of carcinogenesis. To test this proposal directly, the effects of an initiator of carcinogenesis (i.e., UV irradiation) on proadipocyte stem cell differentiation and proliferation was assayed. In this regard, 3T3 T proadipocytes represent a nontransformed mesenchymal stem cell line that possesses the ability to regulate its differentiation at a distinct state in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle as well as the ability to regulate its proliferation at two additional G 1 states. The results establish that a slow dosage of 254 nm UV irradiation selectivity and stably inhibits the differentiation of a high percentage of proadipocyte stem cells without significantly altering their ability to regulate cellular proliferation in growth factor-deficient or nutrient-deficient culture conditions. Differentiation-defect proadipocyte stem cells are demonstrated not to be completely transformed but to show an increased spontaneous transformation rate, as evidenced by the formation of type III foci in high density cell cultures. These data support the role of defects in the control of differentiation in the inhibition of carcinogenesis. These observations support a concept that the initiation of carcinogenesis involves multiple phases

  7. Short- and medium-term efficacy of a Web-based computer-tailored nutrition education intervention for adults including cognitive and environmental feedback: randomized controlled trial.

    Springvloet, Linda; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein; Candel, Math J J M; Oenema, Anke

    2015-01-19

    Web-based, computer-tailored nutrition education interventions can be effective in modifying self-reported dietary behaviors. Traditional computer-tailored programs primarily targeted individual cognitions (knowledge, awareness, attitude, self-efficacy). Tailoring on additional variables such as self-regulation processes and environmental-level factors (the home food environment arrangement and perception of availability and prices of healthy food products in supermarkets) may improve efficacy and effect sizes (ES) of Web-based computer-tailored nutrition education interventions. This study evaluated the short- and medium-term efficacy and educational differences in efficacy of a cognitive and environmental feedback version of a Web-based computer-tailored nutrition education intervention on self-reported fruit, vegetable, high-energy snack, and saturated fat intake compared to generic nutrition information in the total sample and among participants who did not comply with dietary guidelines (the risk groups). A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a basic (tailored intervention targeting individual cognition and self-regulation processes; n=456), plus (basic intervention additionally targeting environmental-level factors; n=459), and control (generic nutrition information; n=434) group. Participants were recruited from the general population and randomly assigned to a study group. Self-reported fruit, vegetable, high-energy snack, and saturated fat intake were assessed at baseline and at 1- (T1) and 4-months (T2) postintervention using online questionnaires. Linear mixed model analyses examined group differences in change over time. Educational differences were examined with group×time×education interaction terms. In the total sample, the basic (T1: ES=-0.30; T2: ES=-0.18) and plus intervention groups (T1: ES=-0.29; T2: ES=-0.27) had larger decreases in high-energy snack intake than the control group. The basic version resulted in a larger decrease in

  8. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  9. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Xia, Xiaojun; Park, Eunmi; Fischer, Susan M.; Hu, Yinling

    2013-01-01

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside

  10. Mammary carcinogenesis induced by three consecutive 14 MeV neutron irradiations in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Jacrot, M.; Mouriquand, J.; Mouriquand, C.

    1978-01-01

    At high doses (400 to 800 rads) the relative biological effectiveness (R.B.E.) of neutrons is two or three times greater than that of X-rays or gamma radiation. The neutron irradiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis threshold, if any, is certainly very low in Sprague-Dawley females. The purpose of this work is to test the possibilities offered by three consecutive 14 MeV neutron irradiations in the mammary carcinogenesis region of Sprague-Dawley rats. The results of these experiments show a hormone-dependence of tumour promotion similar to that observed with chemical carcinogenetic agents. However these tumours, by their recurrences and possible metastases, bear some resemblance to breast cancers in women. Although the tumour induction frequencies seem modest in relation to those obtained with the DMBA model they should nevertheless prove very useful in the study of hormone effects liable to control the appearance of such radioinduced cancers [fr

  11. Towards a systemic paradigm in carcinogenesis: linking epigenetics and genetics.

    Burgio, Ernesto; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    For at least 30 years cancer has been defined as a genetic disease and explained by the so-called somatic mutation theory (SMT), which has dominated the carcinogenesis field. Criticism of the SMT has recently greatly increased, although still not enough to force all SMT supporters to recognize its limits. Various researchers point out that cancer appears to be a complex process concerning a whole tissue; and that genomic mutations, although variably deleterious and unpredictably important in determining the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype, are not the primary origin for a malignant neoplasia. We attempt to describe the inadequacies of the SMT and demonstrate that epigenetics is a more logical cause of carcinogenesis. Many previous models of carcinogenesis fall into two classes: (i) in which some biological changes inside cells alone lead to malignancy; and (ii) requiring changes in stroma/extracellular matrix. We try to make clear that in the (ii) model genomic instability is induced by persistent signals coming from the microenvironment, provoking epigenetic and genetic modifications in tissue stem cells that can lead to cancer. In this perspective, stochastic mutations of DNA are a critical by-product rather then the primary cause of cancer. Indirect support for such model of carcinogenesis comes from the in vitro and vivo experiments showing apparent 'reversion' of cancer phenotypes obtained via physiological factors of cellular differentiation (cytokines and other signaling molecules) or drugs, even if the key mutations are not 'reversed'.

  12. A challenge to mutation theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    Watanabe, Masami

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an objection against the commonly accepted mutation theory in radiation carcinogenesis. First, author's studies of X-ray irradiated syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells on malignant morphological changes and mutational change of HGPRT gene showed that the changing patterns were quite different, and as well, other studies in mice gave the essentially similar results. Thus radiation-induced carcinogenesis in cells does not simply occur by an accumulation of radiation-induced mutation. Second, as cultured cells usually used for oncogenesis studies already have the infinitively proliferative ability, the author used the primary cell culture obtained from the rodent embryo. Even those cells became immortal to be cancerous after repeated culture passage with the higher frequency of 10 3 -10 4 relative to somatic cell mutation. Cells thus seem to be easily changeable to cancerous ones. Bystander effect can cause transformation in non-irradiated cells and genetic instability by radiation can form the potentially unstable chromatin region, which induces telomere instability. The author has found that, while short-lived radicals yielded by X-ray irradiation attack DNA to induce cell death and chromosome aberration, long-lived radicals in biomolecules do not, but can cause mutation and carcinogenesis, which are reduced by vitamine C supplementation. The author concludes that the primary target in the radiation carcinogenesis in cells and even in the whole individuals is conceivably protein and not DNA. (T.I.)

  13. Ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanisms and experimental models

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindhasamy, Kanimozhi; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Robert, Beualah Mary; Nagarajan, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a very prominent environmental toxic agent. UVR has been implicated in the initiation and progression of photocarcinogenesis. UVR exposure elicits numerous cellular and molecular events which include the generation of inflammatory mediators, DNA damage, epigenetic modifications, and oxidative damages mediated activation of signaling pathways. UVR-initiated signal transduction pathways are believed to be responsible for tumor promotion effects. UVR-induced carcinogenic mechanism has been well studied using various animal and cellular models. Human skin-derived dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes served as excellent cellular model systems for the understanding of UVR-mediated carcinogenic events. Apart from this, scientists developed reconstituted three-dimensional normal human skin equivalent models for the study of UVR signaling pathways. Moreover, hairless mice such as SKH-1, devoid of Hr gene, served as a valuable model for experimental carcinogenesis. Scientists have also used transgenic mice and dorsal portion shaved Swiss albino mice for UVR carcinogenesis studies. In this review, we have discussed the current progress in the study on ultraviolet B (UVB)-mediated carcinogenesis and outlined appropriate experimental models for both ultraviolet A- and UVB-mediated carcinogenesis. (author)

  14. Chronology of p53 protein accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    p53 Protein accumulation in early gastric carcinoma was studied in relation to the histological type (Lauren classification) and the type of growth pattern, including the chronology of p53 protein accumulation during carcinogenesis. Forty five, paraffin embedded gastrectomy specimens from early

  15. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...

  16. Hypoxia and cell cycle deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    Horrée, N.

    2007-01-01

    Because uterine endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and 1 of every 5 patients dies of this disease, understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma is important. In general, this thesis can be summarized as a study

  17. An experimental study on carcinogenesis related to localized fibrosis in the lung

    Ohwada, Hidemi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Seki, Masatoshi.

    1980-01-01

    The present series of experiments was carried out in order to see what role pre-existing localized fibrosis plays in carcinogenesis of the lung. Hemorrhagic infarction was produced in the lung of 180 male Wistar rats by injecting 0.05 ml of hexachlorotetrafluorobutane into the tail vein. This resulted in localized fibrosis in the lung 3 months later. One hundred and fifteen rats were alive 3 months after administration of the chemical. Of these animals, 30 were given no further treatment (control). The remaining 85 rats were given intratracheal instillation of 0.2 μCi of polonium-210 once a week, a total of 15 times. It was subsequently found that lung carcinoma was induced in close proximity to the localized pulmonary fibrosis in 3 of 26 rats (11.5%) during the period from completion of the 15 weekly administrations of polonium-210 until the end of this experiment (21 months after the 1st instillation of polonium-210). Polonium-210 was found to be deposited in the fibrous thickening of the alveolus around the subpleural fibrotic lesion, bronchial epithelium, and peribronchial lymph apparati at the initial period of administration of polonium-210, but during the period of pulmonary carcinogenesis, it was deposited in the localized fibrotic lesion in the lung and in a few cancer cells. This suggests that polonium-210 deposited in the pulmonary fibrotic lesion remains there over a long period of time, indicating a reduced clearance ability at this site. (author)

  18. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Hitoshi Nakagama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine (BOP into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  19. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention

  20. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  1. Chemopreventive effect of artesunate in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis

    Sazal Patyar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artesunate (ART is a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin. Artemisinin and its derivatives have shown profound cytotoxicity and antitumor activity in addition to antimalarial activity in various studies. As the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy of ART in colon carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, the aim of the current study was to study the chemopreventive effect of ART in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Animals were divided into four groups (n = 6: Group I - vehicle (1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Group II - DMH (20 mg/kg, Group III - DMH + 5-fluorouracil (81 mg/kg, Group IV - DMH + ART (6.7 mg/kg. After completion of 15 weeks of treatment, rats were sacrificed under ether anesthesia by cervical dislocation for assessment of lipid peroxidation (LPO, antioxidant status, average number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF, and cytokine levels. ART administration significantly decreased the average number of ACF/microscopic field. Similarly, LPO level was decreased and antioxidant activities were enhanced after ART treatment. ART decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and induced apoptosis in the colons of DMH-treated rats. The results of this study suggest that ART has a beneficial effect against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats.

  2. Environment and breast cancer - the role of xenooestrogens in breast cancer carcinogenesis

    Plesnicar, A.; Kralj, B.; Druzina, B.; Kovac, V.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The survival rate of breast cancer patients has not changed much in the last few decades in developed countries. In order to improve the efficacy of breast cancer prevention and treatment, the role of xenooestrogens in the mechanisms of its development has been evaluated. These industrial chemicals bear little structural resemblance to each other and bind to the oestrogen receptors of exposed cells and/or trigger oestrogenic responses in laboratory test systems. Exposure to xenooestrogens has been regarded as a risk factor for carcinogenesis and a preventable cause of breast carcinoma. Several epidemiological and experimental studies in in vivo and in in vitro conditions of the influence of xenooestrogens on the occurrence of breast cancer have been conducted in the last decades and have shown ambiguous results. Conclusions. No increase in breast carcinoma incidence could be found in women who were exposed to relatively high concentrations of xenooestrogens for extended periods and small quantities of these compounds that are present in the environment probably cannot act as etiological agents for the occurrence of this disease. A multi step approach is suggested regarding the sequence of studies and measures that should be taken to further assess the importance of xenooestrogens on breast cancer carcinogenesis. (author)

  3. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  4. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    series of transcription factors. Moreover, in addition to direct production of ROS by these pathogens, liver infiltration by activated phagocytic cells provides an additional source of ROS production that promotes oxidative stress via interleukin or NO production that can damage proteins, lipids and DNA.

    Nuclear MSI was demonstrated first in familial hereditary colorectal cancer (HNPCC and then in sporadic cancers, primarily digestive tract cancers such as colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers.In HCC, although nuclear MSI has been shown in some studies (15,18, there is as yet no direct evidence of alteration of the MMR genes and the biological and the clinicopathological significance of the lowlevel MSI seen in HCC is unclear. MSI has also been shown to occur in inflammatory tissues such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis as well as in ulcerative colitis, chronic pancreatitis and in non digestive inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

    Recently, the role of mitochondria in carcinogenesis has been under numerous investigation, in part because their prominent role in apoptosis, ROS production and other aspects of tumour biology. The mitochondrial genome is particularly susceptible to mutations because of the high level of ROS generation in this organelle, coupled with a relatively low level of DNA repair. Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been shown in HCC as was also observed MSI. These findings suggest a potential role for mitochondrial genome instability in the early steps of tumorigenesis.

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury can occur in several situations and is a major cause of cell damage during surgery. Cells and tissues subjected to hypoxia by prolonged ischemia become acidic

  5. Adult stem cell theory of the multi-stage, multi-mechanism theory of carcinogenesis: role of inflammation on the promotion of initiated stem cells.

    Trosko, James E; Tai, Mei-Hui

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation, induced by microbial agents, radiation, endogenous or exogenous chemicals, has been associated with chronic diseases, including cancer. Since carcinogenesis has been characterized as consisting of the 'initiation', 'promotion' and 'progression' phases, the inflammatory process could affect any or all three phases. The stem cell theory of carcinogenesis has been given a revival, in that isolated human adult stem cells have been isolated and shown to be 'targets' for neoplastic transformation. Oct4, a transcription factor, has been associated with adult stem cells, as well as their immortalized and tumorigenic derivatives, but not with the normal differentiated daughters. These data are consistent with the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. In addition, Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication (GJIC) seems to play a major role in cell growth. Inhibition of GJIC by non-genotoxic chemicals or various oncogenes seems to be the mechanism for the tumor promotion and progression phases of carcinogenesis. Many of the toxins, synthetic non-genotoxicants, and endogenous inflammatory factors have been shown to inhibit GJIC and act as tumor promoters. The inhibition of GJIC might be the mechanism by which the inflammatory process affects cancer and that to intervene during tumor promotion with anti-inflammatory factors might be the most efficacious anti-cancer strategy.

  6. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  7. Strawberry Phytochemicals Inhibit Azoxymethane/Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 Mice

    Ni Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg−1 body weight. One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05. The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease.

  8. Modifying factors in rat mammary gland carcinogenesis

    Shellabarger, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    The spontaneous incidence of mammary adenocarcinomas and mammary fibroadenomas in rats was found to be related to the strain of rat studied. Strains of rats that are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in regard to induced mammary neoplasia tend to be the same strains of rats that are sensitive to radiation. Methylcholantrene (MCA) and x-rays appeared to act in an additive fashion on the induction of mammary adenocarcinomas when they were given together. Lactating and older rats lose responsiveness to chemical carcinogens but do not lose responsiveness to radiation. Radiation appears to act in a scopal fashion in the induction of mammary neoplasia. Mammary neoplasia induction was not changed when low LET radiation was split into 2 equal fractions and high LET radiation was more effective than low LET radiation in inducing mammary neoplasia. It is suggested that DMBA can act as an initiator for the induction of mammary adenocarcinomas, that phorbol can act as a promotor, and that viruses may induce mammary neoplasia. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and radiation appeared to act synergistically in the induction of mammary adenocarcinomas in one strain of rat but not in another strain. (U.S.)

  9. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  10. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  11. Genetic susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis in rats

    Kamiya, Kenji; Nitta, Yumiko [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1999-06-01

    The Copenhagen (COP) rat strain has previously been shown to be genetically resistant to chemical induction of breast cancer, while Wistar/Furth (WF) and Fischer 344 (F344) animals are relatively susceptible. We have compared the carcinogenic response of these three strains of rats to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) with that to {sup 60}Co gamma rays. High incidences of mammary carcinomas were induced by MNU in the F344 and WF rats (100%), whereas the COP strain proved resistant (11.8%). In contrast, radiation-induced mammary carcinomas in COP rats developed in a similar incidence (37.0%) to those in the F344 (22.6%) and WF (26.9%) strains. The low incidence of papillary carcinomas in MNU-treated COP rats appeared to be directly related to the COP genetic resistance controlled by the Mcs genes. Ionizing radiation did, however, induce papillary carcinomas in all the three strains of rats. These carcinomas were more differentiated than MNU-induced cancers with regard to the two mammary differentiation markers, rat milk fat globule membrane (R-MFGM) and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA). Furthermore, ionizing radiation but not MNU induced mammary adenomas in all three strains, especially in COP rats. Such adenomas had differentiation marker profiles similar to these of carcinomas induced by {sup 60}Co gamma rays. When transplanted into syngenic hosts, growth of adenomas was 17 {beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2})-dependent and they progressed to carcinomas. Furthermore, one microcarcinoma was observed to develop from adenoma tissue in a radiation-exposed COP rat. The findings suggest that radiation and chemical carcinogens are likely to induce mammary cancers through different pathways or from different cell populations. The induction of relatively high incidences of mammary carcinomas and adenomas by radiation in COP rats may correlate with the genetically modulated and highly differentiated physiological status of their mammary glands. (author)

  12. Effectiveness of Bioactive Food Components in Experimental Colon Carcinogenesis

    Emília Hijová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the evaluation of possible protective effects of selected bioactive food components in experimental N,N-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. Wistar albino rats (n = 92 were fed a high fat diet or conventional laboratory diet. Two weeks after the beginning of the trial, DMH injections were given to six groups of rats at the dose of 20 mg/kg b.w. twice weekly. The activity of bacterial enzymes in faeces and serum bile acid concentrations were determined. High fat diet, DMH injections, and their combination significantly increased the activies of β-galactosidase, β-glucuronidase, and α-glucosidase (p p < 0.001, as well as the bile acid concentration compared to the group at the highest risk. The protective effects of selected bioactive food components in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis allow for their possible use in cancer prevention or treatment.

  13. Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: Oxidative Stress and Natural Antioxidants

    Velid Unsal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world, and it is influenced by agents such as DEN, 2-AAF, phenobarbital, alcohol, aflatoxin B1 metabolite or hepatitis viruses (B and C. Oxidative stress is becoming recognized as a key factor in the progression of hepatocarcinogenesis. Reactive oxygen species can play a leading role in initiation and promotion of hepatic carcinogenesis. The metabolites of DEN Diethylnitrosamine (DEN mediate the binding of tumour promoters by covalently binding to the DNA with one or two oxidation-providing electrons. 2-AAF is the inducer of DEN, and it is involved in tumour formation in the bladder and liver. Reactive Oxygen species (ROS; carbohydrates, lipids, DNA and enzymes, such as affect all important structures. Additionally, an excessive amount of ROS is highly toxic to cells. Antioxidants are protects against ROS, toxic substances, carcinogens. This review focuses on the literature on studies of Hepatic Carcinogenesis, oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy.

  14. Experimental gastric carcinogenesis in Cebus apella nonhuman primates.

    Joana de Fátima Ferreira Borges da Costa

    Full Text Available The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU. Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9(th day though on the 14(th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940(th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the

  15. Effect of Dendrobium officinale Extraction on Gastric Carcinogenesis in Rats

    Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yan; Lan, Xi-Ming; Xu, Guo-Liang; Sun, You-Zhi; Li, Fei; Liu, Hong-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale (Tie Pi Shi Hu in Chinese) has been widely used to treat different diseases in China. Anticancer effect is one of the important effects of Dendrobium officinale. However, the molecular mechanism of its anticancer effect remains unclear. In the present study, gastric carcinogenesis in rats was used to evaluate the effect of Dendrobium officinale on cancer, and its pharmacological mechanism was explored. Dendrobium officinale extracts (4.8 and 2.4 g/kg) were orally adminis...

  16. Influence of biological variables on radiation carcinogenesis

    Sasaki, Shunsaku

    1989-01-01

    1. Age at exposure: Female B6C3F 1 mice were irradiated at day 17 of the prenatal age, or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 of the postnatal age with 1.9, 3.8 or 5.7 Gy of gamma-rays from 137 Cs. All mice were allowed to live through their entire lifespan under a specific pathogen free condition. It has become evident that mice of the late fetal period have susceptibility to induction of pituitary tumors, bone tumors, liver tumors, lung tumors, lymphocytic lymphomas and ovarian tumors. Neonatal mice were found to be more susceptible to induction of lymphocytic lymphomas, liver tumors and ovarian tumors than fetal mice. Irradiation of fetal or neonatal mice did not result in the excess development of myeloid leukemias and Harderian gland tumors, whereas these neoplasms were induced by irradiation at the adult period. 2. Combination effects of radiation and chemicals: Both sexes of B6WF 1 mice were exposed to X-rays at day 5 of postnatal age. After weaning, pellet diet containing 0.05 % phenobarbital was given until their natural death. It was rather surprising that life-shortening effect of X-irradiation was decreased by oral administration of phenobarbital. This effect seemed to be due to delayed development of neoplastic diseases. Administration of phenobarbital did not result in decrease in incidences of neoplasms. (author)

  17. Potential effects of the herbicide Diuron on mammary and urinary bladder two-stage carcinogenesis in a female Swiss mouse model.

    de Moura, Nelci Antunes; Grassi, Tony Fernando; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan; Barbisan, Luís Fernando

    2010-02-01

    The potential promoting effect of Diuron was investigated in a mouse model of mammary and urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN). Four-week old female Swiss mice were allocated to five groups: Groups G1-G3 received DMBA (5 x 1.5 mg/mouse) and BBN (8 x 7.5 mg/mouse) and G4 and G5 groups received only vehicles during the first 6 weeks. At week 7, G1 and G5 groups received basal diet and G2, G3 and G4 groups were fed a diet containing Diuron at 1,250, 2,500 and 2,500 ppm, respectively, during 13 weeks. At week 20, the animals were euthanized and the gross tumors were registered. Mammary glands and urinary bladder were processed for histopathological analysis. Samples from non-tumor areas were evaluated for cell proliferation by 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling index (BrdU-LI%) and apoptosis. Dietary treatment with Diuron at 1,250 and 2,500 ppm significantly increased BrdU-LI% (P Diuron 2,500 ppm (G3). In contrast, in the mammary gland, Diuron feeding for 13 weeks did not significantly alter cell proliferation and apoptosis indexes or the incidence of hyperplastic lesions or neoplasms in the DMBA/BBN-initiated groups. These findings suggest that Diuron is a promoting agent to the urinary bladder but not to the mammary gland in female Swiss mice submitted to a medium-term two-stage carcinogenesis bioassay.

  18. Biologically based modelling and simulation of carcinogenesis at low doses

    Ouchi, Noriyuki B.

    2003-01-01

    The process of the carcinogenesis is studied by computer simulation. In general, we need a large number of experimental samples to detect mutations at low doses, but in practice it is difficult to get such a large number of data. To satisfy the requirements of the situation at low doses, it is good to study the process of carcinogenesis using biologically based mathematical model. We have mainly studied it by using as known as 'multi-stage model'; the model seems to get complicated, as we adopt the recent new findings of molecular biological experiments. Moreover, the basic idea of the multi-stage model is based on the epidemiologic data of log-log variation of cancer incidence with age, it seems to be difficult to compare with experimental data of irradiated cell culture system, which has been increasing in recent years. Taking above into consideration, we concluded that we had better make new model with following features: 1) a unit of the target system is a cell, 2) the new information of the molecular biology can be easily introduced, 3) having spatial coordinates for checking a colony formation or tumorigenesis. In this presentation, we will show the detail of the model and some simulation results about the carcinogenesis. (author)

  19. The relevance of cell transformation to carcinogenesis in vivo

    Little, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the caveats concerning rodent as opposed to human cell transformation systems, the author concludes there are several areas in which cell transformation studies with rodent cells have shown clear relevance to carcinogenesis in vivo, especially studies of carcinogenic effects of high LET radiation, particularly dependence on dose rate. In vitro studies firmly established the generality of promotion by phorbol esters tumour promotors. Initial studies on suppression of transformation, notably by protease inhibitors, has led to the confirmation of this phenomenon in in vivo carcinogenesis; development of inhibitor preparations from natural sources suitable for long-term supplementation in human diet, is under investigation. The potential importance of these modifiers is further emphasized by mechanistic studies suggesting that radiation may initiate a large fraction of exposed cell population, and expression of transformation may be controlled to a large extent by environmental conditions including the presence of promoting or suppressing agents. Finally, cell transformation systems offer the opportunity for mechanistic studies of the initial stages of carcinogenesis. Provocative results have arisen in several areas consistent with findings in experimental animals. (author)

  20. Role of Free Radicals, Oxidative Stress and Xenobiotics in Carcinogenesis by Environmental Pollutants

    Dibyajyoti Saha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis by many small molecular weight chemicals involves either a direct action of the chemical on cellular DNA or metabolism of the parent chemical to an active or ultimate form, which can than react with cellular DNA to produce a permanent chemical change in a DNA structure. A free radical is an atom or molecule that has one or more unpaired electron(s. These are highly reactive species capable of wide spread, indiscriminate oxidation and per oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA which can lead to significant cellular damage and even tissue and/or organ failure. . Oxidative stress is a leading cause to damage cells by oxidation. The rate at which oxidative damage is induced (input and the rate at which it is efficiently repaired and removed (output. Xenobiotics are a compound that is foreign to the body. Xenobiotics can produce a variety of biological effects, including pharmacologic responses, toxicity, genes, immunologic reactions and cancer. Oxidative stress is a leading cause to damage cells by oxidation. The rate at which oxidative damage is induced (input and the rate at which it is efficiently repaired and removed (output. This communication highlights the role of carcinogens as environmental pollutants with the possible mechanism of free radicals, oxidative stress and xenobiotics.

  1. Role of immunological surveillance in radiation carcinogenesis

    Sado, Toshihiko

    2003-01-01

    The immune system is known to be highly susceptible to various physical, chemical, and biological insults. The studies on the immediate and long-term effects of radiation on immune system of mice indicated very clearly that there was a dose-dependent reduction in the number of T and B cells, depression of antibody and cytotoxic T cell responses as well as proliferative responses of spleen cells to T and B cell mitogens shortly after irradiation, but they all recovered to the control level within a few months. Immunosuppression observed shortly after irradiation had little influence on the development of radiogenic tumors. The effects of radiation on the incidence of Friend leukemia virus (FLV)-induced leukemias are examined by using young adult B6C3F 1 male mice which are normally resistant to FLV-induced leukemogenesis. There was a clear threshold dose of 2 Gy below which the development of FLV induced leukemias was not observed but after exposure to >3 Gy high incidence of leukemias was observed. Fractionated, weekly exposure of young C57BL strain mice to 1.6 Gy of X-rays for four successive weeks causes most of the exposed mice to develop thymic lymphomas between 3 and 10 months. However, when the exposed mice are grafted with bone marrow cells from normal donors, the development of thymic lymphomas on the exposed mice is greatly inhibited. There was a clear dose response relationship between the number of bone marrow cells injected and the inhibition of the development of thymic lymphomas. It now appears clear that T cell-mediated immunological surveillance against newly arising neoplasms conceived by Thomas and Burnet does not hold true anymore in the original form, although virus-infected host cells and other host cells expressing altered-self' markers on their cell surfaces are constantly monitored by the immunological surveillance mechanism. A surveillance function against newly arising neoplasms may be a property of surrounding normal tissue cells rather

  2. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURESR. Julian PrestonEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USAThere ...

  3. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    Bastide, Nadia M; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 + 25 μg/kg in diet), and NOC (induced by NaNO₂+ NaNO₂; 0.17 + 0.23 g/L of drinking water) was determined by a factorial design and preneoplastic endpoints in chemically induced rats and validated on tumors in Min mice. The molecular mechanisms (genotoxicity, cytotoxicity) were analyzed in vitro in normal and Apc-deficient cell lines and confirmed on colon mucosa. Heme iron increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, but dietary heterocyclic amines and NOC had no effect on carcinogenesis in rats. Dietary hemoglobin increased tumor load in Min mice (control diet: 67 ± 39 mm²; 2.5% hemoglobin diet: 114 ± 47 mm², P = 0.004). In vitro, fecal water from rats given hemoglobin was rich in aldehydes and was cytotoxic to normal cells, but not to premalignant cells. The aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxyhexenal were more toxic to normal versus mutated cells and were only genotoxic to normal cells. Genotoxicity was also observed in colon mucosa of mice given hemoglobin. These results highlight the role of heme iron in the promotion of colon cancer by red meat and suggest that heme iron could initiate carcinogenesis through lipid peroxidation. . ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Alterations in mtDNA, gastric carcinogenesis and early diagnosis.

    Rodrigues-Antunes, S; Borges, B N

    2018-05-26

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Due to this, efforts are being made to improve the diagnosis of this neoplasm and the search for molecular markers that may be involved in its genesis. Within this perspective, the mitochondrial DNA is considered as a potential candidate, since it has several well documented changes and is readily accessible. However, numerous alterations have been reported in mtDNA, not facilitating the visualization of which alterations and molecular markers are truly involved with gastric carcinogenesis. This review presents a compilation of the main known changes relating mtDNA to gastric cancer and their clinical significance.

  5. Perspectives in the paradigm of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    Sugakhara, T.; Vatanabe, M.; Niva, O.; Nikajdo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is analysed as a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression. This model includes the mutation of oncogenes and the loss of hetrezygosity by tumor-suppressor genes. The threshold concept of radiation cancerogenesis is proposed, under which ionizing radiation can induce in somatic cell genetic effects a s result of DNA damage and epigenetic changes as well. The epigenetic changes (through DNA or cytoplasma) can be stabilized as mutations observed in many cancer cells and play a dominant role in radiation cancerogenesis induction. The ration of epigenetic and genetic effects largely depends on radiation doses

  6. Bacterial infection increases risk of carcinogenesis by targeting mitochondria

    Strickertsson, Jesper A.B.; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    pathways, and compares the impact of the bacterial alteration of mitochondrial function to that of cancer. Bacterial virulence factors have been demonstrated to induce mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and to modulate DNA repair pathways of the mitochondria. Furthermore, virulence factors can induce...... or impair the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The effect of bacterial targeting of mitochondria is analogous to behavior of mitochondria in a wide array of tumours, and this strongly suggests that mitochondrial targeting of bacteria is a risk factor for carcinogenesis....

  7. The PTEN/NRF2 Axis Promotes Human Carcinogenesis

    Rojo, Ana I; Rada, Patricia; Mendiola, Marta

    2014-01-01

    and tumorigenic advantage. Tissue microarrays from endometrioid carcinomas showed that 80% of PTEN-negative tumors expressed high levels of NRF2 or its target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). INNOVATION: These results uncover a new mechanism of oncogenic activation of NRF2 by loss of its negative regulation by PTEN/GSK-3....../β-TrCP that may be relevant to a large number of tumors, including endometrioid carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Increased activity of NRF2 due to loss of PTEN is instrumental in human carcinogenesis and represents a novel therapeutic target. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2498-2514....

  8. Etiologic related studies of ultraviolet light-mediated carcinogenesis

    Black, H S; Chan, J T

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons were made of cholesterol-5..cap alpha.. 6..cap alpha..-epoxide (CAE) levels in skin of hairless mice maintained on a regular or antioxidant supplemented diet and receiving chronic ultraviolet light (UVL) radiation over an 18-week period. Cholesterol-5..cap alpha.., 6..cap alpha..-epoxide levels in skin of animals on antioxidant supplemented diet, while reaching a peak four weeks after that of animals on regular diet, thereafter were consistently higher. Dietary antioxidants nevertheless had an inhibitory effect on UVL-induced tumors. These data are inconsistent with the theory of CAE involvement as an ultimate carcinogen in UVL-mediated carcinogenesis.

  9. Prediction of Short- and Medium-term Efficacy of Biosimilar Infliximab Therapy. Do Trough Levels and Antidrug Antibody Levels or Clinical And Biochemical Markers Play the More Important Role?

    Gonczi, Lorant; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra Anna; Rutka, Mariann; Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Bor, Renata; Farkas, Klaudia; Szamosi, Tamás; Bene, László; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Kristóf, Tünde; Lakatos, László; Miheller, Pál; Palatka, Károly; Papp, Mária; Patai, Árpád; Salamon, Ágnes; Tóth, Gábor Tamás; Vincze, Áron; Biro, Edina; Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Szepes, Zoltan; Molnár, Tamás; Lakatos, Péter L

    2017-06-01

    Biosimilar infliximab CT-P13 received European Medicines Agency [EMA] approval in June 2013 for all indications of the originator product. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the predictors of short- and medium-term clinical outcome in patients treated with the biosimilar infliximab at the participating inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] centres in Hungary. Demographic data were collected and a harmonised monitoring strategy was applied. Clinical and biochemical activities were evaluated at Weeks 14, 30, and 54. Trough level [TL] and anti-drug antibody [ADA] concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] [LT-005, Theradiag, France] at baseline at 14, 30 and 54 weeks and in two centres at Weeks 2 and 6. A total of 291 consecutive IBD patients (184 Crohn's disease [CD] and 107 ulcerative colitis [UC]) were included. In UC, TLs at Week 2 predicted both clinical response and remission at Weeks 14 and 30 (clinical response/remission at Week 14: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.81, p < 0.001, cut-off: 11.5 μg/ml/AUC = 0.79, p < 0.001, cut-off: 15.3μg/ml; clinical response/remission at Week 30: AUC = 0.79, p = 0.002, cut-off: 11.5 μg/ml/AUC = 0.74, p = 0.006, cut-off: 14.5 μg/ml), whereas ADA positivity at Week 14 was inversely associated with clinical response at Week 30 [58.3% vs 84.8% ,p = 0.04]. Previous anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] exposure was inversely associated with short-term clinical remission [Week 2: 18.8% vs 47.8%, p = 0.03, at Week 6: 38.9% vs 69.7%, p = 0.013, at Week 14: 37.5% vs 2.5%, p = 0.06]. In CD, TLs at Week 2 predicted short-term [Week 14 response/remission, AUCTLweek2 = 0.715-0.721, p = 0.05/0.005] but not medium-term clinical efficacy. In addition, early ADA status by Week 14 [p = 0.04-0.05 for Weeks 14 and 30], early clinical response [p < 0.001 for Weeks 30/54] and normal C-reactive protein [CRP] at Week 14 [p = 0.005-0.0001] and previous anti-TNF exposure [p = 0.03-0.0001 for Weeks 14, 30, and 54] were

  10. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  11. Etoricoxib in the Prevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis

    P. Orendáš

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Several experimental studies suggest that non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs have chemopreventive effects in mammary carcinogenesis. In this study, tumour suppressive effects of a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 etoricoxib in the prevention of N-methyl-Nnitrosourea (NMU-induced mammary carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. Etoricoxib was administered in the diet, at two concentrations: 1 0.01 mg/g (ETO 0.001% and 2 0.025 mg/g (ETO 0.0025%. Although the chemopreventive effects were not statistically significant, remarkable tumour suppressive effects with the concentration of ETO 0.0025% were recorded. The incidence decreased by 4.31% and tumour frequency per group decreased by 6.67% when compared to the control group. Latency (the period from carcinogen administration to the first tumour appearance increased by 7.28% in dose-dependent manner. The results of our experiments point to dose-dependent tumour suppressive effects of a higher concentration of etoricoxib (ETO 0.0025% when compared to the control group. They suggest that higher etoricoxib concentrations may enhance its tumour suppressive effects.

  12. Experimental photoimmunology: immunologic ramifications of UV-induced carcinogenesis

    Daynes, R.A.; Bernhard, E.J.; Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of animal model systems to investigate the sequence of events which lead to the induction and progression of skin tumors following chronic ultraviolet light (UVL) exposure has clearly shown that the direct mutagenic effects of UVL is only one of the components involved in this process. In spite of the fact that overt carcinogenesis is only one of the many effects produced by UV light, most hypotheses as to the mechanism by which UVL can cause the mutations necessary to achieve the transformed phenotype have focused on the direct effects of UVL on DNA and the generation of carcinogenic compounds. Investigations during the last 5 yr, however, have clearly demonstrated that immunologic factors are also critically important in the pathogenesis of UV-induced skin cancers. A complete understanding of UV-carcinogenesis must therefore consider the mechanisms which allow the transformed cell to evade immunologic rejection by the host in addition to those aspects which deal with conversion of a normal cell to a cancer cell. It is the object of this review to provide both a historical account of the work which established the immunologic consequences of chronic UVL exposure and the results of recent experiments designed to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms by which UVL affects the immunologic apparatus. In addition, a hypothetical model is presented to explain the sequence of events which ultimately lead to the emergence of the suppressor T-cells which regulate antitumor immune responses

  13. Inherent aerobic capacity-dependent differences in breast carcinogenesis.

    Thompson, Henry J; Jones, Lee W; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Neil, Elizabeth S; McGinley, John N

    2017-09-01

    Although regular physical activity is associated with improvement in aerobic capacity and lower breast cancer risk, there are heritable sets of traits that affect improvement in aerobic capacity in response to physical activity. Although aerobic capacity segregates risk for a number of chronic diseases, the effect of the heritable component on cancer risk has not been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated breast carcinogenesis in rodent models of heritable fitness in the absence of induced physical activity. Female offspring of N:NIH rats selectively bred for low (LIAC) or high (HIAC) inherent aerobic capacity were injected intraperitoneally with 1-methyl-1-nitrosurea (70 mg/kg body wt). At study termination 33 weeks post-carcinogen, cancer incidence (14.0 versus 47.3%; P < 0.001) and multiplicity (0.18 versus 0.85 cancers per rat; P < 0.0001) were significantly decreased in HIAC versus LIAC rats, respectively. HIAC had smaller visceral and subcutaneous body fat depots than LIAC and activity of two proteins that regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin, protein kinase B (Akt), and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were suppressed and activated, respectively, in HIAC. Although many factors distinguish between HIAC and LIAC, it appears that the protective effect of HIAC against breast carcinogenesis is mediated, at least in part, via alterations in core metabolic signaling pathways deregulated in the majority of human breast cancers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Glutaminolysis and carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Cetindis, Marcel; Biegner, Thorsten; Munz, Adelheid; Teriete, Peter; Reinert, Siegmar; Grimm, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Glutaminolysis is a crucial factor for tumor metabolism in the carcinogenesis of several tumors but has not been clarified for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) yet. Expression of glutaminolysis-related solute carrier family 1, member 5 (SLC1A5)/neutral amino acid transporter (ASCT2), glutaminase (GLS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) was analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry. SLC1A5/ASCT2 and GLS were significantly overexpressed in the carcinogenesis of OSCC compared with normal tissue, while GLDH was weakly detected. Compared with SIN I-III SLC1A5/ASCT2 and GLS expression were significantly increased in OSCC. GLDH expression did not significantly differ from SIN I-III compared with OSCC. This study shows the first evidence of glutaminolysis-related SLC1A5/ASCT2, GLS, and GLDH expression in OSCC. The very weak GLDH expression indicates that glutamine metabolism is rather related to nucleotide or protein/hexosamine biosynthesis or to the function as an antioxidant (glutathione) than to energy production or generation of lactate through entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Overcoming glutaminolysis by targeting c-Myc oncogene (e.g. by natural compounds) and thereby cross-activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 or SLC1A5/ASCT2, GLS inhibitors may be a useful strategy to sensitize cancer cells to common OSCC cancer therapies.

  15. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  16. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3 H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection. 3 H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  17. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/- of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC.

  18. International Activities in Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis. Survey Paper

    Komarov, E. [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1969-11-15

    During the past 10 years special attention has been paid to the problem of late effects of radiation and in particular to radiation-induced carcinogenesis and leukaemogenesis. In the UNSCEAR report of 1958-1962 this.problem was mentioned as being of considerable importance from the point of view of estimation of risk to the population from environmental radiation. In 1964 a special report was prepared by UNSCEAR on radiation- induced carcinogenesis. In the ICRP publication No. 8, a chapter dealing with assessment of somatic risks discussed the problem of leukaemia and other neoplasms and particularly stressed the problem of thyroid carcinoma-and bone sarcoma. WHO panels of experts discussed the problem in 1960-1966 and made some recommendations for international activity in this field. In spite of the amount of scientific attention that has been given in recent years to experimental radiobiology in animals and lower forms, it has become abundantly clear that information directly applicable to humans is woefully inadequate and that there is a desperate need for carefully collected data from man on which to base public health planning and day to day work in radiation protection. This has long been recognized in the technical program of WHO in the emphasis given to the practical importance of epidemiology in human radiobiology and the degree to which it depends upon international collaboration.

  19. Introduction and overview. Perinatal carcinogenesis: growing a node for epidemiology, risk management, and animal studies

    Anderson, Lucy M.

    2004-01-01

    Perinatal carcinogenesis as a cross-disciplinary concern is the subject of this special issue of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, which consists of a total of eight reviews or commentaries in the areas of epidemiology, risk assessment, and animal models. Some of the conclusions from these articles, and the Questions and Answers section that follows most of them, are summarized here. There is adequate reason to suspect that perinatal exposures contribute to human cancer risk, both childhood cancers, and those appearing later in life. The latter type of risk may actually be quantitatively the more important, and involve a wide range of types of effects, but has received only limited attention. With regard to childhood cancers, fetal irradiation and diethylstilbestrol exposure are known etiological agents, and it is likely, but not yet certain, there are additional external causes of a portion of these. Some current focal points of interest here include nitroso compounds, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors, viruses, anti-AIDS drugs, and endocrine disruptors. Regulatory agencies must rely heavily on animal data for estimation of human risk due to perinatal exposures to chemicals, and the quantity and quality of these data presently available for this purpose are greatly limiting. Correctly designed conventional animal studies with suspect chemicals are still needed. Furthermore, genetically engineered mouse models for childhood cancers, especially medulloblastoma, have become available, and could be used for screening of candidate causative agents for this cancer type, and for better understanding of gene-environment interactions

  20. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Erdman, John W.; Moran, Nancy E.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4-10 wk-of-age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone-repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 wk after castration). Ten-wk-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString®, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (Plycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato-feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). Additionally, tomato-feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, while lycopene-feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early stages of prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  1. Biological parameters for lung cancer in mathematical models of carcinogenesis

    Jacob, P.; Jacob, V.

    2003-01-01

    Applications of the two-step model of carcinogenesis with clonal expansion (TSCE) to lung cancer data are reviewed, including those on atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, British doctors, Colorado Plateau miners, and Chinese tin miners. Different sets of identifiable model parameters are used in the literature. The parameter set which could be determined with the lowest uncertainty consists of the net proliferation rate gamma of intermediate cells, the hazard h 55 at an intermediate age, and the hazard H? at an asymptotically large age. Also, the values of these three parameters obtained in the various studies are more consistent than other identifiable combinations of the biological parameters. Based on representative results for these three parameters, implications for the biological parameters in the TSCE model are derived. (author)

  2. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane...... zone of stratified epithelia. Immunohistochemical studies have previously reported changes in steady-state levels of different alpha(IV) chains in several epithelial cancer types. In the present study we aimed to quantitatively determine the mRNA levels of type IV collagen (alpha1/alpha 4/alpha 6......) and type VII collagen (alpha1) during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for alpha1(IV), alpha 4(IV), alpha 6(IV), and alpha1(VII) in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 33), adenomas (n = 29) and in normal tissue from the same individuals...

  3. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    Fry, R.J.M.; Ley, R.D.; Grube, D.; Staffeldt, E.

    1980-01-01

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion

  4. Mechanistic modelling of genetic and epigenetic events in radiation carcinogenesis

    Andreev, S. G.; Eidelman, Y. A.; Salnikov, I. V.; Khvostunov, I. K.

    2006-01-01

    Methodological problems arise on the way of radiation carcinogenesis modelling with the incorporation of radiobiological and cancer biology mechanistic data. The results of biophysical modelling of different endpoints [DNA DSB induction, repair, chromosome aberrations (CA) and cell proliferation] are presented and applied to the analysis of RBE-LET relationships for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation (RINT) of C3H/10T1/2 cells in culture. Predicted values for some endpoints correlate well with the data. It is concluded that slowly repaired DSB clusters, as well as some kind of CA, may be initiating events for RINT. As an alternative interpretation, it is possible that DNA damage can induce RINT indirectly via epigenetic process. A hypothetical epigenetic pathway for RINT is discussed. (authors)

  5. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    Olinski, R.; Jaruga, P.; Zastawny, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  6. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...... observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks...... in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent...

  7. Radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanistically based differences between gamma-rays and neutrons, and interactions with DMBA.

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available Different types of ionizing radiation produce different dependences of cancer risk on radiation dose/dose rate. Sparsely ionizing radiation (e.g. γ-rays generally produces linear or upwardly curving dose responses at low doses, and the risk decreases when the dose rate is reduced (direct dose rate effect. Densely ionizing radiation (e.g. neutrons often produces downwardly curving dose responses, where the risk initially grows with dose, but eventually stabilizes or decreases. When the dose rate is reduced, the risk increases (inverse dose rate effect. These qualitative differences suggest qualitative differences in carcinogenesis mechanisms. We hypothesize that the dominant mechanism for induction of many solid cancers by sparsely ionizing radiation is initiation of stem cells to a pre-malignant state, but for densely ionizing radiation the dominant mechanism is radiation-bystander-effect mediated promotion of already pre-malignant cell clone growth. Here we present a mathematical model based on these assumptions and test it using data on the incidence of dysplastic growths and tumors in the mammary glands of mice exposed to high or low dose rates of γ-rays and neutrons, either with or without pre-treatment with the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz-alpha-anthracene (DMBA. The model provides a mechanistic and quantitative explanation which is consistent with the data and may provide useful insight into human carcinogenesis.

  8. Detection of the onset of ischemia and carcinogenesis by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-based in vivo bioluminescence imaging.

    Tetsuya Kadonosono

    Full Text Available An animal model for the early detection of common fatal diseases such as ischemic diseases and cancer is desirable for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 is a transcription factor that regulates oxygen homeostasis and plays key roles in a number of diseases, including cancer. Here, we established transgenic (Tg mice that carry HRE/ODD-luciferase (HOL gene, which generates bioluminescence in an HIF-1-dependent manner and was successfully used in this study to monitor HIF-1 activity in ischemic tissues. To monitor carcinogenesis in vivo, we mated HOL mice with rasH2 Tg mice, which are highly sensitive to carcinogens and are used for short-term carcinogenicity assessments. After rasH2-HOL Tg mice were treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, bioluminescence was detected noninvasively as early as 9 weeks in tissues that contained papillomas and malignant lesions. These results suggest that the Tg mouse lines we established hold significant potential for monitoring the early onset of both ischemia and carcinogenesis and that these lines will be useful for screening chemicals for carcinogenic potential.

  9. Paradoxes in carcinogenesis: New opportunities for research directions

    Kramer Barnett S

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevailing paradigm in cancer research is the somatic mutation theory that posits that cancer begins with a single mutation in a somatic cell followed by successive mutations. Much cancer research involves refining the somatic mutation theory with an ever increasing catalog of genetic changes. The problem is that such research may miss paradoxical aspects of carcinogenesis for which there is no likely explanation under the somatic mutation theory. These paradoxical aspects offer opportunities for new research directions that should not be ignored. Discussion Various paradoxes related to the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis are discussed: (1 the presence of large numbers of spatially distinct precancerous lesions at the onset of promotion, (2 the large number of genetic instabilities found in hyperplastic polyps not considered cancer, (3 spontaneous regression, (4 higher incidence of cancer in patients with xeroderma pigmentosa but not in patients with other comparable defects in DNA repair, (5 lower incidence of many cancers except leukemia and testicular cancer in patients with Down's syndrome, (6 cancer developing after normal tissue is transplanted to other parts of the body or next to stroma previously exposed to carcinogens, (7 the lack of tumors when epithelial cells exposed to a carcinogen were transplanted next to normal stroma, (8 the development of cancers when Millipore filters of various pore sizes were was inserted under the skin of rats, but only if the holes were sufficiently small. For the latter paradox, a microarray experiment is proposed to try to better understand the phenomena. Summary The famous physicist Niels Bohr said "How wonderful that we have met with a paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress." The same viewpoint should apply to cancer research. It is easy to ignore this piece of wisdom about the means to advance knowledge, but we do so at our peril.

  10. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  11. Mechanisms of caffeine-induced inhibition of UVB carcinogenesis

    Allan H Conney

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than 2 million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect.Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345 and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis and supports the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine’s inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis.

  12. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Liu Jie; Qu Wei; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  13. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Sliva, Daniel; Loganathan, Jagadish; Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Lamb, John G.; Terry, Colin; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Adamec, Jiri; Sandusky, George E.; Dudhgaonkar, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP]) and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS]) in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. Conclusions Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:23118901

  14. Challenging the Myth: Transvaginal Mesh is Not Associated with Carcinogenesis.

    Chughtai, Bilal; Sedrakyan, Art; Mao, Jialin; Thomas, Dominique; Eilber, Karyn S; Clemens, J Quentin; Anger, Jennifer T

    2017-10-01

    We sought to determine if there was a potential link between synthetic polypropylene mesh implantation for transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence, and carcinogenesis using statewide administrative data. Women who underwent transvaginal surgery for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence with mesh between January 2008 and December 2009 in New York State were identified using ICD-9-CM procedure codes and CPT-4 codes. Patients in the mesh cohort were individually matched to 2 control cohorts based on comorbidities and procedure date. Carcinogenesis was determined before and after matching at 1, 2 and 3 years, and during the entire followup time. A total of 2,229 patients who underwent mesh based pelvic organ prolapse surgery and 10,401 who underwent sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence between January 2008 and December 2009 were included in the study. Mean followup was 6 years (range 5 to 7). Exact matching between the mesh and control cohorts resulted in 1,870 pairs for pelvic organ prolapse mesh and cholecystectomy (1:2), 1,278 pairs for pelvic organ prolapse mesh and hysterectomy (1:1), 7,986 pairs for sling and cholecystectomy (1:1) and 3,810 pairs for sling and hysterectomy (1:1). Transvaginal mesh implantation was not associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis (pelvic/local cancers or any cancer) at 1 year and during the entire followup of up to 7 years. Transvaginal surgery with implantation of mesh was not associated with the development of malignancy at a mean followup of 6 years. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Celecoxib prevents colitis associated colon carcinogenesis: an upregulation of apoptosis.

    Setia, Shruti; Nehru, Bimla; Sanyal, Sankar N

    2014-12-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis are the critical events transforming a normal cell to a cancerous one wherein the inflammatory microenvironment supports this oncogenic transformation. The process of colon carcinogenesis may be aggravated in chronic inflammatory conditions such as ulcerative colitis where non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may effectively prevent the cellular and molecular events. Western blots and immunofluorescent analysis of DNA mismatch repair enzymes, cell cycle regulators and pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins were performed in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis and 1,2-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMH)-induced colon cancer. Also, apoptotic studies were done in isolated colonocytes using fluorescent staining and in paraffin sections using TUNEL assay. An upregulation of cell cycle regulators: cyclin D1/cdk4 and cyclin E/cdk2 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, along with the suppression of DNA repair enzymes: MLH1 and MSH2; tumour suppressors: p53, p21and Rb and pro-apoptotic proteins: Bax and Bad were observed in the DSS, DMH and DSS+DMH groups. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was also overexpressed in these groups. The ultimate executioner of the apoptotic pathway; caspase-3, was suppressed in these groups. Apoptotic studies in colonocytes and paraffin sections revealed suppressed apoptosis in these groups. These effects were corrected with the administration of a second generation NSAID, celecoxib along with the treatment of DSS and DMH. The chemopreventive action of celecoxib in colitis mediated colon carcinogenesis may include the regulation of DNA mismatch repair enzymes, cell cycle check points, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Present status of theories and data analyses of mathematical models for carcinogenesis

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawaguchi, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are the basic mathematical models (hazard functions), present trend of the model studies and that for radiation carcinogenesis. Hazard functions of carcinogenesis are described for multi-stage model and 2-event model related with cell dynamics. At present, the age distribution of cancer mortality is analyzed, relationship between mutation and carcinogenesis is discussed, and models for colorectal carcinogenesis are presented. As for radiation carcinogenesis, models of Armitage-Doll and of generalized MVK (Moolgavkar, Venson, Knudson, 1971-1990) by 2-stage clonal expansion have been applied to analysis of carcinogenesis in A-bomb survivors, workers in uranium mine (Rn exposure) and smoking doctors in UK and other cases, of which characteristics are discussed. In analyses of A-bomb survivors, models above are applied to solid tumors and leukemia to see the effect, if any, of stage, age of exposure, time progression etc. In miners and smokers, stages of the initiation, promotion and progression in carcinogenesis are discussed on the analyses. Others contain the analyses of workers in Canadian atomic power plant, and of patients who underwent the radiation therapy. Model analysis can help to understand the carcinogenic process in a quantitative aspect rather than to describe the process. (R.T.)

  17. Analysis and Modeling for Short- to Medium-Term Load Forecasting Using a Hybrid Manifold Learning Principal Component Model and Comparison with Classical Statistical Models (SARIMAX, Exponential Smoothing and Artificial Intelligence Models (ANN, SVM: The Case of Greek Electricity Market

    George P. Papaioannou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose a new hybrid model, a combination of the manifold learning Principal Components (PC technique and the traditional multiple regression (PC-regression, for short and medium-term forecasting of daily, aggregated, day-ahead, electricity system-wide load in the Greek Electricity Market for the period 2004–2014. PC-regression is shown to effectively capture the intraday, intraweek and annual patterns of load. We compare our model with a number of classical statistical approaches (Holt-Winters exponential smoothing of its generalizations Error-Trend-Seasonal, ETS models, the Seasonal Autoregressive Moving Average with exogenous variables, Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average with eXogenous (SARIMAX model as well as with the more sophisticated artificial intelligence models, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and Support Vector Machines (SVM. Using a number of criteria for measuring the quality of the generated in-and out-of-sample forecasts, we have concluded that the forecasts of our hybrid model outperforms the ones generated by the other model, with the SARMAX model being the next best performing approach, giving comparable results. Our approach contributes to studies aimed at providing more accurate and reliable load forecasting, prerequisites for an efficient management of modern power systems.

  18. The French biogas market by 2020. Injected biogas, co-generation, fuel biomethane, and so on: which challenges and perspectives for the market and the different actors on the medium term?

    2016-03-01

    As the French biogas market keeps on developing, as its growth potential on the medium term is doubtless, and as always more farmers and waste-water treatment plants are equipped with biogas plants, many technical problems remain to be solved, objectives will not be reached, and new regulations and measures are introduced by public authorities to support the sector. In order to provide an overview of this context, this report proposes an analysis of the market and of its perspectives (presentation of determining factors, analysis of the activity evolution until 2015, analysis of the main biogas producing sectors, provisional scenario by 2020), an analysis of the external environment (support measures, impact of regulation, assessments of waste supplies, focus on some other structural factors like economy de-industrialisation and difficult acceptance of biogas projects). The report also analyses the business model of operators (income, financing, investments, burdens, relationships between actors) and their financial situation (site profitability, over-costs related to technical difficulties). The last part addresses challenges and highlights: sector consolidation (takeovers, construction of large sites), new perspectives of valorisation with presentation of a case study, security of supplies through partnerships, and technique improvements

  19. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis.

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-09-06

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin.To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

  20. Silica-induced Chronic Inflammation Promotes Lung Carcinogenesis in the Context of an Immunosuppressive Microenvironment

    Javier Freire

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The association between inflammation and lung tumor development has been clearly demonstrated. However, little is known concerning the molecular events preceding the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize a chemically induced lung cancer mouse model in which lung cancer developed in the presence of silicotic chronic inflammation. Silica-induced lung inflammation increased the incidence and multiplicity of lung cancer in mice treated with N-nitrosodimethylamine, a carcinogen found in tobacco smoke. Histologic and molecular analysis revealed that concomitant chronic inflammation contributed to lung tumorigenesis through induction of preneoplastic changes in lung epithelial cells. In addition, silica-mediated inflammation generated an immunosuppressive microenvironment in which we observed increased expression of programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1, transforming growth factor-β1, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1, lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3, and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3, as well as the presence of regulatory T cells. Finally, the K-RAS mutational profile of the tumors changed from Q61R to G12D mutations in the inflammatory milieu. In summary, we describe some of the early molecular changes associated to lung carcinogenesis in a chronic inflammatory microenvironment and provide novel information concerning the mechanisms underlying the formation and the fate of preneoplastic lesions in the silicotic lung.

  1. Radionuclides in cigarettes may lead to carcinogenesis via p16INK4a inactivation

    Prueitt, Robyn L.; Goodman, Julie E.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that tobacco smoke is responsible for the vast majority of lung cancers worldwide. There are many known and suspected carcinogens present in cigarette smoke, including α-emitting radioisotopes. Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased lung cancer risk is associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, and it is estimated that the majority of smoking-induced lung cancers may be at least partly attributable to the inhaled and deposited radiation dose from radioisotopes in the cigarette smoke itself. Recent research shows that silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p16 INK4a (p16) by promoter methylation plays a role in smoking-related lung cancer. Inactivation of p16 has also been associated with lung cancer incidence in radiation-exposed workers, suggesting that radionuclides in cigarette smoke may be acting with other compounds to cause smoking-induced lung cancer. We evaluated the mechanism of ionizing radiation as an accepted cause of lung cancer in terms of its dose from tobacco smoke and silencing of p16. Because both radiation and cigarette smoking are associated with inactivation of p16, and p16 inactivation has been shown to play a major role in carcinogenesis, ionizing radiation from cigarette smoke likely plays a role in lung cancer risk. How large a role it plays, relative to chemical carcinogens and other modes of action, remains to be elucidated

  2. Suppression of radiation-induced in vitro carcinogenesis by ascorbic acid

    Tauchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Shozo

    1993-01-01

    The effects of ascorbic acid on radiation-induced in vitro carcinogenesis have been reported using neoplastic transformation system of C3H 10T1/2 cells. In these reports, no suppressive effect on X-ray-induced transformation was observed with 6 weeks' administration of ascorbic acid (daily addition for 5 days per week) by Kennedy (1984), whereas apparent suppression was observed with daily addition for 7 days by Yasukawa et al (1989). We have tested the effects of ascorbic acid on 60 Co gamma-ray or 252 Cf fission neutron-induced transformation in Balb/c 3T3 cells. The transformation induced by both types of radiations was markedly suppressed when ascorbic acid was daily added to the medium during first 8 days of the post-irradiation period. If ascorbic acid was added for a total of 8 days but with a day's interruption in the middle, the suppression of transformation was decreased. These results suggest that continuous presence of ascorbic acid for a certain number of days is needed to suppress radiation-induced transformation. Since ascorbic acid also suppressed the promotion of radiation-induced transformation by TPA when both chemicals were added together into the medium, ascorbic acid might act on the promotion stage of transformation. Therefore, the effect of ascorbic acid on the distribution of protein kinase C activity was also investigated, and possible mechanisms of suppression of radiation-induced transformation by ascorbic acid will be discussed. (author)

  3. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    Jae Sung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual’s genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk.

  4. Suppression of carcinogenesis in mice by adaptive responses to low dose rate irradiation

    Sakai, Kazuo; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Hoshi, Yuko; Nomura, Takaharu; Ina, Yasuhiro; Tanooka, Hiroshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Low Dose Radiation Research Center, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Effects of prolonged low-dose-rate irradiation on the process of carcinogenesis were examined in mice treated with chemical carcinogen or irradiated with high doses of X-rays. Female ICR mice, 5 week-old, 35 in each group, were exposed to gamma-rays from a {sup 137}Cs source in the long-term low dose rate irradiation facility at CRIEPI. The dose rate was 2.6 mGy/hr (A), 0.96 mGy/hr (B), or 0.30 mGy/hr (C). Thirty-five days later, the mice were injected into the groin with 0.5 mg of methylcholanthrene (MC) dissolved in olive oil and irradiation was continued. Cumulative tumor incidences after 216 days following MC injection were 89% in group A, 76% in group B, and 94% in group C. That in non-irradiated control group was 94%. The difference in the tumor incidence between the control and position B was statistically significant, indicating the suppressive effect of the low dose rate irradiation on the process of MC-induced carcinogenesis with an optimum dose rate around 1 mGy/hr. In B6C3F1 mice, although the suppression of tumor incidence was not observed, there was a significant delay in tumor appearance in the irradiated mice between 100-150 days after MC injection. A group of 20 female C57BL/6N mice, 5 weeks old, were exposed to gamma-rays at 0.95 mGy/hr for 5 weeks. Then, they were exposed weekly to 1.8 Gy whole body X-irradiation (300 kVp) for consecutive 4 weeks to induce thymic lymphoma. Another group received only the fractionated irradiation. The first mouse died from thymic lymphoma appeared 89 days after the last irradiation in the group received only the fractionated irradiation, while 110 days in the group combined with the low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  5. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  6. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    Nagy, Tamas

    2007-01-01

    ...) deletion in mammary-specific polyoma middle-T transgenic mice. We monitored mammary carcinogenesis in positive control (FAKFlox/Flox; MMTV-PyVT) and target (FAKFlox/Flox; MMTV-Cre; MMTV-PyVT) females...

  7. Age and Space Irradiation Modulate Tumor Progression: Implications for Carcinogenesis Risk

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Age plays a major role in tumor incidence and is an important consideration when modeling the carcinogenesis process or estimating cancer risks. Epidemiological data...

  8. Effects of environmental stressors on histone modifications and their relevance to carcinogenesis: a systematic review.

    Dik, S.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Godderis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex process involving both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The cellular molecular epigenetic machinery, including histone modifications, is associated with changes in gene expression induced by exposure to environmental agents. In this paper, we systematically reviewed

  9. Sweden's Future Climate in the short- and medium-term perspective. Basis for development of climate adaptation tools; Sveriges framtida klimat paa kort och medellaang sikt. Underlag foer utveckling av verktyg foer klimatanpassning

    Carlsen, Henrik; Parmhed, Oskar

    2008-12-15

    This report studies two questions - how the actual amount of greenhouse gas emissions has changed over time in comparison with previous assumptions and what will happen to Sweden's climate from short and medium term perspectives given the future development of the climate in general. The content of this report shall be used as the basis for continued work in the development of climate adaptation tools that can be used primarily in Sweden. The first section of this report presents the development of actual greenhouse gas emissions in recent years. Eight years have passed since IPCC published its emissions scenarios (SRES) and for this reason a comparison between the emissions levels from the report and the experimental data from observations made in recent years is well due. Measurements show that current levels of emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels exceed the average of the SRES families as a whole. Among other implications, this means that emission levels are significantly higher than the levels assumed in the climate scenarios of the Swedish Commission on Climate and Vulnerability (Klimat- och saarbarhetsutredningen). There is little support from the experimental data to indicate that this rate of increase will subside. In addition, studies are indicating that the increased emissions are not solely attributable to a rise in population levels and increased wealth (GNP/capita). Another aspect is that the carbon intensity, measured as the amount of carbon dioxide per unit production price, has been declining since 2000. This is entirely contrary to the assumptions made in all of the emissions scenarios in SRES that carbon dioxide efficiency would continue to increase. The report therefore concludes that work with climate adaptation in Sweden must take into consideration to a greater extent than is currently done today the consequences of emissions levels that are in line with or exceed the highest SRES levels. The second section of this report takes

  10. The level of claudin-7 is reduced as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

    Lange, Jette Bornholdt; Friis, Stine; Godiksen, Sine

    2011-01-01

    -regulation of the oncogenic serine protease, matriptase, induces leakiness in epithelial barriers both in vivo and in vitro. We found in an in-silico search tight co-regulation between matriptase and claudin-7 expression. We have previously shown that the matriptase expression level decreases during colorectal carcinogenesis....... In the present study we investigated whether claudin-7 expression is likewise decreased during colorectal carcinogenesis, thereby causing or contributing to the compromised epithelial leakiness of dysplastic tissue....

  11. Prospective evaluation of the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of Cocoon Duct Occluder for transcatheter closure of large patent ductus arteriosus: A single-center study with short- and medium-term follow-up results

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Razi, Mahmadula; Pandey, Rama Niwas; Kumar, Prakash; Krishna, Vinay; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Mishra, Vikas; Asif, Mohammad; Abdali, Nasar; Tewari, Pradyot; Thakur, Ramesh; Pandey, Umeshwar; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a novel Cocoon Duct Occluder device for the transcatheter closure (TCC) of large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Methods: In this prospective, non-randomized study, consecutive patients with large PDA (narrowest diameter: ≥3.5/4.0 mm in symptomatic/asymptomatic patients, respectively), who underwent TCC with Cocoon Duct Occluder at our institute between November, 2012 and June, 2016 were examined. TCC was performed using the standard technique, and devices were antegradely delivered via 6–10F delivery sheaths. Device embolization, residual shunt, hemolysis, left pulmonary artery (LPA) stenosis, procedural and fluoroscopy time, and mortality were assessed. Patients were followed-up by transthoracic echocardiography with color Doppler imaging at 24 h (D1), 1 month (D30), and 6 months (D180) after implantation. Results: A total of 57 patients (age: 11.7±2.8 years; weight: 22.3±3.5 kg) were enrolled. The mean narrowest diameter was 7.4±0.7 mm. The PDA closure was successfully performed in each patient. Fluoroscopy and procedural time was 6.7±3.2 min and 23.9±2.7 min, respectively. Postprocedural angiography revealed that 49 (85.9%) patients had immediate and complete closure, whereas 8 (14.1%) had residual shunt. Color Doppler imaging at D1 revealed complete closure in 52 (91.3%) patients. At D30, complete closure was reported in all patients and was maintained at D180. Hemolysis, embolization, obstruction of LPA or descending aorta, and death were not reported till D180. Conclusion: TCC using Cocoon Duct Occluder is feasible, safe, and effective in the management of patients with large PDA, with excellent results on short- and medium-term follow-up. PMID:29145233

  12. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  13. A generalized theory of carcinogenesis due to chronodisruption.

    Erren, Thomas C; Reiter, Russel J

    2008-12-01

    For two decades, research has been suggested and conducted into the causation and development of cancers in seemingly diverse and unrelated populations such as blind individuals, shift-workers, flight personnel, Arctic residents and subsets of sleepers. One common denominator of these investigations is "melatonin". Another common denominator is that all these studies implicitly pursued the validity of the so-called "melatonin hypothesis", of a corollary and of associated predictions which can be united in our proposed theory of "carcinogenesis due to chronodisruption". The new theory suggests that the various predictions investigated between 1987 and 2008 represent different aspects of the same problem. Indeed, abundant experimental evidence supports the notion that the final common cause of many cases of cancer may be what has been termed chronodisruption (CD), a relevant disturbance of the temporal organization or order of physiology, endocrinology, metabolism and behaviour. While melatonin as a key time messenger and time keeper can be a marker of CD, it is probably only partially related to the differential cancer occurrence apparent in individuals who chronically or frequently experience an excess or deficit of chronodisruption.

  14. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  15. Experimental pulmonary carcinogenesis by radon and its daughters

    Sato, Fumiaki

    1989-01-01

    Information on experimental pulmonary carcinogenesis by radon and its daughters has come mostly from experiments carried out in France and United States of America. In rats a dose response relation was estimated to be linear with dose at low dose region. Studies of rats exposed daily to radon and radon daughters indicated that the frequency of pulmonary cancer at total exposure greater than 3000 WLM was greater when the exposure rates were low. At low total exposures the dose-rate effect was less apparent. Cigarette smoke increased the pulmonary cancer in rats but decreased in dogs. The decrease may be due to a decrease of absorbed doses with increased secretion of mucus and to an enhancement of mucociliary clearance. After inhalation of 222 Ru at equilibrium with radon daughters, rats were inoculated intrapleurally with asbestos fibres or glass fibres. The additive co-carcinogenic effects of this type of insult were demonstrated by the increased incidence of malignant thoracic tumours. As for species differences, dogs and hamsters are relatively resistant to cancer induction and rats are sensitive. While bronchogenic carcinomas are the most frequently observed radiation-induced pulmonary cancer in humans, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas are the most frequent type in most animal species. (author)

  16. Skin carcinogenesis in man and in experimental models

    Hecker, E.; Jung, E.G.; Marks, F.; Tilgen, W.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents an updated overview of the current state of the art in scientific, experimental and clinical investigations on the generation and the prevention of cancer of the skin. From the achievements presented, marked refinements in the assessment of the risk of cancer, by environmental and endogenous factors, including tumor virus, will be stimulated. They include the problem of the stratospheric 'ozone holes' above both poles of the earth causing much public concern as expressed by current headlines in the media and by the United Nations Environmental Program. Moreover, new ideas will merge for developing specific approaches to explore the mechanistic, i.e. ultimately the molecular-biological, causes of skin cancer and others. In addition, the experimental utilization of oncogens and of other techniques of molecular biology at all levels of the biology of tissues and cells, may open up entirely new facets in the research on skin cancer. Detailed knowledge of the mechanistic aspects of skin carcinogenesis may give important hints with respect to 'tailor-make' and utilize new anti-tumor agents in the therapy of skin cancer for the benefit of the cancer patient. (orig.). 67 figs., 44 tabs

  17. Carcinogenesis in mice after low doses and dose rates

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The results from the experimental systems reported here indicate that the dose-response curves for tumor induction in various tissues cannot be described by a single model. Furthermore, although the understanding of the mechanisms involved in different systems is incomplete, it is clear that very different mechanisms for induction are involved. For some tumors the mechanism of carcinogenesis may be mainly a result of direct effects on the target cell, perhaps involving one or more mutations. While induction may occur, in many instances, through such direct effects, the eventual expression of the tumor can be influenced by a variety of host factors including endocrine status, competence of the immune system, and kinetics of target and interacting cell populations. In other tumors, indirect effects may play a major role in the initiation or expression of tumors. Some of the hormone-modulated tumors would fall into this class. Despite the complexities of the experimental systems and the lack of understanding of the types of mechanisms involved, in nearly every example the tumorigenic effectiveness per rad of low-LET radiation tends to decrease with decreasing dose rate. For some tumor types the differences may be small or may appear only with very low dose rates, while for others the dose-rate effects may be large

  18. Effects of retinoids on ultraviolet-induced carcinogenesis

    Epstein, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The evidence for effects of the retinoids on UV-induced carcinogenesis is sparse. Clinical observations indicate that topical RA can cause significant regression of premalignant actinic keratoses. Also there is some evidence that this agent can cause dissolution of some basal cell epitheliomas. However this latter effect does not appear to be of therapeutic value. Systemic retinoids are of little value in the treatment of premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions though 13-cis-retinoic acid might be of use in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Examination of the influence of the retinoids on photocarcinogenesis essentially has been confined to RA and animal experimentation. RA in nontoxic concentrations can both stimulate and inhibit photocarcinogenesis depending upon the circumstances of the study. The mechanisms of these responses are not clear. Influences on DNA synthesis directly and/or indirectly or on immune responses may be involved in both effects. Preliminary studies with oral 13-cis-retinoic acid have not demonstrated any effects to date on UV-induced skin cancer formation

  19. Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis

    Black, H S [Photobiology Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston, TX (USA); McCann, V [Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine; Thornby, J I [Biostatistics Section, Research Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston, TX (USA)

    1982-08-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the effects of animal age on the anticarcinogenic properties of antioxidants. Female hairless mice, 2.5, 4.5 and 9.5 months of age, were subjected to daily irradiation from Westinghouse BZS-WLG lamps for 19 weeks. Experimental groups of animals were maintained on a commercial rodent meal supplemented with a 2% (w/w) antioxidant mixture. Control groups received only the meal. Tumour latency, expressed as median time to tumor development, was significantly greater for all age groups receiving antioxidants than for their similarly aged controls. However, the response to antioxidants appeared to decrease with age and the antioxidant effect was significantly less in the 9.5 month-old group than in the 2.5 month-old group. Likewise, the two youngest groups receiving antioxidants demonstrated a significantly fewer number of tumors per animal. It is concluded that animal age influences the degree of photoprotection provided by antioxidants. Whether this effect is related to dietary intake, and thus dependent upon resident antioxidant levels, is unknown. Nevertheless, dietary antioxidants provide significant protection in young animals against carcinogenesis induced by radiation of predominantly UVB wavelengths.

  20. Review of hepatocellular carcinoma: Epidemiology, etiology, and carcinogenesis

    Yezaz Ahmed Ghouri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, the epidemic of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has spread beyond the Eastern Asian predominance and has been increasing in Northern hemisphere, especially in the United States (US and Western Europe. It occurs more commonly in males in the fourth and fifth decades of life. Among all cancers, HCC is one of the fastest growing causes of death in the US and poses a significant economic burden on healthcare. Chronic liver disease due to hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus and alcohol accounts for the majority of HCC cases. Incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been on the risem and it has also been associated with the development of HCC. Its pathogenesis varies based on the underlying etiological factor although majority of cases develop in the setting of background cirrhosis. Carcinogenesis of HCC includes angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and tumor macroenvironment and microenvironment. There is a significant role of both intrinsic genetic risk factors and extrinsic influences such as alcohol or viral infections that lead to the development of HCC. Understanding its etiopathogenesis helps select appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments.

  1. Review of hepatocellular carcinoma: Epidemiology, etiology, and carcinogenesis.

    Ghouri, Yezaz Ahmed; Mian, Idrees; Rowe, Julie H

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the epidemic of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has spread beyond the Eastern Asian predominance and has been increasing in Northern hemisphere, especially in the United States (US) and Western Europe. It occurs more commonly in males in the fourth and fifth decades of life. Among all cancers, HCC is one of the fastest growing causes of death in the US and poses a significant economic burden on healthcare. Chronic liver disease due to hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus and alcohol accounts for the majority of HCC cases. Incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been on the risem and it has also been associated with the development of HCC. Its pathogenesis varies based on the underlying etiological factor although majority of cases develop in the setting of background cirrhosis. Carcinogenesis of HCC includes angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and tumor macroenvironment and microenvironment. There is a significant role of both intrinsic genetic risk factors and extrinsic influences such as alcohol or viral infections that lead to the development of HCC. Understanding its etiopathogenesis helps select appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments.

  2. Short-term carcinogenesis evaluation of Casearia sylvestris

    Cleide A.S. Tirloni

    Full Text Available Abstract Casearia sylvestris Sw., Salicaceae, is an important medicinal plant widely used in Brazil for the treatment of various cardiovascular disorders. This species was included as of interest by Brazilian Unified Health System. Although preclinical studies described cardiovascular protective effects and apparent absence of toxicity, no studies have evaluated its carcinogenic potential. In this study, we proposed a short-term carcinogenesis evaluation of C. sylvestris in Wistar rats, aiming to check the safety of this species to use it as proposed by Brazilian Unified Health System. C. sylvestris leaves were obtained and the crude extract was prepared by maceration from methanol/water. Wistar rats were orally treated for 12 weeks with 50, 250 or 500 mg kg−1 of crude extract or vehicle. Body weight, daily morbidity and mortality were monitored. Blood and bone marrow samples were collect for micronucleus test, comet assay and tumor markers evaluation. Vital organs were removed to macro and histopathological analyses. The crude extract did not induce mutagenic and genotoxic effects and no alterations were observed in important tumor markers. Finally, no detectable signs of injury through gross pathology or histopathological examinations were observed. Our results certify the absence of the crude extract toxicity, indicating its safety, even at prolonged exposure as proposed by Brazilian Unified Health System.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition in colon experimental carcinogenesis Inhibición de la ciclooxigenasa-2 en la carcinogénesis cólica experimental

    J. F. Noguera Aguilar

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: an overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 has been seen in colon tumors; therefore, COX-2 specific inhibitors may be used as preventive agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of both selective and non-selective COX-2 inhibitors on the incidence of colonic tumors in a model of chemical carcinogenesis in the rat. Design: experimental study with 65 male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four groups: (a control (n = 20, with chemical carcinogenesis using 1-2 dimethylhydrazine (1-2 DMH; (b acetylsalicylic acid (ASA (n = 15, with chemical carcinogenesis and the addition of ASA at 30 mg/kg; (c low-dose rofecoxib (n = 15, with chemical carcinogenesis and the addition of rofecoxib at a dose of 1.2 mg/kg; (d high-dose rofecoxib (n = 15, with carcinogenesis and the addition of rofecoxib at 3 mg/kg. Carcinogenic induction was performed with 1-2 DMH at a weekly dose of 25 mg/kg for 18 weeks. The main parameter evaluated was percentage of neoplastic colonic tissue, which relates tumor surface area to colon surface area. Results: rofecoxib at a dose of 3 mg/kg significantly reduced chemical colon carcinogenesis in rats (p Introducción: se ha comprobado a nivel clínico y experimental la existencia de sobreexpresión de la ciclooxigenasa-2 (COX-2 en los tumores de colon, por lo que los inhibidores de dicha enzima podrían tener un efecto preventivo. El objetivo del estudio es investigar el efecto de la inhibición de la ciclooxigenasa en un modelo de carcinogénesis cólica farmacológica en la rata. Material y métodos: estudio experimental en 65 ratas Sprague-Dawley macho, asignadas a uno de los grupos: control (n = 20, con carcinogénesis farmacológica con 1-2 dimetilhidrazina; grupo ácido acetilsalicílico (n = 15, con carcinogénesis y adición de AAS, grupo Inhibidores COX-2 a bajas dosis (n = 15, con carcinogénesis y adición de rofecoxib a dosis de 1,2 mg/kg, y grupo Inhibidores COX-2 a altas dosis

  4. Chemical and Molecular Biological Aspects of Alkylhydrazine-Induced Carcinogenesis in Human Cells in Vitro. Revised

    1984-04-01

    DMH) and the metabolite methylazoxymethanol acetate ( MAMA ) have been shown to induce cancer in vivo in several species of rodents producing a variety of...The Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Research Institute (PTRI) I Co-Director, Developmental Chemotherapeutics, OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center...NNL[Methyl-l 4 C] I -dimethylhydrazine) of high specific activity Chapter III - Synthesis of (14 C] -labeled methylazoxymethanol 13 acetate ( MAMA ) of

  5. Selenium prevents tumor development in a rat model for chemical carcinogenesis

    Bjorkhem-Bergman, L.; Torndal, U. B.; Eken, S.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have shown that selenium compounds can prevent cancer development. In this work we studied the tumor preventive effect of selenium supplementation, administrated as selenite, in the initiation, promotion and progression phases in a synchronized rat model for...

  6. Role of environmental chemicals, processed food derivatives, and nutrients in the induction of carcinogenesis

    Persano, L.; Zagoura, D.; Louisse, J.; Pistollato, F.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it has been hypothesized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the actual driving force of tumor formation, highlighting the need to specifically target CSCs to successfully eradicate cancer growth and recurrence. Particularly, the deregulation of physiological signaling pathways

  7. Immunophenotypic Analysis in Early Müllerian Serous Carcinogenesis.

    Nafisi, Houman; Ghorab, Zeina; Ismill, Nadia; Dubé, Valerie; Plotkin, Anna; Han, Guangming; Cesari, Matthew; Lu, Fang-I; Saad, Reda; Khalifa, Mahmoud; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon

    2015-09-01

    Studies on the immunophenotypes of early forms of serous carcinoma arising from female genital tract are limited. We aimed to examine p53, p16(Ink4a), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), ERBB2, WT1, and Ki-67 protein expression in endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (n=29), serous tubal intraepithelial lesion (n=4) and carcinoma (STIC, n=10), and the putative precursor p53 signature (n=11). Among endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma, 80% demonstrated p53 overexpression and 10% were consistent with a null phenotype. p16(Ink4a) immunostaining were observed in all endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma cases. ER, PR, ERBB2, and WT1 were positive in 54%, 25%, 11%, and 18% of cases, respectively. STIC cases demonstrated p53 overexpression and null phenotype in 90% and 10%, respectively. All STIC cases were p16(Ink4a) and WT1 positive, whereas ER and PR were positive in 70% and 20%, respectively. All STICs were negative for ERBB2. Among serous tubal intraepithelial lesion cases, 75% demonstrated p53 overexpression and 25% a null phenotype. p53 was positive in all 11 p53 signature cases, whereas p16(Ink4a) was universally negative. Finally, ER and PR were positive in 100% and 73% of p53 signature cases, respectively. These results suggest that p16(Ink4a) has a role in early Müllerian serous carcinogenesis but is absent in the earliest noncommitted lesion. p16(Ink4a) immunohistochemistry can be used as an adjunct confirmatory tool in p53-null cases with limited surface area.

  8. Relationship to carcinogenesis of repetitive low-dose radiation exposure

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose. (author)

  9. Three molecular pathways model colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome.

    Ahadova, Aysel; Gallon, Richard; Gebert, Johannes; Ballhausen, Alexej; Endris, Volker; Kirchner, Martina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Burn, John; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Bläker, Hendrik; Kloor, Matthias

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency has long been regarded as a secondary event in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Recently, this concept has been challenged by the discovery of MMR-deficient crypt foci in the normal mucosa. We aimed to reconstruct colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome by collecting molecular and histology evidence from Lynch syndrome adenomas and carcinomas. We determined the frequency of MMR deficiency in adenomas from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers by immunohistochemistry and by systematic literature analysis. To trace back the pathways of pathogenesis, histological growth patterns and mutational signatures were analyzed in Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Literature and immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated MMR deficiency in 491 (76.7%) out of 640 adenomas (95% CI: 73.3% to 79.8%) from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Histologically normal MMR-deficient crypts were found directly adjacent to dysplastic adenoma tissue, proving their role as tumor precursors in Lynch syndrome. Accordingly, mutation signature analysis in Lynch colorectal cancers revealed that KRAS and APC mutations commonly occur after the onset of MMR deficiency. Tumors lacking evidence of polypous growth frequently presented with CTNNB1 and TP53 mutations. Our findings demonstrate that Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers can develop through three pathways, with MMR deficiency commonly representing an early and possibly initiating event. This underlines that targeting MMR-deficient cells by chemoprevention or vaccines against MMR deficiency-induced frameshift peptide neoantigens holds promise for tumor prevention in Lynch syndrome. © 2018 UICC.

  10. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  11. Interaction between APC and Fen1 during breast carcinogenesis.

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Law, Brian K; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant DNA base excision repair (BER) contributes to malignant transformation. However, inter-individual variations in DNA repair capacity plays a key role in modifying breast cancer risk. We review here emerging evidence that two proteins involved in BER - adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) - promote the development of breast cancer through novel mechanisms. APC and Fen1 expression and interaction is increased in breast tumors versus normal cells, APC interacts with and blocks Fen1 activity in Pol-β-directed LP-BER, and abrogation of LP-BER is linked with cigarette smoke condensate-induced transformation of normal breast epithelial cells. Carcinogens increase expression of APC and Fen1 in spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cells, human colon cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Since APC and Fen1 are tumor suppressors, an increase in their levels could protect against carcinogenesis; however, this does not seem to be the case. Elevated Fen1 levels in breast and lung cancer cells may reflect the enhanced proliferation of cancer cells or increased DNA damage in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor functions of APC and Fen1 is due to their interaction, which may act as a susceptibility factor for breast cancer. The increased interaction of APC and Fen1 may occur due to polypmorphic and/or mutational variation in these genes. Screening of APC and Fen1 polymorphic and/or mutational variations and APC/Fen1 interaction may permit assessment of individual DNA repair capability and the risk for breast cancer development. Such individuals might lower their breast cancer risk by reducing exposure to carcinogens. Stratifying individuals according to susceptibility would greatly assist epidemiologic studies of the impact of suspected environmental carcinogens. Additionally, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of APC and Fen1 may provide the basis for developing new and

  12. Biogenic silica fibre promotes carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    Bhatt, T; Coombs, M; O'Neill, C

    1984-10-15

    Silica fibres derived from plants are common contaminants of human diet in certain regions of the world where oesophageal cancer reaches extremely high incidences. We show here that one of these types of fibre (derived from Phalaris canariensis L) promotes the occurrence of tumours in the skin of mice initiated with a polycyclic carcinogen. Three experiments are described. In the first, the grain which bears these fibres was added to the diet. This did not result in any abnormality in any part of the gastrointestinal tract, but there was a significant induction of tumours in the skin around the mouth and nose; these were the areas of the body surface which most frequently came into contact with the grain. In the second experiment, the mice were separated from the grain by an intervening wire gauze barrier; a similar number of tumours appeared on initiated mice treated in this way. In this case, contact now occurred most frequently on the dorsal surface, which was rubbed against the gauze barrier, and it was on this surface that the tumours appeared. No tumours appeared if the grain was removed. In the third experiment, pure fibres were isolated from the surface of the grain and boiled in strong nitric acid so as to remove any organic material. When these acid-cleaned fibres were applied to the initiated skin with light pressure, they promoted carcinogenesis in the same way as croton oil. In each experiment the majority of tumours produced were benign neoplasms, together with at least one squamous carcinoma. It seems possible that the size and shape of these fibres are the critical properties determining their promoting activity. Their mean diameter is 15 microns, their modal length close to 200 microns, and they are sharply pointed with a tip diameter of 0.5 micron.

  13. A medium-term intervention study on the impact of high- and low-fat snacks varying in sweetness and fat content: large shifts in daily fat intake but good compensation for daily energy intake.

    Lawton, C L; Delargy, H J; Smith, F C; Hamilton, V; Blundell, J E

    1998-08-01

    Thirty-six normal-weight, habitual snackers (eighteen males, eighteen females) completed a medium-term intervention study designed to examine the tendency of four different types of snacks, varying in nutrient (low- (LF) or high-fat (HF) and sensory properties (sweet (SW) or non-sweet (NSW)), to influence the control of appetite and to adjust daily energy intake. Subjects were exposed to each snack category for a 3-week period and were asked to consume a minimum number of snacks each day so that at least 25% of their daily energy intake would be derived from the test snacks. Energy and macronutrient intakes from the test snacks were calculated every day and also from other eating episodes (using 3 d food diary records) during the third week of snack exposure. Subjects consumed more energy/d from the SW snacks than from the NSW snacks, with most energy being consumed from the HF/SW snacks (3213 kJ) and least energy from the LF/NSW snacks (1628 kJ). This differential snack intake remained stable across the whole snack exposure period. Total daily energy intake did not differ significantly during exposure to any of the four snack types. Furthermore, the encouragement to eat freely from the test snacks did not lead to daily overconsumption of energy when compared with pre-study intakes. Hence, the level of snack consumption was largely compensated for by the energy consumed from the rest of the eating pattern. Although daily energy intake during exposure to the HF snacks was an average of 364 kJ higher (NS) than that during exposure to the LF snacks, the clearest and most significant effect of snack consumption was on daily macronutrient intake. Appreciable consumption of the HF snacks raised the percentage of total daily energy intake consumed as fat from 37 to 41% (P snacks reduced daily fat intake to 33.5% (LF/SW, P snacks, when compared with HF snacks, is an effective strategy to reduce fat intake so that it approaches the recommendations of dietary guidelines

  14. MicroRNA, SND1, and alterations in translational regulation in colon carcinogenesis

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNA (miRNA) has recently attracted major interest in relation to its involvement in cancer development. miRNA is a member of small non-coding RNA, consists of 22-24 nucleotides and regulates expression of target mRNA species in a post-transcriptional manner by being incorporated with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1), a component of RISC, is frequently up-regulated in human colon cancers and also chemically induced colon cancers in animals. We here showed that SDN1 is involved in miRNA-mediated gene suppression and overexpression of SND1 in colon cancer cells causes down-regulation of APC without altering APC mRNA levels. As for the miRNA expression profile in human colon cancer, miR-34a was among the list of down-regulated miRNA. Expression of miR-34a is tightly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of miR-34a in colon cancer cells causes remarkable reduction of cell proliferation and induces senescence-like phenotypes. MiR-34a also participates in the positive feedback loop of the p53 tumor suppressor network. This circuitry mechanism for p53 activation is of interest in understanding the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in colon carcinogenesis. miRNA should also be considered as novel anti-cancer agents in tumor suppressive therapeutic applications.

  15. δ- and γ-tocopherols, but not α-tocopherol, inhibit colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-treated F344 rats.

    Guan, Fei; Li, Guangxun; Liu, Anna B; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Zhihong; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung; Yang, Chung S

    2012-04-01

    The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E has been extensively discussed, but the activities of specific forms of tocopherols have not received sufficient attention. Herein, we compared the activities of δ-tocopherol (δ-T), γ-T, and α-T in a colon carcinogenesis model. Male F344 rats, seven weeks old, were given two weekly subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane (AOM) each at a dose of 15 mg/kg body weight. Starting 1 week before the AOM injection, the animals were maintained on a modified AIN76A diet, or the same diet containing 0.2% of δ-T, γ-T, α-T, or a γ-T-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT), until the termination of the experiment at 8 weeks after the second AOM injection. δ-T treatment showed the strongest inhibitory effect, decreasing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci by 62%. γ-T and γ-TmT were also effective, but α-T was not. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that δ-T and γ-T treatments reduced the levels of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine and the expression of cyclin D1 in the colon, preserved the expression of PPAR-γ, and decreased the serum levels of prostaglandin E2 and 8-isoprostane. Supplementation with 0.2% δ-T, γ-T, or α-T increased the respective levels of tocopherols and their side-chain degradation metabolites in the serum and colon tissues. Rather high concentrations of δ-T and γ-T and their metabolites were found in colon tissues. Our study provides the first evidence for the much higher cancer preventive activity of δ-T and γ-T than α-T in a chemically induced colon carcinogenesis model. It further suggests that δ-T is more effective than γ-T. 2012 AACR

  16. O-GlcNAcylation of RACK1 promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Duan, Fangfang; Wu, Hao; Jia, Dongwei; Wu, Weicheng; Ren, Shifang; Wang, Lan; Song, Shushu; Guo, Xinying; Liu, Fenglin; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Aberrant oncogenic mRNA translation and protein O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) are general features during tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, whether and how these two pathways are interlinked remain unknown. Our previous study indicated that ribosomal receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1) promoted chemoresistance and growth in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study is to examine the role of RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation in oncogene translation and HCC carcinogenesis. The site(s) of RACK1 for O-GlcNAcylation was mapped by mass spectrometry analysis. HCC cell lines were employed to examine the effects of RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation on the translation of oncogenic factors and behaviors of tumor cells in vitro. Transgenic knock-in mice were used to detect the role of RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation in modulating HCC tumorigenesis in vivo. The correlation of RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation with tumor progression and relapse were analyzed in clinical HCC samples. We found that ribosomal RACK1 was highly modified by O-GlcNAc at Ser122. O-GlcNAcylation of RACK1 enhanced its protein stability, ribosome binding and interaction with PKCβII (PRKCB), leading to increased eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation and translation of potent oncogenes in HCC cells. Genetic ablation of RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation at Ser122 dramatically suppressed tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis in vitro and in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC mouse model. Increased RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation was also observed in HCC patient samples and correlated with tumor development and recurrence after chemotherapy. These findings demonstrate that RACK1 acts as key mediator linking O-GlcNAc metabolism to cap-dependent translation during HCC tumorigenesis. Targeting RACK1 O-GlcNAcylation provides promising options for HCC treatment. O-GlcNAcylation of ribosomal receptor for activated C-kinase 1 at the amino acid serine122 promotes its stability, ribosome localization and interaction

  17. Mouse Models of the Skin: Models to Define Mechanisms of Skin Carcinogenesis

    Wheeler, D. L.; Verma, A. K.; Denning, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The multistep model of mouse skin carcinogenesis has facilitated identification of irreversible genetic events of initiation and progression, and epigenetic events of tumor promotion. Mouse skin tumor initiation can be accomplished by a single exposure to a sufficiently small dose of a carcinogen, and this step is rapid and irreversible. However, promotion of skin tumor formation requires a repeated and prolonged exposure to a promoter, and that tumor promotion is reversible. Investigations focused on the mechanisms of mouse carcinogenesis have resulted in the identifications of potential molecular targets of cancer induction and progression useful in planning strategies for human cancer prevention trials. This special issue contains eight papers that focus on mouse models used to study individual proteins expressed in the mouse skin and the role they play in differentiation, tissue homeostasis, skin carcinogenesis, and chemo prevention of skin cancer.

  18. Medium-term forecast of the Germany-wide electricity supply to final consumers for the calendar years 2016 to 2020. Study on behalf of the German transmission system operators

    Elsland, Rainer; Bossmann, Tobias; Klingler, Anna-Lena; Friedrichsen, Nele; Klobasa, Marian

    2015-01-01

    almost decisive for the amount of the EEG apportionment, depends on the development of the privileged final consumption and the associated payment flows. The amendment of the EEG in 2014 also resulted in a reform of the special compensation scheme (BesAR). This implies a much more complex calculation methodology for the calculation of privileged final consumption quantities. For 2016, a privileged final consumption of about 104 TWh is expected, which is slightly below the level of the previous years. This declining trend will continue in the coming years due to efficiency improvements in the industry, reaching a level of 101 TWh in 2020. The related allocation payments amount to 467 million Euros in 2016. Taking into account the prognosticated amounts for net electricity demand, self-procured self-supply and privileged final consumption, a non-privileged final consumption amounting to around 356 TWh results for 2016. It can be expected that the future decline in demand for net electricity will have a direct impact on the medium-term development of non-privileged final consumption, as the increase in self-sufficiency is compensated by a reduction in privileged final consumption. Accordingly, non-privileged final consumption is reduced to 351 TWh by the year 2020. [de

  19. Overview of osseous tissue findings from the lifespan carcinogenesis studies: From whole animals to molecules

    Miller, S.C.; Jee, W.S.S.; Bruenger, F.B.; Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    This summary presents some of the findings from the 226 Ra and 239 Pu lifespan carcinogenesis studies in Beagle dogs and discusses these findings relative to the tissue, cellular and molecular biology of osseous tissues. This report attempts to integrate some of the dosimetric and pathological findings with current understanding of the factors that may influence carcinogenesis (and non-carcinogenic pathologies) at the various levels of biological organization. Emphasis is placed on the findings from the 226 Ra study, as this study has recently been completely reviewed and verified

  20. Estrogen receptor beta, a possible tumor suppressor involved in ovarian carcinogenesis

    Lazennec, Gwendal

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading cause of death from gynecological tumors in women. Several lines of evidence suggest that estrogens may play an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis, through their receptors, ERα and ERβ. Interestingly, malignant ovarian tumors originating from epithelial surface constitute about 90% of ovarian cancers and expressed low levels of ERβ, compared to normal tissues. In addition, restoration of ERβ in ovarian cancer cells, leads to strong inhibition of their proliferation and invasion, while apoptosis is enhanced. In this manuscript, recent data suggesting a possible tumor-suppressor role for ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis are discussed. PMID:16399219

  1. Estimating radiation-induced cancer risk using MVK two-stage model for carcinogenesis

    Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Aoki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the carcinogenesis model as proposed by Moolgavkar et al., time-dependent relative risk models were derived for projecting the time variation in excess relative risk. If it is assumed that each process is described by time-independent linear dose-response relationship, the time variation in excess relative risk is influenced by the parameter related with the promotion process. The risk model based carcinogenesis theory would play a marked role in estimating radiation-induced cancer risk in constructing a projection model or transfer model

  2. Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cancer: Respirable Particulate Matter, Fibrous Dusts and Ozone as Major Causes of Lung Carcinogenesis through Reactive Oxygen Species Mechanisms

    Spyridon Loridas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.. Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM, at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc. play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM10 and PM2.5 are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  3. Fiscal 1999 survey report on long-term energy technological strategies and the like. Long-term energy technological strategy survey (Medium-term energy technological strategy survey); 1999 nendo choki energy gijutsu senryaku nado ni kansuru chosa hokokusho. Choki energy gijutsu senryaku chosa (chuki energy gijutsu senryaku chosa)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Energy strategies to be implemented under the New Sunshine Program by around 2010 have been compiled, with nation's industrial technological strategies, long-term energy outlook, and the like taken into consideration. The present survey aims to work out medium-term energy technological strategies. In Chapter 2, by conducting studies on the state of energy strategies in the national industry technological strategies as primarily compiled, long-term energy supply and demand outlook, and the history so far of the New Sunshine Program, and social conditions surrounding energy/environmental technologies and energy conditions are arranged in order and then analyzed with a view to deriving social needs. In Chapter 3, in view of the derived social needs, medium-term energy technological strategies are broken down into strategic target details, based on the important regions and major and minor strategic targets of the national industry technological strategies. In Chapter 4, medium-term energy technological strategies are worked out. In Chapter 5, 'basic ideas,' 'measures for promoting technology development,' 'return of the fruits to society' are mentioned as the methods of realizing the strategies. In Chapter 6, surveys and researches are summarized, and future development is predicted. (NEDO)

  4. Fiscal 1999 survey report on long-term energy technological strategies and the like. Long-term energy technological strategy survey (Medium-term energy technological strategy survey); 1999 nendo choki energy gijutsu senryaku nado ni kansuru chosa hokokusho. Choki energy gijutsu senryaku chosa (chuki energy gijutsu senryaku chosa)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Energy strategies to be implemented under the New Sunshine Program by around 2010 have been compiled, with nation's industrial technological strategies, long-term energy outlook, and the like taken into consideration. The present survey aims to work out medium-term energy technological strategies. In Chapter 2, by conducting studies on the state of energy strategies in the national industry technological strategies as primarily compiled, long-term energy supply and demand outlook, and the history so far of the New Sunshine Program, and social conditions surrounding energy/environmental technologies and energy conditions are arranged in order and then analyzed with a view to deriving social needs. In Chapter 3, in view of the derived social needs, medium-term energy technological strategies are broken down into strategic target details, based on the important regions and major and minor strategic targets of the national industry technological strategies. In Chapter 4, medium-term energy technological strategies are worked out. In Chapter 5, 'basic ideas,' 'measures for promoting technology development,' 'return of the fruits to society' are mentioned as the methods of realizing the strategies. In Chapter 6, surveys and researches are summarized, and future development is predicted. (NEDO)

  5. [Histologic study on impeding leukoplakia carcinogenesis of golden hamster cheek pouch about Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz].

    Zhou, C T; Zhong, W J; Hua, L; Hu, H F; Jin, Z G

    2000-06-01

    To observe the effect of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand Mazz (HEr) in impeding oral leukoplakia carcinogenesis, and to seek effective Chinese herb medicine that can impede precarcinoma of oral mucosas. 132 golden hamsters were randomly divided into model group (60 animals), HEr group (60 animals), and control group 12 animals. Salley's leukoplakia carcinogenesis model of golden hamster cheek pouch was used in this study. HEr was injected into the stomach to impede evolution of carcinogenesis. Pathological specimens were observed via naked eye and light microscope between model group and HEr group. Results were compared. Observation via naked-eye showed that leukoplakia rate of HEr group (18.2%) was lower than that of model group (27.3%). Observation via light microscope showed that carcinogenesis rate descended one fold and displasia rate descended 0.4 fold in HEr group. HEr has exact effect in impeding leukoplakia carcinogenesis.

  6. Lactobacillus salivarius Ren prevent the early colorectal carcinogenesis in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat model.

    Zhu, J; Zhu, C; Ge, S; Zhang, M; Jiang, L; Cui, J; Ren, F

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of Lactobacillus salivarius Ren (LS) on modulating colonic micro flora structure and influencing host colonic health in a rat model with colorectal precancerous lesions. Male F344 rats were injected with 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and treated with LS of two doses (5 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(10) CFU kg(-1) body weight) for 15 weeks. The colonic microflora profiles, luminal metabolites, epithelial proliferation and precancerous lesions [aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] were determined. A distinct segregation of colonic microflora structures was observed in LS-treated group. The abundance of one Prevotella-related strain was increased, and the abundance of one Bacillus-related strain was decreased by LS treatment. These changes were accompanied by increased short-chain fatty acid levels and decreased azoreductase activity. LS treatment also reduced the number of ACF by c. 40% and suppressed epithelial proliferation. Lactobacillus salivarius Ren improved the colonic microflora structures and the luminal metabolisms in addition preventing the early colorectal carcinogenesis in DMH-induced rat model. Colonic microflora is an important factor in colorectal carcinogenesis. Modulating the structural shifts of microflora may provide a novel option for preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. This study suggested a potential probiotic-based approach to modulate the intestinal microflora in the prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. E-cadherin Mediates the Preventive Effect of Vitamin D3 in Colitis-associated Carcinogenesis.

    Xin, Yu; He, Longmei; Luan, Zijian; Lv, Hong; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Xinhua; Zhou, Weixun; Yu, Songlin; Tan, Bei; Wang, Hongying; Qian, Jiaming

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin D3 is beneficial in ameliorating or preventing inflammation and carcinogenesis. Here, we evaluated if vitamin D3 has a preventive effect on colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Administration of azoxymethane (AOM), followed with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), was used to simulate colitis-associated colon cancer in mice. The supplement of vitamin D3 at different dosages (15, 30, 60 IU·g·w), started before AOM or immediately after DSS treatment (post 60), was sustained to the end of the experiment. Dietary vitamin D3 significantly reduced the number of tumors and tumor burden in a dose-dependent manner. Of note, vitamin D3 in high doses showed significant preventive effects on carcinogenesis regardless of administration before or after AOM-DSS treatment. Cell proliferation decreased in vitamin D3 groups compared with the control group after inhibition of expression of β-catenin and its downstream target gene cyclin D1 in the colon. In vitro, vitamin D3 reduced the transcriptional activity and nuclear level of β-catenin, and it also increased E-cadherin expression and its binding affinity for β-catenin. Moreover, repression of E-cadherin was rescued by supplemental vitamin D3 in mouse colons. Taken together, our results indicate that vitamin D3 effectively suppressed colonic carcinogenesis in the AOM-DSS mouse model. Our findings further suggest that upregulation of E-cadherin contributes to the preventive effect of vitamin D3 on β-catenin activity.

  8. Role of Stat in Skin Carcinogenesis: Insights Gained from Relevant Mouse Models

    Macias, E.; Rao, D.; DiGiovanni, J.; DiGiovanni, J.; DiGiovanni, J.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat) is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated in response to cytokines and growth factors and acts as a transcription factor. Stat plays critical roles in various biological activities including cell proliferation, migration, and survival. Studies using keratinocyte-specific Stat-deficient mice have revealed that Stat plays an important role in skin homeostasis including keratinocyte migration, wound healing, and hair follicle growth. Use of both constitutive and inducible keratinocyte-specific Stat-deficient mouse models has demonstrated that Stat is required for both the initiation and promotion stages of multistage skin carcinogenesis. Further studies using a transgenic mouse model with a gain of function mutant of Stat (Stat3C) expressed in the basal layer of the epidermis revealed a novel role for Stat in skin tumor progression. Studies using similar Stat-deficient and gain-of-function mouse models have indicated its similar roles in ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-mediated skin carcinogenesis. This paper summarizes the use of these various mouse models for studying the role and underlying mechanisms for the function of Stat in skin carcinogenesis. Given its significant role throughout the skin carcinogenesis process, Stat is an attractive target for skin cancer prevention and treatment.

  9. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures

  10. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    Payne CM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss.Keywords: chromosome 1p, colon carcinogenesis, molecular pathways, cellular pathways

  11. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria - A systematic review.

    Dias-Jácome, Emanuel; Libânio, Diogo; Borges-Canha, Marta; Galaghar, Ana; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii) as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis). However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any) of different microorganisms.

  12. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated

  13. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive three-year progress report, 1 May 1972--15 March 1976

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1976-03-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the pathological effects of various doses of x radiation on rats and mice, with emphasis on radioinduced carcinogenesis in parabiont rats with one of the pair exposed to 1000 R of whole body x radiation and the other shielded. Results are included from studies on alterations in metabolic parameters and life span induced by irradiation

  14. Dietary fish oil (MaxEPA) enhances pancreatic carcinogenesis in azaserine-treated rats

    Appel, M.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study the putative chemopreventive effect of dietary fish oil (MaxEPA) on azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats was investigated. Groups of rats were maintained on a semipurified low-fat (LF; 5 wt%) diet or on semipurified high-fat (HF; 25 wt%) diets containing 5 wt%

  15. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    Chen Shuhui; Wang Yiwen; Hsu Jueliang; Chang Hongyi; Wang Chiyun; Shen Potsun; Chiang Chiwu; Chuang Jingjing; Tsai Hungwen; Gu Powen; Chang Fangchih; Liu Hsiaosheng; Chow Nanhaw

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  16. Palytoxin: exploiting a novel skin tumor promoter to explore signal transduction and carcinogenesis.

    Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2007-01-01

    Palytoxin is a novel skin tumor promoter, which has been used to help probe the role of different types of signaling mechanisms in carcinogenesis. The multistage mouse skin model indicates that tumor promotion is an early, prolonged, and reversible phase of carcinogenesis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor promotion is therefore important for developing strategies to prevent and treat cancer. Naturally occurring tumor promoters that bind to specific cellular receptors have proven to be useful tools for investigating important biochemical events in multistage carcinogenesis. For example, the identification of protein kinase C as the receptor for the prototypical skin tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (also called phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) provided key evidence that tumor promotion involves the aberrant modulation of signaling cascades that govern cell fate and function. The subsequent discovery that palytoxin, a marine toxin isolated from zoanthids (genus Palythoa), is a potent skin tumor promoter yet does not activate protein kinase C indicated that investigating palytoxin action could help reveal new aspects of tumor promotion. Interestingly, the putative receptor for palytoxin is the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. This review focuses on palytoxin-stimulated signaling and how palytoxin has been used to investigate alternate biochemical mechanisms by which important targets in carcinogenesis can be modulated.

  17. Null effect of dietary restriction on prostate carcinogenesis in the Wistar-Unilever rat.

    McCormick, David L; Johnson, William D; Haryu, Todd M; Bosland, Maarten C; Lubet, Ronald A; Steele, Vernon E

    2007-01-01

    Chronic dietary restriction inhibits carcinogenesis in several sites in laboratory animals. To determine the effects of dietary restriction on prostate carcinogenesis, prostate cancers were induced in male Wistar-Unilever rats by a sequential regimen of cyproterone acetate (50 mg/day; 21 days); testosterone propionate (100 mg/kg/day; 3 days); N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [MNU; 30 mg/kg; single dose]; and testosterone (subcutaneous implants of 2 pellets containing 40 mg each). Dietary restriction (0% [ad libitum control], 15%, or 30%) was initiated 2 wk post-MNU, and continued until study termination at 12 mo. Dietary restriction induced a rapid suppression of body weight gain but conferred no protection against prostate carcinogenesis. 74% of carcinogen-treated ad libitum controls developed accessory sex gland cancers, versus cancer incidences of 64% and 72% in groups restricted by 15% and 30%, respectively. Similarly, 44% of dietary controls developed cancers limited to the dorsolateral/prostate, versus incidences of 45% and 53% in groups restricted by 15% and 30%. The results of the present study do not support the hypothesis that prostate carcinogenesis can be prevented by reducing caloric intake. Reducing mean body weight by up to 25% through chronic dietary restriction has no effect on the induction of prostate cancers in the Wistar-Unilever rat model.

  18. Multistep carcinogenesis of normal human fibroblasts. Human fibroblasts immortalized by repeated treatment with Co-60 gamma rays were transformed into tumorigenic cells with Ha-ras oncogenes.

    Namba, M; Nishitani, K; Fukushima, F; Kimoto, T

    1988-01-01

    Two normal mortal human fibroblast cell strains were transformed into immortal cell lines, SUSM-1 and KMST-6, by treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) and Co-60 gamma rays, respectively. These immortalized cell lines showed morphological changes of cells and remarkable chromosome aberrations, but neither of them grew in soft agar or formed tumors in nude mice. The immortal cell line, KMST-6, was then converted into neoplastic cells by treatment with Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MSV) or the c-Ha-ras oncogene derived from a human lung carcinoma. These neoplastically transformed cells acquired anchorage-independent growth potential and developed tumors when transplanted into nude mice. All the tumors grew progressively without regression until the animals died of tumors. In addition, the tumors were transplantable into other nude mice. Normal human fibroblasts, on the other hand, were not transformed into either immortal or tumorigenic cells by treatment with Ha-MSV or c-Ha-ras alone. Our present data indicate that (1) the chemical carcinogen, 4NQO, or gamma rays worked as an initiator of carcinogenesis in normal human cells, giving rise to immortality, and (2) the ras gene played a role in the progression of the immortally transformed cells to more malignant cells showing anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. In other words, the immortalization process of human cells seems to be a pivotal or rate-limiting step in the carcinogenesis of human cells.

  19. Endocrine disruptors in female reproductive tract development and carcinogenesis

    Ma, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their effects on human fetal development and adult health have promoted research into the underlying molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Gene targeting technology has allowed insight into the genetic pathways governing reproductive tract development and how exposure to EDCs during a critical developmental window can alter reproductive tract development, potentially forming the basis for adult diseases. This review prima...

  20. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  1. A comparison of the radiological and chemical detriments in man

    Maximilien, R.

    1988-04-01

    Following a review of the knowledge on the assessment of chemical carcinogens, a comparison between chemical and radiological detriments is attempted from a methodological standpoint. The main problem in chemical carcinogenesis is to get proofs, the discussion bearing on the identity of the interspecific biological mechanisms on account of the nearly constant lack of epidemiological data. The quantification of the neoplastic effects of chemical agents has not been fully developed and can be considered case by case only by carrying out a critical examination of the indicators available in order to extrapolate to man or to low doses [fr

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship Models for Rat Carcinogenesis and Assessing the Role Mutagens Play in Model Predictivity

    Carrasquer, C. Alex; Batey, Kaylind; Qamar, Shahid; Cunningham, Albert R.; Cunningham, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that fragment based cat-SAR carcinogenesis models consisting solely of mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens varied greatly in terms of their predictive accuracy. This led us to investigate how well the rat cancer cat-SAR model predicted mutagens and non-mutagens in their learning set. Four rat cancer cat-SAR models were developed: Complete Rat, Transgender Rat, Male Rat, and Female Rat, with leave-one-out (LOO) validation concordance values of 69%, 74%, 67%, and 73%, respectively. The mutagenic carcinogens produced concordance values in the range of 69–76% as compared to only 47–53% for non-mutagenic carcinogens. As a surrogate for mutagenicity comparisons between single site and multiple site carcinogen SAR models was analyzed. The LOO concordance values for models consisting of 1-site, 2-site, and 4+-site carcinogens were 66%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. As expected, the proportion of mutagens to non-mutagens also increased, rising from 54% for 1-site to 80% for 4+-site carcinogens. This study demonstrates that mutagenic chemicals, in both SAR learning sets and test sets, are influential in assessing model accuracy. This suggests that SAR models for carcinogens may require a two-step process in which mutagenicity is first determined before carcinogenicity can be accurately predicted. PMID:24697549

  3. Application of radiotracers in the assessment of prophylactic role of zinc in experimental model of colon carcinogenesis

    Dani, Vijayata; Vaiphei, K.; Dhawan, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The present study elucidated the modulatory effects of zinc in 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis using radiotracer techniques. Rats were segregated into four groups viz., untreated control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH+zinc treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/Kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum. The prophylactic role of zinc was assessed by following radiotracer techniques viz: whole body biological half life of 65 Zn and 65 Zn biodistribution, subcellular distribution, uptake of 3 H-Thymidine to assess rate of DNA synthesis, radiorespirometric determination of 14 C-D-Glucose metabolism and in-vitro uptake of labeled aminoacids. The statistical significance of the data has been determined by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by multiple post - hoc test. The carcinogenic state in the animals was confirmed by histopathological examination, whereby, well-differentiated signs of dysplasia were evident in colonic tissue sections of DMH treated rats. The biokinetics study of zinc revealed a significant decrease in the biological half life of 65 Zn. Also, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of 65 Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. The uptake rates of amino acids viz: 14 C-glycine, 14 C-alanine and 14 C-lysine were significantly higher in the DMH treated colons. Moreover, a significant increase in the uptake and turnover of 14 C-D-Glucose was also observed after DMH treatment. A significant increase in the ( 3 H)-thymidine uptake was observed following 16 weeks DMH treatment. However, supplementation of zinc significantly reversed the proliferative effect of DMH as evidenced by ameliorating the altered parameters. Radiotracer techniques play an important role in assessing

  4. [The biochemical carcinogenesis of selected heavy metals in bladder cancer].

    Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Marchewka, Zofia; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer takes the second place in the classification of morbidity of urinary system cancers. Many chemical factors take part in cancerogenesis. It is suggested that exposure to heavy metals such as arsenic, chromium, nickel and cadmium as well as its metabolites may trigger the bladder cancer through inducing excessive reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress formation which are responsible for DNA damage. In patients with bladder cancer is observed the disorder of processes regulated by p-53, including apoptosis. There are many patients with bladder cancer with confirmed absence of retinoblastoma protein, which is responsible of holding on the process of coming up the cells with mutation into synthesis, where the replication process undergoes. It is mentioned that excessive expression of proto-oncogenes may also cause the bladder cancer. The article concerns biochemical effects of exposure to chosen heavy metals and their potential role in bladder cancer progression.

  5. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  6. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  7. The influence of chromosome density variations on the increase in nuclear disorder strength in carcinogenesis

    Kim, Jun Soo; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic structural changes have long been observed in cancer cells and used as a marker in cancer diagnosis. Recent development of an optical technique, partial-wave spectroscopy (PWS), enabled more sensitive detection of nanoscale structural changes in early carcinogenesis in terms of the disorder strength related to density variations. These nanoscale alterations precede the well-known microscopic morphological changes. We investigate the influence of nuclear density variations due to chromosome condensation on changes of disorder strength by computer simulations of model chromosomes. Nuclear configurations with different degrees of chromosome condensation are realized from simulations of decondensing chromosomes and the disorder strength is calculated for these nuclear configurations. We found that the disorder strength increases significantly for configurations with slightly more condensed chromosomes. Coupled with PWS measurements, the simulation results suggest that the chromosome condensation and the resulting spatial density inhomogeneity may represent one of the earliest events in carcinogenesis

  8. The effect of synthetic immunomodulator thymogen on radiation carcinogenesis in rats

    Anisimov, V.N.; Miretskij, G.I.; Morozov, V.G.; Pavel'eva, I.A.; Khavinson, V.Kh.

    1992-01-01

    Five month-old female rats were given a mixture of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in drinking water in the dose of 0.1 and 0.2 μCi/day per animal over 12 months. Some animals received 12 monthly course of a synthetic immunomodulating dipeptide-thymogen in the dose of 5 μg/animal for 5 consecutive days. Radionuclide-treated rats showed higher occurence of tumors on the whole and of breast adenocarcinoma, in particular. Thymogen was shown to inhibit Sr-90- and Cs-137-induced radiation carcinogenesis, namely, a decrease in the total tumor and cancer occurence was observed. The animals receiving thymogen alone showed longer life span, slower rate of aging and lower overall tumor and cancer occurence. In this study, the ability of asynthetic peptide immunomodulator-thymogen to inhibit spontaneous and radionuclide-induced carcinogenesis in female rats was first established

  9. Cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation as the mode of action for diuron-induced urothelial carcinogenesis in the rat.

    da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Nascimento, Merielen G; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; de Lima, Patrícia L A; Zelandi, Edneia A; de Camargo, João Lauro V; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza C S

    2010-01-01

    Diuron, a substituted urea herbicide, is carcinogenic to the urinary bladder of rats at high dietary levels. Its proposed carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) includes urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative cell proliferation and sustained urothelial hyperplasia. Cytotoxicity could be induced either by urinary solids or by chemical toxicity by diuron and/or metabolites excreted in the urine. Diuron was not genotoxic in a previous single-cell gel (comet) assay, but possible cross-linking activity remained to be evaluated. The present study explored the MOA of diuron and the effect of urinary acidification on the development of urothelial lesions. Male Wistar rats were fed diuron (2500 ppm, about 130 mg/kg of body weight) either with or without NH(4)Cl 10,000 ppm to acidify the urine. Reversibility of urothelial changes was also examined. The animals were euthanized after 15, 25, or 30 weeks. Diuron-fed rats had urinary amorphous precipitate and magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals similar to control animals. Groups treated with diuron + NH(4)Cl showed decreased urinary pH and reduced amounts of urinary crystals and precipitate. Urothelial necrosis and simple hyperplasia were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy both in diuron- and in diuron + NH(4)Cl-treated groups. Cytotoxicity and proliferative changes were mostly reversible. A modified comet assay developed in vitro with Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that diuron did not induce DNA cross-links. These data suggest that cytotoxicity with consequent regenerative cell proliferation is the predominant MOA for diuron rat urothelial carcinogenesis, the cytotoxicity being chemically induced and not due to urinary solids.

  10. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice.

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-03-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1(-/-) and Mlh1(+/+) mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1(+/+) mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1(-/-) mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Wnt5a Is Associated with Cigarette Smoke-Related Lung Carcinogenesis via Protein Kinase C

    Whang, Young Mi; Jo, Ukhyun; Sung, Jae Sook; Ju, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Kyong Hwa; Lee, Jong Won; Koh, In Song; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I) at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Abnormal up-regulation ...

  12. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  13. Differentiation and carcinogenesis: an integrated multilevel study of mechanisms from molecules to man. Progress report

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to identify and characterize mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in vitro, to identify the in vivo equivalent of the in vitro MPCs, and to determine the relationship between the presence or response of these cells both in vitro and eventually in vivo to altered proliferative capacity (in vitro cellular senescence, in vivo organismal aging) and altered susceptibility to carcinogenesis (frequency of in vitro neoplastic transformation and age-related frequency of in vivo cancer incidence). 16 refs

  14. Basic molecular biology in radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    Rytoemaa, T.

    1992-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is 'guardian of the genome'. If a DNA molecule (each chromosome has one DNA molecule) is damaged by an external factor, such as ionizing radiation, the protein product of the p53 gene stops the cell's proliferative activity until the damage is repaired. If the repair fails, the p53 gene product normally triggers programmed death of the cell. P53 gene itself is commonly damaged by radiation (or by another DNA-damaging factor). The altered gene product fails to control the integrity of the genome, and it also prevents the guardian action of the protein which is produced by the intact allele (each cell has two p53 genes). Under these circumstances any subsequent damage to DNA, induced e.g. by a chemical, is easily 'fixed'. Potentially critical sites for an additional DNA damage are the proto-oncogens (when damaged these genes are called oncogens), which commonly act as components of the regulatory network in a cell. Permanent malfunction of the signal network may then lead to uncontrolled cell growth, resulting in a malignant clone (=cancer). This simplified molecular model seems to be the common mechanism in many (or most) human cancers. (orig.)

  15. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani

    2012-01-01

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of zinc utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. The rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and DMH treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30mg/Kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body 65 Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb1 representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb2, the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb1 and Tb2 components of 65 Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of 65 Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in 65 Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. The present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of zinc during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of zinc in colon tumorigenesis, a paradigm which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer. (author)

  16. Modification of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea initiated bladder carcinogenesis in Wistar rats by terephthalic acid

    Cui Lunbiao; Shi Yuan; Dai Guidong; Pan Hongxin; Chen Jianfeng; Song Ling; Wang Shouling; Chang, Hebron C.; Sheng Hongbing; Wang Xinru

    2006-01-01

    The effect of terephthalic acid (TPA) on urinary bladder carcinogenesis was examined. Male Wistar rats were initiated by injection of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU) (20 mg/kg b.w. ip) twice a week for 4 weeks, then given basal diet containing 5% TPA, 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) or 1% TPA for the next 22 weeks, and then euthanized. 5% TPA treatment induced a high incidence of urinary bladder calculi and a large amount of precipitate. Though 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and 1% TPA treatment did not induce urinary bladder calculi formation, they resulted in a moderate increase in urinary precipitate. Histological examination of urinary bladder revealed that MNU-5% TPA treatment resulted in a higher incidence of simple hyperplasia, papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia), papilloma and cancer than MNU control. MNU-5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and 1% TPA treatment increased slightly the incidence of simple hyperplasia and PN hyperplasia (not statistically significant). The major elements of the precipitate are phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, chloride, calcium and TPA. The present study indicated that the calculi induced by TPA had a strong promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis and the precipitate containing calcium terephthalate (CaTPA) may also have weak promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  17. Deficiency of the Erc/mesothelin gene ameliorates renal carcinogenesis in Tsc2 knockout mice.

    Zhang, Danqing; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Tetsuo; Kanenishi, Kenji; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masaaki; Okura, Hidehiro; Hamano, Yoshitomo; Sun, Guodong; Maeda, Masahiro; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Hino, Okio

    2011-04-01

    Genetic crossing experiments were performed between tuberous sclerosis-2 (Tsc2) KO and expressed in renal carcinoma (Erc) KO mice to analyze the function of the Erc/mesothelin gene in renal carcinogenesis. We found the number and size of renal tumors were significantly less in Tsc2+/-;Erc-/- mice than in Tsc2+/-;Erc+/+ and Tsc2+/-;Erc+/- mice. Tumors from Tsc2+/-;Erc-/- mice exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Ki67) and TUNEL analysis, respectively. Adhesion to collagen-coated plates in vitro was enhanced in Erc-restored cells and decreased in Erc-suppressed cells with siRNA. Tumor formation by Tsc2-deficient cells in nude mice was remarkably suppressed by stable knockdown of Erc with shRNA. Western blot analysis showed that the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, Akt and signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 were weaker in Erc-deficient/suppressed cells compared with Erc-expressed cells. These results indicate that deficiency of the Erc/mesothelin gene ameliorates renal carcinogenesis in Tsc2 KO mice and inhibits the phosphorylation of several kinases of cell adhesion mechanism. This suggests that Erc/mesothelin may have an important role in the promotion and/or maintenance of carcinogenesis by influencing cell-substrate adhesion via the integrin-related signal pathway. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Antibiotic suppression of intestinal microbiota reduces heme-induced lipoperoxidation associated with colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    Martin, O C B; Lin, C; Naud, N; Tache, S; Raymond-Letron, I; Corpet, D E; Pierre, F H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that heme iron from red meat is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. In carcinogen-induced-rats, a heme iron-rich diet increases the number of precancerous lesions and raises associated fecal biomarkers. Heme-induced lipoperoxidation measured by fecal thiobarbituric acid reagents (TBARs) could explain the promotion of colon carcinogenesis by heme. Using a factorial design we studied if microbiota could be involved in heme-induced carcinogenesis, by modulating peroxidation. Rats treated or not with an antibiotic cocktail were given a control or a hemoglobin-diet. Fecal bacteria were counted on agar and TBARs concentration assayed in fecal water. The suppression of microbiota by antibiotics was associated with a reduction of crypt height and proliferation and with a cecum enlargement, which are characteristics of germ-free rats. Rats given hemoglobin diets had increased fecal TBARs, which were suppressed by the antibiotic treatment. A duplicate experiment in rats given dietary hemin yielded similar results. These data show that the intestinal microbiota is involved in enhancement of lipoperoxidation by heme iron. We thus suggest that microbiota could play a role in the heme-induced promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  19. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis. [Cornybacterium; E. coli; S. typhimurium; B. subtillis

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Research on nickel carcinogenesis from 1979 to 1983 is reviewed. Epidemiological studies have strengthened the evidence that workers in nickel refineries have increased risks of lung and sinonasal cancers, but have not substantiated increased risks of respiratory cancers in other nickel-exposed workers. Carcinogenesis bioassays have demonstrated carcinogenicity of certain nickel sulfide, hydroxide, selenide, arsenide, antimonide, and telluride compounds following parenteral administration to rodents. Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Cornybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein cross-links, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 6 tables.

  20. Carcinogenesis associated with parasites other than Schistosoma, Opisthorchis and Clonorchis: A systematic review.

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A

    2016-06-15

    Only three helminths (Schistosoma haematobium, Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis) are directly associated with carcinogenesis in humans whereas the role of other parasites in cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to perform a systematic review to identify recent insights in the role of other parasite infections in carcinogenesis. We conducted systematic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE on July 2015. Our primary outcome was the association between parasitic infections and carcinogenesis. Out of 1,266 studies, 19 were selected for detailed evaluation (eight for helminths and 11 for protozoa). The mechanisms of helminth-induced cancer included chronic inflammation, sustained proliferation, modulation of the host immune system, reprogramming of glucose metabolism and redox signaling, induction of genomic instability and destabilization of suppressor tumor proteins, stimulation of angiogenesis, resisting cell death, and activation of invasion and metastasis. In addition to the current knowledge, the following parasites were found in cancers or tumors: Echinococcus, Strongyloides, Fasciola, Heterakis, Platynosomum and Trichuris. Additional parasites were found in this systematic review that could potentially be associated with cancers or tumors but further evidence is needed to elaborate a cause-effect relationship. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  2. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Joshi, Hrushikesh M; Dravid, Vinayak P; Roy, Hemant K; Taflove, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed

  3. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis

  4. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. A Review of ERCC1 Gene in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Carcinogenesis and Resistance to Chemoradiotherapy

    Atsunari Kawashima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1 gene performs a critical incision step in DNA repair and is reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and resistance to drug or ionizing radiation therapy. We reviewed the correlation between ERCC1 and bladder cancer. In carcinogenesis, several reports discussed the relation between ERCC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and carcinogenesis in bladder cancer only in case-control studies. Regarding the relation between ERCC1 and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, in vitro and clinical studies indicate that ERCC1 might be related to resistance to radiation therapy rather than cisplatin therapy. It is controversial whether ERCC1 predicts prognosis of bladder cancer treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase receptors or endothelial-mesenchymal transition are reported to regulate the expression of ERCC1, and further study is needed to clarify the mechanism of ERCC1 expression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy in vitro and to discover novel therapies for advanced and metastatic bladder cancer.

  6. A Review of ERCC1 Gene in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Carcinogenesis and Resistance to Chemoradiotherapy.

    Kawashima, Atsunari; Takayama, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) gene performs a critical incision step in DNA repair and is reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and resistance to drug or ionizing radiation therapy. We reviewed the correlation between ERCC1 and bladder cancer. In carcinogenesis, several reports discussed the relation between ERCC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and carcinogenesis in bladder cancer only in case-control studies. Regarding the relation between ERCC1 and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, in vitro and clinical studies indicate that ERCC1 might be related to resistance to radiation therapy rather than cisplatin therapy. It is controversial whether ERCC1 predicts prognosis of bladder cancer treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase receptors or endothelial-mesenchymal transition are reported to regulate the expression of ERCC1, and further study is needed to clarify the mechanism of ERCC1 expression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy in vitro and to discover novel therapies for advanced and metastatic bladder cancer.

  7. Review: the Contribution of both Nature and Nurture to Carcinogenesis and Progression in Solid Tumours.

    Hyndman, Iain Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cancer arises due to a series of somatic mutations that accumulate within the nucleus of a cell which enable the cell to proliferate in an unregulated manner. These mutations arise as a result of both endogenous and exogenous factors. Genes that are commonly mutated in cancer cells are involved in cell cycle regulation, growth and proliferation. It is known that both nature and nurture play important roles in cancer development through complex gene-environment interactions; however, the exact mechanism of these interactions in carcinogenesis is presently unclear. Key environmental factors that play a role in carcinogenesis include smoking, UV light and oncoviruses. Angiogenesis, inflammation and altered cell metabolism are important factors in carcinogenesis and are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although the exact mechanism of nature-nurture interactions in solid tumour formation are not yet fully understood, it is evident that neither nature nor nurture can be considered in isolation. By understanding more about gene-environment interactions, it is possible that cancer mortality could be reduced.

  8. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-03-01

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Late effects of early exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals in rats

    Boberg, Julie; Hass, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds may interfere with tissues at critical developmental stages and give rise to cancer later in life. This talk will focus on early-life exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals which is associated with increased risk for carcinogenesis in mammary and prostate glands...

  10. Epigenome remodelling in breast cancer: insights from an early in vitro model of carcinogenesis.

    Locke, Warwick J; Clark, Susan J

    2012-11-15

    Epigenetic gene regulation has influence over a diverse range of cellular functions, including the maintenance of pluripotency, differentiation, and cellular identity, and is deregulated in many diseases, including cancer. Whereas the involvement of epigenetic dysregulation in cancer is well documented, much of the mechanistic detail involved in triggering these changes remains unclear. In the current age of genomics, the development of new sequencing technologies has seen an influx of genomic and epigenomic data and drastic improvements in both resolution and coverage. Studies in cancer cell lines and clinical samples using next-generation sequencing are rapidly delivering spectacular insights into the nature of the cancer genome and epigenome. Despite these improvements in technology, the timing and relationship between genetic and epigenetic changes that occur during the process of carcinogenesis are still unclear. In particular, what changes to the epigenome are playing a driving role during carcinogenesis and what influence the temporal nature of these changes has on cancer progression are not known. Understanding the early epigenetic changes driving breast cancer has the exciting potential to provide a novel set of therapeutic targets or early-disease biomarkers or both. Therefore, it is important to find novel systems that permit the study of initial epigenetic events that potentially occur during the first stages of breast cancer. Non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) provide an exciting in vitro model of very early breast carcinogenesis. When grown in culture, HMECs are able to temporarily escape senescence and acquire a pre-malignant breast cancer-like phenotype (variant HMECs, or vHMECs). Cultured HMECs are composed mainly of cells from the basal breast epithelial layer. Therefore, vHMECs are considered to represent the basal-like subtype of breast cancer. The transition from HMECs to vHMECs in culture recapitulates the epigenomic

  11. Chemical Peels

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  12. Chemical Hazards and Safety Issues in Fusion Safety Design

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Radiological inventory releases have dominated accident consequences for fusion; these consequences are important to analyze and are generally the most severe result of a fusion facility accident event. However, the advent of, or plan for, large-scale usage of some toxic materials poses the additional hazard of chemical exposure from an accident event. Examples of toxic chemicals are beryllium for magnetic fusion and fluorine for laser fusion. Therefore, chemical exposure consequences must also be addressed in fusion safety assessment. This paper provides guidance for fusion safety analysis. US Department of Energy (DOE) chemical safety assessment practices for workers and the public are reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published some guidance on public exposure to releases of mixtures of chemicals, this guidance has been used to create an initial guideline for treating mixed radiological and toxicological releases in fusion; for example, tritiated hazardous dust from a tokamak vacuum vessel. There is no convenient means to judge the hazard severity of exposure to mixed materials. The chemical fate of mixed material constituents must be reviewed to determine if there is a separate or combined radiological and toxicological carcinogenesis, or if other health threats exist with radiological carcinogenesis. Recommendations are made for fusion facility chemical safety evaluation and safety guidance for protecting the public from chemical releases, since such levels are not specifically identified in the DOE fusion safety standard

  13. Toxicogenomic outcomes predictive of forestomach carcinogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene: Relevance to human cancer risk

    Labib, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Labib@hc-sc.gc.ca; Guo, Charles H., E-mail: Charles.Guo@hc-sc.gc.ca; Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Williams@hc-sc.gc.ca; Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: Carole.Yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca; White, Paul A., E-mail: Paul.White@hc-sc.gc.ca; Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: Sabina.Halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2013-12-01

    Forestomach tumors are observed in mice exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, the relevance of this data to humans is controversial because humans lack a forestomach. We hypothesize that an understanding of early molecular changes after exposure to a carcinogen in the forestomach will provide mode-of-action information to evaluate the applicability of forestomach cancers to human cancer risk assessment. In the present study we exposed mice to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental carcinogen commonly associated with tumors of the rodent forestomach. Toxicogenomic tools were used to profile gene expression response in the forestomach. Adult Muta™Mouse males were orally exposed to 25, 50, and 75 mg BaP/kg-body-weight/day for 28 consecutive days. The forestomach was collected three days post-exposure. DNA microarrays, real-time RT-qPCR arrays, and protein analyses were employed to characterize responses in the forestomach. Microarray results showed altered expression of 414 genes across all treatment groups (± 1.5 fold; false discovery rate adjusted P ≤ 0.05). Significant downregulation of genes associated with phase II xenobiotic metabolism and increased expression of genes implicated in antigen processing and presentation, immune response, chemotaxis, and keratinocyte differentiation were observed in treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. A systematic comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the forestomach from the present study to differentially expressed genes identified in human diseases including human gastrointestinal tract cancers using the NextBio Human Disease Atlas showed significant commonalities between the two models. Our results provide molecular evidence supporting the use of the mouse forestomach model to evaluate chemically-induced gastrointestinal carcinogenesis in humans. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene-mediated transcriptomic response in the forestomach was examined. • The immunoproteosome subunits and MHC class I

  14. CENP-R acts bilaterally as a tumor suppressor and as an oncogene in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis model.

    Okumura, Kazuhiro; Kagawa, Naoko; Saito, Megumi; Yoshizawa, Yasuhiro; Munakata, Haruka; Isogai, Eriko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2017-11-01

    CENP-R is a component of the CENP-O complex, including CENP-O, CENP-P, CENP-Q, CENP-R, and CENP-U and is constitutively localized to kinetochores throughout the cell cycle in vertebrates. CENP-R-deficient chicken DT40 cells are viable and show a very minor effect on mitosis. To investigate the functional roles of CENP-R in vivo, we generated CENP-R-deficient mice (Cenp-r -/- ). Mice heterozygous or homozygous for Cenp-r null mutation are viable and healthy, with no apparent defect in growth and morphology, indicating Cenp-r is not essential for normal development. Accordingly, to investigate the role of the Cenp-r gene in skin carcinogenesis, we subjected Cenp-r -/- mice to the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/TPA chemical carcinogenesis protocol and monitored tumor development. As a result, Cenp-r -/- mice initially developed significantly more papillomas than control wild-type mice. However, papillomas in Cenp-r -/- mice showed a decrease of proliferative cells and an increase of apoptotic cells. As a result, they did not grow bigger and some papillomas showed substantial regression. Furthermore, papillomas in Cenp-r -/- mice showed lower frequency of malignant conversion to squamous cell carcinomas. These results indicate Cenp-r functions bilaterally in cancer development: during early developmental stages, Cenp-r functions as a tumor suppressor, but during the expansion and progression of papillomas it functions as a tumor-promoting factor. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Studies on the repair of double strand break of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis, and consideration on the concept of extinction of nuclear power

    Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the relationship between the repair of double strand break (DSB) of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis mainly on author's investigations, and his recent thought aiming at the extinction of nuclear power. The molecular repairing system is explained about DNA DSB induced by radiation and chemicals. When DSB occurs, nucleosome consisting from 4 core-histones participates to link the broken ends and then repair mechanisms of homologous recombination (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) begin to work. The latter is dominant in mammalians. Thus the genetic defect in these systems of DSB response and repair is a course of disorders such as ataxia telangiectasia (AT) (DSB sensor defect), genetic breast cancer (HRR defect), and radiosensitive-severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID) (NHEJ defect), all of which result in cancer formation. NHEJ repair is known to be error-prone. Against multi-step carcinogenesis where accumulated gene mutations lead to the cancer formation, the author thinks chromosomal instability is one of important carcinogenic causes: the instability can be a trigger of producing cancer stem cells because the cells can be yielded from mouse embryonic stem cells where DSB is shown to participate in the process. Low dose radiation produces a small amount of DSB, to which the repair response is less sensitive at G2/M checkpoint, ultimately leading to genomic instability. Considering effects of the low dose radiation exposure above, and of the internal exposure to 3 H-thymidine beta ray in cells, of indoor Rn participating 16% of lung cancer incidence (Canadian epidemiological data) and so on, together with moral and social responsibility of scientist and technologist, the author says to have attained to the concept of the ''Extinction of Nuclear Power''. (T.T)

  16. Peut-on envisager le remplacement de l'éthylène par l'acétylène à moyen terme ? Can the Substitution of Ethylene by Acetylene Be Imagined in the Medium Term?

    Lefebvre G.

    2006-11-01

    energy of nuclear origin. Despite the following optimistic assumption: (a mean growth rate of oil prices (in constant 1982 R, currency of 7% per year, (b increase in that of coal limited to 3 % per year, (c electric power permanently available at 5 to 10 French centimes per kWh, (d unit production capacity of acetylene of about 300 000 t/year, comparable to that of ethylene, it appears impossible for acetylene to rival ethylene before the year 2000. Only vinyl chloride, manufactured from acetylene in large units with a considerable scale factor, could do so, provided that electricity could be supplied constantly at 0. 10 French francs per kWh. This point does not take into consideration the remodeling of current petrochemical processes for producing the second-generation chemicals. If these were to be manufactured from acetylene, installations having an entirely different design would have to be created. Whereas in 1975 electric-arc processes for producing acetylene from naphtha appeared more economical than the calcium-carbide route, the opposite situation is now seen as the resuit of the increases in oil prices that have occurred since then.

  17. Tea polyphenols EGCG and TF restrict tongue and liver carcinogenesis simultaneously induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine in mice

    Sur, Subhayan, E-mail: subhayansur18@gmail.com [Dept. of Oncogene Regulation, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026, West Bengal (India); Pal, Debolina; Roy, Rituparna; Barua, Atish [Dept. of Oncogene Regulation, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026, West Bengal (India); Roy, Anup [North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal (India); Saha, Prosenjit [Dept. of Oncogene Regulation, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026, West Bengal (India); Panda, Chinmay Kumar, E-mail: ckpanda.cnci@gmail.com [Dept. of Oncogene Regulation, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026, West Bengal (India)

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the molecular mechanisms of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) induced multi-organ carcinogenesis in tongue and liver of the same mouse and restriction of carcinogenesis by Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and Theaflavin (TF), if any. For that purpose, cellular proliferation/apoptosis, prevalence of CD44 positive stem cell population and expressions of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways and some of their associated genes were analyzed in the NDEA induced tongue and liver lesions in absence or presence of EGCG/TF. Chronic NDEA exposure in oral cavity could decrease mice body weights and induce tongue and liver carcinogenesis with similar histological stages (severe dysplasia up to 30th weeks of NDEA administration). Increasing mice body weights were seen in continuous and post EGCG/TF treated groups. EGCG/TF treatment could restrict both the carcinogenesis at similar histological stages showing potential chemopreventive effect in continuous treated groups (mild dysplasia) followed by pre treatment (moderate dysplasia) and therapeutic efficacy in post treated groups (mild dysplasia) up to 30th week. The mechanism of carcinogenesis by NDEA and restriction by the EGCG/TF in both tongue and liver were similar and found to be associated with modulation in cellular proliferation/apoptosis and prevalence of CD44 positive population. The up-regulation of self renewal Wnt/β-catenin, Hh/Gli1 pathways and their associated genes Cyclin D1, cMyc and EGFR along with down regulation of E-cadherin seen during the carcinogenesis processes were found to be modulated during the restriction processes by EGCG/TF. - Highlights: • Simultaneous tongue and liver carcinogenesis in mice by oral NDEA administration • Restriction of both carcinogenesis by EGCG and TF at early pre-malignant stages • The mechanisms of carcinogenesis and restriction were similar in both the organs. • Changes in proliferation

  18. Tea polyphenols EGCG and TF restrict tongue and liver carcinogenesis simultaneously induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine in mice

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Roy, Rituparna; Barua, Atish; Roy, Anup; Saha, Prosenjit; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the molecular mechanisms of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) induced multi-organ carcinogenesis in tongue and liver of the same mouse and restriction of carcinogenesis by Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and Theaflavin (TF), if any. For that purpose, cellular proliferation/apoptosis, prevalence of CD44 positive stem cell population and expressions of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways and some of their associated genes were analyzed in the NDEA induced tongue and liver lesions in absence or presence of EGCG/TF. Chronic NDEA exposure in oral cavity could decrease mice body weights and induce tongue and liver carcinogenesis with similar histological stages (severe dysplasia up to 30th weeks of NDEA administration). Increasing mice body weights were seen in continuous and post EGCG/TF treated groups. EGCG/TF treatment could restrict both the carcinogenesis at similar histological stages showing potential chemopreventive effect in continuous treated groups (mild dysplasia) followed by pre treatment (moderate dysplasia) and therapeutic efficacy in post treated groups (mild dysplasia) up to 30th week. The mechanism of carcinogenesis by NDEA and restriction by the EGCG/TF in both tongue and liver were similar and found to be associated with modulation in cellular proliferation/apoptosis and prevalence of CD44 positive population. The up-regulation of self renewal Wnt/β-catenin, Hh/Gli1 pathways and their associated genes Cyclin D1, cMyc and EGFR along with down regulation of E-cadherin seen during the carcinogenesis processes were found to be modulated during the restriction processes by EGCG/TF. - Highlights: • Simultaneous tongue and liver carcinogenesis in mice by oral NDEA administration • Restriction of both carcinogenesis by EGCG and TF at early pre-malignant stages • The mechanisms of carcinogenesis and restriction were similar in both the organs. • Changes in proliferation

  19. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C → A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C → T, two C → A, one C → G, and one A → T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Iron and thiols as two major players in carcinogenesis: friends or foes?

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant metal in the human body and mainly works as a cofactor for proteins such as hemoglobin and various enzymes. No independent life forms on earth can survive without iron. However, excess iron is intimately associated with carcinogenesis by increasing oxidative stress via its catalytic activity to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biomolecules with redox-active sulfhydryl function(s) (thiol compounds) are necessary for the maintenance of mildly reductive cellular environments to counteract oxidative stress, and for the execution of redox reactions for metabolism and detoxification. Involvement of glutathione S-transferase and thioredoxin has long attracted the attention of cancer researchers. Here, I update recent findings on the involvement of iron and thiol compounds during carcinogenesis and in cancer cells. It is now recognized that the cystine/glutamate transporter (antiporter) is intimately associated with ferroptosis, an iron-dependent, non-apoptotic form of cell death, observed in cancer cells, and also with cancer stem cells; the former with transporter blockage but the latter with its stabilization. Excess iron in the presence of oxygen appears the most common known mutagen. Ironically, the persistent activation of antioxidant systems via genetic alterations in Nrf2 and Keap1 also contributes to carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is difficult to conclude the role of iron and thiol compounds as friends or foes, which depends on the quantity/distribution and induction/flexibility, respectively. Avoiding further mutation would be the most helpful strategy for cancer prevention, and myriad of efforts are being made to sort out the weaknesses of cancer cells.

  1. Wnt5a is associated with cigarette smoke-related lung carcinogenesis via protein kinase C.

    Whang, Young Mi; Jo, Ukhyun; Sung, Jae Sook; Ju, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Kyong Hwa; Lee, Jong Won; Koh, In Song; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I) at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Abnormal up-regulation of Wnt5a mRNA and proteins was detected in CSC-exposed transformed 1198 and tumorigenic 1170I cells as compared with other non-CSC exposed HBE cells. Tumor tissues obtained from smokers showed higher Wnt5a expressions than matched normal tissues. In non-CSC exposed 1799 cells, treatment of recombinant Wnt5a caused the activations of PKC and Akt, and the blockage of Wnt5a and PKC significantly decreased the viabilities of CSC-transformed 1198 cells expressing high levels of Wnt5a. This reduced cell survival rate was associated with increased apoptosis via the down-regulation of Bcl2 and the induction of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, CSC-treated 1799 cells showed induction of Wnt5a expression and enhanced colony-forming capacity. The CSC-induced colony forming efficiency was suppressed by the co-incubation with a PKC inhibitor. In conclusion, these results suggest that cigarette smoke induces Wnt5a-coupled PKC activity during lung carcinogenesis, which causes Akt activity and anti-apoptosis in lung cancer. Therefore, current study provides novel clues for the crucial role of Wnt5a in the smoking-related lung carcinogenesis.

  2. Wnt5a is associated with cigarette smoke-related lung carcinogenesis via protein kinase C.

    Young Mi Whang

    Full Text Available Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC. Abnormal up-regulation of Wnt5a mRNA and proteins was detected in CSC-exposed transformed 1198 and tumorigenic 1170I cells as compared with other non-CSC exposed HBE cells. Tumor tissues obtained from smokers showed higher Wnt5a expressions than matched normal tissues. In non-CSC exposed 1799 cells, treatment of recombinant Wnt5a caused the activations of PKC and Akt, and the blockage of Wnt5a and PKC significantly decreased the viabilities of CSC-transformed 1198 cells expressing high levels of Wnt5a. This reduced cell survival rate was associated with increased apoptosis via the down-regulation of Bcl2 and the induction of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, CSC-treated 1799 cells showed induction of Wnt5a expression and enhanced colony-forming capacity. The CSC-induced colony forming efficiency was suppressed by the co-incubation with a PKC inhibitor. In conclusion, these results suggest that cigarette smoke induces Wnt5a-coupled PKC activity during lung carcinogenesis, which causes Akt activity and anti-apoptosis in lung cancer. Therefore, current study provides novel clues for the crucial role of Wnt5a in the smoking-related lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Estrogen receptor signaling in prostate cancer: Implications for carcinogenesis and tumor progression.

    Bonkhoff, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the classical target for prostate cancer prevention and treatment, but more recently estrogens and their receptors have also been implicated in prostate cancer development and tumor progression. Recent experimental and clinical data were reviewed to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms how estrogens and their receptors may affect prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is the most prevalent ER in the human prostate, while the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is restricted to basal cells of the prostatic epithelium and stromal cells. In high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the ERα is up-regulated and most likely mediates carcinogenic effects of estradiol as demonstrated in animal models. The partial loss of the ERβ in HGPIN indicates that the ERβ acts as a tumor suppressor. The tumor promoting function of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, a major driver of prostate carcinogenesis, is triggered by the ERα and repressed by the ERβ. The ERβ is generally retained in hormone naïve and metastatic prostate cancer, but is partially lost in castration resistant disease. The progressive emergence of the ERα and ERα-regulated genes (eg, progesterone receptor (PR), PS2, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and NEAT1) during prostate cancer progression and hormone refractory disease suggests that these tumors can bypass the AR by using estrogens and progestins for their growth. In addition, nongenomic estrogen signaling pathways mediated by orphan receptors (eg, GPR30 and ERRα) has also been implicated in prostate cancer progression. Increasing evidences demonstrate that local estrogen signaling mechanisms are required for prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Despite the recent progress in this research topic, the translation of the current information into potential therapeutic applications remains highly challenging and clearly warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dysregulation of microRNAs in colonic field carcinogenesis: implications for screening.

    Dhananjay P Kunte

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC screening tests often have a trade-off between efficacy and patient acceptability/cost. Fecal tests (occult blood, methylation engender excellent patient compliance but lack requisite performance underscoring the need for better population screening tests. We assessed the utility of microRNAs (miRNAs as markers of field carcinogenesis and their potential role for CRC screening using the azoxymethane (AOM-treated rat model. We found that 63 miRNAs were upregulated and miR-122, miR-296-5p and miR-503# were downregulated in the uninvolved colonic mucosa of AOM rats. We monitored the expression of selected miRNAs in colonic biopsies of AOM rats at 16 weeks and correlated it with tumor development. We noted that the tumor bearing rats had significantly greater miRNA modulation compared to those without tumors. The miRNAs showed good diagnostic performance with an area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC of >0.7. We also noted that the miRNA induction in the colonic mucosa was mirrorred in the mucus layer fecal colonocytes isolated from AOM rat stool and the degree of miRNA induction was greater in the tumor bearing rats compared to those without tumors. Lastly, we also noted significant miRNA modulation in the Pirc rats- the genetic model of colon carcinogenesis, both in the uninvolved colonic mucosa and the fecal colonocytes. We thus demonstrate that miRNAs are excellent markers of field carcinogenesis and could accurately predict future neoplasia. Based on our results, we propose an accurate, inexpensive, non-invasive miRNA test for CRC risk stratification based on rectal brushings or from abraded fecal colonocytes.

  5. Chemoprevention by Probiotics During 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    Walia, Sohini; Kamal, Rozy; Dhawan, D K; Kanwar, S S

    2018-04-01

    Probiotics are believed to have properties that lower the risk of colon cancer. However, the mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects are relatively unknown. To assess the impact of probiotics in preventing induction of colon carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were divided into six groups viz., normal control, Lactobacillus plantarum (AdF10)-treated, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-treated, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-treated, L. plantarum (AdF10) + DMH-treated and L. rhamnosus GG (LGG) + DMH-treated. Both the probiotics were supplemented daily at a dose of 2 × 10 10 cells per day. DMH at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously twice a week for the first 4 weeks and then once every week for a duration of 16 weeks. Glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase as protein expression of genes involved in apoptosis were assessed during DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. DMH treatment decreased the activity of GSH, GPx, GST, SOD and catalase. However, AdF10 and LGG supplementation to DMH-treated rats significantly increased the activity of these enzymes. Further, DMH treatment revealed alterations in the protein expressions of various genes involved in the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway such as p53, p21, Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3, which, however, were shifted towards normal control levels upon simultaneous supplementation with probiotics. The present study suggests that probiotics can provide protection against oxidative stress and apoptotic-related protein disregulation during experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Thermodynamic considerations on the role of heat and mass transfer in biochemical causes of carcinogenesis

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2018-01-01

    Cellular homoeostasis involves a continuous interaction between the cell and its microenvironment. As such, active and passive transport of ions, nutrients, molecules and water are the basis for biochemical-physical cell life. These transport phenomena change the internal and external ionic concentrations, and, as a consequence, the cell membrane's electric potential and the pH. In this paper we focus on the relationship between these ion transport-induced pH and membrane voltage changes to highlight their impact on carcinogenesis. The preliminary results suggest a critical role for Cl- in driving tumour transformation towards a more malignant phenotype.

  7. Prevention of Lung Carcinogenesis by Suppressing Pathogenic CD4 T Cells

    2017-05-01

    intestinal inflammation by reducing TH17 cells and preserving group 3 innate lymphoid cells . Nat Med, 2016. 22(3): p. 319-23.   ...stable population of YFP+  cells  similar  to  innate  IL‐17–producing  cells  (e.g., γδ T  cells ) during acute infection (Fig.2) , which is in sharp contrast...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0100 TITLE: Prevention of Lung Carcinogenesis by Suppressing Pathogenic CD4 T Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seon Hee

  8. Carcinogenesis of the Oral Cavity: Environmental Causes and Potential Prevention by Black Raspberry.

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Chen, Kun-Ming; Zhang, Shang-Min; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Amin, Shantu; Stoner, Gary; Guttenplan, Joseph B

    2017-01-17

    Worldwide, cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx comprise the sixth most common malignancies. Histologically, more than 90% of oral cancers are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Epidemiologic data strongly support the role of exogenous factors such as tobacco, alcohol, and human papilloma virus infection as major causative agents. Avoidance of risk factors has only been partially successful, and survival rates have not improved despite advances in therapeutic approaches. Therefore, new or improved approaches to prevention and/or early detection are critical. Better understanding of the mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis can assist in the development of novel biomarkers for early detection and strategies for disease prevention. Toward this goal, several animal models for carcinogenesis in the oral cavity have been developed. Among these are xenograft, and transgenic animal models, and others employing the synthetic carcinogens such as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in hamster cheek pouch and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide in rats and mice. Additional animal models employing environmental carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene and N'-nitrosonornicotine have been reported. Each model has certain advantages and disadvantages. Models that (1) utilize environmental carcinogens, (2) reflect tumor heterogeneity, and (3) accurately represent the cellular and molecular changes involved in the initiation and progression of oral cancer in humans could provide a realistic platform. To achieve this goal, we introduced a novel nonsurgical mouse model to study oral carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), an environmental pollutant and tobacco smoke constituent, and its diol epoxide metabolite (±)-anti-11,12-dihydroxy-13,14-epoxy-11,12,13,14-tetrahydrodibenzo[a,l]pyrene [(±)-anti-DB[a,l]PDE]. On the basis of a detailed comparison of oral cancer induced by DB[a,l]P with that induced by the other above-mentioned oral carcinogens with respect to dose, duration, species and

  9. Thyroid cancer. Reevaluation of an experimental model for radiogenic endocrine carcinogenesis

    Clifton, K.H.

    1984-11-01

    The status of experimental studies of radiogenic thyroid cancer is appraised, and some older data are reinterpreted in the light of more recent findings. Problems of thyroid dosimetry, particularly the dosimetry of internal radioiodides, are discussed. The steps in radiation carcinogenesis during the acute phase, the latent phase, and the phase of tumor growth are discussed in terms of thyroid epithelial cell population changes. The roles of three cell populations (undamaged or completely repaired epithelial cells, oncogenically initiated cells, and terminally damaged but functionally competent cells) in neoplasia are described. Finally, the implications for man of these experimental results and conclusions are discussed. 89 refs., 4 figs

  10. Environmental pollution and DNA methylation: carcinogenesis, clinical significance, and practical applications.

    Cao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the main causes of human cancer. Exposures to environmental carcinogens result in genetic and epigenetic alterations which induce cell transformation. Epigenetic changes caused by environmental pollution play important roles in the development and progression of environmental pollution-related cancers. Studies on DNA methylation are among the earliest and most conducted epigenetic research linked to cancer. In this review, the roles of DNA methylation in carcinogenesis and their significance in clinical medicine were summarized, and the effects of environmental pollutants, particularly air pollutants, on DNA methylation were introduced. Furthermore, prospective applications of DNA methylation to environmental pollution detection and cancer prevention were discussed.

  11. Chemical Emergencies

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  12. Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job's tears”; the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf is a Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent toward Multistage Carcinogenesis Processes

    Ching-Chuan Kuo, Ph.D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job’s tears”, the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf is a grass crop that has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and as a nourishing food in China for the treatment of warts, chapped skin, rheumatism, neuralgia, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. In addition, adlay also has been said to have stomachic, diuretic, antipholgistic, anodynic, and antispasmodic effects. Carcinogenesis is a multistage process that begins with exposure of viruses or chemicals that are found in the environment. Chemoprevention refers to the use of natural or synthetic, non-toxic chemical substances to reverse, repress, or prevent carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to study the chemopreventive blocking and suppressing potential of adlay and its active components in scavenging electrophiles and reactive oxygen species, antimutagenicity, enhancing Nrf2-mediated detoxification and antioxidant effect, altering carcinogen metabolism, suppressing proliferation, decreasing inflammation, and enhancing antitumor immunity. In addition, several active components with diverse chemopreventive properties have been also mentioned in this review article.

  13. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk

  14. End-Binding Protein 1 (EB1) Up-regulation is an Early Event in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Cruz, Mart Angelo Dela; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Wali, Ramesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    End-binding protein (EB1) is a microtubule protein that binds to the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). While EB1 is implicated as a potential oncogene, its role in cancer progression is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed EB1/APC expression at the earliest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and in the uninvolved mucosa ("field effect") of human and animal tissue. We also performed siRNA-knockdown in colon cancer cell lines. EB1 is up-regulated in early and field carcinogenesis in the colon, and the cellular/nano-architectural effect of EB1 knockdown depended on the genetic context. Thus, dysregulation of EB1 is an important early event in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24492008

  15. Downregulation of keratin 76 expression during oral carcinogenesis of human, hamster and mouse.

    Srikant Ambatipudi

    Full Text Available Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development.We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO mice.We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue.The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted.

  16. Toll-like receptor 7 regulates pancreatic carcinogenesis in mice and humans

    Ochi, Atsuo; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Rehman, Adeel; Hackman, Michael; Fallon, Nina; Barilla, Rocky M.; Henning, Justin R.; Jamal, Mohsin; Rao, Raghavendra; Greco, Stephanie; Deutsch, Michael; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Saeed, Usama Bin; Ego-Osuala, Melvin O.; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer that interacts with stromal cells to produce a highly inflammatory tumor microenvironment that promotes tumor growth and invasiveness. The precise interplay between tumor and stroma remains poorly understood. TLRs mediate interactions between environmental stimuli and innate immunity and trigger proinflammatory signaling cascades. Our finding that TLR7 expression is upregulated in both epithelial and stromal compartments in human and murine pancreatic cancer led us to postulate that carcinogenesis is dependent on TLR7 signaling. In a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, TLR7 ligation vigorously accelerated tumor progression and induced loss of expression of PTEN, p16, and cyclin D1 and upregulation of p21, p27, p53, c-Myc, SHPTP1, TGF-β, PPARγ, and cyclin B1. Furthermore, TLR7 ligation induced STAT3 activation and interfaced with Notch as well as canonical NF-κB and MAP kinase pathways, but downregulated expression of Notch target genes. Moreover, blockade of TLR7 protected against carcinogenesis. Since pancreatic tumorigenesis requires stromal expansion, we proposed that TLR7 ligation modulates pancreatic cancer by driving stromal inflammation. Accordingly, we found that mice lacking TLR7 exclusively within their inflammatory cells were protected from neoplasia. These data suggest that targeting TLR7 holds promise for treatment of human pancreatic cancer. PMID:23023703

  17. Multistage models of carcinogenesis and their implications for dose-response models and risk projections

    Hoel, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Multistage models are used to both describe the biological steps in developing a cancer and as a mathematical description of the relationship of exposure to tumor incidence. With the rapid development of molecular biology the stages of tumor development are becoming understood. Specifically, the effect and role of proto-oncogenes and suppressor genes are exciting developments in the field of carcinogenesis. Mathematically the field has moved from the original Armitage-Doll multistage model to the more current cell kinetic models. These latter models attempt to describe both the rate of cell mutation and the birth-death process involved in clonal expansion. This then allows modeling of both initiation and promotion or cellular proliferation. The field of radiation carcinogenesis has a considerable body of data and knowledge. Unfortunately, relatively little work has been done with the cell kinetic models as to estimation of tumor incidence. This may be due to the newness of kinetic models in general. The field holds promise and it is essential if we are to develop better human risk estimates from exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  18. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  19. Role of MLH1 methylation in esophageal cancer carcinogenesis and its clinical significance.

    Li, Jinyun; Ye, Dong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Yingying; Li, Qun; Deng, Hongxia; Zhou, Chongchang

    2018-01-01

    The mutL homolog-1 ( MLH1 ) is a DNA mismatch repair gene and has been reported to be frequently methylated in numerous cancers. However, the association between MLH1 methylation and esophageal cancer (EC), as well as its clinical significance, remains unclear. Hence, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis based on 19 articles (including 1384 ECs, 345 premalignant lesions, and 1244 healthy controls). Our analysis revealed that the frequency of MLH1 methylation was significantly elevated during EC carcinogenesis. In addition, we observed that MLH1 promoter methylation was associated with age (odds ratio [OR]=1.79; 95% CI =1.20-2.66), advanced tumor grade (OR=3.7; 95% CI =2.37-5.77), lymph node metastasis (OR=2.65; 95% CI =1.81-3.88), distant metastasis (OR=7.60; 95% CI =1.23-47.19), advanced clinical stage (OR=4.46; 95% CI =2.88-6.91), and poor prognosis in EC patients (hazard ratio =1.64, 95% CI =1.00-2.69). The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of MLH1 methylation in EC patients versus healthy individuals were 0.15, 0.99, and 0.77, respectively. Our findings indicate that MLH1 methylation is involved in the carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis of EC. Moreover, methylated MLH1 could be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for EC.

  20. Stimulatory effects of curcumin and quercetin on posttranslational modifications of p53 during lung carcinogenesis.

    Zhang, P; Zhang, Xy

    2018-06-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for increase in mortality due to cancer-related deaths, and new approaches are being explored for the betterment of the situation. In the present study, chemopreventive efficacy of curcumin and quercetin was investigated against benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-induced lung carcinogenesis. The mice were segregated into five groups, which included normal control, BP-treated, BP + curcumin-treated, BP + quercetin-treated, and BP + curcumin + quercetin-treated groups. The morphological and histological analyses of tumor nodules confirmed lung carcinogenesis22 weeks after weeks single intraperitoneal injection of BP at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight to mice. Curcumin and quercetin when administered individually as well as in combination significantly elevated the expression of acetylated-p53, which was otherwise depressed due to BP treatment. Also, both the phytochemicals significantly reduced the BP-inflicted increased levels of phosphorylated-p53. Furthermore, observed increase in the number of apoptotic cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), assay and increased activities of caspase 3 and 9 confirmed the induction of apoptosis by curcumin and quercetin. Moreover, the histological slides also showed noticeable improvement in the histoarchitecture of lungs by phytochemicals. The present study concludes that prophylactic treatment with curcumin and quercetin induces apoptosis in the lungs by modulation of p53 posttranslational modifications.

  1. Nutraceutical Approach for Preventing Obesity-Related Colorectal and Liver Carcinogenesis

    Hisataka Moriwaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R axis, and the state of chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, these findings also indicate that the metabolic disorders caused by obesity might be effective targets to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals. Green tea catechins (GTCs possess anticancer and chemopreventive properties against cancer in various organs, including the colorectum and liver. GTCs have also been known to exert anti-obesity, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects, indicating that GTCs might be useful for the prevention of obesity-associated colorectal and liver carcinogenesis. Further, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, which improve protein malnutrition and prevent progressive hepatic failure in patients with chronic liver diseases, might be also effective for the suppression of obesity-related carcinogenesis because oral supplementation with BCAA reduces the risk of HCC in obese cirrhotic patients. BCAA shows these beneficial effects because they can improve insulin resistance. Here, we review the detailed relationship between metabolic abnormalities and the development of CRC and HCC. We also review evidence, especially that based on our basic and clinical research using GTCs and BCAA, which indicates that targeting metabolic abnormalities by either pharmaceutical or nutritional intervention may be an effective strategy to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals.

  2. CDB-4124, a progesterone receptor modulator, inhibits mammary carcinogenesis by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Wiehle, Ronald; Lantvit, Daniel; Yamada, Tohru; Christov, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    CDB-4124 (Proellex or telapristone acetate) is a modulator of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling, which is currently employed in preclinical studies for prevention and treatment of breast cancer and has been used in clinical studies for treatment of uterine fibroids and endometriosis. Here we provide evidence for its action on steroid hormone-signaling, cell cycle-regulated genes and in vivo on mammary carcinogenesis. When CDB-4124 is given to rats at 200 mg/kg for 24 months, it prevents the development of spontaneous mammary hyperplastic and premalignant lesions. Also, CDB-4124 given as subcutaneous pellets at two different doses suppressed, dose dependently, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The high dose (30 mg, over 84 days) increased tumor latency from 66 ± 24 days to 87 ± 20 days (P CDB-4124 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in MNU-induced mammary tumors, which correlated with a decreased proportion of PR(+) tumor cells and with decreased serum progesterone. CDB-4124 did not affect serum estradiol. In a mechanistic study employing T47D cells we found that CDB-4124 suppressed G(1)/G(0)-S transition by inhibiting CDK2 and CDK4 expressions, which correlated with inhibition of estrogen receptor (ER) expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CDB-4124 can suppress the development of precancerous lesions and carcinogen-induced ER(+) mammary tumors in rats, and may have implications for prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  4. Genetic and Molecular Differences in Prostate Carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian American Men

    Shiv Srivastava

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. Prostate cancer incidence and associated mortality are highest in African American men in comparison to other races. The observed differences in incidence and disease aggressiveness at presentation support a potential role for different pathways of prostate carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian men. This review focuses on some of the recent molecular biology discoveries, which have been investigated in prostate carcinogenesis and their likely contribution to the known discrepancies across race and ethnicity. Key discussion points include the androgen receptor gene structure and function, genome-wide association studies and epigenetics. The new observations of the ethnic differences of the ERG oncogene, the most common prostate cancer gene, are providing new insights into ERG based stratification of prostate cancers in the context of ethnically diverse patient populations. This rapidly advancing knowledge has the likely potential to benefit clinical practice. Current and future work will improve the ability to sub-type prostate cancers by molecular alterations and lead to targeted therapy against this common malignancy.

  5. Alterations of global histone H4K20 methylation during prostate carcinogenesis

    Behbahani Turang E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global histone modifications have been implicated in the progression of various tumour entities. Our study was designed to assess global methylation levels of histone 4 lysine 20 (H4K20me1-3 at different stages of prostate cancer (PCA carcinogenesis. Methods Global H4K20 methylation levels were evaluated using a tissue microarray in patients with clinically localized PCA (n = 113, non-malignant prostate disease (n = 27, metastatic hormone-naive PCA (mPCA, n = 30 and castration-resistant PCA (CRPC, n = 34. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess global levels of H4K20 methylation levels. Results Similar proportions of the normal, PCA, and mPCA prostate tissues showed strong H4K20me3 staining. CRPC tissue analysis showed the weakest immunostaining levels of H4K20me1 and H4K20me2, compared to other prostate tissues. H4K20me2 methylation levels indicated significant differences in examined tissues except for normal prostate versus PCA tissue. H4K20me1 differentiates CRPC from other prostate tissues. H4K20me1 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastases, and H4K20me2 showed a significant correlation with the Gleason score. However, H4K20 methylation levels failed to predict PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Conclusions H4K20 methylation levels constitute valuable markers for the dynamic process of prostate cancer carcinogenesis.

  6. Aggravation of serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor levels during hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    Abdelgawad, M.R.; Ghareeb, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has an essential role during liver development and it plays an important role in the regeneration and repair of injured tissues and acting as a mitogen, motogen and morphogens for a variety of epithelial cells. The role of HGF in carcinogenesis is in straggle and so, the present study aimed to through light through the level of HGF during different steps of carcinogenesis. Forty male rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water (100 mg/l) for up to 16 weeks. Eight rats were sacrificed at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Besides, 8 hepatoma bearing rats were exposed to a single dose gamma irradiation (3 Gy) were sacrificed after 2 weeks from exposure (2 rats died, 36 hrs post irradiation) and 8 hepatoma bearing rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks from receiving a combined antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine and Lmethionine). Serum HGF was assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum HGF level in DEN treated rats and in exposed hepatoma bearing rats was significantly higher than in control rats whereas, serum HGF level after treatment with N acetylcysteine and L-methionine for 4 weeks was significantly decreased than DEN treated rats and concluded that serum HGF may play a role during promotion and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and during treatment

  7. Cell Cycle Phase Abnormalities Do Not Account for Disordered Proliferation in Barrett's Carcinogenesis

    Pierre Lao-Sirieix

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE epithelium is the precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Cell cycle proteins have been advocated as biomarkers to predict the malignant potential in BE. However, whether disruption of the cell cycle plays a causal role in Barrett's carcinogenesis is not clear. Specimens from the Barrett's dysplasia—carcinoma sequence were immunostained for cell cycle phase markers (cyclin D1 for G1; cyclin A for S, G2, and M; cytoplasmic cyclin B1 for G2; and phosphorylated histone 3 for M phase and expressed as a proportion of proliferating cells. Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle phase of prospective biopsies was also performed. The proliferation status of nondysplastic BE was similar to gastric antrum and D2, but the proliferative compartment extended to the luminal surface. In dysplastic samples, the number of proliferating cells correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. The overall levels of cyclins A and B1 correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. However, the cell cycle phase distribution measured with both immunostaining and flow cytometry was conserved during all stages of BE, dysplasia, and cancer. Hence, the increased proliferation seen in Barrett's carcinogenesis is due to abnormal cell cycle entry or exit, rather than a primary abnormality within the cell cycle.

  8. Widespread hypomethylation occurs early and synergizes with gene amplification during esophageal carcinogenesis.

    Hector Alvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although a combination of genomic and epigenetic alterations are implicated in the multistep transformation of normal squamous esophageal epithelium to Barrett esophagus, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma, the combinatorial effect of these changes is unknown. By integrating genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number, and transcriptomic datasets obtained from endoscopic biopsies of neoplastic progression within the same individual, we are uniquely able to define the molecular events associated progression of Barrett esophagus. We find that the previously reported global hypomethylation phenomenon in cancer has its origins at the earliest stages of epithelial carcinogenesis. Promoter hypomethylation synergizes with gene amplification and leads to significant upregulation of a chr4q21 chemokine cluster and other transcripts during Barrett neoplasia. In contrast, gene-specific hypermethylation is observed at a restricted number of loci and, in combination with hemi-allelic deletions, leads to downregulatation of selected transcripts during multistep progression. We also observe that epigenetic regulation during epithelial carcinogenesis is not restricted to traditionally defined "CpG islands," but may also occur through a mechanism of differential methylation outside of these regions. Finally, validation of novel upregulated targets (CXCL1 and 3, GATA6, and DMBT1 in a larger independent panel of samples confirms the utility of integrative analysis in cancer biomarker discovery.

  9. STICS, SCOUTs and p53 signatures; a new language for pelvic serous carcinogenesis.

    Mehra, Karishma; Mehrad, Mitra; Ning, Geng; Drapkin, Ronny; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Crum, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    The events leading to the most common and most lethal ovarian carcinoma - high grade serous carcinoma - have been poorly understood. However, the detailed pathologic study of asymptomatic women with germ-line BRCA 1 or BRCA2 (BCRA+) mutations has unearthed an early malignancy, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), which has linked many peritoneal and ovarian serous carcinomas to the fimbria. The distinction between high-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas continues to narrow, with shared alterations in expression of pTEN, PAX2 and p53. Moreover, the discovery of clonal alterations in p53 in benign tubal epithelium, - p53 signatures - has established a foundation for a serous cancer precursor in the fimbria. We have expanded this concept to include a generic secretory cell outgrowth (SCOUT) in the fallopian tube that is associated with altered PAX2 expression. As the repertoire of gene alterations is expanded and its link to serous carcinogenesis clarified, a cogent pathway to high-grade Mullerian carcinomas will emerge. This will challenge conventional thinking about ovarian carcinogenesis but will provide a new template for studies of ovarian cancer prevention.

  10. Cell cycle gene expression networks discovered using systems biology: Significance in carcinogenesis

    Scott, RE; Ghule, PN; Stein, JL; Stein, GS

    2015-01-01

    The early stages of carcinogenesis are linked to defects in the cell cycle. A series of cell cycle checkpoints are involved in this process. The G1/S checkpoint that serves to integrate the control of cell proliferation and differentiation is linked to carcinogenesis and the mitotic spindle checkpoint with the development of chromosomal instability. This paper presents the outcome of systems biology studies designed to evaluate if networks of covariate cell cycle gene transcripts exist in proliferative mammalian tissues including mice, rats and humans. The GeneNetwork website that contains numerous gene expression datasets from different species, sexes and tissues represents the foundational resource for these studies (www.genenetwork.org). In addition, WebGestalt, a gene ontology tool, facilitated the identification of expression networks of genes that co-vary with key cell cycle targets, especially Cdc20 and Plk1 (www.bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/webgestalt). Cell cycle expression networks of such covariate mRNAs exist in multiple proliferative tissues including liver, lung, pituitary, adipose and lymphoid tissues among others but not in brain or retina that have low proliferative potential. Sixty-three covariate cell cycle gene transcripts (mRNAs) compose the average cell cycle network with p = e−13 to e−36. Cell cycle expression networks show species, sex and tissue variability and they are enriched in mRNA transcripts associated with mitosis many of which are associated with chromosomal instability. PMID:25808367

  11. Candidate mechanisms accounting for effects of physical activity on breast carcinogenesis.

    Thompson, Henry J; Jiang, Weiqin; Zhu, Zongjian

    2009-09-01

    Evidence is strong that a reduction in risk for breast cancer is associated with moderate to vigorous physical activity (PA); however, there is limited understanding of the role of type, intensity, duration, and frequency of PA and their mechanisms in accounting for this health benefit. The objective of this review is to stimulate investigations of candidate mechanisms that may account for the effects of the intensity and duration of aerobic PA on breast cancer risk and tumor burden. Three hypotheses are considered: 1) the mTOR network hypothesis: PA inhibits carcinogenesis by suppressing the activation of the mTOR signaling network in mammary carcinomas; 2) the hormesis hypothesis: the carcinogenic response to PA is nonlinear and accounted for by a physiological cellular stress response; and 3) the metabolic reprogramming hypothesis: PA limits the amount of glucose and glutamine available to mammary carcinomas thereby inducing apoptosis because tumor-associated metabolic programming is reversed. To link these hypotheses to systemic effects of PA, it is recommended that consideration be given to determining: 1) what contracting muscle releases into circulation or removes from circulation that would directly modulate the carcinogenic process in epithelial cells; 2) whether the effects of muscle contraction on epithelial cell carcinogenesis are exerted in an endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, or intracrine manner; and 3) if the effects of muscle contraction on malignant cells differ from effects on normal or premalignant cells that do not manifest the hallmarks of malignancy. (c) 2009 IUBMB

  12. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  13. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies.

  14. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation.

  15. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bleddyn.Jones@rob.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  16. Home energy monitors : Impact over the medium-term

    Van Dam, S.S.; Bakker, C.A.; Van Hal, J.D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS), e.g. energy monitors, are intermediary products that can visualize, manage, and/or monitor the energy use of other products or whole households. HEMS increasingly receive attention for their role in energy conservation in households. A literature review and a

  17. Medium-Term Outcome of Sacral Nerve Modulation for Constipation

    Govaert, Bastiaan; Maeda, Yasuko; Alberga, Job

    2012-01-01

    was percutaneous nerve evaluation. If this was successful, patients underwent sacral nerve modulation therapy with an implanted device (tined-lead and implantable pulse generator). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and yearly thereafter. Outcome was assessed with the Wexner...... constipation score. RESULTS: A total of 117 patients (13 men, 104 women) with a mean age of 45.6 (SD, 13.0) years underwent percutaneous nerve evaluation. Of these, 68 patients (58%) had successful percutaneous nerve evaluation and underwent implantation of a device. The mean Wexner score was 17.0 (SD, 3.......8) at baseline and 10.2 (SD 5.3) after percutaneous nerve evaluation (p latest follow-up (median, 37 months; range, 4–92) was only 61 (52% of all patients who...

  18. Medium-Term Oil and Gas Markets 2011

    NONE

    2011-06-16

    Oil and gas markets have been marked by an increased divergence in recent months. On the one hand, oil market developments have generated an unpleasant sense of deja vu: rapid demand growth in emerging markets eclipsed sluggish supply growth to push prices higher even before the conflict in Libya tightened supplies still further. Oil prices around $100/bbl are weighing down on an already-fragile macroeconomic and financial situation in the OECD, pressuring national budgets in the non-OECD and causing price inflation of other commodities, as well as political concerns about speculation. There is an uncanny resemblance to the first half of 2008. On the other hand, in the world of natural gas an amazing disconnect has developed as demand recovered to well above pre-financial-crisis levels in most major regions. Gas markets have tightened in Europe and Asia, where prices are about twice the level seen in the United States, as the unconventional gas revolution is in full swing. From the upstream implications of the Arab Spring to the macroeconomic consequences of the eurozone crisis, energy markets are experiencing one of the most uncertain periods in decades. This publication provides a comprehensive outlook for oil and gas fundamentals through 2016. The oil market analysis covers demand developments on a product-by-product and key-sector basis, as well as a detailed bottom-up assessment of upstream and refinery investments, trade flows, oil products supply and OPEC spare capacity. The gas market analysis offers a region-by-region assessment of demand and production, infrastructure investment, price developments and prospects for unconventional gas. It also examines the globalising LNG trade.

  19. Energy technologies for post Kyoto targets in the medium term

    Soenderberg Petersen, L.; Larsen, H.

    2003-09-01

    The Risoe International Energy Conference took place 19 - 21 May 2003 and the aim was to present and discuss new developments and trends in energy technologies which may become main contributors to the energy scene in 15 to 20 years. The conference addressed R and D related to the individual technologies as well as system integration. The proceedings are prepared from papers presented at the conference and received with corrections, if any, until the final deadline on 25 June 2003. (au)

  20. Energy technologies for post Kyoto targets in the medium term

    Soenderberg Petersen, L; Larsen, H [eds.

    2003-09-01

    The Risoe International Energy Conference took place 19 - 21 May 2003 and the aim was to present and discuss new developments and trends in energy technologies which may become main contributors to the energy scene in 15 to 20 years. The conference addressed R&D related to the individual technologies as well as system integration. The proceedings are prepared from papers presented at the conference and received with corrections, if any, until the final deadline on 25 June 2003. (au)

  1. Medium-term changes in Drosophila subobscura chromosomal ...

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... Krimbas C. B. 1993 Drosophila subobscura: biology, genetics and inversion polymorphism. Verlag Dr, Kovac, Hamburg. Menozzi P. and Krimbas C. B. 1992 The inversion polymorphism of Drosophila subobscura revisited: synthetic maps of gene arrangements frequencies and their interpretation. J. Evol.

  2. Medium Term Economic Effects of Peak Oil Today

    Dr. Ulrike Lehr; Dr. Christian Lutz; Kirsten Wiebe

    2011-01-01

    The paper at hand presents results of a model-based scenario analysis on the economic implications in the next decade of an oil peak today and significantly decreasing oil production in the coming years. For that the extraction paths of oil and other fossil fuels given in LBST (2010) are implemented in the global macroeconomic model GINFORS. Additionally, the scenarios incorporate different technological potentials for energy efficiency and renewable energy, which cannot be forecast using eco...

  3. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    Kristine von Maltzan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results.

  4. Age-dependent change in biological characteristics of stem cells in radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Yasukawa-Barnes, Jane; Gould, Michael N.; Clifton, Kelly H.

    2003-01-01

    If you ask what types of cells are the targets for carcinogenesis, a popular answer would be that cancer arises from stem cells. Stem cells are cells that are capable of both self-renewal and generation of differentiated progenies. If the hypothesis of 'cancer as stem cell disease' is correct, the risk of carcinogenesis should be a function of the number of stem cells and their responsiveness of carcinogen-induced damage. In the present study, we addressed the feasibility of this hypothesis using the rat mammary carcinogenesis model. One of the important conclusions emerging from studies on atomic bomb survivors concerns age-related changes in the susceptibility to breast cancer. The relative risk of breast cancer is very high among women exposed to ionizing radiation before or during puberty, and it decreases thereafter. Little information is available, however, on age-related changes in the radiobiological nature of mammary stem cells. We examined age-associated changes in the number of mammary stem-like cells (clonogens) and their susceptibility to radiation in terms of cell death and carcinogenic initiation frequency. The results were as follows. (1) During the prepubertal period, the total number of mammary clonogens per rat increased exponentially with a population doubling time of ∼4 days. After puberty, the doubling time lengthened to ∼30 days. The total number of clonogens in abdominal and inguinal mammary glands was ∼200 in 2-week-old rats, while it was ∼5600 in 8-week-old rats. (2) The survival curves of clonogenic cells after irradiation indicated that radiation sensitivity of the cells before and during puberty was much higher than after puberty. (3) The initiation frequency of the clonogens from prepubertal rats after 5 Gy irradiation was four times higher than that of the clonogens from post-pubertal rats. These results suggest that changes in the number of stem cells and their radiobiological characteristics underlie the age

  5. Age-dependent change in biological characteristics of stem cells in radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Chiba (Japan); Yasukawa-Barnes, Jane; Gould, Michael N.; Clifton, Kelly H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-07-01

    If you ask what types of cells are the targets for carcinogenesis, a popular answer would be that cancer arises from stem cells. Stem cells are cells that are capable of both self-renewal and generation of differentiated progenies. If the hypothesis of 'cancer as stem cell disease' is correct, the risk of carcinogenesis should be a function of the number of stem cells and their responsiveness of carcinogen-induced damage. In the present study, we addressed the feasibility of this hypothesis using the rat mammary carcinogenesis model. One of the important conclusions emerging from studies on atomic bomb survivors concerns age-related changes in the susceptibility to breast cancer. The relative risk of breast cancer is very high among women exposed to ionizing radiation before or during puberty, and it decreases thereafter. Little information is available, however, on age-related changes in the radiobiological nature of mammary stem cells. We examined age-associated changes in the number of mammary stem-like cells (clonogens) and their susceptibility to radiation in terms of cell death and carcinogenic initiation frequency. The results were as follows. (1) During the prepubertal period, the total number of mammary clonogens per rat increased exponentially with a population doubling time of {approx}4 days. After puberty, the doubling time lengthened to {approx}30 days. The total number of clonogens in abdominal and inguinal mammary glands was {approx}200 in 2-week-old rats, while it was {approx}5600 in 8-week-old rats. (2) The survival curves of clonogenic cells after irradiation indicated that radiation sensitivity of the cells before and during puberty was much higher than after puberty. (3) The initiation frequency of the clonogens from prepubertal rats after 5 Gy irradiation was four times higher than that of the clonogens from post-pubertal rats. These results suggest that changes in the number of stem cells and their radiobiological characteristics

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha expression increases during colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression

    Simiantonaki, Nektaria; Taxeidis, Marios; Jayasinghe, Caren; Kurzik-Dumke, Ursula; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is involved in processes promoting carcinogenesis of many tumors. However, its role in the development of colorectal cancer is unknown. To investigate the significance of HIF-1α during colorectal carcinogenesis and progression we examined its expression in precursor lesions constituting the conventional and serrated pathways, as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot is used to analyse HIF-1α expression in normal colonic mucosa, hyperplastic polyps (HPP), sessile serrated adenomas (SSA), low-grade (TA-LGD) and high-grade (TA-HGD) traditional adenomas as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. Eight colorectal carcinoma cell lines are tested for their HIF-1α inducibility after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation using western blot and immunocytochemistry. In normal mucosa, HPP and TA-LGD HIF-1α was not expressed. In contast, perinuclear protein accumulation and nuclear expression of HIF-1α were shown in half of the examined SSA and TA-HGD. In all investigated colorectal carcinomas a significant nuclear HIF-1α overexpression compared to the premalignant lesions was observed but a significant correlation with the metastatic status was not found. Nuclear HIF-1α expression was strongly accumulated in perinecrotic regions. In these cases HIF-1α activation was seen in viable cohesive tumor epithelia surrounding necrosis and in dissociated tumor cells, which subsequently die. Enhanced distribution of HIF-1α was also seen in periiflammatory regions. In additional in vitro studies, treatment of diverse colorectal carcinoma cell lines with the potent pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to HIF-1α expression and nuclear translocation. We conclude that HIF-1α expression occurs in early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and achieves a maximum in the invasive stage independent of the metastatic status. Perinecrotic

  7. p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression and the p53/MDM2 feedback loop in gastric carcinogenesis

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meijer, G. A.; Dekker, W.; Kuipers, E. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Data are non-existent regarding coincidental alterations in the expression of p53 and its downstream target genes MDM2 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in gastric carcinogenesis. An immunohistochemical study was therefore performed to examine the interrelationships of p53, MDM2, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression in a

  8. No evidence for functional inactivation of wild-type p53 protein by MDM2 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of wild-type p53 during gastric carcinogenesis is usually caused by mutations within exons 5-8 of the p53 gene leading to mutated, usually immunohistochemically detectable p53 proteins. However, functional inactivation of wild-type p53, mimicking mutational inactivation, may also result

  9. Chromosome aberrations induced by radiation. With special reference to possible relation between chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis

    Kamada, N [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1980-02-01

    Chromosome aberration seems to be one of the most conspicuous residual abnormalities recognizable in radiation-exposed persons for many years after exposure. Knowledge of the biological significance of these abnormalities seems to be necessary for understanding of the effect of radiation on humans, especially in relation to possible leukemic development. Cytogenetic studies were performed on the bone marrow cells, T and B lymphocytes, and fibroblasts in atomic bomb-survivors who were in apparent good health (105 cases), atomic bomb exposed patients who had prolonged periods of blood disorders which terminated in acute leukemia (8 cases), and who had no such abnormalities (6 cases). All patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and a history of atomic bomb exposure showed Philadelphia chromosome, a characteristic chromosome abnormality for CML. The persistent chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells, T and B lymphocytes found among the atomic bomb survivors with or without blood disorders may give some clue to solve the problems of carcinogenesis.

  10. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Takai, Atsushi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis

  11. Exosomes participate in the carcinogenesis and the malignant behavior of gastric cancer.

    Yan, Yunmeng; Fu, Guangzhen; Ye, Yafei; Ming, Liang

    2017-05-01

    In order to summarize the role of exosomes in invasion and metastasis in gastric cancer (GC). Exosomes are vesicles of endocytic origin ranging from 30 to 100 nm in size; they are composed of a lipid bilayer and contain DNA, mRNA, miRNA, circular RNA and multiple proteins. Recently, increasing evidence shows that exosomes play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of GC. In this review, we focus on the latest findings on GC exosomes, mainly summarizing their role in invasion and metastasis in GC. Then, exosomes? potential functions as novel diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers for GC are briefly discussed. At last, we prospect the clinical application perspective of exosomes in GC. Exosomes play a vital role in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis.

  12. Protective molecular mechanisms of resveratrol in UVR-induced Skin carcinogenesis.

    Aziz, Saba W; Aziz, Moammir H

    2018-01-01

    Skin cancer is a major health problem worldwide. It is the most common cancer in the United States and poses a significant healthcare burden. Excessive UVR exposure is the most common cause of skin cancer. Despite various precautionary measures to avoid direct UVR exposure, the incidence of skin cancer and mortality related to it remains high. Furthermore, the current treatment options are expensive and have side effects including toxicity to normal cells. Thus, a safe and effective approach is needed to prevent and treat skin cancer. Chemopreventive strategy using naturally occurring compounds, such as resveratrol, is a promising approach to reduce the incidence of UVR-induced skin cancer and delay its progression. This review highlights the current body of evidence related to chemopreventive role of resveratrol and its molecular mechanisms in UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: Possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers. PMID:25483826

  14. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    N.B.R. Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  15. Cell survival following alpha particle irradiation: critical sites and implications for carcinogenesis

    Lloyd, E.L.; Gemmell, M.A.; Henning, C.B.; Gemmell, D.S.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    In experiments in which mammalian cells were irradiated with 5.6 MeV alpha particles from a Tandem Van de Graaff machine we have confirmed the finding of others that the mean lethal dose (D 0 ) is about 100 rad, but by measurements of the area of the cell nuclei as irradiated we found that this mean lethal dose corresponds not to 1, as expected, but to about 27 alpha particles per cell nucleus. (The exact number appears to change slightly with cell passage number.) This allows for the possibility that the direct action of alpha particles on the nucleus may be the important event in carcinogenesis, a theory which was previously difficult to accept if a single particle hitting the nucleus anywhere was considered to be lethal. Evidence is presented to implicate the nucleolus as a possible critical site for the inhibition of reproductive integrity of the cell

  16. Combined effects of inhaled plutonium oxide and benzo[a]pyrene on lung carcinogenesis in rats

    Metivier, H.; Masse, R.; Wahrendorf, J.; Lafuma, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study describes the effect of two intratracheal instillations (5 mg each) of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) on lung carcinogenesis in rats that had previously inhaled three levels of 239 PuO 2 . The BP does not modify survival in the high-level 239 PuO 2 -exposed rats, but markedly reduces survival in the two other groups. Median survival time with BP alone is shorter (666 days) than for the control group (838 days). Tumor incidence was increased by BP exposure, and the tumors were usually fatal, whereas tumors observed after 239 PuO 2 inhalation alone were usually not fatal. Statistical analysis of these data poses a problem because of the need to compare incidental and fatal tumors. 22 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Influences of age and anatomical site on ultraviolet carcinogenesis in BALB/c mice

    Ebbesen, P.; Kripke, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Young adult BALB/c mice were mor susceptible to the induction of skin tumors from FS40 sunlamps than were 18-month-old animals. The relative contributions of tissue and host factors to this difference in susceptibility to carcinogenesis were analyzed by reciprocal grafting of skin between young and old animals, followed by repeated exposure of the grafts to UV radiation. More tumors developed in ear skin grafted to the middorsum of young recipients than in that of old recipients, regardless of the age of the skin donor. These ear skin grafts were more susceptible to tumor induction than were comparable grafts of back skin. When large areas of dorsal skin (16 cm2) were grafted to young adult mice, very old skin (greater than 2 yr) was more susceptible to tumor induction than skin that was 1 year old at the start of irradiation

  18. Oxidative Stress Resulting From Helicobacter pylori Infection Contributes to Gastric CarcinogenesisSummary

    Lindsay D. Butcher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that infects the stomach and can lead to, among other disorders, the development of gastric cancer. The inability of the host to clear the infection results in a chronic inflammatory state with continued oxidative stress within the tissue. Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by the immune and epithelial cells damage the host cells and can result in DNA damage. H pylori has evolved to evoke this damaging response while blunting the host’s efforts to kill the bacteria. This long-lasting state with inflammation and oxidative stress can result in gastric carcinogenesis. Continued efforts to better understand the bacterium and the host response will serve to prevent or provide improved early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Keywords: AP Endonuclease, DNA Damage, H pylori, Gastric Cancer, Oxidative Stress

  19. Resistance of germfree athymic nude mice to two-stage skin carcinogenesis

    Holland, J.M.; Perkins, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    Germfree athymic and normal littermate mice were compared with respect to their relative sensitivity to single skin application of dimethylbenzanthacine followed either by croton oil or TPA applied as a co-carcinogen. In separate experiments the acute response of both phenotypes to TPA was assessed by histologic examination of skin as well as the incorporttion of tritiated thymidine into acid insoluble material obtained from the isolated epidermis. Nude mice were observed to be less, equal, or more sensitive than normal littermate to topical skin carcinogenesis depending upon experimental variables. The tendency of solvent to spread rapidly on the skin of nude mice appeared to have the greatest influence on susceptibility to papilloma induction. Other factors of potential, although unproven importance, include differences in skin structure, possibly associated with accelerated activity of hair follicles as well as resistance to both the inflammatory and hyperplasiogenic effects of TPA.

  20. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  1. Lack of promotion of colon carcinogenesis by high-oleic safflower oil.

    Takeshita, M; Ueda, H; Shirabe, K; Higuchi, Y; Yoshida, S

    1997-04-15

    The nonpromoting effect of olive oil on colon carcinogenesis has been attributed to its high oleic acid content, whereas a positive association of monounsaturated fat in beef tallow with colon tumors has been reported. The effect of constituents other than fatty acids could not be neglected in these experiments. In order to minimize the effects of minor constituents in the oils, the authors compared conventional safflower oil with oil from a mutant strain of safflower that is rich in oleic acid. ICR mice were treated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 20 mg/kg body weight every week for 12 weeks) and then were fed either a high-fat diet (23.5% by weight), containing safflower oil (HF-LA) or high-oleic safflower oil (HF-OA), or a low-fat diet (5% by weight), containing safflower oil (LF-LA) or high-oleic safflower oil (LF-OA). The test diets were continued until termination of the experiment at 30 weeks after the first administration of DMH. Fatty acid composition of colon phospholipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tumor multiplicity in animals fed the HF-OA diet was indistinguishable from that in animals fed LF-LA or LF-OA. In contrast, animals fed the HF-LA diet had a significantly higher incidence of colon tumors (mostly adenocarcinomas) than the other groups. Fatty acid profiles of colon phospholipids reflected those of the diet. Animals fed a HF-LA diet showed a marked decrease of nervonic acid (C24:1, n-9) in the colon sphingomyelin. These data indicate that oleic acid does not enhance DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in mice, even when they are fed a high-fat diet.

  2. DPEP1, expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, affects cancer cell invasiveness.

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Hiromi; Saigusa, Susumu; Yokoe, Takeshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-02-01

    We investigated changes in the gene expression profile in colon cancer in order to identify gene markers that may be useful in the management of this disease. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project was used to detect differences in gene expression between normal and cancer tissue. The overexpression of dipeptidase-1 (DPEP1) in cancer tissue was confirmed in a sample of 76 patients by real-time PCR. To identify the function of DPEP1, RNA interference (RNAi) was used to inactivate this gene in the colon cancer cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to characterize the pattern of DPEP1 expression in colon cancer. DPEP1 expression in cancer was significantly higher than that in normal tissue. However, DPEP1 expression decreased with pathological differentiation, lymph-node and distant metastasis. Patients with tumors with decreased DPEP1 expression showed a poorer prognosis, and this was also true of patients with tumors who are treated with curative intent. RNAi-mediated DPEP1 reduction in the colon cancer cell line did not result in cell proliferation or apoptosis, but was associated with an increased invasive ability. DPEP1 protein was observed on the apical side of the cancer cells, and is expressed in the early stages of carcinogenesis, even in adenomas of both sporadic colorectal cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis patients. DPEP1 expression in normal colonic mucosa is very low, but it is highly expressed in colorectal adenoma and cancer specimens and is negatively correlated with parameters of pathological aggressiveness and poor prognosis. DPEP1 is expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis and affects cancer cell invasiveness.

  3. A study of tobacco carcinogenesis XLVIII. Carcinogenicity of N'-nitrosonornicotine in mink (Mustela vison).

    Koppang, N; Rivenson, A; Reith, A; Dahle, H K; Evensen, O; Hoffmann, D

    1992-11-01

    During tobacco processing and smoking, nicotine and nornicotine give rise to N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), a highly abundant, strong carcinogen. NNN is known to exert carcinogenic activity in mice, rats and hamsters. Major target organs for NNN carcinogenicity in the rat are the esophagus and the nasal mucosa, and in the Syrian golden hamster trachea and nasal mucosa. In comparison with the rat, the mink (Mustela vison) has a markedly expanded nasal mucosa. Therefore, we explored in this study whether the mink could serve as a non-rodent model for nasal carcinogenesis using NNN as the carcinogen. Twenty random-bred mink, beginning at the age of 3 weeks, received twice weekly s.c. injections of NNN, a total dose of 11.9 mM per animal over a 38 week period. All of the 19 mink at risk developed malignant tumors of both the respiratory and the olfactory region of the nose within 3.5 years. In most animals the malignant tumors, primarily esthesioneuroepithelioma, invaded the brain. Remarkably, NNN induced no other tumors in the mink. None of the control animals developed nasal tumors nor tumors at other sites during the 3.5 years of the assay. The historical data from the farm did not reveal any spontaneous occurrence of nasal tumors in mink at any age. This study supports the concept that NNN is a proven carcinogen for multiple species of mammals and that the mink can serve as a non-rodent, non-inbred animal model for nasal carcinogenesis, especially since NNN induces only tumors in the nasal cavity in this species and not at other sites, as it does in mice, rats and hamsters.

  4. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Carcinogenesis Induced by Metals and Xenobiotics

    Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Luch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In addition to a wide range of adverse effects on human health, toxic metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can also promote carcinogenesis. The toxicological properties of these metals are partly related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can induce DNA damage and trigger redox-dependent transcription factors. The precise mechanisms that induce oxidative stress are not fully understood. Further, it is not yet known whether chronic exposures to low doses of arsenic, cadmium or other metals are sufficient to induce mutations in vivo, leading to DNA repair responses and/or tumorigenesis. Oxidative stress can also be induced by environmental xenobiotics, when certain metabolites are generated that lead to the continuous release of superoxide, as long as the capacity to reduce the resulting dions (quinones) into hydroquinones is maintained. However, the specific significance of superoxide-dependent pathways to carcinogenesis is often difficult to address, because formation of DNA adducts by mutagenic metabolites can occur in parallel. Here, we will review both mechanisms and toxicological consequences of oxidative stress triggered by metals and dietary or environmental pollutants in general. Besides causing DNA damage, ROS may further induce multiple intracellular signaling pathways, notably NF-κB, JNK/SAPK/p38, as well as Erk/MAPK. These signaling routes can lead to transcriptional induction of target genes that could promote proliferation or confer apoptosis resistance to exposed cells. The significance of these additional modes depends on tissue, cell-type and is often masked by alternate oncogenic mechanisms being activated in parallel

  5. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Zengshengping fractions on DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters.

    Guan, Xiao-Bing; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiao-Xin; Wu, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Xin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Zengshengping (ZSP) tablets had inhibitory effects on oral precancerous lesions by reducing the incidence of oral cancer. However, the severe liver toxicity caused by systemic administration of ZSP limits the long-term use of this anti-cancer drug. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tumor inhibitory effects due to the topical application of extracts from ZSP, a Chinese herbal drug, on 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced oral tumors in hamsters. The study also investigated the anti-cancer mechanisms of the ZSP extracts on oral carcinogenesis. DMBA (0.5%) was applied topically to the buccal pouches of Syrian golden hamsters (6 - 8 weeks old) three times per week for six weeks in order to induce the development of oral tumors. Different fractions of ZSP were either applied topically to the oral tumor lesions or fed orally at varying dosages to animals with oral tumors for 18 weeks. Tumor volume was measured by histopathological examination. Tumor cell proliferation was evaluated by counting BrdU labeled cells and by Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein levels. The protein levels of apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and regulator Bcl-2 protein were also measured by Western blotting. Topical application of DMBA to the left pouch of hamsters induced oral tumor formation. Animals treated with DMBA showed a loss in body weight while animals treated with ZSP maintained normal body weights. Both the ZSP n-butanol fraction and water fraction significantly reduced tumor volume by 32.6% (P oral tumor lesions and reduced the expression level of MAPK. In addition, ZSP promoted tumor cell apoptosis by increasing Caspase-3 expression but decreasing Bcl-2 protein production. The n-butanol and water fractions of ZSP are effective at inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and stimulating apoptosis in oral cancer suggesting that these fractions have chemopreventive effects on DMBA induced oral carcinogenesis.

  7. Genome-wide transcriptional reorganization associated with senescence-to-immortality switch during human hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Gokhan Yildiz

    Full Text Available Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become "immortal" by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15

  8. Histopathological and in vivo evidence of regucalcin as a protective molecule in mammary gland carcinogenesis

    Marques, Ricardo; Vaz, Cátia V.; Maia, Cláudio J. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Gomes, Madalena [IPATIMUP, Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Gama, Adelina [Department of Veterinary Sciences, Animal and Veterinary Science Research Center (CECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD) (Portugal); Alves, Gilberto; Santos, Cecília R. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Schmitt, Fernando [IPATIMUP, Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Medical Faculty, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Socorro, Sílvia, E-mail: ssocorro@fcsaude.ubi.pt [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Regucalcin (RGN) is a calcium-binding protein, which has been shown to be underexpressed in cancer cases. This study aimed to determine the association of RGN expression with clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In addition, the role of RGN in malignancy of mammary gland using transgenic rats overexpressing the protein (Tg-RGN) was investigated. Wild-type (Wt) and Tg-RGN rats were treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA). Carcinogen-induced tumors were histologically classified and the Ki67 proliferation index was estimated. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that RGN immunoreactivity was negatively correlated with the histological grade of breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma suggesting that progression of breast cancer is associated with loss of RGN. Tg-RGN rats displayed lower incidence of carcinogen-induced mammary gland tumors, as well as lower incidence of invasive forms. Moreover, higher proliferation was observed in non-invasive tumors of Wt animals comparatively with Tg-RGN. Overexpression of RGN was associated with diminished expression of cell-cycle inhibitors and increased expression of apoptosis inducers. Augmented activity of apoptosis effector caspase-3 was found in the mammary gland of Tg-RGN. RGN overexpression protected from carcinogen-induced mammary gland tumor development and was linked with reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. These findings indicated the protective role of RGN in the carcinogenesis of mammary gland. - Highlights: • RGN immunoreactivity was negatively correlated with breast cancer differentiation. • Transgenic overexpression of RGN diminished incidence of carcinogen-induced tumors. • Transgenic overexpression of RGN restricted proliferation and fostered apoptosis. • RGN has a protective role in the carcinogenesis of mammary gland.

  9. Local Acetaldehyde—An Essential Role in Alcohol-Related Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Carcinogenesis

    Mikko T. Nieminen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The resident microbiome plays a key role in exposure of the upper gastrointestinal (GI tract mucosa to acetaldehyde (ACH, a carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol. Poor oral health is a significant risk factor for oral and esophageal carcinogenesis and is characterized by a dysbiotic microbiome. Dysbiosis leads to increased growth of opportunistic pathogens (such as Candida yeasts and may cause an up to 100% increase in the local ACH production, which is further modified by organ-specific expression and gene polymorphisms of ethanol-metabolizing and ACH-metabolizing enzymes. A point mutation in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene has randomized millions of alcohol consumers to markedly increased local ACH exposure via saliva and gastric juice, which is associated with a manifold risk for upper GI tract cancers. This human cancer model proves conclusively the causal relationship between ACH and upper GI tract carcinogenesis and provides novel possibilities for the quantitative assessment of ACH carcinogenicity in the human oropharynx. ACH formed from ethanol present in “non-alcoholic” beverages, fermented food, or added during food preparation forms a significant epidemiologic bias in cancer epidemiology. The same also concerns “free” ACH present in mutagenic concentrations in multiple beverages and foodstuffs. Local exposure to ACH is cumulative and can be reduced markedly both at the population and individual level. At best, a person would never consume tobacco, alcohol, or both. However, even smoking cessation and moderation of alcohol consumption are associated with a marked decrease in local ACH exposure and cancer risk, especially among established risk groups.

  10. [Carcinogenesis and its mechanism of mutant-type[12Asp]K-ras4B gene].

    Gui, Li-ming; Wei, Li-hui; Zhang, Ying-mei; Wang, Jian-liu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ying; Ma, Da-long

    2002-01-01

    Ras gene plays an important role in the extra- and intra-cellular signal transduction pathway. It mediates series cascade reactions, and eventually actives transcriptional factors in nucleus. It is unknown on the mechanism of carcinogenesis of Ras gene in endometrial carcinoma, though K-ras mutant is very common in endometrial atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma. On basis of discovering the mutation in 12th codon of K-ras in endometrial carcinoma cell line, HEC-1A, we explored the carcinogenesis and molecular mechanism of mutant-type [12Asp] K-ras4B gene. (1) Full-length [12Asp]K-ras4B cDNA was amplified with RT-PCR, then inserted into pcDI eukaryotic expressive vector. (2) Morphological change, growth kinetics in vitro and tumorigencity in nude mice in vivo after-before transfection were observed. (3) To test the cell growth kinetics by methyl thiazolium tetrazolium (MTT) and [3H]thymidine incorporation method. (1) The authors have successfully constructed eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDI-[12Asp] K-ras4B; (2) To confirm that [12Asp] K-ras4B mutant can trigger the neoplastic transformation of NIH3T3 cells by test in vitro and in vivo. (3) After pMCV-RasN17 plasmid, a Ras mutant were transfected into pcDI-[12Asp] K-ras4B cells, the growth of this cell were restrained significantly in comparison with control group. (4) These findings indicate the expression of RafS621A resulted in remarkable inhibition in proliferation of pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B cell (P ras4B cell growth (P ras4B gene alone is able to cause neoplastic transformation in NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. (2) [12Asp]K-ras4B-induced NIH3T3 cells neoplastic transformation required Raf signaling pathway.

  11. SMT or TOFT? How the two main theories of carcinogenesis are made (artificially) incompatible.

    Bedessem, Baptiste; Ruphy, Stéphanie

    2015-09-01

    The building of a global model of carcinogenesis is one of modern biology's greatest challenges. The traditional somatic mutation theory (SMT) is now supplemented by a new approach, called the Tissue Organization Field Theory (TOFT). According to TOFT, the original source of cancer is loss of tissue organization rather than genetic mutations. In this paper, we study the argumentative strategy used by the advocates of TOFT to impose their view. In particular, we criticize their claim of incompatibility used to justify the necessity to definitively reject SMT. First, we note that since it is difficult to build a non-ambiguous experimental demonstration of the superiority of TOFT, its partisans add epistemological and metaphysical arguments to the debate. This argumentative strategy allows them to defend the necessity of a paradigm shift, with TOFT superseding SMT. To do so, they introduce a notion of incompatibility, which they actually use as the Kuhnian notion of incommensurability. To justify this so-called incompatibility between the two theories of cancer, they move the debate to a metaphysical ground by assimilating the controversy to a fundamental opposition between reductionism and organicism. We show here that this argumentative strategy is specious, because it does not demonstrate clearly that TOFT is an organicist theory. Since it shares with SMT its vocabulary, its ontology and its methodology, it appears that a claim of incompatibility based on this metaphysical plan is not fully justified in the present state of the debate. We conclude that it is more cogent to argue that the two theories are compatible, both biologically and metaphysically. We propose to consider that TOFT and SMT describe two distinct and compatible causal pathways to carcinogenesis. This view is coherent with the existence of integrative approaches, and suggests that they have a higher epistemic value than the two theories taken separately.

  12. Dietary chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin of hairless mice

    Uddin, Ahmed N.; Burns, Fredric J.; Rossman, Toby G.; Chen, Haobin; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2007-01-01

    The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1 mice was investigated. The dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine were tested for prevention of chromium-enhanced skin carcinogenesis. The mice were exposed to UVR (1.0 kJ/m 2 3x weekly) for 26 weeks either alone, or combined with 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate, or with 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride in drinking water. Vitamin E or selenomethionine was added to the lab chow for 29 weeks beginning 3 weeks before the start of UVR exposure. Both chromium and nickel significantly increased the UVR-induced skin cancer yield in mice. In male Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.9 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate added to drinking water increased the yields to 5.9 ± 0.8 and 8.6 ± 0.9 cancers/mouse, respectively. In female Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.7 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and the addition of 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride increased the yields to 2.8 ± 0.9, 5.6 ± 0.7 and 4.2 ± 1.0 cancers/mouse, respectively. Neither vitamin E nor selenomethionine reduced the cancer yield enhancement by chromium. These results confirm that chromium and nickel, while not good skin carcinogens per se, are enhancers of UVR-induced skin cancers in Skh1 mice. Data also suggest that the enhancement of UVR-induced skin cancers by chromate may not be oxidatively mediated since the antioxidant vitamin E as well as selenomethionine, found to prevent arsenite-enhanced skin carcinogenesis, failed to suppress enhancement by chromate

  13. [Curcumin inhibited rat colorectal carcinogenesis by activating PPAR-γ: an experimental study].

    Liu, Liu-bin; Duan, Chang-nong; Ma, Zeng-yi; Xu, Gang

    2015-04-01

    To explore the chemopreventive effect of curcumin on DMH induced colorectal carcinogenesis and the underlining mechanism. Totally 40 Wistar rats were divided into the model group and the curcumin group by random digit table, 20 in each group. Meanwhile, a normal control group was set up (n =10). A colorectal cancer model was induced by subcutaneously injecting 20 mg/kg DMH. The tumor incidence and the inhibition rate were calculated. The effect of curcumin on the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in rat colon mucosal tissues was observed using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. HT 29 cell line were cultured and divided into a control group, the curcumin + GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-4-phenylbenzamide) intervention group, and the curcumin group. The inhibition of different concentrations curcumin on HT29 cell line was detected using MTT. The expression of curcumin on PPARy was also detected using Western blot. The tumor incidence was 80. 00% (12/15 cases) in the model group, obviously higher than that of the curcumin group (58. 82%, 10/17 cases, P manners. The expression of PPARy protein was significantly increased in the GW9662 group and the curcumin group, showing statistical difference when compared with the normal control group (P <0. 01). Compared with the GW9662 group, the expression of PPARγ protein was significantly increased in the curcumin group (P <0. 01). Curcumin could inhibit DMH-induced rat colorectal carcinogenesis and the growth of in vitro cultured HT 29 cell line, which might be achieved by activating PPARy signal transduction pathway.

  14. Role of human papilloma virus in the oral carcinogenesis: An Indian perspective

    Chocolatewala Noureen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is one of the most common cancers in the Indian subcontinent. Although tobacco and alcohol are the main etiologic factors for nearly three-fourth of these cancers, no definite etiologic factor can be identified in one-fourth of the cases. There is growing evidence that human papilloma virus (HPV may act as a cocarcinogen, along with tobacco, in the causation of oral cancers. The role of HPV in the etiology of anogenital cancers has been firmly established, and infection with this virus has also been shown to have prognostic significance. However, there is no clear evidence to support its involvement in oral carcinogenesis. We searched the PubMed database for all literature published from 1985 to 2008 and performed a systemic review in order to understand the relationship of HPV with oral cancers and its prevalence in various sub-sites in the oral cavity. Association of HPV is strongest for oropharyngeal cancers, especially cancers of the tonsils, followed by those of the base of tongue. High-risk HPV-16 is the predominant type; it commonly affects the younger age-groups, with males appearing to have a predisposition for infection with this strain. Its prevalence increases from normal to dysplasia and finally to cancer. HPV prevalence has been reported to be twice as high in premalignant lesions as in normal mucosa and is nearly five times higher in OSCC. The overall prevalence of HPV in OSCC ranges between 20-50%. OSCCs associated with HPV have been found to have better outcomes, being more responsive to radiotherapy and showing higher survival rates. In view of the association of HPV with OSCC, it should be worthwhile to conduct further experimental studies to elucidate its role in oral carcinogenesis.

  15. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

    Gurushankar, K; Gohulkumar, M; Krishnakumar, N; Kumar, Piyush; Murali Krishna, C

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800–500 cm −1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC–LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  16. Anticarcinogenesis effect of Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr on tongue carcinogenesis in 4NQO-induced rat

    D. Agustina

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr leaves have been long used as various cancers medication. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated anticarcinogenesis of ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticarcinogenesis of the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves on 4 nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis. Fifty six 4 week old male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study and divided into 7 groups. Group 1, 2 and 3 were lingually induced by 4NQO for 8 weeks. In groups 2 and 3 the extract was given simultaneously with or after 4NQO induction finished, each for 10 weeks and 26 weeks, respectively. Groups 4, 5 and 6 were induced by 4NQO for 16 weeks. However, in groups 5 and 6 the extract was given as well simultaneously with or after the 4NQO induction, each for 18 weeks, respectively. Group 7 served as the as untreated control group. The results from microscopical assessment showed that tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC developed in 100% (3/3 of group 1. However, only 33.3% (2/6 and 25% (2/8 of rats in groups 2 and 3, respectively demonstrated tongue SCC. Among groups 4, 5 and 6, no significant difference of tongue SCC incidence was observed. From these results it is apparent that the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves could inhibit the progression of 4NQOinduced rat tongue carcinogenesis in the initiation phase.

  17. Radiation and non-radiation damage to DNA. Onset of molecular instability and carcinogenesis. Theoretical explorations on DNA damage and repair

    Pinak, Miroslay; Bunta, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    The current work is focused on results of molecular dynamics simulations performed on two DNA damages: 8-oxoguanine as the most significant oxidative damage leading to transversion mutation cytosine-guanine→adenine-thymine', which is common mutation found in human cancer cells; and on the DNA strand break, the type of damage that is considered to be one of the most significant damage leading to genetic instability that may result in enhanced cell proliferation or carcinogenesis. Except the structural changes induced by these two lesions the role and importance of electrostatic energy in recognition process in which a respective repair enzyme recognizes damaged DNA site is also described. Among the significant results can be included the fact, that most of the damages on DNA alternate locally electronic state by modifying chemical and electron orbital configuration. This modified configuration may be represented outside DNA molecule as an enhanced electrostatic interaction with surrounding environment, that may signal the presence of the damaged site toward the repair enzyme. Work on the DNA strand break shows that open valences at broken strand ends are quickly filled by the electrons generated during radiolysis. Results of simulation indicate a local instability of hydrogen bonds between complementary bases. (author)

  18. Liver-specific expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice promotes liver carcinogenesis in the absence of obesity and diabetes

    Kuklin, Alexander [ORNL; Mynatt, Randall [ORNL; Klebig, Mitch [ORNL; Kiefer, Laura [Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC; Wilkison, William O [Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC; Woychik, Richard P [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    Background: The agouti protein is a paracrine factor that is normally present in the skin of many species of mammals. Agouti regulates the switch between black and yellow hair pigmentation by signalling through the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) on melanocytes. Lethal yellow (Ay) and viable yellow (Avy) are dominant regulatory mutations in the mouse agouti gene that cause the wild- ype protein to be produced at abnormally high levels throughout the body. Mice harboring these mutations exhibit a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by yellow coat color, obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and increased susceptibility to hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in numerous tissues, including the liver. The goal of this research was to determine if ectopic expression of the agouti gene in the liver alone is sufficient to recapitulate any aspect of this syndrome. For this purpose, we generated lines of transgenic mice expressing high levels of agouti in the liver under the regulatory control of the albumin promoter. Expression levels of the agouti transgene in the liver were quantified by Northern blot analysis. Functional agouti protein in the liver of transgenic mice was assayed by its ability to inhibit binding of the -melanocyte stimulating hormone ( MSH) to the Mc1r. Body weight, plasma insulin and blood glucose levels were analyzed in control and transgenic mice. Control and transgenic male mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg) of the hepatocellular carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN), at 15 days of age. Mice were euthanized at 36 or 40 weeks after DEN injection and the number of tumors per liver and total liver weights were recorded. Results: The albumin-agouti transgene was expressed at high levels in the livers of mice and produced a functional agouti protein. Albumin-agouti transgenic mice had normal body weights and normal levels of blood glucose and plasma insulin, but responded to chemical initiation of the liver with an increased number

  19. [Changes of expression of miR-155 in colitis-associated colonic carcinogenesis].

    Li, Weiwei; Han, Wenxiao; Zhao, Xinhua; Wang, Hongying

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the changes of miR-155 and its target genes in colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Colitis-associated colon cancer was induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in C57BL/6 mice. Mice of three different stages during the development of colon cancer were obtained, named AD1, AD2 and AD3, respectively. A control group of mice without any treatment and a DSS only group representing chronic inflammation without cancer were set up as well. Colon tissue was collected and expression of miR-155 in the colon tissues was measured by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. TargetScan and PicTar were used to predict potential target genes of miR-155, which were then preliminarily screened with our gene expression microarray database of AOM-DSS mouse model. Regular PCR was used to confirm the changes of the expression of these potential target genes in AOM-DSS mouse model. Colitis-associated colon cancer was effectively induced by azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium in C57BL/6 mice. Histological examination revealed that the evolution process was sequentially from normal, mild dysplasia, moderate dysplasia, and severe dysplasia to adenocarcinoma in the AOM-DSS mouse model. The level of miR-155 was gradually elevated with the formation of colitis-associated colon cancer. There was no significant difference between the levels of miR-155 expression in the DSS group (0.005 6 ± 0.003 7) and control group (0.012 0 ± 0.005 1) (P > 0.05), but the level of miR-155 in the AD3 group (0.054 4 ± 0.027 0) was significantly higher than that of the DSS group (0.005 6 ± 0.003 7)(P Bcorl1, Cacna1c, Rspo2 and Foxo3 were potential target genes of miR-155 in the AOM-DSS mouse model. Changes of Kcna1 and Cacna1c in the AOM-DSS mouse model were validated to be consistent with the changes obtained with the gene expression microarray. The up-regulation of miR-155 is related to colitis-associated carcinogenesis, but is irrelevant to chronic inflammation in the

  20. Aberrant Hypermethylation of SALL3 with HPV Involvement Contributes to the Carcinogenesis of Cervical Cancer.

    Xing Wei

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the methylation status of the promoter region of spalt-like transcription factor 3 (SALL3 and the expression of SALL3 in cervical cancer to explore the function of this gene in cervical cancer carcinogenesis.The methylation status of SALL3 was detected by methylation-specific PCR, and SALL3 gene expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR in the cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa, HeLa and C33A, as well as in cervical cancer tissue samples (n = 23, matched pericarcinomatous tissue samples (n = 23 and normal cervix tissue samples (n = 17. MTT was used to measure the cell viability and proliferation capacity of SiHa and HeLa cells.The SALL3 promoter was completely methylated in SiHa cells, unmethylated in C33A cells and partially methylated in HeLa cells. After treatment of SiHa and HeLa cells with 5 μM and 10 μM of 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, respectively, the methylation level of the SALL3 promoter decreased and observed increase in the degree of unmethylation in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the relative expression of SALL3 mRNA increased as the concentration of 5-Aza increased in SiHa (p<0.05 and HeLa (p<0.05 cells. This above-mentioned increase in SALL3 mRNA in SiHa cells was more remarkable than that observed in HeLa cells. Cell proliferation capacity also decreased after administration of 5-Aza to SiHa and HeLa cells (p<0.05. Methylation of the SALL3 promoter was observed in 15 of 23 (65.21% cervical cancer tissue samples, 15 of 23 (65.21% matched pericarcinomatous tissue samples and 5 of 17 (29.41% normal cervical tissue samples (p<0.05. SALL3 mRNA expression was significantly lower in cervical cancer and pericarcinomatous tissues compared with normal cervical tissues (p<0.05. In all cervix tissue samples, HPV infection was positively associated with hypermethylation of the promoter region of SALL3 (p<0.05, r = 0.408, and the expression of SALL3 mRNA in HPV-positive tissues was lower than that in

  1. Bladder carcinogenesis in rats subjected to ureterosigmoidostomy and treated with L-lysine.

    Dornelas, Conceição Aparecida; Santos, Alessandra Marques Dos; Correia, Antonio Lucas Oliveira; Juanes, Camila de Carvalho; Coelho, João Paulo Ferreira; Cunha, Bianca Lopes; Maciel, André Vinicius Vieira; Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo Fechine

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the effect of L-lysine in the bladder and intestinal epithelia in rats submitted to vesicosigmoidostomy. we divided forty Wistar rats into four groups: group I - control group (Sham); group II - submitted to vesicosigmoidostomy and treated with L-lysine 150mg/kg; group III - submitted only to vesicosigmoidostomy; and group IV - received L-lysine 150mg/kg. After eight weeks the animals were sacrificed. in the bladders of all operated animals we observed simple, papillary and nodular hyperplasia of transitional cells, transitional cell papillomas and squamous metaplasia. As for the occurrence of aberrant crypt foci in the colons of operated animals, we did not observe statistically significant differences in any of the distal, proximal and medium fragments, or in all fragments together (p=1.0000). Although statistically there was no promotion of carcinogenesis in the epithelia of rats treated with L-lysine in the observed time, it was clear the histogenesis of bladder carcinogenesis in its initial phase in all operated rats, this being probably associated with chronic infection and tiny bladder stones. o objetivo deste trabalho é avaliar o efeito da L-lisina nos epitélios vesical e intestinal de ratas submetidas à vesicossigmoidostomia. quarenta ratas Wistar, foram divididas em quatro grupos: grupo I- grupo controle (Sham); grupo II- submetido à vesicossigmoidostomia e tratado com L-lisina 150mg/kg; grupo III- submetido apenas à vesicossigmoidostomia; e grupo IV- recebeu L-lisina 150mg/kg. Após oito semanas os animais foram sacrificados. na bexiga de todos os animais operados observou-se hiperplasia simples, papilar e nodular de células transicionais, papiloma de células transicionais e metaplasia escamosa. Quanto à ocorrência de focos de criptas aberrantes nos colos dos animais operados, não foi evidenciado diferença estatística significante em nenhum dos fragmentos distal, proximal e médio, e todos juntos (P=1,0000). apesar de

  2. Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers

    Alibek Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally. In the case of brain cancer, no infection has been accepted as directly oncogenic, although a number of viruses and parasites are associated with the malignancy. Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens. Several epidemiological studies reported associations of brain cancer and toxoplasmosis seropositivity. In head and neck cancers, there is a distinct correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Considering that almost every undifferentiated NPC is EBV-positive, virus titer levels can be measured to screen high-risk populations. In addition there is an apparent association between human papilloma virus (HPV and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC; specifically, 26% of HNSCCs are positive for HPV. HPV type 16 was the most common type detected in HNSCCs (90% and its dominance is even greater than that reported in cervical carcinoma. Although there are many studies showing an association of infectious agents with cancer, with various levels of involvement and either a direct or indirect causative effect, there is a scarcity of articles covering the role of

  3. 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) inhibits radiation induced carcinogenesis (skin tumors) in mice

    Singh, Saurabh; Bhuria, Vikas; Pandey, Sanjay; Saluja, Daman; Dwarakanath, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the late effects of radiation exposure i.e. carcinogenesis is exemplified by atomic bomb survivors, radiotherapy patients and occupational workers. Enhanced glucose metabolism (Warburg's effect) is a fundamental metabolic change in transformed cells which drives tumorigenesis. It is suggested that Dietary Energy Restriction (DER) that targets glucose metabolism may afford protection against radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, DER is practically difficult to sustain in humans. Therefore, we have hypothesized that the glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a potential energy restriction mimetic agent (ERMA) may impair the process of tumorigenesis as an alternative to DER. In the present studies we investigated the effects of dietary 2-DG on radiation induced papillomas in mice. Swiss albino mice (male) were irradiated with a fractionated dose schedule (1.5 Gy ionizing radiation/week for four weeks) focally on the shaved back followed by the application of tumor promoting agent (TPA) once weekly till the termination of the study. Mice were administered 2-DG (0.2% and 0.4% w/v) containing water starting a week after last irradiation. A significant reduction in the tumor incidence, tumor burden, besides increase in the latency period was observed in the 2-DG fed mice. The average tumor incidence (papillomas formation) was reduced to 25% and 37% in 0.2% and 0.4% 2-DG group respectively from 47% in the control group with a significant delay in the onset. Under these conditions, 2-DG considerably enhanced the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) with a concomitant decrease in the lipid peroxidation. 2-DG fed tumor bearing mice showed decrease in splenic CD4 + to CD8 + T-cell ratio and prevented the tumor induced augmentation of T-regulatory cells (CD4 + CD25 + ) which correlated with an increase in CD8 + (CTLs) cells. Dietary 2-DG also reduced the tumor associated and radiation induced angiogenesis. These observations suggest that dietary 2-DG

  4. Chemical Peels

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  5. Chemical Oscillations

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  6. Comparative experimental study of cancer induced by ionizing radiations or by chemical carcinogens

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Animal experiments have contributed to specify a number of parameters used in setting human safety limits for ionizing radiation. In the same way, comparisons have been made between cancers induced in man and in animals in well-defined conditions. In order to use the same experimental data for chemical carcinogens, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis should be the same, i.e. additivity of responses instead of synergy of effects, which requires the development of a new experimental method [fr

  7. Chemical ecotoxicology

    Paasivirta, J.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses risk assessment, chemical cycles, structure-activity relations, organohalogens, oil residues, mercury, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals, and emissions from the forestry industry. Topics include: Cycles of chemicals in the environment. Rick assessment and management, strucuture and toxicity, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals in environment, interpretation of the environmental analysis results, mercury in the environment, organohalogen compounds in the environment, emissions from forestry industry, oil residues in the environment: oil spills in the marine environment

  8. Chemopreventive effect of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. extract against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in experimental animals.

    Albert-Baskar, Arul; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2010-07-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive property of Cynodon dactylon. The antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic potentials of the plant were investigated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, nitric oxide radical scavenging activity (NO(-)) and MTT assay on four cancer cell lines (COLO 320 DM, MCH-7, AGS, A549) and a normal cell line (VERO). In vivo chemopreventive property of the plant extract was studied in DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. The methanolic extract of C. dactylon was found to be antiproliferative and antioxidative at lower concentrations and induced apoptotic cell death in COLO 320 DM cells. Treatment with methanolic extract of C. dactylon increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the number of dysplastic crypts in DMH-induced colon of albino rats. The present investigation revealed the anticancer potential of methanolic extract of C. dactylon in COLO 320 DM cells and experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

  9. Chemical sensor

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  10. Protein Kinases and Transcription Factors Activation in Response to UV-Radiation of Skin: Implications for Carcinogenesis

    Laurence A. Marchat; Elena Aréchaga Ocampo; Mavil López Casamichana; Carlos Pérez-Plasencia; César López-Camarillo; Elizbeth Álvarez-Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important environmental factor that leads to immune suppression, inflammation, photoaging, and skin carcinogenesis. Here, we reviewed the specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors involved in the cellular response to UV-irradiation. Increasing experimental data supporting a role for p38, MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2, and ATM kinases in the response network to UV exposure is discussed. We also reviewed the participation of NF-?B, AP-1, and NRF2...

  11. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Tanaka, Takuji, E-mail: tmntt08@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Mori, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Naiki, Takafumi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hisataka [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi [The Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  12. Effects of dietary beef, pork, chicken and salmon on intestinal carcinogenesis in A/J Min/+ mice.

    Christina Steppeler

    Full Text Available The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified red meat as "probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A. In mechanistic studies exploring the link between intake of red meat and CRC, heme iron, the pigment of red meat, is proposed to play a central role as a catalyzer of luminal lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity. In the present work, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse was used to investigate the effects of dietary beef, pork, chicken, or salmon (40% muscle food (dry weight and 60% powder diet on Apc-driven intestinal carcinogenesis, from week 3-13 of age. Muscle food diets did not differentially affect carcinogenesis in the colon (flat ACF and tumors. In the small intestine, salmon intake resulted in a lower tumor size and load than did meat from terrestrial animals (beef, pork or chicken, while no differences were observed between the effects of white meat (chicken and red meat (pork and beef. Additional results indicated that intestinal carcinogenesis was not related to dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, intestinal formation of lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS, or cytotoxic effects of fecal water on Apc-/+ cells. Notably, the amount of heme reaching the colon appeared to be relatively low in this study. The greatest tumor load was induced by the reference diet RM1, underlining the importance of the basic diets in experimental CRC. The present study in A/J Min/+ mice does not support the hypothesis of a role of red meat in intestinal carcinogenesis.

  13. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Watanabe, Naoki; Naiki, Takafumi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation

  14. Induction of experimental mammary carcinogenesis in rats with 7,12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene Indução da carcinogênese mamária experimental em ratas com 7,12-dimetilbenz(aantraceno

    Alfredo Carlos S. D. Barros

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test an experimental model of chemical mammary carcinogenesis induction in rats. METHODS: Twenty young virgin Sprague-Dawley female rats, aged 47 days, received 20 mg of 7,12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene (DMBA intragastrically by gavage. Afterwards, at 8 and 13 weeks, their mammary glands were examined. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed, and the mammary tumors were measured and weighed. Tumor fragments were analyzed using light microscopy. RESULTS: Eight weeks after DMBA injection, 16 rats presented at least 1 breast tumor (80%. After 13 weeks, all of them (100% developed breast carcinomas that were confirmed by histopathological analysis. CONCLUSION: This experimental animal model of chemical mammary induced carcinogenesis is feasible and can be used in further experiments on the role of tumorigenic biomodulator substances.OBJETIVO: Testar um modelo experimental de indução química de carcinogênese mamária em ratas. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Com 47 dias de vida, 20 ratas Sprague-Dawley, jovens e virgens, receberam por gavagem intragástrica 20 mg de 7,12-dimetilbenz(aantraceno (DMBA. Oito e 13 semanas depois da injeção de droga as mamas das ratas foram examinadas. Ao final os animais foram sacrificados e fragmentos dos tumores foram estudados ao microscópio. RESULTADO: Oito semanas depois da injeção de DMBA 16 ratas apresentavam tumor nas mamas (80%. Com 13 semanas todas desenvolveram carcinomas de mama (100%, que foram confirmados por análise histopatológica. CONCLUSÃO: Este modelo experimental de indução química de carcinogênese mamária é factível e pode ser empregado em futuras pesquisas para avaliar o papel de substâncias biomoduladoras da tumorigênese.

  15. Interaction of renin-angiotensin system and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in renal carcinogenesis of uninephrectomized rats.

    Yang, Ke-Ke; Sui, Yi; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2017-05-01

    Renin-angiotensin system and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway both play important roles in carcinogenesis, but the interplay of renin-angiotensin system and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in carcinogenesis is not clear. In this study, we researched the interaction of renin-angiotensin system and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in renal carcinogenesis of uninephrectomized rats. A total of 96 rats were stratified into four groups: sham, uninephrectomized, and uninephrectomized treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. Renal adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and its downstream molecule acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot at 10 months after uninephrectomy. Meanwhile, we examined renal carcinogenesis by histological transformation and expressions of Ki67 and mutant p53. During the study, fasting lipid profiles were detected dynamically at 3, 6, 8, and 10 months. The results indicated that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase expression in uninephrectomized rats showed 36.8% reduction by immunohistochemistry and 89.73% reduction by western blot. Inversely, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase expression increased 83.3% and 19.07% in parallel to hyperlipidemia at 6, 8, and 10 months. The histopathology of carcinogenesis in remnant kidneys was manifested by atypical proliferation and carcinoma in situ, as well as increased expressions of Ki67 and mutant p53. Intervention with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker significantly prevented the inhibition of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and renal carcinogenesis in uninephrectomized rats. In conclusion, the novel findings suggest that uninephrectomy-induced disturbance in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway resulted in hyperlipidemia and

  16. Monitoring Autophagy Immunohistochemically and Ultrastructurally during Human Head and Neck Carcinogenesis. Relationship with the DNA Damage Response Pathway †

    Havaki, Sophia; Vlachou, Vassiliki; Zampetidis, Christos P.; Selemenakis, Platonas; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Rizou, Sophia V.; Kyrodimos, Euthymios; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Kletsas, Dimitris; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that preserves cellular homeostasis. Its exact role during carcinogenesis is not completely defined. Specifically in head and neck cancer, such information from clinical settings that comprise the whole spectrum of human carcinogenesis is very limited. Towards this direction, we examined the in situ status of the autophagy-related factors, Beclin-1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, member B (LC3B) and sequestosome 1/p62 (p62) in clinical material covering all histopathological stages of human head and neck carcinogenesis. This material is unique as each panel of lesions is derived from the same patient and moreover we have previously assessed it for the DNA damage response (DDR) activation status. Since Beclin-1, LC3B and p62 reflect the nucleation, elongation and degradation stages of autophagy, respectively, their combined immunohistochemical (IHC) expression profiles could grossly mirror the autophagic flux. This experimental approach was further corroborated by ultrastructural analysis, applying transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed Beclin-1/LC3B/p62 IHC patterns, obtained from serial sections analysis, along with TEM findings are suggestive of a declined authophagic activity in preneoplastic lesions that was restored in full blown cancers. Correlating these findings with DDR status in the same pathological stages are indicative of: (i) an antitumor function of autophagy in support to that of DDR, possibly through energy deprivation in preneoplastic stages, thus preventing incipient cancer cells from evolving; and (ii) a tumor-supporting role in the cancerous stage. PMID:28880214

  17. Life-shortening and carcinogenesis in mice irradiated neonatally with x rays

    Sasaki, S.; Kasuga, T.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of life-shortening and carcinogenesis were investigated in x-irradiated neonatal B6WFr mice. Animals were irradiated with 24 hr after birth and allowed to complete their normal life span. Mean life span was shortened linearly with doses at a rate of 9.1% per 100 R for females and 9.8% for males. The spectrum of neoplastic diseases was apparently modulated by x irradiation, showing neonatal B6WFr mice to be highly susceptible to the induction of thymic lymphoma, liver tumor, and pituitary tumor. The dose-response relationship for thymice lymphoma could be described by a linear-quadratic model, and linearity could be rejected. Thymic lymphoma developed after a short latent period, resulting in death between 100 and 450 days of age. Liver and pituitary tumors increased with increasing dose up to 400 R and decreased thereafter. The latent period for liver tumor development was apparently shortened with increasing doses. Pituitary tumor developed in excess only in females after a long latent period

  18. Genetic characteristics of mitochondrial DNA was associated with colorectal carcinogenesis and its prognosis.

    Jae-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical value of mitochondrial DNA has been described in colorectal cancer (CRC. To clarify its role in colorectal carcinogenesis, mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI and other markers were investigated in CRCs and their precancerous lesions, as a multitier genetic study. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 78 tubular adenomas (TAs, 34 serrated polyps (SPs, and 100 CRCs. mtMSI, nucleus microsatellite instability (nMSI, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were investigated in these tumors and their statistical analysis was performed. mtMSI was found in 30% of CRCs and 21.4% of precancerous lesions. Mitochondrial copy number was higher in SPs than TAs and it was associated with mtMSI in low grade TAs. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in TAs and SPs. CRCs with mtMSI showed shorter overall survival times than the patients without mtMSI. In CRCs without nMSI or BRAF mutation, mtMSI was a more accurate marker for predicting prognosis. The genetic change of mitochondrial DNA is an early and independent event in colorectal precancerous lesions and mtMSI and mitochondrial contents are associated with the tubular adenoma-carcinoma sequence, resulting in poor prognosis. This result suggested that the genetic change in mitochondrial DNA appears to be a possible prognosis marker in CRC.

  19. Test of the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis for inhaled radon decay products

    Cohen, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations - rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers - are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found. (author)

  20. MicroRNA-7/NF-κB signaling regulatory feedback circuit regulates gastric carcinogenesis

    Zhao, Xiao-Di; Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Guo, Hao; Xie, Hua-Hong; He, Li-Jie; Shen, Gao-Fei; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ting; Hu, Si-Jun; Zhou, Lin; Han, Ya-Nan; Liang, Shu-Li; Wang, Xin; Wu, Kai-Chun; Shi, Yong-Quan; Nie, Yong-Zhan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play essential roles in gene expression regulation during carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated the role of miR-7 and the mechanism by which it is dysregulated in gastric cancer (GC). We used genome-wide screenings and identified RELA and FOS as novel targets of miR-7. Overexpression of miR-7 repressed RELA and FOS expression and prevented GC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. These effects were clinically relevant, as low miR-7 expression was correlated with high RELA and FOS expression and poor survival in GC patients. Intriguingly, we found that miR-7 indirectly regulated RELA activation by targeting the IκB kinase IKKε. Furthermore, IKKε and RELA can repress miR-7 transcription, which forms a feedback circuit between miR-7 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. Additionally, we demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-7 may occur as a result of the aberrant activation of NF-κB signaling by Helicobacter pylori infection. These findings suggest that miR-7 may serve as an important regulator in GC development and progression. PMID:26261179