WorldWideScience

Sample records for medium temperature fuel

  1. Importance of temperature and anodic medium composition on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Romàn, Ó.B.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated at different temperatures and anodic media. A lag phase of 30 h occurred at 30°C which was half that at room temperature (22°C). The maximum power density at 30°C was 70 mW/m2 and at 22°C was 43 mW/m2. At 15°C, no successful operation...... was observed even after several loadings for a long period of operation. Maximum power density of 320 mW/m2 was obtained with wastewater medium containing phosphate buffer (conductivity: 11.8 mS/cm), which was approx. 4 times higher than the value without phosphate additions (2.89 mS/cm)....

  2. A boron phosphate-phosphoric acid composite membrane for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    2015-07-01

    A composite membrane based on a non-stoichiometric composition of BPO4 with excess of PO4 (BPOx) was synthesised and characterised for medium temperature fuel cell use (120-180 °C). The electrolyte was characterised by FTIR, SS-NMR, TGA and XRD and showed that the B-O is tetrahedral, in agreement with reports in the literature that boron phosphorus oxide compounds at B:P < 1 are exclusively built of borate and phosphate tetrahedra. Platinum micro electrodes were used to study the electrolyte compatibility and stability towards oxygen reduction at 150 °C and to obtain kinetic and mass transport parameters. The conductivities of the pure BPOx membrane electrolyte and a Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-4BPOx composite membrane were 7.9 × 10-2 S cm-1 and 4.5 × 10-2 S cm-1 respectively at 150 °C, 5%RH. Fuel cell tests showed a significant enhancement in performance of BPOx over that of typical 5.6H3PO4-PBI membrane electrolyte. The enhancement is due to the improved ionic conductivity (3×), a higher exchange current density of the oxygen reduction (30×) and a lower membrane gas permeability (10×). Fuel cell current densities at 0.6 V were 706 and 425 mA cm-2 for BPOx and 5.6H3PO4-PBI, respectively, at 150 °C with O2 (atm).

  3. Nafion®/ODF-silica composite membranes for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Treekamol, Yaowapa

    2014-01-01

    A series of composite membranes were prepared by dispersing fluorinated polyoxadiazole oligomer (ODF)-functionalized silica nanoparticles in a Nafion matrix. Both melt-extrusion and solvent casting processes were explored. Ion exchange capacity, conductivity, water uptake and dimensional stability, thermal stability and morphology were characterized. The inclusion of functionalized nanoparticles proved advantageous, mainly due to a physical crosslinking effect and better water retention, with functionalized nanoparticles performing better than the pristine silica particles. For the same filler loading, better nanoparticle dispersion was achieved for solvent-cast membranes, resulting in higher proton conductivity. Filler agglomeration, however,was more severe for solvent-castmembranes at loadings beyond 5wt.%. The composite membranes showed excellent thermal stability, allowing for operation in medium temperature PEM fuel cells. Fuel cell performance of the compositemembranesdecreaseswithdecreasing relativehumidity, but goodperformance values are still obtained at 34% RHand 90 °C,with the best results obtained for solvent castmembranes loaded with 10 wt.% ODF-functionalized silica. Hydrogen crossover of the composite membranes is higher than that forpureNafion membranes,possiblydue toporosityresulting fromsuboptimalparticle- matrixcompatibility. © 2013 Crown Copyright and Elsevier BV. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in medium and high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatore, Aricò

    2017-01-01

    In this book well-known experts highlight cutting-edge research priorities and discuss the state of the art in the field of solid oxide fuel cells giving an update on specific subjects such as protonic conductors, interconnects, electrocatalytic and catalytic processes and modelling approaches. Fundamentals and advances in this field are illustrated to help young researchers address issues in the characterization of materials and in the analysis of processes, not often tackled in scholarly books.

  5. Investigation of phosphate compounds for use in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel

    Der udvises stigende interesse for brændselsceller og elektrolysatorer der opererer ved middeltemperaturer, 150-500 °C. Polymerbaserede celler der opererer ved lave temperaturer har en hurtig opstartstid, støttematerialerne er billige og de er egnede til mobile anvendelser. Desværre kræver de æde...

  6. Proton Content and Nature in Perovskite Ceramic Membranes for Medium Temperature Fuel Cells and Electrolysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Slodczyk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1–5 × 10−3 mole/mole, but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  7. Proton content and nature in perovskite ceramic membranes for medium temperature fuel cells and electrolysers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomban, Philippe; Zaafrani, Oumaya; Slodczyk, Aneta

    2012-07-25

    Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1-5 × 10-3 mole/mole), but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  8. The 3rd CARISMA international conference on medium and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Three approaches to better platinum catalysts at biannual conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    The 3rd CARISMA International Conference was held at the Axelborg venue in Copenhagen, Denmark, from September 3-5, 2012. The CARISMA conference series was specifically devoted to challenges in the development and testing of fuel cell materials and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for proton...... exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) to be operated at intermediate and high temperatures. The conference series was initiated by the European CARISMA Coordination Action for Research on Intermediate and High Temperature Specialized Membrane Electrode Assemblies. The 2012 event in Copenhagen had around...

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...... temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  11. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  12. MEDIUM PRESSURE HYDROUPGRADING PROCESS (MHUG) AND PRODUCTION OF CLEAN FUELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The medium pressure hydroupgrading process (MHUG) unit with an 800 kt/a processing capacity of Jinzhou Petrochemical Company is used to hydroupgrade the mixture of FCC LCO fuel and straight-run diesel fuel in the presence of RN/RT series catalysts for improvement of the quality of the diesel fuel. Meanwhile, catalytic reforming feedstock is also obtained. The sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics contained in the hydroupgraded diesel fuel products can be minimized and the cetane number can be heightened. The produced clean fuels can meet the requirements of environmental protection.

  13. Critical Ignition Temperature of Fuel-air Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhang

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The charge of fuel-air explosive (FAE warhead usually is solid-liquid mixed fuel. The solid component is aluminium powder. To meet the demand of FAE weapon usage and storage safety, in the mixed-fuel medium, there must be gaps where adiabatic compression occurs during launchin-e overloading- of warhead. Adiabatic compression makes the temperature of the mediumin the gaps to rise. High temperature can cause dxplosion of the mixed fuel during launching acceleration of the warhead, which is very dangerous. Because the fuel is a multicomponentmixture, the critical ignitioh temperature can't be determined only by one component. Through experiment, the critical ignition temperature of the mixed fuel is attained, and the changingregularity of the pressure following the temperature is shown in this paper.

  14. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  15. A high temperature fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekido, A.; Nakai, M.; Ninomiya, Y.

    1982-12-21

    A solid electrolyte which conducts electricity with heating by oxygen ions and operates at a temperature of 1,000C is used in the element. The cathode, besides the ionic conductivity in oxygen, has an electron conductivity. The anode has electron conductivity. Substances such as Bi203, into which oxides of alkaline earth metals are added, are used for making the cathode. The electrolyte consists of ZrO2 and Y2O3, to which CaO is added. WC, to which an H2 type fuel is fed, serves as the anode. The element has a long service life.

  16. Medium-speed diesel engineers: part I-design trends and the use of residual/blended fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, F.J.; Ahluwalia, J.S.; Shamah, E.

    1984-10-01

    Fuel costs can exceed 50 percent of the total diesel plant's operational expenditures. To reduce fuel costs, medium-speed engines are now available with improved fuel consumption and ability to burn residual fuels. Part I of this paper reviews these engine and design changes needed for both improved fuel consumption and the ability to burn poorer quality fuels. Characteristics of these fuels and international fuel specifications are discussed. Ignition quality of residual fuels by a modified ASTM D 613 procedure are presented and correlation shown to calculated diesel index and calculated carbon aromaticity index (CCAI). Residual fuel ignition delay effects on combustion pressure rise, fuel consumption, and piston temperature in a laboratory single-cylinder diesel engine are shown.

  17. Medium-speed diesel engines Part I: Design trends and the use of residual/blended fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, F.J.; vander Horst, G.W.; Ahluwalia, J.S.; Shamah, E.

    1984-02-01

    Fuel costs can exceed 50% of the total diesel plant's operational expenditures. To reduce fuel costs, medium-speed engines are now available with improved fuel consumption and ability to burn residual fuels. Part 1 reviews these engine and design changes needed for both improved fuel consumption and ability to burn poorer quality fuels. Characteristics of these fuels and international fuel specifications are discussed. Ignition quality of residual fuels by a modified ASTM D 613 procedure are presented and correlation shown to calculated diesel index and calculated carbon aromaticity index (CCAI). Residual fuel ignition delay effects on combustion pressure rise, fuel consumption, and piston temperature in a laboratory single-cylinder diesel engine are shown. Part 2 reviews characteristics of lubricants suitable for use with residual fuels in medium-speed engines. Examples are shown of how lubricants and their additives control engine wear, deposits, and oxidation, and how fuel consumption is affected by viscosity. Control of insolubles and the purification of lubricants are discussed.

  18. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  19. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells and Organic Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton

    such an opportunity. Some knowledge about the electrooxidation of DME is available, together with its limited use in low temperature PEM fuel cells, where the low temperature poses an obstacle in the form of phase separation in the fuel supply, making the cells less effective and reducing the amount of power...... harvested from the cells. This is completely avoided at the elevated temperatures with the additional benefit of increased kinetics. In the presented work an experimental setup for testing direct dimethyl ether high temperature fuel cells is described, proposing a novel design of an evaporator for a burst...... evaporated liquid stream supply to either of the electrodes. A large number of MEAs with different component compositions have been prepared and tested in different conditions using the constructed setups to obtain a basic understanding of the nature of direct DME HT-PEM FC, to map the processes occurring...

  20. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  1. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Scott; M. Mamlouk

    2006-01-01

    One of the major issues limiting the introduction of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the low temperature of operation which makes platinum-based anode catalysts susceptible to poisoning by the trace amount of CO, inevitably present in reformed fuel. In order to alleviate the problem of CO poisoning and improve the power density of the cell, operating at temperature above 100 ℃ is preferred. Nafion(R) -type perfluorosulfonated polymers have been typically used for PEMFC. However, the conductivity of Nafion(R) -type polymers is not high enough to be used for fuel cell operations at higher temperature ( > 90 ℃) and atmospheric pressure because they dehydrate under these condition.An additional problem which faces the introduction of PEMFC technology is that of supplying or storing hydrogen for cell operation,especially for vehicular applications. Consequently the use of alternative fuels such as methanol and ethanol is of interest, especially if this can be used directly in the fuel cell, without reformation to hydrogen. A limitation of the direct use of alcohol is the lower activity of oxidation in comparison to hydrogen, which means that power densities are considerably lower. Hence to improve activity and power output higher temperatures of operation are preferable. To achieve this goal, requires a new polymer electrolyte membrane which exhibits stability and high conductivity in the absence of liquid water.Experimental data on a polybenzimidazole based PEMFC were presented. A simple steady-state isothermal model of the fuel cell is also used to aid in fuel cell performance optimisation. The governing equations involve the coupling of kinetic, ohmic and mass transport. This paper also considers the advances made in the performance of direct methanol and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells and considers their limitations in relation to the source and type of fuels to be used.

  2. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  3. Comparison of Different Fuel Temperature Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weddig, Beatrice

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the performance of the core calculation system used in Ringhals for in-core fuel management. It has been observed that, whereas the codes yield results that are in good agreement with measurements when the core operates at full nominal power, this agreement deteriorates noticeably when the reactor is running at reduced power. This deficiency of the code system was observed by comparing the calculated and measured boron concentrations in the moderator of the PWR. From the neutronic point of view, the difference between full power and reduced power in the same core is the different temperature of the fuel and the moderator. Whereas the coolant temperature can be measured and is thus relatively well known, the fuel temperature is only inferred from the moderator temperature as well as neutron physics and heat transfer calculations. The most likely reason for the above mentioned discrepancy is therefore the uncertainty of the fuel temperature at low power, and hence the incorrect calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity feedback through the so called Doppler effect. To obtain the fuel temperature at low power, usually some semi-empirical relations, sometimes called correlations, are used. The above-mentioned inaccuracy of the core calculation procedures can thus be tracked down to the insufficiency of these correlations. Therefore, the suggestion is that the above mentioned deficiency of the core calculation codes can be eliminated or reduced if the fuel temperature correlations are improved. An improved model, called the 30% model, is implemented in SIMULATE-3, the core calculation code used at Ringhals. The accuracy of the 30% model was compared to that of the present model by considering a number of cases, where measured values of the boron concentration at low power were available, and comparing them with calculated values using both the present and the new model. It was found that on the whole, the new fuel temperature

  4. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes, runs on pure hydrogen in a dead end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack is managed by running...... conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection and heating of the inlet gasses in manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  5. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is a comprehensive review of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PEMFCs are the preferred fuel cells for a variety of applications such as automobiles, cogeneration of heat and power units, emergency power and portable electronics. The first 5 chapters...... of the book describe rationalization and illustration of approaches to high temperature PEM systems. Chapters 6 - 13 are devoted to fabrication, optimization and characterization of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes, the very first electrolyte system that has demonstrated the concept...... of and motivated extensive research activity in the field. The last 11 chapters summarize the state-of-the-art of technological development of high temperature-PEMFCs based on acid doped PBI membranes including catalysts, electrodes, MEAs, bipolar plates, modelling, stacking, diagnostics and applications....

  6. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  7. Numerical investigation of the effects of fuel spray type on the interaction of fuel spray and hot porous medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiguo ZHAO; Maozhao XIE

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between two types of fuel spray and a hot porous medium is studied numerically by using an improved version of KIVA-3V code. The improved KIVA-3V code is incorporated with an impingement model, a heat transfer model and a linearized instability sheet atomization (LISA) model to model the hollow cone spray. An evaporating fuel spray impingement on a hot plane surface was simulated under conditions of experiments performed by Senda to validate the reasonability of the KIVA-3V code. The numerical results conform well with experimental data for spray radius in the liquid and the vapor phases. Computational results on the interaction of two types of the fuel spray and the hot porous medium show that the fuel spray can be split, which provides conditions for quick evaporation of fuel droplets and mixing of fuel vapor with air. The possibility of fuel droplets from hollow cone spray crossing the porous medium reduces compared with that from solid cone spray, with the same initial kinetic energy of fuel droplets in both injection types.

  8. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleige, Michael

    This thesis presents the development and application of electrochemical half-cell setups to study the catalytic reactions taking place in High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (HTPEM-FCs): (i) a pressurized electrochemical cell with integrated magnetically coupled rotating disk electrode...... of dissolved oxygen. A potential step method (hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) is evaluated for simultaneous measurement of diffusivity and solubility of oxygen by means of RDE. Finally, the ORR tests are extended to conc. H3PO4 at more relevant working temperatures and under increased oxygen pressure. Direct...... of platinumphosphoric acid. At room temperature, a relative slow ORR hindering process is active, which requires using a fast method (cyclic voltammetry with high scan rate / hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) to accurately measure the diffusion limited currents, and thus, oxygen diffusivity and solubility. In conc. H3PO4...

  9. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleige, Michael

    This thesis presents the development and application of electrochemical half-cell setups to study the catalytic reactions taking place in High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (HTPEM-FCs): (i) a pressurized electrochemical cell with integrated magnetically coupled rotating disk electrode...... (RDE) and (ii) a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) setup designed for experiments in conc. H3PO4. The pressurized cell is demonstrated by tests on polycrystalline platinum electrodes up to 150 ºC. Functionality of the RDE system is proved studying the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at temperatures up...... to 140 ºC and oxygen pressures up to ~100 bar at room temperature. The GDE cell is successfully tested at 130 ºC by means of direct oxidation of methanol and ethanol, respectively. In the second part of the thesis, the emphasis is put on the ORR in H3PO4 with particular focus on the mass transport...

  10. New plant-growth medium for increased power output of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Kuijken, R.C.P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    In a Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell anode-conditions must be created that are favorable for plant growth and electricity production. One of the major aspects in this is the composition of the plant-growth medium. Hoagland medium has been used until now, with added phosphate buffer to reduce potential

  11. 40 CFR 1065.120 - Fuel properties and fuel temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and pressure. 1065.120 Section 1065.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... properties and fuel temperature and pressure. (a) Use fuels as specified in the standard-setting part, or as... engine manufacturer specifies fuel temperature and pressure tolerances and the location where they are to...

  12. Temperature feedback of TRIGA MARK-II fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usang, M. D.; Minhat, M. S.; Rabir, M. H.; M. Rawi M., Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the amount of temperature feedback on reactivity for the three types of TRIGA fuel i.. ST8, ST12 and LEU fuel, are used in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. We employ WIMSD-5B for the calculation of kin f for a single TRIGA fuel surrounded by water. Typical calculations of TRIGA fuel reactivity are usually limited to ST8 fuel, but in this paper our investigation extends to ST12 and LEU fuel. We look at the kin f of our model at various fuel temperatures and calculate the amount reactivity removed. In one instance, the water temperature is kept at room temperature of 300K to simulate sudden reactivity increase from startup. In another instance, we simulate the sudden temperature increase during normal operation where the water temperature is approximately 320K while observing the kin f at various fuel temperatures. For accidents, two cases are simulated. The first case is for water temperature at 370K and the other is without any water. We observe that the higher Uranium content fuel such as the ST12 and LEU have much smaller contribution to the reactivity in comparison to the often studied ST8 fuel. In fact the negative reactivity coefficient for LEU fuel at high temperature in water is only slightly larger to the negative reactivity coefficient for ST8 fuel in void. The performance of ST8 fuel in terms of negative reactivity coefficient is cut almost by half when it is in void. These results are essential in the safety evaluation of the reactor and should be carefully considered when choices of fuel for core reconfiguration are made.

  13. Temperature feedback of TRIGA MARK-II fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usang, M. D., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Minhat, M. S.; Rabir, M. H.; Rawi, M. Z. M. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    We study the amount of temperature feedback on reactivity for the three types of TRIGA fuel i.. ST8, ST12 and LEU fuel, are used in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. We employ WIMSD-5B for the calculation of kin f for a single TRIGA fuel surrounded by water. Typical calculations of TRIGA fuel reactivity are usually limited to ST8 fuel, but in this paper our investigation extends to ST12 and LEU fuel. We look at the kin f of our model at various fuel temperatures and calculate the amount reactivity removed. In one instance, the water temperature is kept at room temperature of 300K to simulate sudden reactivity increase from startup. In another instance, we simulate the sudden temperature increase during normal operation where the water temperature is approximately 320K while observing the kin f at various fuel temperatures. For accidents, two cases are simulated. The first case is for water temperature at 370K and the other is without any water. We observe that the higher Uranium content fuel such as the ST12 and LEU have much smaller contribution to the reactivity in comparison to the often studied ST8 fuel. In fact the negative reactivity coefficient for LEU fuel at high temperature in water is only slightly larger to the negative reactivity coefficient for ST8 fuel in void. The performance of ST8 fuel in terms of negative reactivity coefficient is cut almost by half when it is in void. These results are essential in the safety evaluation of the reactor and should be carefully considered when choices of fuel for core reconfiguration are made.

  14. 75 FR 81952 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and...--Proposed Vocational Diesel Engine Standards Over the Heavy-Duty FTP Cycle Medium Model year Standard Light... Light heavy-duty Medium heavy-duty Heavy heavy-duty Fuel Consumption Baseline (gallon/1,000 ton-mile...

  15. 76 FR 65971 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles AGENCY... 57106). The regulations established fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and... trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles'' will be added. List of Subjects in 49 CFR Parts 523 and 535...

  16. 76 FR 59922 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles AGENCY: National... established fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles, as prescribed under the...--MEDIUM- AND HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLES 0 1. The authority citation for part 535 continues to read as follows...

  17. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Systems, Control and Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Justesen, Kristian Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Various system topologies are available when it comes to designing high temperature PEM fuel cell systems. Very simple system designs are possible using pure hydrogen, and more complex system designs present themselves when alternative fuels are desired, using reformer systems. The use of reformed...... fuels utilizes one of the main advantages of the high temperature PEM fuel cell: robustness to fuel quality and impurities. In order for such systems to provide efficient, robust, and reliable energy, proper control strategies are needed. The complexity and nonlinearity of many of the components...

  18. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  19. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems--including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells--and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  20. Novel Low Temperature Solid State Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nash, Patrick [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Liu, Jian [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-03-23

    We have successfully fabricated (PrBa)Co2O5+δ and (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film on various single crystal substrates. Physical and electrochemical properties characterizations were carried out. Highly conductive oxygen-deficient double perovskite LnBaCo2O5+ thin films were grown on single crystal (001) SrTiO3 (STO), (001) MgO, (001) LaAlO3 and (110) NdGaO3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure studies from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. High temperature transport properties was carried in different atmosphere (O2,Air, N2) up to ~900K. Resistance response of (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film was characterized in oxygen, nitrogen and 4% hydrogen over a wide range of temperature from 400 C up to 800 C. To determine the electrode performance and oxygen exchange kinetics of PrBaCo2O5+δ, multi-layered thin film based half cell was deposited on LaAlO3(001) substrate. The temperature dependence of the resistance of this half cell structure was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within different temperature and gas environments. Anode supported fuel cells, with GCO:YSZ multilayer thin film as electrolyte and PBCO thin film as electrode, are fabricated on tape casted NiO/YSZ substrate. Full cell performance is characterized up to 800 C.

  1. ALMA Reveals the Molecular Medium Fueling the Nearest Nuclear Starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Walter, Fabian; Warren, Steven R.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Hodge, Jacqueline; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Veilleux, Sylvain; Zwaan, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We use ALMA observations to derive mass, length, and time scales associated with NGC 253's nuclear starburst. This region forms ~2 M ⊙ yr-1 of stars and resembles other starbursts in ratios of gas, dense gas, and star formation tracers, with star formation consuming the gas reservoir at a normalized rate 10 times higher than in normal galaxy disks. We present new ~35 pc resolution observations of bulk gas tracers (CO), high critical density transitions (HCN, HCO+, and CS), and their isotopologues. The starburst is fueled by a highly inclined distribution of dense gas with vertical extent factor implied by our cloud calculations is approximately Galactic, contrasting with results showing a low value for the whole starburst region. The contrast provides resolved support for the idea of mixed molecular ISM phases in starburst galaxies.

  2. Soot blower using fuel gas as blowing medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanca, Michael C.

    1982-01-01

    A soot blower assembly (10) for use in combination with a coal gasifier (14). The soot blower assembly is adapted for use in the hot combustible product gas generated in the gasifier as the blowing medium. The soot blower lance (20) and the drive means (30) by which it is moved into and out of the gasifier is housed in a gas tight enclosure (40) which completely surrounds the combination. The interior of the enclosure (40) is pressurized by an inert gas to a pressure level higher than that present in the gasifier so that any combustible product gas leaking from the soot blower lance (20) is forced into the gasifier rather than accumulating within the enclosure.

  3. Comparative Study on Composite Electrodes for Medium Temperature PEFCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Gatto; A.Carbone; R.Pedicini; A.Saccà; E.Passalacqua

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The phenomena that affect the membranes could be found in the electrodes when they operate at medium temperature,due to the utilisation of Nafion as an ionomer in the catalytic layer.An approach to improve the mechanical properties of the ionomer in the catalytic layer was used: different inorganic compounds (zeolite,titania and zirconia),having different chemical-physical properties,were selected as inorganic fillers due to their water retention capacity and to act as mechanical reinforce by ...

  4. Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriyanti, Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K.; Zuhair, Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study a fesibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850° C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticallity was obtained for this reactor.

  5. Innovative High Temperature Fuel Cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Siu Fai

    2003-01-01

    The world's energy consumption is growing extremely rapidly. Fuel cell systems are of interest by researchers and industry as the more efficient alternative to conventional thermal systems for power generation. The principle of fuel cell conversion does not involve thermal combustion and hence in th

  6. Innovative High Temperature Fuel Cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Siu Fai

    2003-01-01

    The world's energy consumption is growing extremely rapidly. Fuel cell systems are of interest by researchers and industry as the more efficient alternative to conventional thermal systems for power generation. The principle of fuel cell conversion does not involve thermal combustion and hence in th

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Jarosław; Bujalski, Wojciech; Lewandowski, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC) are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV) for projects was estimated and commented.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewski Jarosław

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV for projects was estimated and commented.

  9. Cycle Average Peak Fuel Temperature Prediction Using CAPP/GAMMA+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Nam-il; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to obtain a cycle average maximum fuel temperature without rigorous efforts, a neutronics/thermo-fluid coupled calculation is needed with depletion capability. Recently, a CAPP/GAMMA+ coupled code system has been developed and the initial core of PMR200 was analyzed using the CAPP/GAMMA+ code system. The GAMMA+ code is a system thermo-fluid analysis code and the CAPP code is a neutronics code. The General Atomics proposed that the design limit of the fuel temperature under normal operating conditions should be a cycle-averaged maximum value. Nonetheless, the existing works of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) only calculated the maximum fuel temperature at a fixed time point, e.g., the beginning of cycle (BOC) just because the calculation capability was not ready for a cycle average value. In this work, a cycle average maximum fuel temperature has been calculated using CAPP/GAMMA+ code system for the equilibrium core of PMR200. The CAPP/GAMMA+ coupled calculation was carried out for the equilibrium core of PMR 200 from BOC to EOC to obtain a cycle average peak fuel temperature. The peak fuel temperature was predicted to be 1372 .deg. C near MOC. However, the cycle average peak fuel temperature was calculated as 1181 .deg. C, which is below the design target of 1250 .deg. C.

  10. Drying Spirulina with Foam Mat Drying at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji Prasetyaningrum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina is a single cell blue green microalgae (Cyanobacteria containing many Phytonutrients (Beta-carotene, Chlorophyl, Xanthophyl, Phyocianin using as anti-carcinogen in food. Producing dry spirulina by quick drying process at medium temperature is very important to retain the Phytonutrient quality. Currently, the work is still challenging due to the gel formation that block the water diffusion from inside to the surface.  This research studies the performance of foam-mat drying on production of dry spirulina. In this method the spirulina was mixed with foaming agent (glair/egg albumen, popular as white egg at 2.5% by weight at air velocity 2.2 m/sec. Here, the effect of spirulina thickness and operational temperature on drying time and quality (Beta-carotene and color were observed. The drying time was estimated based on the measurement of water content in spirulina versus time. Result showed that the thicker spirulina, the longer drying time. Conversely, the higher operational temperature, faster drying time. At thickness ranging 1-3 mm and operational temperature below 70oC, the quality of spirulina can fit the market requirement

  11. Carbon monoxide oxidation on Pt single crystal electrodes: understanding the catalysis for low temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gonzalo; Koper, Marc T M

    2011-08-01

    Herein the general concepts of fuel cells are discussed, with special attention to low temperature fuel cells working in alkaline media. Alkaline low temperature fuel cells could well be one of the energy sources in the next future. This technology has the potential to provide power to portable devices, transportation and stationary sectors. With the aim to solve the principal catalytic problems at the anode of low temperature fuel cells, a fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of carbon monoxide as well as water dissociation on stepped platinum surfaces in alkaline medium is discussed and compared with those in acidic media. Furthermore, cations involved as promoters for catalytic surface reactions are also considered. Therefore, the aim of the present work is not only to provide the new fundamental advances in the electrocatalysis field, but also to understand the reactions occurring at fuel cell catalysts, which may help to improve the fabrication of novel electrodes in order to enhance the performance and to decrease the cost of low temperature fuel cells.

  12. Lowering the temperature of solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsman, Eric D; Lee, Kang Taek

    2011-11-18

    Fuel cells are uniquely capable of overcoming combustion efficiency limitations (e.g., the Carnot cycle). However, the linking of fuel cells (an energy conversion device) and hydrogen (an energy carrier) has emphasized investment in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells as part of a larger hydrogen economy and thus relegated fuel cells to a future technology. In contrast, solid oxide fuel cells are capable of operating on conventional fuels (as well as hydrogen) today. The main issue for solid oxide fuel cells is high operating temperature (about 800°C) and the resulting materials and cost limitations and operating complexities (e.g., thermal cycling). Recent solid oxide fuel cells results have demonstrated extremely high power densities of about 2 watts per square centimeter at 650°C along with flexible fueling, thus enabling higher efficiency within the current fuel infrastructure. Newly developed, high-conductivity electrolytes and nanostructured electrode designs provide a path for further performance improvement at much lower temperatures, down to ~350°C, thus providing opportunity to transform the way we convert and store energy.

  13. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  14. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  15. Medium effects on the quarkonia states above critical temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Parmar, Arpit; Vinodkumar, P C

    2012-01-01

    We present the quarkonia correlators for charmonium and bottomonium systems in the pseudoscalar, vector and scalar channels. For the description of quark-antiquark interaction we adopt the temperature dependant colour screening potential of the power law form. The spectroscopic parameters defined from the model are employed in the spectral functions to compute the quarkonia correlators. We find considerable medium modifications to the effective masses of the quarkonia as well as in the behaviour of the respective radial wave functions. These modifications are then reflected in the computed correlators. The general behaviour of correlators in the vector and scalar channel are in accordance with the latest lattice results while their behaviour in the pseudoscalar channels are found to be different.

  16. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    F., Urban; Ľ., Kučák; Bereznai, J.; Závodný, Z.; Muškát, P.

    2014-08-01

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  17. Novel High Temperature Membrane for PEM Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed in this STTR program is a high temperature membrane to increase the efficiency and power density of PEM fuel cells. The NASA application is...

  18. 75 FR 74151 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and... that power them, except for medium-duty passenger vehicles already covered by the greenhouse gas...

  19. 76 FR 57105 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles; Final... for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and... that power them, except for medium-duty passenger vehicles already covered by the greenhouse gas...

  20. Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP 2 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 December 2016 – 11 January 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP-2 Fuel...Rev. 8- 98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 TEMPERATURE JUMP PYROLYSIS STUDIES OF RP-2 FUEL Owen Pryor1, Steven D. Chambreau2, Ghanshyam L...Mixture Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. PA Clearance 17026 4 RP-2 Pyrolysis /Combustion Chemistries? • Recent

  1. Advanced anodes for high-temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, A.; Barnett, S.; Gorte, R.J.;

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells will undoubtedly find widespread use in this new millennium in the conversion of chemical to electrical energy, as they offer very high efficiencies and have unique scalability in electricity-generation applications. The solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the most exciting...... of these energy technologies; it is an all-ceramic device that operates at temperatures in the range 500-1,000degreesC. The SOFC offers certain advantages over lower temperature fuel cells, notably its ability to use carbon monoxide as a fuel rather than being poisoned by it, and the availability of high......-grade exhaust heat for combined heat and power, or combined cycle gas-turbine applications. Although cost is clearly the most important barrier to widespread SOFC implementation, perhaps the most important technical barriers currently being addressed relate to the electrodes, particularly the fuel electrode...

  2. Experiment and Simulation of Medium-Duty Tactical Truck for Fuel Economy Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen M. Quail

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuel economy improvement on medium-duty tactical truck has and continues to be a significant initiative for the U.S. Army. The focus of this study is the investigation of Automated Manual Transmissions (AMT and mild hybridization powertrain that have potential to improve the fuel economy of the 2.5-ton cargo trucks. The current platform uses a seven-speed automatic transmission. This study utilized a combination of on-road experimental vehicle data and analytical vehicle modeling and simulation. This paper presents the results of (1 establishment of a validated, high fidelity baseline analytical vehicle model, (2 modeling and simulation of two AMTs and their control strategy, (3 optimization of transmissions shift schedules, and (4 modeling and simulation of engine idle stop/start and Belt-Integrated-Starter-Generator (B-ISG systems to improve the fuel economy. The fuel economy discrepancy between experimental average and the baseline simulation result was 2.87%. The simulation results indicated a 14.5% and 12.2% fuel economy improvement for the 10-speed and 12-speed AMT respectively. A stop/start system followed by a B-ISG mild hybrid system incorporating regenerative braking was estimated to improve fuel economy 3.39% and 10.2% respectively.

  3. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  4. Conversion of medium and low temperature heat to power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Johann; Wendland, Martin; Lai, Ngoc Anh

    2013-04-01

    Presently most electricity is produced in power plants which use high temperature heat supplied by coal, oil, gas or nuclear fission and Clausius-Rankine cycles (CRC) with water as working fluid (WF). On the other hand, geo-, solar-, ocean-, and biogenic-heat have medium and low temperatures. At these temperatures, however, the use of other WF and/or other cycles can yield higher efficiencies than those of the water-CRC. For an assessment of the efficiency we model systems which include the heat transfer to and from the WF and the cycle. Optimization criterion is the exergy efficiency defined as the ratio of the net power output to the incoming exergy flow of the heat carrier. First, for a better understanding we discuss some thermodynamic properties of the WFs: 1) the critical point parameters, 2) the shape of the vapour- liquid coexistence curve in the temperature vs entropy (T,s)-diagram which may be either bell-shaped or overhanging [1,2], and 3) the shape of sub- and supercritical isobars for pure fluids and fluid mixtures. Second, we show that the problems of a CRC with water at lower temperatures are 1) the shape of the T,s-diagram and 2) the exergy loss during heat transfer to the WF. The first problem can be overcome by using an organic working fluid in the CRC which then is called organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second problem is reduced by supercritical organic Rankine cycles (sORC) [1,2], trilateral cycles (TLC) and the more general power-flash cycles (PFC) [2], and organic flash cycles (OFC) [3]. Next, selected results for systems with the above mentioned cycles will be presented. The heat carrier inlet temperatures THC range from 120°C to 350°C.The pure working fluids are water, refrigerants, alkanes, aromates and siloxanes and have to be selected to match with THC. It is found that TLC with water have the highest efficiencies but show very large volume flows at lower temperatures. Moreover, expansion machines for TLC and PFC are still under

  5. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  6. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Yan, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Gouveia Dal Pino, E.M. de [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Lazarian, A. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Astronomy

    2016-05-15

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are successful to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities which can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the ions scattering rate due to the parallel firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instabilities thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model which bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvenic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  7. High temperature polymer fuel cells. Heat utilization and co tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jens, Oluf Jensen; Qingfeng, Li; Ronghuan, He; Gang, Xiao; Ji-An, Gao; Bjerrum, N.J. [Denmark Technical Univ., Department of Chemistry, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-09-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer poly-benzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200 C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150 C has been demonstrated. (authors)

  8. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    This work demonstrates the operation of a 30 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. This prototype stack has been developed at the Institute of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, as a proof-of-concept for a low pressure cathode air cooled HTPEM stack. The membranes used are Celtec P...... of the species as in a LTPEM fuel cell system. The use of the HTPEM fuel cell makes it possible to use reformed gas at high CO concentrations, still with a stable efficient performance....

  9. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  10. Temperature and burnup correlated fuel-cladding chemical interaction in U-10ZR metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, William J.

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors and provide a number of advantages over other fuel types considering their fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Resistance to cladding "breach" and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the nuclear power plant primary coolant system is a key performance parameter for a nuclear fuel system. In metallic fuel, FCCI weakens the cladding, especially at high power-high temperature operation, contributing to fuel pin breach. Empirical relationships for FCCI have been developed from a large body of data collected from in-pile (EBR-II) and out-of-pile experiments [1]. However, these relationships are unreliable in predicting FCCI outside the range of EBR-II experimental data. This dissertation examines new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of prototypic length metallic fuel irradiations performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The fuel in these assemblies operated a temperature and burnup conditions similar to that in EBR-II but with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. Comparing FCCI formation data from FFTF and EBR-II provides new insight into FCCI formation kinetics. A model is developed combining both production and diffusion of lanthanides to the fuel-cladding interface and subsequent reaction with the cladding. The model allows these phenomena to be influenced by fuel burnup (lanthanide concentrations) and operating temperature. Parameters in the model are adjusted to reproduce measured FCCI layer thicknesses from EBR-II and FFTF. The model predicts that, under appropriate conditions, rate of FCCI formation can be controlled by either fission product transport or by the reaction rate of the interaction species at the fuel-cladding interface. This dissertation will help forward the design of metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full

  11. High temperature polymer fuel cells and their Interplay with fuel processing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports recent results from our group on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all....... The high working temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  12. Study on containerisation of irradiated fuel at JRC ISPRA for medium/long-term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, S.; Bielli, G.; Covini, R.

    2001-07-01

    During the last 40 years big amounts of wastes arising from past experiments have been generated at JRC Ispra. These wastes are now stored on site in unconditioned form and must be characterised and re-conditioned to ensure their acceptance by future repositories. Among the several types of wastes produced, spent fuel has a great importance in JRC waste management. In fact, there are more than the tons of irradiated material, varying widely from commercial to experimental fuel elements or pins, in form of oxides and metal fuel, with very different geometry, dry and wet stored. The biggest part of it can be considered as unirradiated, according to the IAEA regulations (ST-1, 1996), while a relatively small amount (nearly 720 kg U total) are to be considered as irradiated and treated accordingly. Studies on the most suitable solutions for medium/long term storage for such irradiated experimental fuel are being performed, taking into account two main options, containerisation of the nuclear materials, as it is, in suitable casks or reprocessing. The technical aspects of the project for containerisation are here discussed. (Author)

  13. Status and prospects of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangwu Liu; Yue Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Compared with conventional electric power generation systems, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has many advantages because of its unique features. High temperature SOFC has been successfully developed to its commercial applications, but it still faces many problems which hamper large-scale commercial applications of SOFC. To reduce the cost of SOFC, intermediate tem-perature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) is presently under rapid development. The status of IT-SOFC was reviewed with emphasis on discussion of their component materials.

  14. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    and suffers from low DME solubility in water. When the DME - water mixture is fed as vapour miscibility is no longer a problem. The increased temperature is more beneficial for the kinetics of the direct oxidation of DME than of methanol. The Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) with DME operation was 50 to 100 m......A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed...

  15. Tetrazole substituted polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkensmeier, Dirk; My Hanh Duong, Ngoc; Brela, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    While tetrazole (TZ) has much lower basicity than imidazole and may not be fully protonated in the presence of phosphoric acid (PA), DFT calculations suggest that the basicity of TZ groups can be increased by the introduction of a 2,6-dioxy-phenyl-group in position 5 of TZ. This structure allows...... interesting for use in a high temperature fuel cell (HT PEMFC). Based on these findings, two polymers incorporating the proposed TZ groups were synthesised, formed into membranes, doped with PA and tested for fuel cell relevant properties. At room temperature, TZ-PEEN and commercial meta-PBI showed...

  16. CFD Analysis of the Fuel Temperature in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, W. K.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have received a renewed interest as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor (PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both PBR and PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the fuel temperature distributions in PBR and PMR using a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-5. The reference reactor designs used in this analysis are PBMR400 and GT-MHR600.

  17. Effect of fuel size and process temperature on fuel gas quality from CFB gasification of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Drift, A.; Van Doorn, J. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    A bench-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) gasifier with a capacity of max. 500 kWh{sub th} has been used to study the effect of fuel size and process temperature. A higher process temperature (range tested: 750 to 910C) results in more air needed to maintain the desired temperature, a lower heating value of the product gas, a higher carbon conversion and a net increase of cold gas efficiency of the gasifier. A higher process temperature also results in less heavy tars. However, light tars (measured using the solid phase adsorbent (SPA) method) do show an odd behaviour. Some individual components within the group of light tars even increase in concentration when process temperature is raised. The main reason probably is that heavy tars decompose to these relatively stable light tar components. The particle size of the fuel does influence some product gas parameters considerably. The presence of small particles seems to increase the (heavy) tar concentration and decrease the conversion of fuel-nitrogen to ammonia. Small particles can also be responsible for large temperature gradients along the axis of the riser of a CFB-gasifier. This effect can be avoided by either mixing the fuel with larger particles or feed the small particles at the bottom of the reactor. 5 refs.

  18. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...... corrosion, in turn, triggers the agglomeration of platinum particles resulting in reduction of the active surface area and catalytic activity. This is a major mechanism of the catalyst degradation and a key challenge to the PEMFC long-term durability. High temperature PEMFC, on the other hand, has attached...... the selectivity for platinum loading. Fuel cell durability tests in term of performance degradation were performed with acid doped polybenzimidazole membrane fuel cells at temperatures of up to 160°C. The tests were focused on catalyst degradation by means of a potential cycling protocol. The electrochemical...

  19. New polymer electrolytes for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundholm, F.; Elomaa, M.; Ennari, J.; Hietala, S.; Paronen, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Lab. of Polymer Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Proton conducting polymer membranes for demanding applications, such as low temperature fuel cells, have been synthesised and characterised. Pre-irradiation methods are used to introduce sulfonic acid groups, directly or using polystyrene grafting, in stable, preformed polymer films. The membranes produced in this work show promise for the development of cost-effective, highly conducting membranes. (orig.)

  20. Advanced energy analysis of high temperature fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the performance of high temperature fuel cell systems is studied using a new method of exergy analysis. The thesis consists of three parts: ⢠In the first part a new analysis method is developed, which not only considers the total exergy losses in a unit operation, but which distingu

  1. Finite-temperature electromagnetic-field quantization in a medium: The thermofield approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheirandish, F.; Soltani, M.; Jafari, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar-Jarib Street, 81746-73441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Starting from a Lagrangian, an electromagnetic field is quantized in the presence of a medium in thermal equilibrium and also in a medium with time-varying temperature. The vector potential for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases is obtained and vacuum fluctuations of the fields are calculated. As an illustrative example, the finite-temperature decay rate and level shift of an atom in a polarizable medium are calculated in this approach.

  2. Strategies for Lowering Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tarancón

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs to the intermediate range (500–700 ºC has become one of the main SOFC research goals. High operating temperatures put numerous requirements on materials selection and on secondary units, limiting the commercial development of SOFCs. The present review first focuses on the main effects of reducing the operating temperature in terms of materials stability, thermo-mechanical mismatch, thermal management and efficiency. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs, attention is focused on emerging oxide-ionic conductors with high conductivity in the intermediate range of temperatures with an introductory section on materials technology for reducing the electrolyte thickness. Finally, recent advances in cathode materials based on layered mixed ionic-electronic conductors are highlighted because the decreasing temperature converts the cathode into the major source of electrical losses for the whole SOFC system. It is concluded that the introduction of alternative materials that would enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate in the intermediate range of temperatures would have a major impact on the commercialization of fuel cell technology.

  3. Electrode Kinetics in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse

    1998-01-01

    The O_2 reduction on Pt electrode with an yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte is examined with potential step, voltammetry and impedance measurements. Inductive hysteresis are observed in all cases, indicating an activation-deactivation process for the electrode reaction. The same is found...... when the electrolyte is Gd doped ceria. The activation is generated by current passage. The time constant for the hysteresis is large considering the high operating temperatures, 800- 1000^oC. For the activation process potential steps give two time constants 10^2s and 10^3s for an anodic current, 10...... treated by modelling. The phenomenological model proposed can explain the principal behaviour of the inductive hysteresis. The activation process has first order dependence of the current density and the deactivation first order with respect to the activation.AFM pictures of the electrode...

  4. High temperature PEM fuel cell. Final report. Public part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf (DTU (DK)); Yde Andersen, S.; Rycke, T. de (IRD Fuel Cells A/S (DK)); Nilsson, M. (Danish Power Systems ApS (DK)); Christensen, Torkild, (DONG Energy (DK))

    2006-07-01

    The main outcome of the project is the development of stacking technology for high temperature PEMFC stacks based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes (PBI-membranes) and a study of the potential of a possible accommodation of HT-PEMFC in the national energy system. Stacks of different lengths (up to 40 cells) have been built using two different approaches in terms of plate materials and sealing. The stacks still need maturing and further testing to prove satisfactory reliability, and a steady reduction of production cost is also desired (as in general for fuel cells). However, during the project the process has come a long way. The survey of HT-PEM fuel cells and their regulatory power in the utility system concludes that fuel cells will most likely not be the dominating technique for regulation, but as no other technique has that potential alone, fuel cells are well suited to play a role in the system provided that the establishment of a communication system is not too complicated. In order to maintain an efficient power system with high reliability in a distributed generation scenario, it is important that communication between TSO (Transmission System Operator) and fuel cells is included in the fuel cell system design at an early stage. (au)

  5. Polybenzimidazoles based on high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Leon, Jose Joaquin; Camargo, Ana Paula M.; Ashino, Natalia M.; Morgado, Daniella L.; Frollini, Elisabeth; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Gonzalez, Ernesto Rafael [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bajo, Justo Lobato [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an interesting approach in order to enhance the performance of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) by means of an increase in the operational temperature. For this, two polymeric materials, Poly(2,5-bibenzimidazole) (ABPBI) and Poly[2,2'-(m-phenyl en)-5,5' bib enzimidazol] (PBI), impregnated with phosphoric acid have been utilized. These have shown excellent properties, such as thermal stability above 500 deg C, reasonably high conductivity when impregnated with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and a low permeability to alcohols compared to Nafion. Preliminary fuel cells measurements on hydrogen based Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) displayed an interestingly reasonable good fuel cell performance, a quite reduced loss when the hydrogen stream was polluted with carbon monoxide, and finally, when the system was tested with an ethanol/water (E/W) fuel, it displayed quite promising results that allows placing this system as an attractive option in order to increase the cell performance and deal with the typical limitations of low temperature Nafion-based PEMFC. (author)

  6. Influence of the Ambient Temperature, to the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPOVICI Ovidiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reversible fuel cell can be used to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen is further the chemical energy source to produce electrical energy using the fuel cell. The ambient temperature will influence theparameters of the hydrogen fuel cell.

  7. Effect of Oxidizing Medium on Synthesis Gas Content at Solid Fuel Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotkikh Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid fuel gasification is promising technology in sphere of clean energy. The synthesis gas content for air-blown fixed bed gasification may be defined using Gibbs free energy minimization procedure. The minimization procedure was realized via steepest descent method. The feed consisted of steam, air and coal at standard conditions. The temperature and gas content were calculated at different ratios of coal/steam/air. It was found that optimal syngas content resulted at component ratio of 1.0/0.5/2.2 with the ambient temperature of 1300 K and syngas heating power of 7.7 kJ/m3.

  8. Low-Temperature Additive Performance in Jet A Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    20% recovered, °C 189 189 189 191 191 190 50% recovered, °C 211 211 211 210 210 211 90% recovered, °C 250 249 250 240 241 242 EP , °C ≤300 267...chain n-alkanes) which are known to increase the bulk viscosity and nucleate fuel solidification as the temperature is reduced. However, the LT...studies with the LT additive. The LT additive clearly prevented the viscosity transition of the bulk fuel. However, following nucleation and growth

  9. Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yimin

    2009-07-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

  10. Gasoline Ultra Efficient Fuel Vehicle with Advanced Low Temperature Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confer, Keith [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Troy, MI (United States)

    2014-12-18

    The objective of this program was to develop, implement and demonstrate fuel consumption reduction technologies which are focused on reduction of friction and parasitic losses and on the improvement of thermal efficiency from in-cylinder combustion. The program was executed in two phases. The conclusion of each phase was marked by an on-vehicle technology demonstration. Phase I concentrated on short term goals to achieve technologies to reduce friction and parasitic losses. The duration of Phase I was approximately two years and the target fuel economy improvement over the baseline was 20% for the Phase I demonstration. Phase II was focused on the development and demonstration of a breakthrough low temperature combustion process called Gasoline Direct- Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI). The duration of Phase II was approximately four years and the targeted fuel economy improvement was 35% over the baseline for the Phase II demonstration vehicle. The targeted tailpipe emissions for this demonstration were Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards.

  11. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  12. Gasoline Ultra Efficient Fuel Vehicle with Advanced Low Temperature Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confer, Keith

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this program was to develop, implement and demonstrate fuel consumption reduction technologies which are focused on reduction of friction and parasitic losses and on the improvement of thermal efficiency from in-cylinder combustion. The program was executed in two phases. The conclusion of each phase was marked by an on-vehicle technology demonstration. Phase I concentrated on short term goals to achieve technologies to reduce friction and parasitic losses. The duration of Phase I was approximately two years and the target fuel economy improvement over the baseline was 20% for the Phase I demonstration. Phase II was focused on the development and demonstration of a breakthrough low temperature combustion process called Gasoline Direct- Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI). The duration of Phase II was approximately four years and the targeted fuel economy improvement was 35% over the baseline for the Phase II demonstration vehicle. The targeted tailpipe emissions for this demonstration were Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards.

  13. Mixed fuel strategy for carbon deposition mitigation in solid oxide fuel cells at intermediate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chao; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Wei; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping; Diniz da Costa, João C; Liu, Shaomin

    2014-06-17

    In this study, we propose and experimentally verified that methane and formic acid mixed fuel can be employed to sustain solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to deliver high power outputs at intermediate temperatures and simultaneously reduce the coke formation over the anode catalyst. In this SOFC system, methane itself was one part of the fuel, but it also played as the carrier gas to deliver the formic acid to reach the anode chamber. On the other hand, the products from the thermal decomposition of formic acid helped to reduce the carbon deposition from methane cracking. In order to clarify the reaction pathways for carbon formation and elimination occurring in the anode chamber during the SOFC operation, O2-TPO and SEM analysis were carried out together with the theoretical calculation. Electrochemical tests demonstrated that stable and high power output at an intermediate temperature range was well-maintained with a peak power density of 1061 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C. With the synergic functions provided by the mixed fuel, the SOFC was running for 3 days without any sign of cell performance decay. In sharp contrast, fuelled by pure methane and tested at similar conditions, the SOFC immediately failed after running for only 30 min due to significant carbon deposition. This work opens a new way for SOFC to conquer the annoying problem of carbon deposition just by properly selecting the fuel components to realize their synergic effects.

  14. MINICHANNEL-TUBE SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTORS FOR LOW TO MEDIUM TEMPERATURE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Thuc

    2015-01-01

    Novel minichannel-tube solar thermal collectors for low to medium temperature applications are introduced. Two types of minichannel solar thermal collectors are analyzed experimentally: aluminum minichannel solar collector for low temperature applications, and copper minichannel solar collector for low to medium temperature applications.The aluminum minichannel solar collector has been tested for over a year alongside a conventional copper flat-plate solar collector of similar dimensions as t...

  15. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  16. Formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium of microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Huzairy; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng; Ngau, Cornelius

    2016-11-01

    The formation of microbial biofilm while maintaining the electricity output is a challenging topic in microbial fuel cell (MFC) studies. This MFC critical factor becomes more significant when handling with industrial wastewater which normally contains refractory and toxic compounds. This study explores the formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium through observing and characterizing microscopically its establishment on MFC anode surface. The mixed culture was found to develop its biofilm on the anode surface in the chlorophenol environment and established its maturity and dispersal stages with concurrent electricity generation and phenolic degradation. The mixed culture biofilm engaged the electron transfer roles in MFC by generating current density of 1.4 mA/m2 and removing 53 % of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The results support further research especially on hazardous wastewater treatment using a benign and sustainable method.

  17. Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-31

    The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

  18. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  19. Novel cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.; Xia, C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies

    2002-04-04

    A solid-oxide fuel cell that operates at 500 C (instead of 600 C and higher), with lower material cost and better long-term stability, is presented. Its key piece is a cathode made of a silver/copper-doped bismuth vanadate (Ag-BI-CUVOX) composite, which reduces oxygen at lower temperatures and diminishes the resistance between the cathode and the electrolyte. (orig.)

  20. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stacks with Advent TPS Meas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neophytides Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High power/high energy applications are expected to greatly benefit from high temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs. In this work, a combinatorial approach is presented, in which separately developed and evaluated MEAs, design and engineering are employed to result in reliable and effective stacks operating above 180°C and having the characteristics well matched to applications including auxiliary power, micro combined heat and power, and telecommunication satellites.

  1. Low cost, high temperature membranes for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-08-15

    This report details the results of a project to develop novel, low-cost high temperature membranes specifically for automotive fuel cell use. The specific aim of the project was to determine whether a polyaromatic hydrocarbon membrane could be developed that would give a performance (0.68V at 500 mAcm{sub -2}) competitive with an established perfluoronated sulfonic acid (PSA) membrane in a fuel cell at 120{sup o}C and relative humidity of less than 50%. The novel approach used in this project was to increase the concentration of sulphonic groups to a useful level without dissolution by controlling the molecular structure of the membrane through the design of the monomer repeat unit. The physicochemical properties of 70 polymers synthesised in order to determine the effects of controlled sequence distribution were identified using an array of analytical techniques. Appropriate membranes were selected for fuel cell testing and fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies. Most of the homopolymers tested were able to withstand low humidity environments without immediate catastrophic failure and some showed promise from accelerated durability results. The properties of a simple starting polymer structure were found to be enhanced by doping with sulphonated copper phthalocyanine, resulting in high temperature capacity from a potential cheap, simple and scaleable process. The accelerated and long-term durability of such a doped polymer membrane showed that polyaromatics could easily outperform fluoropolymers under high temperature (120{sup o}C) operating conditions.

  2. High Temperature Polymers for use in Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Katherine M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently working on polymers for fuel cell and lithium battery applications. The desire for more efficient, higher power density, and a lower environmental impact power sources has led to interest in proton exchanges membrane fuels cells (PEMFC) and lithium batteries. A PEMFC has many advantages as a power source. The fuel cell uses oxygen and hydrogen as reactants. The resulting products are electricity, heat, and water. The PEMFC consists of electrodes with a catalyst, and an electrolyte. The electrolyte is an ion-conducting polymer that transports protons from the anode to the cathode. Typically, a PEMFC is operated at a temperature of about 80 C. There is intense interest in developing a fuel cell membrane that can operate at higher temperatures in the range of 80 C- 120 C. Operating the he1 cell at higher temperatures increases the kinetics of the fuel cell reaction as well as decreasing the susceptibility of the catalyst to be poisoned by impurities. Currently, Nafion made by Dupont is the most widely used polymer membrane in PEMFC. Nafion does not function well above 80 C due to a significant decrease in the conductivity of the membrane from a loss of hydration. In addition to the loss of conductivity at high temperatures, the long term stability and relatively high cost of Nafion have stimulated many researches to find a substitute for Nafion. Lithium ion batteries are popular for use in portable electronic devices, such as laptop computers and mobile phones. The high power density of lithium batteries makes them ideal for the high power demand of today s advanced electronics. NASA is developing a solid polymer electrolyte that can be used for lithium batteries. Solid polymer electrolytes have many advantages over the current gel or liquid based systems that are used currently. Among these advantages are the potential for increased power density and design flexibility. Automobiles, computers, and cell phones require

  3. Energetic and Exergetic Analysis of Low and Medium Temperature District Heating Network Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    In this paper, energetic and exergetic approaches were applied to an exemplary low temperature district heating (LTDH) network with supply/return water temperature at 55oC/25 oC. The small LTDH network is annexed to a large medium temperature district heating (MTDH) network. The LTDH network can...

  4. Low Temperature Dechlorination of Densified Refuse Derived Fuel in Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; XIE Qiang

    2005-01-01

    Study on behavior of chlorine contained in oval-shaped densified refuse derived fuel (d-RDF) prepared from unicipal solid waste in pyrolysis was carried out by means of temperature-programmed electrical furnace, and the gasevolving from pyrolysis was investigated by FTIR. De-HCl rate was calculated by determining the emission fraction of HCl in the flue gas and the fraction of Cl left in the pyrolysis residue. The results show that Cl in the d-RDF releases primarily in the form of HCl during the pyrolysis, and the initial releasing temperature of HCl enhances with the increase of heating rate. Meanwhile, the higher the end temperature of pyrolysis, the more the Cl released. De-HCl rate is about 70% when the end temperature of pyrolysis is around 600℃. Besides, mechanism of Cl release is discussed.

  5. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  6. Modeling research in low-medium temperature geothermal field, Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤; 李春华

    2002-01-01

    The geothermal reservoir in Tianjin can be divided into two parts: the upper one is the porous medium reservoir in the Tertiary system; the lower one includes the basement reservoir in Lower Paleozoic and Middle-Upper Proterozoic. Hot springs are exposed in the northern mountain and confined geothermal water is imbedded in the southern plain. The geothermal reservoir is incised by several fractures. In recent years, TDS of the geothermal water have gone up along with the production rate increasing, along the eastern fracture zone (Cangdong Fracture and West Baitangkou Fracture). This means that the northern fracture system is the main seepage channel of the deep circulation geothermal water, and the reservoir has good connection in a certain area and definite direction. The isotopic research about hydrogen and carbon chronology indicates that the main recharge period of geothermal water is the Holocene Epoch, the pluvial and chilly period of 20 kaBP. The karst conduits in weathered carbonate rocks of the Proterozoic and Lower Paleozoic and the northeast regional fracture system are the main feeding channels of Tianjin geothermal water. Since the Holocene epoch, the geothermal water stayed at a sealed warm period. The tracer test in WR45 doublet system shows that the tracer test is a very effective measure for understanding the reservoir's transport nature and predicting the cooling time and transport velocity during the reinjection. 3-D numerical simulation shows that if the reinjection well keeps a suitable distance from the production well, reinjection will be a highly effective measure to extract more thermal energy from the rock matrix. The cooling of the production well will not be a problem.

  7. Development of Low-Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells for Direct Conversion of Methane to Methanol Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Alireza; Barton, Joseph D.; Willman, Carl; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Li, Na; Poozhikunnath, Abhinav; Maric, Radenka; Marina, Olga A.

    2017-09-26

    The objective of this project is development of a durable, low-cost, and high performance Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LT-SOFC) for direct conversion of methane to methanol and other liquids, characterized by: a) operating temperature < 500oC, b) current density of > 100 mA/cm2 in liquid hydrocarbon production mode, c) continuous operation of > 100 h, d) cell area >100 cm2, e) cell cost per rate of product output < 100,000/bpd, f) process intensity of > 0.1 bpd/ft3, g) product yield and carbon efficiency > 50%, and h) volumetric output per cell > 30 L/day.

  8. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime....... On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes...... at 400ºC. The potential of using WO3 ceramic as an alternative anode materials has been explored. The relatively high electrode polarization resistance obtained, 11 Ohm cm2 at 600 ºC, proved the inadequate catalytic activity of this system for hydrogen oxidation. At the end of this thesis...

  9. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning ASTM jet-A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated ASTM Jet-A fuel to determine the effect of increased fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperature ranged from ambient to 700 K. The NOx emission index increased at a rate of 6 percent per 100 K increase in fuel temperature.

  10. Estimation of CO concentration in high temperature PEM fuel cells using electrochemical impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    , a possible solution, an avoidance of the long recharging time is combining them with the use of fuel cells. Fuel cells continuously deliver electrical power as long as a proper fuel supply is maintained. The ideal fuel for fuel cells is hydrogen, which in it’s pure for has high volumetric storage...... requirements. One of the solutions to this fuel storage problem is using liquid fuels such as methanol that through a chemical reformer converts the fuel into a hydrogen rich gas mixture. Methanol is a liquid fuel, which has low storage requirements and high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM......) fuel cells can eciently run on the reformed hydrogen rich gas, although with reduced performance depending on the contaminants, such as CO, in the gas. By estimating the amount of CO in the fuel cell, it could be possible to adjust the fuel cell system operating parameters to increase performance...

  11. The intergalactic medium temperature and Compton y parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Trac, H; Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue-Li; Trac, Hy

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged) The precision modeling of the thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect and future high accuracy measurements will provide a powerful way to constrain the thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we combine high resolution adiabatic hydro simulations and analytical models to provide a precision modeling of the gas density weighted temperature $\\bar{T}_g$ and the mean SZ Compton $y$ parameter. Simulation artifacts are quantified and corrected and our analytical model passes tests of various simulations and is able to predict $\\bar{T}_g$ and $\\bar{y}$ to several percent accuracy. For low matter density $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the present $\\bar{T}_g$ is $0.32 (\\sigma_8/0.84)^{3.05-0.15\\Omega_m}(\\Omega_m/0.268)^{1.28-0.2\\sigma_8} {\\rm keV}$. The mean $y$ parameter is $2.6\\times 10^{-6} (\\sigma_8/0.84)^{4.1-2\\Omega_m}(\\Omega_m/0.268)^{1.28-0.2\\sigma_8}$. The current upper limit of $y<1.5\\times 10^{-5}$ measured by FIRAS has already ruled out combinations of high $\\sigma_8\\ga 1.1$ and high $\\Omega_...

  12. High-temperature passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with concentrated fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuxin; Yuan, Wenxiang; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan; Luo, Zhongkuan; Fu, Huide

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are fed with diluted methanol solutions and can hardly be operated at elevated temperatures (>120 °C) because the ionic conductivity of Nafion-type proton exchange membranes depends strongly on water content. Such a system design would limit its energy density and power density in mobile applications. In this communication, a passive vapor feed DMFC capable of operating with concentrated fuels at high temperatures is reported. The passive DMFC proposed in this work consists of a fuel reservoir, a perforated silicone sheet, a vapor chamber, two current collectors and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The experimental results reveal that the methanol crossover through a PBI membrane is substantially low when compared with the Nafion membranes and the PBI-based passive DMFC can yield a peak power density of 37.2 mW cm-2 and 22.1 mW cm-2 at 180 °C when 16 M methanol solutions and neat methanol are used respectively. In addition, the 132 h discharge test indicates that the performance of this new DMFC is quite stable and no obvious performance degradation is observed after activation, showing its promising applications in portable power sources.

  13. Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio

    This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and their performance at low operating temperatures. Cathodes were mainly fabricated by the infiltration method, whereby electrocatalysts are introduced onto porous, ionic conducting backbones......degreeC. The most promising cathode was integrated onto an anode supported cell and it was found that the cell exhibits electrochemical stability with no measureable degradation during 1500 h operation at 700degreeC. LaCoO3 and Co3O4 infiltrated - CGO cathodes were also investigated and revealed...

  14. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James O' Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model

  15. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James O' Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model

  16. Method of Hydrogenous Fuel Usage to Increase the Efficiency in Tandem Diverse Temperature Oxidation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubkova Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of estimation energy efficiency, the collation data of thermodynamic calculations and data on material balance for an assessment of electric and thermal components in considered ways to use convention products, performance enhancement in the tandem system containing the high-temperature fuel cell and the low-temperature fuel cell with full heat regeneration for hydrogenous fuel (CH4. The overall effective efficiency (ηΣef. making full use of the recovered heat considered tandem system depends on the efficiency of its constituent fuel cells. The overall effective efficiency of the tandem installation including the fuel converter, separating system, high-temperature oxidation system, and hydrogen disposal system in case of fuel use in the low-temperature fuel cell, is higher than for each of the fuel cell elements separately.

  17. Electrolytes For Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rękas M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid electrolytes for construction of the intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, IT-SOFC, have been reviewed. Yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals, YTZP, as a potential electrolyte of IT-SOFC have been highlighted. The experimental results involving structural, microstructural, electrical properties based on our own studies were presented. In order to study aluminum diffusion in YTZP, aluminum oxide was deposited on the surface of 3 mol.% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP. The samples were annealed at temperatures from 1523 to 1773 K. Diffusion profiles of Al in the form of mean concentration vs. depth in B-type kinetic region were investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS. Both the lattice (DB and grain boundary (DGB diffusion were determined.

  18. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    consists of a prototype cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes and runs on pure hydrogen in a dead-end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  19. Evolution of Surface Oxide Film of Typical Aluminum Alloy During Medium-Temperature Brazing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程方杰; 赵海微; 王颖; 肖兵; 姚俊峰

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the surface oxide film along the depth direction of typical aluminum alloy under medium-temperature brazing was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the alloy with Mg content below 2.0wt%, whether under cold rolling condition or during medium-temperature brazing process, the en-richment of Mg element on the surface was not detected and the oxide film was pure Al2O3. However, the oxide film grew obviously during medium-temperature brazing process, and the thickness was about 80 nm. For the alloy with Mg content above 2.0wt%, under cold rolling condition, the original surface oxide film was pure Al2O3. However, the Mg element was significantly enriched on the outermost surface during medium-temperature brazing process, and MgO-based oxide film mixed with small amount of MgAl2O4 was formed with a thickness of about 130 nm. The alloy-ing elements of Mn and Si were not enriched on the surface neither under cold rolling condition nor during medium-temperature brazing process for all the selected aluminum alloy, and the surface oxide film was similar to that of pure aluminum, which was almost entire Al2O3.

  20. Solid Medium for Culturing Black Smoker Bacteria at Temperatures to 120°C

    OpenAIRE

    Deming, Jody W.; Baross, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A solid, highly thermostable medium, based on the new gelling agent GELRITE, was devised to facilitate the culturing of extremely thermophilic microorganisms from submarine hydrothermal vents. The medium remained solid at temperatures to 120°C at vapor pressures and hydrostatic pressures to 265 atm. It proved useful to its maximum tested limits in isolating colonies of black smoker bacteria from hydrothermal fluids recently collected at the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean.

  1. Comparison of temperature distributions inside a PEM fuel cell with parallel and interdigitated gas distributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. J.; Liu, S. J.

    A comparison of the temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell between the parallel-flow gas distributors and the interdigitated gas distributor has been discussed in detail. An electrochemical-thermal coupled numerical model in a five-layer membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) is developed. The temperatures for the reactant fuels as well as the carbon fibers in the porous electrode are predicted by using a CFD technique. The overpotential across the MEA is varied to examine its effect on the temperature distributions of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that both the fuel temperature and the carbon fiber temperature are increased with increasing the total overpotential. In addition, the fuel and carbon-fiber temperature distributions are significantly affected by the flow pattern that cast on the gas distributor. Replacing the parallel-flow gas distributor by the interdigitated gas distributor will increase the local maximum temperature inside the PEM fuel cell.

  2. Methods of aircraft fuel system protection against low-temperature failures of its serviceability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    П. Ф. Максютинський

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The following aircraft fuel system protection methods against low-temperature failures of its serviceability have been considered: the method of fuel temperature stabilization in the tanks at a predetermined level, also method of hydrocleaning of low-temperature deposits from the fuel pump filter. By the application of calculations and experimental research we have determined parameters of the system for the fuel temperature stabilization by means of utilization of heat at the radiator of the air-conditioning system and the effectiveness of the hydrocleaning of low-temperature deposits. The design of punched collector and the effective modes of hydrocleaning have been proposed

  3. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  4. Development of a Low NOx Medium sized Industrial Gas Turbine Operating on Hydrogen-Rich Renewable and Opportunity Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Ram

    2013-07-31

    This report presents the accomplishments at the completion of the DOE sponsored project (Contract # DE-FC26-09NT05873) undertaken by Solar Turbines Incorporated. The objective of this 54-month project was to develop a low NOx combustion system for a medium sized industrial gas turbine engine operating on Hydrogen-rich renewable and opportunity Fuels. The work in this project was focused on development of a combustion system sized for 15MW Titan 130 gas turbine engine based on design analysis and rig test results. Although detailed engine evaluation of the complete system is required prior to commercial application, those tasks were beyond the scope of this DOE sponsored project. The project tasks were organized in three stages, Stages 2 through 4. In Stage 2 of this project, Solar Turbines Incorporated characterized the low emission capability of current Titan 130 SoLoNOx fuel injector while operating on a matrix of fuel blends with varying Hydrogen concentration. The mapping in this phase was performed on a fuel injector designed for natural gas operation. Favorable test results were obtained in this phase on emissions and operability. However, the resulting fuel supply pressure needed to operate the engine with the lower Wobbe Index opportunity fuels would require additional gas compression, resulting in parasitic load and reduced thermal efficiency. In Stage 3, Solar characterized the pressure loss in the fuel injector and developed modifications to the fuel injection system through detailed network analysis. In this modification, only the fuel delivery flowpath was modified and the air-side of the injector and the premixing passages were not altered. The modified injector was fabricated and tested and verified to produce similar operability and emissions as the Stage 2 results. In parallel, Solar also fabricated a dual fuel capable injector with the same air-side flowpath to improve commercialization potential. This injector was also test verified to produce 15

  5. Modeling Heavy/Medium-Duty Fuel Consumption Based on Drive Cycle Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Duran, Adam; Gonder, Jeffrey; Kelly, Kenneth

    2015-10-13

    This paper presents multiple methods for predicting heavy/medium-duty vehicle fuel consumption based on driving cycle information. A polynomial model, a black box artificial neural net model, a polynomial neural network model, and a multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model were developed and verified using data collected from chassis testing performed on a parcel delivery diesel truck operating over the Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT), City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle (CSHVC), New York Composite Cycle (NYCC), and hydraulic hybrid vehicle (HHV) drive cycles. Each model was trained using one of four drive cycles as a training cycle and the other three as testing cycles. By comparing the training and testing results, a representative training cycle was chosen and used to further tune each method. HHDDT as the training cycle gave the best predictive results, because HHDDT contains a variety of drive characteristics, such as high speed, acceleration, idling, and deceleration. Among the four model approaches, MARS gave the best predictive performance, with an average absolute percent error of -1.84% over the four chassis dynamometer drive cycles. To further evaluate the accuracy of the predictive models, the approaches were first applied to real-world data. MARS outperformed the other three approaches, providing an average absolute percent error of -2.2% of four real-world road segments. The MARS model performance was then compared to HHDDT, CSHVC, NYCC, and HHV drive cycles with the performance from Future Automotive System Technology Simulator (FASTSim). The results indicated that the MARS method achieved a comparative predictive performance with FASTSim.

  6. Engineering high performance intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Soo

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are an efficient, fuel flexible energy conversion device, capable of operating on fuels ranging from natural gas to gasoline, diesel, and biofuels, as well as hydrogen. However, to this point the marketability of SOFCs has been limited by their high operating temperatures. Achieving high power at intermediate temperatures (IT, 500 -- 700 °C) would be a significant breakthrough, as low temperature operation would result in better stability and allow for a broader range of material options for the SOFC components as well as the balance of plant, such as stainless steel interconnects (which are only viable at open circuit potential (OCP) by more than 0.1 V resulting in a 140 % increase in power. Further investigations into this molecular AFL showed that a multilayered AFL can further reduce the ASR and increase the maximum power density. Secondly, the potential use of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O 2-delta as an electrolyte has been investigated. The current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell exhibits a maximum power density reaching 1.38 W/cm2 with an area specific resistance (ASR) of 0.087 Ocm 2 at 650 °C with 90 sccm of air and wet hydrogen. Also, the high OCP achieved at 500 °C (0.96 V) as well as the high performance confirmed the viability of Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85 O2-delta as an alternative electrolyte material. The cathode used for this study was La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe 0.8O3 (LSCF) -- Gd0.1Ce0.9O 2 (GDC) composite. Finally, Er0.8Bi1.2O3 (ESB)/GDC bilayered electrolyte combined with recently developed ESB/Bi2Ru2O7 (BRO) composite cathodes was tested. In this work a maximum power density of 2 W/cm2 was achieved at 650 °C with the help of the novel AFL and tapecast anode supports. This is the highest power yet achieved in the IT range and I believe redefines the expectation level for maximum power under IT-SOFC operating conditions.

  7. The Evaluation of the Impact of New Technologies for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Trucks on Fuel Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Duran, Adam; Kelly, Kenneth; Konan, Arnaud; Lammert, Michael; Prohaska, Robert

    2016-10-06

    In this paper, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory present the results of simulation studies to evaluate potential fuel savings as a result of improvements to vehicle rolling resistance, coefficient of drag, and vehicle weight as well as hybridization for four power trains for medium-duty parcel delivery vehicles. The vehicles will be modeled and simulated over 1,290 real-world driving trips to determine the fuel savings potential based on improvements to each technology and to identify best use cases for each platform. The results of impacts of new technologies on fuel saving will be presented, and the most favorable driving routes on which to adopt them will be explored.

  8. The Evaluation of the Impact of New Technologies for Different Powertrain Medium-Duty Trucks on Fuel Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Duran, Adam; Kelly, Kenneth; Konan, Arnaud; Lammert, Michael; Prohaska, Robert

    2016-09-27

    In this paper, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory present the results of simulation studies to evaluate potential fuel savings as a result of improvements to vehicle rolling resistance, coefficient of drag, and vehicle weight as well as hybridization for four powertrains for medium-duty parcel delivery vehicles. The vehicles will be modeled and simulated over 1,290 real-world driving trips to determine the fuel savings potential based on improvements to each technology and to identify best use cases for each platform. The results of impacts of new technologies on fuel saving will be presented, and the most favorable driving routes on which to adopt them will be explored.

  9. New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

    2006-09-30

    Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

  10. Research of power fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in industrial boiler based on numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova K.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the presented research is to perform numerical modelling of fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in once-through industrial steam boiler. Full size and scaled-down furnace model created with FIRE 3D software and was used for the research. All geometrical features were observed. The baseline information for the low-temperature vortex furnace process are velocity and temperature of low, upper and burner blast, air-fuel ratio, fuel consumption, coal dust size range. The obtained results are: temperature and velocity three dimensional fields, furnace gases and solid fuel ash particles concentration.

  11. Carbon dioxide as working fluid for medium and high-temperature concentrated solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of using carbon dioxide in solar thermal systems at medium and high operating temperatures. For medium temperatures, application of CO2 in non-imaging-optics based compound parabolic concentrators (CPC combined with evacuated-tube collectors is studied. These collectors have been shown to obtain efficiencies higher than 40% operating at around 200℃ without the need of tracking. Validated numerical models of external compound parabolic concentrators (XCPCs are used to simulate their performance using CO2 as working fluid. For higher temperatures, a mathematical model is implemented to analyze the operating performance of a parabolic trough solar collector (PTC using CO2 at temperatures between 100℃ and 600℃.

  12. Reconstruction of Temperature Field in 3-D, Absorbing, Emitting,and Anisotropically Scattering Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing-de; LIU Ni; ZHONG Ke

    2006-01-01

    The soft measurement technology of flame temperature field is an efficient method to learn the combustion status in furnace. Generally, it reconstructs the temperature field in furnace through the image of flame, which is a process to solve radiative inverse problem. In this paper, the flame of pulverized coal is considered as 3-D, absorbing, emitting,and anisotropically scattering non-gray medium. Through the study on inverse problem of radiative heat transfer, the temperature field in this kind of medium has been reconstructed. The mechanism of 3-D radiative heat transfer in a rectangular media, which is 2 m × 3 m × 5 m and full of CO2, N2 and carbon particles, is studied with Monte Carlo method. The 3-D temperature field in this rectangular space is reconstructed and the influence of particles density profile is discussed.

  13. PBI-based polymer electrolyte membranes fuel cells. Temperature effects on cell performance and catalyst stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Justo; Canizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Linares, Jose J. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2007-03-10

    In this work, it has been shown that the temperature (ranging from 100 to 175 C) greatly influences the performance of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped polybenzimidazole-based high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by several and complex processes. The temperature, by itself, increases H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped PBI conductivity and enhances the electrodic reactions as it rises. Nevertheless, high temperatures reduce the level of hydration of the membrane, above 130-140 C accelerate the self-dehydration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, and they may boost the process of catalyst particle agglomeration that takes place in strongly acidic H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} medium (as checked by multi-cycling sweep voltammetry), reducing the overall electrochemical active surface. The first process seems to have a rapid response to changes in the temperature and controls the cell performance immediately after them. The second process seems to develop slower, and influences the cell performance in the 'long-term'. The predominant processes, at each moment and temperature, determine the effect of the temperature on the cell performance, as potentiostatic curves display. 'Long-term' polarization curves grow up to 150 C and decrease at 175 C. 'Short-term' ones continuously increase as the temperature does after 'conditioning' the cell at 125 C. On the contrary, when compared the polarization curves at 175 C a continuous decrease is observed with the 'conditioning' temperature. A discussion of the observed trends is proposed in this work. (author)

  14. Power port contrast medium flushing and trapping: impact of temperature, an in vitro experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiffant G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Guiffant,1 Jean Jacques Durussel,1 Patrice Flaud,1 Laurent Royon,1 Pierre Yves Marcy,2 Jacques Merckx1,31University Paris Diderot, Paris, France; 2Radiodiagnosis and Interventional Radiology Department, Caen, France; 3University Teaching Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, FrancePurpose: The use of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs certified as "high pressure resistant" or "power port" has begun to spread worldwide as a safe procedure for power contrast injection. Owing to the thermo-rheological properties of the contrast media, the primary aim of this work is to present an in vitro experimental impact study concerning the impact of the temperature level on flushing efficiency after contrast medium injection. Moreover, we report experimental data that confirms the role of needle bevel orientation. The secondary aim is to answer the following questions: Is there significant device contrast medium trapping after contrast medium injection? Is saline flushing efficient? And, finally, is it safe to inject contrast medium through an indwelled port catheter?Results: The experimental results show that in addition to hydrodynamics, temperature is a key parameter for the efficiency of device flushing after contrast medium injection. It appears that this is the case when the cavity is incompletely rinsed after three calibrated flushing volumes of 10 mL saline solution, even by using the Huber needle bevel opposite to the port exit. This leads to a potentially important trapped volume of contrast medium in the port, and consequently to the possibility of subsequent salt precipitates and long term trisubstituted benzene nuclei delivery that might impair the solute properties, which may be further injected via the power port later on.Conclusion: We thus suggest, in TIVADS patients, the use of a temporary supplementary intravenous line rather than the port to perform contrast medium injections in daily radiology routine practice

  15. Analytical approximations for temperature dependent thermophysical properties of supercritical diesel fuel surrogates used in combustion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Saini, Vishnu; Dondapati, Raja Sekhar; Usurumarti, Preeti Rao

    2017-07-01

    Supercritical fluid technology is introduced to combat the critical challenges related with emissions, incomplete and clean diesel fuel combustion. The chemical kinetics of diesel fuel is a strong function of temperature. As surrogate fuels have a potential to represent a real diesel fuel, thermophysical properties of such fuels have been studied in this present work as a function of temperature. Further, two diesel surrogate fuels which have been identified as the components of actual diesel fuel for jet engines are studied and thermophysical properties of these two surrogates are evaluated as a function of temperature at critical pressure. In addition, the accuracy and reliability of the developed correlations is estimated using two statistical parameters such as Absolute Average of Relative Error (AARE) and Sum of Average Residues (SAR). Results show an excellent agreement between the standard data and the correlated property values.

  16. Fuel Maps for the GEP 6.5LT Engine When Operating on at J/JP-8 Fuel Blends at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED FUEL MAPS FOR THE GEP 6.5LT ENGINE WHEN OPERATING ON ATJ/JP-8 FUEL BLENDS AT AMBIENT AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURES...INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 464 By Douglas M. Yost Edwin A. Frame U.S. Army TARDEC Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility Southwest... FUEL MAPS FOR THE GEP 6.5LT ENGINE WHEN OPERATING ON ATJ/JP-8 FUEL BLENDS AT AMBIENT AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURES INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 464

  17. Metal sorbents for high temperature mercury capture from fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Poulston; Evan J. Granite; Henry W. Pennline; Christina R. Myers; Dennis P. Stanko; Hugh Hamilton; Liz Rowsell; Andrew W.J. Smith; Thomas Ilkenhans; Wilson Chu [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    We have determined the effect of a pre-sulphiding treatment on the Hg removal capacities of Pt and Pd supported on alumina at a range of different metal loadings from 2 to 9wt% using Hg vapour in a simulated fuel gas feed. In the temperature range studied (204-288{sup o}C) Pd proved far superior to Pt for Hg removal and the sulphur pre-treatment led to a considerable increase in the Hg adsorption capacity. The Hg removal capacity for Pd increased with metal loading though decreased with sorbent temperature. A shift in the 2 Theta position of the Pd XRD diffraction peak from 82.1 to 79.5{sup o} after Hg adsorption at 204{sup o}C in the absence of a sulphur pre-treatment was consistent with the formation of a solid solution of Hg in Pd, with the sulphur pre-treatment the Pd related XRD peaks occur at even lower 2 Theta position suggesting a different Pd-Hg phase is formed. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  18. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas...... of the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently suffer from intermittency problems. The excess energy can be used to produce hydrogen from water or can...... be stored in liquid alcohols such as methanol, which can be sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. In addition, fuel cells unlike other technologies can use a variety of other fuels that can provide a source of hydrogen, such as biogas, methane, butane, etc. More fuel flexibility combined...

  19. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  20. Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

    2013-10-01

    Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

  1. Electrocatalysis and electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells: fundamentals, state of the art, research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendt Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with electrocatalysis and electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells and also with established means and methods in electrocatalyst research, development and characterization. The intention is to inform about the fundamentals, state of the art, research and development of noble metal electrocatalysts for fuel cells operating at low temperatures.

  2. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...

  3. Low-temperature irradiation behavior of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Hayes, S. L.; Clark, C. R.; Wiencek, T. C.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Strain, R. V.; Kim, K.-H.

    2002-08-01

    Irradiation tests have been conducted to evaluate the performance of a series of high-density uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy, aluminum matrix dispersion fuels. Fuel plates incorporating alloys with molybdenum content in the range of 4-10 wt% were tested. Two irradiation test vehicles were used to irradiate low-enrichment fuels to approximately 40 and 70 at.% 235U burnup in the advanced test reactor at fuel temperatures of approximately 65 °C. The fuel particles used to fabricate dispersion specimens for most of the test were produced by generating filings from a cast rod. In general, fuels with molybdenum contents of 6 wt% or more showed stable in-reactor fission gas behavior, exhibiting a distribution of small, stable gas bubbles. Fuel particle swelling was moderate and decreased with increasing alloy content. Fuel particles with a molybdenum content of 4 wt% performed poorly, exhibiting extensive fuel-matrix interaction and the growth of relatively large fission gas bubbles. Fuel particles with 4 or 6 wt% molybdenum reacted more rapidly with the aluminum matrix than those with higher-alloy content. Fuel particles produced by an atomization process were also included in the test to determine the effect of fuel particle morphology and microstructure on fuel performance for the U-10Mo composition. Both of the U-10Mo fuel particle types exhibited good irradiation performance, but showed visible differences in fission gas bubble nucleation and growth behavior.

  4. D* and B* mesons in strange hadronic medium at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the effect of density and temperature of isospin symmetric strange medium on the shift in masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons using chiral SU(3 model and QCD sum rule approach. In the present investigation the values of quark and gluon condensates are calculated from the chiral SU(3 model and these condensatesare further used as input in the QCD Sum rule framework to calculate the in-medium masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons. These in medium properties of vector D and B mesons may be helpful to understand the experimental observables of the experiments like CBM and PANDA under FAIR project at GSI, Germany. The results which are observed in present work are also compared with the previous predictions.

  5. A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core for high outlet-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamadate, Megumi; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Sugino, Kazuteru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2003-03-01

    A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core was performed. The new core concept studied here has low radial power peaking by applying three regions core configuration with different diameters of fuel pins and the same enrichment of plutonium. The core reveals constant radial power distribution during nominal power operation, which gives the advantage of low cladding maximum temperature or high core outlet temperature with a cladding limit temperature. The core thermal hydraulic design shows that a core outlet temperature as high as that of the oxide fuel core is feasible even in the application of metal fuel pins, which have a lower cladding limit temperature than oxide fuel pins. The core concept is possible to have additional attractiveness such as high breeding ratio, high burnup, and long-term operation cycle due to its high internal conversion ratio. (author)

  6. Additional experiments on flowability improvements of aviation fuels at low temperatures, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockemer, F. J.; Deane, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study flow improver additives and scale-model fuel heating systems for use with aviation hydrocarbon fuel at low temperatures. Test were performed in a facility that simulated the heat transfer and temperature profiles anticipated in wing fuel tanks during flight of long-range commercial aircraft. The results are presented of experiments conducted in a test tank simulating a section of an outer wing integral fuel tank approximately full-scale in height, chilled through heat exchange panels bonded to the upper and lower horizontal surfaces. A separate system heated lubricating oil externally by a controllable electric heater, to transfer heat to fuel pumped from the test tank through an oil-to-fuel heat exchanger, and to recirculate the heated fuel back to the test tank.

  7. Temperature Structure of the Intra-Cluster Medium from SPH and AMR simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rasia, Elena; Borgani, Stefano; Nagai, Daisuke; Dolag, Klaus; Avestruz, Camille; Granato, Gian Luigi; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Murante, Giuseppe; Nelson, Kaylea; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10% to 30%. The largest bias originates by both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray emitting intra-cluster medium (ICM). To elucidate on this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in no-radiative simulations, while it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with the observed one in the central regions of clusters. Around R_500 the temperature inhomogeneit...

  8. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Ismail B. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  9. Performance characteristics of a diesel engine using low- and medium-energy gases as a fuel supplement (fumigation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    The use of low- and medium-energy gases derived from solid waste is investigated. Gases that simulate those gases that could be derived from refuse were injected into the air inlet of a 298-kilowatt (400 horsepower) diesel engine as a fuel supplement. This process is called fumigation. Three different gases with thermal-energy contents of 6.11 MJ/cu m (164 Btu/cu ft), 18.1 MJ/cu m (485 Btu/cu ft), and 18.8 MJ/cu m (505 Btu/cu ft, respectively, were used at rates ranging as high as 20 percent of the normal fuel oil energy at four different engine load points. The test results indicated approximately 100 percent gas energy utilization with no observable deleterious effect on the engine.

  10. Testing of uranium nitride fuel in T-111 cladding at 1200 K cladding temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.; Smith, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of six fuel pins each were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a tantalum alloy clad. The first group of fuel pins was irradiated for 1500 hours to a maximum burnup of 0.7-atom-percent uranium. The second group of fuel pins was irradiated for about 3000 hours to a maximum burnup of 1.0-atom-percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation of both groups of fuel pins was approximately 1200 K. The postirradiation examination revealed the following: no clad failures or fuel swelling occurred; less than 1 percent of the fission gases escaped from the fuel; and the clad of the first group of fuel pins experienced clad embrittlement whereas the second group, which had modified assembly and fabrication procedures to minimize contamination, had a ductile clad after irradiation.

  11. Interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenhua

    Presently, one of the principal goals of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) research is to reduce the stack operating temperature to between 600 and 800°C. However, one of the principal technological barriers is the non-availability of a suitable material satisfying all of the stability requirements for the interconnect. In this work two approaches for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnects have been explored. The first approach comprises an interconnect consisting of a bi-layer structure, a p-type oxide (La0.96Sr0.08MnO 2.001/LSM) layer exposed to a cathodic environment, and an n-type oxide (Y0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al0.05O 3-delta/YSTA) layer exposed to anodic conditions. Theoretical analysis based on the bi-layer structure has established design criteria to implement this approach. The analysis shows that the interfacial oxygen partial pressure, which determines the interconnect stability, is independent of the electronic conductivities of both layers but dependent on the oxygen ion layer interconnects, the oxygen ion conductivities of LSM and YSTA were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Based on the measured data, it has been determined that if the thickness of YSTA layer is around 0.1cm, the thickness of LSM layer should be around 0.6 mum in order to maintain the stability of LSM. In a second approach, a less expensive stainless steel interconnect has been studied. However, one of the major concerns associated with the use of metallic interconnects is the development of a semi-conducting or insulating oxide scale and chromium volatility during extended exposure to the SOFC operating environment. Dense and well adhered Mn-Cu spinet oxide coatings were successfully deposited on stainless steel by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. It was found that the Mn-Cu-O coating significantly reduced the oxidation rate of the stainless steel and the volatility of chromium. The area specific resistance (ASR) of coated Crofer 22 APU is

  12. TEMP: a computer code to calculate fuel pin temperatures during a transient. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, F E; Christensen, B Y; Gneiting, B C

    1980-04-01

    The computer code TEMP calculates fuel pin temperatures during a transient. It was developed to accommodate temperature calculations in any system of axi-symmetric concentric cylinders. When used to calculate fuel pin temperatures, the code will handle a fuel pin as simple as a solid cylinder or as complex as a central void surrounded by fuel that is broken into three regions by two circumferential cracks. Any fuel situation between these two extremes can be analyzed along with additional cladding, heat sink, coolant or capsule regions surrounding the fuel. The one-region version of the code accurately calculates the solution to two problems having closed-form solutions. The code uses an implicit method, an explicit method and a Crank-Nicolson (implicit-explicit) method.

  13. Study on the fuel cycle cost of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300). Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Masanobu; Katanishi, Shoji; Nakata, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Oda, Takefumi; Izumiya, Toru [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    In the basic design of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300), reduction of the fuel cycle cost has a large benefit of improving overall plant economy. Then, fuel cycle cost was evaluated for GTHTR300. First, of fuel fabrication for high-temperature gas cooled reactor, since there was no actual experience with a commercial scale, a preliminary design for a fuel fabrication plant with annual processing of 7.7 ton-U sufficient four GTHTR300 was performed, and fuel fabrication cost was evaluated. Second, fuel cycle cost was evaluated based on the equilibrium cycle of GTHTR300. The factors which were considered in this cost evaluation include uranium price, conversion, enrichment, fabrication, storage of spent fuel, reprocessing, and waste disposal. The fuel cycle cost of GTHTR300 was estimated at about 1.07 yen/kWh. If the back-end cost of reprocessing and waste disposal is included and assumed to be nearly equivalent to LWR, the fuel cycle cost of GTHTR300 was estimated to be about 1.31 yen/kWh. Furthermore, the effects on fuel fabrication cost by such of fuel specification parameters as enrichment, the number of fuel types, and the layer thickness were considered. Even if the enrichment varies from 10 to 20%, the number of fuel types change from 1 to 4, the 1st layer thickness of fuel changes by 30 {mu}m, or the 2nd layer to the 4th layer thickness of fuel changes by 10 {mu}m, the impact on fuel fabrication cost was evaluated to be negligible. (author)

  14. Power and temperature control of fluctuating biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    This paper addresses how the power and temperature are controlled in a biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and micro gas turbine (MGT) hybrid system. A SOFC and MGT dynamic model are developed and used to simulate the hybrid system performance operating on biomass gas. The transient behavior of both the SOFC and MGT are discussed in detail. An unstable power output is observed when the system is fed biomass gas. This instability is due to the fluctuation of gas composition in the fuel. A specially designed fuel controller succeeded not only in allowing the hybrid system to follow a step change of power demand from 32 to 35 kW, but also stably maintained the system power output at 35 kW. In addition to power control, fuel cell temperature is controlled by introduction and use of a bypass valve around the recuperator. By releasing excess heat to the exhaust, the bypass valve provided the control means to avoid the self-exciting behavior of system temperature and stabilized the temperature of SOFC at 850 °C.

  15. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80 degrees C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Fuel Centerline Temperatures in SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ayman

    SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are one of the six nuclear-reactor concepts currently being developed under the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). A main advantage of SCW Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is that they offer higher thermal efficiencies compared to those of current conventional NPPs. Unlike today's conventional NPPs, which have thermal efficiencies between 30 - 35%, SCW NPPs will have thermal efficiencies within a range of 45 - 50%, owing to high operating temperatures and pressures (i.e., coolant temperatures as high as 625°C at 25 MPa pressure). The use of current fuel bundles with UO2 fuel at the high operating parameters of SCWRs may cause high fuel centerline temperatures, which could lead to fuel failure and fission gas release. Studies have shown that when the Variant-20 (43-element) fuel bundle was examined at SCW conditions, the fuel centerline temperature industry limit of 1850°C for UO2 and the sheath temperature design limit of 850°C might be exceeded. Therefore, new fuel-bundle designs, which comply with the design requirements, are required for future use in SCWRs. The main objective of this study to conduct a sensitivity analysis in order to identify the main factors that leads to fuel centerline temperature reduction. Therefore, a 54-element fuel bundle with smaller diameter of fuel elements compared to that of the 43-element bundle was designed and various nuclear fuels are examined for future use in a generic Pressure Tube (PT) SCWR. The 54-element bundle consists of 53 heated fuel elements with an outer diameter of 9.5 mm and one central unheated element of 20-mm outer diameter which contains burnable poison. The 54-element fuel bundle has an outer diameter of 103.45 mm, which is the same as the outer diameter of the 43-element fuel bundle. After developing the 54-element fuel bundle, one-dimensional heat-transfer analysis was conducted using MATLAB and NIST REFPROP programs. As a result, the Heat Transfer

  17. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether...

  18. Detection of Extended He II Reionization in the Temperature Evolution of the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, George D; Haehnelt, Martin G; Sargent, Wallace L W

    2010-01-01

    We present new measurements of the temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) derived from the Lyman-alpha forest over 2.0 ~12000 K at z ~ 2.8. This increase is not consistent with the monotonic decline in T0 expected in the absence of He II reionization. We therefore interpret the observed rise in temperature as evidence of He II reionization beginning at z >~ 4.4. The evolution of T0 is consistent with an end to He II reionization at z ~ 3, as suggested by opacity measurements of the He II Lyman-alpha forest, although the redshift at which T0 peaks will depend somewhat on the evolution of th e temperature-density relation. These new temperature measurements suggest that the heat input due to the reionization of He II dominates the thermal balance of the IGM over an extended period with Delta_z >~ 1.

  19. Analysis Method of Transient Temperature Field for Fuel Tank of High-Altitude Large UAV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Ai; Liang Chen; Xiaojing Xu; Shiyu Liu; Zhenwen Hu; Xinlin Xia

    2016-01-01

    Based on the analysis of factors affecting transient temperature field of aircraft fuel tank and coupled heat transfer mechanism, a mathematical model of transient coupled heat transfer, including the dynamic change of fuel quality, the internal heat transfer, the external aerodynamic convection and the radiation heat transfer, is established. Taking the aerodynamic convection and radiation heat transfer outside the tank as the third kinds of thermal boundary conditions for the thermal analysis of the fuel tank, calculation of internal and external coupling heat of fuel tank is decoupled. Thermal network method combined with hierarchical dynamic grid is used to deal with the fuel consumption, and carry on the heat transfer analysis of the fuel tank. The numerical method for the transient temperature field of aircraft fuel tank is established. Through the simulation calculation, the transient temperature distribution of the fuel tank under different flight conditions is obtained, and the influence of the fuel mass and the external thermal environment on the temperature field is analyzed.

  20. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  1. Fuel enrichment and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod in (D-T) driven hybrid reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Ypek [Suleyman Demirel Universitesi Muhendislik-Mimarlyk Fakultesi, Isparta (Turkey)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, melting point of the fuel rod and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod are investigated for different coolants under various first wall loads (P{sub w}, =5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 MWm{sup -2}) in Fusion-Fission reactor fueled with 50%LWR +50%CANDU. The fusion source of neutrons of 14.1 MeV is simulated by a movable target along the main axis of cylindrical geometry as a line source. In addition, the fusion chamber was thought as a cylindrical cavity with a diameter of 300 cm that is comparatively small value. The fissile fuel zone is considered to be cooled with four different coolants, gas, flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), natural lithium (Li), and eutectic lithium (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}). Investigations are observed during 4 years for discrete time intervals of{delta}t= 0.5 month and by a plant factor (PF) of 75%. Volumetric ratio of coolant-to fuel is 1:1, 45.515% coolant, 45.515% fuel, 8.971% clad, in fuel zone. (author)

  2. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Long term deposit formation in aviation turbine fuel at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental characterization is conducted for the relationships between deposit mass, operating time, and temperature, in coking associated with aviation fuels under conditions simulating those typical of turbine engine fuel systems. Jet A and Suntech A fuels were tested in stainless steel tubing heated to 420-750 K, over test durations of between 3 and 730 hr and at fuel velocities of 0.07-1.3 m/sec. Deposit rates are noted to be a strong function of tube temperature; for a given set of test conditions, deposition rates for Suntech A exceed those of Jet A by a factor of 10. Deposition rates increased markedly with test duration for both fuels. The heated tube data obtained are used to develop a global chemical kinetic model for fuel oxidation and carbon deposition.

  4. High-Temperature Chemistry in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: In Situ Optical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Walker, Robert A; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C

    2012-10-18

    Solid oxide fuels cells (SOFCs) are promising devices for versatile and efficient power generation with fuel flexibility, but their viability is contingent upon understanding chemical and material processes to improve their performance and durability. Newly developed in situ optical methods provide new insight into how carbon deposition varies with different hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels and depends on operating conditions. Some findings, such as heavier hydrocarbon fuels forming more carbon than lighter fuels, are expected, but other discoveries are surprising. For example, methanol shows a greater tendency to form carbon deposits than methane at temperatures below 800 °C, and kinetically controlled steam reforming with ethanol at high temperatures (∼800 °C) is less detrimental to SOFC performance than operating the device with dry methanol as the fuel. In situ optical techniques will continue to provide the chemical information and mechanistic insight that is critical for SOFCs to become a viable energy conversion technology.

  5. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether...... fuel cell suffers greatly from the very low DME-water miscibility. To cope with the problem polybenzimidazole (PBI) based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) have been made and tested in a vapor fed system. PtRu on carbon has been used as anode catalyst and air at ambient pressure was used as oxidant...

  6. The analysis of the transient temperature distribution of double-slab Nd:YAG laser medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Huang; Junqing Meng; Lingling Zhang; Qiquan Hu

    2005-01-01

    A novel double-slab Nd:YAG laser, which uses face-pumped slab medium cooled by liquid with different temperatures on both sides, is proposed. The thermal distortion of wavefront caused by the non-uniform temperature distribution in the laser gain media can be self-compensated. According to the method of operation, the models of the temperature distribution and stress are presented, and the analytic solutions for the model are derived. Furthermore, the numerical simulations with pulse pumping energy of 10 J and repetition frequencies of 500 and 1000 Hz are calculated respectively for Nd:YAG laser medium. The simulation results show that the temperature gradient remains the approximative linearity, and the heat stress is within the extreme range. Then the absorption coefficient is also discussed. The result indicates that the doping concentration cannot be too large for the high repetition frequency laser. It has been proved that the high repetition frequency, high laser beam quality, and high average output power of the order of kilowatt of Nd: YAG slab laser can be achieved in this structure.

  7. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chuang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10-3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C.

  8. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  9. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-10-06

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  10. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  11. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    In designing and controlling fuel cell sys-tems it is advantageous having models predicting the behavior of the fuel cells in steady-state as well as in dynamic ope-ration. This work examines the use of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for characterizing and developing a model for a ...... for a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual interface has been developed to perform the signal generation and acquisition which is needed to perform EIS....

  12. A review on phosphate based, solid state, protonic conductors for intermediate temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, O; Kunze, J; Stimming, U; Maglia, F

    2011-06-15

    The electrolytes currently used for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are mainly based on polymers such as Nafion which limits the operation regime of the cell to ∼80 °C. Solid oxide fuel cells operate at much elevated temperatures compared to proton exchange membrane fuel cells (∼1000 °C) and employ oxide electrolytes such as yttrium stabilized zirconia and gadolinium doped ceria. So far an intermediate temperature operation regime (300 °C) has not been widely explored which would open new pathways for novel fuel cell systems. In this review we summarize the potential use of phosphate compounds as electrolytes for intermediate temperature fuel cells. Various examples on ammonium polyphosphate, pyrophosphate, cesium phosphate and other phosphate based electrolytes are presented and their preparation methods, conduction mechanism and conductivity values are demonstrated.

  13. A review on phosphate based, solid state, protonic conductors for intermediate temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschos, O; Kunze, J; Stimming, U [Department of Physics E19, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Maglia, F, E-mail: odysseas.paschos@ph.tum.de [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ' M Rolla' , Universita di Pavia, Viale Taramelli 16, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The electrolytes currently used for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are mainly based on polymers such as Nafion which limits the operation regime of the cell to {approx} 80 {sup 0}C. Solid oxide fuel cells operate at much elevated temperatures compared to proton exchange membrane fuel cells ({approx}1000 {sup 0}C) and employ oxide electrolytes such as yttrium stabilized zirconia and gadolinium doped ceria. So far an intermediate temperature operation regime (300 {sup 0}C) has not been widely explored which would open new pathways for novel fuel cell systems. In this review we summarize the potential use of phosphate compounds as electrolytes for intermediate temperature fuel cells. Various examples on ammonium polyphosphate, pyrophosphate, cesium phosphate and other phosphate based electrolytes are presented and their preparation methods, conduction mechanism and conductivity values are demonstrated.

  14. Study of fuel inlet temperature variations on palm biodiesel operating with a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Yasin Mohd Hafizil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel includes biodiesel is introduced to overcome the air pollution problems. Biodiesel is the sustainable and alternative fuel that derived from edible and non-edible oil produced from bio-originated species, plants, and animals. This paper presents the simulation analysis on the effect of fuel temperature variations on diesel engine performance and emission using palm-biodiesel. A one-dimensional numerical analysis, Diesel RK software is used to simulate a single cylinder, four-stroke diesel engine on the performance and emission when operated at a full load condition using fuel temperature variations ranging 300 K to 333 K. Results showed that simulated results for brake power and brake torque were 0.7% each when compared to the highest and lowest fuel temperature ranging from 333 K to 300 K. Moreover, higher fuel temperature for palm biodiesel tends to produce lower exhaust gas temperature and brake specific fuel consumption at a constant engine speed of 2400 rpm. It can be concluded that from the study, fuel temperature variations of biodiesel could produce a significant effect regarding engine performance and emission that influence the driving economy of the engine.

  15. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  16. Evaluation of maximum allowable temperature inside basket of dry storage module for CANDU spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ho; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Chae, Kyoung Myoung; Choi, Byung Il; Lee, Heung Young; Song, Myung Jae [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    This study provides a maximum allowable fuel temperature through a preliminary evaluation of the UO{sub 2} weight gain that may occur on a failed (breached sheathing) element of a fuel bundle. Intact bundles would not be affected as the UO{sub 2} would not be in contact with the air for the fuel storage basket. The analysis is made for the MACSTOR/KN-400 to be operated in Wolsong ambient air temperature conditions. The design basis fuel is a 6-year cooled fuel bundle that, on average has reached a burnup of 7,800 MWd/MTU. The fuel bundle considered for analysis is assumed to have a high burnup of 12,000 MWd/MTU and be located in a hot basket. The MACSTOR/KN-400 has the same air circuit as the MACSTOR and the air circuit will require a slightly higher temperature difference to exit the increased heat load. The maximum temperature of a high burnup bundle stored in the new MACSTOR/KN-400 is expected to be about 9 .deg. C higher than the fuel temperature of the MACSTOR at an equivalent constant ambient temperature. This temperature increase will in turn increase the UO{sub 2} weight gain from 0.06% (MACSTOR for Wolsong conditions) to an estimated 0.13% weight gain for the MACSTOR/KN-400. Compared to an acceptable UO{sub 2} weight gain of 0.6%, we are thus expecting to maintain a very acceptable safety factor of 4 to 5 for the new module against unacceptable stresses in the fuel sheathing. For the UO{sub 2} weight gain, the maximum allowable fuel temperature was shown by 164 .deg. C.

  17. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  18. Dynamic modeling and experimental investigation of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Gia; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Andreasen, Søren Juhl;

    2016-01-01

    High temperature polymer fuel cells operating at 100 to 200◦C require simple fuel processing and produce high quality heat that can integrate well with domestic heating systems. Because the transportation of hydrogen is challenging, an alternative option is to reform natural gas on site. This art...

  19. Characterisation and Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik

    2009-01-01

    temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual instrument has been developed to perform the signal generation and data acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. The typical output of an EIS measurement on a fuel cell, is a Nyquist plot, which shows the imaginary and real part of the impedance...

  20. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  1. Investigating SO3 Formation from the Combustion of Heavy Fuel Oil in a Four-Stroke Medium Speed Test Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Schramm, Jesper; Rabe, Rom

    2013-01-01

    The validation of detailed models, in terms of SO3 formation in large marine engines operating on sulfur-containing heavy fuel oils (HFOs), relies on experimental work. The requisite is addressed in the present work, where SO3 is measured in the exhaust gas of an 80 kW medium-speed single......-cylinder HFO-fuelled test engine. SO3 formation is triggered by running the engine at altered operational conditions and speeds within 1050−1500 rpm. The test engine does not represent a large low-speed marine engine; however, the nature of high-temperature SO3 formation may well be explored with the current...... conversion and indirect detection via light absorption in a photometer. Present results show that SO3 formation is favored by elevated pressure histories, premixed combustion, and reduced speeds. The fraction of fuel sulfur converted to SO3 is measured to be on the order of 0.5%−2.4%, corresponding to 4...

  2. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with

  3. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of a second grade fluid in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiulhaq; Ahmad, Sohail; Vieru, Dumitru; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field influence on unsteady free convection flow of a second grade fluid near an infinite vertical flat plate with ramped wall temperature embedded in a porous medium is studied. It has been observed that magnitude of velocity as well as skin friction in case of ramped temperature is quite less than the isothermal temperature. Some special cases namely: (i) second grade fluid in the absence of magnetic field and porous medium and (ii) Newtonian fluid in the presence of magnetic field and porous medium, performing the same motion are obtained. Finally, the influence of various parameters is graphically shown.

  4. Unsteady Magnetohydrodynamic Free Convection Flow of a Second Grade Fluid in a Porous Medium with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiulhaq; Ahmad, Sohail; Vieru, Dumitru; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field influence on unsteady free convection flow of a second grade fluid near an infinite vertical flat plate with ramped wall temperature embedded in a porous medium is studied. It has been observed that magnitude of velocity as well as skin friction in case of ramped temperature is quite less than the isothermal temperature. Some special cases namely: (i) second grade fluid in the absence of magnetic field and porous medium and (ii) Newtonian fluid in the presence of magnetic field and porous medium, performing the same motion are obtained. Finally, the influence of various parameters is graphically shown. PMID:24785147

  5. Thermoacoustic enhancements for nuclear fuel rods and other high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    2017-05-09

    A nuclear thermoacoustic device includes a housing defining an interior chamber and a portion of nuclear fuel disposed in the interior chamber. A stack is disposed in the interior chamber and has a hot end and a cold end. The stack is spaced from the portion of nuclear fuel with the hot end directed toward the portion of nuclear fuel. The stack and portion of nuclear fuel are positioned such that an acoustic standing wave is produced in the interior chamber. A frequency of the acoustic standing wave depends on a temperature in the interior chamber.

  6. Low-Temperature Miscibility of Ethanol-Gasoline-Water Blends in Flex Fuel Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T.; Schramm, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The miscibility of blends of gasoline and hydrous ethanol was investigated experimentally at - 25 degrees C and - 2 degrees C. Furthermore, the maximum water content was found for ethanol in flex fuel blends. The results strongly indicate that blends containing ethanol with a water content above...... that of the ethanol/water azeotrope (4.4% water by mass) can be used as Flex Fuel blends together with gasoline at ambient temperatures of 25 degrees C and 2 degrees C, without phase separation occurring. Additionally, it was shown that the ethanol purity requirement of ethanol-rich flex fuel blends falls...... with increasing ethanol content in the gasoline-rich flex fuel blend....

  7. Multivariable H-Function with Application to Temperature Distribution in a Moving Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The Meijer's G-function has been obtained for the first time as a solution of a differential equation governing a heat conduction problem. The problem of temperature distribution in a moving medium between x = - 1 and x = 1 and having variable velocity and variable thermal conductivity is considered. Due to a general character of the G-function, many known and unknown results may be derived as particular cases. The modified multivariable H-function to obtain a particular solution has been employed.

  8. On the Prediction of α-Martensite Temperatures in Medium Manganese Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Baker, Daniel S.; Van Aken, David C.

    2017-02-01

    A new composition-based method for calculating the α-martensite start temperature in medium manganese steel is presented and uses a regular solution model to accurately calculate the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation, Δ G_{Chem}^{γ to α } . In addition, a compositional relationship for the strain energy contribution during martensitic transformation was developed using measured Young's moduli (E) reported in literature and measured values for steels produced during this investigation. An empirical relationship was developed to calculate Young's modulus using alloy composition and was used where dilatometry literature did not report Young's moduli. A comparison of the Δ G_{Chem}^{γ to α } normalized by dividing by the product of Young's modulus, unconstrained lattice misfit squared (δ 2), and molar volume (Ω) with respect to the measured α-martensite start temperatures, M_{S}^{α } , produced a single linear relationship for 42 alloys exhibiting either lath or plate martensite. A temperature-dependent strain energy term was then formulated as Δ G_{str}^{γ to α } ( {{J}/{mol}} ) = EΩ δ2 (14.8 - 0.013T) , which opposed the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation. M_{S}^{α } was determined at a temperature where Δ G_{Chem}^{γ to α } + Δ G_{str}^{γ to α } = 0 . The proposed M_{S}^{α } model shows an extended temperature range of prediction from 170 K to 820 K (-103 °C to 547 °C). The model is then shown to corroborate alloy chemistries that exhibit two-stage athermal martensitic transformations and two-stage TRIP behavior in three previously reported medium manganese steels. In addition, the model can be used to predict the retained γ-austenite in twelve alloys, containing ɛ-martensite, using the difference between the calculated M_{S}^{ɛ} and M_{S}^{α }.

  9. Dual-ion Conducting Nanocompoiste for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    wang, Xiaodi

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are considered as one of the most promising power generation technologies due to their high energy conversion efficiency, fuel flexibility and reduced pollution. There is a broad interest in reducing the operating temperature of SOFCs. The key issue to develop low-temperature (300~600 °C) SOFCs (LTSOFCs) is to explore new electrolyte materials. Recently, ceria-based composite electrolytes have been developed as capable alternative electrolyte for LTSOFCs. The ce...

  10. Temperature limits for LMFBR fuel cladding under upset and emergency operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, S.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam Tamilnadu (India). Nuclear Systems Division

    1996-07-01

    LMFBR fuel pin cladding tube is subjected to high transient temperatures during incidents such as pump trip, pump to grid plate pipe rupture etc. It is required to know temperature limits under such transient operating conditions for components involved while analyzing such incidents. A methodology for deriving such limits for fuel clad tube is worked out in this paper by making use of the transient damage correlation proposed by W.F. Brizes et. al.

  11. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    -1000 series MEAs by Pemeas, with an active area of 45cm2. The low pressure gas channels enable the use of low power blowers instead of a compressor which increases the overall system efficiency. This initial system was made to test the bipolar plate design, and there is no need for humidification...... of the species as in a LTPEM fuel cell system. The use of the HTPEM fuel cell makes it possible to use reformed gas at high CO concentrations, still with a stable efficient performance....

  12. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  13. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  14. Effects of urban green areas on air temperature in a medium-sized Argentinian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra S. Coronel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Urban climate is the result of both atmospheric and geographic factors affecting a region, as well as the morphology, structures and human activities in a city. Urban vegetation in particular affects this climate at a local scale and provides many other social, economic and ecological benefits. Thus, it is important to explore the effects of different green areas used for urban and periurban agriculture and forestry activities (UPAF on daily atmospheric temperature and the required degrees of cooling or refrigerating temperature. Comfort temperatures were defined using a range 18-24°C and analyzed using actual measured as well as forecasted temperatures using a future scenario. Actual temperatures were recorded from September 2013 to August 2014 using digital sensors across eight sites in Rosario, Argentina: three in the central core with no vegetation, one in the central core with street trees, one in an urban agriculture site, one in a public park and two in periurban agricultural areas. Results show that air temperature in the central core with no vegetation were higher than those in other sites with vegetation during day and night, with the exception of the temperatures measured at the central core site with street trees. Findings also show that temperature effects in urban agricultural gardens of approximately 0.2 ha were similar to those of gardens and public parks 2-3 ha in size. Three UPAF types were classified according to cooling degree days, which decreased in order from (1 central core with no trees; (2 central core with street trees and public parks; and (3 urban and periurban agriculture areas. Conversely, the opposite trends for heating degree days were found. Results from this study can be used for integrating UPAF measures into climate change mitigation and urban planning policies in medium-sized cities in the developing world.

  15. Plastic behavior of medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel at temperatures near g « a transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatometric techniques were used to build the continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagram for a medium carbon microalloyed steel; the microstructure and hardness were determined at different cooling rates. The mechanical behavior of the steel in the austenite field and at temperatures approaching austenite to ferrite transformation was measured by means of hot torsion tests under isothermal and continuous cooling conditions. The no recrystallization temperatures, Tnr, and start of phase transformation, Ar3, were determined under continuous cooling condition using mean flow stress vs. inverse of absolute temperature diagrams. Interruption of static recrystallization within the interpass time in the austenite field indicated that the start of vanadium carbonitride precipitation occurred under 860 °C. Austenite transformation was found to start at around 710 °C, a temperature similar to that measured by dilatometry, suggesting that interphase precipitation delays the transformation of deformed austenite. Pearlite was observed at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 600 °C, with the flow curves taking on a particular shape, i.e., stress rose sharply as strain was increased, reaching peak stress at low deformation, around 0.2, followed by an extensive softening region after peak stress.

  16. Heat transfer enhancement in medium temperature thermal energy storage system using a multitube heat transfer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis; Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    An experimental energy storage system has been designed using an horizontal shell and tube heat exchanger incorporating a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) with a melting point of 117.7 C. Two experimental configurations consisting of a control unit with one heat transfer tube and a multitube unit with four heat transfer tubes were studied. The thermal characteristics in the systems have been analysed using isothermal contour plots and temperature time curves. Temperature gradients along the three directions of the shell and tube systems; axial, radial and angular directions have been analysed and compared. The phase change in the multitube system was dominated by the effect of convective heat transfer compared to conductive heat transfer in the control system. The temperature gradient in the PCM during phase change was greatest in the radial direction for both the control and multitube systems. The temperature gradients recorded in the axial direction for the control and multitube systems during the change of phase were respectively 2.5 and 3.5% that of the radial direction, indicating essentially a two-dimensional heat transfer in the PCM. The onset of natural convection through the formation of multiple convective cells in the multitube system significantly altered the shape of the solid liquid interface fluid flow and indicates the requirement for an in-depth study of multitube arrangements. (author)

  17. PAPER-64 Constraints On Reionization II: The Temperature Of The z=8.4 Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Pober, Jonathan C; Parsons, Aaron R; McQuinn, Matthew; Aguirre, James E; Bernardi, Gianni; Bradley, Richard F; Carilli, Chris L; Cheng, Carina; DeBoer, David R; Dexter, Matthew R; Furlanetto, Steven R; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Horrell, Jasper; Jacobs, Daniel C; Klima, Patricia J; Kohn, Saul A; Liu, Adrian; MacMahon, David H E; Maree, Matthys; Mesinger, Andrei; Moore, David F; Razavi-Ghods, Nima; Stefan, Irina I; Walbrugh, William P; Walker, Andre; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2015-01-01

    We present constraints on both the kinetic temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z=8.4, and on models for heating the IGM at high-redshift with X-ray emission from the first collapsed objects. These constraints are derived using a semi-analytic method to explore the new measurements of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which were presented in a companion paper, Ali et al. (2015). Twenty-one cm power spectra with amplitudes of hundreds of mK^2 can be generically produced if the kinetic temperature of the IGM is significantly below the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB); as such, the new results from PAPER place lower limits on the IGM temperature at z=8.4. Allowing for the unknown ionization state of the IGM, our measurements find the IGM temperature to be above ~5 K for neutral fractions between 10% and 85%, above ~7 K for neutral fractions between 15% and 80%, or above ~10 K for neutral fractions betw...

  18. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...... of the MEA's is 160-180oC, depending on the purity of the hydrogen used, the load pattern and the desired lifetime. The advantages of the HTPEM fuel cell technology include fast response to load changes and high tolerance to CO (1-3%)...

  19. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  20. Preparation of solar selective absorbing CuO coating for medium temperature application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qunwu; WANG Yiping; LI Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    A new method of preparing CuO solar selective absorbing coating for medium temperature is presented.After pretreatment,brass was overlaid with CuO by chemical plating.The effects of reactant concentration,reaction temperature and reaction time on the absorptivity of CuO coating were investigated.The optimized condition of preparing CuO coating was obtained.The CuO coating was analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM).In order to prolong the period of use,the CuO coating was protected by TiO2.The experiment shows that the TiO2/CuO coating is more heat-resistant,acid-resistant,and wear resistant than CuO coating,without Iosing absorptivity markedly.The TiO2 coating can reduce emissivity and protect the CuO coating.

  1. Experimental Specifications for the Liquidus and the Solidus temperature of the Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. O.; Cho, C. H.; Lee, Y. B.; Ryu, H. J

    2008-01-15

    There are some phenomenological uncertainties for partial or whole core melting of Sodium-cooled fast reactor with the metal fuel. Especially, the major phenomenology to be experimentally resolved is the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above-core and below-core structures and possibly in inter-subassembly spaces. For suspect to these phenomenological uncertainties, we are required to understand characteristic behavior of molten fuel. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling that is one of the technical issue for safety of Gen IV SFR is an essential condition to solve the problem of in vessel retention of the core debris. For these sequences, experimental data for liquidus/solidus temperature and mobilization temperature of metal fuel are required essentially. In this study, review of the technical status on the liquidus/solidus temperature of metal fuel was carried out to investigate the behavior of liquidus/solidus/relocation of metal fuel. Also, the experimental specifications for the liquidus/solidus temperature of metal fuel were established.

  2. Charring temperatures are driven by the fuel types burned in a peatland wildfire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Hudspith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands represent a globally important carbon store; however, the human exploitation of this ecosystem is increasing both the frequency and severity of fires on drained peatlands. Yet, the interactions between the hydrological conditions (ecotopes, the fuel types being burned, the burn severity, and the charring temperatures (pyrolysis intensity remain poorly understood. Here we present a post-burn assessment of a fire on a lowland raised bog in Co. Offaly, Ireland (All Saints Bog. Three burn severities were identified in the field (light, moderate, and deeply burned, and surface charcoals were taken from 17 sites across all burn severities. Charcoals were classified into two fuel type categories (either ground or aboveground fuel and the reflectance of each charcoal particle was measured under oil using reflectance microscopy. Charcoal reflectance shows a positive relationship with charring temperature and as such can be used as a temperature proxy to reconstruct minimum charring temperatures after a fire event. Resulting median reflectance values for ground fuels are 1.09 ± 0.32%Romedian, corresponding to estimated minimum charring temperatures of 447°C ± 49°C. In contrast, the median charring temperatures of aboveground fuels were found to be considerably higher, 646°C ± 73°C (3.58 ± 0.77%Romedian. A mixed-effects modelling approach was used to demonstrate that the interaction effects of burn severity, as well as ecotope classes, on the charcoal reflectance is small compared to the main effect of fuel type. Our findings reveal that the different fuel types on raised bogs are capable of charring at different temperatures within the same fire, and that the pyrolysis intensity of the fire on All Saints Bog was primarily driven by the fuel types burning, with only a weak association to the burn severity or ecotope classes.

  3. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    demands for this. A 1kW fuel cell stack with optimized  ow plates was heated in 5 minutes using the introduction of an electrical air pre-heater. Using pure hydrogen in compressed form is problematic due to the very small density of hydrogen, even at high pressures. Hydrogen is a very energy e-cient gas...

  4. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroichi; Ueta, Shouhei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  5. Modelling and Evaluation of Heating Strategies for High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on two different cathode air cooled high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stacks; a 30 cell 400W prototype stack using two bipolar plates per cell, and a 65 cell 1 kW commercial stack using one bipolar plate per cell. The work seeks to examine the use of different...... heating strategies and find a strategy suited for fast startup of the HTPEM fuel cell stacks. Fast start-up of these high temperature systems enables use in a wide range of applications, such as automotive and auxiliary power units, where immediate system response is needed. The development of a dynamic...... model to simulate the temperature development of a fuel cell stack during heating can be used for assistance in system and control design. The heating strategies analyzed and tested reduced the startup time of one of the fuel cell stacks from 1 h to about 6 min....

  6. Estimated performance of an adaptive trailing-edge device aimed at reducing fuel consumption on a medium-size aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodati, Gianluca; Concilio, Antonio; Ricci, Sergio; De Gaspari, Alessandro; Huvelin, Fabien; Dumont, Antoine; Godard, Jean-Luc

    2013-03-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of the performance of a medium-size aircraft (3-hour flight range) equipped with an adaptive trailing edge device (ATED) that runs span-wise from the wing root in the flap zone and extends chord-wise for a limited percentage of the MAC. Computations are calculated referring to the full wing and do not refer to the complete aircraft configuration. Aerodynamic computations, taking into account ideal shapes, have been performed by using both Euler and Navier- Stokes method in order to extract the wing polars for the reference and the optimal wing, implementing an ATED, deflected upwards and downwards. A comparison of the achieved results is discussed. Considering the shape domain, a suitable interpolation procedure has been set up to obtain the wing polar envelop of the adaptive wing, intended as the set of "best" values, picked by each different polar. At the end, the performances of the complete reference and adaptive wing are computed and compared for a symmetric, centered, leveled and steady cruise flight for a medium size aircraft. A significant fuel burn reduction estimate or, alternatively, an increased range capability is demonstrated, with margins of further improvements. The research leading to these results has gratefully received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007- 2013) under Grant Agreement n° 284562.

  7. Medium-speed diesel engineers: part I-design trends and the use of residual/blended fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lio, X.Q.; Law, C.K.; Wang, C.H.

    1984-10-01

    The heating and gasification of a fuel droplet during the intake and compression strokes of an SI engine are modeled. Results show that the simultaneous increases in the gas temperature and pressure during compression tend to have compensatory effects on the droplet gasification rate such that it remains somewhat insensitive to changes in the cylinder environment. Generalized results are presented allowing for the assessment of the lower and upper bounds in the initial size of the droplet that can achieve complete gasification prior to the end of the compression stroke.

  8. Experimental investigation on circumferential and axial temperature gradient over fuel channel under LOCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashwini Kumar; kumar, Ravi; Gupta, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Barun; Mukhopadhyay, Deb; Lele, H. G.

    2014-06-01

    In a nuclear reactor temperature rises drastically in fuel channels under loss of coolant accident due to failure of primary heat transportation system. Present investigation has been carried out to capture circumferential and axial temperature gradients during fully and partially voiding conditions in a fuel channel using 19 pin fuel element simulator. A series of experiments were carried out by supplying power to outer, middle and center rods of 19 pin fuel simulator in ratio of 1.4:1.1:1. The temperature at upper periphery of pressure tube (PT) was slightly higher than at bottom due to increase in local equivalent thermal conductivity from top to bottom of PT. To simulate fully voided conditions PT was pressurized at 2.0 MPa pressure with 17.5 kW power injection. Ballooning initiated from center and then propagates towards the ends and hence axial temperature difference has been observed along the length of PT. For asymmetric heating, upper eight rods of fuel simulator were activated and temperature difference up-to 250 °C has been observed from top to bottom periphery of PT. Such situation creates steep circumferential temperature gradient over PT and could lead to breaching of PT under high pressure.

  9. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Systems using Methanol Reformers with Air or Liquid Heat Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the ongoing development of high temperature PEM fuel cell systems fuelled by steam reformed methanol. Various fuel cell system solutions exist, they mainly differ depending on the desired fuel used. High temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells offer the possibility of using...... methanol is converted to a hydrogen rich gas with CO2 trace amounts of CO, the increased operating temperatures allow the fuel cell to tolerate much higher CO concentrations than Nafion-based membranes. The increased tolerance to CO also enables the use of reformer systems with less hydrogen cleaning steps...... liquid fuels such as methanol, due to the increased robustness of operating at higher temperatures (160-180oC). Using liquid fuels such as methanol removes the high volume demands of compressed hydrogen storages, simplifies refueling, and enables the use of existing fuel distribution systems. The liquid...

  10. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Systems using Methanol Reformers with Air or Liquid Heat Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Justesen, Kristian Kjær

    The present work describes the ongoing development of high temperature PEM fuel cell systems fuelled by steam reformed methanol. Various fuel cell system solutions exist, they mainly differ depending on the desired fuel used. High temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells offer the possibility of using...... methanol is converted to a hydrogen rich gas with CO2 trace amounts of CO, the increased operating temperatures allow the fuel cell to tolerate much higher CO concentrations than Nafion-based membranes. The increased tolerance to CO also enables the use of reformer systems with less hydrogen cleaning steps...... liquid fuels such as methanol, due to the increased robustness of operating at higher temperatures (160-180oC). Using liquid fuels such as methanol removes the high volume demands of compressed hydrogen storages, simplifies refueling, and enables the use of existing fuel distribution systems. The liquid...

  11. Direct dimethyl ether fueling of a high temperature polymer fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Vassiliev, Anton; Olsen, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Direct dimethyl ether (DME) fuel cells suffer from poor DME–water miscibility and so far peak powers of only 20–40 mW cm−2 have been reported. Based on available literature on solubility of dimethyl ether (DME) in water at ambient pressure it was estimated that the maximum concentration of DME at...

  12. Quantifying the effects of heating temperature, and combined effects of heating medium pH and recovery medium pH on the heat resistance of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguérinel, I; Spegagne, I; Couvert, O; Coroller, L; Mafart, P

    2007-05-01

    The influence of heating treatment temperature, pH of heating and recovery medium on the survival kinetics of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13311 is studied and quantified. From each non-log linear survival curve, Weibull model parameters were estimated. An average shape parameter value of 1.67 was found, which is characteristic of downward concavity curves and is in agreement with values estimated from other S. typhimurium strains. Bigelow type models quantifying the heating temperature, heating and recovery medium pH influences are fitted on scale parameter delta data (time of first decimal reduction), which reflects the bacterial heat resistance. The estimate of z(T) (4.64 degrees C) is in the range of values given in the literature for this species. The influence of pH of the heating medium on the scale parameter (z(pH): 8.25) is lower than that of the recovery pH medium influence (z(')(pH): 3.65).

  13. Heat and fuel coupled operation of a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell with a heat exchanger methanol steam reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, G.; Vázquez, F. Vidal; Waiblinger, W.; Auvinen, S.; Ribeirinha, P.

    2017-04-01

    In this work a methanol steam reforming (MSR) reactor has been operated thermally coupled to a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack (HT-PEMFC) utilizing its waste heat. The operating temperature of the coupled system was 180 °C which is significantly lower than the conventional operating temperature of the MSR process which is around 250 °C. A newly designed heat exchanger reformer has been developed by VTT (Technical Research Center of Finland LTD) and was equipped with commercially available CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 (BASF RP-60) catalyst. The liquid cooled, 165 cm2, 12-cell stack used for the measurements was supplied by Serenergy A/S. The off-heat from the electrochemical fuel cell reaction was transferred to the reforming reactor using triethylene glycol (TEG) as heat transfer fluid. The system was operated up to 0.4 A cm-2 generating an electrical power output of 427 Wel. A total stack waste heat utilization of 86.4% was achieved. It has been shown that it is possible to transfer sufficient heat from the fuel cell stack to the liquid circuit in order to provide the needed amount for vaporizing and reforming of the methanol-water-mixture. Furthermore a set of recommendations is given for future system design considerations.

  14. An earthquake transient method for pebble-bed reactors and a fuel temperature model for TRISO fueled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Javier

    This investigation is divided into two general topics: (1) a new method for analyzing the safe shutdown earthquake event in a pebble bed reactor core, and (2) the development of an explicit tristructural-isotropic fuel model for high temperature reactors. The safe shutdown earthquake event is one of the design basis accidents for the pebble bed reactor. The new method captures the dynamic geometric compaction of the pebble bed core. The neutronic and thermal-fluids grids are dynamically re-meshed to simulate the re-arrangement of the pebbles in the reactor during the earthquake. Results are shown for the PBMR-400 assuming it is subjected to the Idaho National Laboratory's design basis earthquake. The study concludes that the PBMR-400 can safely withstand the reactivity insertions induced by the slumping of the core and the resulting relative withdrawal of the control rods. This characteristic stems from the large negative Doppler feedback of the fuel. This Doppler feedback mechanism is a major contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors that use fuel based on TRISO particles. The correct prediction of the magnitude and time-dependence of this feedback effect is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed in this work and incorporated in the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with more complex methods, requiring multi-TRISO calculations within one control volume. The performance of the code during fast and moderately-slow transients is verified. These analyses show how explicit TRISO models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature, and consequently, of the power escalation. In addition, a brief study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap inside the TRISO particles is included

  15. Liquid fuel film ignition delay times on the substrate heated up to high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonov D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer processes under the conditions of unsteady evaporation and boiling of the liquid fuel film in coordination with the substrate heated up to high temperatures were investigated. The film thickness values and the substrate temperature (whereby the ignition conditions are not implemented were determined. The film thickness values and the substrate temperature (whereby as low as practicable ignition delay times are provided were found. The differences of liquid fuel film ignition condition under the local heating and the interoperating with the massive heating source were analyzed.

  16. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  17. Nano-electrocatalyst materials for low temperature fuel cells:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Vignarooban; J. Lin; A. Arvay; S. Kolli; I. Kruusenberg; K. Tammeveski; L. Munukutla; A. M. Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature fuel cells are an attractive technology for transportation and residential applica‐tions due to their quick start up and shut down capabilities. This review analyzed the current status of nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells and alkaline membrane fuel cells. The preparation process influences the performance of the nanocatalyst. Several synthesis methods are covered for noble and non‐noble metal catalysts on various catalyst supports including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, nanowires, and graphenes. Ex situ and in situ characterization methods like scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fuel cell testing of the nanocatalysts on various supports for both proton exchange and alkaline membrane fuel cells are discussed. The accelerated durability estimate of the nanocat‐alysts, predicted by measuring changes in the electrochemically active surface area using a voltage cycling method, is considered one of the most reliable and valuable method for establishing durabil‐ity.

  18. Durability of symmetrically and asymmetrically porous polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheng, Li-Cheng; Chang, Wesley Jen-Yang; Hsu, Steve Lien-Chung; Cheng, Po-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Two types of porous polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes with symmetric and asymmetric morphologies were fabricated by the template-leaching method and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Their physicochemical properties were compared in terms of acid-doping level, proton conductivity, mechanical strength, and oxidative stability. The durability of fuel cell operation is one of the most challenging for the PBI based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) used in high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). In the present work, we carried out a long-term steady-state fuel cell test to compare the effect of membrane structure on the cell voltage degradation. It has also been demonstrated that the asymmetrically porous PBI could bring some notable improvements on the durability of fuel cell operation, the fuel crossover problem, and the phosphoric acid leakage.

  19. Hybrid solar receiver as a source of high-temperature medium for an absorption chiller supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przenzak, Estera; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the problems related with the cold production, i.e. energy efficiency of the process. The idea of solar cooling systems has been presented as the solution of the problem of big electricity demand. The paper discusses the principle of the operation of absorption chillers. Disadvantages and advantages of the solar cooling systems were discussed. The installation for manufacturing high-temperature heat based on solar collectors and concentrator of solar radiation constructed in AGH in Cracow has been presented. This installation is a first stage of projected, complete solar cooling system. The special attention is paid to the dedicated solar high-temperature heat receiver as a most important element of the system. The achieved values of temperature, power and efficiency depending on the working medium flow has been presented and discussed. The intensity of solar radiation during the measurements has been taken into account. Two versions of heat receiver were investigated: non-insulated and insulated with mineral wool. The obtained efficiency of the heat receiver (less than 30%) is not satisfactory but possibility of improvements exist.

  20. Hybrid solar receiver as a source of high-temperature medium for an absorption chiller supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przenzak Estera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the problems related with the cold production, i.e. energy efficiency of the process. The idea of solar cooling systems has been presented as the solution of the problem of big electricity demand. The paper discusses the principle of the operation of absorption chillers. Disadvantages and advantages of the solar cooling systems were discussed. The installation for manufacturing high-temperature heat based on solar collectors and concentrator of solar radiation constructed in AGH in Cracow has been presented. This installation is a first stage of projected, complete solar cooling system. The special attention is paid to the dedicated solar high-temperature heat receiver as a most important element of the system. The achieved values of temperature, power and efficiency depending on the working medium flow has been presented and discussed. The intensity of solar radiation during the measurements has been taken into account. Two versions of heat receiver were investigated: non-insulated and insulated with mineral wool. The obtained efficiency of the heat receiver (less than 30% is not satisfactory but possibility of improvements exist.

  1. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350 W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a control strategy for controlling the methanol reformer temperature of a 350 W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system, by using a cascade control structure for reliable system operation. The primary states affecting the methanol catalyst bed temperature...... is the water and methanol mixture fuel flow and the burner fuel/air ratio and combined flow. An experimental setup is presented capable of testing the methanol reformer used in the Serenergy H3 350 Mobile Battery Charger; a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell system....... The experimental system consists of a fuel evaporator utilizing the high temperature waste gas from the cathode air cooled 45 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack. The fuel cells used are BASF P1000 MEAs which use phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. The resulting reformate gas output of the reformer system...

  2. Thermally activated decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As thin layer at medium temperature post growth annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, Y.; Konstantynov, P.; Domagala, J.; Sadowski, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Syryanyy, Y.; Demchenko, I. N.

    2016-05-01

    The redistribution of Mn atoms in Ga1-xMnxAs layer during medium-temperature annealing, 250-450 oC, by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) recorded at ALBA facility, was studied. For this purpose Ga1-xMnxAs thin layer with x=0.01 was grown on AlAs buffer layer deposited on GaAs(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by annealing. The examined layer was detached from the substrate using a “lift-off” procedure in order to eliminate elastic scattering in XAFS spectra. Fourier transform analysis of experimentally obtained EXAFS spectra allowed to propose a model which describes a redistribution/diffusion of Mn atoms in the host matrix. Theoretical XANES spectra, simulated using multiple scattering formalism (FEFF code) with the support of density functional theory (WIEN2k code), qualitatively describe the features observed in the experimental fine structure.

  3. INFLUENCE OF FUEL TEMPERATURE ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE OPERATING WITH BIODIESEL BLEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafidah Rahim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of the effect of temperature on diesel engine performance using a 5% biodiesel blend. A one-dimensional numerical analysis is used to simulate the four-cylinder diesel engine. The diesel engine simulation is used to study the characteristics of engine performance when the engine is operating with a fuel blend as an alternative fuel. The simulations are conducted at full load conditions where the temperature varies from 300 to 500 K. The results show that the maximum brake power and brake torque reduction was 1.39% and 1.13%, respectively for an engine operating with a fuel blend. It is shown that the insignificant different due to the small gap between energy content values. A decrease in the lower heating value caused an increase in the brake specific fuel consumption and thus, a reduction in the brake thermal efficiency of the engine performance at full load.

  4. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Materials technology reactor operating experience medium-enriched-uranium fuel development. Quarterly progress report for the period ending April 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaae, J. L.; Lai, G. Y.; Thompson, L. D.; Sheehan, J. E.; Rosenwasser, S. N.; Johnson, W. R.; Li, C. C.; Pieren, W. R.; Smith, A. B.; Holko, K. H.; Baenteli, G. J.; Cheung, K. C.; Orr, J. D.; Potter, R. C.; Baxter, A.; Bell, W.; Lane, R.; Wunderlich, R. G.; Neylan, A. J.

    1978-05-01

    The work reported includes the development of the materials properties data base for noncore components, plant surveillance and testing performed at Fort St. Vrain, and work to demonstrate the feasibility of using medium-enriched fuel in Fort St. Vrain. Studies and analyses plus experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  5. HTGR Generic Technology Program: materials technology reactor; operating experience; medium-enriched-uranium fuel development. Quarterly progress report for the period ending July 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The work reported includes the development of the materials properties data base for noncore components, plant surveillance and testing performed at Fort St. Vrain, and work to demonstrate the feasibility of using medium-enriched fuel in Fort St. Vrain. Studies and analyses plus experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  6. Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D H; Fisk, W; Apte, M G; Wu, X; Trout, A; Faulkner, D; Sullivan, D

    2012-08-01

    This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Electrolytes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, F.P.F. van; Christie, G.M.; Heuveln, F.H. van; Huijsmans, J.P.P. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Self-supported electrolytes and electrode supported electrolytes of zirconia and ceria have been developed by means of tape casting. The conductivity data of these compounds have been obtained. Cell tests with these materials were conducted in the temperature range of 600 to 800 C. Operation of SOFC within this temperature range has been shown to be feasible.

  8. Numerical Prediction of Dual-Cooled Annular Fuel Temperature During Control Rod Ejection Accident in OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Eun; In, Wang Kee; Yang, Soo Hyung; Chun, Tae Hyun; Song, Kun Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A dual-cooled annular fuel concept for a light water reactor has been introduced by MIT for a significant amount of reactor power uprate. MIT proposed a 13x13 annular fuel array replacing the 17x17 solid fuel in the Westinghouse 4-loop plant, which could increase the core power up to 50% with the considerable changes in the major reactor components. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is also conducting a research to develop a dual-cooled fuel for its employment in an optimized pressurized water reactor in Korea, OPR1000. The dual-cooled fuel for the OPR1000 is targeted to increase the reactor power by 20% as well as reduce the fuel-pellet temperature by more than 30% without a change to the reactor components other than the fuel. Numerous technical tasks exist for assessing the applicability of the dual cooled annular fuel to the power uprate in the OPR1000. One of the important tasks is to evaluate the performance of the annular fuel during the design basis events. Particularly, the fuel temperature and the peak cladding temperature (PCT) are the important variables during the control rod ejection accident (REA), since the rod averaged fuel enthalpy should be lower than its safety limit. The fuel enthalpy is known to largely depend on the fuel temperature. This paper presents the predictions of the fuel and peak cladding temperatures during the REA. A general-purpose structural code, ABAQUS-6.8 and a computational fluid dynamics code, ANSYS CFX-11.0 were used to perform the numerical analysis of a heat transfer in the annular fuel as well as the solid fuel. The numerical predictions of the fuel maximum temperature (FMT) and PCT are compared against those predicted by a best-estimate system transient analysis code, MARS.

  9. Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

    2009-11-01

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  10. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. S.; Christidis, N.; Stott, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC), produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm-2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm-2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Production of ethanol at high temperatures in the fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke juice and a simple medium by Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, M.F.; Correia, I.S.; Novais, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Temperatures as high as 36 degrees C and 40 degrees C did not negatively affect the ethanol productivity of Jerusalem artichoke (J.a.) juice batch fermentation and the final concentrations of ethanol were close to those produced at lower temperatures. At higher process temperatures (36-40 degrees C), ethanol toxicity in Kluyveromyces marxianus was less important during the fermentation of J.a. juice as compared with a simple medium. In simple medium, the heat-sticking of fermentation was observed and the percentage of unfermented sugars steeply increased from 28 degrees C up to 40 degrees C. (Refs. 13).

  12. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  13. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    consists of a prototype cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes and runs on pure hydrogen in a dead-end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack...

  14. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  15. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June-Hyung; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Oon; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Jung, Yang-Hong; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The U and Pu constituents in the fuel, however, tend to interact metallurgically with iron-based claddings at elevated temperatures during nominal steady-state operating conditions and off-normal reactor events. In particular, if the temperature is raised above the eutectic temperature of metallic fuel, e.g., in an off-normal reactor event, the fuel can form a mixture of liquid and solid phases that may promote further cladding interaction. Such fuel-cladding chemical interaction, in conjunction with fission gas pressure loading, can potentially shorten fuel pin lifetime and eventually cause cladding breach. In this work, microstructure observation results through microscope, SEM and EPMA are reported for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate is compared with the prediction value by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modelling purposes. Microstructure of the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slug with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test were investigated through the microscope, SEM and EPMA. Also, the measured maximum eutectic penetration rate along cladding direction was compared with the prediction value by existing eutectic penetration correlation. In the case of U-10Zr/T92 specimen, migration phenomena of U, Zr, and Fe as well as Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was almost similar to prediction value by existing eutectic penetration rate correlation.

  16. Determination of optimal reformer temperature in a reformed methanol fuel cell system using ANFIS models and numerical optimization methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for choosing the optimal reformer temperature for a reformed methanol fuel cell system is presented based on a case study of a H3 350 module produced by Serenergy A/S. The method is based on ANFIS models of the dependence of the reformer output gas composition on the reformer...... temperature and fuel flow, and the dependence of the fuel cell voltage on the fuel cell temperature, current and anode supply gas CO content. These models are combined to give a matrix of system efficiencies at different fuel cell currents and reformer temperatures. This matrix is then used to find...... the reformer temperature which gives the highest efficiency for each fuel cell current. The average of this optimal efficiency curve is 32.11% and the average efficiency achieved using the standard constant temperature is 30.64% an increase of 1.47 percentage points. The gain in efficiency is 4 percentage...

  17. Development of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, W.T.; Goldstein, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The historical focus of the electric utility industry has been central station power plants. These plants are usually sited outside urban areas and electricity was delivered via high voltage transmission lines. Several things are beginning to change this historical precedent One is the popular concern with EMF as a health hazard. This has rendered the construction of new lines as well as upgrading old ones very difficult. Installation of power generating equipment near the customer enables the utility to better utilize existing transmission and distribution networks and defer investments. Power quality and lark of disturbances and interruptions is also becoming increasingly more important to many customers. Grid connected, but dedicated small power plants can greatly improve power quality. Finally the development of high efficiency, low emission, modular fuel cells promises near pollution free localized power generation with an efficiency equal to or exceeding that of even the most efficient central power stations.

  18. Exergy Assessment of Recovery Solutions from Dry and Moist Gas Available at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhel Ayachi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-EESI ENERGY ReCOvery from Low Temperature heat sources (ENERCO_LT project is a waste heat recovery project that aims to reduce energy consumption in industrial gas production sites, by producing electrical power from exothermic processes discharges at low and medium temperature. Two promising thermal sources, consisting of: (i almost dry gas flow at 165 °C and (ii moist gas flow at 150 °C with a dew point at 60 °C, were then investigated. In this paper, the challenge was to discern suitable recovery solutions facing resource specificities and their thermodynamic constraints, in order to minimize the overall exergy destruction, i.e., to move up the exergy efficiency of the entire system. In this spirit, different designs, including Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs and CO2 transcritical cycles, operating as simple and cascade cycles, were investigated. Combined exergy analysis and pinch optimization was performed to identify the potential of various working fluids, by their properties, to overcome the global irreversibility according to the studied resource. Supercritical parameters of various working fluids are investigated too, and seem to bring promising results regarding system performances.

  19. Combustion studies of coal derived solid fuels by thermogravimetric analysis. III. Correlation between burnout temperature and carbon combustion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; DeBarr, J.A.; Chen, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    Burning profiles of 35-53 ??m size fractions of an Illinois coal and three partially devolatilized coals prepared from the original coal were obtained using a thermogravimetric analyzer. The burning profile burnout temperatures were higher for lower volatile fuels and correlated well with carbon combustion efficiencies of the fuels when burned in a laboratory-scale laminar flow reactor. Fuels with higher burnout temperatures had lower carbon combustion efficiencies under various time-temperature conditions in the laboratory-scale reactor. ?? 1990.

  20. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  1. Optimization of In Vitro Conservation Protocol of Carica pubescens Lenne & K. Koch through Medium Concentration, Temperature and Irradiation Duration Decrease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enni Suwarsi Rahayu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carica pubescens Lenne & K. Koch, an endemic species in Dieng mountains, must be conserved. The in vitro conservation has been developed, but sub-culture period needs to be extended. This study aimed to obtain a more efficient in vitro conservation protocol of C. pubescens. The research was carried out experimentally by using a completely randomized factorial design with three factors, namely decreasing in storage medium concentration (75% and 50% of MS medium, temperature (4oC and 8°C, and irradiation duration (8 hours/day and 16 hours/day. Shoots were kept in the storage medium for 6, 9 and 12 months, then their viability were tested by growing them in the regeneration medium. Data were analyzed by Analyses of Variance and Least Significant Difference Test. The results showed that medium concentration of 50% of MS, the temperature of 8 °C, and 16 hours/day of irradiation were able to suppress the C. pubescens growth in vitro storage for six months and could maintain its viability in the regeneration medium. Based on these results the medium concentration of 50% of MS, the temperature of 8 °C and 16 hours/day irradiation can be used for in vitro conservation of C. pubescens without sub-culture for six months. How to CiteRahayu, E., & Habibah, N. (2016. Optimization of In Vitro Conservation Protocol of Carica pubescens Lenne & K. Koch through Medium Concentration, Temperature and Irradiation Duration Decrease. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(1, 85-93.

  2. High temperature nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus measurement in a neutron-irradiated fuel cladding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kese, K.; Olsson, P. A. T.; Alvarez Holston, A.-M.; Broitman, E.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoindentation, in combination with scanning probe microscopy, has been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus in the hydride and matrix of a high burn-up neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding material in the temperature range 25-300 °C. The matrix hardness was found to decrease only slightly with increasing temperature while the hydride hardness was essentially constant within the temperature range. Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature for both the hydride and the matrix of the high burn-up fuel cladding material. The hydride Young's modulus and hardness were higher than those of the matrix in the temperature range.

  3. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  4. Photo-Activated Low Temperature, Micro Fuel Cell Power Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry L. Tuller

    2007-03-30

    A Key objective of this program is to identify electrodes that will make it possible to significantly reduce the operating temperature of micro-SOFC and thin film-based SOFCs. Towards this end, efforts are directed towards: (a) identifying the key rate limiting steps which limit presently utilized electrodes from performing at reduced temperatures, as well as, (b) investigating the use of optical, as opposed to thermal energy, as a means for photocatalyzing electrode reactions and enabling reduced operating temperatures. During Phase I, the following objectives were achieved: (a) assembly and testing of our unique Microprobe Thin Film Characterization System; (b) fabrication of the model cathode materials system in thin film form by both PLD and ink jet printing; and (c) the successful configuration and testing of the model materials as cathodes in electrochemical cells. A further key objective (d) to test the potential of illumination in enhancing electrode performance was also achieved.

  5. A Chandra Study of Temperature Distributions of the Intracluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of the intracluster medium temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind it, we analyze the X-ray spectra from a sample of 50 clusters that were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument over the past 15 years and measure the radial temperature profiles out to 0.45r500. We construct a physical model that takes into consideration the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, active galactic nucleus feedback, and thermal conduction), and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. For further validation, we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to ≳0.3r500) and Suzaku (out to ≳1.5r500) and fit their Chandra spectra with our model. We then compare the extrapolation of the best fits with the Suzaku measurements and find that the model profiles agree with the Suzaku results very well in seven clusters. In the remaining two clusters the difference between the model and the observation is possibly caused by local thermal substructures. Our study also implies that for most of the clusters the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium is safe out to at least 0.5r500 and the non-gravitational interactions between dark matter and its luminous counterparts is consistent with zero.

  6. Challenges for new electro catalysts development for the ORR in acid medium for PEM fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratory of New Materials for Electrochemistry and Energy

    2010-07-01

    The low kinetic rate at the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts in acid mediums is one of the most limiting factors for the industrial mass production of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). New electrocatalyst materials are currently being investigated by researchers as a replacement for Pt include lignited ruthenium-based chalcogenides; pyrolized iron (Fe) porphyrins; metal carbides; and molybdenum (Mo), iridium (Ir) and cobalt (Co) based catalysts. Co-polypyrrole is also being considered as a non-noble catalyst. This presentation discussed the main parameters that limit the ORR of non-noble catalysts in PEMFC applications. Palladium (Pa) based bi-metallic alloys were investigated. The study showed that Pd-alloy catalysts exhibit excellent activity for the ORR in acidic media. The highest electrocatalytic activity was demonstrated in an alloy composition of 60 per cent Pd. The cost of Pd was compared to the cost of Pt. The intrinsic metal surface properties of Pd-alloys were also discussed, and the onset potential of the ORR was compared for various alloys. 31 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Re-energizing energy supply: Electrolytically-produced hydrogen as a flexible energy storage medium and fuel for road transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, Bernd; Schiebahn, Sebastian; Görner, Klaus; Lindenberger, Dietmar; Markewitz, Peter; Merten, Frank; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    ;Energiewende;, which roughly translates as the transformation of the German energy sector in accordance with the imperatives of climate change, may soon become a byword for the corresponding processes most other developed countries are at various stages of undergoing. Germany's notable progress in this area offers valuable insights that other states can draw on in implementing their own transitions. The German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) is making its own contribution to achieving the Energiewende's ambitious objectives: in addition to funding an array of 'clean and green' projects, the Virtual Institute Power to Gas and Heat was established as a consortium of seven scientific and technical organizations whose aim is to inscribe a future, renewable-based German energy system with adequate flexibility. Thus, it is tasked with conceiving of and evaluating suitable energy path options. This paper outlines one of the most promising of these pathways, which is predicated on the use of electrolytically-produced hydrogen as an energy storage medium, as well as the replacement of hydrocarbon-based fuel for most road vehicles. We describe and evaluate this path and place it in a systemic context, outlining a case study from which other countries and federated jurisdictions therein may draw inspiration.

  8. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Emilia Satoshi Miyamaru; Yoshito, Walter Kenji; Ussui, Valter; Lazar, Dolores Ribeiro Ricci; Castanho, Sonia Regina Homem de Mello; Paschoal, Jose Octavio Armani [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmiyseo@net.ipen.br

    2004-03-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of N Ox and S Ox emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 deg C) used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute) in Sao Paulo, have been presented. (author)

  9. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Satoshi Miyamaru Seo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of NOx and SOx emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 °C used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute in São Paulo, have been presented.

  10. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum...

  11. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

    2010-09-30

    In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

  12. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  13. Temperature and performance variations along single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Bertrand; Roberge, Réal; Savoie, Sylvio; Napporn, Teko W.; Meunier, Michel

    The catalytic activity of single chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) with respect to hydrocarbon fuels induces a major overheating of the fuel cell, temperature variations along its length, and changes in the original fuel/air composition mainly over the anode component. This paper assesses the temperature gradients and the variations in performance along electrolyte-supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM cells fed with methane gas. The investigations are performed in a useful range of CH 4/O 2 ratios between 1.0 and 2.0, in which the furnace temperature and flow rate of methane-air mixtures are held constant at 700 °C and 450 sccm, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to sense the temperature at the location where smaller size cathodes are positioned on the opposite side of a full-size anode. Due to temperature increases, cells always perform better when the small cathodes are located at the inlet as well as at a CH 4/O 2 ratio of 1.0. With an increase in ratio, the results show the presence of artefacts due to the use of an active LSM material for the combustion of methane, and open-type gas distribution plates for the single chamber reactor.

  14. Porous Carbon Materials for Elements in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlodarczyk R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The porosity, distribution of pores, shape of pores and specific surface area of carbon materials were investigated. The study of sintered graphite and commercial carbon materials used in low-temperature fuel cells (Graphite Grade FU, Toray Teflon Treated was compared. The study covered measurements of density, microstructural examinations and wettability (contact angle of carbon materials. The main criterion adopted for choosing a particular material for components of fuel cells is their corrosion resistance under operating conditions of hydrogen fuel cells. In order to determine resistance to corrosion in the environment of operation of fuel cells, potentiokinetic curves were registered for synthetic solution 0.1M H2SO4+ 2 ppmF-at 80°C.

  15. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... of phosphates were systematically reviewed including solid acids or alkali hydrogen phosphates, pyrophosphates, and rare earth metal phosphates. Demonstration of the fuel cell technology based on solid acid proton conductor CsH2PO4 has inspired the active research in the area. Based on the literature survey...

  16. A comprehensive review of PBI-based high temperature PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon Araya, Samuel; Zhou, Fan; Liso, Vincenzo;

    2016-01-01

    The current status on the understanding of the various operational aspects of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) has been summarized. The paper focuses on phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based HT-PEMFCs and an overview of the common practices...... are outlined. Catalyst degradation and electrolyte loss take place at higher rates in the beginning of life of the fuel cell. This is due to the smaller size of Pt particles and the presence of excess phosphoric acid in the beginning of life that favor the respective degradation. Therefore, the redistribution...... of phosphoric acid in the membrane and the electrodes is crucial for the proper activation of the fuel cell, and a startup procedure should take this into account in order to avoid beginning of life degradation. On-line monitoring of the fuel cell system's state of health using diagnostic tools can help detect...

  17. Hydroxide Self-Feeding High-Temperature Alkaline Direct Formate Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinshi; Sun, Xianda; Feng, Ying

    2017-03-11

    Conventionally, both the thermal degradation of the anion-exchange membrane and the requirement of additional hydroxide for fuel oxidation reaction hinder the development of the high-temperature alkaline direct liquid fuel cells. The present work addresses these two issues by reporting a polybenzimidazole-membrane-based direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). Theoretically, the cell voltage of the high-temperature alkaline DFFC can be as high as 1.45 V at 90 °C. It has been demonstrated that a proof-of-concept alkaline DFFC without adding additional hydroxide yields a peak power density of 20.9 mW cm(-2) , an order of magnitude higher than both alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells and alkaline direct methanol fuel cells, mainly because the hydrolysis of formate provides enough OH(-) ions for formate oxidation reaction. It was also found that this hydroxide self-feeding high-temperature alkaline DFFC shows a stable 100 min constant-current discharge at 90 °C, proving the conceptual feasibility.

  18. Analytical Solution of Fick's Law of the TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles and Fuel Elements in Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jian-Zhu; FANG Chao; SUN Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    T wo kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytica,solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.%@@ Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models(Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly.Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented,respectively.The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system,a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element.Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.

  19. Organic transistors making use of room temperature ionic liquids as gating medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Jonathan Javier Sayago

    The ability to couple ionic and electronic transport in organic transistors, based on pi conjugated organic materials for the transistor channel, can be particularly interesting to achieve low voltage transistor operation, i.e. below 1 V. The operation voltage in typical organic transistors based on conventional dielectrics (200 nm thick SiO2) is commonly higher than 10 V. Electrolyte-gated (EG) transistors, i.e. employing an electrolyte as the gating medium, permit current modulations of several orders of magnitude at relatively low gate voltages thanks to the exceptionally high capacitance at the electrolyte/transistor channel interface, in turn due to the low thickness (ca. 3 nm) of the electrical double layers forming at the electrolyte/semiconductor interface. Electrolytes based on room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are promising in EG transistor applications for their high electrochemical stability and good ionic conductivity. The main motivation behind this work is to achieve low voltage operation in organic transistors by making use of RTILs as gating medium. First we demonstrate the importance of the gate electrode material in the EG transistor performance. The use of high surface area carbon gate electrodes limits undesirable electrochemical processes and renders unnecessary the presence of a reference electrode to monitor the channel potential. This was demonstrated using activated carbon as gate electrode, the electronic conducting polymer MEH-PPV, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] channel material, and the ionic liquid [EMIM][TFSI] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide), as gating medium. Using high surface area gate electrodes resulted in sub-1 V operation and charge carrier mobilities of (1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10-2 cm2V -1s-1. A challenge in the field of EG transistors is to decrease their response time, a consequence of the slow ion redistribution in the transistor channel upon application of electric

  20. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2001-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate1 temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid start-up is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research are to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  1. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  2. High temperature dissolution of chromium substituted nickel ferrite in nitrilotriacetic acid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaseelan, V. S.; Chandramohan, P.; Velmurugan, S.

    2016-12-01

    High temperature (HT) dissolution of chromium substituted nickel ferrite was carried out with relevance to the decontamination of nuclear reactors by way of chemical dissolution of contaminated corrosion product oxides present on stainless steel coolant circuit surfaces. Chromium substituted nickel ferrites of composition, NiFe(2-x)CrxO4 (x ≤ 1), was synthetically prepared and characterized. HT dissolution of these oxides was carried out in nitrilotriacetic acid medium at 160 °C. Dissolution was remarkably increased at 160 °C when compared to at 85 °C in a reducing decontamination formulation. Complete dissolution could be achieved for the oxides with chromium content 0 and 0.2. Increasing the chromium content brought about a marked reduction in the dissolution rate. About 40 fold decrease in rate of dissolution was observed when chromium was increased from 0 to 1. The rate of dissolution was not very significantly reduced in the presence of N2H4. Dissolution of oxide was found to be stoichiometric.

  3. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  4. Temperature and stress fields produced by ultrasound-induced cavitation in a viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Lauren; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents can act as cavitation nuclei that mechanically damage surrounding tissue when they oscillate in diagnostic ultrasound. Encapsulated microbubbles have also been proposed as a means to improve the efficiency and efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound by increasing the rate of tissue heating. However, the thermal and mechanical effects of cavitation are difficult to distinguish from each other and to quantify experimentally as they often occur simultaneously. To address this challenge, we study the cavitation-induced temperature and stress fields produced by a spherical bubble oscillating in a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic medium with nonlinear elasticity using a model that also accounts for energy transport inside and outside the bubble. We find that the primary contribution to heating is viscous dissipation, which itself depends on both the material (viscosity) and the bubble dynamics. We examine the rate of viscous heating and the magnitude of stresses over a relevant range of tissue properties and waveform parameters to determine regimes where heating is expected to be dominant. A means of estimating the expected significance of viscous dissipation from given tissue properties and waveform parameters is proposed.

  5. NOVEL GAS SENSORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera

    2004-05-01

    SRI is developing ceramic-based microsensors for detection of exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes and are designed to operate at high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. Under this research project we are developing sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package along with data acquisition and control software and hardware. The sensor package can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. This report details the research activities performed from October 2003 to April 2004.

  6. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  7. Integration of high temperature PEM fuel cells with a methanol reformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Chao; He, Ronghuan; Li, Qingfeng

    2005-01-01

    On-board generation of hydrogen by methanol reforming is an efficient and practical option to fuel PEMFC especially for vehicle propulsion purpose. The methanol reforming can take place at temperatures around 200°C with a nearly 100% conversion at a hydrogen yield of about 400 L–(h–kg catalyst)-1...

  8. Phosphoric acid doped imidazolium polysulfone membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    A novel acid–base polymer membrane is prepared by doping of imidazolium polysulfone with phosphoric acid for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Polysulfone is first chloromethylated, followed by functionalization of the chloromethylated polysulfone with alkyl imidazoles i.e. me...

  9. Determining Role of Temperature Chart while Evaluating Specific Expenses of Organic Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nesenchouk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers designing principles of operational space continuous heating and heat-treating furnaces at mechanical engineering, automotive and tractor enterprises in theRepublicofBelarus. A role of temperature chart on heating metallic charge while evaluating specific expenses of organic fuel in heating and heat-treating furnaces of mechanical engineering, automotive and tractor industries. 

  10. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... testing to reproduce fuel and vapor temperature behavior over the specified driving schedule. The design... § 86.1207-96(e) and (f), and a driver's aid, which shall be configured to provide the test driver with... surface. The driver's aid shall be started and the vehicle operated over the driving cycle specified...

  11. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes...

  12. Evolution of temperature of a droplet of liquid composite fuel interacting with heated airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Zakharevich, A. V.; Strizhak, P. A.; Syrodoy, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic patterns of a temperature change at the center of a droplet of three-component (coal, water, petroleum) composite liquid fuel (CLF) were studied using a low-inertia thermoelectric converter and system of high-speed (up to 105 frames per second) video recording during the induction period at different heating intensity by the air flow with variable parameters: temperature of 670-870 K and motion velocity of 1-4 m/s. The studies were carried out for two groups of CLF compositions: fuel based on brown coal and coal cleaning rejects (filter cake). To assess the effect of liquid combustible component of CLF on characteristics of the ignition process, the corresponding composition of two-component coal-water fuel (CWF) was studied. The stages of inert heating of CLF and CWF droplets with characteristic size corresponding to radius of 0.75-1.5 mm, evaporation of moisture and liquid oil (for CLF), thermal decomposition of the organic part of coal, gas mixture ignition, and carbon burnout were identified. Regularities of changes in the temperature of CLF and CWF droplets at each of identified stages were identified for the cooccurrence of phase transitions and chemical reactions. Comparative analysis of the times of ignition delay and complete combustion of the droplets of examined fuel compositions was performed with varying droplet dimensions, temperatures, and oxidant flow velocity.

  13. Dynamic Thermal Model and Temperature Control of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵庆龙; 卫东; 曹广益; 朱新坚

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic thermal transfer model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack is developed based on energy conservation in order to reach better temperature control of PEMFC stack. Considering its uncertain parameters and disturbance, we propose a robust adaptive controller based on backstepping algorithm of Lyaponov function. Numerical simulations indicate the validity of the proposed controller.

  14. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Xin; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, a thermoelectric (TE) exhaust heat recovery subsystem for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack was developed and modeled. Numerical simulations were conducted and have identified an optimized subsystem configuration and 4 types of compact heat...

  15. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    . A combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM...... designers in choosing the required coolant mass flow rate and radiator size to minimize the stack temperature gradients....

  16. Effect of heat transfer correlations on the fuel temperature prediction of SCWRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa-Martínez Erick-Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the effect of different heat transfer correlations on the prediction of the cladding wall temperature in a supercritical water reactor at nominal operating conditions. The neutronics process with temperature feedback effects, the heat transfer in the fuel rod, and the thermal-hydraulics in the core were simulated with a three-pass core design.

  17. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Bastidas, David

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects....

  18. The Challenges Associated with High Burnup and High Temperature for UO2 TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; John Maki

    2005-02-01

    The fuel service conditions for the DOE Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be challenging. All major fuel related design parameters (burnup, temperature, fast neutron fluence, power density, particle packing fraction) exceed the values that were qualified in the successful German UO2 TRISO-coated particle fuel development program in the 1980s. While TRISO-coated particle fuel has been irradiated at NGNP relevant levels for two or three of the design parameters, no data exist for TRISO-coated particle fuel for all five parameters simultaneously. Of particular concern are the high burnup and high temperatures expected in the NGNP. In this paper, where possible, we evaluate the challenges associated with high burnup and high temperature quantitatively by examining the performance of the fuel in terms of different known failure mechanisms. Potential design solutions to ameliorate the negative effects of high burnup and high temperature are also discussed.

  19. UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF CALCULATED TEMPERATURES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam [Idaho National Laboratory; Hawkes, Grant Lynn [Idaho National Laboratory; Einerson, Jeffrey James [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the quantification of uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Advanced Reactor Technology Research and Development program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR tests, the results of the numerical simulations are used in combination with statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. The temperature simulation data for AGR tests are also used for validation of the fission product transport and fuel performance simulation models. These crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. To quantify the uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures, this study identifies and analyzes ABAQUS model parameters of potential importance to the AGR predicted fuel temperatures. The selection of input parameters for uncertainty quantification of the AGR calculated temperatures is based on the ranking of their influences on variation of temperature predictions. Thus, selected input parameters include those with high sensitivity and those with large uncertainty. Propagation of model parameter uncertainty and sensitivity is then used to quantify the overall uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures. Expert judgment is used as the basis to specify the uncertainty range for selected input parameters. The input uncertainties are dynamic accounting for the effect of unplanned events and changes in thermal properties of capsule components over extended exposure to high temperature and fast neutron irradiation. The sensitivity analysis performed in this work went beyond the traditional local sensitivity. Using experimental design, analysis of pairwise interactions of model parameters was performed to establish

  20. Temperature monitoring using fibre optic sensors in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pauw, B., E-mail: bdepauw@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Lamberti, A.; Ertveldt, J.; Rezayat, A.; Vanlanduit, S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Van Tichelen, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Berghmans, F. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors in lead-bismuth cooled installations. • In this first of a kind experiment, we focus on temperature measurements of fuel rods • We acquire the surface temperature with a resolution of 30 mK. • We asses the condition of the installation during different steps of the operation. - Abstract: In-core temperature measurements are crucial to assess the condition of nuclear reactor components. The sensors that measure temperature must respond adequately in order, for example, to actuate safety systems that will mitigate the consequences of an undesired temperature excursion and to prevent component failure. This issue is exacerbated in new reactor designs that use liquid metals, such as for example a molten lead-bismuth eutectic, as coolant. Unlike water cooled reactors that need to operate at high pressure to raise the boiling point of water, liquid metal cooled reactors can operate at high temperatures whilst keeping the pressure at lower levels. In this paper we demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors to measure the temperature distribution in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation and we derive functional input e.g. the temperature control system or other systems that rely on accurate temperature actuation. This first-of-a-kind experiment demonstrates the potential of optical fibre based instrumentation in these environments. We focus on measuring the surface temperature of the individual fuel rods in the fuel assembly, but the technique can also be applied to other components or sections of the installation. We show that these surface temperatures can be experimentally measured with limited intervention on the fuel pin owing to the small geometry and fundamental properties of the optical fibres. The unique properties of the fibre sensors allowed acquiring the surface temperatures with a resolution of 30 mK. With these sensors, we assess the condition of the test section containing the fuel

  1. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by the aerosol's control is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about + 0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with a little under + 2.5 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 years of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to a number of analysis choices, and fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from the unscaled simulation. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, −0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Performance comparison between high temperature and traditional proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Wenhua H.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    A temperature above 100 °C is always desired for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell operation. It not only improves kinetic and mass transport processes, but also facilitates thermal and water management in fuel cell systems. Increased carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance at higher operating temperature also simplifies the pretreatment of fuel supplement. The novel phosphoric acid (PA) doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes achieve PEM fuel cell operations above 100 °C. The performance of a commercial high temperature (HT) PEM fuel cell stack module is studied by measuring its impedance under various current loads when the operating temperature is set at 160 °C. The contributions of kinetic and mass transport processes to stack impedance are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by equivalent circuit (EC) simulation. The performance of a traditional PEM fuel cell stack module operated is also studied by impedance measurement and EC simulation. The operating temperature is self-stabilized between 40 °C and 65 °C. An enhancement of the HT-PEM fuel cell stack in polarization impedance is evaluated by comparing to the traditional PEM fuel cell stack. The impedance study on two commercial fuel cell stacks reveals the real situation of current fuel cell development.

  4. NOVEL GAS SENSORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera

    2004-05-01

    SRI is developing ceramic-based microsensors for detection of exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes and are designed to operate at high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. Under this research project we are developing sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package along with data acquisition and control software and hardware. The sensor package can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. This report details the research activities performed from May 2004 to October 2004 including testing of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, and software development.

  5. MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2004-02-15

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

  6. Fuel temperature prediction using a variable bypass gap size in the prismatic VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Nam, E-mail: snlee@kaeri.re.kr; Tak, Nam-il; Kim, Min Hwan

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The bypass flow of the prismatic very high temperature reactor is analyzed. • The bypass gap sizes are calculated considering the effect of the neutron fluences and thermal expansion. • The fuel hot spot temperature and temperature profiles are calculated using the variable gap size. • The BOC, MOC and EOC condition at the cycle 07 and 14 are applied. - Abstract: The temperature gradient and hot spot temperatures were calculated in the prismatic very high temperature reactor as a function of the variable bypass gap size. Many previous studies have predicted the temperature of the reactor core based on a fixed bypass gap size. The graphite matrix of the assemblies in the reactor core undergoes a dimensional change during the operation due to thermal expansion and neutron fluence. The expansion and shrinkage of the bypass gaps change the coolant flow fractions into the coolant channels, the control rod holes, and the bypass gaps. Therefore, the temperature of the assemblies may differ compared to those for the fixed bypass gap case. The temperature gradient and the hot spot temperatures are important for the design of reactor structures to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, the temperature variation of the PMR200 is studied at the beginning (BOC), middle (MOC), and end (EOC) of cycles 07 and 14. CORONA code which has been developed in KAERI is applied to solve the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core of the PMR200. CORONA solves a fluid region using a one-dimensional formulation and a solid region using a three-dimensional formulation to enhance the computational speed and still obtain a reasonable accuracy. The maximum temperatures in the fuel assemblies using the variable bypass gaps did not differ much from the corresponding temperatures using the fixed bypass gaps. However, the maximum temperatures in the reflector assemblies using the variable bypass gaps differ significantly from the corresponding temperatures

  7. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dickey, John [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Hennebelle, Patrick, E-mail: cmurray@astro.wisc.edu [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  8. A review of the development of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suthida Authayanun; Karittha Im-orb; Amornchai Arpornwichanop

    2015-01-01

    Due to the need for clean energy, the development of an efficient fuel cell technology for electricity generation has received considerable attention. Much of the current research efforts have investi‐gated the materials for and process development of fuel cells, including the optimization and simpli‐fication of the fuel cell components, and the modeling of the fuel cell systems to reduce their cost and improve their performance, durability and reliability to enable them to compete with the con‐ventional combustion engine. A high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT‐PEMFC) is an interesting alternative to conventional PEMFCs as it is able to mitigate CO poisoning and water management problems. Although the HT‐PEMFC has many attractive features, it also possesses many limitations and presents several challenges to its widespread commercialization. In this re‐view, the trends of HT‐PEMFC research and development with respect to electrochemistry, mem‐brane, modeling, fuel options, and system design were presented.

  9. Feasibility of Thorium Fuel Cycles in a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Rodriguez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy presents key challenges to be successful as a sustainable energy source. Currently, the viability of the use thorium-based fuel cycles in an innovative nuclear energy generation system is being investigated in order to solve these key challenges. In this work, the feasibility of three thorium-based fuel cycles (232Th-233U, 232Th-239Pu, and 232Th-U in a hybrid system formed by a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Reactor (VHTR and two Pebble-Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs was evaluated using parameters related to the neutronic behavior such as nuclear fuel breeding, minor actinide stockpile, the energetic contribution of each fissile isotope, and the radiotoxicity of the long lived wastes. These parameters were used to compare the fuel cycles using the well-known MCNPX ver. 2.6e computational code. The results obtained confirm that the 232Th-233U fuel cycle is the best cycle for minimizing the production of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides. Moreover, the inclusion of the second stage in the ADSs demonstrated the possibility of extending the burnup cycle duration and reducing the radiotoxicity of the discharged fuel from the VHTR.

  10. Behavior of a high-temperature gas reactor with transuranic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortini, A.; Pereira, C.; Sousa, R.V.; Veloso, M.A.F.; Costa, A.L.; Silva, C.A.; Cardoso, F.S., E-mail: fortini@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we modeled a high-temperature gas reactor, HTGR, of prismatic block type using the SCALE 6.0 code to analyze the use of transuranic fuel in these reactors. To represent the concept, the Japanese HTTR reactor was chosen. The fuels considered used transuranic elements from UREX+ reprocessing of burned PWR fuel spiked with depleted U or Th. The calculations, performed for typical temperatures of HTR reactors, showed that, in mixtures with the same percentage of fissile material, the initial effective multiplication factor, K{sub eff} , is higher in the mixtures containing Th than that with U. Comparisons between the two types of fuel were performed using fuel pairs with the same initial K{sub eff}. During burn-up, the two mixtures show a slow and practically equal decrease in K{sub eff}. For the same level of burnup, mixtures containing Th show greater effectiveness in burning transuranics and total plutonium when compared to corresponding mixtures with depleted U. (author)

  11. Effects of temperature and stoichiometric ratio on performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.H.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Engines, Emissions, Energy Laboratory; Parulian, A. [Arbin Instruments, College Station, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Relative to any power source using any hydrocarbon fuel, the fuel cell offers the potential to produce power with minimal or zero emissions. Depending on the electrolyte utilized in the cell, there are several types of fuel cells. The most common is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because of its simplicity, quick start-up, and diversity for any application from powering small portable device to automobile applications. However, the handling and storing of hydrogen is the biggest challenge of the PEMFC. The technology related with the PEMFC, however, enables it to be commercialized in the near future as both hydrogen generation and storage continues to evolve. This paper assessed the effects of temperature and stoichiometric flow rate for various conditions for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The study investigated the performance associated with the reagent stoichiometric ratio and the desired current starting stoichiometric flow rate, the effect of operating temperature, and the relationship between quantity of air used at the cathode and cell performance. The paper discussed membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) preparation as well as the study results. It was concluded that higher air supply leads to better performance at the constant stoichiometric ratio at the anode, but there is not have much of an increase after the stoichiometric ratio of 5. 14 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. Evaluation of MHD materials for use in high-temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidotti, R.

    1978-06-15

    The MHD and high-temperature fuel cell literature was surveyed for data pertaining to materials properties in order to identify materials used in MHD power generation which also might be suitable for component use in high-temperature fuel cells. Classes of MHD-electrode materials evaluated include carbides, nitrides, silicides, borides, composites, and oxides. Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/ used as a reference point to evaluate materials for use in the solid-oxide fuel cell. Physical and chemical properties such as electrical resistivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, and thermodynamic stability toward oxidation were used to screen candidate materials. A number of the non-oxide ceramic MHD-electrode materials appear promising for use in the solid-electrolyte and molten-carbonate fuel cell as anodes or anode constituents. The MHD-insulator materials appear suitable candidates for electrolyte-support tiles in the molten-carbonate fuel cells. The merits and possible problem areas for these applications are discussed and additional needed areas of research are delineated.

  13. Characterisation and modelling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jespersen, J.L. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Schaltz, E.; Kaer, S.K. [Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstraede 101, DK-9220 Aalborg East (Denmark); Andreasen, S.J.

    2009-08-15

    In designing and controlling fuel cell systems, it is advantageous to have models which predict fuel cell behaviour in steady-state as well as in dynamic operation. This work examines the use of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for characterising and developing an impedance model for a high temperature PEM (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual instrument has been developed to perform the signal generation and data acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. The typical output of an EIS measurement on a fuel cell is a Nyquist plot, which shows the imaginary and real parts of the impedance of the measured system. The full stack impedance depends on the impedance of each of the single cells of the stack. Equivalent circuit models for each single cell can be used to predict the stack impedance at different temperature profiles of the stack. The information available in such models can be used to predict the fuel cell stack performance, e.g. in systems where different electronic components introduce current harmonics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Improved Prediction of the Temperature Feedback in TRISO-Fueled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javier Ortensi; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-08-01

    The Doppler feedback mechanism is a major contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic coated particles. It follows that the correct prediction of the magnitude and time-dependence of this feedback effect is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. We present a fuel conduction model for obtaining better estimates of the temperature feedback during moderate and fast transients. The fuel model has been incorporated in the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes as a single TRISO particle within each calculation cell. The heat generation rate is scaled down from the neutronic solution and a Dirichlet boundary condition is imposed as the bulk graphite temperature from the thermal-hydraulic solution. This simplified approach yields similar results to those obtained with more complex methods, requiring multi-TRISO calculations within one control volume, but with much less computational effort. An analysis of the hypothetical total control ejection in the PBMR-400 design verifies the performance of the code during fast transients. In addition, the analysis of the earthquake-initiated event in the PBMR-400 design verifies the performance of the code during slow transients. These events clearly depict the improvement in the predictions of the fuel temperature, and consequently, of the power escalations. In addition, a brief study of the potential effects of particle layer de-bonding on the transient behavior of high temperature reactors is included. Although the formation of a gap occurs under special conditions its consequences on the dynamic behavior of the reactor should be analyzed. The presence of a gap in the fuel can cause some unusual reactor behavior during fast transients, but still the reactor shuts down due to the strong feedback effects.

  15. TRISO-Coated Fuel Processing to Support High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2002-10-01

    The initial objective of the work described herein was to identify potential methods and technologies needed to disassemble and dissolve graphite-encapsulated, ceramic-coated gas-cooled-reactor spent fuels so that the oxide fuel components can be separated by means of chemical processing. The purpose of this processing is to recover (1) unburned fuel for recycle, (2) long-lived actinides and fission products for transmutation, and (3) other fission products for disposal in acceptable waste forms. Follow-on objectives were to identify and select the most promising candidate flow sheets for experimental evaluation and demonstration and to address the needs to reduce technical risks of the selected technologies. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) may be deployed in the next -20 years to (1) enable the use of highly efficient gas turbines for producing electricity and (2) provide high-temperature process heat for use in chemical processes, such as the production of hydrogen for use as clean-burning transportation fuel. Also, HTGR fuels are capable of significantly higher burn-up than light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels or fast-reactor (FR) fuels; thus, the HTGR fuels can be used efficiently for transmutation of fissile materials and long-lived actinides and fission products, thereby reducing the inventory of such hazardous and proliferation-prone materials. The ''deep-burn'' concept, described in this report, is an example of this capability. Processing of spent graphite-encapsulated, ceramic-coated fuels presents challenges different from those of processing spent LWR fuels. LWR fuels are processed commercially in Europe and Japan; however, similar infrastructure is not available for processing of the HTGR fuels. Laboratory studies on the processing of HTGR fuels were performed in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s, but no engineering-scale processes were demonstrated. Currently, new regulations concerning emissions will impact the

  16. Effect of temperature fluctuation on hydrate-based CO2 separation from fuel gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosen Li; Chungang Xu; Zhaoyang Chen; Huijie Wu; Jing Cai

    2011-01-01

    A new method of temperature fluctuation is proposed to promote the process of hydrate-based CO2 separation from fuel gas in this work according to the dual nature of CO2 solubility in hydrate forming and non-hydrate forming regions [1].The temperature fluctuation operated in the process of hydrate formation improves the formation of gas hydrate observably.The amount of the gas consumed with temperature fluctuation is approximately 35% more than that without temperature fluctuation.It is found that only the temperature fluctuation operated in the period of forming hydrate leads to a good effect on CO2 separation.Meanwhile,with the proceeding of hydrate formation,the effect of temperature fluctuation on the gas hydrate gradually reduces,and little effect is left in the completion term.The CO2 separation efficiencies in the separation processes with the effective temperature fluctuations are improved remarkably.

  17. Comprehensive study of biodiesel fuel for HSDI engines in conventional and low temperature combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormos, Bernardo; Novella, Ricardo; Garcia, Antonio; Gargar, Kevin [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia, ES, Campus de Vera, s/n, Edificio 6D. Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    In this research, an experimental investigation has been performed to give insight into the potential of biodiesel as an alternative fuel for High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engines. The scope of this work has been broadened by comparing the combustion characteristics of diesel and biodiesel fuels in a wide range of engine loads and EGR conditions, including the high EGR rates expected for future diesel engines operating in the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime. The experimental work has been carried out in a single-cylinder engine running alternatively with diesel and biodiesel fuels. Conventional diesel fuel and neat biodiesel have been compared in terms of their combustion performance through a new methodology designed for isolating the actual effects of each fuel on diesel combustion, aside from their intrinsic differences in chemical composition. The analysis of the results has been sequentially divided into two progressive and complementary steps. Initially, the overall combustion performance of each fuel has been critically evaluated based on a set of parameters used as tracers of the combustion quality, such as the combustion duration or the indicated efficiency. With the knowledge obtained from this previous overview, the analysis focuses on the detailed influence of biodiesel on the different diesel combustion stages known ignition delay, premixed combustion and mixing controlled combustion, considering also the impact on CO and UHC (unburn-hydrocarbons) pollutant emissions. The results of this research explain why the biodiesel fuel accelerates the diesel combustion process in all engine loads and EGR rates, even in those corresponding with LTC conditions, increasing its possibilities as alternative fuel for future DI diesel engines. (author)

  18. Novel Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera; Francis Tanzella

    2005-03-01

    SRI International (SRI) is developing ceramic-based microsensors to detect exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems under this DOE NETL-sponsored research project. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes attached to a solid state electrolyte and are designed to operate at the high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. The sensors can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. The ultimate objective is to develop sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package, along with data acquisition and control software and hardware, so that the information can be used for closed-loop control in novel advanced power generation systems. This report details the Phase I Proof-of-Concept, research activities performed from October 2003 to March 2005. SRI's research work includes synthesis of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, software development, and demonstration of pulse voltammetric analysis of NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO gases on catalytic electrodes.

  19. Catalytic hydrogen/oxygen reaction assisted the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) startup at subzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shucheng; Yu, Hongmei; Hou, Junbo; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Zhongjun

    Fuel cells for automobile application need to operate in a wide temperature range including freezing temperature. However, the rapid startup of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at subfreezing temperature, e.g., -20 °C, is very difficult. A cold-start procedure was developed, which made hydrogen and oxygen react to heat the fuel cell considering that the FC flow channel was the characteristic of microchannel reactor. The effect of hydrogen and oxygen reaction on fuel cell performance at ambient temperature was also investigated. The electrochemical characterizations such as I- V plot and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were performed. The heat generated rate for either the single cell or the stack was calculated. The results showed that the heat generated rate was proportional to the gas flow rate when H 2 concentration and the active area were constant. The fuel cell temperature rose rapidly and steadily by controlling gas flow rate.

  20. A Quaternary Polybenzimidazole Membrane for Intermediate Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.; Scott, K.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    A quaternary ammonium polybenzimidazole (QPBI) membrane was synthesized for applications in intermediate temperature (100–200 °C) hydrogen fuel cells. The QPBI membrane was imbibed with phosphoric acid to provide suitable proton conductivity. The proton conductivity of the membrane was 0.051 S cm–1...... at 150 °C with the PA acid loading level of 3.5 PRU (amount of H3PO4 per repeat unit of polymer QPBI). The QPBI membrane was characterized in terms of composition, structure and morphology by NMR, FTIR, SEM, and EDX. The fuel cell performance with the membrane gave peak power densities of 440 and 240 m...

  1. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology is discussed which has application to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics. The forward and reverse operating cycles are described, and heat flow, mass, and energy balance data are presented to characterize the system's performance and the variation of performance with changing reactant storage pressure. The present system weighs less than nickel hydrogen battery systems after 0.7 darkside operation, and it maintains a specific weight advantage over radioisotope generators for discharge periods up to 72 hours.

  2. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology is discussed which has application to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics. The forward and reverse operating cycles are described, and heat flow, mass, and energy balance data are presented to characterize the system's performance and the variation of performance with changing reactant storage pressure. The present system weighs less than nickel hydrogen battery systems after 0.7 darkside operation, and it maintains a specific weight advantage over radioisotope generators for discharge periods up to 72 hours.

  3. Improved Electrodes for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells using Carbon Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Héctor; Plaza, Jorge; Cañizares, Pablo; Lobato, Justo; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2016-05-23

    This work evaluates the use of carbon nanospheres (CNS) in microporous layers (MPL) of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) electrodes and compares the characteristics and performance with those obtained using conventional MPL based on carbon black. XRD, hydrophobicity, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory, and gas permeability of MPL prepared with CNS were the parameters evaluated. In addition, a short life test in a fuel cell was carried out to evaluate performance under accelerated stress conditions. The results demonstrate that CNS is a promising alternative to traditional carbonaceous materials because of its high electrochemical stability and good electrical conductivity, suitable to be used in this technology.

  4. High temperature corrosion by combustion gases produced by burning liquid fuels containing sulphur, sodium and vanadium.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Fazlur Rahman

    1980-01-01

    High temperature corrosion, at 730° C, by combustion gases produced by burning liquid fuels in a laboratory combustor has been investigated. A selected range of steels and alloys (mild steel, stainless steel type 347, Nimonic N90, N105, and IN657) have been tested in the combustion gases using fuels containing varying amounts of impurities in the range of 0 - 6% sulphur, 0 - 60 ppm sodium, and 0 - 300 ppm vanadium. On the basis of the comprehensive results a computer programme was written t...

  5. Effects of Fuel Temperature on Injection Process and Combustion of Dimethyl Ether Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangxin, Gao; Zhulin, Yuan; Apeng, Zhou; Shenghua, Liu; Yanju, Wei

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the effects of fuel temperature on the injection process in the fuel-injection pipe and the combustion characteristics of compression ignition (CI) engine, tests on a four stroke, direct injection dimethyl ether (DME) engine were conducted. Experimental results show that as the fuel temperature increases from 20 to 40 °C, the sound speed is decreased by 12.2%, the peak line pressure at pump and nozzle sides are decreased by 7.2% and 5.6%, respectively. Meanwhile, the injection timing is retarded by 2.2 °CA and the injection duration is extended by 0.8 °CA. Accordingly, the ignition delay and the combustion duration are extended by 0.7 °CA and 4.0 °CA, respectively. The cylinder peak pressure is decreased by 5.4%. As a result, the effective thermal efficiency is decreased, especially for temperature above 40 °C. Before beginning an experiment, the fuel properties of DME, including the density, the bulk modulus, and the sound speed were calculated by "ThermoData." The calculated result of sound speed is consistent with the experimental results.

  6. Quantitative Surface Emissivity and Temperature Measurements of a Burning Solid Fuel Accompanied by Soot Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Ferkul, Paul; Sacksteder, K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surface radiometry is an established technique for noncontact temperature measurement of solids. We adapt this technique to the study of solid surface combustion where the solid fuel undergoes physical and chemical changes as pyrolysis proceeds, and additionally may produce soot. The physical and chemical changes alter the fuel surface emissivity, and soot contributes to the infrared signature in the same spectral band as the signal of interest. We have developed a measurement that isolates the fuel's surface emissions in the presence of soot, and determine the surface emissivity as a function of temperature. A commercially available infrared camera images the two-dimensional surface of ashless filter paper burning in concurrent flow. The camera is sensitive in the 2 to 5 gm band, but spectrally filtered to reduce the interference from hot gas phase combustion products. Results show a strong functional dependence of emissivity on temperature, attributed to the combined effects of thermal and oxidative processes. Using the measured emissivity, radiance measurements from several burning samples were corrected for the presence of soot and for changes in emissivity, to yield quantitative surface temperature measurements. Ultimately the results will be used to develop a full-field, non-contact temperature measurement that will be used in spacebased combustion investigations.

  7. Materials and Components for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Radhika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the recent advancements made in the area of materials and components for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs. LT-SOFC is a new trend in SOFCtechnology since high temperature SOFC puts very high demands on the materials and too expensive to match marketability. The current status of the electrolyte and electrode materials used in SOFCs, their specific features and the need for utilizing them for LT-SOFC are presented precisely in this review article. The section on electrolytes gives an overview of zirconia, lanthanum gallate and ceria based materials. Also, this review article explains the application of different anode, cathode and interconnect materials used for SOFC systems. SOFC can result in better performance with the application of liquid fuels such methanol and ethanol. As a whole, this review article discusses the novel materials suitable for operation of SOFC systems especially for low temperature operation.

  8. Mechanical behaviour of membrane electrode assembly (MEA during cold start of PEM fuel cell from subzero environment temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Durability is one of the most critical remaining issues impeding successful commercialization of broad PEM fuel cell transportation energy applications. Automotive fuel cells are likely to operate with neat hydrogen under load-following or load-levelled modes and be expected to withstand variations in environmental conditions, particularly in the context of temperature and atmospheric composition. In addition, they are also required to survive over the course of their expected operational lifetimes i.e., around 5,500 hrs, while undergoing as many as 30,000 startup/shutdown cycles. Cold start capability and survivability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM in a subzero environment temperature remain a challenge for automotive applications. A key component of increasing the durability of PEM fuel cells is studying the behaviour of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA at the heart of the fuel cell. The present work investigates how the mechanical behaviour of MEA are influenced during cold start of the PEM fuel cell from subzero environment temperatures. Full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to simulate the stresses inside the PEM fuel cell, which are occurring during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and stresses distribution that have limited experimental data.

  9. Combustion of Gaseous Fuels with High Temperature Air in Normal- and Micro-gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Gupta, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is determine the effect of air preheat temperature on flame characteristics in normal and microgravity conditions. We have obtained qualitative (global flame features) and some quantitative information on the features of flames using high temperature combustion air under normal gravity conditions with propane and methane as the fuels. This data will be compared with the data under microgravity conditions. The specific focus under normal gravity conditions has been on determining the global flame features as well as the spatial distribution of OH, CH, and C2 from flames using high temperature combustion air at different equivalence ratio.

  10. Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three medium heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (-6.7°C and 21.7°C) operating on ...

  11. Mechanical properties of solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic seal at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhans, Jacqueline; Li, Dongsheng; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin; Al-Haik, Marwan; Harris, Adrian; Garmestani, Hamid

    2011-04-20

    Mechanical properties of solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic seal material, G18, are studied at high temperatures. Samples of G18 are aged for either 4h or 100h, resulting in samples with different crystallinity. Reduced modulus, hardness, and time-dependent behavior are measured by nanoindentation. The nanoindentation is performed at room temperature, 550, 650, and 750°C, using loading rates of 5 mN/s and 25 mN/s. Results show a decrease in reduced modulus with increasing temperature, with significant decrease above the glass transition temperature (Tg). Hardness generally decreases with increasing temperature, with a slight increase before Tg for the 4h aged sample. Dwell tests show that creep increases with increasing temperature, but decrease with further aging.

  12. Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination

    CERN Document Server

    Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

    2009-01-01

    Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

  13. A review of the high temperature creep in oxide nuclear fuels (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Woo; Na, S. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Joung, C. Y

    1998-06-01

    Since the initial stage of fuel developmental until recently, considerable efforts have been extensively directed at studying the creep properties of uranium dioxide and its related phases largely due to the importance of their application to the reactor fuels. In this state-of-the-art report, the creep behavior and mechanisms of UO{sub 2} and its related phases were reviewed and discussed in terms of experimental variables such as applied stress, temperature, microstructure and stoichiometry. The objective of this review is to obtain a complete understanding of the influences of these variables on the creep property and creep mechanism in these materials aiming at devising more proper methods for the improvement of the behavior. The database obtained from the results will be primarily utilized also, as the reference data for studying the creep behavior of UO{sub 2}-based mixed oxide nuclear fuels. (author). 64 refs., 6 tabs., 25 figs

  14. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane represents an effective approach, which in recent years has motivated extensive research activities with great progress....... As a critical concern, issues of long term durability of PBI based fuel cells are addressed in this talk, including oxidative degradation of the polymer, mechanical failures of the membrane, acid leaching out, corrosion of carbon support and sintering of catalysts particles. Excellent polymer durability has...... observed under continuous operation with hydrogen and air at 150-160oC, with a fuel cell performance degradation rate of 5-10 µV/h. Improvement of the membrane performance such as mechanical strength, swelling and oxidative stability has achieved by exploring the polymer chemistry, i.e. covalently...

  15. Silica based composite membranes for methanol fuel cells operating at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, A.; Guzman, C.; Peza-Ledesma, C.; Godinez, Luis A.; Nava, R.; Duron-Torres, S.M.; Ledesma-Garcia, J.; Arriaga, L.G.

    2011-01-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are seen as an alternative energy source for several applications, particularly portable power sources. Nafion membranes constitute a well known proton exchange system for DMFC systems due to their convenient electrochemical, mechanical and thermal stability and high proton conductivity properties. But there are problems currently associated with the direct methanol fuel cell technology. Intensive efforts to decrease the methanol crossover are focused mainly on the development of new polymer electrolyte membranes. In this study, Nafion polymer was modified by means of the incorporation of inorganic oxides with different structural properties (SBA-15 and SiO2), both prepared by sol-gel method in order to increase the proton conductivity at high temperature of fuel cell and to contribute decrementing the methanol crossover effect. Composite membranes based in inorganic fillers showed a significant decrease in the concentration of methanol permeation.

  16. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Goodman, R.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the first full-length high-temperature test (FLHT-1) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The test is part of a series of experiments being performed for the NRC as a part of their Severe Fuel Damage Program and is one of several planned for PNL`s Coolant Boilaway and Damage Progression Program. The report summarizes the test design and test plan. it also provides a summary and discussion of the data collected during the test and of the photos taken during the post-test examination. All objectives for the test were met. The key objective was to demonstrate that severe fuel damage tests on full-length fuel bundles can be safely conducted in the NRU reactor.

  17. High-temperature fuel cell research and development. Final technical status report, June 1977-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-15

    An initial survey of the literature produced a list of ceramic materials with properties which made them potential candidates for use in molten-carbonate fuel cell tiles or electrodes. Seven of the materials in the original list were dropped from consideration because of unfavorable thermodynamic properties; four materials were set aside because of high cost, lack of availability, or fabrication difficulties. Thirteen compositions were tested statically at 1000 K in a Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ bath under a dry CO/sub 2/ atmosphere. Only four of the materials tested showed severe degradation reactions in the molten carbonate. A low-temperature process for forming small diameter, high-aspect ratio ceramic fibers for fuel cell use has been developed. A short-term program to initiate a computer study on the thermodynamic analysis of fuel cell materials was initiated at Montana State University. The report on this program is included as Appendix B. The MHD and high-temperature fuel cell literature was surveyed, and material properties were evaluated to identify MHD materials with potential use for fuel cell applications. A technology transfer report of these findings was prepared. This report is included as Appendix A. Laboratory facilities were established to conduct research on interfacial diffusion processes which could be detrimental to successful long-term operation of the solid-electrolyte fuel cell. A variety of physical and chemical techniques were examined for the preparation of high-density substituted LaCrO/sub 3/ which was to be one component of a diffusion couple with Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. Hydrolysis of a mixed metal-nitrate solution with urea produced the most reactive powder. A final theoretical density of almost 98% was attained in cold-pressed sintered discs of this material. (Extensive list of references)

  18. High-temperature isothermal chemical cycling for solar-driven fuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yong; Yang, Chih-Kai; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-10-28

    The possibility of producing chemical fuel (hydrogen) from the solar-thermal energy input using an isothermal cycling strategy is explored. The canonical thermochemical reactive oxide, ceria, is reduced under high temperature and inert sweep gas, and in the second step oxidized by H2O at the same temperature. The process takes advantage of the oxygen chemical potential difference between the inert sweep gas and high-temperature steam, the latter becoming more oxidizing with increasing temperature as a result of thermolysis. The isothermal operation relieves the need to achieve high solid-state heat recovery for high system efficiency, as is required in a conventional two-temperature process. Thermodynamic analysis underscores the importance of gas-phase heat recovery in the isothermal approach and suggests that attractive efficiencies may be practically achievable on the system level. However, with ceria as the reactive oxide, the isothermal approach is not viable at temperatures much below 1400 °C irrespective of heat recovery. Experimental investigations show that an isothermal cycle performed at 1500 °C can yield fuel at a rate of ~9.2 ml g(-1) h(-1), while providing exceptional system simplification relative to two-temperature cycling.

  19. Isolation and mycelial growth of Diehliomyces microsporus: effect of culture medium and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Soares do Nascimento

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The false truffle is one of the main problems in the production of the Agaricus brasiliensis in Brazil and the control of this fungal competitor has been rather difficult due to difficulties in the isolation and cultivation of this pathogen. This experiment was conducted in three stages, the first consisting of the isolation of Diehliomyces microsporus starting from portions of the fruiting body and through the ascospores suspension; second, D. microsporus cultivated in vitro at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35ºC in six different culture media (CSDA, OCDA, PCDA, ODA, PDA, CDA; third, D. microsporus was inoculated on sterilized compost for formation of the fruiting body. The colony formation from tissue of D. microsporus starting from portions of fruiting body was more efficient than germination of the ascospores. Compost medium (CDA allowed a larger diameter of the D. microsporus colony, followed by the medium made up of compost and potato mixture, favoring a denser composition. The largest mycelial growth speed of D. microsporus occurred when the culture was incubated at 28 and 30ºC. Incubation temperatures lower than 15ºC or above 35ºC inhibited the mycelial growth of D. microsporus completely. The fruiting bodies were obtained easily in sterilized compost and later inoculated along with mycelial competitor.A falsa trufa está sendo um dos principais problemas na produção do Agaricus brasiliensis cultivado no Brasil e o controle deste fungo competidor tem sido difícil, devido às dificuldades encontradas no isolamento e cultivo do patógeno. Este experimento foi conduzido em três etapas, sendo a primeira constituída pelo isolamento de Diehliomyces microsporus a partir de porções do ascostroma e através da suspensão de ascósporos; a segunda, o cultivo in vitro de D. microsporus nas temperaturas de 15, 20, 25, 30 e 35ºC e em seis meios de cultura (CTDA, ACDA, BCDA, ADA, BDA e CDA e a terceira pela inoculação de D. microsporus no composto

  20. Design and experimental characterization of a 350 W High Temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Zuliani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT PEM fuel cell based on polybenzimidazole (PBI polymer and phosphoric acid, can be operated at temperature between 120 °C and 180 °C. Reactants humidification is not required and CO content up to 2% in the fuel can be tolerated, affecting only marginally performance. This is what makes HT PEM very attractive, as low quality reformed hydrogen can be used and water management problems are avoided. Till nowadays, from experimental point of view, only few studies relate to the development and characterization of high temperature stacks. The aim of this work is to present the main design features and the performance curves of a 25 cells HT PEM stack based on PBI and phosphoric acid membranes. Performance curves refer to the stack operating with two type of fuels: pure hydrogen and a gas mixture simulating a typical steam reformer output. The stack voltage distribution analysis and the stack temperature distribution analysis suggest that cathode air could be used as coolant leading to a better thermal management. This could simplify stack design and system BOP, thus increasing system performance.

  1. Experimental factors that influence carbon monoxide tolerance of high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Yoo, Duck Young; Park, Jung Ock

    The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is investigated with respect to CO concentration, operating temperature, fuel feed mode, and anode Pt loading. The loss in cell voltage when CO is added to pure hydrogen anode gas is a function of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading as well as obvious factors such as CO concentration, temperature and current density. The tolerance to CO can be varied significantly using a different experimental design of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading. A difference in cell performance with CO-containing hydrogen is observed when two cells with different flow channel geometries are used, although the two cells show similar cell performance with pure hydrogen. A different combination of fuel utilization, anode Pt loading and flow channel design can cause an order of magnitude difference in CO tolerance under identical experimental conditions of temperature and current density.

  2. Experimental factors that influence carbon monoxide tolerance of high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Yoo, Duck Young; Park, Jung Ock [Energy and Environment Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is investigated with respect to CO concentration, operating temperature, fuel feed mode, and anode Pt loading. The loss in cell voltage when CO is added to pure hydrogen anode gas is a function of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading as well as obvious factors such as CO concentration, temperature and current density. The tolerance to CO can be varied significantly using a different experimental design of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading. A difference in cell performance with CO-containing hydrogen is observed when two cells with different flow channel geometries are used, although the two cells show similar cell performance with pure hydrogen. A different combination of fuel utilization, anode Pt loading and flow channel design can cause an order of magnitude difference in CO tolerance under identical experimental conditions of temperature and current density. (author)

  3. Extraction of medium chain fatty acids from organic municipal waste and subsequent production of bio-based fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannengiesser, Jan; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Mrukwia, Timo; Jager, Johannes; Schebek, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on investigations for a new technology to generate bio-based fuel additives from bio-waste. The investigations are taking place at the composting plant in Darmstadt-Kranichstein (Germany). The aim is to explore the potential of bio-waste as feedstock in producing different bio-based products (or bio-based fuels). For this investigation, a facultative anaerobic process is to be integrated into the normal aerobic waste treatment process for composting. The bio-waste is to be treated in four steps to produce biofuels. The first step is the facultative anaerobic treatment of the waste in a rotting box namely percolate to generate a fatty-acid rich liquid fraction. The Hydrolysis takes place in the rotting box during the waste treatment. The organic compounds are then dissolved and transferred into the waste liquid phase. Browne et al. (2013) describes the hydrolysis as an enzymatically degradation of high solid substrates to soluble products which are further degraded to volatile fatty acids (VFA). This is confirmed by analytical tests done on the liquid fraction. After the percolation, volatile and medium chain fatty acids are found in the liquid phase. Concentrations of fatty acids between 8.0 and 31.5 were detected depending on the nature of the input material. In the second step, a fermentation process will be initiated to produce additional fatty acids. Existing microorganism mass is activated to degrade the organic components that are still remaining in the percolate. After fermentation the quantity of fatty acids in four investigated reactors increased 3-5 times. While fermentation mainly non-polar fatty acids (pentanoic to octanoic acid) are build. Next to the fermentation process, a chain-elongation step is arranged by adding ethanol to the fatty acid rich percolate. While these investigations a chain-elongation of mainly fatty acids with pair numbers of carbon atoms (acetate, butanoic and hexanoic acid) are demonstrated. After

  4. Fundamental research in the area of high temperature fuel cells in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyomin, A.K.

    1996-04-01

    Research in the area of molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells has been conducted in Russia since the late 60`s. Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry is the lead organisation in this area. Research in the area of materials used in fuel cells has allowed us to identify compositions of electrolytes, electrodes, current paths and transmitting, sealing and structural materials appropriate for long-term fuel cell applications. Studies of electrode processes resulted in better understanding of basic patterns of electrode reactions and in the development of a foundation for electrode structure optimization. We have developed methods to increase electrode activity levels that allowed us to reach current density levels of up to 1 amper/cm{sup 2}. Development of mathematical models of processes in high temperature fuel cells has allowed us to optimize their structure. The results of fundamental studies have been tested on laboratory mockups. MCFC mockups with up to 100 W capacity and SOFC mockups with up to 1 kW capacity have been manufactured and tested at IHTE. There are three SOFC structural options: tube, plate and modular.

  5. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  6. Radiation and mass transfer effects on MHD flow through porous medium past an exponentially accelerated inclined plate with variable temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Rani Pattnaik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of unsteady MHD free convection flow, heat and mass transfer past an exponentially accelerated inclined plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with uniform permeability, variable temperature and concentration has been carried out. The novelty of the present study was to analyze the effect of angle of inclination on the flow phenomena in the presence of heat source/sink and destructive reaction. The Laplace transformation method has been used to solve the governing equations. The effects of the material parameters, magnetic field and the permeability of the porous medium are discussed. From the present analysis it is reported that the presence of magnetic field and porous medium prevents the flow reversal. Angle of inclination and heat source sustains a retarding effect on velocity. The present study has an immediate application in understanding the drag experienced at the heated/cooled and inclined surfaces in a seepage flow.

  7. Medium-temperature supermarket refrigeration conversion from CFC-12 to HCFC-22 (R-12 to R-22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.H.

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a project to investigate the best approach for the conversion of medium-temperature supermarket refrigeration from R-12 (CFC) to R-22 (HCFC) so that the maximum energy-savings benefit can be realized by its member utilities and their customers. Such conversions will be necessary as CFCs are phased out. In this report, two medium temperature display case circuits at the EPRI/Safeway test store were converted. Single, large semihermetic, and open-drive compressors were tested. The large semihermetic and open-drive compressors were also equipped with cylinder unloaders and variable-speed drive so that either method of capacity control could be employed. The results of the testing showed that conversion to R-22 produced energy savings and that large semihermetic compressors with re-expansion unloaders were a viable alternative to single compressors in this application. Computer model results suggested that conversion of all medium-temperature refrigeration from R-12 to R-22 would result in peak demand savings of 5.3 kw (9.3%) and annual energy savings of 37,595 kWh (10.5%). Additional savings are possible by incorporating energy-efficient features such as floating head pressure control, condenser resizing to enable it to operate at a lower temperature, and high-efficiency condenser fan motors. Guidelines and procedures for energy-efficient retrofit are outlined.

  8. Influence of coolant temperature and pressure on destructive forces at fuel failure in the NSRR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusagaya, Kazuyuki [Global Nuclear Fuel - Japan Co., Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takehiko; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-01-01

    In order to design a new experimental capsule to be used in the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) experiment with the temperature and pressure conditions in a typical commercial BWR, coolant temperature and pressure influence is estimated for destructive forces during fuel rod failure in the experiment simulating reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). Considering steam property dependence on temperature and pressure, it is qualitatively shown that the destructive forces in the BWR operation condition are smaller than those in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. Water column velocity, which determines impact by water hammer, is further investigated quantitatively by modeling the experimental system and water hammer phenomenon. As a result, the maximum velocity of the water column in the BWR operation conditions is calculated to be only about 10% of that in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. (author)

  9. Effects of cooling channel blockage on fuel plate temperature in Tehran Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TABBAKH Farshid

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the variation of the temperature distribution of the fuel plate in Tehran Research Reactor core was studied in case of coolant channels blockage. While the experimental method is not possible, both the analytical and simulation methods were used to obtain the more reliable data. The results show that one channel blockage will increase the fuel temperature to about 100%, but it does not lead to clad melt down still. With further calculation and simulation it is understood that if the coolant velocity drops to 90% of its nominal value, it may causes the clad melt-ing down. At least two channels with complete blockage even at the positions far from the core center can also melt down the clad.

  10. Performance analysis results of a battery fuel gauge algorithm at multiple temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingam, B.; Avvari, G. V.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating a battery fuel gauge (BFG) algorithm is a challenging problem due to the fact that there are no reliable mathematical models to represent the complex features of a Li-ion battery, such as hysteresis and relaxation effects, temperature effects on parameters, aging, power fade (PF), and capacity fade (CF) with respect to the chemical composition of the battery. The existing literature is largely focused on developing different BFG strategies and BFG validation has received little attention. In this paper, using hardware in the loop (HIL) data collected form three Li-ion batteries at nine different temperatures ranging from -20 °C to 40 °C, we demonstrate detailed validation results of a battery fuel gauge (BFG) algorithm. The BFG validation is based on three different BFG validation metrics; we provide implementation details of these three BFG evaluation metrics by proposing three different BFG validation load profiles that satisfy varying levels of user requirements.

  11. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based

  12. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based

  13. TEMPERATURE PROFILES OF LOCAL THERMAL NONEQUILIBRIUM FOR THERMAL DEVELOPING FORCED CONVECTION IN POROUS MEDIUM PARALLEL PLATE CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao; LIU Xue-mei

    2006-01-01

    Based on the two-energy equation model, taking into account viscous dissipation due to the interaction between solid skeleton and pore fluid flow, temperature expressions of the solid skeleton and pore fluid flow are obtained analytically for the thermally developing forced convection in a saturated porous medium parallel plate channel,with walls being at constant temperature. It is proved that the temperatures of the two phases for the local thermal nonequilibrium approach to the temperature derived from the one-energy equation model for the local thermal equilibrium when the heat exchange coefficient goes to infinite. The temperature profiles are shown in figures for different dimensionless parameters and the effects of the parameters on the local thermal nonequilibrium are revealed by parameter study.

  14. CUTTING TEMPERATURE OF CBN TOOLS WHEN MACHINING STEEL OF MEDIUM HARDNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The cutting temperature of CBN tools when machining hardened steel was investigated at different cutting regime and cutting tool geometry. An unusual phenomenon that the depth of cut influenced the temperature more significantly than the feed rate was analysed via partial differentiation. A chamfered cutting edge generally raised the cutting temperature and the significance of the temperature increase was associated with the cutting speed.

  15. Self-supported interconnected Pt nanoassemblies as highly stable electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bao Yu; Ng, Wan Theng; Wu, Hao Bin; Wang, Xin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-16

    In it for the long haul: Clusters of Pt nanowires (3D Pt nanoassemblies, Pt NA) serve as an electrocatalyst for low-temperature fuel cells. These Pt nanoassemblies exhibit remarkably high stability following thousands of voltage cycles and good catalytic activity, when compared with a commercial Pt catalyst and 20 % wt Pt catalyst supported on carbon black (20 % Pt/CB).

  16. Temperature of aircraft cargo flame exposure during accidents involving fuel spills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of flame exposure temperatures of weapons contained in alert (parked) bombers due to accidents that involve aircraft fuel fires. The evaluation includes two types of accident, collisions into an alert aircraft by an aircraft that is on landing or take-off, and engine start accidents. Both the B-1B and B-52 alert aircraft are included in the evaluation.

  17. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  18. Characterizing high-temperature deformation of internally heated nuclear fuel element simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, A.I.; Fong, R.W.L.; Leitch, B.W.; Nitheanandan, T.; Williams, A., E-mail: alexander.belov@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The sag behaviour of a simulated nuclear fuel element during high-temperature transients has been investigated in an experiment utilizing an internal indirect heating method. The major motivation of the experiment was to improve understanding of the dominant mechanisms underlying the element thermo-mechanical response under loss-of-coolant accident conditions and to obtain accurate experimental data to support development of 3-D computational fuel element models. The experiment was conducted using an electrically heated CANDU fuel element simulator. Three consecutive thermal cycles with peak temperatures up to ≈1000 {sup o}C were applied to the element. The element sag deflections and sheath temperatures were measured. On heating up to 600 {sup o}C, only minor lateral deflections of the element were observed. Further heating to above 700 {sup o}C resulted in an element multi-rate creep and significant permanent bow. Post-test visual and X-ray examinations revealed a pronounced necking of the sheath at the pellet-to-pellet interface locations. A wall thickness reduction was detected in the necked region that is interpreted as a sheath longitudinal strain localization effect. The sheath cross-sectioning showed signs of a 'hard' pellet-cladding interaction due to the applied cycles. A 3-D model of the experiment was generated using the ANSYS finite element code. As a fully coupled thermal mechanical simulation is computationally expensive, it was deemed sufficient to use the measured sheath temperatures as a boundary condition, and thus an uncoupled mechanical simulation only was conducted. The ANSYS simulation results match the experiment sag observations well up to the point at which the fuel element started cooling down. (author)

  19. Niobium phosphates as an intermediate temperature proton conducting electrolyte for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    2012-01-01

    A new proton conductor based on niobium phosphates was synthesized using niobium pentoxide and phosphoric acid as precursors. The existence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphates was confirmed and found to be preserved after heat treatment at 500 °C or higher, contributing to an anhydrous proton co...... are of high interest as potential proton conducting electrolytes for fuel cells operational in an intermediate temperature range....

  20. Influence of carbon monoxide on the cathode in high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Stine; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the results of adding small amounts of CO gas to the cathode side in a HT-PEM fuel cell with a polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane running on either oxygen or air. Experimental conditions: Temperature ranges 120–160 °C, constant current either 200 mA/cm2 or 800 mA/cm2 and CO ran...

  1. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

    2005-08-25

    Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

  2. Composite electrolyte with proton conductivity for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Rizwan, E-mail: razahussaini786@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Ahmed, Akhlaq; Akram, Nadeem; Saleem, Muhammad; Niaz Akhtar, Majid; Ajmal Khan, M.; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Alvi, Farah; Yasir Rafique, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Sherazi, Tauqir A. [Department of Chemistry, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbotabad 22060 (Pakistan); Shakir, Imran [Sustainable Energy Technologies (SET) center, College of Engineering, King Saud University, PO-BOX 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Mohsin, Munazza [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore, 54000 (Pakistan); Javed, Muhammad Sufyan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: binzhu@kth.se, E-mail: zhubin@hubu.edu.cn [Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Faculty of Physics and Electronic Science/Faculty of Computer and Information, Hubei University, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China)

    2015-11-02

    In the present work, cost-effective nanocomposite electrolyte (Ba-SDC) oxide is developed for efficient low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). Analysis has shown that dual phase conduction of O{sup −2} (oxygen ions) and H{sup +} (protons) plays a significant role in the development of advanced LTSOFCs. Comparatively high proton ion conductivity (0.19 s/cm) for LTSOFCs was achieved at low temperature (460 °C). In this article, the ionic conduction behaviour of LTSOFCs is explained by carrying out electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Further, the phase and structure analysis are investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, we achieved an ionic transport number of the composite electrolyte for LTSOFCs as high as 0.95 and energy and power density of 90% and 550 mW/cm{sup 2}, respectively, after sintering the composite electrolyte at 800 °C for 4 h, which is promising. Our current effort toward the development of an efficient, green, low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with the incorporation of high proton conductivity composite electrolyte may open frontiers in the fields of energy and fuel cell technology.

  3. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O' Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power

  4. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O' Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power

  5. Preliminary study : optimization of pH and salinity for biosurfactant production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in diesel fuel and crude oil medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhwani, A. Z. N.; Nurlaila, H. S.; Ferdinand, F. D. K.; Fachria, R.; Hasan, A. E. Z.; Yani, M.; Setyawati, I.; Suryani

    2017-03-01

    Biosurfactant is secondary metabolite surface active compound produced by microorganisms which is nontoxic and eco-friendly. Microorganism producing biosurfactant that is quite potential to use in many applications is from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Good quality of biosurfactant production from microbes is supported by the suitable nutrients and environmental factors. The aim of this research was to obtain preliminary o data upon the optimum pH and salinity for the production of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in diesel fuel and crude oil medium. P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 cultured in diesel fuel and crude oil as carbon source showed biosurfactant activity. P.aeruginosa-derived biosurfactant was capable to form stable emulsion for 24 hours (EI24) in hydrocarbons n-hexane solutions. The particular biosurfactant showed EI24 highest value at pH 7 (31.02%) and 1% NaCl (24.00%) when P. aeruginosa was grown in 10% diesel fuel medium in mineral salt solution. As for the media crude oil, the highest EI24 value was at pH 6 (52.16%) and 1% NaCl (33.30%).

  6. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2002-03-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid startup is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  7. Study on the properties of the fuel compact for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung-yong; Lee, Sung-yong; Choi, Min-young; Lee, Seung-jae; Jo, Young-ho [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-woo; Cho, Moon-sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), one of the Gen-IV reactors, have been using the fuel element which is manufactured by the graphite matrix, surrounding Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)-coated Uranium particles. Factors with these characteristics effecting on the matrix of fuel compact are chosen and their impacts on the properties are studied. The fuel elements are considered with two types of concepts for HTGR, which are the block type reactor and the pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength with the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and the two kinds of candidate binder (Phenol and Polyvinyl butyral) were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated to measure mechanical properties. The objective of this research is to optimize the materials and composition of the mixture and the forming process by evaluating the mechanical properties before/after carbonization and heat treatment. From the mechanical test results, the mechanical properties of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents and kinds of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatments. In the result of the compressive strength and Vicker's hardness, the 10 wt% phenol binder added R+S graphite pellet was relatively higher mechanical properties than other pellets. The contents of Phenol binder, the kinds of graphite powder and the temperature of carbonization and heat treatment are considered important factors for the properties. To optimize the mechanical properties of fuel elements, the role of binders and the properties of graphites will be investigated as

  8. Chitosan-phosphotungstic acid complex as membranes for low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, M.; Pecoraro, C. M.; Di Quarto, F.; Bocchetta, P.

    2015-02-01

    Free-standing Chitosan/phosphotungstic acid polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by an easy and fast in-situ ionotropic gelation process performed at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study their morphological features and their thickness as a function of the chitosan concentration. The membrane was tested as proton conductor in low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell allowing to get peak power densities up to 350 mW cm-2. Electrochemical impedance measurements allowed to estimate a polyelectrolyte conductivity of 18 mS cm-1.

  9. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Hot-Spot Fuel Temperature in Pebble Bed and Prismatic Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Lim, H. S.; Lee, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors(HTGR) have been reviewed as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor(PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor(PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both a PBR and a PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the hot-spot fuel temperature distributions in a PBR and a PMR at a steady state. The computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10 is used to perform the three-dimensional analysis. The latest design data was used here based on the reference reactor designs, PBMR400 and GTMHR60.

  10. Numerical investigation of a heat transfer within the prismatic fuel assembly of a very high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Nam-il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok Street, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: takni@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok Street, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    The complex geometry of the hexagonal fuel blocks of the prismatic fuel assembly in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) hinders accurate evaluations of the temperature profile within the fuel assembly without elaborate numerical calculations. Therefore, simplified models such as a unit cell model have been widely applied for the analyses and designs of prismatic VHTRs since they have been considered as effective approaches reducing the computational efforts. In a prismatic VHTR, however, the simplified models cannot consider a heat transfer within a fuel assembly as well as a coolant flow through a bypass gap between the fuel assemblies, which may significantly affect the maximum fuel temperature. In this paper, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been carried out on a typical fuel assembly of a prismatic VHTR. Thermal behaviours and heat transfer within the fuel assembly are intensively investigated using the CFD solutions. In addition, the accuracy of the unit cell approach is assessed against the CFD solutions. Two example situations are illustrated to demonstrate the deficiency of the unit cell model caused by neglecting the effects of the bypass gap flow and the radial power distribution within the fuel assembly.

  11. Temperature control of a PEM fuel cell test bench for experimental MEA assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, J.J.; Puleston, P.F.; Kunusch, C. [LEICI, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), calle 1 esq. 47 s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia, N 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Visintin, A. [Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia, N 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisico-Quimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64 s/n, 1900, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the design, implementation and testing of a temperature control for a laboratory PEM fuel cell stack work bench intended for evaluation of experimental MEAs. The controller design is based on a thermal model of the fuel cell stack developed by the authors. The model is extended to the complete temperature range by considering a nonlinear description of the heating resistances. Its parameters are experimentally adjusted and its accuracy is validated in all the temperature operating range. Then, the temperature control is developed, using a proportional-integral structure with anti-windup features. It is implemented in a PC connected to an ad-hoc equipment of acquisition and control, that drives distributed cycles actuators to energize two heating resistances. The controller proved to be capable of regulating the stack temperature in a wide operating range, while eliminating the ripple typical of ON-OFF actuators. Finally, experimental results of closed loop operation are presented, demonstrating the good performance of the proposed control set up and thermal model. (author)

  12. The temperature of the warm neutral medium in the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanekar, N; Subrahmanyan, R; Chengalur, JN; Safouris, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    We report high-spectral-resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) H I 21-cm observations resulting in the detection of the warm neutral medium (WNM) of the Galaxy in absorption against two extragalactic radio sources, PKS 1814-637 and PKS 0407-658. The two lines of sight were selected on t

  13. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  14. Heat management in a portable high temperature PEM fuel cell module with open cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, T.; Keller, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The development and characterisation of a portable high temperature PEM fuel cell module is presented. The module consists of a 5-cell stack with open cathodes and coil compression. This design enables the operation and control with only one fan and compact and lightweight packaging. The stack is characterised with polarisation curves and single cell impedance spectroscopy. Temperature distribution in the stack and temperature control is analysed during startup and operation. The results show very similar cell characteristics and stable operation with high power density. Temperature control shows a good reaction on load changes as well as on setpoint changes. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Towards a Future of District Heating Systems with Low-Temperature Operation together with Non-Fossil Fuel Heat Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan; Dinçer, Ibrahim; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigation of non-fossil fuel heat sources to be supplied to low-energy district heating systems operating in low temperature such as 55 C and 25 C in terms of, respectively, supply and return. Vast variety of heat sources classed in categories such as fossil fuel, renewa...

  16. Effects of Straight and Serpentine Flow Field Designs on Temperature Distribution in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Izzuddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cells or sometimes called as polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is a device for energy transformation in a changing process from one form of energy to another form of energy. It became as an alternative especially for future use in stationary and vehicular applications. PEM fuel cells provide high efficiency and power density with null emission, low operating temperature, quickly start and long life. One of the aspects that are crucial in optimizing the PEM fuel cells performance is a flow field geometry. In this paper, a simulation case of PEM fuel cells was simulated to determine effects of a straight and serpentine flow field on temperature distribution in PEM fuel cells. ANSYS Fluent software was used to simulate 3-dimensional models of single PEM fuel cells in order to determine the effects of changes in the geometry flow field on temperature distributions. Results showed that the serpentine flow field design produces a better temperature distribution along the membrane. The simulation result shows a good agreement with the experiment, thus boost a higher confidence in the results to determine the effectiveness of the flow field design in PEM fuel cells.

  17. Physical, mechanical and electrochemical characterization of all-perovskite intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alidad

    Strontium- and magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) has been considered as a promising electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems in recent years due to its high ionic conductivity and chemical stability over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures and temperatures. This research describes synthesis, physical and mechanical behavior, electrochemical properties, phase evolution, and microstructure of components of an all-perovskite anode-supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (ITSOFC), based on porous La 0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3 (LSCM) anode, La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O 2.8 (LSGM) electrolyte, and porous La0.6Sr0.4Fe 0.8Co0.2O3 (LSCF) cathode. The phase evolution of synthesized LSGM and LSCM powders has been investigated, and it has been confirmed that there is no reaction between LSGM and LSCM at sintering temperature. Using different amounts of poreformers and binders as well as controlling firing temperature, porosity of the anode was optimized while still retaining good mechanical integrity. The effect of cell operation conditions under dry hydrogen fuel on the SOFC open circuit voltage (OCV) and cell performance were also investigated. Characterization study of the synthesized LSGM indicates that sintering at 1500°C obtains higher electrical conductivity compared to the currently published results, while conductivity of pellets sintered at 1400°C and 1450°C would be slightly lower. The effect of sintering temperature on bulk and grain boundary resistivities was also discussed. The mechanical properties, such as hardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness and modulus of rupture of the electrolyte were determined and correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphological characterization. Linear thermal expansion and thermal expansion coefficient of LSGM were also measured.

  18. The 21 cm Forest as a Probe of the Reionization and the Temperature of the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yidong; Fan, Zuhui; Trac, Hy; Cen, Renyue

    2009-01-01

    Using high redshift radio sources as background, the 21cm forest observations probe the neutral hydrogen absorption signatures of early structures along the lines of sight. Directly sensitive to the spin temperature of the hydrogen atoms, it complements the 21cm tomography observations, and provides information on the temperature as well as the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM). We use a radiative transfer simulation to investigate the 21cm forest signals during the epoch of reionization. We first check whether the equivalent width (EW) can be a representative indicator of the ionization and thermal state of the IGM, and find that the optical depth and EW are good representation of the reionization process. The features selected by their relative optical depth are excellent tracers of ionization fields, and the features selected by their absolute optical depth are very sensitive to the IGM temperature, so the IGM temperature information could potentially be extracted from 21cm forest observat...

  19. Heat treatment of medium-temperature Sasol-Lurgi gasifier coal-tar pitch for polymerizing to higher value products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mokoena; T.J. Van der Walt; T.J. Morgan; A.A. Herod; R. Kandiyoti [Sasol Technology (Pty) Ltd., Sasolburg (South Africa). R& amp; D Division

    2008-05-15

    Two coal-derived pitch samples, one a medium temperature pitch from a Sasol-Lurgi gasifier and the other from a high temperature coking process, have been heat treated to induce polymerization, both separately and as a mixture of pitches (co-pyrolysis). The initial pitch samples and the heat-treated samples have been examined by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), by UV-fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-F), by solid state {sup 13}C NMR; elemental analyses of the initial pitch samples have been carried out. The Sasol-Lurgi pitch showed larger apparent sizes, more alkyl and carbonyl functions, and smaller polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) groups than the high temperature pitch. Co-pyrolysis of the two pitches indicated that polymerized product from the Sasol-Lurgi pitch can be used as an extender for high-temperature binder pitch. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Neutronic behavior of thorium fuel cycles in a very high temperature hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Garcia, Lorena; Milian Perez, Daniel; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos; Milian Lorenzo, Daniel, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, Havana (Cuba); Velasco, Abanades, E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Department of Simulation of Thermo Energy Systems, Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy needs to guarantee four important issues to be successful as a sustainable energy source: nuclear safety, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and a minimal production of radioactive waste. Pebble bed reactors (PBR), which are very high temperature systems together with fuel cycles based in Thorium, they could offer the opportunity to meet the sustainability demands. Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant as Uranium. It is also a widely distributed natural resource readily accessible in many countries. This paper shows the main advantages of the use of a hybrid system formed by a Pebble Bed critical nuclear reactor and two Pebble Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) using a variety of fuel cycles with Thorium (Th+U{sup 233}, Th+Pu{sup 239} and Th+U). The parameters related to the neutronic behavior like deep burn, nuclear fuel breeding, Minor Actinide stockpile, power density profiles and other are used to compare the fuel cycles using the well-known MCNPX computational code. (author)

  1. High temperature solid oxide fuel cell integrated with novel allothermal biomass gasification. Part II: Exergy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulos, K. D.; Fryda, L.; Karl, J.; Poulou, S.; Kakaras, E.

    Biomass gasification derived gas is a renewable fuel, which can be used for SOFC applications. This work investigates the integration of a near atmospheric solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a novel allothermal biomass steam gasification process into a combined heat and power (CHP) system of less than MW e range. Heat for steam gasification is supplied from SOFC depleted fuel in a fluidised bed (FB) combustor via high temperature sodium heat pipes. In the first paper, the integrated system was modelled in Aspen Plus™ and critical aspects for its feasibility were identified. The aim of this second part is the evaluation of the integrated system in exergy terms. Satisfying allothermal gasification heat demand is illustrated by examining each sub-process involved separately as well as combined. For a relatively low STBR = 0.6, the SOFC fuel utilisation for which the system operates under optimum conditions is U f = 0.7. Above that value additional biomass has to be used in the FB combustor to provide gasification heat with considerable exergy losses. For SOFC operation at current density 2500 A m -2, the system uses 90 kg h -1 biomass, operates with electrical exergetic efficiency 32% producing 140 kW e, while the combined electrical and thermal exergetic efficiency is 35%.

  2. Evaluation of lower flammability limits of fuel-air-diluent mixtures using calculated adiabatic flame temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, M; Wong, W; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2006-03-17

    The lower flammability limit (LFL) of a fuel is the minimum composition in air over which a flame can propagate. Calculated adiabatic flame temperatures (CAFT) are a powerful tool to estimate the LFL of gas mixtures. Different CAFT values are used for the estimation of LFL. SuperChems is used by industry to perform flammability calculations under different initial conditions which depends on the selection of a threshold temperature. In this work, the CAFT at the LFL is suggested for mixtures of fuel-air and fuel-air-diluents. These CAFT can be used as the threshold values in SuperChems to calculate the LFL. This paper discusses an approach to evaluate the LFL in the presence of diluents such as N2 and CO2 by an algebraic method and by the application of SuperChems using CAFT as the basis of the calculations. The CAFT for different paraffinic and unsaturated hydrocarbons are presented as well as an average value per family of chemicals.

  3. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintauro, Peter [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  4. Studies in new materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Alex W.

    Ceramic materials have historically been of interest for their thermal and mechanical properties. However, certain ceramic materials can have very interesting electrical, magnetic and optical properties, leading to a new subclass, the electroceramics. Perovskites, in particular, have become the subject of intense research in this field. Specifically, doped barium zirconates have shown high proton conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (600--800°C), making them advantageous for use in solid oxide fuel cells. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert chemical energy into electricity using ion-conducting oxide ceramics as electrolytes. The anode component of the cell is also of interest. Cermets or ceramic metals can serve a dual role as substrates for thin film electrolytes and anodes in the cell. Thin films of gadolinium and ytterbium doped barium zirconate were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (KrF; 1--3 J/cm2) on several substrates, including cermets developed in our lab, in a 10--400 mTorr oxygen environment with various substrate temperatures. Crystalline structure and chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, respectively. Preliminary electrical measurements of the electrolyte/cermet structure were taken using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Keywords: solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), perovskites, proton conductors, electroceramics, gadolinium-doped barium zirconate (BZG).

  5. Synthesis and properties of random copolymers of functionalised polybenzimidazoles for high temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, J.A.; Benicewicz, B.C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and USC Nanocenter, University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    A series of polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) incorporating main chain sulphonic acid groups were synthesised as random copolymers with p-PBI in varying ratios using polyphosphoric acid (PPA) as both the polymerisation solvent and polycondensation reagent. The PPA process was used to produce high molecular weight phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI gel membranes in a one-step procedure. These membranes exhibit excellent mechanical properties (0.528-2.51 MPa tensile stress and 130-300% tensile strain) even at high acid doping levels [20-40 mol PA/PRU (polymer repeat unit)] and high conductivities (0.148-0.291 S cm{sup -1}) at elevated temperatures (>100 C) with no external humidification, depending on copolymer composition. Fuel cell testing was conducted with hydrogen fuel and air or oxygen oxidants for all membrane compositions at temperatures greater than 100 C without external feed gas humidification. Initial studies showed a maximum fuel performance of 0.675 V for the 25 mol% s-PBI/75 mol% p-PBI random copolymer at 180 C and 0.2 A cm{sup -2} with hydrogen and air, and 0.747 V for the same copolymer at 180 C and 0.2 A cm{sup -2} with hydrogen and oxygen. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Properties, degradation and high temperature fuel cell test of different types of PBI and PBI blend membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, Hans Christian; Chromik, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) with synthetically modified structures and their blends with a partially fluorinated sulfonated aromatic polyether have been prepared and characterized for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Significant improvement in the polymer chemical stability in ...

  7. Temperature Trends in Coal Char Combustion under Oxy-fuel Conditions for the Determination of Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Samira [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hecht, Ethan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion technology with carbon capture and storage could significantly reduce global CO2 emissions, a greenhouse gas. Implementation can be aided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, which require an accurate understanding of coal particle kinetics as they go through combustion in a range of environments. To understand the kinetics of pulverized coal char combustion, a heated flow reactor was operated under a wide range of experimental conditions. We varied the environment for combustion by modifying the diluent gas, oxygen concentration, gas flow rate, and temperature of the reactor/reacting gases. Measurements of reacting particle temperatures were made for a sub-bituminous and bituminous coal char, in environments with CO2 or N2 as the diluent gas, with 12, 24, and 36 vol-% oxygen concentration, at 50, 80, 100, and 200 standard liters per minute flowing through the reactor, reactor temperatures of 1200, 1400 K, at pressures slightly above atmospheric. The data shows consistent increasing particle temperature with increased oxygen concentration, reactor temperature and higher particle temperatures for N2 diluent than CO2. We also see the effects of CO2 gasification when different ranks of coal are used, and how the reduction in the temperature due to the CO2 diluent is greater for the coal char that has higher reactivity. Quantitative measurements for temperature are not yet complete due to ongoing calibration of detection systems.

  8. Impact of the Cooled-Vessel Design on the Peak Fuel Temperature of VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Jo, Chang Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This design can make the temperature of SA508/533 RPV maintain below the ASME code, which is 371 .deg. C during normal operation and 538 .deg. C for up to 1000 h during accident conditions. Based on the previous NGNP design, KAERI is developing a 350MWt VHTR which will adopt the cooled-vessel and could be applied for the hydrogen production, the process heat and cogeneration. As a low level design stage, the sizing of riser hole is needed. The reference CV is designed to have the same flow area with that of NGNP. Because the riser hole is located into the PSR, the sizing of riser hole affects the reduced amount of the graphite in PSR. It is expected that the peak fuel temperature will be increased during the accident conditions due to the reduced amount of the graphite heat capacity. Thus, the modified CV design is considered to have a smaller flow area. Based on the GAMMA+ code simulations of the reference CV and the modified CV designs, this paper evaluates the impact of the cooled-vessel design on the peak fuel temperature of a 350MWt VHTR during the accident conditions like LPCC and HPCC events. As comparing GAMMA+ code simulation results of 350MWt VHTR core using the reference cooled-vessel design with the modified cooled-vessel, it is evaluated that the peak fuel temperature of the reference cooled-vessel is 4 .deg. C - 8 .deg. C increased due to the reduction of graphite heat capacity during the accident conditions.

  9. Artificial Neural Network-Based Monitoring of the Fuel Assembly Temperature Sensor and FPGA Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    Numerous methods have been developed around the world to model the dynamic behavior and detect a faulty operating mode of a temperature sensor. In this context, we present in this study a new method based on the dependence between the fuel assembly temperature profile on control rods positions, and the coolant flow rate in a nuclear reactor. This seems to be possible since the insertion of control rods at different axial positions and variations in flow rate of the reactor coolant results in different produced thermal power in the reactor. This is closely linked to the instant fuel rod temperature profile. In a first step, we selected parameters to be used and confirmed the adequate correlation between the chosen parameters and those to be estimated by the proposed monitoring system. In the next step, we acquired and de-noised the data of corresponding parameters, the qualified data is then used to design and train the artificial neural network. The effective data denoising was done by using the wavelet transform to remove a various kind of artifacts such as inherent noise. With the suitable choice of wavelet level and smoothing method, it was possible for us to remove all the non-required artifacts with a view to verify and analyze the considered signal. In our work, several potential mother wavelet functions (Haar, Daubechies, Bi-orthogonal, Reverse Bi-orthogonal, Discrete Meyer and Symlets) were investigated to find the most similar function with the being processed signals. To implement the proposed monitoring system for the fuel rod temperature sensor (03 wire RTD sensor), we used the Bayesian artificial neural network 'BNN' technique to model the dynamic behavior of the considered sensor, the system correlate the estimated values with the measured for the concretization of the proposed system we propose an FPGA (field programmable gate array) implementation. The monitoring system use the correlation. (authors)

  10. Influence of Composition on Properties of Medium Temperature Sintering (Ba, Sr)TiO3 Series Capacitor Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the composition (Yb2O3, MgO, CeO2, Li2CO3) on the dielectric properties of medium temperature sintering (Ba,Sr)TiO3(BST) series capacitor ceramics was investigated by means of conventional technology process and orthogonal design experiments. The major secondary influencing factors and the influencing tendency of various factor′s levels for the dielectric properties of BST ceramics were obtained. The optimum formula for maximum dielectric constant (ε) and for minimum dielectric loss (tanδ) was obtained under the experimental conditions. The BST ceramics with optimum comprehensive properties was obtained by means of orthogonal design experiments, with the sintering temperature at 1200 ℃, the dielectric constant 5239, the dielectric loss 0.0097, withstand electric voltage over 6 MV·m-1, capacitance temperature changing rate (ΔC/C) -75.67%, and suited for Y5V character. The mechanism of the influence of various components on the dielectric properties of medium temperature sintering BST ceramics was studied, thus providing the basis for preparation of multilayer capacitor ceramics and single-chip capacitor ceramics.

  11. Validation of a Grid Independent Spray Model and Fuel Chemistry Mechanism for Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yoshikawa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Spray and combustion submodels used in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code, KIVACHEMKIN, were validated for Low Temperature Combustion (LTC in a diesel engine by comparing measured and model predicted fuel spray penetrations, and in-cylinder distributions of OH and soot. The conditions considered were long ignition delay, early and late fuel injection cases. It was found that use of a grid independent spray model, called the GASJET model, with an improved n-heptane chemistry mechanism can well predict the heat release rate, not only of the main combustion stage, but also of the cool flame stage. Additionally, the GASJET model appropriately predicts the distributions of OH and soot in the cylinder even when the resolution of the computational mesh is decreased by half, which significantly reduces the required computational time.

  12. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng;

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...... and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little...... contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also...

  13. High temperature proton exchange membranes based on polybenzimidazoles for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Savinell, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, acid–base polymer membranes represent an effective approach. The phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membrane seems so far the most successful system in the field. It has...... in recent years motivated extensive research activities with great progress. This treatise is devoted to updating the development, covering polymer synthesis, membrane casting, physicochemical characterizations and fuel cell technologies. To optimize the membrane properties, high molecular weight polymers...... with synthetically modified or N-substituted structures have been synthesized. Techniques for membrane casting from organic solutions and directly from acid solutions have been developed. Ionic and covalent cross-linking as well as inorganic–organic composites has been explored. Membrane characterizations...

  14. High temperature proton exchange membranes based on polybenzimidazole and clay composites for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Siu, Ana; Li, Qingfeng

    2011-01-01

    and pyridinium salts with varying polarity and hydrogen-bonding capacity. Clay modification by ion-exchange reactions involving replacement of interlayer inorganic cations was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The cast PBI membranes were characterized by their water uptake......, acid doping and swelling, tensile strength, conductivity and hydrogen permeability as well as by fuel cell tests. For the composite membranes, high acid doping levels were achieved with sufficient mechanical strength and improved dimensional stability or reduced membrane swelling. At an acid doping......-doped pristine PBI membranes. In accordance with the hydrogen permeability measurements, fuel cell tests exhibited high open circuit voltages (i.e., 1.02 V) at room temperature as well as high I–V performance compared with normal PBI membranes....

  15. Three-Dimensional Measurements of Fuel Distribution in High-Pressure, High- Temperature, Next-Generation Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.

    1998-01-01

    In our world-class, optically accessible combustion facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have developed the unique capability of making three-dimensional fuel distribution measurements of aviation gas turbine fuel injectors at actual operating conditions. These measurements are made in situ at the actual operating temperatures and pressures using the JP-grade fuels of candidate next-generation advanced aircraft engines for the High Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) programs. The inlet temperature and pressure ranges used thus far are 300 to 1100 F and 80 to 250 psia. With these data, we can obtain the injector spray angles, the fuel mass distributions of liquid and vapor, the degree of fuel vaporization, and the degree to which fuel has been consumed. The data have been used to diagnose the performance of injectors designed both in-house and by major U.S. engine manufacturers and to design new fuel injectors with overall engine performance goals of increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Mie scattering is used to visualize the liquid fuel, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize both liquid and fuel vapor.

  16. Development of a Microchannel High Temperature Recuperator for Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukas, Michael [Fuelcell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2014-03-24

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of microchannel recuperators for high temperature fuel cell/turbine hybrid systems for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. Both Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Turbine (SOFC/T) and Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T) systems employ an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell’s byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the SOFC/T and DFC/T systems include: electrical efficiencies of up to 65% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Project work consisted of candidate material selection from FuelCell Energy (FCE) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) institutional databases as well as from industrial and academic literature. Candidate materials were then downselected and actual samples were tested under representative environmental conditions resulting in further downselection. A microchannel thermal-mechanical model was developed to calculate overall device cost to be later used in developing a final Tier 1 material candidate list. Specifications and operating conditions were developed for both SOFC/T and DFC/T systems. This development included system conceptualization and progression to process flow diagrams (PFD’s) including all major equipment. Material and energy balances were then developed for the two types of systems which were then used for extensive sensitivity studies that used high temperature recuperator (HTR) design parameters (e.g., operating temperature) as inputs and calculated overall system parameters (e.g., system efficiency). The results of the sensitivity studies determined the final HTR design temperatures, pressure drops, and gas compositions. The results also established operating conditions and

  17. Formation of Medium Carbon TRIP Steel Microstructure During Annealing in the Intercritical Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokosza A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research conducted on austenite formation in the microstructure of 41MnSi6-5 TRIP steel during annealing in the intercritical temperature range. The influence of the annealing temperature on the volume fraction of retained austenite in the microstructure of the investigated steel after water quenching was also determined.

  18. Temperature insensitive prediction of glucose concentration in turbid medium using multivariable calibration based on external parameter orthogonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tongshuai; Zhang, Ziyang; Sun, Cuiying; Guo, Chao; Sun, Di; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The measurement accuracy of non-invasive blood glucose concentration (BGC) sensing with near-infrared spectroscopy is easily affected by the temperature variation in tissue because it would induce an unacceptable spectrum variation and the consequent prediction deviation. We use a multivariable correction method based on external parameter orthogonalization (EPO) to calibrate the spectral data recorded at different temperature values to reduce the spectral variation. The tested medium is a kind of tissue phantom, the Intralipid aqueous solution. The calibration uses a projection matrix to get the orthogonal spectral space to the variable of external parameter, i.e. temperature, and then the useful spectral information relative to glucose concentration has been reserved. Even more, training the projection matrix can be separated to building the calibration matrix for the prediction of glucose concentration as it only uses the representative samples' data with temperature variation. The method presents a lower complexity than modeling a robust prediction matrix, which can be built from comprehensive spectral data involved the all variables both of BGC and temperature. In our test, the calibrated spectra with the same glucose concentration but different temperature values show a significantly improved repeatability. And then the glucose concentration prediction results show a lower root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) than that using the robust calibration model, which has considered the two variables. We also discuss the rationality of the representative samples chosen by EPO. This research may be referenced to the temperature calibration for in vivo BGC sensing.

  19. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared those at lower temperatures. MFC performance was examined here over a temperature range of 4-30°C in terms of startup time needed for reproducible power cycles, and performance. MFCs initially operated at 15°C or higher all attained a reproducible cycles of power generation, but the startup time to reach stable operation increased from 50h at 30°C to 210h at 15°C. At temperatures below 15°C, MFCs did not produce appreciable power even after one month of operation. If an MFC was first started up at temperature of 30°C, however, reproducible cycles of power generation could then be achieved at even the two lowest temperatures of 4°C and 10°C. Power production increased linearly with temperature at a rate of 33±4mW°C-1, from 425±2mWm-2 at 4°C to 1260±10mWm-2 at 30°C. Coulombic efficiency decreased by 45% over this same temperature range, or from CE=31% at 4°C to CE=17% at 30°C. These results demonstrate that MFCs can effectively be operated over a wide range of temperatures, but our findings have important implications for the startup of larger scale reactors where low wastewater temperatures could delay or prevent adequate startup of the system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela; Zhou, Fan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) at varying temperatures, ranging from 140 °C to 180 °C. For the study, a H3PO4 – doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) – based membrane electrode assembly (MEA......) of 45 cm2 active surface area from BASF was employed. The study showed overall negligible effects of methanol-water vapor mixture slips on performance, even at relatively low simulated steam methanol reforming conversion of 90%, which corresponds to 3% methanol vapor by volume in the anode gas feed....... Temperature on the other hand has significant impact on the performance of an HT-PEMFC. To assess the effects of methanol-water vapor mixture alone, CO2 and CO are not considered in these tests. The analysis is based on polarization curves and impedance spectra registered for all the test points. After...

  1. Further Improvement and System Integration of High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    with these compatible subunits. The main goal of the project is a 2kWel HT-PEMFC stack operating in a temperature range of 150-200°C, with a single cell performance target of 0.7 A/cm² at a cell voltage around 0.6 V. The target durability is more than 5,000 hours. A hydrocarbon reformer and a catalytic burner...... are to be developed and integrated with the stack. The key issue of the project is development and improvement of the temperature-resistant polymer membranes with respect to durability, conductivity, mechanical and other properties. For this purpose, basic polymers will be first synthesized and optimized. Different...... routes to functionalize the polymers will be explored to increate proton conductivity. By the development of advanced materials, demonstration of the high temperature PEMFC stack and integration of such a system, FURIM is expected to sufficiently promote the commercialisation of the fuel cell technology...

  2. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Performance Characterisation with CO and CO2 using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    In this work, extensive electrochemical impedance measurements have been conducted on a 45 cm2 BASF Celtec P2100 high temperature PEM MEA. The fuel cell performance has been examined subject to some of the poisoning effects experienced when running on a reformate gas. The impedance is measured...... at different temperatures, currents, and different content of CO, CO2 and H2 in the anode gas. The impedance spectrum at each operating point is fitted to an equivalent circuit and an analysis to identify the different mechanisms governing the impedance is performed. The trends observed, when varying...... the operating conditions under pure H2, generally show good agreement with results from the literature. When adding CO and CO2 to the anode gas the entire frequency spectrum is affected, and especially the measurements conducted at low temperatures and high CO concentrations reveal undesirable transient effects....

  3. An experimental study on the effects of the thermal barrier plating over engine fuel consumption exhaust temperature and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Gürbüz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study, the combustion chamber elements of a one-cylinder diesel engine which is air-cooled, single-cylinder, direct injection, 4-stroke and starter motor were plated with thermal barrier plating and tested with diesel fuel between the speeds of 1600 1/min to 3200 1/min and determined the effects of the thermal barrier plating on the engine exhaust gas temperature, emissions and fuel consumption. Increase in the temperature of the exhaust gas, decrease in HC and CO emissions that are harmful to the environment and living things and improvement in fuel consumption were observed.

  4. Fuel reforming and electrical performance studies in intermediate temperature ceria - gadolinia-based SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livermore, S.J.A. [CERAM Research, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Birchall Centre for Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Chemistry, Keele Univ. (United Kingdom); Cotton, J.W. [CERAM Research, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Ormerod, R.M. [Birchall Centre for Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Chemistry, Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2000-03-01

    The methane reforming and carbon deposition characteristics of two nickel/ceria-gadolinia cermet anodes have been studied over the temperature range 550-700 C, for use in intermediate temperature ceria-gadolinia (CGO)-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), using conventional catalytic methods and temperature-programmed spectroscopy. The electrical performance and durability of planar CGO-based SOFCs with a 280-{mu}m-thick CGO electrolyte, screen printed cathode and different screen printed nickel/CGO cermet anodes have been studied over the temperature range 500-650 C. Temperature-programmed reduction has been used to study the reduction characteristics of the anodes, and indicates the presence of 'bulk' NiO particles and smaller NiO particles in intimate contact with the ceria. Both anodes show good activity towards methane steam reforming with methane activation occurring at temperatures as low as 210 C; steady-state steam reforming of methane was observed using a methane-rich mixture at 650 C, with 20% methane conversion. Post-reaction temperature-programmed oxidation has been used to determine the amount of carbon deposited during reforming and the strength of its interaction with the anode. (orig.)

  5. A comparison of heat transfer enhancement in a medium temperature thermal energy storage heat exchanger using fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis; Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    An experimental energy storage system has been designed using a horizontal concentric tube heat exchanger incorporating a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) Erythritol, with a melting point of 117.7 C. Three experimental configurations, a control system with no heat transfer enhancement and systems augmented with circular and longitudinal fins have been studied. The results presented compare the system heat transfer characteristics using isotherm plots and temperature-time curves. The system with longitudinal fins gave the best performance with increased thermal response during charging and reduced subcooling in the melt during discharging. The experimentally measured data for the control, circular finned and longitudinal finned systems have been shown to vindicate the assumption of axissymmetry (direction parallel to the heat transfer fluid flow) using temperature gradients in the axial, radial and angular directions in the double pipe PCM system. (author)

  6. Effects of wall shear stress on unsteady MHD conjugate flow in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Khan

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of an arbitrary wall shear stress on unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a Newtonian fluid with conjugate effects of heat and mass transfer. The fluid is considered in a porous medium over a vertical plate with ramped temperature. The influence of thermal radiation in the energy equations is also considered. The coupled partial differential equations governing the flow are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for velocity and temperature in case of both ramped and constant wall temperature as well as for concentration are obtained. It is found that velocity solutions are more general and can produce a huge number of exact solutions correlative to various fluid motions. Graphical results are provided for various embedded flow parameters and discussed in details.

  7. Generalized Thermoelastic Medium with Temperature-Dependent Properties for Different Theories under the Effect of Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamed I. A.; Elmaklizi, Yassmin D.; Said, Samia M.

    2013-03-01

    The problem of the generalized thermoelastic medium for three different theories under the effect of a gravity field is investigated. The Lord-Shulman (L-S), Green-Lindsay (G-L), and classical-coupled (CD) theories are discussed. The modulus of the elasticity is given as a linear function of the reference temperature. The exact expressions for the displacement components, temperature, and stress components are obtained by using normal mode analysis. Numerical results for the field quantities are given in the physical domain and illustrated graphically in the absence and presence of gravity. A comparison also is made between the three theories for the results with and without a temperature dependence.

  8. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 97 October. Tunneling reaction and quantum medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru [eds.

    1998-02-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 3rd Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in Oct. 13 and 14, 1997. The main subject of the meeting is `Tunneling Reaction and Quantum Medium`. In the meeting, the physical and chemical phenomena in the liquid helium such as quantum nucleation, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and tunneling abstraction reaction of tritium atom were discussed as the main topics as well as the tunneling reactions in the solid hydrogen and organic compounds. Through the meetings held in 1995, 1996, and 1997, the tunneling phenomena proceeding at various temperatures (room temperature to mK) in the wide fields of chemistry, biology, and physics were discussed intensively and the importance of the tunneling phenomena in the science has been getting clear. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 97 October. Tunneling reaction and quantum medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru [eds.

    1998-02-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 3rd Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in Oct. 13 and 14, 1997. The main subject of the meeting is `Tunneling Reaction and Quantum Medium`. In the meeting, the physical and chemical phenomena in the liquid helium such as quantum nucleation, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and tunneling abstraction reaction of tritium atom were discussed as the main topics as well as the tunneling reactions in the solid hydrogen and organic compounds. Through the meetings held in 1995, 1996, and 1997, the tunneling phenomena proceeding at various temperatures (room temperature to mK) in the wide fields of chemistry, biology, and physics were discussed intensively and the importance of the tunneling phenomena in the science has been getting clear. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert N., E-mail: morrisrn@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • High-temperature safety tests were performed on 14 irradiated HTGR fuel compacts. • Significant krypton release was detected in only one of the safety tests. • Cesium retention by intact SiC was excellent, even up to 1800 °C. • Release of Ag, Eu, and Sr was dominated by previous release during irradiation. • Silver exhibited the highest fractional release. - Abstract: The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ∼58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 85}Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ∼100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10{sup −6} after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and {sup

  11. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  12. Thermodynamics of Micellization of n-Alkyl Sulfates in an Alkaline Medium at Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso; Taboada; Mosquera; Sarmiento

    1999-06-15

    Critical micelle concentrations (cmc) have been calculated from conductivity measurements at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K for sodium n-decyl sulfate (SDES), sodium n-undecyl sulfate (SUNDS), and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a medium of pH 10.0 and ionic strength 0.0312. Thermodynamic parameters of micellization, standard Gibbs energies (), standard enthalpies (), and standard entropies (), have been obtained by application of the model of Evans and Ninham in terms of hydrophobic and surface contributions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chunghao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Baney, Ronald H., E-mail: rbane@mse.ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-02-28

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO{sub 2} fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO{sub 2} surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  14. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, James S.; Baney, Ronald H.

    2011-02-01

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO 2 fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO 2 surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  15. Scale-up of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell based on polybenzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, F. Javier; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Úbeda, Diego; Lobato, Justo

    A high temperature PEM fuel cell stack with a total active area 150 cm 2 has been studied. The PEM technology is based on a polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. Cast from a PBI polymer synthesised in our lab, the performance of a three-cell stack was analysed in static and dynamic modes. In static mode, operating at high constant oxygen flow rate (QO2 > 1105 ml O2 / min) produces a small decrease on the stack performance. High constant oxygen stoichiometry (λO2 > 3) does not produce a decrease on the performance of the stack. There are not differences between operating at constant flow rate of oxygen and constant stoichiometry of oxygen in the stack performance. The effect of operating at high temperature with a pressurization system and operating at higher temperatures are beneficial since the performance of the fuel cell is enhanced. A large shut-down stage produces important performance losses due to the loss of catalyst activity and the loss of membrane conductivity. After 150 h of operation at 0.2 A cm -2, it is observed a very high voltage drop. The phosphoric acid leached from the stack was also evaluated and did not exceed 2% (w/w). This fact suggests that the main degradation mechanism of a fuel cell stack based on polybenzimidazole is not the electrolyte loss. In dynamic test mode, it was observed a rapid response of power and current output even at the lower step-time (10 s). In the static mode at 125 °C and 1 atm, the stack reached a power density peak of 0.29 W cm -2 (43.5 W) at 1 V.

  16. 75 FR 33565 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for New Medium- and Heavy-Duty Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... the report recently issued by the National Academy of Sciences. Transportation Research Board... comments from Federal, State, and local agencies, Indian tribes, and the public to help identify the... Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, Final Rule, 75 FR 25324 (May 7, 2010)....

  17. Mathematical Simulation of Heat Transfer in Heterogenous Forest Fuel Layer Influenced by Heated Up to High Temperatures Steel Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovskiy Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity of forest fuel layer renders the important influence on forest fire occurrence processes. One of sources of the raised temperature on forested territories is metal particles heated up to high temperatures. Such particles can be formed as a result of welding of metals on forested territories. The present paper represents the heat transfer research in forest fuel at the influence of metal particle heated up to high temperatures. The heterogonous forest fuel layer with inclusions of small wooden branches and chips is considered. Such object research is urgent especially at fire forecasting on forest cutting. The technology of mathematical simulation is used. The two-dimensional problem of heat transfer in forest fuel layer structure with wood inclusions is solved.

  18. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  19. Copper cobalt spinel as a high performance cathode for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lin; Wang, Qi; Fan, Lishuang; Wang, Pengxiang; Zhang, Naiqing; Sun, Kening

    2016-06-30

    CuCo2O4 spinel prepared via an EDTA-citric acid process was studied as a candidate solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material at intermediate temperatures (IT). CuCo2O4 cathodes were measured using thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. AC impedance spectroscopy and DC polarization measurements were used to study the electrode performance. The obtained value of the polarization resistances at 800 °C was 0.12 Ω cm(2) with a maximum power density of 972 mW cm(-2).

  20. New electrocatalyst support for high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaventura, M.; Brandao, L.; Mendes, A. [Porto Univ. (PT). Lab. de Engenharia de Processos, Ambiente e Energia (LEPAE)

    2010-07-01

    This work compares the performance of electrocatalysts based on platinum supported in single-wall carbon nanohorns (Pt-SWNH) and supported in carbon black (Pt-carbon black) during high temperature PEM fuel operation. MEAs made of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) were characterized by polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), at 160 C. The Pt-SWNH electrocatalyst presented a higher electrochemical surface area (ESA) when compared to Pt-carbon black. However, electrochemical experiments showed a higher ohmic resistance of the Pt-SWNH electrode related to a higher hydrophobic character of the SWNH carbon. (orig.)

  1. Potential Usage of Thermoelectric Devices in a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Chen, Min; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Methanol fuelled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) power systems are promising as the next generation of vehicle engines, efficient and environmentally friendly. Currently, their performance still needs to be improved and they still rely on a large Li-ion battery......-difference model is then employed and two main parameters are identified. Secondly, TE coolers are integrated into the methanol steam reformer to regulate heat fluxes herein and improve the system dynamic performance. Similar modification is also done on the evaporator to improve its dynamic performance as well...

  2. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    the oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending......Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper...

  3. Dynamic modeling of a three-stage low-temperature ethanol reformer for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Vanesa M.; Serra, Maria [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Eduardo; Llorca, Jordi [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, ed. ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    A low-temperature ethanol reformer based on a cobalt catalyst for the production of hydrogen has been designed aiming the feed of a fuel cell for an autonomous low-scale power production unit. The reformer comprises three stages: ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and hydrogen over SnO{sub 2} followed by acetaldehyde steam reforming over Co(Fe)/ZnO catalyst and water gas shift reaction. Kinetic data have been obtained under different experimental conditions and a dynamic model has been developed for a tubular reformer loaded with catalytic monoliths for the production of the hydrogen required to feed a 1 kW PEMFC. (author)

  4. Potential Usage of Thermoelectric Devices in a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Chen, Min; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2012-01-01

    -liquid heat exchanger to jointly form a heat recovery subsystem for electricity production. It is calculated that the recovered power can increase the system efficiency and mitigate the dependence on Li-ion battery during system startup. To further improve the TEG subsystem performance, a finite......Methanol fuelled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) power systems are promising as the next generation of vehicle engines, efficient and environmentally friendly. Currently, their performance still needs to be improved and they still rely on a large Li-ion battery...

  5. A fuel cell operating between room temperature and 250 C based on a new phosphoric acid based composite electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Rong [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Xu, Xiaoxiang; Irvine, John T.S. [School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Tao, Shanwen [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    A phosphoric acid based composite material with core-shell microstructure has been developed to be used as a new electrolyte for fuel cells. A fuel cell based on this electrolyte can operate at room temperature indicating leaching of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with liquid water is insignificant at room temperature. This will help to improve the thermal cyclability of phosphoric acid based electrolyte to make it easier for practical use. The conductivity of this H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-based electrolyte is stable at 250 C with addition of the hydrophilic inorganic compound BPO{sub 4} forming a core-shell microstructure which makes it possible to run a PAFC at a temperature above 200 C. The core-shell microstructure retains after the fuel cell measurements. A power density of 350 mW/cm{sup 2} for a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell has been achieved at 200 C. The increase in operating temperature does not have significant benefit to the performance of a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell. For the first time, a composite electrolyte material for phosphoric acid fuel cells which can operate in a wide range of temperature has been evaluated but certainly further investigation is required. (author)

  6. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Samples of irradiated MOX fuel of 44.5 GWd/tHM mean burn-up were prepared by core drilling at three different radial positions of a fuel pellet. They were subsequently heated in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer up to complete vaporisation of the sample (˜2600 K) and the release of fission gas (krypton and xenon) as well as helium was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used in parallel to investigate the evolution of the microstructure of a sample heated under the same condition up to given key temperatures as determined from the gas release profiles. A clear initial difference for fission gas release and microstructure was observed as a function of the radial position of the samples and therefore of irradiation temperature. A good correlation between the microstructure evolution and the gas release peaks could be established as a function of the temperature of irradiation and (laboratory) heating. The region closest to the cladding (0.58 < r/r0 < 0.96), designated as sample type A in Fig. 1. It represents the "cooler" part of the fuel pellet. The irradiation temperatures (Tirrad) in this range are from 854 to 1312 K (ΔT: 458 K). The intermediate radial zone of the pellet (0.42 < r/r0 < 0.81), designated sample type B in Fig. 1, has a Tirrad ranging from 1068 to 1434 K (ΔT: 365 K). The central zone of the pellet (0.003 < r/r0 < 0.41), designated sample type C in Fig. 1, which was close to the hottest part of the pellet, has a Tirrad ranging from 1442 to 1572 K (ΔT: 131 K). The sample irradiation temperatures were determined from the calculated temperature profile (exponential function) knowing the core temperature of the fuel (1573 K) [11], the standard temperature for this type of fuel at the inner side of the cladding (800 K). The average burnup was calculated with TRANSURANUS code [12] and the PA burnup is the average burnup multiplied by the ratio of the fissile Pu concentration in PA over average fissile Pu concentration in fuel [11]. Calculated

  7. Low-temperature Ignition-delay Characteristics of Several Rocket Fuels with Mixed Acid in Modified Open-cup-type Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Riley O

    1950-01-01

    Summaries of low-temperature self-ignition data of various rocket fuels with mixed acid (nitric plus sulfuric) are presented. Several fuels are shown to have shorter ignition-delay intervals and less variation in delay intervals at moderate and sub-zero temperatures than crude N-ethylaniline (monoethylaniline),a rocket fuel in current use.

  8. The use of organic zeotropic mixture with high temperature glide as a working fluid in medium-temperature vapor power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsukiewicz Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the idea of using organic substances as working fluids in vapor power plants, in order to convert the low and medium temperature thermal energy sources into electrical energy. The calculation results of the power plant efficiency for butane-ethane zeotropic mixtures of different mass compositions, for the power plant supplied with hot water having a temperature of 120°C. Based on the results of thermal-flow calculations it was found that the use of zeotropic mixture does not allow to increase the efficiency and output of the power plant (these values appeared as slightly lower ones. However, it was found that, through the selection of a mixture of sufficiently large temperature glide, the heat exchange surface of the condenser can be reduced or a co-generation system can be implemented.

  9. Degradation kinetics of fisetin and quercetin in solutions affected by medium pH, temperature and co-existed proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of medium pH, temperature and coexisted proteins on the degradation of two flavonoids fisetin and quercetin were assessed by spectroscopic method in the present study. Based on the measured degradation rate constants (k, fisetin was more stable than quercetin in all cases. Increasing medium pH from 6.0 to 7.5 at 37°C enhanced respective k values of fisetin and quercetin from 8.30x10−3 and 2.81x10−2 to 0.202 and 0.375 h-1 (P<0.05. In comparison with their degradation at 37°C, fisetin and quercetin showed larger k values at higher temperature (0.124 and 0.245 h−1 at 50°C, or 0.490 and 1.42 h−1 at 65°C. Four protein products in medium could stabilize the two flavonoids (P<0.05, as these proteins at 0.10 g L-1 decreased respective k values of fisetin and quercetin to 2.28x10−2-2.98x10−2 and 4.37´10−2-5.97x10−2 h−1. Hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and the two flavonoids was evidenced responsible for the stabilization, as sodium dodecyl sulfate could destroy the stabilization significantly (P<0.05. Casein and soybean protein provided greater stabilization than whey protein isolate. It is thus concluded that higher temperature and alkaline pH can enhance flavonoid loss, whereas coexisted proteins as flavonoid stabilizers can inhibit flavonoid degradation.

  10. Thorium-Based Fuel Cycles in the Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Hong; YANG Yongwei; JING Xingqing; XU Yunlin

    2006-01-01

    Large stockpiles of civil-grade as well as weapons-grade plutonium have been accumulated in the world from nuclear power or other programs of different countries. One alternative for the management of the plutonium is to incinerate it in the high temperature reactor (HTR). The thorium-based fuel cycle was studied in the modular HTR to reduce weapons-grade plutonium stockpiles, while producing no additional plutonium or other transuranic elements. Three thorium-uranium fuel cycles were also investigated. The thorium absorption cross sections of the resolved and unresolved resonances were generated using the ZUT-DGL code based on existing resonance data. The equilibrium core of the modular HTR was calculated and analyzed by means of the code VSOP'94. The results show that the modular HTR can incinerate most of the initially loaded plutonium amounting to about 95.3% net 239Pu for weapons-grade plutonium and can effectively utilize the uranium and thorium in the thorium-uranium fuel cycles.

  11. An Innovative Configuration for CO2 Capture by High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rossi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many technological solutions have been proposed for CO2 capture in the last few years. Most of them are characterized by high costs in terms of energy consumption and, consequently, higher fossil fuel use and higher economic costs. High temperature fuel cells are technological solutions currently developed for energy production with low environmental impact. In CIRIAF—University of Perugia labs, cylindrical geometry, small-sized molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC prototypes were built and tested with good energy production and lifetime performances. In the present work, an innovative application for MCFCs is proposed, and an innovative configuration for CO2 capture/separation is investigated. The plant scheme is based on a reformer and a cylindrical MCFC. MCFCs are the most suitable solutions, because CO2 is used in their operating cycle. An analysis in terms of energy consumption/kgCO2 captured is made by coupling the proposed configuration with a gas turbine plant. The proposed configuration is characterized by a theoretical energy consumption of about 500 kJ/kgCO2, which is quite lower than actual sequestration technologies. An experimental campaign will be scheduled to verify the theoretical findings.

  12. Hydrogen from biomass gas steam reforming for low temperature fuel cell: energy and exergy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sordi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a method to analyze hydrogen production by biomass gasification, as well as electric power generation in small scale fuel cells. The proposed methodology is the thermodynamic modeling of a reaction system for the conversion of methane and carbon monoxide (steam reforming, as well as the energy balance of gaseous flow purification in PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption is used with eight types of gasification gases in this study. The electric power is generated by electrochemical hydrogen conversion in fuel cell type PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. Energy and exergy analyses are applied to evaluate the performance of the system model. The simulation demonstrates that hydrogen production varies with the operation temperature of the reforming reactor and with the composition of the gas mixture. The maximum H2 mole fraction (0.6-0.64 mol.mol-1 and exergetic efficiency of 91- 92.5% for the reforming reactor are achieved when gas mixtures of higher quality such as: GGAS2, GGAS4 and GGAS5 are used. The use of those gas mixtures for electric power generation results in lower irreversibility and higher exergetic efficiency of 30-30.5%.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells And Electrolyzers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    range. For the electrodes, carbon cloth and carbon paper were tested as gas diffusion layers with different catalytic compositions, and of the two, carbon paper with a platinum loading of 7 mg cm−2 had the better performance. However, carbon is unstable at the conditions in the fuel cell cathode...... conductivity of the electrolyte, a high level of humidification was necessary. Composites with CsH2PO4 were made to improve the properties of the electrolyte material. Composites in formation with mechanically strong materials including ZrO2, TiO2 and NdPO4·0.5H2O improved the densification of the electrolyte......, which further resulted in improved stability of the fuel cell. Open circuit voltages (OCVs) using such fuel cells were found to be high, above 0.9 V, and stable up to 250°C. Composite formation with ZrO2 furthermore resulted in increased conductivity at higher temperatures probably due to the physical...

  14. Raman spectroscopy to monitor the effects of temperature regime and medium composition on micro-organism growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, O.; Haroniková, A.; Ježek, J.; Bernatová, S.; Márová, I.; Breierová, E.; Šerý, M.; Šiler, M.; Zemánek, P.

    2016-12-01

    A biomass of yeast strains has been studied using Raman spectroscopy due to their potential applications in the field of biofuel generation, food industry and biotechnological applications. In order to utilize biomass for efficient industrial/biotechnological production, the optimal cultivation parameters have to be determined which in turn lead to high production of desired substances such as oil, carotenoids, and pigments in the selected cell line of yeast. Therefore, we focused on different cultivation conditions (the effects of temperature regime and medium composition) and their influence on microorganisms growth and metabolic changes.

  15. Intermediate temperature fuel cells based on proton conducting electrolytes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duval, S.; Holtappels, P.

    2006-03-15

    Solid oxide proton conductors can offer a new intermediate temperature fuel cell technology combining the advantages of polymeric fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cells. Among potential proton conductor materials, Y-doped barium zirconate (BZY) was found to be a promising candidate. This material was synthesised and characterised at EMPA. The synthesis study shows the possibility to use up scalable methods to produce BZY. It was demonstrated that BZY can take up protons and that the protons are the mobile charge carriers that dominate the conductivity. The conductivity of the grain interior (log {sigma} {approx} -3 S.cm{sup -1} at 300 {sup o}C) competes with the conductivity of the best proton conductors. A correlation between the bulk conductivity and the cubic lattice parameter was observed. It was found that controlling the lattice parameter during the synthesis enable to tune the conductivity. The total conductivity of the test material was found to be dominated by the large resistive grain boundary contribution. Neither a clear microstructure/conductivity relationship could be identified nor could be found a blocking secondary phase. Only an exceptional thermal treatment (annealing up to 2200 {sup o}C) showed an improvement of the grain boundary conductivity. A first interpretation presumes an electronic effect arising from the shearing of crystallographic planes that depresses either the proton concentration or the proton mobility in the vicinity of the grain boundaries (i.e. in the so-called 'space charge region'). Consequences for the further development of BZY for fuel cell application are discussed. (author)

  16. Using Extractive FTIR to Measure N2O from Medium Heavy Duty Vehicles Powered with Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to measure N2O and other pollutant gases during an evaluation of two medium heavy-duty diesel trucks equipped with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). The emissions of these trucks were characterized under a variety of oper...

  17. Behavior of a hammerhead ribozyme in aqueous solution at medium to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Murr, Nizar; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Rihova, Martina; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Kato, Mikio; Kawamura, Kunio

    2012-09-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis proposes that—early in the evolution of life—RNA molecules played important roles both in information storage and in enzymatic functions. However, this hypothesis seems to be inconsistent with the concept that life may have emerged under hydrothermal conditions since RNA molecules are considered to be labile under such extreme conditions. Presently, the possibility that the last common ancestor of the present organisms was a hyperthermophilic organism which is important to support the hypothesis of the hydrothermal origin of life has been subject of strong discussions. Consequently, it is of importance to study the behavior of RNA molecules under hydrothermal conditions from the viewpoints of stability, catalytic functions, and storage of genetic information of RNA molecules and determination of the upper limit of temperature where life could have emerged. In the present work, self-cleavage of a natural hammerhead ribozyme was examined at temperatures 10-200 °C. Self-cleavage was investigated in the presence of Mg2+, which facilitates and accelerates this reaction. Self-cleavage of the hammerhead ribozyme was clearly observed at temperatures up to 60 °C, but at higher temperatures self-cleavage occurs together with hydrolysis and with increasing temperature hydrolysis becomes dominant. The influence of the amount of Mg2+ on the reaction rate was also investigated. In addition, we discovered that the reaction proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations (Na+ or K+), although very slowly. Furthermore, at high temperatures (above 60 °C), monovalent cations protect the ribozyme against degradation.

  18. New fuel air control strategy for reducing NOx emissions from corner-fired utility boilers at medium-low loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Sinan; Fang, Qingyan; Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Due to the rapidly growing renewable power, the fossil fuel power plants have to be increasingly operated under large and rapid load change conditions, which can induce various challenges. This work aims to reduce NOx emissions of large-scale corner-fired boilers operated at medium–low loads...... of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system by about 20% at medium–low loads, compared to those based on the original control. The new control strategy has also been successfully applied to two other corner-fired boilers to achieve a significant NOx emission reduction at partial loads. In all three....... The combustion characteristics and NOx emissions from a 1000 MWe corner-fired tower boiler under different loads are investigated experimentally and numerically. A new control strategy for the annular fuel air is proposed and implemented in the boiler, in which the secondary air admitted to the furnace through...

  19. Development and design of experiments optimization of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell auxiliary power unit with onboard fuel processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstedt, Jörg; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen; Severin, Christopher; Pischinger, Stefan

    In this work, the concept development, system layout, component simulation and the overall DOE system optimization of a HT-PEM fuel cell APU with a net electric power output of 4.5 kW and an onboard methane fuel processor are presented. A highly integrated system layout has been developed that enables fast startup within 7.5 min, a closed system water balance and high fuel processor efficiencies of up to 85% due to the recuperation of the anode offgas burner heat. The integration of the system battery into the load management enhances the transient electric performance and the maximum electric power output of the APU system. Simulation models of the carbon monoxide influence on HT-PEM cell voltage, the concentration and temperature profiles within the autothermal reformer (ATR) and the CO conversion rates within the watergas shift stages (WGSs) have been developed. They enable the optimization of the CO concentration in the anode gas of the fuel cell in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies and an optimized dimensioning of the ATR and WGS reactors. Furthermore a DOE optimization of the global system parameters cathode stoichiometry, anode stoichiometry, air/fuel ratio and steam/carbon ratio of the fuel processing system has been performed in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies for all system operating points under given boundary conditions.

  20. Investigation of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells for air-independent UUV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moton, Jennie Mariko

    Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) will benefit greatly from high energy density (> 500 Wh/L) power systems utilizing high-energy-density fuels and air-independent oxidizers. Current battery-based systems have limited energy densities (electrolytes with operating temperatures of 650°C and lower may operate in the unique environments of a promising UUV power plant. The plant would contain a H 2O2 decomposition reactor to supply humidified O2 to the SOFC cathode and exothermic aluminum/H2O combustor to provide heated humidified H2 fuel to the anode. To characterize low-temperature SOFC performance with these unique O2 and H2 source, SOFC button cells based on nickel/GDC (Gd0.1Ce0.9O 1.95) anodes, GDC electrolytes, and lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ or LSCF)/GDC cathodes were fabricated and tested for performance and stability with humidity on both the anode and the cathode. Cells were also tested with various reactant concentrations of H2 and O2 to simulate gas depletion down the channel of an SOFC stack. Results showed that anode performance depended primarily on fuel concentration and less on the concentration of the associated increase in product H2O. O 2 depletion with humidified cathode flows also caused significant loss in cell current density at a given voltage. With the humidified flows in either the anode or cathode, stability tests of the button cells at 650 °C showed stable voltage is maintained at low operating current (0.17 A/cm2) at up to 50 % by mole H2O, but at higher current densities (0.34 A/cm2), irreversible voltage degradation occurred at rates of 0.8-3.7 mV/hour depending on exposure time. From these button cell results, estimated average current densities over the length of a low-temperature SOFC stack were estimated and used to size a UUV power system based on Al/H 2O oxidation for fuel and H2O2 decomposition for O2. The resulting system design suggested that energy densities above 300 Wh/L may be achieved at

  1. Capturing medium scale heterogeneity in surface water-groundwater interactions: challenges and advantages of high resolution temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafield, M.; Cook, P. G.; McCallum, J.; Noorduijn, S.

    2013-12-01

    Although heat is now a commonly-used tracer for quantifying the movement of water between streams and streambed sediments, the measurements are commonly collected as vertical profiles. This results in point measurements that are often difficult to scale up. However, for understanding contaminant transport, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem use, it is important to capture streambed dynamics at a larger scale. In this study, over 1000 meters of fiber optic cable was installed at three depths in five parallel, longitudinal transects within the shallow subsurface of a large, intermittent channel in southeastern Australia. A fiber optic distributed temperature system was then used to collected time variable temperature measurements at each meter along the cable, giving high spatial resolution within the 20 meter by 20 meter by 0.5 meter deep study plot. At this resolution, the raw temperature data itself was useful for examining preferential flow pathways beneath the subsurface. While some areas responded to daily fluctuations in water temperature from the surface, other areas retained the initial temperature, allowing the observation of regions of increased and decreased flux, respectively. Complementing the temperature data, Guelph permeameter measurements for a range of depths at the study site also revealed a highly heterogeneous subsurface, with measured field saturation hydraulic conductivity values ranging from less than 0.006 to 3.1 meters per day. Given a limited amount of head information to parameterize the boundary conditions, the objective was to see how well the patterns observed in the raw data could be quantified using numerical models. Using inverse methods, we therefore used the temperature data to parameterize both one-dimensional and a three-dimensional heat and temperature transport models to quantify differences in flux rates within the study plot. Comparison of the advantages and limitations of these models provides insight into the challenges of

  2. Low Temperature Properties Of Fuel Mixtures Of Kerosene And Fame Type Used To Supply Turbine Engines In Marine And Other Non-Aeronautical Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wojciech Dzięgielewski; Bartosz Gawron; Andrzej Kulczycki

    2015-01-01

    .... Specific conditions in which fuels are combusted in turbine engines used in these applications are the reason why fuel mixtures of kerosene and FAME type should reveal relevant low temperature characteristics...

  3. Temperature modeling and control of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell based on adaptive neural fuzzy technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhidong; Zhu Xinjian; Cao Guangyi

    2006-01-01

    Aiming at on-line controlling of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack, an adaptive neural fuzzy inference technology is adopted in the modeling and control of DMFC temperature system. In the modeling process, an Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) identification model of DMFC stack temperature is developed based on the input-output sampled data, which can avoid the internal complexity of DMFC stack. In the controlling process, with the network model trained well as the reference model of the DMFC control system, a novel fuzzy genetic algorithm is used to regulate the parameters and fuzzy rules of a neural fuzzy controller. In the simulation, compared with the nonlinear Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) and traditional fuzzy algorithm, the improved neural fuzzy controller designed in this paper gets better performance, as demonstrated by the simulation results.

  4. EXAFS and XRD characterization of palladium sorbents for high temperature mercury capture from fuel gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulston, Stephen; Hyde, Timothy I; Hamilton, Hugh; Mathon, Olivier; Prestipino, Carmelo; Sankar, Gopinathan; Smith, Andrew W J

    2010-01-14

    Removal of pollutants such as mercury at elevated temperatures provides improvements in the overall thermal efficiency during the process of coal gasification. The two high temperature sorbents studied were 5 wt% Pd/Al(2)O(3) and 5 wt% Pd/SiO(2): materials shown to have significantly different Hg adsorption capacities. A combination of XRD and EXAFS has been used to characterize the Pd-Hg alloy formed when these Pd-based sorbents were exposed to fuel gas (CO, CO(2), H(2)) containing Hg vapour at 204 degrees C. Significant differences were found in the nature of the alloy formed on the two sorbents following Hg exposure. The Pd/Al(2)O(3) sorbent produced a single homogeneous solid solution of Pd-Hg whilst the silica-supported Pd produced an alloy of varying composition.

  5. Fuel gas desulfurization at elevated temperatures with copper-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Lau, F.S. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States); Honea, F.I. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Zinc-based sorbents, the leading candidates for hot gas cleanup, have been shown to suffer from zinc volatilization at elevated temperatures, leading to sorbent deterioration, increasing sorbent replacement costs. Copper-based sorbents, because of the high melting point of the metal, do not suffer from this problem. However, bulk copper oxide is generally reduced to metallic copper in reducing fuel gas environments leading to thermodynamic limitations, resulting in insufficient level of desulfurization. The reduction stability and therefore the desulfurization performance of copper oxide sorbents can be significantly improved by combining copper oxide with other oxides in a supported form or as bulk mixed metal oxides. This paper addresses the results of a systematic study of several novel copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup application. The evaluation criteria included reduction stability, sulfidation reactivity and regenerability at elevated temperatures. The performance of the most promising sorbent in long duration cycle sulfidation-regeneration tests is also presented.

  6. Catalytic decomposition of ammonia in a fuel gas at high temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Abbasian, J. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1995-11-01

    In connection with the purification of fuel gas for gas turbines in the IGCC process to meet NO{sub x} standards and maintain the thermal efficiency of the process, tests were carried out with a 7.5 cm pressurized reactor to decompose ammonia at high temperature (700-900{degree}C) and pressure (2 MPa) using Ni-based catalysts. The effects of temperature, pressure, ammonia concentration and gas residence time were determined. The simulated coal gas composition was varied to allow assessment of the effect of contaminants (sulfur compounds and tars) on the ammonia decomposition efficiency of five catalysts under otherwise identical operating conditions. The results show that two of the catalysts tested are capable of efficiently reducing the concentration of ammonia in the gas. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  7. The use of a very high temperature nuclear reactor in the manufacture of synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    The three parts of a program directed toward creating a cost-effective nuclear hydrogen production system are described. The discussion covers the development of a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) as a nuclear heat and power source capable of producing the high temperature needed for hydrogen production and other processes; the development of a hydrogen generation process based on water decomposition, which can utilize the outputs of the VHTR and be integrated with many different ultimate hydrogen consuming processes; and the evaluation of the process applications of the nuclear hydrogen systems to assess the merits and potential payoffs. It is shown that the use of VHTR for the manufacture of synthetic fuels appears to have a very high probability of making a positive contribution to meeting the nation's energy needs in the future.

  8. Platinum-based nanocomposite electrodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with extended lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Ho; Cho, Gu Young; Chang, Ikwhang; Ji, Sanghoon; Kim, Young Beom; Cha, Suk Won

    2016-03-01

    Due to its high catalytic activity and convenient fabrication procedure that uses physical vapor deposition (PVD), nanofabricated platinum (Pt) is widely used for low temperature operating solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFC). However, the poor thermal stability of nanofabricated Pt accelerates cell performance degradation. To solve this problem, we apply a thermal barrier coating and use the dispersion hardening process for the nanofabrication of Pt by sputter device. Through morphological and electrochemical data, GDC modified nano-porous Pt electrodes shows improved performance and thermal stability at the operating temperature of 500 °C. While the peak power density of pure Pt sample is 6.16 mW cm-2 with a performance degradation of 43% in an hour, the peak power density of the GDC modified Pt electrodes are in range of 7.42-7.91 mW cm-2 with a 7-16% of performance degradation.

  9. Ice formation in PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhan, Roger W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Arif, Muhammad [NIST

    2009-01-01

    The effect of MEA and GDL structure and composition on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are not only dependent on the MEA/GDL materials used but also on their interfaces. When a cell is operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures in constant current mode, the water formation due to the current density initially hydrates the membrane/ionomer and then forms ice in the catalyst layer/GDL. An increase in high frequency resistance was also observed in certain MEAs where there is a possibility of ice formation between the catalyst layer and GDL leading to a loss in contact area. The total water/ice holding capacity for any MEA was lower at lower temperatures and higher current densities. The durability of MEAs subjected to multiple isothermal starts was better for LANL prepared MEAs as compared to commercial MEAs, and cloth GDLs when compared to paper GDLs. The ice formation was monitored using high-resolution neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer. However, there was significant ice formation in the GDLs especially at the higher temperature ({approx} -10 C) and lower current density (0.02 A/cm{sup 2}) operations. These results are consistent with the longer-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at the lower temperatures.

  10. Non-linear dynamo waves in an incompressible medium when the turbulence dissipative coefficients depend on temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Pataraya

    Full Text Available Non-linear α-ω; dynamo waves existing in an incompressible medium with the turbulence dissipative coefficients depending on temperature are studied in this paper. We investigate of α-ω solar non-linear dynamo waves when only the first harmonics of magnetic induction components are included. If we ignore the second harmonics in the non-linear equation, the turbulent magnetic diffusion coefficient increases together with the temperature, the coefficient of turbulent viscosity decreases, and for an interval of time the value of dynamo number is greater than 1. In these conditions a stationary solution of the non-linear equation for the dynamo wave's amplitude exists; meaning that the magnetic field is sufficiently excited. The amplitude of the dynamo waves oscillates and becomes stationary. Using these results we can explain the existence of Maunder's minimum.

  11. Accurate High-Temperature Reaction Networks for Alternative Fuels: Butanol Isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Geem, K. M.; Pyl, S. P.; Marin, G. B.; Harper, M. R.; Green, W. H.

    2010-11-03

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons, particularly alcohol compounds, are being studied extensively as alternatives and additives to conventional fuels due to their propensity of decreasing soot formation and improving the octane number of gasoline. However, oxygenated fuels also increase the production of toxic byproducts, such as formaldehyde. To gain a better understanding of the oxygenated functional group’s influence on combustion properties—e.g., ignition delay at temperatures above the negative temperature coefficient regime, and the rate of benzene production, which is the common precursor to soot formation—a detailed pressure-dependent reaction network for n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol consisting of 281 species and 3608 reactions is presented. The reaction network is validated against shock tube ignition delays and doped methane flame concentration profiles reported previously in the literature, in addition to newly acquired pyrolysis data. Good agreement between simulated and experimental data is achieved in all cases. Flux and sensitivity analyses for each set of experiments have been performed, and high-pressure-limit reaction rate coefficients for important pathways, e.g., the dehydration reactions of the butanol isomers, have been computed using statistical mechanics and quantum chemistry. The different alcohol decomposition pathways, i.e., the pathways from primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols, are discussed. Furthermore, comparisons between ethanol and n-butanol, two primary alcohols, are presented, as they relate to ignition delay.

  12. Self-assembled dynamic perovskite composite cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J. Felix; Xu, Wen; Zanella, Marco; Dawson, Karl; Savvin, Stanislav N.; Claridge, John B.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Electrode materials for intermediate temperature (500-700 ∘C) solid oxide fuel cells require electrical and mechanical stability to maintain performance during the cell lifetime. This has proven difficult to achieve for many candidate cathode materials and their derivatives with good transport and electrocatalytic properties because of reactivity towards cell components, and the fuels and oxidants. Here we present Ba0.5Sr0.5(Co0.7Fe0.3)0.6875W0.3125O3-δ (BSCFW), a self-assembled composite prepared through simple solid state synthesis, consisting of B-site cation ordered double perovskite and disordered single perovskite oxide phases, as a candidate cathode material. These phases interact by dynamic compositional change at the operating temperature, promoting both chemical stability through the increased amount of W in the catalytically active single perovskite provided from the W-reservoir double perovskite, and microstructural stability through reduced sintering of the supported catalytically active phase. This interactive catalyst-support system enabled stable high electrochemical activity through the synergic integration of the distinct properties of the two phases.

  13. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Arramova, Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  14. Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell Using CsH2PO4/ZrO2-Based Composite Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Proton conductors operating at intermediate temperatures are receiving significant attention due to their advantages over conventionally used materials in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. CsH2PO4 has proven to be proton conducting above 230°C, however within a narrow temperature range...

  15. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... parameters that may affect fuel temperatures, such as solar loading, pavement heat, and relative wind... parking (e.g., N, SW, etc.) shall be documented. (B) The vehicle may be soaked in a temperature-controlled... the parking location onto the road surface. The driver's aid shall be started and the vehicle...

  16. Cumulative damage fatigue tests on nuclear reactor Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes at room temperature and 300°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandarinathan, P. R.; Vasudevan, P.

    1980-06-01

    Cumulative damage fatigue tests were conducted on the Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes at room temperature and 300°C on the modified Moore type, four-point-loaded, deflection-controlled, rotating bending fatigue testing machine. The cumulative cycle ratio at fracture for the Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes was found to depend on the sequence of loading, stress history, number of cycles of application of the pre-stress and the test temperature. A Hi-Lo type fatigue loading was found to be very much damaging at room temperature and this feature was not observed in the tests at 300°C. Results indicate significant differences in damage interaction and damage propagation under cumulative damage tests at room temperature and at 300°C. Block-loading fatigue tests are suggested as the best method to determine the life-time of Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes under random fatigue loading during their service in the reactor.

  17. Studies on disintegrating spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor by a electrochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifang; Wen, Mingfen; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Spherical fuel elements of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor were disintegrated through a electrochemical method with NaNO3 as electrolyte. The X-ray diffraction spectra and total carbon contents of the graphite fragments were determined, and the results agreed with those from simulated fuel elements. After conducting the characterization analysis and the leaching experiment of coated fuel particles, the uranium concentrations of leaching solutions and spent electrolyte were found to be at background levels. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the improved electrochemical method with NaNO3 as electrolyte in disintegrating the unirradiated fuel elements without any damage to the coated fuel particles. Moreover, the method avoided unexpected radioactivity contamination to the graphite matrix and spent electrolyte.

  18. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  19. Multifactorial modelling of high-temperature treatment of timber in the saturated water steam medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosvirnikov, D. B.; Safin, R. G.; Ziatdinova, D. F.; Timerbaev, N. F.; Lashkov, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper analyses experimental data obtained in studies of high-temperature treatment of softwood and hardwood in an environment of saturated water steam. Data were processed in the Curve Expert software for the purpose of statistical modelling of processes and phenomena occurring during this process. The multifactorial modelling resulted in the empirical dependences, allowing determining the main parameters of this type of hydrothermal treatment with high accuracy.

  20. Influence of temperature, medium, and storage duration on Chlamydia trachomatis DNA detection by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Wolffs, Petra F G; van Tiel, Frank H; Dukers, Nicole; Herngreen, Selma B; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Hoebe, Christian J P A

    2013-03-01

    We validated the use of stored samples for Chlamydia trachomatis research. C. trachomatis DNA was detected by real-time PCR in clinical (urine and self-taken vaginal swabs) and spiked samples using six different media, five different time points (up to 2 years), and four different temperature conditions. C. trachomatis was detected in all 423 samples, and no clinically relevant degradation impact was detected.

  1. Performance of AGR-1 High-Temperature Reactor Fuel During Post-Irradiation Heating Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Demkowicz, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Reber, Edward [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600 1800 C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4 to 19.1% FIMA have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 10-6 after 300 h at 1600 C or 100 h at 1800 C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with breached SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 C in one compact. Post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers to understand particle behavior.

  2. System model development for a methanol reformed 5 kW high temperature PEM fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the system performance when reforming methanol in an oil heated reformer system for a 5 kW fuel cell system. A dynamic model of the system is created and evaluated. The system is divided into 4 separate components. These components are the fuel cell, reformer, burner...... and evaporator, which are connected by two separate oil circuits, one with a burner and reformer and one with a fuel cell and evaporator. Experiments were made on the reformer and measured oil and bed temperatures are presented in multiple working points. The system is examined at loads from 0 to 5000 W electric...

  3. Neutron analysis of the fuel of high temperature nuclear reactors; Analisis neutronico del combustible de reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work a neutron analysis of the fuel of some high temperature nuclear reactors is presented, studying its main features, besides some alternatives of compound fuel by uranium and plutonium, and of coolant: sodium and helium. For this study was necessary the use of a code able to carry out a reliable calculation of the main parameters of the fuel. The use of the Monte Carlo method was convenient to simulate the neutrons transport in the reactor core, which is the base of the Serpent code, with which the calculations will be made for the analysis. (Author)

  4. On active disturbance rejection in temperature regulation of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Li, Chong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qibing

    2015-06-01

    Operating a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system to maintain the stack temperature stable is one of the key issues in PEMFC's normal electrochemical reaction process. Its temperature characteristic is easily affected by inlet gas humidity, external disturbances, and electrical load changes and so on. Because of the complexity and nonlinearity of the reaction process, it is hard to build a model totally consistent with the real characteristic of the process. If model uncertainty, external disturbances, parameters changes can be regarded as "total disturbance", which is then estimated and compensated, the accurate model is no longer required and the control design can be greatly simplified to meet the practical needs. Based on this idea, an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) with a switching law is proposed for the problem of precise temperature regulation in PEMFC. Results of the work show that the proposed control system allows the PEMFC to operate successfully at the temperature of 343 K point in the presence of two different disturbances.

  5. No enhancement of cyanobacterial bloom biomass decomposition by sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian-Ran; Song, Na; Chen, Mo; Yan, Zai-Sheng; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-11-01

    The sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) has potential application to control the degradation of decayed cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) in sediment in eutrophic lakes. In this study, temperatures from 4 to 35 °C were investigated herein as the major impact on SMFC performance in CBB-amended sediment. Under low temperature conditions, the SMFC could still operate, and produced a maximum power density of 4.09 mW m(-2) at 4 °C. Coupled with the high substrate utilization, high output voltage was generated in SMFCs at high temperatures. The application of SMFC affected the anaerobic fermentation progress and was detrimental to the growth of methanogens. At the same time, organic matter of sediments in SMFC became more humified. As a result, the fermentation of CBB was not accelerated with the SMFC application, and the removal efficiency of the total organic matter was inhibited by 5% compared to the control. Thus, SMFC could operate well year round in sediments with a temperature ranging from 4 to 35 °C, and also exhibit practical value by inhibiting quick CBB decomposition in sediments in summer against the pollution of algae organic matter.

  6. Microblock ionomers: a new concept in high temperature, swelling-resistant membranes for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AD (United Kingdom); Thompsett, D.; Petrucco, E. [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blounts Court, Sonning Common, Reading, RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Walsby, N.M.; Colquhoun, H.M.

    2009-08-15

    A novel series of polyaromatic ionomers with similar equivalent weights but very different sulphonic acid distributions along the ionomer backbone has been designed and prepared. By synthetically organising the sequence-distribution so that it consists of fully defined ionic segments (containing singlets, doublets or quadruplets of sulphonic acid groups) alternating strictly with equally well-defined nonionic spacer segments, a new class of polymers which may be described as microblock ionomers has been developed. These materials exhibit very different properties and morphologies from analogous randomly substituted systems. Progressively extending the nonionic spacer length in the repeat unit (maintaining a constant equivalent weight by increasing the degree of sulphonation of the ionic segment) leads to an increasing degree of nanophase separation between hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains in these materials. Membranes cast from ionomers with the more highly phase-separated morphologies show significantly higher onset temperatures for uncontrolled swelling in water. This new type of ionomer design has enabled the fabrication of swelling-resistant hydrocarbon membranes, suitable for fuel cell operation, with very much higher ion exchange capacities (>2 meq g{sup -1}) than those previously reported in the literature. When tested in a fuel cell at high temperature (120 C) and low relative humidity (35% RH), the best microblock membrane matched the performance of Nafion 112. Moreover, comparative low load cycle testing of membrane -electrode assemblies suggests that the durability of the new membranes under conditions of high temperature and low relative humidity is superior to that of conventional perfluorinated materials. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. A novel H2S/H2O2 fuel cell operating at the room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanli, Ayse Elif [Gazi University (Turkey)], email: aecsanli@gmail.com; Aytac, Aylin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Gazi University, Teknikokullar (Turkey)], email: aytaca@gazi.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    This study concerns the oxidation mechanism of hydrogen sulfide and a fuel cell; acidic peroxide is used as the oxidant and basic hydrogen sulfide is the fuel. A solid state H2S/H2O2 stable fuel cell was produced at room temperature. A cell potential of 0.85 V was reached; this is quite remarkable in comparison to the H2S/O2 fuel cell potential of 0.85 V obtained at 850-1000 degree celsius. The hydrogen sulfide goes through an oxidation reaction in the alkaline fuel cell (H2S/H2O2 fuel cell) which opens up the possibility of using the cheaper nickel as a catalyst. As a result, the fuel cell becomes a potentially low cost technology. A further benefit from using H2S as the alkaline liquid H2S/H2O2 fuel cell, is that sulfide ions are oxidized at the anode, releasing electrons. Sulfur produced reacts with the other sulfide ions and forms disulfide and polysulfide ions in basic electrolytes (such as Black Sea water).

  8. High temperature solid oxide fuel cell integrated with novel allothermal biomass gasification. Part I: Modelling and feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulos, K. D.; Fryda, L. E.; Karl, J.; Poulou, S.; Kakaras, E.

    Biomass gasification derived fuel gas is a renewable fuel that can be used by high temperature fuel cells. In this two-part work an attempt is made to investigate the integration of a near atmospheric pressure solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a novel allothermal biomass steam gasification process into a combined heat and power (CHP) system of less than MW e nominal output range. Heat for steam gasification is supplied from SOFC depleted fuel into a fluidised bed combustor via high temperature sodium heat pipes. The integrated system model was built in Aspen Plus™ simulation software and is described in detail. Part I investigates the feasibility and critical aspects of the system based on modelling results. A low gasification steam to biomass ratio (STBR = 0.6) is used to avoid excess heat demands and to allow effective H 2S high temperature removal. Water vapour is added prior to the anode to avoid carbon deposition. The SOFC off gases adequately provide gasification heat when fuel utilisation factors are f = 0.7 and current density 2500 A m -2 the electrical efficiency is estimated at 36% while thermal efficiency at 14%. An exergy analysis is presented in Part II.

  9. Energy cost based design optimization method for medium temperature CPC collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Pedro; Osório, Tiago; Collares-Pereira, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    CPC collectors, approaching the ideal concentration limits established by non-imaging optics, can be designed to have such acceptance angles enabling fully stationary designs, useful for applications in the low temperature range (T concentration factors in turn requiring seasonal tracking strategies. Considering the CPC design options in terms of effective concentration factor, truncation, concentrator height, mirror perimeter, seasonal tracking, trough spacing, etc., an energy cost function based design optimization method is presented in this article. Accounting for the impact of the design on its optical (optical efficiency, Incidence Angle Modifier, diffuse acceptance) and thermal performances (dependent on the concentration factor), the optimization function integrates design (e.g. mirror area, frame length, trough spacing/shading), concept (e.g. rotating/stationary components, materials) and operation (e.g. O&M, tilt shifts and tracking strategy) costs into a collector specific energy cost function, in €/(kWh.m2). The use of such function stands for a location and operating temperature dependent design optimization procedure, aiming at the lowest solar energy cost. Illustrating this approach, optimization results will be presented for a (tubular) evacuated absorber CPC design operating in Morocco.

  10. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Corneloup, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the French R&D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 °C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlabin order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  11. Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium OxideFilms for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Jason Dale [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) has been identified as an acceptable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte at temperatures (500-700 C) where cheap, rigid, stainless steel interconnect substrates can be used. Unfortunately, both the high sintering temperature of pure CGO, >1200 C, and the fact that constraint during sintering often results in cracked, low density ceramic films, have complicated development of metal supported CGO SOFCs. The aim of this work was to find new sintering aids for Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95, and to evaluate whether they could be used to produce dense, constrained Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 films at temperatures below 1000 C. To find the optimal sintering aid, Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 was doped with a variety of elements, of which lithium was found to be the most effective. Dilatometric studies indicated that by doping CGO with 3mol% lithium nitrate, it was possible to sinter pellets to a relative density of 98.5% at 800 C--a full one hundred degrees below the previous low temperature sintering record for CGO. Further, it was also found that a sintering aid's effectiveness could be explained in terms of its size, charge and high temperature mobility. A closer examination of lithium doped Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 indicated that lithium affects sintering by producing a Li2O-Gd2O3-CeO2 liquid at the CGO grain boundaries. Due to this liquid phase sintering, it was possible to produce dense, crack-free constrained films of CGO at the record low temperature of 950 C using cheap, colloidal spray deposition processes. This is the first time dense constrained CGO films have been produced below 1000 C and could help commercialize metal supported ceria based solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. An easy-to-use simulation program demonstrates variations in bacterial cell cycle parameters depending on medium and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokke, Caroline; Flåtten, Ingvild; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Many studies are performed on chromosome replication and segregation in Escherichia coli and other bacteria capable of complex replication with C phases spanning several generations. For such investigations an understanding of the replication patterns, including copy numbers of origins and replication forks, is crucial for correct interpretation of the results.Flow cytometry is an important tool for generation of experimental DNA distributions of cell populations. Here, a Visual Basic based simulation program was written for the computation of theoretical DNA distributions for different choices of cell cycle parameters (C and D phase durations, doubling time etc). These cell cycle parameters can be iterated until the best fit between the experimental and theoretical DNA histograms is obtained. The Excel file containing the simulation software is attached as supporting information.Cultures of Escherichia coli were grown at twelve different media and temperature conditions, with following measurements by flow cytometry and simulation of the DNA distributions. A good fit was found for each growth condition by use of our simulation program. The resulting cell cycle parameters displayed clear inter-media differences in replication patterns, but indicated a high degree of temperature independence for each medium. The exception was the poorest medium (acetate), where the cells grew with overlapping replication cycles at 42 °C, but without at the lower temperatures.We have developed an easy-to-use tool for determination of bacteria's cell cycle parameters, and consequently the cells' chromosome configurations. The procedure only requires DNA distribution measurements by flow cytometry. Use of this simulation program for E. coli cultures shows that even cells growing quite slowly can have overlapping replication cycles. It is therefore always important not only to assume cells' replication patterns, but to actually determine the cell cycle parameters when changing growth

  13. An easy-to-use simulation program demonstrates variations in bacterial cell cycle parameters depending on medium and temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Stokke

    Full Text Available Many studies are performed on chromosome replication and segregation in Escherichia coli and other bacteria capable of complex replication with C phases spanning several generations. For such investigations an understanding of the replication patterns, including copy numbers of origins and replication forks, is crucial for correct interpretation of the results.Flow cytometry is an important tool for generation of experimental DNA distributions of cell populations. Here, a Visual Basic based simulation program was written for the computation of theoretical DNA distributions for different choices of cell cycle parameters (C and D phase durations, doubling time etc. These cell cycle parameters can be iterated until the best fit between the experimental and theoretical DNA histograms is obtained. The Excel file containing the simulation software is attached as supporting information.Cultures of Escherichia coli were grown at twelve different media and temperature conditions, with following measurements by flow cytometry and simulation of the DNA distributions. A good fit was found for each growth condition by use of our simulation program. The resulting cell cycle parameters displayed clear inter-media differences in replication patterns, but indicated a high degree of temperature independence for each medium. The exception was the poorest medium (acetate, where the cells grew with overlapping replication cycles at 42 °C, but without at the lower temperatures.We have developed an easy-to-use tool for determination of bacteria's cell cycle parameters, and consequently the cells' chromosome configurations. The procedure only requires DNA distribution measurements by flow cytometry. Use of this simulation program for E. coli cultures shows that even cells growing quite slowly can have overlapping replication cycles. It is therefore always important not only to assume cells' replication patterns, but to actually determine the cell cycle parameters when

  14. DNS of moderate-temperature gaseous mixing layers laden with multicomponent-fuel drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clercq, P. C. Le; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    A formulation representing multicomponent-fuel (MC-fuel) composition as a Probability Distribution Function (PDF) depending on the molar weight is used to construct a model of a large number of MC-fuel drops evaporating in a gas flow, so as to assess the extent of fuel specificity on the vapor composition.

  15. Memory-dependent derivatives for photothermal semiconducting medium in generalized thermoelasticity with two-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, K.; Sarkar, N.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a novel generalized model of photothermal theory with two-temperature thermoelasticity theory based on memory-dependent derivative (MDD) theory is performed. A one-dimensional problem for an elastic semiconductor material with isotropic and homogeneous properties has been considered. The problem is solved with a new model (MDD) under the influence of a mechanical force with a photothermal excitation. The Laplace transform technique is used to remove the time-dependent terms in the governing equations. Moreover, the general solutions of some physical fields are obtained. The surface taken into consideration is free of traction and subjected to a time-dependent thermal shock. The numerical Laplace inversion is used to obtain the numerical results of the physical quantities of the problem. Finally, the obtained results are presented and discussed graphically.

  16. Measurements on high temperature fuel cells with carbon monoxide-containing fuel gases; Messungen an Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen mit kohlenmonoxidhaltigen Brenngasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, Holger

    2012-10-10

    In the present work the different power density of anode-supported high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) were examined for carbon monoxide-containing fuels. In addition to wet hydrogen / carbon monoxide mixtures the cells were run with synthetic gas mixtures resembling the products of an autothermal reformer, and actual reformate generated by a 2 kW autothermal reformer. It was found that the power-voltage characteristics of an ASC depends primarily on the open circuit voltages of different gas mixtures, but is nearly independent of the hydrogen concentration of the fuel, although the reaction rates of other potential fuels within the gas mixture, namely carbon monoxide and methane, are much lower that the hydrogen reaction rate. The probable reason is that the main fuel for the electrochemical oxidation within the cell is hydrogen, while the nickel in the base layer of the anode acts as a reformer which replenishes the hydrogen by water reduction via carbon monoxide and methane oxidation.

  17. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  18. Comparison of Fuel Temperature Coefficients of PWR UO{sub 2} Fuel from Monte Carlo Codes (MCNP6.1 and KENO6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a result, there was a difference within about 300-400 pcm between keff values at each enrichment due to the difference of codes and nuclear data used in the evaluations. The FTC was changed to be less negative with the increase of uranium enrichment, and it followed the form of asymptotic curve. However, it is necessary to perform additional study for investigating what factor causes the differences more than two standard deviation (2σ) among the FTCs at partial enrichment region. The interaction probability of incident neutron with nuclear fuel is depended on the relative velocity between the neutron and the target nuclei. The Fuel Temperature Coefficient (FTC) is defined as the change of Doppler effect with respect to the change in fuel temperature without any other change such as moderator temperature, moderator density, etc. In this study, the FTCs for UO{sub 2} fuel were evaluated by using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes based on a Monte Carlo method. In addition, the latest neutron cross-sections (ENDF/B-VI and VII) were applied to analyze the effect of these data on the evaluation of FTC, and nuclear data used in MCNP calculations were generated from the makxsf code. An evaluation of the Doppler effect and FTC for UO{sub 2} fuel widely used in PWR was conducted using MCNP6.1 and KENO6 codes. The ENDF/B-VI and VII were also applied to analyze what effect these data has on those evaluations. All cross-sections needed for MCNP calculation were produced using makxsf code. The calculation models used in the evaluations were based on the typical PWR UO{sub 2} lattice.

  19. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  20. Processing of mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels for high temperature space nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2000-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for high performance, next generation space power and propulsion systems. These mixed carbides such as the pseudo-ternary, (U, Zr, Nb)C, hold significant promise because of their high melting points (typically greater than 3200 K), thermochemical stability in a hot hydrogen environment, and high thermal conductivity. However, insufficient test data exist under nuclear thermal propulsion conditions of temperature and hot hydrogen environment to fully evaluate their performance. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders while hypostoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.95 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold pressing, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce dense (low porosity), homogeneous, single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for space power and propulsion applications. .

  1. A High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Model for Reformate Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mamlouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using polybenzimidazole (PBI membranes is described. The model considers mass transport through a thin film electrolyte covering the catalyst particles as well as through the porous media. The incorporation of a thin film model describing reactant gas mass transport through electrolyte covering the electrocatalyst is shown to be an essential requirement for accurate simulation. The catalyst interface is represented using a macrohomogeneous model. The influence of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, which would be present in a reformate gas, is considered in terms of the effect on the anode polarisation/kinetics behaviour. The model simulates the influence of operating conditions, cell parameters, and fuel gas compositions on the cell voltage current density characteristics. The model gives good predictions of the effect of oxygen and air pressures on cell behaviour and correctly simulates the mass transport behaviour of the cell. The model with reformate gas shows that additional voltage losses associated with CO poisoning can lead to loss in voltage of tens of mV and thus reduction in power.

  2. Performance of Spanish white Macael marble exposed to narrow- and medium-range temperature cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Gordillo, J.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available White marble specimens from Macael in the Spanish province of Almeria were exposed to narrow- (50/20 ºC and medium- (100/-20 ºC and 75/-20 ºC range thermal stress cycles. The effects were monitored with ultrasound techniques. Ultrasound velocity declined considerably in samples subjected to 100/-20 ºC cycles, more moderately when the range was 75/-20 ºC and insignificantly when it was narrowed to 50/-20 ºC. All variations were recorded in the first five to seven cycles, with values flattening thereafter. The Schmidt hardness and compression test results concurred with the ultrasound findings. Petrographic and scanning electron microscope (SEM imaging revealed some very superficial granular decohesion in the specimens subjected to forty 100/-20 ºC cycles. The concurrent results from compression testing on the one hand and surface hardness and ultrasound measurements on the other confirmed the validity of the latter two nondestructive techniques (NDT for determining the effects of thermal stress cycling on stone mechanical strength.

    Se aplican ciclos de estrés térmico de medio (100/-20 ºC y 75/-20 ºC y bajo (50/-20 ºC rango sobre probetas de mármol blanco de Macael (Almería, España, y se evalúa ciclo a ciclo su incidencia mediante ultrasonidos. Los resultados indican un considerable descenso de velocidad de los ultrasonidos en las muestras sometidas a estrés de 100/-20 ºC, más moderado en el caso de 75/-20 ºC, poco significativo en el caso de 50/-20 ºC. Las variaciones de velocidad tienen lugar durante los primeros ciclos (5-7, permaneciendo los valores constantes en ciclos posteriores. Los resultados proporcionados por medidas de dureza de Schmidt, y de rotura por compresión uniaxial son coincidentes con los proporcionados por los ultrasonidos. Las imágenes de microscopía petrográfica y electrónica (SEM manifiestan una cierta descohesión granular en zonas muy superficiales de las probetas sometidas a 40 ciclos de

  3. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  4. Part-Load Performance Prediction and Operation Strategy Design of Organic Rankine Cycles with a Medium Cycle Used for Recovering Waste Heat from Gaseous Fuel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is regarded as a suitable way to recover waste heat from gaseous fuel internal combustion engines. As waste heat recovery systems (WHRS have always been designed based on rated working conditions, while engines often work under part-load conditions, it is quite significant to analyze the part-load performance and corresponding operation strategy of ORC systems. This paper presents a dynamic model of ORC with a medium cycle used for a large gaseous fuel engine and analyzes the effect of adjustable parameters on the system performance, giving effective control directions under various conditions. The results indicate that the intermediary fluid mass flow rate has nearly no effect on the output power and thermal efficiency of the ORC, while the mass flow rate of working fluid has a great effect on them. In order to get a better system performance under different working conditions, the system should be operated with the working fluid mass flow rate as large as possible, but with a slight degree of superheating. Then, with the control of constant superheat degree at the end of the heating process, the performance of the combined system that consists of ORC and the engine at steady state under seven typical working conditions is also analyzed. The results indicate that the energy-saving effect of WHRS becomes worse and worse as the working condition decreases. Especially at 40% working condition the WHRS nearly has no energy-saving effect anymore.

  5. A comparison of heat transfer enhancement in medium temperature thermal energy storage heat exchanger using fins and multitubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis [Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff Univ., Wales (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [School of Engineering, Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Univ. of Ulster, Newtownabbey (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies using a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) Erythritol, melting point 117.7 C, in a horizontal shell and tube system have been undertaken. The experimental programme investigated the suitability of Erythritol (a sugar based material) to deliver a near constant thermal energy to be used for the hot side of LiBr/water absorption cooling system. Four experimental configurations, consisting a base model with no heat enhancement (control system), systems enhanced with circular and longitudinal fins and a multitube system were studied. Experiments were conducted at the same inlet heat transfer fluid temperature of 140 C and mass flow rate of 30 kg min{sup 1} for the different configurations. The results presented include experimentally determined isotherm plots for the final melt illustrating the heat transfer characteristics of the systems and quantitative information relating to the transient change in temperature during the charging and discharging processes. The experimental results indicate that the multitube system achieved the best charging performance with the shortest melt time due to the presence of convection but showed large subcooling during the discharge process. The presence of longitudinal fins improved the conduction heat transfer significantly during the charging process due to increased heat transfer surface area and also reduced the level of subcooling during the discharge process. The circular finned system showed no significant improvement in melt time and size and as such would not be worthy of further development. (orig.)

  6. High-temperature liquid water: a viable medium for terephthalic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jennifer B; Savage, Phillip E

    2005-07-15

    We report new information concerning the effect of oxygen concentration and catalyst concentration and identity [MnBr2, CoBr2, ZrBr4, and Mn(OAc)2] on the partial oxidation of p-xylene in dense water from 250 to 380 degrees C. Water is a more environmentally benign replacementfor the acetic acid solvent used commercially. We used a 440 mL Hastelloy batch reactorfor all experiments and monitored O2 consumption and product (including COx) formation. Increasing the catalyst concentration at 300 degrees C significantly increased terephthalic acid yields. MnBr2 was the most active catalyst of those we assessed. Increasing the initial O2 concentration beyond a modest excess did not significantly alter the terephthalic acid yield, but it increased the CO2 yield. Injecting supplemental 02 midreaction, however, did cause the terephthalic acid yield to increase. The highest terephthalic acid yields (>80%) occurred at 300 degrees C, [p-xylene]0 = 0.02 M, [O2]0 = 0.10 M, [Br] = 0.014 M, and t = 5-15 min. These yields are the highest reported to date from this reaction in high-temperature liquid water. Moreover, under these conditions and t=15 min, COx yields were below 2% and reaction intermediates were not detected.

  7. Evaluation of microstructure anisotropy on room and medium temperature ECAP deformed F138 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vincentis, N.S., E-mail: devincentis@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Física Rosario, FCEIA-UNR-CONICET, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Kliauga, A.; Ferrante, M. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais — Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235 — SP-310, São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Avalos, M. [Instituto de Física Rosario, FCEIA-UNR-CONICET, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Brokmeier, H.-G. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, TU Clausthal, Agricolastr.6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld. Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, GEMS Outstation, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bolmaro, R.E. [Instituto de Física Rosario, FCEIA-UNR-CONICET, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure developed during severe plastic deformation results in improved mechanical properties because of the decrease in domain sizes and accumulation of defects, mainly dislocation arrays. The characteristic deformation stages observed in low stacking fault energy (SFE) face centered cubic (FCC) materials are highly influenced by the development of the primary and secondary twinning that compete with dislocation glide. In this paper, a low SFE F138 stainless steel is deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 4 passes at room temperature (RT) and at 300 °C to compare the grain refinement and twin boundary development with increasing deformation. Tensile tests were performed to determine the deformation stages reached by the material before and after ECAP deformation, and the resulting microstructure was observed by TEM. X-ray diffraction and EBSD, average technique the first and local the second one, were used to quantify the microstructural changes, allowing the determination of diffraction domain sizes, dislocation and stacking fault densities and misorientation indices, which lead to a complete analysis of the deformation introduced in the material, with comparative correlations between various microstructural parameters. - Highlights: • The microstructure of ECAP pressed F138 steel was studied using TEM, EBSD and XRD. • Increasing deformation reduced domain sizes and increased dislocation densities. • Dislocation array compactness and misorientation increased with higher deformation. • Largest dislocation densities, mostly screw, match with simultaneous activation of twins. • Several correlations among microstructural features and parameters have been disclosed.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Cu-MFI catalyst for the direct medium temperature range NO decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valkaj Karolina Maduna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the physico-chemical and catalytic properties of copper bearing MFI zeolites (Cu-MFI with different Si/Al and Si/Cu ratios were investigated. Two different methods for incorporation of metal ions into the zeolite framework were used: the ion exchange from the solution of copper acetate and the direct hydrothermal synthesis. Direct synthesis of a zeolite in the presence of copper-phosphate complexes was expected to generate more active copper species necessary for the desired reaction than the conventional ion exchange method. Direct decomposition of NO was used as a model reaction, because this reaction still offers a very attractive approach to NOX removal. The catalytic properties of zeolite samples were studied using techniques, such as XRD, SEM, EPR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements at 77 K. Results of the kinetic investigation revealed that both methods are applicable for the preparation of the catalysts with active sites capable of catalyzing the NO decomposition. It was found out that Cu-MFI zeolites obtained through direct synthesis are promising catalysts for NO decomposition, especially at lower reaction temperatures. The efficiency of the catalysts prepared by both methods is compared and discussed.

  9. Material synthesis and fabrication method development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hanping

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are operated in high temperature conditions (750-1000 °C). The high operating temperature in turn may lead to very complicated material degradation issues, significantly increasing the cost and reducing the durability of SOFC material systems. In order to widen material selections, reduce cost, and increase durability of SOFCs, there is a growing interest to develop intermediate temperature SOFCs (500-750 °C). However, lowering operating temperature will cause substantial increases of ohmic resistance of electrolyte and polarization resistance of electrodes. This dissertation aimed at developing high-performance intermediate-temperature SOFCs through the employment of a series of layered perovskite oxides as novel cathode materials to minimize the potential electrode polarization on oxygen reduction reaction resulting from the unique crystal structure. The high performance of such perovskites under lower temperatures lies in the fact that a simple cubic perovskite with randomly occupied A-sites transforming into a layered compound with ordered lanthanide and alkali-earth cations may reduce the oxygen bonding strength and provide disorder-free channels for oxygen ion migrations. In order to compromise the cell performance and chemical and mechanical stability, the substitution of Fe in B site was comprehensively investigated to explore the effects of Fe doping on the crystal structure, thermal and electrical properties, as well as electrochemical performance. Furthermore, a platinum nanowire network was successfully developed as an ultrathin electrochemically efficient current collector for SOFCs. The unique platinum network on cathode surface can connect the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) sites at the nano-scale to the external circuit while being able to substantially avoid blocking the open pores of the cathode. The superior electrochemical performance was exhibited, including the highly reduced electrode polarization resistance

  10. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, C [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ramdutt, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Brault, P [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Caillard, A [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bulla, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Boswell, R [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Rabat, H [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Dicks, A [School of Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    A low energy ({approx}30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm{sup -2}, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm{sup -2}) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm{sup -2}). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  11. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, C.; Ramdutt, D.; Brault, P.; Caillard, A.; Bulla, D.; Boswell, R.; Rabat, H.; Dicks, A.

    2007-05-01

    A low energy (~30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm-2, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm-2) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm-2). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  12. Effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on the properties of sewage sludge derived solid fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available High moisture content along with poor dewaterability are the main challenges for sewage sludge treatment and utilization. In this study, the effect of hydrothermal treatment at various temperature (120-200 ˚C on the properties of sewage sludge derived solid fuel was investigated in the terms of mechanical dewatering character, drying character, calorific value and heavy metal distribution. Hydrothermal treatment (HT followed by dewatering process significantly reduced moisture content and improved calorific value of sewage sludge with the optimum condition obtained at 140˚C. No significant alteration of drying characteristic was produced by HT. Heavy metal enrichment in solid particle was found after HT that highlighted the importance of further study regarding heavy metal behavior during combustion. However, it also implied the potential application of HT on sewage sludge for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

  13. Cross-linked aromatic cationic polymer electrolytes with enhanced stability for high temperature fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Wenjia; Zhao, Chengji; Yang, Jingshuai

    2012-01-01

    Diamine-cross-linked membranes were prepared from cross-linkable poly(arylene ether ketone) containing pendant cationic quaternary ammonium group (QPAEK) solution by a facile and general thermal curing method using 4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane with rigid framework and 1,6-diaminohexane with flexible...... framework as cross-linker, respectively. Self-cross-linked cationic polymer electrolytes membranes were also prepared for comparison. The diamines were advantageously distributed within the polymeric matrix and its amine function groups interacted with the benzyl bromide of QPAEK, resulting in a double...... that the diamine-cross-linked membranes using the rigid cross-linker show much improved properties than that using the flexible cross-linker. More properties relating to the feasibility in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications were investigated in detail....

  14. The Temperature of the Dimethylhydrazine Drops Moving in the Atmosphere after Depressurization of the Fuel Tank Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work includes the results of the numerical modeling of temperature changes process of the dimethylhydrazine (DMH drops, taking into account the radial temperature gradient in the air after the depressurization of the fuel compartments rockets at high altitude. There is formulated a mathematical model describing the process of DMH drops thermal state modifying when it's moving to the Earth's surface. There is the evaluation of the influence of the characteristic size of heptyl drops on the temperature distribution. It's established that the temperatures of the small size droplets practically completely coincide with the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere at altitudes of up to 40 kilometers.

  15. Rapid self-start of polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks from subfreezing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for light-duty vehicles must be able to start unassisted and rapidly from temperatures below -20 °C. Managing buildup of ice within the porous cathode catalyst and electrode structure is the key to self-starting a PEFC stack from subfreezing temperatures. The stack temperature must be raised above the melting point of ice before the ice completely covers the cathode catalyst and shuts down the electrochemical reaction. For rapid and robust self-start it is desirable to operate the stack near the short-circuit conditions. This mode of operation maximizes hydrogen utilization, favors production of waste heat that is absorbed by the stack, and delays complete loss of effective electrochemical surface area by causing a large fraction of the ice to form in the gas diffusion layer rather than in the cathode catalyst layer. Preheating the feed gases, using the power generated to electrically heat the stack, and operating pressures have only small effect on the ability to self-start or the startup time. In subfreezing weather, the stack shut-down protocol should include flowing ambient air through the hot cathode passages to vaporize liquid water remaining in the cathode catalyst. Self-start is faster and more robust if the bipolar plates are made from metal rather than graphite.

  16. Carbon composite bipolar plate for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Dai Gil

    2016-09-01

    A carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate is an ideal substitute for the brittle graphite bipolar plate for lightweight proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) because of its high specific strength and stiffness. However, conventional carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plates are not applicable for high-temperature PEMFCs (HT-PEMFCs) because these systems are operated at higher temperatures than the glass transition temperatures of conventional epoxies. Therefore, in this study, a cyanate ester-modified epoxy is adopted for the development of a carbon composite bipolar plate for HT-PEMFCs. The composite bipolar plate with exposed surface carbon fibers is produced without any surface treatments or coatings to increase the productivity and is integrated with a silicone gasket to reduce the assembly cost. The developed carbon composite bipolar plate exhibits not only superior electrical properties but also high thermo-mechanical properties. In addition, a unit cell test is performed, and the results are compared with those of the conventional graphite bipolar plate.

  17. Thermal expansion of simulated thoria-urania fuel by high temperature XRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, R. K.; Krishnan, K.; Kutty, T. R. G.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H. S.; Banerjee, S.

    2012-03-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of polycrystalline samples of ThO2-3.45% UO2 and SIMFUEL corresponding to burn-up of 43,000 MWd/Te has been investigated from room temperature to 1473 K, and for SIMFUEL corresponding to burn-up of 28,000 MWd/Te has been investigated from room temperature to 1173 K, using a high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Linear and volumetric thermal expansion data like, percentage thermal expansion, average or mean coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was generated using the lattice parameters. It is observed that SIMFUEL has a lower lattice parameter compared to ThO2-3.45% UO2 and this is attributed to the dissolution of the rare earths and part of the Zr and Ce in fuel matrix. Also SIMFUEL has slightly higher thermal expansion than ThO2-3.45% UO2 and this is related to the lower melting point of SIMFUEL.

  18. Thermal expansion of simulated thoria-urania fuel by high temperature XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, R.K. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Krishnan, K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kutty, T.R.G., E-mail: tkutty@barc.gov.in [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Arun [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kamath, H.S. [Nuclear Fuels Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Banerjee, S. [Department of Atomic Energy, Anushakti Bhavan, Mumbai 400 001 (India)

    2012-03-15

    The thermal expansion behavior of polycrystalline samples of ThO{sub 2}-3.45% UO{sub 2} and SIMFUEL corresponding to burn-up of 43,000 MWd/Te has been investigated from room temperature to 1473 K, and for SIMFUEL corresponding to burn-up of 28,000 MWd/Te has been investigated from room temperature to 1173 K, using a high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Linear and volumetric thermal expansion data like, percentage thermal expansion, average or mean coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was generated using the lattice parameters. It is observed that SIMFUEL has a lower lattice parameter compared to ThO{sub 2}-3.45% UO{sub 2} and this is attributed to the dissolution of the rare earths and part of the Zr and Ce in fuel matrix. Also SIMFUEL has slightly higher thermal expansion than ThO{sub 2}-3.45% UO{sub 2} and this is related to the lower melting point of SIMFUEL.

  19. Online estimation of internal stack temperatures in solid oxide fuel cell power generating units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, B.; Vrečko, D.; Juričić, Ɖ.; Pohjoranta, A.; Pianese, C.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal stress is one of the main factors affecting the degradation rate of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. In order to mitigate the possibility of fatal thermal stress, stack temperatures and the corresponding thermal gradients need to be continuously controlled during operation. Due to the fact that in future commercial applications the use of temperature sensors embedded within the stack is impractical, the use of estimators appears to be a viable option. In this paper we present an efficient and consistent approach to data-driven design of the estimator for maximum and minimum stack temperatures intended (i) to be of high precision, (ii) to be simple to implement on conventional platforms like programmable logic controllers, and (iii) to maintain reliability in spite of degradation processes. By careful application of subspace identification, supported by physical arguments, we derive a simple estimator structure capable of producing estimates with 3% error irrespective of the evolving stack degradation. The degradation drift is handled without any explicit modelling. The approach is experimentally validated on a 10 kW SOFC system.

  20. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350W high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker

    High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane(HTPEM) fuel cells offer many advantages due to their increased operating tempera-tures compared to similar Nafion-based membrane tech-nologies, that rely on the conductive abilities of liquid water. The polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes are especially...... suited for reformer systems, where high CO tolerance is required. This enables the use fuels based on e.g. liquid alcohols. This work presents the control strategies of a methanol refoermer for a 350W HTPEM FC system. The system examined is the Serenergy H3-350 Mobile Battery Charger, an integrated...

  1. Lowering the platinum loading of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Santiago Martin; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2015-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer was establ......Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer...

  2. A high-temperature gas-and-steam turbine plant operating on combined fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Milman, O. O.; Shifrin, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    A high-temperature gas-steam turbine plant (GSTP) for ultrasupercritical steam conditions is proposed based on an analysis of prospects for the development of power engineering around the world and in Russia up to 2040. The performance indicators of a GSTP using steam from a coal-fired boiler with a temperature of 560-620°C with its superheating to 1000-1500°C by firing natural gas with oxygen in a mixingtype steam superheater are analyzed. The thermal process circuit and design of a GSTP for a capacity of 25 MW with the high- and intermediate-pressure high-temperature parts with the total efficiency equal to 51.7% and the natural gas utilization efficiency equal to 64-68% are developed. The principles of designing and the design arrangement of a 300 MW GSTP are developed. The effect of economic parameters (the level and ratio of prices for solid fuel and gas, and capital investments) on the net cost of electric energy is determined. The net cost of electric energy produced by the GSTP is lower than that produced by modern combined-cycle power plants in a wide variation range of these parameters. The components of a high-temperature GSTP the development of which determines the main features of such installations are pointed out: a chamber for combusting natural gas and oxygen in a mixture with steam, a vacuum device for condensing steam with a high content of nondensables, and a control system. The possibility of using domestically available gas turbine technologies for developing the GSTP's intermediate-pressure high-temperature part is pointed out. In regard of its environmental characteristics, the GSTP is more advantageous as compared with modern condensing power plants: it allows a flow of concentrated carbon dioxide to be obtained at its outlet, which can be reclaimed; in addition, this plant requires half as much consumption of fresh water.

  3. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera Control”. The conditions of the explosive vapor formation of the heterogeneous water droplet were found. The typical phase change mechanisms of the heterogeneous water droplet under the conditions of intensive heat exchange were determined.

  4. Geochemical survey of medium temperature geothermal resources from the Baja California Peninsula and Sonora, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán R, R. M.; Birkle, P.; Portugal M, E.; Arellano G, V. M.; Alvarez R, J.

    2001-09-01

    Waters from hot springs and deep wells from Cerritos in the northern Baja California Peninsula and deep wells from the Riı´to zone (Sonora state) were studied in order to classify medium temperature geothermal resources to be exploited in NW-Mexico. Geochemical characteristics of San Felipe and Punta Estrella coastal springs indicate the mixing of seawater and meteoric components with secondary leaching of evaporates. Reservoir temperatures for both zones were estimated up to 225°C. Mixing of high portions of seawater (>80 wt%) with local waters could be the origin for the Puertecitos coastal spring, with a reservoir temperature estimation of 195°C. The El Coloradito coastal spring is composed of meteoric water with a reservoir temperature of 127°C. The formation of thermal manifestations along the Baja California coast could be related to the heating up of convecting seawater along extensional tectonic structures, as observed for submarine hydrothermal vents at the Gulf of California and along the East Pacific Rise. Volcanic steam-heated waters with a reservoir temperature of 135°C were found at the Valle Chico inland springs from the Baja California Peninsula. Deep fluids from the Riı´to zone originated by evaporation of infiltrated waters with similar characteristics to those located in the Mexicali Valley. Reservoir temperature of 192 and 126°C are estimated for the Riı´to deep wells ER-1B (ER) and R-1, respectively. The Riı´to artesian wells M-1, M-2 and M-4 indicate reservoir temperatures from 109 to 118°C. Isotopic data define the artesian wells as typical surface water or shallow groundwater from the Mexicali Valley. The Cerritos deep fluids of the Mexicali Valley show a close chemical and isotopic relationship to the adjacent Cerro Prieto reservoir fluids suggesting a similar origin and a possible connection of both aquifer systems. Conductive cooling of Cerro Prieto discharge fluids could originate the cooler Cerritos system (130

  5. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  6. Current issues on the production and utilization of medium-calorific solid recovered fuel: a case study on SRF for the HOTDISC technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomberger, Roland; Klampfl-Pernold, Hannes; Abl, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The HOTDISC technology allows the use of Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) of a coarse grain size in cement rotary kilns. A suitable medium-calorific SRF is produced by mechanical treatment of mixed municipal and commercial waste that was previously used in fluidized bed incineration systems. Through a modification of the production process the quality of the SRF could be improved and its energetic utilization within a cement kiln with an integrated HOTDISC technology was realized. In course of a material flow analysis changes in quality and mass due to planned process changes were simulated on a theoretical basis. Due to a good agreement of the mass and quality prediction with the real data of the material flow analysis conducted after the system implementation it can be stated that by simulation beforehand the security in planning increases while the economic risk can be significantly reduced. Both the material flow analysis as well as practical operational experience confirms that the industrially produced HOTDISC SRF is applicable and can be produced from mixed municipal and commercial solid waste. An improvement in quality of the produced HOTDISC SRF can be shown by positive changes of essential parameters. From a waste management perspective the production and energetic utilization of HOTDISC SRF is reasonable by all means. This is shown by the conduction of an energy and CO₂-balance. A growing international importance of the HOTDISC technology and the increased use of medium-calorific SRF are expected.

  7. Oral administration of a medium containing both D-aspartate-producing live bacteria and D-aspartate reduces rectal temperature in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, P H; Tran, P V; Bahry, M A; Yang, H; Han, G; Tsuchiya, A; Asami, Y; Furuse, M; Chowdhury, V S

    2017-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on the rectal temperature of young chicks of the oral administration of a medium that contained both live bacteria that produce D-aspartate (D-Asp) and D-Asp. 2. In Experiment 1, chicks were subjected to chronic oral administration of either the medium (containing live bacteria and 2.46 μmol D-Asp) or water from 7 to 14 d of age. Plasma-free amino acids as well as mitochondrial biogenic gene expression in the breast muscle were analysed. In Experiment 2, 7-d-old chicks were subjected to acute oral administration of the above medium or of an equimolar amount of D-Asp to examine their effect on changes in rectal temperature. In Experiment 3, after 1 week of chronic oral administration of the medium, 14-d-old chicks were exposed to either high ambient temperature (HT; 40 ± 1°C, 3 h) or control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 ± 1°C, 3 h) to monitor the changes in rectal temperature. 3. Chronic, but not acute, oral administration of the medium significantly reduced rectal temperature in chicks, and a chronic effect also appeared under HT conditions. 4. Chronic oral administration of the medium significantly reduced the mRNA abundance of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) in the breast muscle, but led to a significant increase in avian adenine nucleotide translocator (avANT) mRNA in the same muscle. 5. (a) These results indicate that the medium can reduce body temperature through the decline in avUCP mRNA expression in the breast muscle that may be involved in reduced mitochondrial proton leaks and heat production. (b) The increase in avANT further suggests a possible enhancement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis.

  8. Experimental study of cell reversal of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell caused by H2 starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    Operation under fuel starvation has been proved to be harmful to the fuel cell by causing severe and irreversible degradation. To characterize the behaviors of the high temperature PEM fuel cell under fuel starvation conditions, the cell voltage and local current density is measured simultaneously...... under different H2 stoichiometries below 1.0 and at different current loads. The experimental results show that the cell voltage decreases promptly when the H2 stoichiometry decreases to below 1.0. Negative cell voltage can be observed which indicates cell reversal. The local current density starts...... to diverge when the cell voltage decreases. In the H2 upstream regions the current densities show an increasing trend, while those in the H2 downstream regions show a decreasing trend. Consequently, the current density distribution becomes very uneven. The current density is the highest in the upstream...

  9. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  10. Fossil fuel savings, carbon emission reduction and economic attractiveness of medium-scale integrated biomass gasification combined cycle cogeneration plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper theoretically investigates the system made up of fluidized bed gasifier, SGT-100 gas turbine and bottoming steam cycle. Different configurations of the combined cycle plant are examined. A comparison is made between systems with producer gas (PG and natural gas (NG fired turbine. Supplementary firing of the PG in a heat recovery steam generator is also taken into account. The performance of the gas turbine is investigated using in-house built Engineering Equation Solver model. Steam cycle is modeled using GateCycleTM simulation software. The results are compared in terms of electric energy generation efficiency, CO2 emission and fossil fuel energy savings. Finally there is performed an economic analysis of a sample project. The results show relatively good performance in the both alternative configurations at different rates of supplementary firing. Furthermore, positive values of economic indices were obtained. [Acknowledgements. This work was carried out within the frame of research project no. N N513 004036, titled: Analysis and optimization of distributed energy conversion plants integrated with gasification of biomass. The project is financed by the Polish Ministry of Science.

  11. Low Temperature, High Energy Density Micro Thin Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of solid oxide fuel cell based on thin film technology and ultra-thin electrolyte is being proposed to develop to realize major reductions in fuel cell...

  12. Boundary model-based reference control of blower cooled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells have, by design, a limited effective life time, which depends on how they are operated. The general consent is that operation of the fuel cell at the extreme of the operational range, or operation of the fuel cell without sufficient reactants (a.k.a. starvation), will lower the effective...... life time of a fuel cell significantly. On air cooled HTPEMFCs, the blower, which supplies the fuel cell with oxygen for the chemical process, also functions as the cooling system. This makes the blower bi-functional and as a result a higher supply of oxygen is often available, hence changes...... in the fuel cell output can be optimised by the knowledge of how much oxygen is supplied to the fuel cell at any given time, without reducing the effective life time of a fuel cell by starvation....

  13. Boundary model-based reference control of blower cooled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells have, by design, a limited effective life time, which depends on how they are operated. The general consent is that operation of the fuel cell at the extreme of the operational range, or operation of the fuel cell without sufficient reactants (a.k.a. starvation), will lower the effective...... life time of a fuel cell significantly. On air cooled HTPEMFCs, the blower, which supplies the fuel cell with oxygen for the chemical process, also functions as the cooling system. This makes the blower bi-functional and as a result a higher supply of oxygen is often available, hence changes...... in the fuel cell output can be optimised by the knowledge of how much oxygen is supplied to the fuel cell at any given time, without reducing the effective life time of a fuel cell by starvation....

  14. The neural networks based modeling of a polybenzimidazole-based polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell: Effect of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Linares, José J.; Piuleac, Ciprian-George; Curteanu, Silvia

    Neural network models represent an important tool of Artificial Intelligence for fuel cell researchers in order to help them to elucidate the processes within the cells, by allowing optimization of materials, cells, stacks, and systems and support control systems. In this work three types of neural networks, that have as common characteristic the supervised learning control (Multilayer Perceptron, Generalized Feedforward Network and Jordan and Elman Network), have been designed to model the performance of a polybenzimidazole-polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells operating upon a temperature range of 100-175 °C. The influence of temperature of two periods was studied: the temperature in the conditioning period and temperature when the fuel cell was operating. Three inputs variables: the conditioning temperature, the operating temperature and current density were taken into account in order to evaluate their influence upon the potential, the cathode resistance and the ohmic resistance. The Multilayer Perceptron model provides good predictions for different values of operating temperatures and potential and, hence, it is the best choice among the study models, recommended to investigate the influence of process variables of PEMFCs.

  15. The neural networks based modeling of a polybenzimidazole-based polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell: Effect of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Justo; Canizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Linares, Jose J. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n. 13004, Ciudad Real (Spain); Piuleac, Ciprian-George; Curteanu, Silvia [Gh. Asachi Technical University Iasi, Department of Chemical Engineering (Romania)

    2009-07-01

    Neural network models represent an important tool of Artificial Intelligence for fuel cell researchers in order to help them to elucidate the processes within the cells, by allowing optimization of materials, cells, stacks, and systems and support control systems. In this work three types of neural networks, that have as common characteristic the supervised learning control (Multilayer Perceptron, Generalized Feedforward Network and Jordan and Elman Network), have been designed to model the performance of a polybenzimidazole-polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells operating upon a temperature range of 100-175 C. The influence of temperature of two periods was studied: the temperature in the conditioning period and temperature when the fuel cell was operating. Three inputs variables: the conditioning temperature, the operating temperature and current density were taken into account in order to evaluate their influence upon the potential, the cathode resistance and the ohmic resistance. The Multilayer Perceptron model provides good predictions for different values of operating temperatures and potential and, hence, it is the best choice among the study models, recommended to investigate the influence of process variables of PEMFCs. (author)

  16. Combustion Characteristics and Performance of Low-Swirl Injectors with Natural Gas and Alternative Fuels At Elevated Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerer, David Joseph

    Stationary power-generating gas turbines in the United States have historically been fueled with natural gas, but due to its increasing price and the need to reduce carbon emissions, interest in alternative fuels is increasing. In order to effectively operate engines with these fuels their combustion characteristics need be well understood, especially at elevated pressures and temperatures. In this dissertation, the performance of blends of natural gas / methane with hydrogen and carbon dioxide, to simulate syngas and biogas, are evaluated in a model low-swirl stabilized combustor inside an optically accessible high-pressure vessel. The flashback and lean blow out limits, along with pollutant emissions, flow field, and turbulent displacement flame speeds, are measured as a function of fuel composition, pressure, inlet temperature, firing temperature, and flow rate in the range from 1 to 8 atm, 294 to 600K, 1350 to 1950K, and 20 to 60 m/s, respectively. These properties are quantified as a function of the inlet parameters. The lean blow-out limits are independent of pressure and inlet temperature but are weakly dependent on velocity. NOX emissions for both fuels were found to be exponentially dependent upon firing temperature, but emissions for the high-hydrogen flames were consistently higher than those of natural gas flames. The flashback limits for a 90%/10% (by volume) hydrogen/methane mixture increase with velocity and inlet temperature, but decrease with pressure. Correspondingly, the flame position progresses toward the combustor nozzle with increasing pressure and flame temperature, but away with increasing inlet temperature and velocity. Flashback occurred when the leading edge of the flame entered the nozzle. Local displacement turbulent flame speeds scale linearly with the turbulent fluctuating velocities, u', at the leading edge of the flame. Turbulent flame speeds for high-hydrogen fuels are twice that of natural gas for the same inlet conditions. The

  17. Production of planar copper-based anode supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells cosintered at 950 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Vincenzo; Grazioli, Alberto; Sglavo, Vincenzo M.

    2016-10-01

    Copper-based anode supported planar Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are produced and characterized in the present work. The most important advancement is related to the use of copper within the anodic layer, this giving promising results for feeding Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with carbon and sulphur containing fuels. Both anode and Li2O containing-Gadolinia Doped Ceria based electrolyte are produced by water based tape casting process. The supporting anode is coupled to the electrolyte by thermopressing, the cathode being obtained by screen printing. A 3 h isotherm at 950 °C allows to obtain the cosintering of the three layers. The electrochemical test performed on such cells reveals a 0.8 V open circuit voltage and a power density higher than 26 mW cm-2 at 650 °C.

  18. Adsorptive Desulfurization of JP-8 Fuel Using Ag+/Silica Based Adsorbents at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    cell-quality hydrogen is liquid phase desulfurization (figure 1). Any organic sulfur compounds in the fuel are converted into hydrogen sulfide in...the fuel processing reformer, resulting in poisoning the reformation catalysts as well as poisoning downstream operations. Therefore, it is essential...the reformation catalysts from potential poisoning (1). Figure 1. Schematic diagram of logistic fuel processing. Adsorbents with a high

  19. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  20. Dust Temperature Distribution in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium: Modeling the CMB Dust Foreground to Sub-Percent Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    dust cirrus, while a straightforward signal-to-noise analysis of the FIRAS data demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to model the dust temperature and emissivity along multiple lines of sight. The proposed team is highly qualified. The Principal Investigator has over 25 years of experience modeling foreground emission, including the first detection of spinning dust in the interstellar medium. The Co-I is an expert on COBE/FIRAS and has fit numerous sources in the FIRAS data. The proposed effort is well-defined and uses algorithms developed over several decades of similar studies. The team includes participation by a post-doctoral student. All results will be published in peer-reviewed journals.