WorldWideScience

Sample records for medium photon energies

  1. The DHG sum rule measured with medium energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, K.; Ardashev, K. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Babusci, D. [INFN-Lab. Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The structure of the nucleon has many important features that are yet to be uncovered. Of current interest is the nucleon spin-structure which can be measured by doing double-polarization experiments with photon beams of medium energies (0.1 to 2 GeV). One such experiment uses dispersion relations, applied to the Compton scattering amplitude, to relate measurement of the total reaction cross section integrated over the incident photon energy to the nucleon anomalous magnetic moment. At present, no single facility spans the entire range of photon energies necessary to test this sum rule. The Laser-Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) facility will measure the double-polarization observables at photon energies between 0.15--0.47 MeV. Either the SPring8 facility, the GRAAL facility (France), or Jefferson Laboratory could make similar measurements at higher photon energies. A high-precision measurement of the spin-polarizability and the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule is now possible with the advent of high-polarization solid HD targets at medium energy polarized photon facilities such as LEGS, GRAAL and SPring8. Other facilities with lower polarization in either the photon beam or target (or both) are also pursuing these measurements because of the high priority associated with this physics. The Spin-asymmetry (SASY) detector that will be used at LEGS has been briefly outlined in this paper. The detector efficiencies have been explored with simulations studies using the GEANT software, with the result that both charged and uncharged pions can be detected with a reasonable efficiency (> 30%) over a large solid angle. Tracking with a TPC, which will be built at LEGS over the next few years, will improve the capabilities of these measurements.

  2. Coherent scattering of high-energy photon in a medium

    CERN Document Server

    Baier, V N

    2001-01-01

    The coherent scattering of photon in the Coulomb field (the Delbr\\"uck scattering) is considered for the momentum transfer $\\Delta \\ll m$ in the frame of the quasiclassical operator method. In high-energy region this process occurs over rather long distance. The process amplitude is calculated taking into account the multiple scattering of particles of the intermediate electron-positron pair in a medium. The result is the suppression of the process. Limiting cases of weak and strong effects of the multiple scattering are analyzed. The approach used is the generalization of the method developed by authors for consideration of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect.

  3. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hemmers, O. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  4. Optimized undulator to generate low energy photons from medium to high energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Chiu, Mau-Sen; Luo, Hao-Wen; Yang, Chin-Kang; Huang, Jui-Che; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-07-01

    While emitting low energy photons from a medium or high energy storage ring, the on-axis heat load on the beam line optics can become a critical issue. In addition, the heat load in the bending magnet chamber, especially in the vertical and circular polarization mode of operation may cause some concern. In this work, we compare the heat loads for the APPLE-II and the Knot-APPLE, both optimized to emit 10 eV photons from the 3 GeV TPS. Under this constraint the heat load analysis, synchrotron radiation performance and features in various polarization modes are presented. Additional consideration is given to beam dynamics effect.

  5. Medium-induced multi-photon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hao; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Moli\\`{e}re limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

  6. Generalization of the Einstein-Plank-Richardson law for the photon energy in medium resolves Abraham-Minkowski dilemma in the electromagnetic field theory statement

    CERN Document Server

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2012-01-01

    On the base of the Hamilton theory for the time-like photon in isotropic dielectric with refraction index n (S.Antoci, et.al, 2007), we suggest generalization of the Einstein-Plank-Richardson law for the value of the light energy quantum in medium:E=h*nu*n, where h is the Plank's constant, and nu is the light frequency. By use of this new quantum law, we resolve the famous contradiction between de Broglie and Einstein's theories, related with the old Abraham-Minkowski dilemma in the definition of the photon momentum value p (in the medium for n>1). We show that the same value p=p_a=E/(c*n)(c is the speed of light in vacuum) follows now from the both theories of de Broglie and Einstein, which complies with the theory of Abraham, but not with the theory of Minkowski (where p=p_m=E*n/c). Based on the corpuscular approach with p=p_a and E=h*nu*n^2, we give new inference for the Snellius refraction law and resolve more old corresponding corpuscular-wave Newton-Huygens dilemma. We show that even for n-1<<1 th...

  7. Medium-Term Stability of the Photon Beam Energy of An Elekta CompactTM Linear Accelerator Based on Daily Measurements of Beam Quality Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Mosleh-Shirazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to assess the medium-term energy stability of a 6MV Elekta CompactTM linear accelerator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published article to evaluate this linear accelerator in terms of energy stability. As well as investigating the stability of the linear accelerator energy over a period of several weeks, the results will be useful for estimation of the required tolerance values for the beam quality factor (BQF of the PTW QUICKCHECK weblineTM (QCW daily checking device. Materials and Methods Over a 13 week period of routine clinical service, 52 daily readings of BQF were taken and then analyzed for a 10×10 cm2 field. Results No decreasing or increasing trend in BQF was observed over the study period. The mean BQF value was estimated at 5.4483 with a standard deviation (SD of 0.0459 (0.8%. The mean value was only 0.1% different from the baseline value. Conclusion The results of this medium-term stability study of the Elekta Compact linear accelerator energy showed that 96.2% of the observed BQF values were within ±1.3% of the baseline value. This can be considered to be within the recommended tolerance for linear accelerator photon beam energy. If an approach of applying ±3 SD is taken, the tolerance level for BQF may be suggested to be set at ±2.5%. However, further research is required to establish a relationship between BQF value and the actual changes in beam energy and penetrative quality.

  8. High energy photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  9. Perturbative photon production in a dispersive medium

    CERN Document Server

    Belgiorno, Francesco; Piazza, Francesco Dalla

    2014-01-01

    We investigate photon pair-creation in a dispersive dielectric medium induced by the presence of a spacetime varying dielectric constant. Our aim is to examine the possibility to observe new phenomena of pair creation induced by travelling dielectric perturbations e.g. created by laser pulses by means of the Kerr effect. In this perspective, we adopt a semi-phenomenological version of the Hopfield model in which a space-time dependent dielectric susceptibility appears. We focus our attention on perturbation theory, and provide general formulas for the photon production induced by a local but arbitrarily spacetime dependent refractive index perturbation. As an example, we further explore the case of an uniformly travelling perturbation, and provide examples of purely time-dependent perturbations.

  10. Scintillators for photon detection at medium energies--a comparative study of BaF sub 2 , CeF sub 3 and PbWO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Novotny, R; Döring, W; Hejny, V; Hoek, M; Hofstäetter, A; Metag, V; Roemer, K

    2002-01-01

    In a comparative study, the performance of sub-arrays consisting of large CeF sub 3 and PbWO sub 4 crystals has been investigated with high-energy photons below 1 GeV. Energy and time resolutions are determined and compared with the corresponding values for BaF sub 2 based on the experience of operating the electromagnetic calorimeter TAPS.

  11. Photon statistics of the micromaser with a Kerr medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴曙东; 詹志明; 金丽霞

    2002-01-01

    We have established the master equation for the micromaser with a Kerr medium. We have studied the photon statistics of the micromaser with a Kerr medium field and analysed the influence of the Kerr effect on the photon statistics. The influence of the Kerr effect on the photon statistics is different in two regimes. In the thermal-atom regime, the Kerr effect produces quantum noise, and decreases the mean photon number. In the ultracold-atom regime,with the increase of the nonlinear parameter of the Kerr medium, the stability of the mean photon number and the normalized variance enhances the mean photon number, and the normalized variance exhibits collapse-revival phenomena periodically, their resonance peaks become lower, and the photon statistics of more and more regions are sub-Poissonian.

  12. [Medium energy meson research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p[bar p] annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

  13. [Medium energy meson research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, K.M.

    1992-12-01

    The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p{bar p} annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

  14. Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation for fluorescence microscopy in scattering medium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Yang, Mu-Han; Abashin, Maxim; Saisan, Payam; Tian, Peifang; Ferri, Christopher; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation of a fluorophore with two laser beams of different photon energies may offer independent degree of freedom in tuning of the photon flux (i.e., the power) for each beam. Wereport a practical demonstration that the emission intensity of a fluorophore excited in the non-degenerate regime in scattering medium is more efficient than the commonly used degenerate 2-photon excitation. In our experiments we use spatially and temporally aligned Ti:Sapphiremode-locked laser and optical parametric oscillator beams operating at near infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) optical frequencies, respectively. The non-degenerate 2-photon excitation mechanism takes advantage of the infrared wavelengths used in 3-photon microscopy to achieve increased penetration depth, while preserving relatively high 2-photon excitation cross section, exceeding that achievable with the 3-photon excitation. Importantly, independent control of power for each beam implies that the flux requirement for the higher photon energy NIR beam, which experiences higher scattering in biological tissue, can be relaxed at the expense of increasing the flux of the lower photon energy SWIR beam which experiences lower scattering, thus promising deeper penetration with higher efficiency of excitation.Applications for in vivo brain imaging will be also discussed.

  15. Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation in scattering medium for fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Mu-Han; Saisan, Payam A; Tian, Peifang; Ferri, Christopher G L; AnnaDevor,; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2016-01-01

    Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation (ND-2PE) of a fluorophore with two laser beams of different photon energies offers an independent degree of freedom in tuning of the photon flux for each beam. This feature takes advantage of the infrared wavelengths used in 3-photon microscopy to achieve an increased penetration depth, while preserving a relatively high degenerate 2-photon excitation (D-2PE) cross section, exceeding that achievable with 3-photon excitation. Here, using spatially and temporally aligned Ti:Sapphire laser and optical parametric oscillator beams operating at near infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) optical frequencies, respectively, we provide a practical demonstration that the emission intensity of a fluorophore excited in the non-degenerate regime in a scattering medium is more efficient than the commonly used D-2PE.

  16. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong;

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...

  17. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-03-31

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  18. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-03-31

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  19. Modelling polychromatic high energy photon beams by superposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, P E; Hoban, P W; Murray, D C; Round, W H

    1989-09-01

    A unified three dimensional superposition approach to dose calculations used in treatment planning of polychromatic high energy photon beams in radiotherapy is developed. The approach we have used involves computing the dose at all points in a medium by superposing the dose spread array (DSA) from the interaction of a photon at a point in the medium with an array of data representing the TERMA (photon fluence times the photon energy) at points in the beam. The polychromatic nature of the beam is accounted for by modelling the beam as having ten spectral components. A "polychromatic dose spread array" (PDSA) for an interaction from a beam with this spectrum was derived. The TERMA array is calculated from a weighted average of the TERMA arrays for the ten photon energies to give a "polychromatic TERMA array". Thus the method accounts for the effect of beam hardening of the TERMA. But it does not account for the effect of beam hardening on the PDSA since a single PDSA (usually for the spectrum at the surface of the medium) is used at all depths. However, by considering measured and calculated beam central axis data, this model is shown to be adequate for computing depth doses for beams in a homogeneous medium penetrating to extreme radiological depths. A computation time advantage is gained because only one superposition per beam is required.

  20. An Assessment of Nuclear Isomers as an Energy Storage Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartouni, E P

    2008-12-08

    Nuclear Isomers have been suggested as a potential high energy density medium that might be used to store energy. This talk assesses the state of the science supporting key elements of using nuclear isomers in energy storage applications. The focus is on the nuclear isomer {sup 178m2}Hf which has been most widely suggested for energy storage applications. However, the science issues apply to all nuclear isomer. The assessment addresses the production of the nuclear isomer, and inducing the release of the isomer. Also discussed are novel speculations on photon and/or neutron chain reactions, both as a 'pure' material as well as mixed with other materials.

  1. MEGA - Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Bloser, P. F.; Macri, J. R.; McConnell, M. L.; Ajello, M.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Zoglauer, A.; Hunter, S. D.; Kurfess, J. D.; Phlips, B.; Strickman, M.; Wulf, E.; Hartmann, D.; Miller, R.; Paciesas, W.; Zych, A. D.; Kippen, R. M.; Vestrand, W. T.; Cherry, M. L.; Guzik, T. G.; Stacy, J. G.; Wefel, J. P.; Reglero, V.; Di Cocco, G.; Cravens, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy (MEGA) telescope concept will soon be proposed as a MIDEX mission. This mission would enable a sensitive all-sky survey of the medium-energy gamma-ray sky (0.3 - 50 MeV) and bridge the huge sensitivity gap between the COMPTEL and OSSE experiments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the SPI and IBIS instruments on INTEGRAL, and the visionary Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission. The scientific goals include, among other things, compiling a much larger catalog of sources in this energy range, performing far deeper searches for supernovae, better measuring the galactic continuum and line emissions, and identifying the components of the cosmic diffuse gamma-ray emission. MEGA will accomplish these goals using a tracker made of Si strip detector (SSD) planes surrounded by a dense high-Z calorimeter. At lower photon energies (below 30 MeV), the design is sensitive to Compton interactions, with the SSD system serving as a scattering medium that also detects and measures the Compton recoil energy deposit. If the energy of the recoil electron is sufficiently high (> 2 MeV) its momentum vector can also be measured. At higher photon energies (above 10 MeV), the design is sensitive to pair production events, with the SSD system measuring the tracks of the electron and positron. A prototype instrument has been developed and calibrated, and is currently being prepared for a scientific balloon flight.

  2. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium. PMID:28198468

  3. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-02-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium.

  4. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  5. Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2017-06-01

    Conventional theories of electromagnetic waves in a medium assume that the energy propagating with the light pulse in the medium is entirely carried by the field. Thus, the possibility that the optical force field of the light pulse would drive forward an atomic mass density wave (MDW) and the related kinetic and elastic energies is neglected. In this work, we present foundations of a covariant theory of light propagation in a medium by considering a light wave simultaneously with the dynamics of the medium atoms driven by optoelastic forces between the induced dipoles and the electromagnetic field. We show that a light pulse having a total electromagnetic energy ℏ ω propagating in a nondispersive medium transfers a mass equal to δ m =(n2-1 ) ℏ ω /c2 , where n is the refractive index. MDW, which carries this mass, consists of atoms, which are more densely spaced inside the light pulse as a result of the field-dipole interaction. We also prove that the transfer of mass with the light pulse, the photon mass drag effect, gives an essential contribution to the total momentum of the light pulse, which becomes equal to the Minkowski momentum pM=n ℏ ω /c . The field's share of the momentum is the Abraham momentum pA=ℏ ω /(n c ) , while the difference pM-pA is carried by MDW. Due to the coupling of the field and matter, only the total momentum of the light pulse and the transferred mass δ m can be directly measured. Thus, our theory gives an unambiguous physical meaning to the Abraham and Minkowski momenta. We also show that to solve the centenary Abraham-Minkowski controversy of the momentum of light in a nondispersive medium in a way that is consistent with Newton's first law, one must account for the mass transfer effect. We derive the photon mass drag effect using two independent but complementary covariant models. In the mass-polariton (MP) quasiparticle approach, we consider the light pulse as a coupled state between the photon and matter, isolated from

  6. Angle-resolved photon-coincidence measurements in a multiple-scattering medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Muskens, Otto L.; Lagendijk, Ad

    2011-01-01

    We present angle-resolved correlation measurements between photons after propagation through a three-dimensional disordered medium. The multiple-scattering process induces photon correlations that are directly measured for light sources with different photon statistics. We find that multiple...

  7. Photon induced L3 vacancy alignment at tuned photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Himani; Kaur, Gurpreet; Tiwari, Manoj K.; Mittal, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Photon induced L3 X-ray measurements for Lα/Lℓ cross-section ratios in elements, 66 ⩽ Z ⩽ 83, at tuned photon energies on synchrotron Beamline-16 at Indus-2, India have been used to study the effect of Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions and photon energies on alignment of L3 vacancies. Certainty and reliability of the measurements were checked from comparison of measured Lα and Lℓ fluorescence cross-sections at E1 excitation with available theoretical/empirical/experimental values that required additional measurements for source, geometry and efficiency factor S0GɛLα/ℓ in the used set-up. Fall/rise trend of the ratios with energy for different Z's was found to resemble the off/on-set pattern of CK transitions as pointed out by Bambynek et al. and Campbell. Evaluated alignment parameter A2 values are very much within the limits, 0.05 Kronig corrected A2) variation with energy for Dy, W, Pt, Hg and Bi resembles our previously reported theoretical patterns that lends mutual support for both current measurements and earlier theoretical results.

  8. Particle energy cascade in the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, M.; Evoli, C.; Ferrara, A.

    2010-05-01

    We study the development of high-energy (Ein MEDEA (Monte Carlo Energy Deposition Analysis) which includes Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton (IC) processes, along with H/He collisional ionizations and excitations, and electron-electron collisions. The cascade energy partition into heating, excitations and ionizations depends primarily not only on the IGM ionized fraction, xe, but also on redshift, z, due to IC on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. While Bremsstrahlung is unimportant under most conditions, IC becomes largely dominant at energies Ein >= 1 MeV. The main effect of IC at injection energies Ein = 1 GeV CMB photons are preferentially upscattered within the X-ray spectrum (hν > 104 eV) and can free stream to the observer. Complete tables of the fractional energy depositions as a function of redshift, Ein and ionized fraction are given. Our results can be used in many astrophysical contexts, with an obvious application related to the study of decaying/annihilating dark matter (DM) candidates in the high-z Universe.

  9. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...

  10. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at medium energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.

    1984-03-01

    A model of the N-N potential, at medium energies, in the frame work of the BB-πBB equations, is presented. The derivation is based on the Cloudy Bag Model Hamiltonian. Recent N-N calculations are reviewed in the frame work of the model. Theoretical methods for the analysis of dibaryon resonances are compared.

  11. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R. (Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park. School of Physical Sciences)

    1984-03-26

    A model of the N-N potential, at medium energies, in the framework of the BB-..pi..BB equations, is presented. The derivation is based on the Cloudy Bag Model Hamiltonian. Recent N-N calculations are reviewed in the framework of the model. Theoretical methods for the analysis of dibaryon resonances are compared. 30 refs.

  12. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...

  13. Continuous Energy Photon Transport Implementation in MCATK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hughes, Henry Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pritchett-Sheats, Lori A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Werner, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK) code development team has implemented Monte Carlo photon transport into the MCATK software suite. The current particle transport capabilities in MCATK, which process the tracking and collision physics, have been extended to enable tracking of photons using the same continuous energy approximation. We describe the four photoatomic processes implemented, which are coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, pair-production, and photoelectric absorption. The accompanying background, implementation, and verification of these processes will be presented.

  14. In-medium modifications of the $\\pi\\pi$ interaction in photon-induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, J G; Kotulla, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Beck, R; Bloch, Felix; Caselotti, G; Fog, L; Hornidge, D; Krusche, B; Langgärtner, W; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; Mengel, K; Metag, V; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pfeiffer, M; Sack, S; Sanderson, R; Schadmand, S

    2002-01-01

    Differential cross sections of the reactions $(\\gamma,\\pi^\\circ\\pi^\\circ)$ and $(\\gamma,\\pi^\\circ\\pi^++\\pi^\\circ\\pi^-)$ have been measured for several nuclei ($^1$H,$^{12}$C, and $^{\\rm nat}$Pb) at an incident-photon energy of $E_{\\gamma}$=400-460 MeV at the tagged-photon facility at MAMI-B using the TAPS spectrometer. A significant nuclear-mass dependence of the $\\pi\\pi$ invariant-mass distribution is found in the $\\pi^\\circ\\pi^\\circ$ channel. This dependence is not observed in the $\\pi^\\circ\\pi^{+/-}$ channel and is consistent with an in-medium modification of the $\\pi\\pi$ interaction in the $I$=$J$=0 channel. The data are compared to $\\pi$-induced measurements and to calculations within a chiral-unitary approach.

  15. In-medium modifications of the pipi interaction in photon-induced reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messchendorp, J G; Janssen, S; Kotulla, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R H; Beck, R; Bloch, F; Caselotti, G; Fog, L; Hornidge, D; Krusche, B; Langgärtner, W; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; Mengel, K; Metag, V; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pfeiffer, M; Sack, S; Sanderson, R; Schadmand, S

    2002-11-25

    Differential cross sections of the reactions (gamma,pi(0)pi(0)) and (gamma,pi(0)pi(+/-)) have been measured for several nuclei (1H,12C, and (nat)Pb) at an incident-photon energy of E(gamma)=400-460 MeV at the tagged-photon facility at MAMI-B using the TAPS spectrometer. A significant nuclear-mass dependence of the pipi invariant-mass distribution is found in the pi(0)pi(0) channel. This dependence is not observed in the pi(0)pi(+/-) channel and is consistent with an in-medium modification of the pipi interaction in the I=J=0 channel. The data are compared to pi-induced measurements and to calculations within a chiral-unitary approach.

  16. Medium Effects of Low Energy Pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2004-03-01

    Fits of pion--nucleus potentials to large sets of pionic atom data reveal departures of parameter values from the corresponding free π N parameters. These medium effects can be quantitatively reproduced by a chiral-motivated model where the pion decay constant is modified in the medium or by including the empirical on-shell energy dependence of the amplitudes. No consistency is obtained between pionic atoms and the free π N interaction when an extreme off-shell chiral model is used. The role of the size of data sets is briefly discussed.

  17. Photons from nuclear collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gale, Charles; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    We model the hot and dense strongly interacting mater produced in high energy heavy ion collisions using relativistic hydrodynamics. Several different sources of real photons produced during these collisions are considered and their relative importance is assessed. We include contributions from QCD jets, which are allowed to loose and gain energy as they proceed through the hot matter. This is treated within the AMY formalism. We obtain photon spectra, R_{AA}, and v_2 in agreement with measurements performed by the PHENIX collaboration.

  18. Complex photonic structures for energy efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiersma D. S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Photonic structures are playing an increasingly important role in energy efficiency. In particular, they can help to control the flow of light and improve the optical properties of photovoltaic solar cells. We will explain the physics of light transport in such structures with a special focus on disordered materials.

  19. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity....... Single-mode and multimode operations are studied, and dispersion relations are computed for different waveguide widths. Both strong positive, strong negative, and zero dispersion an possible. It is shown that geometric parameters such as the nature of the lattice, the line defect orientation, the defect...... width, and the branching-point geometry have a significant influence on the electrodynamics. These are important issues for the fabrication of photonic crystal structures....

  20. Medium energy hadron scattering from nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginocchio, J.N.; Wenes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Glauber approximation for medium energy scattering of hadronic projectiles from nuclei is combined with the interacting boson model of nuclei to produce a transition matrix for elastic and inelastic scattering in algebraic form which includes coupling to all the intermediate states. We present closed form analytic expresions for the transition matrix elements for the three dynamical symmetries of the interacting boson model; that is for, a spherical quadrupole vibrator, a ..gamma.. unstable rotor, and both prolate and oblate axially symmetric rotors. We give examples of application of this formalism to proton scattering from /sup 154/Sm and /sup 154/Gd. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Decelerating chirped soliton formation at femtosecond laser pulse propagation in a medium with one-photon absorption and gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, V. A.; Lysak, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of decelerating chirped soliton formation at femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium with gold nanoparticles. We take into account the dependence of one-photon absorption on the nanorod aspect ratio and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing due to nanorod reshaping because of laser energy absorption. The soliton formation occurs due to laser radiation trapping by the nanorod reshaping front. We show analytically that a chirp induced by the negative phase grating is crucial for this trapping.

  2. On propagation of photons in a magnetized medium

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, L Cruz; Rojas, H Pérez; Querts, E Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to solve the dispersion relations near the first excitation threshold of photon propagating along the magnetic field in the strong field limit. We have calculated the time damping of the photon in two particular cases: the degenerate gas as well as the diluted gas limit being both important from the Astrophysical point of view. In particular the diluted gas limit could describe the magnethosphere of neutron stars. The solutions have been used to obtain a finite Quantum Faraday angle in both limits. A resonant behavior for the Faraday angle is also obtained. To reproduce the semi-classical result for the Faraday rotation angle the weak field limit is considered.

  3. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Hatarik, R.; Lesher, S. R.; Scielzo, N. D. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Krtička, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Allmond, J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Basunia, M. S.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I-Y.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Goldblum, B. L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in {sup 95}Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to {sup 95}Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  4. Photon scattering and reflection in medical diagnostic energy domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubenov Vladan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of reflected photons angular and energy distributions on parameter c' - the probability for large-angle scattering - is treated in this paper. The simulation of photon reflection was performed by the FOTELP code for a normal incidence of photons into infinite slabs of common shielding materials, and for the photon initial energies of 20 keV up to 100 keV.

  5. Jet-photon conversion with energy loss in heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; ZHANG Ben-Wei; ZHANG Han-Zhong; WANG En-Ke

    2009-01-01

    The rate of high energy photons produced from energetic jets during their propagation through the QGP at RHIC and LHC is studied by taking into account the contribution of jet quenching in the medium. It is shown that the jet quenching effect reduces the rate of jet-photon conversion at large transverse momemtum by about 40% at RHIC with √S= 200 AGeV, and by about 80% at LHC with √S = 5500 AGeV.

  6. Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium

    CERN Document Server

    Partanen, Mikko; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The momentum of light in a transparent material has remained a subject of an extensive scientific controversy for more than a century. The controversy has culminated in the difficulty to establish an unambiguous expression for the photon momentum and in particular in formulating a consistent theory to choose between the Abraham momentum p=hk/n and the Minkowski momentum p=nhk, where n is the refractive index and k is the wavenumber in vacuum. For both momenta, there exists experimental and theoretical support. In this work, we prove that, as a direct consequence of the fundamental conservation laws of nature and the special theory of relativity, the energy and momentum of light propagating in a medium are carried by quasiparticles, coupled states of field and matter, which have a finite rest mass and the Minkowski form of momentum. The total momentum of the quasiparticle, the Minkowski momentum, is the only directly measurable momentum of light in a medium since, due to the coupling, the momenta of the field ...

  7. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  8. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin, E-mail: djanders@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm{sup 3} lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm{sup 3} LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  9. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Apreysan, Artur [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bornheim, Adi [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Duarte, Javier [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Newman, Harvey [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pena, Cristian [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, Maria [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Trevor, Jason [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Xie, Si [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  10. Photon Strength and the Low-Energy Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Krticka, M; Bleuel, D L; Allmond, J M; Basunia, M S; Burke, J T; Fallon, P; Firestone, R B; Goldblum, B L; Hatarik, R; Lake, P T; Lee, I Y; Lesher, S R; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D

    2012-02-22

    The ability of atomic nuclei to emit and absorb photons with energy E{sub {gamma}} is known as the photon strength function f(E{sub {gamma}}). It has direct relevance to astrophysical element formation via neutron capture processes due to its central role in nuclear reactions. Studies of f(E{sub {gamma}}) have benefited from a wealth of data collected in neutron capture and direct reactions but also from newly commissioned inelastic photon scattering facilities. The majority of these experimental methods, however, rely on the use of models because measured {gamma}-ray spectra are simultaneously sensitive to both the nuclear level density and f(E{sub {gamma}}). As excitation energy increases towards the particle separation energies, the level density increases rapidly, creating the quasi-continuum. Nuclear properties in this excitation energy region are best characterized using statistical quantities, such as f(E{sub {gamma}}). A point of contention in studies of the quasi-continuum has been an unexpected and unexplained increase in f(E{sub {gamma}}) at low {gamma}-ray energies (i.e. below E{sub {gamma}} {approx}3 MeV) in a subset of light-to-medium mass nuclei. Ideally, a new model-independent experimental technique is required to address questions regarding the existence and origin of this low-energy enhancement in f(E{sub {gamma}}). Here such a model-independent approach is presented for determining the shape of f(E{sub {gamma}}) over a wide range of energies. The method involves the use of coupled high-resolution particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to determine the emission of {gamma} rays from the quasi-continuum in a nucleus with defined excitation energy to individual discrete levels of known spins and parities. This method shares characteristics of two neutron capture-based techniques: the Average Resonance Capture (ARC) and the Two-Step Cascade analysis (TSC). The power of the new technique lies in the additional ability to positively identify primary

  11. Photon Strength and the Low-Energy Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Krticka, M; Bleuel, D L; Allmond, J M; Basunia, M S; Burke, J T; Fallon, P; Firestone, R B; Goldblum, B L; Hatarik, R; Lake, P T; Lee, I Y; Lesher, S R; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D

    2012-02-22

    The ability of atomic nuclei to emit and absorb photons with energy E{sub {gamma}} is known as the photon strength function f(E{sub {gamma}}). It has direct relevance to astrophysical element formation via neutron capture processes due to its central role in nuclear reactions. Studies of f(E{sub {gamma}}) have benefited from a wealth of data collected in neutron capture and direct reactions but also from newly commissioned inelastic photon scattering facilities. The majority of these experimental methods, however, rely on the use of models because measured {gamma}-ray spectra are simultaneously sensitive to both the nuclear level density and f(E{sub {gamma}}). As excitation energy increases towards the particle separation energies, the level density increases rapidly, creating the quasi-continuum. Nuclear properties in this excitation energy region are best characterized using statistical quantities, such as f(E{sub {gamma}}). A point of contention in studies of the quasi-continuum has been an unexpected and unexplained increase in f(E{sub {gamma}}) at low {gamma}-ray energies (i.e. below E{sub {gamma}} {approx}3 MeV) in a subset of light-to-medium mass nuclei. Ideally, a new model-independent experimental technique is required to address questions regarding the existence and origin of this low-energy enhancement in f(E{sub {gamma}}). Here such a model-independent approach is presented for determining the shape of f(E{sub {gamma}}) over a wide range of energies. The method involves the use of coupled high-resolution particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to determine the emission of {gamma} rays from the quasi-continuum in a nucleus with defined excitation energy to individual discrete levels of known spins and parities. This method shares characteristics of two neutron capture-based techniques: the Average Resonance Capture (ARC) and the Two-Step Cascade analysis (TSC). The power of the new technique lies in the additional ability to positively identify primary

  12. Photon emission in neutral current interactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, E; Nieves, J

    2014-01-01

    Neutral current photon emission reactions with nucleons and nuclei are studied. These processes are important backgrounds for nu_mu to nu_e (bar(nu)_mu to bar(nu)_e) appearance oscillation experiments where electromagnetic showers instigated by electrons (positrons) and photons are not distinguishable. At intermediate energies, these reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance and its subsequent decay into Ngamma There are also non-resonant contributions that, close to threshold, are fully determined by the effective chiral Lagrangian of strong interactions. In addition, we have also included mechanisms mediated by nucleon excitations (N*) from the second resonance region above the Delta(1232). From these states, the contribution of the D13 N*(1520) turns out to be sizable for (anti)neutrino energies above 1.5 GeV. We have extended the model to nuclear targets taking, into account Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Delta resonance broadening. We present our predicti...

  13. Location of the effective diffusing-photon source in a strongly scattering medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, A F; Pavlov, V A

    1997-10-20

    When a narrow laser beam illuminates a strongly scattering medium, the effective pointlike source of diffusing photons appears inside the medium. By the method worked out, which is based on measurements of the diffusive intensity of light emerging from a turbid spherical sample, the depth of this source site (the penetration depth) is determined relatively to the sample diameter, which is known accurately. By using this method of locating the effective source, we have discovered that its position inside the medium is unexpectedly deep. We obtained the penetration depth D(0) = 4.6 l* +/- 0.7 l* instead of one transport mean free path, where l* is the value of D(0) in the standard diffusion theory. Information about this source dipping is useful in diffusing-photon correlation spectroscopy because of its influence on the geometric factor calculated from the diffusion equation.

  14. The low energy frontier: probes with photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, J.

    2008-05-15

    I discuss different aspects of the phenomenology of hypothetical sub eV mass particles arising in the context of extensions of the standard model. I focus on a simple extension based on an additional U(1) gauge symmetry and its corresponding gauge boson, called ''hidden photon''. Kinetic mixing with the standard photon leads to photon-hidden photon oscillations that are searched for in laboratory experiments like ALPS at DESY. Hidden photons produced in the interior of the Sun could be also detected in axion helioscopes like CAST at CERN and could play an interesting role in late cosmology, where the presence of additional feebly interacting relativistic particles seems to be favored. All these effects disappear as the hidden photon mass decreases, allowing phenomenologically large kinetic mixings. However, in this case such a hidden photon will even play a role in gauge coupling unification. (orig.)

  15. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg (eds.)

    2010-01-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  16. Conversion of zero point energy into high-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, B. I. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Instituto de Fisica, Av. Manuel Nava No. 6, Zona Universitaria, 78290 San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    An unusual phenomenon, observed in experiments is studied. X-ray laser bursts of keV energy are emitted from a metal where long-living states, resulting in population inversion, are totally unexpected. Anomalous electron-photon states are revealed to be formed inside the metal. These states are associated with narrow, 10{sup -11} cm, potential well created by the local reduction of zero point electromagnetic energy. In contrast to analogous van der Waals potential well, leading to attraction of two hydrogen atoms, the depth of the anomalous well is on the order of 1 MeV. The states in that well are long-living which results in population inversion and subsequent laser generation observed. The X-ray emission, occurring in transitions to lower levels, is due to the conversion of zero point electromagnetic energy. (Author)

  17. Electromagnetic Energy Momentum Tensor in a Spatially Dispersive Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fietz, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We derive a generalized Minkowski Energy Momentum Tensor for a monochromatic wave in a lossless medium exhibiting temporal and spatial dispersion. The Energy Momentum Tensor is then related to familiar expressions for energy density and energy flux, as well as new expressions for momentum density and momentum flux.

  18. In-medium modifications of the pi pi interaction in photon-induced reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, JG; Janssen, S; Kotulla, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, JRH; Beck, R; Bloch, F; Caselotti, G; Fog, L; Hornidge, D; Krusche, B; Langgartner, W; McGeorge, JC; MacGregor, IJD; Mengel, K; Metag, V.; Novotny, R; Owens, RO; Pfeiffer, M; Sack, S; Sanderson, R.; Schadmand, S

    2002-01-01

    Differential cross sections of the reactions (gamma,pi(0)pi(0)) and (gamma,pi(0)pi(+/-)) have been measured for several nuclei (H-1,C-12, and Pb-nat) at an incident-photon energy of E-gamma=400-460 MeV at the tagged-photon facility at MAMI-B using the TAPS spectrometer. A significant nuclear-mass de

  19. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  20. Photon drag enhancement by a slow-light moving medium via electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Khan, Naveed; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Rahman, Amin Ur; Ahmad, Afaq

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a considerable enhancement has been observed in the celebrated Fresnel-Fizeau light drag by innovative experimental and theoretical approaches because of its fundamental and practical interest in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. We present a semiclassical density matrix approach on the demonstration of light drag in a slow-light moving medium comprising five-level single tripod atomic configuration. To accomplish this, we introduce Kerr-type nonlinearity that leads to electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification under resonance conditions. By switching ON Kerr-type nonlinearity effect, we observe a prominent transparency window in probe field's absorption spectrum whose width and amplitude can be controlled further by the intensity of Kerr field and control field. The incorporation of Kerr field also switches light propagation from superluminal to subluminal domain. We predict a significant enhancement both in the lateral and the rotary photon drag owing to drag of light linear polarization state subjected to translation and rotation of the host medium, respectively. Consistent with earlier results, light drag considerably depends on both transverse and angular velocity of the host medium. In regime of subluminal propagation, light polarization state drags along the medium motion while in the superluminal propagation region it drags opposite to the medium motion.

  1. High intrinsic energy resolution photon number resolving detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lolli, L; Portesi, C; Monticone, E; Rajteri, M

    2013-01-01

    Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) are characterized by the intrinsic figure of merit to resolve both the energy and the statistical distribution of the incident photons. These properties lead TES devices to become the best single photon detector for quantum technology experiments. For a TES based on titanium and gold has been reached, at telecommunication wavelength, an unprecedented intrinsic energy resolution (0.113 eV). The uncertainties analysis of both energy resolution and photon state assignment has been discussed. The thermal properties of the superconductive device have been studied by fitting the bias curve to evaluate theoretical limit of the energy resolution.

  2. A contradictory phenomenon of deshelving pulses in a dilute medium used for lengthened photon storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S

    2010-08-16

    Lengthening of photon storage time has been an important issue in quantum memories for long distance quantum communications utilizing quantum repeaters. Atom population transfer into an auxiliary spin state has been adapted to increase photon storage time of photon echoes. In this population transfer process phase shift to the collective atoms is inevitable, where the phase recovery condition must be multiple of 2pi to satisfy rephasing mechanism. Recent adaptation of the population transfer method to atomic frequency comb (AFC) echoes [Afzelius et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 040503 (2010)], where the population transfer method is originated in a controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening technique [Moiseev and Kroll, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 173601 (2001)], however, shows contradictory phenomenon violating the phase recovery condition. This contradiction in AFC is reviewed as a general case of optical locking applied to a dilute medium for an optical depth-dependent coherence leakage resulting in partial retrieval efficiency.

  3. Dynamical Effects on Jet Energy Loss in QCD Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Computation of radiative energy loss in a finite size dynamically screened QCD medium is a key ingredient for obtaining reliable predictions for jet quenching in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. We develop a theory which allows calculating, to first order in the number of scattering centers, the energy loss of a heavy quark traveling through a finite size dynamical QCD medium. We show that the result for a dynamical medium is significantly larger compared to a medium consisting of randomly distributed static scattering centers. Therefore, a quantitative description of jet suppression at RHIC and LHC experiments must correctly account for the dynamics of the medium's constituents. Furthermore, qualitative predictions that come from this energy loss formalism are also presented.

  4. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon sat

  5. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  6. Decay of photon with high as well as low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Indranath

    2016-01-01

    The decay of photon by the influence of magnetic field is considered. It is shown here that if the photon energy is grater than 1 MeV then photon can decay electron positron pair, but if it remains below 1 MeV then photon decays into neutrino antineutrino pair. The decay rates for both of the processes are calculated. All possible Feynman diagrams are taken into account to construct the matrix element for either of the processes. In the second process all three type of neutrinos are considered. The significance of these processes are discussed briefly.

  7. Energy-correction photon counting pixel for photon energy extraction under pulse pile-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-06-01

    A photon counting detector (PCD) has been proposed as an alternative solution to an energy-integrating detector (EID) in medical imaging field due to its high resolution, high efficiency, and low noise. The PCD has expanded to variety of fields such as spectral CT, k-edge imaging, and material decomposition owing to its capability to count and measure the number and the energy of an incident photon, respectively. Nonetheless, pulse pile-up, which is a superimposition of pulses at the output of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) in each PC pixel, occurs frequently as the X-ray flux increases due to the finite pulse processing time (PPT) in CSAs. Pulse pile-up induces not only a count loss but also distortion in the measured X-ray spectrum from each PC pixel and thus it is a main constraint on the use of PCDs in high flux X-ray applications. To minimize these effects, an energy-correction PC (ECPC) pixel is proposed to resolve pulse pile-up without cutting off the PPT by adding an energy correction logic (ECL) via a cross detection method (CDM). The ECPC pixel with a size of 200×200 μm2 was fabricated by using a 6-metal 1-poly 0.18 μm CMOS process with a static power consumption of 7.2 μW/pixel. The maximum count rate of the ECPC pixel was extended by approximately three times higher than that of a conventional PC pixel with a PPT of 500 nsec. The X-ray spectrum of 90 kVp, filtered by 3 mm Al filter, was measured as the X-ray current was increased using the CdTe and the ECPC pixel. As a result, the ECPC pixel dramatically reduced the energy spectrum distortion at 2 Mphotons/pixel/s when compared to that of the ERCP pixel with the same 500 nsec PPT.

  8. Effects of Photon Absorption in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Joshua; Somanathan, Sidharth; Fries, Ranier

    2014-09-01

    Photons are an important probe of the hot and dense nuclear matter created in high-energy collisions of nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the mean free path of photons is larger than the size of the fireball of nuclear matter, final state interactions of photons are usually neglected. In light of recent tension between theoretical calculations and data from RHIC and LHC, we study the effect of reabsorption of photons on elliptic flow v2 and on the nuclear modification factor RAA. We consider photons emitted in primary hard collisions and thermal photons from quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas. We use the jet-quenching code PPM to simulate the propagation of those photons in a fireball of quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas created by collisions of heavy nuclei. For the absorption cross-sections we consider three different approaches: (a) Compton and pair production processes calculated by us in a static approximation, (b) the photon damping rates calculated by Thoma (1995), and (c) absorption rates derived from a recent photon calculation by van Hees et al.

  9. Energy dissipation of energetic electrons in the inhomogeneous intergalactic medium during the epoch of reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kaurov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    We explore a time-dependent energy dissipation of the energetic electrons in the inhomogeneous intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of cosmic reionization. In addition to the atomic processes we take into account the Inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the electrons on the comic microwave background (CMB) photons, which is the dominant channel of energy loss for the electrons with energies above a few MeV. We show that: (1) the effect on the IGM has both local (atomic processes) and non-local (IC radiation) components; (2) the energy distribution between Hydrogen and Helium ionizations depends on the initial electron energy; (3) the local baryon overdensity significantly affects the fractions of energy distributed in each channel; and (4) the relativistic effect of atomic cross section become important during the epoch of cosmic reionization. We release our code as open source for further modification by the community.

  10. Parton energy loss in hot and dense QCD medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jie; MAO Yaxian; XIANG Wenchang; ZHOU Daicui

    2006-01-01

    Induced gluon radiation and energy loss of heavy quark in hot and dense QCD media are discussed. Using the light-cone path integral approach, an analytical formula of the energy loss of heavy quark is derived. The results show that the quark energy loss obviously depends on the mass of quark, i. e. a remarkable suppression occurs in the case of heavy quark comparing to a light one. The radiative energy loss of energetic quark is proportional to L2, where L is the length of the medium. The dependence of energy loss on L2 turns to L with decreasing quark energy.

  11. ATLAS event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background.

  12. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Daniel H.; Lacount, Michael D.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Lusk, Mark T.; Shaheen, Sean E.

    2017-03-01

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly and simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. Design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems.

  13. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingarten, Daniel H.; LaCount, Michael D.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Lusk, Mark T.; Shaheen, Sean E.

    2017-03-15

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly and simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. Design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems.

  14. Glucose detection in a highly scattering medium with diffuse photon-pair density wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel optical method for glucose measurement based on diffuse photon-pair density wave (DPPDW in a multiple scattering medium (MSM where the light scattering of photon-pair is induced by refractive index mismatch between scatters and phantom solution. Experimentally, the DPPDW propagates in MSM via a two-frequency laser (TFL beam wherein highly correlated pairs of linear polarized photons are generated. The reduced scattering coefficient μ2s′ and absorption coefficient μ2a of DPPDW are measured simultaneously in terms of the amplitude and phase measurements of the detected heterodyne signal under arrangement at different distances between the source and detection fibers in MSM. The results show that the sensitivity of glucose detection via glucose-induced change of reduced scattering coefficient (δμ2s′ is 0.049%mM−1 in a 1% intralipid solution. In addition, the linear range of δμ2s′ vs glucose concentration implies that this DPPDW method can be used to monitor glucose concentration continuously and noninvasively subcutaneously.

  15. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is paramount for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. The results obtained with the pp collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 and 2.7 fb-1 respectively , as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented.

  16. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  17. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  18. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electrons and photons is paramount for many ATLAS physics analyses. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed $in$-$situ$ using a large statistics of $Z \\rightarrow ee$ events. The results obtained with the $pp$ collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ and 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ respectively, as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented

  19. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  20. Electromagnetic energy flow lines as possible paths of photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovic, M [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arsenovic, D; Bozic, M [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by recent experiments where interference patterns behind a grating are obtained by accumulating single photon events, we provide here an electromagnetic energy flow-line description to explain the emergence of such patterns. We find and discuss an analogy between the equation describing these energy flow lines and the equation of Bohmian trajectories used to describe the motion of massive particles.

  1. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  2. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H. (Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-04-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, [mu], to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio [mu][sub ab]/[mu] as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author).

  3. Formulation of photon diffusion from spherical bioluminescent sources in an infinite homogeneous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lihong V

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioluminescent enzyme firefly luciferase (Luc or variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP in transformed cells can be effectively used to reveal molecular and cellular features of neoplasia in vivo. Tumor cell growth and regression in response to various therapies can be evaluated by using bioluminescent imaging. In bioluminescent imaging, light propagates in highly scattering tissue, and the diffusion approximation is sufficiently accurate to predict the imaging signal around the biological tissue. The numerical solutions to the diffusion equation take large amounts of computational time, and the studies for its analytic solutions have attracted more attention in biomedical engineering applications. Methods Biological tissue is a turbid medium that both scatters and absorbs photons. An accurate model for the propagation of photons through tissue can be adopted from transport theory, and its diffusion approximation is applied to predict the imaging signal around the biological tissue. The solution to the diffusion equation is formulated by the convolution between its Green's function and source term. The formulation of photon diffusion from spherical bioluminescent sources in an infinite homogeneous medium can be obtained to accelerate the forward simulation of bioluminescent phenomena. Results The closed form solutions have been derived for the time-dependent diffusion equation and the steady-state diffusion equation with solid and hollow spherical sources in a homogeneous medium, respectively. Meanwhile, the relationship between solutions with a solid sphere source and ones with a surface sphere source is obtained. Conclusion We have formulated solutions for the diffusion equation with solid and hollow spherical sources in an infinite homogeneous medium. These solutions have been verified by Monte Carlo simulation for use in biomedical optical imaging studies. The closed form solution is highly accurate and more

  4. Preservation of Energy-Time Entanglement in a Slow Light Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Camacho, Ryan M.; Xin, Ran; Howell, John C.

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrate the preservation of entanglement of an energy-time entangled biphoton through a slow light medium. Using the D1 and D2 fine structure resonances of Rubidium, we delay one photon of the 1.5 THz biphoton by ˜1.3 correlation lengths and measure the fourth order correlation fringes. After the group delay the fringe visibility is reduced from 97.0±4.4% to 80.0±4.8%, but is still sufficient to violate a Bell inequality. We show that temporal broadening is the primary mechanism for reducing the fringe visibility and that smaller bandwidths lead to greatly reduced broadening.

  5. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, W., E-mail: wabdel@medphys.mcgill.c [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Medical Physics Unit, 1650 avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A4 (Canada); Podgorsak, E.B. [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Medical Physics Unit, 1650 avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  6. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, W.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    2010-05-01

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  7. Design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Sparks, N.; Moriya, K.; Tucker, R. J.; Lee, R. J.; Thorpe, B. N.; Hodges, T.; Barbosa, F. J.; Sandoval, N.; Jones, R. T.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter for measuring the degree of polarization of a linearly-polarized photon beam. The photon polarimeter uses the process of pair production on an atomic electron (triplet production). The azimuthal distribution of scattered atomic electrons following triplet production yields information regarding the degree of linear polarization of the incident photon beam. The polarimeter, operated in conjunction with a pair spectrometer, uses a silicon strip detector to measure the recoil electron distribution resulting from triplet photoproduction in a beryllium target foil. The analyzing power ΣA for the device using a 75 μm beryllium converter foil is about 0.2, with a relative systematic uncertainty in ΣA of 1.5%.

  8. Series expansion of the photon self-energy in QED and the photon anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, H Perez; Chavez, S Villalba

    2008-01-01

    We start from the analytical expression of the eigenvalues $\\kappa^{(i)}$ of the photon self-energy tensor in an external constant magnetic field $B$ calculated by Batalin Shabad in the Furry representation, and in the one-loop approximation. We expand in power series of the external field and in terms of the squared photon transverse momentum $z_2$ and (minus) transverse energy $z_1=k^2-z_2$, in terms of which are expressed $\\kappa^{(i)}$. A general expression is given for the photon anomalous magnetic moment $\\mu_{\\gamma}>0$ in the region of transparency, below the first threshold for pair creation, and it is shown that it is positive, i.e. paramagnetic. The results of the numerical calculation for $\\mu_{\\gamma}>0$ are displayed in a region close to the threshold.

  9. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  10. In-medium effects around the Fermi energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study nuclear stopping in central collisions for heavy-ion induced reactions in the Fermi energy domain (15-100 AMeV. Using the large dataset provided by the 4π array INDRA, we determine that stopping can be directly related to the transport properties in the nuclear medium. By looking specifically at protons, we present a comprehensive body of experimental results concerning the mean free path, the nucleon-nucleon cross-section and in-medium effects in nuclear matter.

  11. Medium modification of jet fragmentation in Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured in direct photon-hadron correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bing, X; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, H J; Kim, K-B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S

    2013-07-19

    The jet fragmentation function is measured with direct photon-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The p(T) of the photon is an excellent approximation to the initial p(T) of the jet and the ratio z(T)=p(T)(h)/p(T)(γ) is used as a proxy for the jet fragmentation function. A statistical subtraction is used to extract the direct photon-hadron yields in Au+Au collisions while a photon isolation cut is applied in p+p. I(AA), the ratio of hadron yield opposite the photon in Au+Au to that in p+p, indicates modification of the jet fragmentation function. Suppression, most likely due to energy loss in the medium, is seen at high z(T). The associated hadron yield at low z(T) is enhanced at large angles. Such a trend is expected from redistribution of the lost energy into increased production of low-momentum particles.

  12. Medium Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV Measured in Direct Photon-Hadron Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, R.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2013-07-01

    The jet fragmentation function is measured with direct photon-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. The pT of the photon is an excellent approximation to the initial pT of the jet and the ratio zT=pTh/pTγ is used as a proxy for the jet fragmentation function. A statistical subtraction is used to extract the direct photon-hadron yields in Au+Au collisions while a photon isolation cut is applied in p+p. IAA, the ratio of hadron yield opposite the photon in Au+Au to that in p+p, indicates modification of the jet fragmentation function. Suppression, most likely due to energy loss in the medium, is seen at high zT. The associated hadron yield at low zT is enhanced at large angles. Such a trend is expected from redistribution of the lost energy into increased production of low-momentum particles.

  13. Multihop Medium Access Control for WSNs: An Energy Analysis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haapola Jussi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an energy analysis technique applicable to medium access control (MAC and multihop communications. Furthermore, the technique's application gives insight on using multihop forwarding instead of single-hop communications. Using the technique, we perform an energy analysis of carrier-sense-multiple-access (CSMA- based MAC protocols with sleeping schemes. Power constraints set by battery operation raise energy efficiency as the prime factor for wireless sensor networks. A detailed energy expenditure analysis of the physical, the link, and the network layers together can provide a basis for developing new energy-efficient wireless sensor networks. The presented technique provides a set of analytical tools for accomplishing this. With those tools, the energy impact of radio, MAC, and topology parameters on the network can be investigated. From the analysis, we extract key parameters of selected MAC protocols and show that some traditional mechanisms, such as binary exponential backoff, have inherent problems.

  14. Exciting reflectionless unidirectional edge modes in a reciprocal photonic topological insulator medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Lai, Kueifu; Yu, Yang; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Shvets, Gennady; Anlage, Steven M.

    2016-11-01

    Photonic topological insulators are an interesting class of materials whose photonic band structure can have a band gap in the bulk while supporting topologically protected unidirectional edge modes. Recent studies on bianisotropic metamaterials that emulate the electronic quantum spin Hall effect using its electromagnetic analog are examples of such systems with a relatively simple and elegant design. In this paper, we present a rotating magnetic dipole antenna, composed of two perpendicularly oriented coils, that can efficiently excite the unidirectional topologically protected surface waves in the bianisotropic metawaveguide (BMW) structure recently realized by T. Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 127401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.127401] despite the fact that the BMW medium does not break time-reversal invariance. In addition to achieving a high directivity, the antenna can be tuned continuously to excite reflectionless edge modes in the two opposite directions at various amplitude ratios. We demonstrate its performance through experiments and compare the results to simulation results.

  15. Thermoluminescent analyses of mean photon energy of a field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Fonseca, G.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: tassio.cavalieri@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays a common method of dosimetry is utilize the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) of LiF, where for pure gamma field is typically used the LiF or CaF{sub 2} TLDs and for mixed neutron and gamma field dosimetry is used the pair TLD-600/TLD-700. The difference between these three LiF TLDs is the amount of isotope {sup 6}Li in their composition. The isotope {sup 6}Li has a great cross section for thermal neutrons, making the TLD-600 sensitive to thermal neutrons beyond the radiation gamma. Whereas the TLD-700 is considered sensitive only for radiation gamma. Some studies showed an energetic dependence of these TLDs for gammas rays. So the goal of this work was study these energetic dependence of TLDs from the angular coefficient of their response versus dose calibration curves when they were irradiated in four fields with photons of different energies: 43 keV, 662 keV, 1.2 MeV, 3 MeV. In order to create the calibration curves TLD, it was performed three irradiations with distinct exposure times for each photon energy. These studies showed a different angular coefficient to each curve; demonstrate the energetic dependence of these TLDs. By simulation with Monte Carlo based code, MCNP-5, it was observed the deposited photon dose due to different photons energies. From these simulations, it was also possible to observe a difference of dose deposition in TLDs when they were exposed to the same dose provided from different photons energies. These work showed the previously study of photon energetic dependence of LiF TLDs. (Author)

  16. Multiple photon effects in $pp$ scattering at SSC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Delaney, D B; Shio, C; Siopsis, G; Ward, B F L

    1992-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program SSCYFS2 is used in conjunction with available parton distribution functions to calculate the effects of multiple photon radiation on pp scattering at SSC energies. Effects relevant to precision SSC physics such as Higgs discovery and exploration are illustrated.

  17. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Saskia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is needed for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. A pre-requisite of this calibration is a good understanding of the material in front of the calorimeter and of the inter-calibration of the different calorimeter layers. The Z->ee sample is also used to measure the energy resolution. The results obtained with the pp collisions data at sqrt(s)=13 TeV in 2016 (2015) corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 33.9 (3.1)fb-1 of sqrt(s)=13 TeV are presented as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales.

  18. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J. [LMITCo, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harmon, F. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Experimental Assessment of Photon Fluence Rate Distributions in a Medium-Pressure UV Photoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Qiang, Zhimin; Wang, Chen; Bolton, James R; Blatchley Iii, Ernest R

    2017-02-28

    The performance of a medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamp photoreactor is strongly influenced by the spatial photon fluence rate (PFR) distributions which are wavelength-dependent. To address this issue, PFR distributions in an MP lamp photoreactor were measured using a 360-degree response microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD). To accurately express the optical behavior in an MP photoreactor, PFR, MFSD response PFR (PFRMFSD), and effective germicidal PFR (PFRGER) were defined and compared. The measured axial and radial PFRMFSD values agreed well with the corresponding results from a simulation model (UVCalc). The PFR and PFRGER were obtained from the measured PFRMFSD by using correction factors calculated by the UVCalc. Under identical UV transmittance (254 nm) conditions (75% and 85%), the weighted average PFRGER values were 13.3-18.7% lower than the corresponding PFR values, indicating that PFRGER, rather than PFR should be used in MP photoreactor design to meet disinfection standards. Based on measured lamp output, medium absorption spectrum, MFSD response, and microbial DNA response spectrum, the detailed relationships between the PFR, PFRMFSD, and PFRGER were elucidated. This work proposes a new method for the accurate description of wavelength-dependent PFR distributions in MP photoreactors, thus providing an important tool for the optimal design of these systems.

  20. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined.

  1. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  2. Modulation of multiple photon energies by use of surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Arakawa, E. T.; Wig, A.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    A form of optical modulation at low pulse rates is reported in the case of surface plasmons excited by 1.55-µm photons in a thin gold foil. Several visible-photon energies are shown to be pulsed by the action of the infrared pulses, the effect being maximized when each visible beam also excites surface plasmons. The infrared surface plasmons are implicated as the primary cause of thermally induced changes in the foil. The thermal effects dissipate in sufficiently small times so that operation up to the kilohertz range in pulse repetition frequency is obtained. Unlike direct photothermal phenomena, no phase change is necessary for the effect to be observed.

  3. Lorentz violation for photons and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaverni, Matteo; Sigl, Günter

    2008-01-18

    Lorentz symmetry breaking at very high energies may lead to photon dispersion relations of the form omega2=k2+xink2(k/MPl)n with new terms suppressed by a power n of the Planck mass MPl. We show that first and second order terms of size |xi1|>orsimilar10(-14) and xi2photon component in cosmic rays above 10(19) eV that should already have been detected, if corresponding terms for e+/- are significantly smaller. This suggests that LI breaking suppressed up to second order in the Planck scale is unlikely to be phenomenologically viable for photons.

  4. Effects of negative index medium defect layers on the trans mission properties of one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Yuan-jiang; DAI Xiao-yu; WEN Shuang-chun

    2007-01-01

    School of Computer and Communication, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, ChinaThe photonic band gap structure of 1D photonic crystal with a negative index medium defect layer is studied by using the transfer matrix method. Investigations show that the introdution of negative index medium defect layer and the increase of the negative index value will result in an extension of the band gap. Moreover, by increasing the negative index, the width of defect layer and the numbers of period photonic crystal, the width of defect modes will be narrowed, which is advantaged to obtain optical filters with narrow band. Finally, the effects of absorption on the properties of band gap and on defect modes have been discussed.

  5. Gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, S.; Klasen, M. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761, Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    We study the potential of high-energy photon colliders for the production of gluino pairs within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this model, the process {gamma}{gamma}{yields}gg is mediated by quark/squark box diagrams with enhancements for up-type quarks/squarks from their larger charges and for third generation squarks from their large mass splittings, generated by the mixing of left- and right-handed states. Far above threshold and in scenarios with very heavy squarks, resolved photons can contribute significantly at tree level. Taking into account the laser photon backscattering spectrum, electron and laser beam polarization effects, and current mass exclusion limits, we find that gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions should be visible over large regions of the MSSM parameter space, contrary to what has been found for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. In addition, the cross section rises rather steeply, so that a gluino mass determination with a precision of a few GeV should be feasible for a wide range of post-LEP benchmark points. (orig.)

  6. Gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, S.; Klasen, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2003-03-01

    We study the potential of high-energy photon colliders for the production of gluino pairs within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this model, the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} gg is mediated by quark/squark box diagrams with enhancements for up-type quarks/squarks from their larger charges and for third generation squarks from their large mass splittings, generated by the mixing of left- and right-handed states. Far above threshold and in scenarios with very heavy squarks, resolved photons can contribute significantly at tree level. Taking into account the laser photon backscattering spectrum, electron and laser beam polarization effects, and current mass exclusion limits, we find that gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions should be visible over large regions of the MSSM parameter space, contrary to what has been found for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. In addition, the cross section rises rather steeply, so that a gluino mass determination with a precision of a few GeV should be feasible for a wide range of post-LEP benchmark points. (orig.)

  7. Medium modification of jet fragmentation in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV measured in direct photon-hadron correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bing, X; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg\\Ho, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger,, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niita, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F

    2012-01-01

    The jet fragmentation function is measured with direct photon-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV. The p_T of the photon is an excellent approximation to the initial p_T of the jet and the ratio z_T=p_T^h/p_T^\\gamma is used as a proxy for the jet fragmentation function. A statistical subtraction is used to extract the direct photon-hadron yields in Au+Au collisions while a photon isolation cut is applied in p+p. I_ AA, the ratio of jet fragment yield in Au+Au to that in p+p, indicates modification of the jet fragmentation function. Suppression, most likely due to energy loss in the medium, is seen at high z_T. The fragment yield at low z_T is enhanced at large angles. Such a trend is expected from redistribution of the lost energy into increased production of low-momentum particles.

  8. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  9. Photon echo under excitation of a medium by pulses consisting of an arbitrary number of oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znamenskii, N. V.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    Echo responses of a three-level medium formed by the λ-scheme of quantum transitions under exposure to optical pulses consisting of an arbitrary number of oscillations have been studied theoretically. The cases of pulses consisting of few optical oscillations (for which the concept of an envelope cannot be used) and combinations of such pulses and quasi-monochromatic resonance signals have been considered. The approach used can be reduced to the renormalization of dipole moments of allowed quantum transitions through their multiplication by coefficients depending on the shape and duration of pump pulses and having absolute values in the range from zero (for nonresonance pulses) to unity (for resonance quasi-monochromatic pulses and broadband pulses consisting of few oscillations, whose spectrum covers the quantum transitions). A general equation has been proposed for the pulse area. In the limit of a large number of oscillations, it transforms into the well-known definition of the area of a quasi-monochromatic signal. The characteristics of primary and longlived photon echoes have been analyzed in detail. It has been shown that, when a medium is exposed to only pulses consisting of a few oscillations, three echo responses of both types can be principally generated at each frequency of the λ-scheme. Introduction of quasi-monochromatic pulses in pump pulse series decreases the number of echoes, and their qualitative character has a non-commutative property with respect to pulse permutation in a series. The extension of the proposed approach to more complex schemes of quantum transitions with the large number of quantum levels faces no principal difficulties.

  10. Analysis of medium-energy transfers to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kenta; Topputo, Francesco; Campagnola, Stefano; Yanao, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzes a recently discovered class of exterior transfers to the Moon. These transfers terminate in retrograde ballistic capture orbits, i.e., orbits with negative Keplerian energy and angular momentum with respect to the Moon. Yet, their Jacobi constant is relatively low, for which no forbidden regions exist, and the trajectories do not appear to mimic the dynamics of the invariant manifolds of the Lagrange points. This paper shows that these orbits shadow instead lunar collision orbits. We investigate the dynamics of singular, lunar collision orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three-body problem, and reveal their rich phase space structure in the medium-energy regime, where invariant manifolds of the Lagrange point orbits break up. We show that lunar retrograde ballistic capture trajectories lie inside the tube structure of collision orbits. We also develop a method to compute medium-energy transfers by patching together orbits inside the collision tube and those whose apogees are located in the appropriate quadrant in the Sun-Earth system. The method yields the novel family of transfers as well as those ending in direct capture orbits, under particular energetic and geometrical conditions.

  11. Three-photon interactions and spin exchange in a quantum nonlinear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Sergio; Liang, Qi-Yu; Thompson, Jeff; Nicholson, Travis; Venkatramani, Aditya; Gullans, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey; Choi, Soonwon; Lukin, Mikhail; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    Robust quantum gates for photonic qubits are a longstanding goal of quantum information science. One promising approach to achieve this goal requires strong nonlinear interactions between single photons, which is impossible with conventional optical media. We realize these interactions with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), and strongly interacting Rydberg states to mediate strong interactions between photons. Operating in the dispersive regime of EIT, we have recently shown that two photons propagating in our system can bind into a photonic molecule. Extending these two-photon experiments to many-body physics would lead to exotic phenomena like photon crystallization. To that end, we have scaled up our two-photon measurements to three-photon experiments. We are now able to discern signatures of three-photon molecules from a variety of two- and three-photon interactions. Three-photon bound states manifest as an increase in photon bunching in g (3) correlation measurements. We also present a recent observation of coherent spin exchange interactions in Rydberg EIT.

  12. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  13. Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2017-01-01

    ) and the related kinetic and elastic energies is neglected. In this work, we present foundations of a covariant theory of light propagation in a medium by considering a light wave simultaneously with the dynamics of the medium atoms driven by optoelastic forces between the induced dipoles and the electromagnetic......) over bar omega/c. The field's share of the momentum is the Abraham momentum p(A) = (h) over bar omega/(nc), while the difference p(M) - p(A) is carried by MDW. Due to the coupling of the field and matter, only the total momentum of the light pulse and the transferred mass delta m can be directly...... measured. Thus, our theory gives an unambiguous physical meaning to the Abraham and Minkowski momenta. We also show that to solve the centenary Abraham-Minkowski controversy of the momentum of light in a nondispersive medium in a way that is consistent with Newton's first law, one must account for the mass...

  14. Positronium-alkali atom scattering at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy [Laban Hrad Vidyapith, AD-369, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Basu, Arindam [Department of Physics, Maheshtala College, Chandannagar, South 24 Parganas, Kolkata 700 140 (India); Sarkar, Nirmal K [Sodepur Chandrachur Vidyapith, 1, Desh Bandhu Nagar, Sodepur, 743 174 (India); Sinha, Prabal K [Department of Physics, Bangabasi College, 19, Raj Kumar Chakravorty Sarani, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2004-04-28

    We investigate the scattering of orthopositronium (o-Ps) atom off different atomic alkali targets (Na to Cs) at low and medium energies (up to 120 eV). Projectile-elastic and target-elastic close-coupling models have been employed to investigate the systems in addition to the static-exchange model. Elastic, excitation and total cross sections have been reported for all four systems. The magnitude of the alkali excitation cross section increases with increasing atomic number of the target atom while the position of the peak value shifts towards lower incident energies. The magnitudes of the Ps excitation and ionization cross sections increase steadily with atomic number with no change in the peak position. The reported results show regular behaviour with increasing atomic number of the target atom. Scattering parameters for the Ps-Rb and Ps-Cs systems are being reported for the first time.

  15. Injection system of teh SSC Medium Energy Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, N.; Gerig, R.; McGill, J.; Brown, K.

    1994-04-01

    The Medium Energy Booster (MEB) is the third of the SSCL accelerators and the largest of the resistive magnet synchrotrons. It accelerates protons from an injection momentum of 12 GeV/c to a top momentum of 200 GeV/c. A beam injection system has been designed to inject the beam transferred from the Low Energy Booster onto the MEB closed orbit in the MEB injection insertion region. The beam is injected via a vertical bending Lambertson septum magnet and a horizontal kicker with appropriate matching and very little beam loss and emittance dilution. The beam optics of the injection system is described in this paper. The required parameters of the Lambertson septum magnet and the injection kicker are given.

  16. Energy savings using medium voltage softstarts on chip blowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. R. [E. B. Eddy Forest Products, Ltd., Espanola, ON (Canada)

    1997-05-01

    Wood chip blowers are used to pneumatically blow hardwood and softwood chips to storage piles, chip bins and batch digesters. In the past they were allowed to run continuously because it was believed that frequent stops and starts would damage the equipment. Excellent energy paybacks have been achieved with the 1994 installation of silicon controlled rectifier softstarts on the blowers, thus eliminating the cost of running the equipment under no load conditions. Installation and operation of these medium voltage softstarts on both induction and synchronous motors, the project costs and the savings realized, were described. The installation of softstarts is only one example of saving energy in the paper and pulp industry. With advances in silicon controlled rectifier technology , variable speed drives, etc., there are many other opportunities which could be implemented at relatively low cost.

  17. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  18. Two particle correlations with photon triggers to study hot QCD medium in ALICE at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yaxian, Mao; Shou, Daicui; Schutz, Yves

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)at the end of 2009, the new accelerator at CERN collides protons and heavy-ions at unprecedented high energies. ALICE , one of the major experiment installed at LHC, is dedicated to the study of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of energy density with the opportunity of creating a partonic medium called the Quark- Gluon-Plasma (QGP). This new experimental facility opens new avenues for the understanding of fundamental properties of the strong interaction and its vacuum. To reach the objectives of this scientific program, it is required to select a set of appropriate probes carrying relevant information on the properties of the medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Based on the information delivered by all the observables and guided by modelization of the fundamental principles in action, a coherent picture will emerge to interpret the observed phenomena. In the first part of the present document I describe the context of the scientif...

  19. On the low-energy limit of one-loop photon-graviton amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastianelli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Corradini, O. [Centro de Estudios en Fisica y Matematicas Basicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, C.P. 29000, Tuxtla Gutierrez (Mexico); Davila, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, C.P. 58040, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Schubert, C., E-mail: schubert@ifm.umich.mx [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, C.P. 58040, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-09-19

    We present first results of a systematic study of the structure of the low-energy limit of the one-loop photon-graviton amplitudes induced by massive scalars and spinors. Our main objective is the search of KLT-type relations where effectively two photons merge into a graviton. We find such a relation at the graviton-photon-photon level. We also derive the diffeomorphism Ward identity for the 1PI one-graviton-N-photon amplitudes.

  20. Influence of Heat-radiating on Multi-photon Compton Scattering High-energy Electron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; WANG Xin-min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model of the inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat-radiation photons, the influence of heat-radiating photons on multi-photon Compton scattering high-energy electrons is studied . The results show that the energy loss, power loss, light resistance and light pressure of the high-energy electron formed by heat radiating are all proportional to the temperature T4 of the vacuum cavity of the electron,the Lorentz factor γ2 of the high-energy electrons, the scattering section of the electron and the number of photons acting at the same time with high-energy electrons. A good method for lessening the energy loss of the high-energy electron by using the one-photon Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat radiation photons is proposed.

  1. Central Arkansas Energy Project. Coal to medium-Btu gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    The Central Arkansas Energy Project has as its objective the conversion of coal in a central location to a more readily usable energy source, medium Btu gas (MBG), for use at dispersed locations as fuel for power production and steam generation, or as a feedstock for chemical processing. The project elements consist of a gasification facility to produce MBG from coal, a pipeline to supply the MBG to the dispersed sites. The end of line users investigated were the repowering or refueling of an existing Arkansas Power and Light Co. Generating station, an ammonia plant, and a combined cycle cogeneration facility for the production of steam and electricity. Preliminary design of the gasification plant including process engineering design bases, process flow diagrams, utility requirements, system description, project engineering design, equipment specifications, plot plan and section plot plans, preliminary piping and instrument diagrams, and facilities requirements. Financial analyses and sensitivities are determined. Design and construction schedules and manpower loadings are developed. It is concluded that the project is technically feasible, but the financial soundness is difficult to project due to uncertainty in energy markets of competing fuels.

  2. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes. [Northwestern Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Kamal K.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications. (RWR)

  3. Photon energy upconverting nanopaper: a bioinspired oxygen protection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svagan, Anna J; Busko, Dmitry; Avlasevich, Yuri; Glasser, Gunnar; Baluschev, Stanislav; Landfester, Katharina

    2014-08-26

    The development of solid materials which are able to upconvert optical radiation into photons of higher energy is attractive for many applications such as photocatalytic cells and photovoltaic devices. However, to fully exploit triplet-triplet annihilation photon energy upconversion (TTA-UC), oxygen protection is imperative because molecular oxygen is an ultimate quencher of the photon upconversion process. So far, reported solid TTA-UC materials have focused mainly on elastomeric matrices with low barrier properties because the TTA-UC efficiency generally drops significantly in glassy and semicrystalline matrices. To overcome this limit, for example, combine effective and sustainable annihilation upconversion with exhaustive oxygen protection of dyes, we prepare a sustainable solid-state-like material based on nanocellulose. Inspired by the structural buildup of leaves in Nature, we compartmentalize the dyes in the liquid core of nanocellulose-based capsules which are then further embedded in a cellulose nanofibers (NFC) matrix. Using pristine cellulose nanofibers, a sustainable and environmentally friendly functional nanomaterial with ultrahigh barrier properties is achieved. Also, an ensemble of sensitizers and emitter compounds are encapsulated, which allow harvesting of the energy of the whole deep-red sunlight region. The films demonstrate excellent lifetime in synthetic air (20.5/79.5, O2/N2)-even after 1 h operation, the intensity of the TTA-UC signal decreased only 7.8% for the film with 8.8 μm thick NFC coating. The lifetime can be further modulated by the thickness of the protective NFC coating. For comparison, the lifetime of TTA-UC in liquids exposed to air is on the level of seconds to minutes due to fast oxygen quenching.

  4. Triplet-triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Victor; Dzebo, Damir; Abrahamsson, Maria; Albinsson, Bo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-06-14

    Solar power production and solar energy storage are important research areas for development of technologies that can facilitate a transition to a future society independent of fossil fuel based energy sources. Devices for direct conversion of solar photons suffer from poor efficiencies due to spectrum losses, which are caused by energy mismatch between the optical absorption of the devices and the broadband irradiation provided by the sun. In this context, photon-upconversion technologies are becoming increasingly interesting since they might offer an efficient way of converting low energy solar energy photons into higher energy photons, ideal for solar power production and solar energy storage. This perspective discusses recent progress in triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) photon-upconversion systems and devices for solar energy applications. Furthermore, challenges with evaluation of the efficiency of TTA-photon-upconversion systems are discussed and a general approach for evaluation and comparison of existing systems is suggested.

  5. In-medium nuclear interactions of low-energy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2007-11-01

    Exotic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying strong interactions and nuclear medium effects at zero kinetic energy. Experimental and theoretical developments of the last decade in the study of exotic atoms and some related low-energy reactions are reviewed. The exotic atoms considered are of π-,K-,pbar,Σ-, and also the so far unobserved Ξ- atoms. The analysis of these atomic systems consists of fitting density-dependent optical potentials Vopt=t(ρ)ρ to comprehensive sets of data of strong-interaction level shifts, widths and yields across the periodic table. These provide information on the in-medium hadron-nucleon t matrix t(ρ) over a wide range of densities up to central nuclear densities. For pions, the review focuses on the extraction of the πN in-medium s-wave interaction from pionic atoms, which include also the deeply bound π- atomic states recently observed at GSI in isotopes of Sn and Pb. Also included are recent measurements at PSI of elastic scattering of π± on Si, Ca, Ni and Zr at 21.5 MeV. The experimental results are analyzed in the context of chirally motivated π-nuclear potentials, and the evidence for partial restoration of chiral symmetry in dense nuclear matter is critically discussed. For antikaons, we review the evidence from K- atoms, and also from low-energy K-p scattering and reaction data for and against a deepKbar-nucleus potential of 150-200 MeV attraction at nuclear matter density. The case for relatively narrow deeply bound K-atomic states is made, essentially independent of the potential-depth issue. Recent experimental suggestions from KEK and DA ΦNE (Frascati) for signals of Kbar-nuclear deeply bound states are reviewed, and dynamical models for calculating binding energies and widths of Kbar- nuclear states are discussed. For kaons we review the evidence, from K+ total and reaction cross section measurements at the AGS (BNL) on Li, C, Si and Ca at plab=500-700 MeV/c, for significant absorptivity of t

  6. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  7. The penetration, diffusion and energy deposition of high-energy photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗正明; 勾成俊; WolframLaub

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory for calculating the transport of high-energy photons and their secondary charged particles. We call this new algorithm characteristic line method, which is completely analytic. Using this new method we cannot only accurately calculate the transport behaviour of energetic photons, but also precisely describes the transport behaviour and energy deposition of secondary electrons, photoelectrons, Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. Its calculation efficiency is much higher than that of the Monte Carlo method. The theory can be directly applied to layered media situation and obtain a pencil-beam-modelled solution. Therefore, it may be applied to clinical applications for radiation therapy.

  8. The penetration, diffusion and energy deposition of high-energy photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zheng-Ming(罗正明); Gou Cheng-Jun(勾成俊); Wolfram Laub

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory for calculating the transport of high-energy photons and their secondary chargedparticles. We call this new algorithm characteristic line method, which is completely analytic. Using this new method wecannot only accurately calculate the transport behaviour of energetic photons, but also precisely describes the transportbehaviour and energy deposition of secondary electrons, photoelectrons, Compton recoil electrons and positron-electronpairs. Its calculation efficiency is much higher than that of the Monte Carlo method. The theory can be directlyapplied to layered media situation and obtain a pencil-beam-modelled solution. Therefore, it may be applied to clinicalapplications for radiation therapy.

  9. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics.

  10. Photonic Crystal Fibres as the Transmission Medium for Future Optical Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsigri, Beata

    2006-01-01

    During this Ph.D. work, air-silica photonic crystal fibres(PCFs) have been investigated for telecommunication applications. PCFs have a complicated cladding structure, where air holes, running along the entire fibre length, ensure light guidance. Photonic crystal fibres can be classified into two......, and exploited for building fully functional, entirely PCF based optical transmission links and networks. The first 40 Gbit/s transmission over 5.6 km PCF with mid-span spectral inversion dispersion compensation realised in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated. The first optical network...

  11. High--Energy Photon--Hadron Scattering in Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Nishio, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth look at hadron high energy scattering by using gravity dual descriptions of strongly coupled gauge theories. Just like deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) serve as clean experimental probes into non-perturbative internal structure of hadrons, elastic scattering amplitude of a hadron and a (virtual) "photon" in gravity dual can be exploited as a theoretical probe. Since the scattering amplitude at sufficiently high energy (small Bjorken x) is dominated by parton contributions (= Pomeron contributions) even in strong coupling regime, there is a chance to learn a lesson for generalized parton distribution (GPD) by using gravity dual models. We begin with refining derivation of Brower-Polchinski-Strassler-Tan (BPST) Pomeron kernel in gravity dual, paying particular attention to the role played by complex spin variable j. The BPST Pomeron on warped spacetime consists of a Kaluza-Klein tower of 4D Pomerons with non-linear trajectories, and...

  12. A comprehensive study on the photon energy response of RadFET dosimeters using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, A.; Kaya, S.; Jaksic, A.; Yilmaz, E.

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-sensing Field Effect Transistors (RadFETs or MOSFET dosimeters) with SiO2 gate dielectric have found applications in space, radiotherapy clinics, and high-energy physics laboratories. More sensitive RadFETs, which require modifications in device design, including gate dielectric, are being considered for personal dosimetry applications. This paper presents results of a detailed study of the RadFET energy response simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Alternative materials to SiO2 were investigated to develop high-efficiency new radiation sensors. Namely, in addition to SiO2, Al2O3 and HfO2 were simulated as gate material and deposited energy amounts in these layers were determined for photon irradiation with energies between 20 keV and 5 MeV. The simulations were performed for capped and uncapped configurations of devices irradiated by point and extended sources, the surface area of which is the same with that of the RadFETs. Energy distributions of transmitted and backscattered photons were estimated using impact detectors to provide information about particle fluxes within the geometrical structures. The absorbed energy values in the RadFETs material zones were recorded. For photons with low and medium energies, the physical processes that affect the absorbed energy values in different gate materials are discussed on the basis of modelling results. The results show that HfO2 is the most promising of the simulated gate materials.

  13. Simultaneous solution of Kompaneets equation and Radiative Transfer equation in the photon energy range 1 - 125 KeV

    CERN Document Server

    Peraiah, A; varghese, B A

    2010-01-01

    Radiative transfer equation in plane parallel geometry and Kompaneets equation is solved simultaneously to obtain theoretical spectrum of 1-125 KeV photon energy range. Diffuse radiation field is calculated using time-independent radiative transfer equation in plane parallel geometry, which is developed using discrete space theory (DST) of radiative transfer in a homogeneous medium for different optical depths. We assumed free-free emission and absorption and emission due to electron gas to be operating in the medium. The three terms $n, n^2$ and $\\displaystyle \\bigg({\\frac {\\partial n}{\\partial x_k}}\\bigg)$ where $n$ is photon phase density and $\\displaystyle x_k= \\bigg({\\frac {h \

  14. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colalillo Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  15. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colalillo, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  16. Charged Particle, Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the charged particle and photon multiplicities and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons, and the transverse energy measurement.

  17. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  18. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  19. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  20. Energy- Angular Correlation of Medium Energy Particles Produced in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, M T; Sadek, N M; Elsweedy, J; Elsweedy, Jamila

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear photo-emulsion technique is used to study the information carried by the medium energy nucleons produced in heavy ion collisions. Multiplicity, energies as well as the angular distribution of this type of particles are measured. Due to the difficulties in measuring the energy only some particles having special criteria could be selected to measure their energy with consenting accuracy. A hypothetical model is proposed to correlate the energy of the produced particles to their emission angles so that it becomes easy to estimate the energy distribution in terms of measured emission angle. The proposed model is constructed upon statistical thermodynamic assumptions. Moreover, two additional base functions are originated that play the role of the statistical angular weight factor and the nuclear density of the compressed nuclear matter at the moment of particle emission. The prediction of the model are compared with complete set of measured data of the reactions of proton, helium, carbon and neon nucl...

  1. Pulsed energy-time entangled twin-photon source for quantum communication

    CERN Document Server

    Brendel, J; Tittel, W; Zbinden, H

    1999-01-01

    A pulsed source of energy-time entangled photon pairs pumped by a standard laser diode is proposed and demonstrated. The basic states can be distinguished by their time of arrival. This greatly simplifies the realization of 2-photon quantum cryptography, Bell state analyzers, quantum teleportation, dense coding, entanglement swapping, GHZ-states sources, etc. Moreover the entanglement is well protected during photon propagation in telecom optical fibers, opening the door to few-photon applications of quantum communication over long distances.

  2. On production $e^{+}+e^{-}$-pairs by a high energy photon in collision with photons of a laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Galynsky, M V; Galynskii, Mikhail; Sikach, Sergei

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the number of $e^+ e^-$-pairs produced by a Compton high energy photon in turn formed in the process $e + n \\gamma_0 -> e + \\gamma$ at simultaneous collision with several photons $\\gamma_0$ of the same laser beam initial electron beam and laser photons are helicity is considered. It is shown that taking into account nonlinear effects in the Compton backscattering leads to decreasing the threshold of production of $e^+ e^-$-pairs and increasing their number. The consideration is based on the direct calculation of matrix elements in the formalism of diagonal spin basis.

  3. Solar energy conversion with photon-enhanced thermionic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribus, Abraham; Segev, Gideon

    2016-07-01

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) converts sunlight to electricity with the combined photonic and thermal excitation of charge carriers in a semiconductor, leading to electron emission over a vacuum gap. Theoretical analyses predict conversion efficiency that can match, or even exceed, the efficiency of traditional solar thermal and photovoltaic converters. Several materials have been examined as candidates for radiation absorbers and electron emitters, with no conclusion yet on the best set of materials to achieve high efficiency. Analyses have shown the complexity of the energy conversion and transport processes, and the significance of several loss mechanisms, requiring careful control of material properties and optimization of the device structure. Here we survey current research on PETE modeling, materials, and device configurations, outline the advances made, and stress the open issues and future research needed. Based on the substantial progress already made in this young topic, and the potential of high conversion efficiency based on theoretical performance limits, continued research in this direction is very promising and may yield a competitive technology for solar electricity generation.

  4. Advanced Photonic Processes for Photovoltaic and Energy Storage Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygletou, Maria; Petridis, Constantinos; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-08-24

    Solar-energy harvesting through photovoltaic (PV) conversion is the most promising technology for long-term renewable energy production. At the same time, significant progress has been made in the development of energy-storage (ES) systems, which are essential components within the cycle of energy generation, transmission, and usage. Toward commercial applications, the enhancement of the performance and competitiveness of PV and ES systems requires the adoption of precise, but simple and low-cost manufacturing solutions, compatible with large-scale and high-throughput production lines. Photonic processes enable cost-efficient, noncontact, highly precise, and selective engineering of materials via photothermal, photochemical, or photophysical routes. Laser-based processes, in particular, provide access to a plethora of processing parameters that can be tuned with a remarkably high degree of precision to enable innovative processing routes that cannot be attained by conventional approaches. The focus here is on the application of advanced light-driven approaches for the fabrication, as well as the synthesis, of materials and components relevant to PV and ES systems. Besides presenting recent advances on recent achievements, the existing limitations are outlined and future possibilities and emerging prospects discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Anomalous effective medium approximation breakdown in deeply subwavelength all-dielectric photonic multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the applicability of the effective medium approximation to deeply subwavelength (period ≤λ/50) all-dielectric multilayer structures. We demonstrate that even though the dispersion relations for such multilayers differ from the effective medium prediction onl...

  6. Radiosurgery with high energy photon beams: a comparison among techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pike, G.B.; Olivier, A.; Pla, M.; Souhami, L.

    1989-03-01

    The presently known radiosurgical techniques with high energy photon beams are based either on the commercially available Gamma unit utilizing 201 stationary cobalt beams or on isocentric linear accelerators. The techniques using linear accelerators are divided into the single plane rotation, the multiple non-coplanar arcs, and the dynamic rotation. A brief description of these techniques is given, and their physical characteristics, such as precision of dose delivery, dose fall-off outside the target volume, and isodose distributions are discussed. It is shown that the multiple non-coplanar arcs technique and the dynamic rotation give dose distributions similar to those of the Gamma unit, which makes these two linear accelerator based techniques attractive alternatives to radiosurgery with the Gamma unit.22 references.

  7. The effect of photon energy weighting on X-ray imaging based on a photon counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Development of photon counting detectors with the ability of energy discrimination would provide additional information. These detectors could improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by using photon energy weighting with energy-dependent weighting factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of photon energy weighting using GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) version 6.0. The photon energy weighting depends on the X-ray attenuation coefficient of contrast elements and background materials. In this study, we simulated a photon counting X-ray imaging system. We designed a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon counting detector (model PID-350, AJAT, Finland), the micro focus X-ray source (model L8601-01, Hamamatsu, Japan) and two phantoms with GATE. In the first case, we were concerned with calcifications in breast tissue or soft tissue. We defined a cubic phantom made of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) material with a thickness of 40 mm including four CaCO{sub 3} contrast elements with different thickness of 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 mm. In the second case, we designed a second phantom for contrast enhanced digital mammography (CEDM). We defined two cylindrical phantoms made of PMMA with thicknesses of 30 and 40 mm, including four iodine contrast elements with different thicknesses of 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm. The effect of photon energy weighting was investigated in terms of the CNR. In all cases, photon energy weighting improve the CNR. The CNR improvements for CaCO{sub 3} with thicknesses of 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 mm were 1.41, 1.32, 1.43, and 1.56, respectively. For the second phantom with a thickness of 30 mm, the CNR improvements of iodine contrast elements with thicknesses of 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 mm were 1.01, 1.03, 1.09, and 1.13, respectively, and for the second phantom with a thicknesses of 40 mm, the CNR improvements of iodine contrast elements with thickness of 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 mm were 1.05, 1.07, 1.16, and 1

  8. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  9. Plasmon-supported emission of entangled photons and zero-point energy

    OpenAIRE

    Hizhnyakov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Emission of pairs of photons in the interface metal-dielectric under the laser excitation arising due to the time-dependent perturbation of the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field by photons of the laser is considered. The enhancement of this emission by surface plasmons may be used for getting polarization-entangled photons. A possibility to compensate the energy of the zero-point fluctuations of bosons by other fluctuations with negative energy is discussed.

  10. High visibility time-energy entangled photons from a silicon nanophotonic chip

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Steven; Lu, Xiyuan; Jiang, Wei C; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Advances in quantum photonics have shown that chip-scale quantum devices are translating from the realm of basic research to applied technologies. Recent developments in integrated photonic circuits and single photon detectors indicate that the bottleneck for fidelity in quantum photonic processes will ultimately lie with the photon sources. We present and demonstrate a silicon nanophotonic chip capable of emitting telecommunication band photon pairs that exhibit the highest raw degree of time-energy entanglement from a micro/nanoscale source, to date. Biphotons are generated through cavity-enhanced spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator, wherein the nature of the triply-resonant generation process leads to a dramatic Purcell enhancement, resulting in highly efficient pair creation rates as well as extreme suppression of the photon noise background. The combination of the excellent photon source and a new phase locking technique, allow for the observation of a nearly perfe...

  11. Medium Modification of Hadronic Interactions from Low Energy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    Medium-modification of hadronic interactions is defined as the differences between hadron-hadron interaction in the nuclear medium and the corresponding interaction in free space. Deeply penetrating hadrons provide such information and we discuss here pionic atoms and scattering by nuclei of 21.5 MeV pions. Brief mention is made also of the interaction of 500-700 MeV/c K+ with nuclei.

  12. Comparison of radiative energy loss models in a hot QCD medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.

    2010-01-01

    The suppression of high $p_{T}$ hadron production in heavy ion collisions is thought to be due to energy loss by gluon radiation off hard partons in a QCD medium. Existing models of QCD radiative energy loss in a color-charged medium give estimates of the coupling strength of the parton to the

  13. Comparison of radiative energy loss models in a hot QCD medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.

    2010-01-01

    The suppression of high $p_{T}$ hadron production in heavy ion collisions is thought to be due to energy loss by gluon radiation off hard partons in a QCD medium. Existing models of QCD radiative energy loss in a color-charged medium give estimates of the coupling strength of the parton to the mediu

  14. Ultra-Fast Low Energy Switching Using an InP Photonic Crystal H0 Nanocavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Palushani, Evarist; Heuck, Mikkel;

    2013-01-01

    Pump-probe measurements on InP photonic crystal H0 nanocavities show large-contrast ultrafast switching at low pulse energy. For large pulse energies, high-frequency carrier density oscillations are induced, leading to pulsesplitting.......Pump-probe measurements on InP photonic crystal H0 nanocavities show large-contrast ultrafast switching at low pulse energy. For large pulse energies, high-frequency carrier density oscillations are induced, leading to pulsesplitting....

  15. Home energy monitors : Impact over the medium-term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van S.S.; Bakker, C.A.; Hal, van J.D.M. (Anke)

    2010-01-01

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS), e.g. energy monitors, are intermediary products that can visualize, manage, and/or monitor the energy use of other products or whole households. HEMS increasingly receive attention for their role in energy conservation in households. A literature review and a c

  16. Home energy monitors : Impact over the medium-term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van S.S.; Bakker, C.A.; Hal, van J.D.M. (Anke)

    2010-01-01

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS), e.g. energy monitors, are intermediary products that can visualize, manage, and/or monitor the energy use of other products or whole households. HEMS increasingly receive attention for their role in energy conservation in households. A literature review and a c

  17. Home energy monitors: impact over the medium-term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, S.S.; Bakker, C.A.; Van Hal, J.D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS), e.g. energy monitors, are intermediary products that can visualize, manage, and/or monitor the energy use of other products or whole households. HEMS increasingly receive attention for their role in energy conservation in households. A literature review and a c

  18. The low energy photon tagger NEPTUN: Toward a detailed study of the Pygmy dipole resonance with real photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Diego; Aumann, T.; Bauer, C.; Baumann, M.; Beckstein, M.; Beller, J.; Blecher, A.; Cvejin, N.; Duchene, M.; Hug, F.; Kahlbow, J.; Knoerzer, M.; Kreis, K.; Kremer, C.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Scheit, H.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Symochko, D.; Walz, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Lefol, R. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Loeher, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, Frankfurt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The low energy photon tagger NEPTUN at the S-DALINAC delivers a quasi-monoenergetic photon beam between about 4 MeV and 20 MeV with a resolution of approximately 25 keV. Tagged photons provide the possibility to measure the dipole strength of nuclei in the energy range below and above the neutron threshold. The highly efficient LaBr{sub 3} based spectrometer GALATEA will be used to detect not only the direct decays to the ground state, but also cascading decays can be measured with suitable efficiency. We will measure (γ,n)- and (γ,nγ)-reactions with neutron detectors based on plastic scintillators. This talk provides an overview about setup and goals of the NEPTUN experiment as well as the current state of the commissioning phase. Planned optimizations of the setup, based on the results of a test beam time in June 2013, are also presented.

  19. Energy efficiency in small and medium scale foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Patange

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the research results of surveys which were conducted in an Indian foundry cluster which are potential members of such sectors are presented. These results indicate that there is an enough potential improvement in the energy use. The use of energy efficient practices can result in their energy use effectively as well as cost reduction. The key findings about the energy pattern are a lack of energy efficient practices. The suggested recommendations can contribute to an increase in energy efficiency in such cluster.

  20. Quantum cryptography using entangled photons in energy-time bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel; Brendel; Zbinden; Gisin

    2000-05-15

    We present a setup for quantum cryptography based on photon pairs in energy-time Bell states and show its feasibility in a laboratory experiment. Our scheme combines the advantages of using photon pairs instead of faint laser pulses and the possibility to preserve energy-time entanglement over long distances. Moreover, using four-dimensional energy-time states, no fast random change of bases is required in our setup: Nature itself decides whether to measure in the energy or in the time base, thus rendering eavesdropper attacks based on "photon number splitting" less efficient.

  1. The Energy Savings and Environmental Benefits for Small and Medium Enterprises by Cloud Energy Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chieh Tseng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium enterprises (SMES play an important role in Taiwan’s economy. The reduction of energy costs and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are critical to preserving the environment. This paper uses the experimental results from 65 sites, gathered over two years since 2012, to determine how the integration of Internet communication, cloud computing technologies and a cloud energy management service (cloud EMS can reduce energy consumption by cost-effective means. The EMS has three levels: infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS and software as a service (SaaS. Working jointly with ChungHwa Telecom, Taiwan’s leading telecom service provider, data from detection devices, control devices, air-conditioning and lighting systems are all uploaded to a cloud EMS platform, to give a so called intelligent energy management network application service platform (IEN-ASP. Various energy saving management functions are developed using this platform: (1 air conditioning optimization; (2 lighting system optimization; (3 scheduling control; (4 power billing control and (5 occupancy detection and timing control. Using the international performance measurement and verification protocol (IPMVP, the energy used at the test sites, before and after the use of the IEN-ASP, are compared to calculate the energy saved. The experimental results show that there is an average energy saving of 5724 kWh per year, which represents a saving ratio of 5.84%. This translates to a total reduction in CO2 emissions of 9,926,829 kg per year. Using the data collected, a regression model is used to demonstrate the correlation between the power that is consumed, the energy that is saved and the area of the sites. Another interesting result is that, if the experimental sites are maintained by experienced electricians or other personnel and EMS protocols are followed, the energy saving can be as great as 6.59%.

  2. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and...

  3. Subthreshold photons in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, G

    1998-01-01

    In the present talk, I discuss about the properties of the energetic photons produced in heavy-ion reactions. I show that they are sensitive to the maximum density reached in the first stage of the nuclear reaction. Then, the existence of a thermal contribution to the photon differential cross-secti

  4. Proposal to Build an Electron-Photon Facility at NAL and to Measure Photon Scattering at High Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfan, D.E.; Flatte, S.M.; Heusch, C.A.; Luxton, G.; del Papa, C.; Seiden, A.

    1971-07-18

    The National Accelerator Laboratory opens up a new era in our search of what elementary particles are like; the 100-500 GeV era. If we want to look at the structure of hadrons with the resolution provided by the wavelength of such high energy beams, what can be more natural, to paraphrase Bjorken, than looking at them, i.e. shining light at them and watching for scattering or absorption? This is precisely what we propose to do in the experiments suggested here. Photons, real and virtual, have contributed immeasurably to our understanding of hadronic matter through investigations done at lower-energy (1 {le} E {le} 20 GeV) electron accelerators. NAL, albeit a proton machine, will be our only potential source of photons beyond SLAC energies. Proton-nucleus collisions will produce photons, principally in two-step processes involving radiative hadron (notably {pi}{sup 0}) decays. It has been shown that sizeable fluxes can be obtained by the appropriate construction of beam lines. NAL will then be a unique tool for the study of electromagnetic interactions at energies in the 20-300 GeV range. At high energies ({approx}> 200 GeV), available electron fluxes will set the limit on photon intensities for experimentation; at lower energies, fluxes rise strongly, but the electronics logic involved in beam momentum definition and tagging will not permit final yields to be considerably larger than those at 200 GeV. The first generation of photon physics at NAL will therefore restrict itself to processes with relatively large cross-sections. As will be seen, some of the most exciting problems involving photons at presently existing energies will be accessible to conclusive experimentation at NAL. Our group has, from past experience at lower-energy photon laboratories and from recent studies of its members, a keen interest in working on these problems. We have been happily active on earlier feasibility studies of beams and experiments; and we are enthusiastic about the prospect of

  5. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartavtsev, A.; Raffelt, G.; Vogel, H.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length (losc) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field l and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length lt) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime (losc ~ l gg lt). We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime (losc ll l, lt). Our results are important in light of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and may also be applied to models with non-zero ALP masses.

  6. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Medium Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Lane, Michael D.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Offices (AEDG-MO or the Guide), a design guidance document which intends to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in medium office buildings that just meet the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  7. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  8. Energy technologies for post Kyoto targets in the medium term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soenderberg Petersen, L.; Larsen, H. (eds.)

    2003-09-01

    The Risoe International Energy Conference took place 19 - 21 May 2003 and the aim was to present and discuss new developments and trends in energy technologies which may become main contributors to the energy scene in 15 to 20 years. The conference addressed R&D related to the individual technologies as well as system integration. The proceedings are prepared from papers presented at the conference and received with corrections, if any, until the final deadline on 25 June 2003. (au)

  9. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjade, D.P. E-mail: dpbl4007@stud.usm.my; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6 MV and 5 and 12 MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5 cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d{sub max} for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  10. High Pressure Gases in Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber:A New Nonlinear Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Azhar, Mohiudeen; Chang, Wonkeun; Joly, Nicolas; Russell, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The effective Kerr nonlinearity of hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber (PCF) filled with argon gas increases over 100 times when the pressure is increased from 1 to 150 bar, reaching 15 % of that of bulk silica glass, while the zero dispersion wavelength shifts from 300 to 900 nm. The group velocity dispersion of the system is uniquely pressure-tunable over a wide range while avoiding Raman scattering : absent in noble gases and having an extremely high optical damage threshold. As a result, detailed and well controlled studies of nonlinear effects can be performed, in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes, using only a fixed-frequency pump laser. For example, the absence of Raman scattering permits clean observation, at high powers, of the interaction between a modulational instability side-band and a soliton created dispersive wave. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical simulations and experimental results. The system has great potential for the realisation of reconfigurable s...

  11. Free Energy Evolution and Photon Radiation from QGP

    OpenAIRE

    Yogesh Kumar; S. Somorendro Singh

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a simple statistical model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation. In the model, we use a phenomenological parameter which enhances the growth of quark droplet formation and also stabilizes the formation of the QGP droplet. Then, we study direct photon radiation through annihilation and Compton processes from these stabilized QGP incorporating the parametrized momentum factor in the quark mass. The production rate of thermal photon is found to be dominated in the low transverse ...

  12. Projection-based energy weighting on photon-counting X-ray images in digital subtraction mammography: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-03-01

    In digital subtraction mammography where subtracts the one image (with contrast medium) from the other (anatomical background) for observing the tumor structure, tumors which include more blood vessels than normal tissue could be distinguished through the enhancement of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In order to improve CNR, we adopted projection-based energy weighting for iodine solutions with four different concentrations embedded in a breast phantom (50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues). In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate a 40 mm thickness breast phantom, which has 15 and 30 mg/cm3 iodine solutions with two different thicknesses, and an energy resolving photon-counting system. The input energy spectrum was simulated in a range of 20 to 45 keV in order to reject electronic noise and include k-edge energy of iodine (33.2 keV). The results showed that the projection-based energy weighting improved the CNR by factors of 1.05-1.86 compared to the conventional integrating images. Consequently, the CNR of images from the digital subtraction mammography could be improved by the projection-based energy weighting with photon-counting detectors.

  13. Medium Access Control in Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon

    Control (MAC) protocols that are following the receiver-initiated paradigm of asynchronous communication. According to the receiver-initiated paradigm the communication is initiated by the receiver that states its availability to receive data through beacons. The sender is passively listening...... to the channel until it receives the beacon of interest. In this context, the dissertation begins with an in-depth survey of all the receiverinitiated MAC protocols and presents their unique optimization features, which deal with several challenges of the link layer such as mitigation of the energy consumption......-efficient features that aim to adapt the consumed energy to match the harvested energy, distribute the load with respect to the harvested energy, decrease the overhead of the communication, address the requirements for collision avoidance, prioritize urgent traffic and secure the system against beacon replay attacks...

  14. Magnetic Energy of the Intergalactic Medium from Galactic Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, P P; Li, H; Colgate, S A

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of two radio source samples having opposite extremes of ambient gas density leads to important new conclusions about the magnetic energy in the IGM. We conclude that giant sources in rarefied IGM environments, which contain magnetic energies E_B ~ 10^60-61 ergs, can be viewed as important "calorimeters" of the minimum energy a black hole (BH) accretion disk system injects into the IGM. In contrast to the radiation energy released by BH accretion, most of the magnetic energy is "trapped" initially in a volume, up to ~10^73 cm^3, around the host galaxy. But since these large, Mpc scale radio lobes are still overpressured after the AGN phase, their subsequent expansion and diffusion will magnetize a large fraction of the entire IGM. This suggests that the energy stored in intergalactic magnetic fields will have a major, as yet underestimated effect on the evolution of subsequently forming galaxies. Comparison with the second sample, consisting of sources within 150 kpc of rich cluster cor...

  15. Coupling of energy into the fundamental diffusion mode of a complex nanophotonic medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojambati, O. S.; Yilmaz, H.; Lagendijk, A.; Mosk, A. P.; Vos, W.L.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that optical wavefront shaping increases light coupling into the fundamental diffusion mode of a scattering medium. The total energy density inside a scattering medium of zinc oxide nanoparticles was probed by exciting fluorescent spheres that were randomly positioned

  16. Total reflection coefficients of low-energy photons presented as universal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubenov Vladan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of expressing the total particle and energy reflection coefficients of low-energy photons in the form of universal functions valid for different shielding materials is investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations of photon reflection by using MCNP, FOTELP, and PENELOPE codes. The normal incidence of the narrow monoenergetic photon beam of the unit intensity and of initial energies from 20 keV up to 100 keV is considered, and particle and energy reflection coefficients from the plane homogenous targets of water, aluminum, and iron are determined and compared. The representations of albedo coefficients on the initial photon energy, on the probability of large-angle photon scattering, and on the mean number of photon scatterings are examined. It is found out that only the rescaled albedo coefficients dependent on the mean number of photon scatterings have the form of universal functions and these functions are determined by applying the least square method.

  17. New constraints on hidden photons using very high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechlin, Hannes-Sebastian; Horns, Dieter [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Extensions of the current standard model of particle physics, in particular those based on string theory, typically predict a new U(1) gauge symmetry in a hidden sector. The corresponding gauge boson, often called hidden photon, naturally interacts with the ordinary photon via gauge kinetic mixing, leading to photon - hidden photon oscillations. In this framework, one expects photon disappearance as a function of the mass of the hidden photon and the mixing angle, loosely constrained from theory. Several experiments have been carried out or are planned to provide constraints on the mass-mixing plane. In this contribution we derive new constraints on the hidden photon parameters, using very high energy {gamma}-rays detected from the Crab Nebula, whose broad-band spectral characteristics are well understood. The very high energy {gamma}-ray observations offer the possibility to provide bounds in a broad mass range at a previously unexplored energy and distance scale. Using existing data that were taken with the HEGRA, H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Whipple Cherenkov telescopes, we discuss our results in the context of current constraints and consider the possibilities of using astrophysical data to search for hidden photon signatures.

  18. Stringy Space-Time Foam and High-Energy Cosmic Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2011-01-01

    In this review, I discuss briefly stringent tests of Lorentz-violating quantum space-time foam models inspired from String/Brane theories, provided by studies of high energy Photons from intense celestial sources, such as Active Galactic Nuclei or Gamma Ray Bursts. The theoretical models predict modifications to the radiation dispersion relations, which are quadratically suppressed by the string mass scale, and time delays in the arrival times of photons (assumed to be emitted more or less simultaneously from the source), which are proportional to the photon energy, so that the more energetic photons arrive later. Although the astrophysics at the source of these energetic photons is still not understood, and such non simultaneous arrivals, that have been observed recently, might well be due to non simultaneous emission as a result of conventional physics effects, nevertheless, rather surprisingly, the observed time delays can also fit excellently the stringy space-time foam scenarios, provided the space-time ...

  19. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kartavtsev, A; Vogel, H

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length ($l_{\\rm osc}$) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field ($l$) and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length $l_{\\rm t}$) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime ($l_{\\rm osc} \\sim l \\gg l_{\\rm t}$). We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime ($l_{\\rm osc} \\ll l, l_{\\rm t}$). Our results are important in light of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and may also be applied to models with non-zero ALP masses.

  20. GeV and higher energy photon interactions in gamma-ray burst fireballs and surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Razzaque, S; Zhang, B; Razzaque, Soebur; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang, Bing

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the opacities and secondary production mechanisms of high energy photons arising in gamma-ray burst internal shocks, using exact cross-sections for the relevant processes. We find that for reasonable choices of parameters, photons in the range of 10's to 100's of GeV may be emitted in the prompt phase. Photons above this range are subject to electron-positron pair production with fireball photons and would be absent from the spectrum escaping the gamma-ray burst. We find that, in such cases, the fireball becomes optically thin again at ultra-high energies ($\\gtrsim$ PeV). On the other hand, for sufficiently large fireball bulk Lorentz factors, the fireball is optically thin at all energies. Both for $\\gamma\\gamma$ self-absorbed and optically thin cases, the escaping high energy photons can interact with infra-red and microwave background photons to produce delayed secondary photons in the GeV-TeV range. These may be observable with GLAST, or at low redshifts with ground-based air Cherenkov ...

  1. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  2. Hadronic scattering amplitudes medium-energy constraints on asymptotic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Cudell, J R; Gauron, P; Kang, K; Kuyanov, Yu V; Lugovsky, S B; Nicolescu, Basarab; Tkachenko, N P; Kuyanov, Yu. V.

    2002-01-01

    We consider several classes of analytic parametrisations of hadronic scattering amplitudes, and compare their predictions to all available forward data (p p, pbar p, pi p, K p, gamma p, gamma gamma, Sigma p). Although these parametrisations are very close for sqrt(s) > 9 GeV, it turns out that they differ markedly at low energy, where a universal pomeron term ~log^2(s) enables one to extend the fit down to sqrt(s)=4 GeV.

  3. Bibliographic survey of medium energy inclusive reaction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, E.D.; Madland, D.G.; McClellan, D.M.

    1986-04-01

    A bibliographic survey of inclusive reaction data (experimental and theoretical) for several projectile types having energies between 50 and 1000 MeV has been completed. Approximately one thousand references selected from this survey describe the current state of knowledge for particle-induced inclusive reaction data. The search covered data for the following projectiles: p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, and lithium ions.

  4. Multi-Period Optimal Distribution Model of Energy Medium and Its Application%Multi-Period Optimal Distribution Model of Energy Medium and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi; TI Wei; CAI Jiu-ju; DU Tao; WANG Ai-hua

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model of optimal energy medium distribution in steelmaking process is formulated. In this model, three kinds of important energy mediums including byproduct gases, steam and electricity are considered, and the objective function accounts for both the change of generation and consumption of the byproduct gases and the demand of low (or middle) pressure steam and electricity for each period to maximize the benefit of products cost and minimize the consumption of energy. The results indicate that the optimal distribution scheme of byproduct gases, middle pressure steam, low pressure steam and electricity is achieved and case study shows that 6% of operation cost is reduced by using the proposed model comparing with the previous model.

  5. Photon-energy dependence of single-photon simultaneous core ionization and core excitation in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.; Marchenko, T.; Travnikova, O.; Goldsztejn, G.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Céolin, D.; Simon, M.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Penent, F.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the K-2V process corresponding to simultaneous K -shell ionization and K -shell excitation in the C O2 molecule. We define these K-2V states as super shake-up, at variance with the "conventional" K-1v-1V shake-up states. While the nature and evolution with photon energy of the conventional shake-up satellites has been the object of many studies, no such data on a large photon-energy range were previously reported on super shake-up. The C O2 molecule is a textbook example because it exhibits two well-isolated K-2V resonances (with V being 2 πu* and 5 σg* ) with different symmetries resulting from shake-up processes of different origin populated in comparable proportions. The variation of the excitation cross section of these two resonances with photon energy is reported, using two different experimental approaches, which sheds light on the excitation mechanisms. Furthermore, double-core-hole spectroscopy is shown to be able to integrate and even expand information provided by conventional single-core-hole X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) techniques, revealing, for instance, g -g dipole forbidden transitions which are only excited in NEXAFS spectra through vibronic coupling.

  6. Feasibility of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility, energy management memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The thermal-economic feasibility was studied of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility designed to serve five varied industries. Generation options included one dual-fuel diesel and one gas turbine, both with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired-boiler cases, also low-sulphur coal and municipal refuse. The fired-boiler cogeneration systems employed back-pressure steam turbines. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The refuse-fired cases utilized modular incinerators. The options provided for a wide range of steam and electrical capacities. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which could be displaced was assumed sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulator Policies Act). The facility was assumed operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users. The economic analysis was predicted on currently applicable energy-investment tax credits and accelerated depreciation for a January 1985 startup date. Based on 100% equity financing, the results indicated that the best alternative was the modular-incinerator cogeneration system.

  7. Neutrino-induced pion production from nuclei at medium energies

    CERN Document Server

    Praet, C; Jachowicz, N; Ryckebusch, J

    2008-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced $\\Delta$-mediated single-pion production from nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the $\\Delta$ interactions. Variations in the cross sections of over 10% are observed, depending on whether or not magnetic-dipole dominance is assumed to extract the vector form factors. These uncertainties have a direct impact on the accuracy with which the axial-vector form factors can be extracted. Different predictions for $C_5^A(Q^2)$ induce up to 40-50% effects on the $\\Delta$-production cross sections. To describe the nucleus, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the $\\sigma$-$\\omega$ Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces comparable results as the RPWIA which naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects...

  8. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, Sergei M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  9. Propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy with the EleCa code

    CERN Document Server

    Settimo, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high energy (UHE) photons play an important role as an independent probe of the photo-pion production mechanism by UHE cosmic rays. Their observation, or non-observation, may constrain astrophysical scenarios for the origin of UHECRs and help to understand the nature of the flux suppression observed by several experiments at energies above $10^{19.5}$ eV. Whereas the interaction length of UHE photons above $10^{17}$ eV ranges from a few hundred kpc up to tenths of Mpc, photons can interact with the extragalactic background radiation initiating the development of electromagnetic cascades which affect the fluxes of photons observed at Earth. The interpretation of the current experimental results rely on the simulations of the UHE photon propagation. In this paper, we present the novel Monte Carlo code EleCa to simulate the $Ele$ctromagnetic $Ca$scading initiated by high-energy photons and electrons. We provide an estimation of the surviving probability for photons inducing electromagnetic cascades as a fu...

  10. Quantum Cryptography using entangled photons in energy-time Bell states

    OpenAIRE

    Tittel, Wolfgang; Brendel, Jurgen; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    We present a setup for quantum cryptography based on photon pairs in energy-time Bell states and show its feasibility in a laboratory experiment. Our scheme combines the advantages of using photon pairs instead of faint laser pulses and the possibility to preserve energy-time entanglement over long distances. Moreover, using four-dimensional energy-time states, no fast random change of bases is required in our setup: Nature itself decides whether to measure in the energy or in the time base, ...

  11. Absorbed Dose and Collision Kerma Relationship for High-Energy Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    Historically, exposure has been used as an important quantity to specify X- or (gamma)- ray beams. For any photon beam the energy fluence is proportional to the exposure. Exposure can be calculated and/or measured if the spectrum of the beam is known and charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists. For low energy photons (up to approximately 1 MeV), due to the existence of CPE, absorbed dose (D) is equal to the collision kerma (K(,c)). For megavoltage photons this equality is lost due to CPE failure, which also restricts the measurement of exposure. It is possible, though, to find a relationship between the absorbed dose and collision kerma when transient charged particle equilibrium (TCPE) exists. This basic idea was originally proposed by Roesch in 1958 and its refinement has been discussed by Attix in 1979 and 1983. The modified Roesch's formula which enables us to measure exposure even for high-energy photons is given by D = (beta) K(,c) (TURNEQ) K(,c) (1 + (mu)' ) where (mu)' is the effective linear attenuation coefficient and is the mean distance the secondary electrons carry kinetic energy in the direction of the photon beam while depositing it as absorbed dose. The symbol (beta) is the quotient of the absorbed dose and the collision kerma. The importance of Roesch's formula has been recognized and used implicitly in the recent dosimetry protocol of the AAPM (Task Group 21). However, the value used in the protocol is based on theoretical calculations which do not include photon scattering. As a result of the present effort the parameters (mu)' and have been determined experimentally, for the first time. The dependence of (beta) on several factors has been studied and (beta) has been obtained including the effects of scattering. Calculations were also performed for several photon energies and materials, using the Roesch method, which does not include photon scattering effects. Comparisons of measured and calculated values of show reasonable agreement.

  12. Energetic Communities: Planning support for sustainable energy transition in small- and medium-sized communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sager-Klauß, C.V.

    2016-01-01

    Small- and medium-sized communities might prove to be game-changers in the overall energy transition because many problems have to be solved within their ambit. Urban planning is dealing with the numerous processes of urban change. Energy is a fairly new task to be addressed and many stakeholders la

  13. Photon diffusion in a homogeneous medium bounded externally or internally by an infinitely long circular cylindrical applicator. V. Steady-state fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Zhang, Anqi; Xu, Guan

    2013-04-01

    As Part V in our series, this paper examines steady-state fluorescence photon diffusion in a homogenous medium that contains a homogenous distribution of fluorophores, and is enclosed by a "concave" circular cylindrical applicator or is enclosing a "convex" circular cylindrical applicator, both geometries being infinite in the longitudinal dimension. The aim is to predict by analytics and examine with the finite-element method the changing characteristics of the fluorescence-wavelength photon-fluence rate and the ratio (sometimes called the Born ratio) of it versus the excitation-wavelength photon-fluence rate, with respect to the source-detector distance. The analysis is performed for a source and a detector located on the medium-applicator interface and aligned either azimuthally or longitudinally in both concave and convex geometries. When compared to its steady-state counterparts on a semi-infinite medium-applicator interface with the same line-of-sight source-detector distance, the fluorescence-wavelength photon-fluence rate reduces faster along the longitudinal direction and slower along the azimuthal direction in the concave geometry, and conversely in the convex geometry. However, the Born ratio increases slower in both azimuthal and longitudinal directions in the concave geometry and faster in both directions in the convex geometry, respectively, when compared to that in the semi-infinite geometry.

  14. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at

  15. Subpicosecond Photon-Energy-Dependent Hole Transfer from PbS Quantum Dots to Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Adam E; Jedlicka, Erin; Wu, Wenbi; Ginger, David S

    2016-12-15

    We use transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy to study the origin of photon-energy dependent hole transfer yields in blends of PbS quantum dots with the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). We selectively excite only the quantum dots at two different wavelengths and measure the polymer ground state bleach resulting from the transfer of photoexcited holes. The higher photon-energy pump shows a greater prompt yield of hole transfer compared to the lower photon-energy excitation, on time scales sufficient to out-compete hot carrier cooling in lead chalcogenide quantum dots. We interpret the results as evidence that the excess energy of nonthermalized, or "hot," excitons resulting from higher photon-energy excitation allows more efficient charge transfer to the polymer in these systems. The data also demonstrate slow charge transfer rates, up to ∼1 ns, of the relaxed excitations on the PbS dots. These findings help to clarify the role of excess photon energy and carrier relaxation dynamics on free carrier generation in donor/acceptor solar cells.

  16. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k{sub T}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A V; Zotov, N P [D V Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119 992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-02-15

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analysis is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In a standard model such events occur mainly due to the Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between the produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies.

  17. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k{sub T}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    2005-09-01

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of k{sub T}-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analysis is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In standard model such events come mainly due to Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the DOe and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies. (orig.)

  18. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k_T-factorization approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A V

    2005-01-01

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of k_T-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analisys is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In Standard Model such events come mainly due to Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies.

  19. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC - dream or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3 / INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2008-08-15

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  20. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, M.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  1. Response of BGO detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulewicz, T.; Henning, W.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Grosse, E.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M.; Kratz, J. V.; Schmidt, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    1993-02-01

    The response of an array of 7 hexagonal BGO detectors each 7.5 cm long (6.7 radiation lengths) with 3.6 cm side-to-side distance was measured using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMI A at Mainz. The experimental spectra of the deposited energy for a single detector and for the array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. Significant improvement of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra compared to the resolution of a single module. This improvement deteriorates at higher photon energies because the length of the detector is not sufficient to absorb the forward component of the electromagnetic shower.

  2. Response of BGO detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T.; Henning, W.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Grosse, E.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R.S.; Wollersheim, H.J. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)); Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M. (Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Kratz, J.V.; Schmidt, R. (Inst. fuer Kernchemie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Janssens, R.V.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The response of an array of 7 hexagonal BGO detectors each 7.5 cm long (6.7 radiation lengths) with 3.6 cm side-to-side distance was measured using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMI A at Mainz. The experimental spectra of the deposited energy for a single detector and for the array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. Significant improvement of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra compared to the resolution of a single module. This improvement deteriorates at higher photon energies because the length of the detector is not sufficient to absorb the forward component of the electromagnetic shower. (orig.).

  3. Computation of the mass attenuation coefficient of polymeric materials at specific gamma photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirji, Rajeshwari; Lobo, Blaise

    2017-06-01

    The gamma ray mass attenuation coefficients of ten synthetic polymeric materials, namely, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been calculated using second order polynomial equation and logarithmic interpolation formula at selected gamma photon energies, in the energy range starting from 14.4 keV up to 1332 keV. It is important to note that second order polynomial equation fits very well with NIST data for all the polymeric materials considered here, for gamma photon energies ranging from 300 keV up to 2000 keV. Third order polynomial fitting is best suited for lower gamma photon energies (from 10 keV up to 200 keV).

  4. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S., E-mail: erickson@gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 770 State St., Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  5. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of the influence of the medium energy and initial fluence FWHM of electron determining a Bremsstrahlung photon spectrum of a linear accelerator; Analisis de sensibilidad de la influencia de la energia media FWHM de la influencia inicial de electrones en la determinacion de un espectro de fotones Bremsstrahlung de un acelerador lineal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juste, B.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.; Diez, S.; Campayo, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    A correct dose calculation in patient under radiotherapy treatments requires and accurate description of the radiation source. The main goal of the present work is to study the effects of initial electron beam characteristics on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose distribution for a 6 MeV linac photon beam. To that, we propose a methodology to determine the initial electron fluence before hitting the accelerator target for an Elektra Precis a medical linear accelerator. The method used for the electron radiation source description is based on a Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (SUSA) and Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 transport code. This electron spectrum has been validated by means of comparison of its resulting depth dose curve in a water cube with experimental data being the mean difference below the 1%. (Author)

  7. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczykm, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamauddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaurg, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. C.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcatov, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, sigma(gamma p)(tot), was determined from e(+) p scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the gamma p system in the range 194

  8. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  9. Photon energy dependence of circular dichroism of the Au(111) surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ärrälä, M.; Nieminen, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Lindroos, M.

    2013-11-01

    Through relativistic photoemission calculations for the Au(111) surface state at the Fermi level, we study the photon energy dependence of circular dichroism. The dichromatic signal (DS) pattern changes 23 times with photon energies between 7 and 100 eV, and we have found 13 different patterns in the k∥ map at the Fermi level for the DS from the Au(111) surface state with normal incidence light. We show that the photon energy dependence of DS is very complex even in the simplest case. The sign change in the circular dichroism as a function of photon energy is related to the relative phases of the complex expansion coefficients of different outgoing partial waves in a time-reversed low-energy electron diffraction state. With off-normal incidence, the z component of the incoming photon field is dominant, and the fine structure seen in the DS in the normal incidence case is lost very rapidly, moving from a normal to an off-normal incidence. We also report that the Rashba split surface state of Au(111) has a significant component of d-type orbital due to relativistic effects and the computational setup used.

  10. Cosmological effects of scalar-photon couplings: dark energy and varying-α Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avgoustidis, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Martins, C.J.A.P.; Monteiro, A.M.R.V.L.; Vielzeuf, P.E. [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Luzzi, G., E-mail: tavgoust@gmail.com, E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt, E-mail: mmonteiro@fc.up.pt, E-mail: up110370652@alunos.fc.up.pt, E-mail: gluzzi@lal.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Université de Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Bâtiment 200, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-06-01

    We study cosmological models involving scalar fields coupled to radiation and discuss their effect on the redshift evolution of the cosmic microwave background temperature, focusing on links with varying fundamental constants and dynamical dark energy. We quantify how allowing for the coupling of scalar fields to photons, and its important effect on luminosity distances, weakens current and future constraints on cosmological parameters. In particular, for evolving dark energy models, joint constraints on the dark energy equation of state combining BAO radial distance and SN luminosity distance determinations, will be strongly dominated by BAO. Thus, to fully exploit future SN data one must also independently constrain photon number non-conservation arising from the possible coupling of SN photons to the dark energy scalar field. We discuss how observational determinations of the background temperature at different redshifts can, in combination with distance measures data, set tight constraints on interactions between scalar fields and photons, thus breaking this degeneracy. We also discuss prospects for future improvements, particularly in the context of Euclid and the E-ELT and show that Euclid can, even on its own, provide useful dark energy constraints while allowing for photon number non-conservation.

  11. Selective coupling of optical energy into the fundamental diffusion mode of a scattering medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Lagendijk, Ad; Mosk, Allard P; Vos, Willem L

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that optical wavefront shaping selectively couples light into the fundamental diffusion mode of a scattering medium. The total energy density inside a scattering medium of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles was probed by measuring the emitted fluorescent power of spheres that were randomly positioned inside the medium. The fluorescent power of an optimized incident wave front is observed to be enhanced compared to a non-optimized incident front. The observed enhancement increases with sample thickness. Based on diffusion theory, we derive a model wherein the distribution of energy density of wavefront-shaped light is described by the fundamental diffusion mode. The agreement between our model and the data is striking not in the least since there are no adjustable parameters. Enhanced total energy density is crucial to increase the efficiency of white LEDs, solar cells, and of random lasers, as well as to realize controlled illumination in biomedical optics.

  12. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-07

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  13. Energy loss of protons in SrTiO{sub 3} studied by medium energy ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedyulin, S.N., E-mail: sdedyuli@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Singh, M.P.; Razavi, F.S. [Department of Physics, Brock University, St. Catherines, Ontario, L2S 3A1 (Canada); Goncharova, L.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The energy loss of medium energy protons (55-170 keV/amu) was studied for a thin SrTiO{sub 3} film on Si. The thickness of the film and the structure of the SrTiO{sub 3}/Si interface was determined by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). These film parameters, together with energy losses extracted from MEIS spectra, were used to calculate stopping cross sections of SrTiO{sub 3} by an iterative procedure. In comparison with Andersen and Ziegler values, the data are systematically lower over the whole energy range.

  14. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-05-01

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue (2H,12C,13C,16O,17O,18O,14N,15N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Photon vs Energy Magnitude Systems and the Measurement of the Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, A; Kim, Alex; Nugent, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The relative brightnesses of standard candles have long been known to be potentially powerful probes of distance. The distance modulus, the difference between observed and absolute magnitudes, has been associated with the values of the cosmological parameters: Hubble's constant H_0, the mass density Omega_M and the cosmological constant Omega_Lambda. In the literature the relationship between these parameters and the distance modulus is calculated for an energy magnitude system; the Johnson-Cousins magnitude system used in observations is in fact a photon-counting system. In this paper, we present the relation between observed and absolute photon magnitudes in terms of the familiar energy distance modulus and derive the correct form of the K-correction. The differences between energy and photon systems are small relative to the measurement errors of contemporary high-redshift supernova searches. The distinction must be made, however, for precision cosmological measurements such as those planned for Type Ia su...

  16. Near-infrared single-photon spectroscopy of a whispering gallery mode resonator using energy-resolving transition edge sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Förtsch, Michael; Stevens, Martin J; Strekalov, Dmitry; Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Nam, Sae Woo; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to perform spectroscopy of near-infrared single photons without the need of dispersive elements. This method is based on a photon energy resolving transition edge sensor and is applied for the characterization of widely wavelength tunable narrow-band single photons emitted from a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. We measure the emission wavelength of the generated signal and idler photons with an uncertainty of up to 2 nm.

  17. Calculation of energy deposition, photon and neutron production in proton therapy of thyroid gland using MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Fornasie, Maria Rosa; de Denaro, Mario

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the MCNPX code has been used to simulate a proton therapy in thyroid gland, in order to calculate the proton energy deposition in the target region. As well as, we have calculated the photon and neutron production spectra due to proton interactions with the tissue. We have considered all the layers of tissue, from the skin to the thyroid gland, and an incident high energy pencil proton beam. The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the thyroid tissue, is from 42 to 54 MeV, assuming that the thyroid gland has a 14 mm thickness and is located 11.2mm under the skin surface. The most percentage of deposited energy (78%) is related to the 54 MeV proton energy beam. Total photon and neutron production are linear and polynomial second order functions of the proton energy, respectively.

  18. No Photon Left Behind: Advanced Optics at ARPA-E for Buildings and Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branz, Howard M.

    2015-04-01

    Key technology challenges in building efficiency and solar energy utilization require transformational optics, plasmonics and photonics technologies. We describe advanced optical technologies funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy. Buildings technologies include a passive daytime photonic cooler, infra-red computer vision mapping for energy audit, and dual-band electrochromic windows based on plasmonic absorption. Solar technologies include novel hybrid energy converters that combine high-efficiency photovoltaics with concentrating solar thermal collection and storage. Because the marginal cost of thermal energy storage is low, these systems enable generation of inexpensive and dispatchable solar energy that can be deployed when the sun doesn't shine. The solar technologies under development include nanoparticle plasmonic spectrum splitting, Rugate filter interference structures and photovoltaic cells that can operate efficiently at over 400° C.

  19. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O., E-mail: klaus.reitberger@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  20. Search for Ultra-High Energy Photons with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Kuempel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture for the search of photons with energy above 100 PeV. In this contribution recent results are presented including the diffuse search for photons and the directional search for photon point sources. The derived limits are of considerable astrophysical interest: Diffuse limits place severe constraints on top-down models and start to touch the predicted GZK photon flux range while directional limits can exclude the continuation of the electromagnetic flux from measured TeV sources with a significance of more than 5$\\sigma$. Finally, prospects of neutral particle searches for the upcoming detector upgrade AugerPrime are highlighted.

  1. Photonic simulation of topological superconductor edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Chen, Liang; Ji, Xia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Photonic simulations of quantum Hall edge states and topological insulators have inspired considerable interest in recent years. Interestingly, there are theoretical predictions for another type of topological states in topological superconductors, but debates over their experimental observations still remain. Here we investigate the photonic analogue of the p(x) + ip(y) model of topological superconductor. Two essential characteristics of topological superconductor, particle-hole symmetry and p(x) + ip(y) pairing potentials, are well emulated in photonic systems. Its topological features are presented by chiral edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex. This work may fertilize the study of photonic topological states, and open up the possibility for emulating wave behaviors in superconductors.

  2. Polarization and dissociation of a high energy photon-excited state in conjugated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-xue, E-mail: sps_lixx@ujn.edu.cn

    2015-02-20

    We use the tight-binding Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model for the one-dimensional conjugated polymers to explore the static polarization behavior of a high energy photon-excited state under the electric field. An obvious reverse polarization is obtained although the electric field is weak. With the increase of field strength, the degree of polarization increases first and then decreases. When the electric field is strong enough, the excited state is dissociated into the polaron pair. In addition, the effects of electron–electron interaction and interchain coupling are also discussed. The results indicate that the electron–electron interaction could weaken the reverse polarization of the high energy photon-excited state, which tends to be dissociated into a high-energy exciton and a pair of solitons with the including of interchain coupling. - Highlights: • We explore the polarization of a high energy photon-excited state in polymers. • An obvious reverse polarization under the moderate electric field is obtained. • High energy photon-excited state is dissociated into polaron pair at strong field. • Increasing electron–electron interaction will weaken the reverse polarization. • Interchain coupling induces dissociation into high-energy exciton and solitons.

  3. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  4. Traffic Adaptive Energy Efficient and Low Latency Medium Access Control for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajesh; Varma, Shirshu; Malaviya, N.

    2008-05-01

    Medium access control for wireless sensor networks has been a very active research area in the recent years. The traditional wireless medium access control protocol such as IEEE 802.11 is not suitable for the sensor network application because these are battery powered. The recharging of these sensor nodes is expensive and also not possible. The most of the literature in the medium access for the sensor network focuses on the energy efficiency. The proposed MAC protocol solves the energy inefficiency caused by idle listening, control packet overhead and overhearing taking nodes latency into consideration based on the network traffic. Simulation experiments have been performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The validation of the simulation results of the proposed MAC has been done by comparing it with the analytical model. This protocol has been simulated in Network Simulator ns-2.

  5. Low-energy-consumption hybrid lasers for silicon photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Ran, Qijiang; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed.......Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed....

  6. Search for ultra-high energy photons with AMIGA muon counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Nicolas Martin [Instituto de Tecnologias en Deteccion y Astroparticulas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie. (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The study of the composition of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) is one of the topical problems of astroparticle physics. The discovery of UHE photons, i.e. photons with energies around 1 EeV, in primary cosmic rays could be of particular interest for the field of astroparticle physics, and also for fundamental physics, since they are tracers of the highest-energy processes in the Universe. For the search for UHE photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), several parameters have been proposed to distinguish between primary hadrons and photons. One of the most promising approaches to search for primary gamma rays is the study of the muon component in extensive air showers (EAS) produced in the interaction between the CR and the nuclei in the atmosphere. The number of muons in showers induced by gamma primaries is an order of magnitude lower than the hadronic primaries counterpart. The AMIGA extension of the PAO, consisting of an array of buried scintillators counters, allows the study of the muons produced during the EAS development. In this talk, the sensitivity of the muon counters to photon-initiated EAS and the possible discrimination procedures are discussed using dedicated EAS simulations with software package CORSIKA, including the detector response using the Offline package developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration.

  7. Low-energy cosmic ray protons from nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    The intensity of low-energy (less than 100 MeV) protons from nuclear interactions of higher-energy (above 100 MeV) cosmic rays with the interstellar medium is calculated. The resultant intensity in the 10- to 100-MeV range is larger by a factor of 3-5 than the observed proton intensity near earth. The calculated intensity from nuclear interactions constitutes a lower limit on the actual proton intensity in interstellar space.

  8. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, August 1--October 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Dunn, E.D. (comps.)

    1978-05-01

    A report is given of the medium-energy physics program at the LAMPF linac for the period from August 1 through October 31, 1977. Topics discussed include: (1) accelerator facilities and development; (2) the main beam lines; (3) experimental areas; (4) research; (5) nuclear chemistry; (6) practical applications; (7) linac technology; and (8) management. (PMA)

  9. Counterposed phase velocity and energy-transport velocity vectors in a dielectric-magnetic uniaxial medium

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhtakia, A.; McCall, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    When a plane wave is launched from a plane surface in a linear, homogenous, dielectric-magnetic, uniaxial medium, we show that its phase velocity and the energy-transport velocity vectors can be counterposed (i.e., lie on different sides of the surface normal) under certain circumstances.

  10. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  11. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui, E-mail: yinghui_wang@jlu.edu.cn; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang, E-mail: zhanghz@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics.

  12. Recent emergence of photon upconversion based on triplet energy migration in molecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-04-07

    An emerging field of triplet energy migration-based photon upconversion (TEM-UC) is reviewed. Highly efficient photon upconversion has been realized in a wide range of chromophore assemblies, such as non-solvent liquids, ionic liquids, amorphous solids, gels, supramolecular assemblies, molecular crystals, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The control over their assembly structures allows for unexpected air-stability and maximum upconversion quantum yield at weak solar irradiance that has never been achieved by the conventional molecular diffusion-based mechanism. The introduction of the "self-assembly" concept offers a new perspective in photon upconversion research and triplet exciton science, which show promise for numerous applications ranging from solar energy conversion to chemical biology.

  13. Medium Access Control for Thermal Energy Harvesting in Advanced Metering Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vithanage, Madava D.; Fafoutis, Xenofon; Andersen, Claus Bo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the feasibility of powering wireless metering devices, namely heat cost allocators, by thermal energy harvested from radiators. The goal is to take a first step toward the realization of Energy-Harvesting Advanced Metering Infrastructures (EH-AMIs). While traditional...... battery-powered devices have a limited amount of energy, energy harvesting can potentially provide an infinite amount of energy for continuous operating lifetimes, thus reducing the cost involved in installation and maintenance. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, we experimentally identify...... the potential energy that can be harvested from Low Surface Temperature (LST) radiators. The experiments are based on a developed Energy-Harvesting Heat Cost Allocator (EH-HCA) prototype. On the basis of this measured power budget, we model and analytically compare the currently used Medium Access Control (MAC...

  14. Discrimination of converted photons and neutral pions at high energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong; WANG Jian; WANG Jian; WANG Xian-You; WANG Zheng; XU Ming; XU Wei-Wei; YANG Min; YAN Qi; CHEN Guo-Ming; TAO Jun-Quan; BIAN Jian-Guo; FAN Jia-Wei; LIANG Song; MENG Xiang-Wei; SHEN Yu-Qiao; TANG Zhi-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    In the LHC experiment,the H → γγ channel provides a clean final state with an effective mass peak that is reconstructed with great precision,despite the small branching ratio.As a consequence,the H → γγ channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs discovery in the very low mass region.In order to increase the sensitivity of the Higgs search,background rejection rate is very important,so γ/π0discrimination is one of the key points in the analysis.At least 40% of photons will convert with the experience of ATLAS and CMS.We constructed electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) in GEANT4 simulation,using 6variables which have different shapes between converted γ and π0,with the TMVA (Toolkit for Multivariate Data Analysis) to do the separation.With this method we can get 30% to 60% π0 rejection efficiency when keeping 90% converted γ efficiency,in the region of transverse momentum 15 GeV to 75 GeV,not only in MC sumulation but also in real data.

  15. 不同背景介质下金属Cu光子晶体带隙%The band structures of metallic photonic crystals filled with different mediums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 梁静秋; 梁中翥; 王维彪

    2012-01-01

    提出了一种利用全反射抑制二维光子晶体表面电磁波泄漏的方法,并计算了不同背景介质下的二维金属Cu光子晶体的带隙结构,得到了带隙结构与填充率间的关系曲线.计算方法采用时域有限差分,金属型光子晶体由Cu柱构成.分别计算了以空气为背景介质和以PMMA为背景介质的正方晶格金属型光子晶体的带隙结构.研究结果表明:以PMMA为背景介质的正方晶格金属型光子晶体与以空气为背景介质相比,第一带隙更窄,第二带隙中心频率更低,且在填充率大于0.70时将会出现第三带隙.这对进一步扩展这种光子晶体的应用具有良好的参考意义.%A method is proposed to inhibit the leakage of electromagnetic waves on the surface of 2D photonic crystals u-sing total internal reflection. The band structures of 2D metallic photonic crystals with different background mediums are analyzed. The band structures as a function of the filling factor are obtained via FDTD method. The metallic photonic crystals are composed of Cu columns. Two kinds of background media, air and PMMA, were selected in this study. The band structures of these two 2D square-lattice metallic photonic crystals were analyzed separately. The results indicate that the metallic photonic crystals filled with PMMA have a narrower first band gap and a lower second band gap than the metallic photonic crystals filled with air. A third band gap appears in the metallic photonic crystals with PMMA as the background medium when the filling factor reaches 0.70. This work provides a good reference for the application of photonic crystals.

  16. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  17. Statistical Characterization of Medium-Duty Electric Vehicle Drive Cycles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohaska, R.; Duran, A.; Ragatz, A.; Kelly, K.

    2015-05-03

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts real-world performance evaluations of advanced medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. Evaluation results can help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and assist fleet managers in selecting fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their economic and operational goals. In 2011, NREL launched a large-scale performance evaluation of medium-duty electric vehicles. With support from vehicle manufacturers Smith and Navistar, NREL research focused on characterizing vehicle operation and drive cycles for electric delivery vehicles operating in commercial service across the nation.

  18. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  19. Millijoule Pulse Energy Second Harmonic Generation With Single-Stage Photonic Bandgap Rod Fiber Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Saby, Julien; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, for the first time, a single-stage Q-switched single-mode (SM) ytterbium-doped rod fiber laser delivering record breaking pulse energies at visible and UV light. We use a photonic bandgap rod fiber with a mode field diameter of 59μm based on a new distributed...

  20. Photon and dilepton production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takao Sakaguchi

    2015-05-01

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, obtained particularly at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  1. LHC collision event at CMS showing two high energy photons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->GammaGamma candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which two high energy photons (dashed orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  2. Demonstration of multilayer reflective optics at photon energies above 0.6 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Soufli, Regina; Descalle, Marie-Anne;

    2014-01-01

    Focusing optics operating in the soft gamma-ray photon energy range can advance a range of scientific and technological applications that benefit from the large improvements in sensitivity and resolution that true imaging provides. An enabling technology to this end is multilayer coatings. We show...

  3. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudipan Dethe ALICE Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  4. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Leach, Matt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Signature-based search for delayed photons in exclusive photon plus missing transverse energy events from pp¯ collisions with s=1.96TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-01

    We present the first signature-based search for delayed photons using an exclusive photon plus missing transverse energy final state. Events are reconstructed in a data sample from the CDF II detector corresponding to 6.3fb-1 of integrated luminosity from s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions. Candidate events are selected if they contain a photon with an arrival time in the detector larger than expected from a promptly produced photon. The mean number of events from standard model sources predicted by the data-driven background model based on the photon timing distribution is 286±24. A total of 322 events are observed. A p value of 12% is obtained, showing consistency of the data with standard model predictions.

  7. Medium-Contention Based Energy-Efficient Distributed Clustering (MEDIC) for Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Zhao; Qilian Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we utilize clustering to organize wireless sensors into an energy-efficient hierarchy. We propose a Medium-contention based Energy-efficient DIstributed Clustering (MEDIC) scheme, through which sensors self-organize themselves into energy-efficient clusters by bidding for cluster headship. This scheme is based on a new criterion that can be used by each sensor node to make a distributed decision on whether electing to be a cluster head or a non-head member, which is a fully dis...

  8. Thermal and structural stability of medium energy target carrier assembly for NOvA at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Ader, C.; Anderson, K.; Hylen, J.; Martens, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The NOvA project will upgrade the existing Neutrino at Main Injector (NuMI) project beamline at Fermilab to accommodate beam power of 700 kW. The Medium Energy (ME) graphite target assembly is provided through an accord with the State Research Center of Russia Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) at Protvino, Russia. The effects of proton beam energy deposition within beamline components are considered as thermal stability of the target carrier assembly and alignment budget are critical operational issues. Results of finite element thermal and structural analysis involving the target carrier assembly is provided with detail regarding the target's beryllium windows.

  9. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic...... dependence of the mass attenuation coefficient, Z(PEA, eff), and the mass energy-absorption coefficient, Z(PI, eff), is shown graphically and in tabular form. Significant differences of 17%-38% between Z(PI, eff) and Z(PEA, eff) occur in the energy region 5-100 keV. The reasons for these differences...

  10. Anisotropy of low energy direct photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-09-01

    Using the Wigner function approach for electromagnetic radiation fields, we investigate the behavior of low energy photons radiated by the deceleration processes of two colliding nuclei in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The angular distribution reveals information of the initial geometric configurations, which is reflected in the anisotropic parameter v 2, with an increasing v 2 as energy decreases. This behavior is qualitatively different to the v 2 from the hadrons produced in the collisions.

  11. Calculation of the Energy Dependence of Dosimeter Response to Ionizing Photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using a program in BASIC applied to a desk-top calculator, simplified calculations provide approximate energy dependence correction factors of dosimeter readings of absorbed dose according to Bragg-Gray cavity theories. Burlin's general cavity theory is applied in the present calculations, and ce...... as given here are available for certain dosimeter probe materials and combinations used with intermediate energy photon spectra (0.01–100 MeV)....

  12. Anisotropicity of Low Energy Direct Photons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of low energy photons radiated by deceleration processes of two colliding nuclei in relativistic heavy ion collisions, where their angular distribution reveals information of the initial geometric configurations. Such a property is reflected in the anisotropic parameter v_{2}, showing an increasing v_{2} as energy decreases, which is qualitatively different behavior from v_{2} from hadrons produced in the collisions.

  13. Solution of the time-dependent diffusion equation for a three-layer medium: application to study photon migration through a simplified adult head model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via G Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Sassaroli, Angelo [Tufts University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering Center, 4 Coly Street, 02155 Medford, MA (United States); Bianco, Samuele Del [CNR-Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Zaccanti, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via G Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

    2007-05-21

    A diffusion-based model for photon migration through a three-layer medium is described. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the performance of a diffusion equation (DE)-based forward model for studying photon migration through a diffusive layered medium having a low scattering layer. This geometrical model can be used as a simple model of the adult head. Numerical results are shown for a set of values of the optical properties typical of the adult human head, where scalp and skull are lumped in the first layer while the second and third layer are associated with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the brain, respectively. Due to the presence of the CSF, which is a relatively clear layer, the diffusion-based model yields an approximate solution of photon migration. Nevertheless, comparisons with MC simulations show that the model can predict the total and the partial mean path length in the different layers with an error less than 20%. In particular, the partial mean path length in the third layer, representative of the brain, is calculated with an error less than 10% if the reduced scattering coefficient of the second layer, representative of the CSF, is assumed 0.25 mm{sup -1}.

  14. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  15. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Tejbir, E-mail: dr.tejbir@gmail.com; Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder [Department of Physics, Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fatehgarh Saheb-140406, Punjab (India); Singh, Parjit S. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala-147002, Punjab (India)

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  16. Search for Anomalous Production of Photon, b-jet, and Missing Transverse Energy at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Shin-Shan

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of two signature-based searches for new physics using 1.9- 2.0 fb-1 of data collected at the CDF experiment. Both analyses look in events containing a photon, a b-tagged jet, and missing transverse energy. The first search requires an additional jet. The second search requires an extra electron or muon. No significant excess of events over the Standard Model prediction is observed. We also describe the ``CES/CPR'' method which is used to estimate the amount of mis-identified photons.

  17. Direct photon production and jet energy-loss in small systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Two types of penetrating probes, direct photon and QCD jets, are investigated in the background of a small and rapidly expanding droplet of quark-gluon plasma. The additional thermal electromagnetic radiation results in a $\\sim$50\\% enhancement of the direct photons. In high multiplicity p+Pb collisions, jets can lose a sizeable fraction of their initial energy, leading to a charged hadron $R_\\mathrm{pA}$ of $\\sim$0.8 at a transverse momentum around 10\\,GeV. Those two proposed measurements can help understand the apparent collective behaviour observed in small collision systems.

  18. Nonlinear photonic diode behavior in energy-graded core-shell quantum well semiconductor rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Suk-Min; Gong, Su-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2014-09-10

    Future technologies require faster data transfer and processing with lower loss. A photonic diode could be an attractive alternative to the present Si-based electronic diode for rapid optical signal processing and communication. Here, we report highly asymmetric photonic diode behavior with low scattering loss, from tapered core-shell quantum well semiconductor rods that were fabricated to have a large gradient in their bandgap energy along their growth direction. Local laser illumination of the core-shell quantum well rods yielded a huge contrast in light output intensities from opposite ends of the rod.

  19. Measurement of pair-production by high energy photons in an aligned tungsten crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Parker, M. A.; Baurichter, A.; Kirsebom, K.; Medenwaldt, R.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Doble, N.; Elsener, K.; Ballestrero, S.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V. M.; Biino, C.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.

    1996-10-01

    A new measurement has been made of the rate of pair-production in a 3.2 mm thick tungsten crystal, exposed to photons with energies in the range 10 to 150 GeV, for angles of incidence up to 10 mrad from the crystal axis. A strong enhancement of the pair-production rate is observed when the beam is aligned along the crystal axis, as compared to a random orientation. This effect can be exploited in the NA48 CP-violation experiment by using a thin crystal rather than an amorphous material to convert photons, thus minimising the scattering of kaons in the converter.

  20. The energy loss of medium-energy He+ ions backscattered from a Cu(100) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Weg, W.F. van der

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for the shape of the surface peak in the energy spectrum of backscattered ions in a channeling and blocking experiment. The elastic energy loss distribution of the ions is calculated by use of Monte Carlo simulation. The inelastic energy loss distribution is calculated by use of

  1. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-02-26

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a {sup 10}B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined

  2. Energy management assistance for small and medium-size manufacturers, 1989--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.J.; Kirsch, F.W.

    1991-01-01

    Small and medium-size manufacturers continue to express strong confidence in and satisfaction with the energy-conserving and cost-saving services provided by the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers. That conclusion is based upon in-depth interviews with 210 of the 330 manufacturers served by 11 of the EADCs during 1989-90. These interviews were conducted at the manufacturing plants by engineers from the Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center, which manages the EADC program under agreement with the Office of Industrial Technologies, U.S. Department of Energy. University engineering faculty and a mix of graduate and undergraduate students who make up the staff of each EADC perform energy audits under subcontract to the Science Center at manufacturing plants which are located within about 150 miles of the university.

  3. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC - dream or reality?

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: exclusive vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  4. Single- and multi-photon final states with missing energy at e sup + e sup - colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Montagna, G; Nicrosini, O; Piccinini, F

    1999-01-01

    The search for new physics in single- and multi-photon final states with large missing energy at LEP and future e sup + e sup - colliders requires precise predictions for the Standard Model irreducible background. While at LEP1 the theoretical situation is under control, going to LEP2 (and beyond) some improvements are necessary. To approach the aimed O(1%) theoretical accuracy, the tree-level matrix elements for the processes e sup + e sup - -> nu nu-barn gamma, with n=1, 2, 3, are exactly computed in the Standard Model, including the possibility of anomalous couplings for single-photon production. Due to the presence of observed photons in the final state, particular attention is paid to the treatment of higher-order QED corrections. Comparisons with existing calculations are shown and commented on. An improved version of the event generator NUNUGPV is presented.

  5. Development and construction of the low-energy photon tagger NEPTUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberg, K.

    2007-07-15

    Within the scope of this thesis a photon tagging system was designed and constructed at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). The set-up consists of a deflecting magnet, an array of focal plane detectors, the data acquisition system and new beam-line components. The system provides tagged photons in an energy range from 6 MeV to 20 MeV with the emphasis on best possible resolution and intensity. The absolute energy resolution of photons at 10 MeV is better than 25 keV. With the current focal-plane detectors a maximum rate of tagged photons of 10{sup 4}/(keV.s) can be achieved. An upgrade to more than 10{sup 5}/(keV.s) with an alternative detector array is under investigation. The design values mentioned above are the requirements for planned experiments in the fields of nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. The most important constraints which have to be considered arise from the special demands of ({gamma},n) reactions above but close to the particle threshold which generates slow neutrons with energies of a few hundreds of keV. The unambiguous assignment of slow neutrons to prompt electrons is done on-line in special buffered time-to-digital converters. With a design of the data acquisition for this scenario one also covers the requirements for experiments with prompt detection of the ejectiles such as in nuclear resonance fluorescence and ({gamma},n) far above the threshold. This photon tagging system enables to measure ({gamma},x) cross sections as a function of excitation energy and decay patterns after particle evaporation. It is an important extension to the high-flux activation experiments and the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments below the threshold with untagged bremsstrahlung. (orig.)

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panettieri, Vanessa [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Duch, Maria Amor [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jornet, Nuria [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Ginjaume, Merce [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carrasco, Pablo [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Badal, Andreu [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ortega, Xavier [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson and Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm{sup 2} and a thickness of 0.5 {mu}m which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water(TM) build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water(TM) cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system

  7. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  8. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disag...... and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now. © 2013 American Physical Society....... and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle...

  9. Nonlinear effects in photoionization over a broad photon-energy range within the TDCIS scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamatskou, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    The present tutorial provides an overview of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles scheme applied to nonlinear ionization over a broad photon-energy range. The efficient propagation of the wave function and the calculation of photoelectron spectra within this approach are described and demonstrated in various applications. Above-threshold ionization of argon and xenon in the extreme ultraviolet energy range is investigated as an example. A particular focus is put on the xenon 4d giant dipole resonance and the information that nonlinear ionization can provide about resonance substructure. Furthermore, above-threshold ionization is studied in the x-ray regime and the intensity regime, at which multiphoton ionization starts to play a role at hard x-ray photon energies, is identified.

  10. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; 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Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Struebig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the electron and photon energy calibration achieved with the ATLAS detector using about 25 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton--proton collision data taken at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV. The reconstruction of electron and photon energies is optimised using multivariate algorithms. The response of the calorimeter layers is equalised in data and simulation, and the longitudinal profile of the electromagnetic showers is exploited to estimate the passive material in front of the calorimeter and reoptimise the detector simulation. After all corrections, the $Z$ resonance is used to set the absolute energy scale. For electrons from $Z$ decays, the achieved calibration is typically accurate to 0.05% in most of the detector acceptance, rising to 0.2% in regions with large amounts of passive material. The remaining inaccuracy is less than 0.2-1% for electrons with a transverse energy of 10 GeV, and is on average 0.3% for photons. The detector resolution is determined with a relative in...

  11. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, A; Ballabriga, R; Bisello, F; Campbell, M; Celi, J C; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Jensch, M; Kochanski, N; Llopart, X; Michel, N; Mollenhauer, U; Ritter, I; Tennert, F; Wölfel, S; Wong, W; Michel, T

    2015-01-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation wa...

  12. A micrometer-scale integrated silicon source of time-energy entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Grassani, Davide; Liscidini, Marco; Galli, Matteo; Strain, Michael J; Sorel, Marc; Sipe, J E; Bajoni, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental resource in quantum information processing. Several studies have explored the integration of sources of entangled states on a silicon chip but the sources demonstrated so far require millimeter lengths and pump powers of the order of hundreds of mWs to produce an appreciable photon flux, hindering their scalability and dense integration. Microring resonators have been shown to be efficient sources of photon pairs, but entangled state emission has never been demonstrated. Here we report the first demonstration of a microring resonator capable of emitting time-energy entangled photons. We use a Franson experiment to show a violation of Bell's inequality by as much as 11 standard deviations. The source is integrated on a silicon chip, operates at sub-mW pump power, emits in the telecom band with a pair generation rate exceeding 10$^7$ Hz per $nm$, and outputs into a photonic waveguide. These are all essential features of an entangled states emitter for a quantum photonic networks.

  13. Response of BaF 2 detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulewicz, T.; Grosse, E.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Henning, W.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M.; Kratz, J. V.; Schmidt, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    1990-04-01

    BaF 2 detectors of 20 cm length (10 radiation lengths) and hexagonal cross section (diameter 5.2 cm) were tested using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMIA at Mainz. The experimental spectra the deposited energy for a single detector and for an array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. At high photon energies a significant improvement (more than a factor 2) of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra as compared to the resolution of one single module.

  14. Response of BaF sub 2 detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T.; Grosse, E.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Henning, W.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R.S.; Wollersheim, H.J. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.)); Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Kratz, J.V.; Schmidt, R. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernchemie); Janssens, R.V.F. (Ar

    1990-01-01

    BaF{sub 2} detectors of 20 cm length (10 radiation lengths) and hexagonal cross section (diameter 5.2 cm) were tested using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMI A at Mainz. The experimental spectra of the deposited energy for a single detector and for an array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. At high photon energies a significant improvement (more than a factor 2) of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra as compared to the resolution of one single module. (orig.).

  15. Response of BaF sub 2 detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T.; Grosse, E.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Henning, W.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R.S.; Wollersheim, H.J. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.)); Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Kratz, J.V.; Schmidt, R. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernchemie); Janssens, R.V.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    BaF{sub 2} detectors of 20 cm length (10 radiation lengths) and hexagonal cross section (diameter 5.2 cm) were tested using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMIA at Mainz. The experimental spectra of the deposited energy for a single detector and for an array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. At high photon energies a significant improvement (more than a factor 2) of the energy resolutions is observed for the summed energy spectra as compared to the resolution of one single module. (orig.).

  16. Algebraic-Eikonal approach to medium energy proton scattering from odd-mass nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1995-01-01

    We extend the algebraic-eikonal approach to medium energy proton scattering from odd-mass nuclei by combining the eikonal approximation for the scattering with a description of odd-mass nuclei in terms of the interacting boson-fermion model. We derive closed expressions for the transition matrix elements for one of the dynamical symmetries and discuss the interplay between collective and single-particle degrees of freedom in an application to elastic and inelastic proton scattering from ^{195}Pt.

  17. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, February 1--April 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, E. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    A quarterly report on the medium-energy physics program at LAMPF is given. Topics covered include: (1) engineering support; (2) accelerator support; (3) accelerator systems development; (4) injector systems; (5) electronic instrumentation and computer systems; (6) accelerator operations; (7) experimental areas; (8) beam line development; (9) large-spectrometer systems; (10) research; (11) nuclear chemistry; (12) practical applications of LAMPF; and (13) management. (PMA)

  18. Unified Description of Charmonium Suppression in Quark-Gluon Plasma Medium at RHIC and LHC Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Captain R.; Srivastava, P. K.; Ganesh, S; Mishra, M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the quarkonia suppression in a thermal QCD medium created at heavy ion collisions is a complex interplay of various physical processes. In this article we put together most of these processes in a unified way to calculate the charmonium survival probability (nuclear modification factor) at energies available at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. We have included shadowing as the dominant ...

  19. Energy-resolved detection of single infrared photons with {\\lambda} = 8 {\\mu}m using a superconducting microbolometer

    CERN Document Server

    Karasik, Boris S; Soibel, Alexander; Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E; Olaya, David; Gershenson, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    We report on the detection of single photons with {\\lambda} = 8 {\\mu}m using a superconducting hot-electron microbolometer. The sensing element is a titanium transition-edge sensor with a volume ~ 0.1 {\\mu}m^3 fabricated on a silicon substrate. Poisson photon counting statistics including simultaneous detection of 3 photons was observed. The width of the photon-number peaks was 0.11 eV, 70% of the photon energy, at 50-100 mK. This achieved energy resolution is the best figure reported so far for superconducting devices. Such devices can be suitable for single photon calorimetric spectroscopy throughout the mid-infrared and even the far-infrared.

  20. Influences of Uncaptured Electron on Energy Conversion of Photon Compton Scattering in High Power Laser-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing-hua; HAO Xiao-fei; HAO Dong-shan

    2004-01-01

    Using the single particle theory and the non-flexibility collision model of electron and photon, the influence of the uncaptured electrons on the energy conversion efficiency of multi-photon nonlinear Compton scattering in the extra stationary laser-plasma is investigated. It shows that in extra stationary laser-plasma,the uncaptured electrons make the Δω of the scattering frequency of the multi-photon Compton fall down with the increases of the incident radiation electron speed,the materials of the incident collision of electron and photon, and the number of the photons which work with the electrons at the same time. Under the modulation of the uncaptured electrons to the laser field, the energy conversion efficiency between electrons and photons will fall down with the increase of the electron incident radiation speed, using the low-power electrons for incident source, the loss can be efficiently reduced.

  1. A Time Tree Medium Access Control for Energy Efficiency and Collision Avoidance in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kilhung Lee

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a medium access control and scheduling scheme for wireless sensor networks. It uses time trees for sending data from the sensor node to the base station. For an energy efficient operation of the sensor networks in a distributed manner, time trees are built in order to reduce the collision probability and to minimize the total energy required to send data to the base station. A time tree is a data gathering tree where the base station is the root and each sensor node is eit...

  2. Energy coservation status and needs: medium-sized commercial/industrial firms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The potential for conserving energy by Seattle City Light's commercial/industrial customers is investigated. The results of the study will help SCL and others to provide energy- and money-saving help to their medium-sized business customers. Fifty in-person interviews of firms within the SCL area and 102 mailed questionnaires from customers outside the area in Washington and Oregon were analyzed. Researchers found that many steps requiring little cost have been implemented, but instituting further hard conservation measures such as new machinery, retrofitting, or changes in machine operations are lacking. (MCW)

  3. Isotope dilution gamma spectrometry for Pu using low energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.; Sarkar, A.; Alamelu, D.; Shah, R.V.; Aggarwal, S.K. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Centre, Mumbai (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    Isotope dilution gamma spectrometry (IDGS) for determination of the Pu concentration, using high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) in the 40-150 keV energy range, is developed and described. The methodology involves purification of Pu by an anion exchange procedure, followed by the determination of Pu isotopic composition using HRGS. For isotope dilution, a pre-calibrated power reactor grade Pu ({proportional_to} 70 at. % {sup 239}Pu) solution from an Indian PHWR was used as a spike for research reactor grade Pu ({proportional_to} 95 at. % {sup 239}Pu) samples and vice versa. Changes in {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu (45.24 keV/51.62 keV) and {sup 241}Pu/{sup 239}Pu (148.57 keV/129.29 keV) activity ratios in the spiked samples were determined by gamma spectrometry. Using the atom ratios calculated from the measured activity ratios, the concentration of Pu in the sample was calculated using two different efficiency calibration methods. The isotopic composition and concentration of Pu samples both from power reactor and research reactor grade agreed well with the values obtained by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The present method also shows the superiority of using the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio against the {sup 241}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in IDGS with respect to the accuracy and precision. (orig.)

  4. A study of photons at ultra high energy using Auger surface detector

    CERN Document Server

    Decerprit, Guillaume; Parizot, E

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to derive an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy (UHE) photon flux above a given energy, using the Auger SD events. As previous studies, it takes advantage of the fundamental differences between showers induced by hadrons and showers induced by photons (signal rise time, slope of the Lateral Distribution Function, radius of curvature), but it uses photon shower simulations adapted to the actually observed SD events, on an event-by-event basis. In particular, we find that a limited number of simulations per event allows to reach an upper limit that is very close to the ideal case that would be obtained with an infinite number of simulations. For instance, 10 simulated showers per event are sufficient to reach an upper limit only 10 percent higher than the ideal one. As an illustration, we apply this method to the SD events reconstructed above 55 EeV, which provides an optimized upper limit on the photon flux above 150 EeV, and indicate how this can be easily extended to the lower-energ...

  5. Photon-impenetrable, electron-permeable: the carbon nanotube forest as a medium for multiphoton thermal-photoemission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdani Moghaddam, Mehran; Yaghoobi, Parham; Sawatzky, George A; Nojeh, Alireza

    2015-04-28

    Combining the photoelectric and thermionic mechanisms to generate free electrons has been of great interest since the early days of quantum physics as exemplified by the Fowler-DuBridge theory, and recently proposed for highly efficient solar conversion. We present experimental evidence of this combined effect over the entire range spanning room-temperature photoemission to thermionic emission. Remarkably, the optical stimulus alone is responsible for both heating and photoemission at the same time. Moreover, the current depends on optical intensity quadratically, indicating two-photon photoemission, for intensities of ca. 1-50 W/cm(2), which are orders of magnitude below the intensities required for two-photon photoemission from bulk metals. This surprising behavior appears to be enabled by the internal nanostructure of the carbon nanotube forest, which captures photons effectively, yet allows electrons to escape easily.

  6. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2009-08-21

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 x 0.9 mm(2) pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel(-1) s(-1) count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and

  7. Photonic Color Filters Integrated with Organic Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hui Joon

    2011-09-27

    Color filters are indispensable in most color display applications. In most cases, they are chemical pigment-based filters, which produce a particular color by absorbing its complementary color, and the absorbed energy is totally wasted. If the absorbed and wasted energy can be utilized, e.g., to generate electricity, innovative energy-efficient electronic media could be envisioned. Here we show photonic nanostructures incorporated with photovoltaics capable of producing desirable colors in the visible band and utilize the absorbed light to simultaneously generate electrical powers. In contrast to the traditional colorant-based filters, these devices offer great advantages for electro-optic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Low and medium energy gamma-ray astronomy: present status and future aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1983-01-01

    The present assessment of progress and prospects in gamma-ray astronomy notes that the exploration of the sky in the low and medium energy gamma ray range (below approximately 30 MeV) lags far behind the exploration of the X-ray and high energy gamma ray bands. The only galactic source which has been detected at low gamma energies remains the Crab Nebula. In the extragalactic sky, active galaxies have come to have special significance for researchers in gamma-ray astronomy in virtue of a luminosity maximum in the several hundreds of keV-several MeV range. The problem posed by the diffuse cosmic gamma ray component, with its spectral bump at MeV energies, is not yet solved.

  9. Monte Carlo-based revised values of dose rate constants at discrete photon energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Palani Selvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose rate to water at 0.2 cm and 1 cm due to a point isotropic photon source as a function of photon energy is calculated using the EDKnrc user-code of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. This code system utilized widely used XCOM photon cross-section dataset for the calculation of absorbed dose to water. Using the above dose rates, dose rate constants are calculated. Air-kerma strength S k needed for deriving dose rate constant is based on the mass-energy absorption coefficient compilations of Hubbell and Seltzer published in the year 1995. A comparison of absorbed dose rates in water at the above distances to the published values reflects the differences in photon cross-section dataset in the low-energy region (difference is up to 2% in dose rate values at 1 cm in the energy range 30-50 keV and up to 4% at 0.2 cm at 30 keV. A maximum difference of about 8% is observed in the dose rate value at 0.2 cm at 1.75 MeV when compared to the published value. S k calculations based on the compilation of Hubbell and Seltzer show a difference of up to 2.5% in the low-energy region (20-50 keV when compared to the published values. The deviations observed in the values of dose rate and S k affect the values of dose rate constants up to 3%.

  10. Photons, missing energy and the quest for supersymmetry at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebbert, Ulla

    2012-03-15

    In this thesis a search for supersymmetry in events with at least one photon, jets and missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) in an integrated luminosity of 4.32 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV is presented. The data is recorded by the CMS detector in 2011. Final states with photons are expected in models with gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, where the lightest supersymmetric particle is the gravitino. The gravitino leaves the detector without energy deposition and thus leads to missing transverse momentum in the event. E{sub T} is crucial to distinguish the signal from the Standard Model events and is reconstructed from all energy deposits in the detector. Due to the non-linearity of the response in the calorimeter, additional corrections are required. In this thesis, a data driven technique to determine the correction for unclustered energy deposits, using the transverse momentum balance between a Z boson and the hadronic recoil, is presented. For the search for supersymmetry the E{sub T} distribution measured in data is compared to the expected Standard Model distribution. For this purpose the main Standard Model background processes from QCD multi- and photon-jet or electro-weak processes are modelled using data events. No excess over the Standard Model expectation is observed. Exclusion limits at the 95% CL are set and interpreted in the GMSB parameter space.

  11. Enhanced harvesting of red photons in nanowire solar cells: evidence of resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Karthik; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-04-28

    Modern excitonic solar cells efficiently harvest photons in the 350-650 nm spectral range; however, device efficiencies are typically limited by poor quantum yields for red and near-infrared photons. Using Forster-type resonance energy transfer from zinc phthalocyanine donor molecules to ruthenium polypyridine complex acceptors, we demonstrate a four-fold increase in quantum yields for red photons in dye-sensitized nanowire array solar cells. The dissolved donor and surface anchored acceptor molecules are not tethered to each other, through either a direct chemical bond or a covalent linker layer. The spatial confinement of the electrolyte imposed by the wire-to-wire spacing of the close-packed nanowire array architecture ensures that the distances between a significant fraction of donors and acceptors are within a Förster radius. The critical distance for energy transfer from an isolated donor chromophore to a self-assembled monolayer of acceptors on a plane follows the inverse fourth power instead of the inverse sixth power relation. Consequently, we observe near quantitative energy transfer efficiencies in our devices. Our results represent a new design paradigm in excitonic solar cells and show it is possible to more closely match the spectral response of the device to the AM 1.5 solar spectrum through use of electronic energy transfer.

  12. Photon and electron identification with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Photon and electron identifications are a crucial input to many ATLAS physics analysis. The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination combining calorimeter and track variables to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficienc...

  13. Development of a Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunter, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eg greater than approximately 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from approximately 20 MeV to greater than 10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below approximately 200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, there will nonetheless remain a significant sensitivity gap in the medium-energy (approximately 0.1-200 MeV) regime; the lower end of this range remains largely unexplored whereas the upper end will allow comparison with FERMI data. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires significant improvements in sensitivity. A major emphasis of modern detector development, with the goal of providing significant improvements in sensitivity in the medium-energy regime, focuses on high-resolution electron tracking. The Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology being developed at GSFC provides high resolution tracking of the electron-positron pair from gamma-ray interactions from 5 to 200 MeV. The 3-DTI consists of a time projection chamber (TPC) and 2-D cross-strip microwell detector (MWD). The low-density and homogeneous design of the 3-DTI, offers unprecedented sensitivity by providing angular resolution near the kinematic limit. Electron tracking also enables measurement of gamma-ray polarization, a new tool to study astrophysical phenomenon. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a 30x30x30 cm3 3-DTI detector prototype of a medium-energy gamma-ray telescope.

  14. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  15. Utilization of industrial dairy waste as microalgae cultivation medium : a potential study for sustainable energy resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmayani, S.; Sugiarti, Y.; Putra, R. H.

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae is one of biodiesel resources and call as third generation biofuel. Biodiesel is one alternative energy that being developed. So study about resource of biodiesel need a development, for the example is development the basic material such as microalgae. In this paper we explain the potential use of dairy waste from industry as a cultivation medium of microalgae for biodiesel production. Dairy waste from dairy industry contains 34.98% protein, 4.42% lactose, 9.77% fiber, 11.04% fat, 2.33% calcium, 1.05% phosfor, and 0.4 % magnesium, meaning that the dairy waste from dairy industry has a relatively high nutrient content and complete from a source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus as macro nutrients. The method in this paper is literature review to resulting a new conclusion about the potency of waste water from dairy industry as microalgae cultivation medium. Based on the study, the dairy waste from dairy industry has potency to be used as cultivation medium of Botryococcus braunii in the production of biodiesel, replacing the conventional cultivation medium.

  16. Medium effects on heavy-flavour observables in high-energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, c and b quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavyquark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Finally, the possibility that the formation of a hot deconfined medium even in small systems (high-multiplicity p-Au and d-Au collisions, so far) may affect also heavy-flavour observables is investigated.

  17. Medium effects on heavy-flavour observables in high-energy nuclear collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beraudo Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, c and b quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavyquark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Finally, the possibility that the formation of a hot deconfined medium even in small systems (high-multiplicity p-Au and d-Au collisions, so far may affect also heavy-flavour observables is investigated.

  18. Medium effects on heavy-flavour observables in high-energy nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, $c$ and $b$ quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavy-quark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Finally, the possibility that the formation of a hot deconfined medium even in small systems (high-multiplicity p-Au and d-Au ...

  19. Saturation and Energy Corrections for TeV Electrons and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Clerbaux, Barbara; Mahmoud, Tariq; Marage, Pierre Edouard

    2006-01-01

    This note presents a study of the response of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL to high energy electrons and photons (from 500 to 4000 GeV), using the full simulation of the CMS detector. The longitudinal containment and the lateral extension of high energy showers are discussed, and energy and eta dependent correction factors F(E_meas, eta), where E_meas = E_ECAL + E_HCAL, are determined in order to reconstruct the incident particle energy, using the energies measured in the ECAL and in the hadronic calorimeter HCAL. For ECAL barrel crystals with energy deposit higher than 1700 GeV, improvements are proposed to techniques aimed at correcting for the effects of electronics saturation.

  20. VUV photophysics and dissociative photoionization of pyrimidine, purine, imidazole and benzimidazole in the 7-18 eV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwell, Martin [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA), CNRS-UMR 7583, Universite Paris 7 and 12, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France)], E-mail: schwell@lisa.univ-paris12.fr; Jochims, Hans-Werner; Baumgaertel, Helmut [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie der Freien Universitaet Berlin, Takustr. 3, Berlin 14195 (Germany); Leach, Sydney [Laboratoire d' Etude du Rayonnement et de la Matiere en Astrophysique (LERMA), CNRS-UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 Place Jules-Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)], E-mail: Sydney.Leach@obspm.fr

    2008-11-03

    Photoionization mass spectrometry is used to study ionization processes and fragmentation pathways of four prebiotic species, pyrimidine, purine, imidazole and benzimidazole, in the 7-18 eV photon energy region, with synchrotron radiation as excitation source. These molecules are possible precursors of the nucleic acid bases that occur in DNA and RNA. Ionization energies and ion appearance energies are reported. They are compared with electron impact and other studies and are discussed in terms of the electronic and nuclear structures of these species and their cations. The ion appearance energies, in conjunction with thermochemical data, were used to propose dissociative photoionization pathways, principally involving loss of HCN molecules in each of the four species. Astrophysical implications of the results concern the prospects for observation and survival of these molecules in the interstellar medium, in comets and in meteorites. Suggestions are made concerning suitable sites for radioastronomical searches for these purines and pyrimidines.

  1. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  2. Phoswich detectors with DSP analysis for low-energy, low-activity photon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, S.; Feng, J.; Miller, W.H. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Several new phoswich detector designs coupled with digital pulse shape discrimination systems are under development for a variety of radiological measurements. Herein the authors report on two detectors for measuring small activities (nanocurie amounts) of low photon energy (30 to 150 keV) from either isotopic decay or beta-produced bremsstrahlung radiation. The lower limit of detection (LLD), assuming a 60-s counting time, for a phoswich well detector is 0.7 Bq (0.02 nCi) of gamma activity in the 20- to 100-keV range and 11 Bq (0.3 nCi) and 550 (15 nCi) for gamma rays and beta bremsstrahlung X rays, respectively. It is envisioned that these detectors would be useful for biomedical applications or for other measurements requiring low-level, low-energy photon measurement.

  3. Self-Energy Correction to the Two-Photon Decay Width in Hydrogenlike Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the gauge invariance of the leading logarithmic radiative correction to the two-photon decay width in hydrogenlike atoms. It is shown that an effective treatment of the correction using a Lamb-shift "potential" leads to equivalent results in both the length as well as the velocity gauges provided all relevant correction terms are taken into account. Specifically, the relevant radiative corrections are related to the energies that enter into the propagator denominators, to the Hamiltonian, to the wave functions, and to the energy conservation condition that holds between the two photons; the form of all of these effects is different in the two gauges, but the final result is shown to be gauge invariant, as it should be. Although the actual calculation only involves integrations over nonrelativistic hydrogenic Green functions, the derivation of the leading logarithmic correction can be regarded as slightly more complex than that of other typical logarithmic terms. The dominant radiative correctio...

  4. Relevance of the quark component in prompt photon and electroweak gauge boson production at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). D.V. Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2009-04-15

    In the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach, we study the production of prompt photons and electroweak gauge bosons in high energy proton-(anti)proton collisions at modern colliders. Our consideration is based on the amplitude for the production of a single photon or W{sup {+-}}/Z{sup 0} boson associated with a quark pair in the fusion of two off-shell gluons. The quark component is taken into account separately using the quark-gluon scattering and quark-antiquark annihilation QCD subprocesses. Special attention is put on the contributions from the quarks involved into the earlier steps of the evolution cascade. Using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin formalism, we simulate this component and demonstrate that it plays an important role at both the Tevatron and LHC energies. Our theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D diameter and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron. (orig.)

  5. An Assessment of "What does photon energy tell us about cellphone safety" by Dr. William Bruno

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Bruno asserts the well-known fact that cell phones radiate microwaves in the classical regime. This, he says, means that the photon energy is not relevant to assessing safety. Citing optical tweezers as an example of biologically relevant non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation, Bruno concludes that all other reports of non-thermal effects from microwaves are likely valid. He seeks safety thresholds based upon requiring that cell phone energy density be less than k_BT. This proposal and related ideas produce thresholds many orders of magnitude below present values. While Dr. Bruno is correct that cell phone microwave radiation is generally in the classical regime, he uses peculiar estimates (number of photons per cubic wavelength) that overstate the circumstance by more than 20 factors of ten. He misunderstands the operation of optical tweezers and ignores their significant thermal effects. He credulously accepts poorly supported claims of non-existent non-thermal effects. He mistakenly believes ...

  6. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, C; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Rivera, T; Azorín, J

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same.

  7. A semi empirical formula for the angular differential number albedo of low-energy photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Srpko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy photon reflection from water, aluminum, and iron is simulated by the MCNP code and results are com pared with similar Monte Carlo calculations. For the energy range from 60 to 150 keV and for the normal incidence of initial photons, a universal shape of the normalized angular differential number albedo is observed and after that fitted by the curve fit ting procedure in form of a second order polynomial over the polar angle. Finally, a one-parameter formula for the angular differential number albedo is developed and verified for water through the comparison of results with the semi empirical formulae and Monte Carlo calculations of other authors.

  8. Integrated AlGaAs source of highly indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Autebert, Claire; Martin, Anthony; Lemaître, Aristide; Carbonell, Carmen Gomez; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Zbinden, Hugo; Ducci, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nonclassical states of light in miniature chips is a crucial step towards practical implementations of future quantum technologies. Semiconductor materials are ideal to achieve extremely compact and massively parallel systems and several platforms are currently under development. In this context, spontaneous parametric down conversion in AlGaAs devices combines the advantages of room temperature operation, possibility of electrical injection and emission in the telecom band. Here we report on a chip-based AlGaAs source, producing indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons with a brightness of $7.2\\times10^6$ pairs/s and a signal-to-noise ratio of $141\\pm12$. Indistinguishability between the photons is demonstrated via a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment with a visibility of $89\\pm3\\%$, while energy-time entanglement is tested via a Franson interferometer leading to a value for the Bell parameter $ S=2.70\\pm0.10$.

  9. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in off-shell gluon-gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, S P; Zotov, N P

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude for production of a single photon associated with quark pair in the fusion of two off-shell gluons is calculated. The matrix element found is applied to the inclusive prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the framework of kt-factorization QCD approach. The total and differential cross sections are calculated in both central and forward pseudo-rapidity regions. The conservative error analisys is performed. We used the unintegrated gluon distributions in a proton which were obtained from the full CCFM evolution equation as well as from the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. Theoretical results were compared with recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Theoretical predictions for LHC energies are given.

  10. Photon and proton induced fission on heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-II E.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of fission induced by intermediate energy protons or photons on actinides. The 660 MeV proton induced reactions are on 241Am, 238U, and 237Np targets and the Bremmstrahlung-photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV are on 232Th and 238U targets. The study was performed by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code CRISP. A multimodal fission extension was added to the code within an approach which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and asymmetric fission. This procedure allowed the investigation of fission cross sections, fissility, number of evaporated nucleons and fission-fragment charge distributions. The comparison with experimental data show a good agreement between calculations and experiments.

  11. Synthetic oligomer analysis using atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry at different photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmazières, Bernard [Global Bioenergies, 5 rue Henri Desbruyeres, 91030 Evry (France); Legros, Véronique [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR1008, CEPIA, INRA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Buchmann, William, E-mail: william.buchmann@univ-evry.fr [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoIonization mass spectra of synthetic oligomers were recorded in the negative mode by varying the photon energy using synchrotron radiation. Photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to ionization potential of the solvent (for example 9.4 eV for tetrahydrofuran). -- Highlights: •Atmospheric pressure photoionization was performed using synchrotron radiation. •Photoionization of oligomers in THF with 10% CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} produces intact [M + Cl]{sup −} ions. •The photon energy required corresponds to ionization potential of the solvent. •Polymer distributions depend on source parameters such T °C and applied voltages. •Liquid chromatography was coupled to MS using an APPI interface for polymer analysis. -- Abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) followed by mass spectrometric detection was used to ionize a variety of polymers: polyethylene glycol, polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, and polysiloxane. In most cases, whatever the polymer or the solvent used (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, acetone or toluene), only negative ion mode produced intact ions such as chlorinated adducts, with no or few fragmentations, in contrast to the positive ion mode that frequently led to important in-source fragmentations. In addition, it was shown that optimal detection of polymer distributions require a fine tuning of other source parameters such as temperature and ion transfer voltage. Series of mass spectra were recorded in the negative mode, in various solvents (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, toluene, and acetone), by varying the photon energy from 8 eV up to 10.6 eV using synchrotron radiation. To these solvents, addition of a classical APPI dopant (toluene or acetone) was not necessary. Courtesy of the synchrotron radiation, it was demonstrated that the photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to the

  12. Interfacial free energy and medium range order: Proof of an inverse of Frank's hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geun Woo; Cho, Yong Chan; Lee, Byeongchan; Kelton, Kenneth F.

    2017-02-01

    We study the relation of crystal-liquid interfacial free energy and medium range order in the quasicrystal-forming T i37Z r42N i21 liquid from undercooling experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Adding a small amount of Ag to the liquid significantly reduces the degree of undercooling, which is suggestive of small interfacial free energy, and thus very similar atomic configuration between the liquid and the icosahedral quasicrystal phases. Using ab initio MD study, we find that Ag atoms predominantly form a bond with Zr atoms in the short range and, further, Ag-Zr pairs are extended in the liquid, as a medium range order which is identical to the global structural feature reported recently [Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155501 (2010)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.155501. This result may expect extremely small undercooling if the icosahedral medium range order exists in a liquid forming an icosahedral quasicrystal, which implies the ambiguity of clear distinction of heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation.

  13. Latest ALICE results of photon and jet measurements arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Haake, Rüdiger

    Highly energetic jets and photons are complementary probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are collimated sprays of charged and neutral particles, which are produced in the fragmentation of hard scattered partons in an early stage of the collision. While traversing the medium formed in nuclear collisions, they lose energy and therefore carry information about the interaction of partons with the medium. The jet substructure is particularly interesting to learn about in-medium modification of the jets and several observables exists to probe it. In contrast to jets, photons are created in all collision stages. There are prompt photons from the initial collision, thermal photons produced in the medium, and decay- and fragmentation photons from later collision stages. Photons escape the medium essentially unaffected after their creation. This article presents recent ALICE results on jet substructure and direct photon measurements in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  14. Dependence of the photochromic transformation of TiO{sub x}- and ZrO{sub x}-embedded Ag nanoparticles on the photon energy of the irradiating light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Hendrik; Sprafke, Alexander; Hallermann, Florian; Becker, Nils; Wuttig, Matthias; Plessen, Gero von [Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Meixner, Melanie

    2011-07-01

    Photochromic materials change their color under irradiation with light. Uniform TiO{sub x}- and ZrO{sub x}-embedded Ag nanoparticles with photochromic properties can be fabricated through a combination of nanosphere lithography and electron-beam evaporation. In comparison to the dc-sputter deposition technique as employed in our previous work, the good reproducibility of this approach and the less inhomogeneously broadened plasmon line of the resulting samples allow us to analyze the photochromic transformation in a more quantitative way. In this work, we investigate the dependence of the photochromic transformation of TiO{sub x}- and ZrO{sub x}-embedded Ag nanoparticles prepared by nanosphere lithography on the photon energy of the irradiating light. We find a photon energy below which no photochromism is observed, almost independently of the embedding medium. Furthermore, the photochromic effect increases with increasing photon energy.

  15. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics'— NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix— were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10

  16. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  17. Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

    2000-03-02

    Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 {micro}m slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} were achieved.

  18. Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

  19. On the rotational energy distributions of reactive, non-polar species in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Glinski, Robert J; Downum, Clark R

    2013-01-01

    A basic model for the formation of non-equilibrium rotational energy distributions is described for reactive, homo-polar diatomic molecules and ions in the interstellar medium. Kinetic models were constructed to calculate the rotational populations of C2+ under the conditions it would experience in the diffuse interstellar medium. As the non-polar ion reacts with molecular hydrogen, but not atomic hydrogen, the thermalization of a hot nascent rotational population will be arrested by chemical reaction when the H2 density begins to be significant. Populations that deviate strongly from the local thermodynamic equilibrium are predicted for C2+ in environments where it may be detectable. Consequences of this are discussed and a new optical spectrum is calculated.

  20. The Escape of High-Energy Photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE have also been seen at much higher energies by EGRET, six at energies above 10 MeV. Such observations imply that these bursts are optically thin to photon-photon pair production at all observed energies. For bursts more than about 30pc away, internal transparency can be achieved only if the source is moving with a relativistic bulk Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\gg 1$, or if the radiation is highly beamed. Early calculations of $\\gamma\\gamma\\to e^+e^-$ considerations for GRBs were limited to cases of a beam with opening half-angle $\\Thetab\\sim 1/\\Gamma$, or expansions of infinitely thin spherical shells. This paper presents our extension of pair production optical depth calculations in relativistically expanding sources to more general geometries, including shells of finite thickness and arbitrary opening angle. The problem is reduced analytically to a single integral in the broadly applicable case of observing photons along the axis of the expansion. We find th...

  1. Photon Upconversion and Molecular Solar Energy Storage by Maximizing the Potential of Molecular Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimizuka, Nobuo; Yanai, Nobuhiro; Morikawa, Masa-Aki

    2016-11-29

    The self-assembly of functional molecules into ordered molecular assemblies and the fulfillment of potentials unique to their nanotomesoscopic structures have been one of the central challenges in chemistry. This Feature Article provides an overview of recent progress in the field of molecular self-assembly with the focus on the triplet-triplet annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC) and supramolecular storage of photon energy. On the basis of the integration of molecular self-assembly and photon energy harvesting, triplet energy migration-based TTA-UC has been achieved in varied molecular systems. Interestingly, some molecular self-assemblies dispersed in solution or organogels revealed oxygen barrier properties, which allowed TTA-UC even under aerated conditions. The elements of molecular self-assembly were also introduced to the field of molecular solar thermal fuel, where reversible photoliquefaction of ionic crystals to ionic liquids was found to double the molecular storage capacity with the simultaneous pursuit of switching ionic conductivity. A future prospect in terms of innovating molecular self-assembly toward molecular systems chemistry is also discussed.

  2. Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a nanowire solar cell with photon-harvesting shells is presented. In this architecture, organic molecules which absorb strongly in the near infrared where silicon absorbs weakly are coupled to silicon nanowires (SiNWs). This enables an array of 7-μm -long nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm to absorb over 85% of the photons above the bandgap of silicon. The organic molecules are bonded to the surface of the SiNWs forming a thin shell. They absorb the low-energy photons and subsequently transfer the energy to the SiNWs via Förster resonant energy transfer, creating free electrons and holes within the SiNWs. The carriers are then separated at a radial p-n junction in a nanowire and extracted at the respective electrodes. The shortness of the nanowires is expected to lower the dark current due to the decrease in p-n junction surface area, which scales linearly with wire length. The theoretical power conversion efficiency is 15%. To demonstrate this concept, we measure a 60% increase in photocurrent from a planar silicon-on-insulator diode when a 5 nm layer of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′ -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene is applied to the surface of the silicon. This increase is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Energy-Efficient Reservation-Based Medium Access Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohvakka Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, a robust and energy-efficient Medium Access Control (MAC protocol is required for high energy efficiency in harsh operating conditions, where node and link failures are common. This paper presents the design of a novel MAC protocol for low-power WSNs. The developed MAC protocol minimizes the energy overhead of idle time and collisions by strict frame synchronization and slot reservation. It combines a dynamic bandwidth adjustment mechanism, multi-cluster-tree network topology, and a network channel allowing rapid and low-energy neighbor discoveries. The protocol achieves high scalability by employing frequency and time division between clusters. Performance analysis shows that the MAC protocol outperforms current state-of-the-art protocols in energy efficiency, and the energy overhead compared to an ideal MAC protocol is only 2.85% to 27.1%. The high energy efficiency is achieved in both leaf and router nodes. The models and the feasibility of the protocol were verified by simulations and with a full-scale prototype implementation.

  4. Energy conserved and costs saved by small and medium-size manufacturers, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, F.W.

    1991-05-01

    Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers (EADCs) provided energy-conserving and cost saving assistance in 339 small and medium-size manufacturing plants nationwide during 1988-89. This report presents the results of what was recommended to those manufacturers, the record of what was implemented by them, and an analysis of the financial rewards gained by them. It also includes an accounting of the financial returns to the federal government, derived from taxes upon the cost savings, or incremental income, of the manufacturers who implement the EADCs` recommendations. EADCs collect implementation data within a year of the energy audit, and for these results that time period extended through 1990. The EADCs are located at accredited engineering departments of universities and staffed by faculty and students. At present there are 18 EADCs serving manufacturers in 37 states; of these, two were established as a result of the 1989 competition, and five more were chosen competitively in 1990. Most of the results in this report were generated by 11 EADCs (named in the Appendix); two others withdrew voluntarily after completing only 10 energy audits during 1988-89. Primary responsibility for selecting, training, evaluating, and managing the EADCs belongs to the Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center (UCSC). The Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies sponsors the EADC program through an agreement with UCSC.

  5. Design of an Energy Monitoring System for a Medium-Scale Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Irmak

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, energy monitoring system of a medium scale industrial plant is achieved through a computer interface both in real time and retrospective using recent data. In order to measure the energy, a measurement card is designed to convert the voltage and current signals in suitable levels for a programmable logic controller (PLC. Current and voltage signals received from the measurement card are sensed by the analogue channels of the PLC. A zero-crossing detector is also designed to measure the power factor of the system. Time difference between the signals which are obtained from the zero-crossing detector is measured by using FM 350-01 counter module. All data received are transferred into a database located at the host computer by the PLC using RS485/RS232 communication protocol. Data obtained from the system can be monitored momentarily through an interface that is designed in C# programming language. Furthermore, retrospective energy analysis of the system is made possible by saving the data obtained continuously. Thus, active, reactive and apparent power values can be observed for a specific time interval. By using the retrospective energy analysis system, time periods in which the energy is more consumed can be determined. Thanks to this feature, work load of the plant can be programmed to specific times when the energy is cheaper in order to reduce the energy costs.

  6. Barriers to energy efficiency improvement. Empirical evidence from small-and-medium-sized enterprises in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostka, Genia; Moslener, Ulf; Andreas, Jan G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper analyzes barriers for energy efficiency investments for small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in China. Based on a survey of 480 SMEs in Zhejiang Province, this study assesses financial, informational, and organizational barriers for energy efficiency investments in the SME sector. The conventional view has been that the lack of appropriate financing mechanisms particularly hinders SMEs to adopt cost-effective energy efficiency measures. As such, closing the financing gap for SMEs is seen as a prerequisite in order to promote energy efficiency in the sector. The econometric estimates of this study, however, suggest that access to information is an important determinant of investment outcomes, while this is less clear with respect to financial and organizational factors. More than 40 percent of enterprises in the sample declared that that they are not aware of energy saving equipments or practices in their respective business area, indicating that there are high transaction costs for SMEs to gather, assess, and apply information about energy saving potentials and relevant technologies. One implication is that the Chinese government may assume an active role in fostering the dissemination of energy-efficiency related information in the SME sector. (orig.)

  7. The High Energy Neutrino Nuisance at a Medium Baseline Reactor Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

    2012-01-01

    10 years from now medium baseline reactor experiments will attempt to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the differences (RL+PV) between the extrema of the Fourier transformed neutrino spectra. Recently Qian et al. have claimed that this goal may be impeded by the strong dependence of the difference parameter RL+PV on the reactor neutrino flux and on slight variations of Delta M^2_32. We demonstrate that this effect results from a spurious dependence of the difference parameter on the very high energy (8+ MeV) tail of the reactor neutrino spectrum. This dependence is spurious because the high energy tail depends upon decays of exotic isotopes and is insensitive to the mass hierarchy. An energy-dependent weight in the Fourier transform not only eliminates this spurious dependence but in fact increases the chance of correctly determining the hierarchy.

  8. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  9. Probability distribution of the free energy of a directed polymer in a random medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2000-06-01

    We calculate exactly the first cumulants of the free energy of a directed polymer in a random medium for the geometry of a cylinder. By using the fact that the nth moment of the partition function is given by the ground-state energy of a quantum problem of n interacting particles on a ring of length L, we write an integral equation allowing to expand these moments in powers of the strength of the disorder γ or in powers of n. For n small and n~(Lγ)-1/2, the moments take a scaling form which allows us to describe all the fluctuations of order 1/L of the free energy per unit length of the directed polymer. The distribution of these fluctuations is the same as the one found recently in the asymmetric exclusion process, indicating that it is characteristic of all the systems described by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation in 1+1 dimensions.

  10. MCNP6 simulation of light and medium nuclei fragmentation at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashnik Stepan G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC, followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  11. A Time Tree Medium Access Control for Energy Efficiency and Collision Avoidance in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilhung Lee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a medium access control and scheduling scheme for wireless sensor networks. It uses time trees for sending data from the sensor node to the base station. For an energy efficient operation of the sensor networks in a distributed manner, time trees are built in order to reduce the collision probability and to minimize the total energy required to send data to the base station. A time tree is a data gathering tree where the base station is the root and each sensor node is either a relaying or a leaf node of the tree. Each tree operates in a different time schedule with possibly different activation rates. Through the simulation, the proposed scheme that uses time trees shows better characteristics toward burst traffic than the previous energy and data arrival rate scheme.

  12. A Time Tree Medium Access Control for Energy Efficiency and Collision Avoidance in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilhung

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a medium access control and scheduling scheme for wireless sensor networks. It uses time trees for sending data from the sensor node to the base station. For an energy efficient operation of the sensor networks in a distributed manner, time trees are built in order to reduce the collision probability and to minimize the total energy required to send data to the base station. A time tree is a data gathering tree where the base station is the root and each sensor node is either a relaying or a leaf node of the tree. Each tree operates in a different time schedule with possibly different activation rates. Through the simulation, the proposed scheme that uses time trees shows better characteristics toward burst traffic than the previous energy and data arrival rate scheme. PMID:22319270

  13. MCNP6 simulation of light and medium nuclei fragmentation at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes

  14. A time tree medium access control for energy efficiency and collision avoidance in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilhung

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a medium access control and scheduling scheme for wireless sensor networks. It uses time trees for sending data from the sensor node to the base station. For an energy efficient operation of the sensor networks in a distributed manner, time trees are built in order to reduce the collision probability and to minimize the total energy required to send data to the base station. A time tree is a data gathering tree where the base station is the root and each sensor node is either a relaying or a leaf node of the tree. Each tree operates in a different time schedule with possibly different activation rates. Through the simulation, the proposed scheme that uses time trees shows better characteristics toward burst traffic than the previous energy and data arrival rate scheme.

  15. MCNP6 simulation of light and medium nuclei fragmentation at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Kerby, Leslie M.

    2016-05-01

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  16. Production of Forward Rapidity Photons in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Jalilian-Marian, J

    2005-01-01

    We consider production of prompt photons in high energy gold-gold and deuteron-gold collisions in the forward rapidity region of RHIC ($y \\sim 3.8$). In this kinematics, the projectile partons typically have large $x_{bj}$ while the target partons are mostly at very small $x_{bj}$ so that the primary partonic collisions involve valence quarks from the projectile and gluons from the target. We take the target nucleus to be a Color Glass Condensate while the projectile deuteron or nucleus is treated as a dilute system of partons. We show that the photon production cross section can be written as a convolution of a quark-nucleus scattering cross section, involving a quark anti-quark dipole, with the Leading Order quark-photon fragmentation function. We consider different models of the quark anti-quark dipole and show that measurement of photons in the forward rapidity region at RHIC can distinguish between different parameterizations of the dipole cross section as well as help clarify the role of parton coalesce...

  17. Three-photon-annihilation contributions to positronium energies at order $m \\alpha^7$

    CERN Document Server

    Adkins, Gregory S; Parsons, Christian; Fell, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Positronium spectroscopy (n=1 hyperfine splitting, n=2 fine structure, and the 1S-2S interval) has reached a precision of order 1 MHz. Vigorous ongoing efforts to improve the experimental results motivate the calculation of the positronium energy levels at order $m \\alpha^7$. In this work we present the result for a complete class of such contributions--those involving virtual annihilation of positronium to three photons in an intermediate state. We find an energy shift of $2.6216(11) m \\alpha^7/(n \\pi)^3$ for the spin-triplet S state with principal quantum number n.

  18. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldman, Terry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  19. Associated photon and heavy quark production at high energy within k_T-factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, N P; Malyshev, M A

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the k_T-factorization approach, the production of prompt photons in association with a heavy (charm or beauty) quarks at high energies is studied. The consideration is based on the O(\\alpha \\alpha_s^2) off-shell amplitudes of gluon-gluon fusion and quark-(anti)quark interaction subprocesses. The unintegrated parton densities in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. Our numerical predictions are compared with the D0 and CDF experimental data. Also we extend our results to LHC energies.

  20. Nuclear physics with a medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Accardi, V. Guzey, A. Prokudin, C. Weiss

    2012-06-01

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with variable center-of-mass energy {radical}s {approx} 20-70 GeV and a luminosity {approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei: (i) the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon in QCD (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, correlations); (ii) the fundamental color fields in nuclei (nuclear parton densities, shadowing, coherence effects, color transparency); (iii) the conversion of color charge to hadrons (fragmentation, parton propagation through matter, in-medium jets). We briefly review the conceptual aspects of these questions and the measurements that would address them, emphasizing the qualitatively new information that could be obtained with the collider. Such a medium-energy EIC could be realized at Jefferson Lab after the 12 GeV Upgrade (MEIC), or at Brookhaven National Lab as the low-energy stage of eRHIC.

  1. In-medium effects for nuclear matter in the Fermi energy domain

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, O; Lehaut, G; Borderie, B; Rivet, M F; Bougault, R; Galichet, E; Guinet, D; Neindre, N Le; Marini, P; Napolitani, P; Pârlog, M; Rosato, E; Spadaccini, G; Vient, E; Vigilante, M

    2014-01-01

    We study nuclear stopping in central collisions for heavy-ion induced reactions in the Fermi energy domain, between $15$ and $100$ A\\,\\textrm{MeV}. Using the large dataset of exclusive measurements provided by the $4\\pi$ array \\emph{INDRA}, we determine the relative degree of stopping as a function of system mass and bombarding energy. We show that the stopping can be directly related to the transport properties in the nuclear medium. By looking specifically at free nucleons (here protons), we present for the first time a comprehensive body of experimental results concerning the mean free path, the nucleon-nucleon cross-section and in-medium effects in nuclear matter. It is shown that the mean free path exhibits a maximum at $\\lambda_{NN}=9.5 \\pm 2$ \\textrm{fm}, around $E_{inc}=35-40$ A\\,\\textrm{MeV} incident energy and decreases toward an asymptotic value $\\lambda_{NN}= 4.5 \\pm 1$ \\textrm{fm} at $E_{inc} = 100$ A\\,\\textrm{MeV}. After accounting for Pauli blocking of elastic nucleon-nucleon collisions, it is ...

  2. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki, E-mail: t-nishi@hosei.ac.jp

    2016-03-15

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of {sup 16}O({sup 4}He, {sup 4}He){sup 16}O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  3. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki

    2016-03-01

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of 16O(4He, 4He)16O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  4. Investigation of the (p,pd) reaction in /sup 14/N with medium-energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Golovin, A.V.; Loshchakov, I.I.

    1987-06-01

    Reaction /sup 14/N(p,pd)/sup 12/C with medium-energy protons is studied on the basis of data obtained in coplanar experiments and in a complete-geometry emulsion experiment. The theoretical analysis is performed in the distorted-wave effective t-matrix approximation which takes into account coherently the direct and two-step processes (inelastic scattering and pickup in the first step). The effective t matrix of pd elastic scattering is constructed. The results calculated for the /sup 14/N(p,pd)/sup 12/C reaction are in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Medium energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, R. Y.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells irradiated by medium energy 2, 5, and 10 MeV protons was evaluated. The Si cells without coverglass and a number of GaAs solar cells with 12 mil coverglass were irradiated simultaneously with bare GaAs cells. The cell degradation is directly related to the penetration of depth of protons with GaAs. The influence of periodic and continuous thermal annealing on the GaAs solar cells was investigated.

  6. The in-medium isovector pi N amplitude from low energy pion scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Breitschopf, J; Clement, H; Denz, H; Doroshkevich, E; Erhardt, A; Hofman, G J; Meier, R; Wagner, G J; Yaari, G

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 21.5 MeV positive and negative pions by Si, Ca, Ni and Zr have been measured as part of a study of the pion-nucleus potential across threshold. The `anomalous' repulsion in the s-wave term was observed, as is the case with pionic atoms. The extra repulsion can be accounted for by a chiral-motivated model where the pion decay constant is modified in the medium. Unlike in pionic atoms, the anomaly cannot be removed by merely introducing an empirical on-shell energy dependence.

  7. In-medium isovector piN amplitude from low-energy pion scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E; Bauer, M; Breitschopf, J; Clement, H; Denz, H; Doroshkevich, E; Erhardt, A; Hofman, G J; Meier, R; Wagner, G J; Yaari, G

    2004-09-17

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 21.5 MeV positive and negative pions by Si, Ca, Ni, and Zr have been measured as part of a study of the pion-nucleus potential across the threshold. The "anomalous" repulsion in the s-wave term was observed, as is the case with pionic atoms. The extra repulsion can be accounted for by a chiral-motivated model where the pion decay constant is modified in the medium. Unlike in pionic atoms, the anomaly cannot be removed by merely introducing an empirical on-shell energy dependence.

  8. The Local Bubble in the interstellar medium and the origin of the low energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D; Wolfendale, A W

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of the energy spectra of cosmic rays and particularly the precise data from the AMS-02 experiment support the view about the important role of the Local Bubble in the nearby interstellar medium. It is suggested that the bulk of cosmic rays below about 200 GV of rigidity (momentum/charge ratio) comes from the modest number of supernova remnants in the Local Bubble which appear to have occurred some $10^6$ years ago and contributed to its formation. At higher rigidities the contribution from a 'Local Source', a single supernova remnant generated some $10^5$ years ago seems to dominate up to, at least 1000 GV.

  9. In-Medium Isovector πN Amplitude from Low-Energy Pion Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Bauer, M.; Breitschopf, J.; Clement, H.; Denz, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Erhardt, A.; Hofman, G. J.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Yaari, G.

    2004-09-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 21.5MeV positive and negative pions by Si, Ca, Ni, and Zr have been measured as part of a study of the pion-nucleus potential across the threshold. The “anomalous” repulsion in the s-wave term was observed, as is the case with pionic atoms. The extra repulsion can be accounted for by a chiral-motivated model where the pion decay constant is modified in the medium. Unlike in pionic atoms, the anomaly cannot be removed by merely introducing an empirical on-shell energy dependence.

  10. Coherent Pair Production by Photons in the 20-170 GeV Energy Range Incident on Crystals and Birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A; Badelek, B; Ballestrero, S; Biino, C; Birol, I; Cenci, P; Connell, S H; Eichblatt, S; Fonseca, T; Freund, A; Gorini, B; Groess, R; Ispirian, K; Ketel, T; Kononets, Yu V; López, A; Mangiarotti, A; Sellschop, J P Friedel; Shieh, M; Sona, P; Strakhovenko, V M; Uggerhøj, Erik; Uggerhøj, U; Van Rens, B; Velasco, M; Vilakazi, Z Z; Wessely, O; Ünel, G; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2003-01-01

    The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germanium crystals. The theoretical description of coherent bremsstrahlung and coherent pair production phenomena is an area of active theoretical debate and development. However, under our experimental conditions, the theory predicted the combined cross section and polarisation experimental observables very well indeed. In macroscopic terms, our experiment measured a birefringence effect in pair production in a crystal. This study of this effect also constituted a measurement of the energy dependent linear polarisation of photons produced by coherent bremsstrahlung in aligned crystals. New technologies for manipulating high energy photon beams can be realised based on an improved understanding of QED phenomena at these energies. In particular, this experiment demonstrates an efficient new polarimetry technique. The pair product...

  11. Measurement of the reaction gamma p --> K0 Sigma+ at photon energies up to 2.6 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lawall, R; Bennhold, C; Glander, K H; Goers, S; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Mart, T; Menze, D; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wieland, F W; Wu, C

    2005-01-01

    The reaction gamma p --> K0 Sigma+ was measured in the photon energy range from threshold up to 2.6 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at the electron stretcher facility, ELSA, in Bonn. Results are presented on the reaction cross section and the polarization of the Sigma+ as a function of the kaon production angle in the centre-of-mass system, cos(Theta_K^{c.m.}), and the photon energy. The cross section is lower and varies less with photon energy and kaon production angle than that of gamma p --> K+ Sigma0. The Sigma+ is polarized predominantly at cos(Theta_K^{c.m.}) \\approx 0. The data presented here are more precise than previous ones obtained with SAPHIR and extend the photon energy range to higher values. They are compared to isobar model calculations.

  12. Neutron-deuteron system and the photon polarization parameter at thermal neutron energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, H.

    2007-04-01

    Effective field theory (EFT) is the unique, model independent and systematic low-energy version of QCD for processes involving momenta below the pion mass. A low-energy photonuclear observable in three-body systems, photon polarization parameter at thermal neutron energies is calculated by using pionless EFT up to next-to-next to leading order (NLO2). In order to make a comparative study of this model, we compared our results for photon polarization parameter with the realistic Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana IX or Tucson-Melbourne three-nucleon interactions. Three-body currents give small but significant contributions to some of the observables in the neutron-deuteron radiative capture cross section at thermal neutron energies. In this formalism the three-nucleon forces are needed up to NLO2 for cut-off independent results. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent at this order.

  13. Neutron-Deuteron System and Photon Polarization Parameter at Thermal Neutron Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghi, H

    2007-01-01

    Effective Field Theory(EFT) is, the unique, model independent and systematic low-energy version of QCD for processes involving momenta below the pion mass. A low-energy photo-nuclear observable in three-body systems, photon polarization parameter at thermal neutron energies is calculated by using pionless EFT up to next-to-next to leading order(N$^2$LO). In order to make a comparative study of this model, we compared our results for photon polarization parameter with the realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Urbana IX or Tucson-Melbourne three-nucleon interactions. Three-body currents give small but significant contributions to some of the observables in the neutron-deuteron radiative capture cross section at thermal neutron energies. In this formalism the three-nucleon forces are needed up to N$^2$LO for cut-off independent results. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent at this order.

  14. New measurement on photon yields from air and the application to the energy estimation of primary cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Nagano, M; Sakaki, N; Ando, K

    2004-01-01

    The air fluorescence technique is used to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), and to estimate their energy. Of fundamental importance is the photon yield due to excitation by electrons, in air of various densities and temperatures. After our previous report, the experiment has been continued using a Sr90 $\\beta$ source to study the pressure dependence of photon yields for radiation in nitrogen and dry air. The photon yields in 15 wave bands between 300 nm and 430 nm have been determined. The total photon yield between 300 nm and 406 nm (used in most experiments) in air excited by a 0.85 MeV electron is 3.81+-0.13 (+-13 % systematics) photons per meter at 1013 hPa and 20 $^{\\circ}$C. The air density and temperature dependencies of 15 wave bands are given for application to UHECR observations.

  15. Energy conservation by means of a closed hybrid medium cooler; Gesloten hybride mediumkoeler spaart veel energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, H.T. [Heat Transfer Holland, Zuidwolde (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    Closed hybrid cooling systems that are integrated into the overall system can, by evaporation of water reduce the condensation temperature and undercooling of the refrigerant. This results in a significant energy saving because of recycled compressor capacity and a reduction of CO2 emissions from the electric power plant. [Dutch] Gesloten hybride koelsystemen die zijn geintegreerd in de totale installatie zorgen door verdamping van water voor een verlaging van de condensatietemperatuur en onderkoeling van de koudemiddelvloeistof. Daardoor ontstaat een aanmerkelijke energiebesparing van her opgenomen compressorvermogen en een reductie van CO2-emissie bij de elektriciteitscentrale.

  16. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-01-01

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red–green–blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications. PMID:28374801

  17. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginov, Andrey Borisovich [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation. Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton (ℓ, either e or μ) and photon (γ), accompanied by missing transverse energy (ET), and/or additional leptons and photons, and jets (X). We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb-1, a p$\\bar{p}$ collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 ℓγET events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 ± 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 ± 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7 σ effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of ℓℓγ + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 ± 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or ET and so find no events like the one eeγγ ET event observed in Run I.

  18. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-04-04

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red-green-blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications.

  19. EleCa: A Monte Carlo code for the propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settimo, Mariangela [University of Siegen (Germany); De Domenico, Manlio [Laboratory of Complex Systems, Scuola Superiore di Catania and INFN (Italy); Lyberis, Haris [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Ultra high energy photons, above 10{sup 17}–10{sup 18}eV, can interact with the extragalactic background radiation leading to the development of electromagnetic cascades. A Monte Carlo code to simulate the electromagnetic cascades initiated by high-energy photons and electrons is presented. Results from simulations and their impact on the predicted flux at Earth are discussed in different astrophysical scenarios.

  20. ESRF-type lattice design and optimization for the High Energy Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Jiao, Yi; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2016-02-01

    A new generation of storage ring-based light sources, called diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), with emittance approaching the diffraction limit for multi-keV photons by means of multi-bend achromat lattices, has attracted extensive studies worldwide. Among various DLSR proposals, the hybrid multi-bend achromat concept developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) predicts an effective way of minimizing the emittance while keeping the required chromatic sextupole strengths to an achievable level. For the High Energy Photon Source planned to be built in Beijing, an ESRF-type lattice design consisting of 48 hybrid seven-bend achromats is proposed to reach emittance as low as 60 pm·rad with a circumference of about 1296 m. Sufficient dynamic aperture, allowing vertical on-axis injection, and moderate momentum acceptance are achieved simultaneously for a promising ring performance. Supported by NSFC (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (2015009)

  1. Multifunctional Photonic Molecular Logic Gate Based On A Biphotochromic Dyad With Reduced Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyka, Mikhail F; Li, Vitalii M

    2017-01-18

    Using molecular logic gates (MLGs) for information processing attracts attention due to perspectives of creating molecular computers. Biphotochromic dyads are suitable models of photonic MLGs. However, they suffer from one weakness: the activity of one of the photochromes is often quenched because of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Herein, we designed a dyad with reduced FRET, in which both photochromes keep their photoactivity thanks to spectral and spatial separation, allowing MLG switching between different states. This novel dyad reproduces the functionality of the full set of 16 two-input gates, as well a reversible gate-dual inverter, all gates are photonic. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dosimetric aspects of the therapeutic photon beams from a dual-energy linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghazi, M.S.A.L.; Arjune, B.; Fiedler, J.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    1988-03-01

    Parameters of the photon beams (6 and 20 MV) from a dual-energy linear accelerator (Mevatron-KD, Siemens Medical Laboratories, CA) are presented. The depth dose characteristics of the photon beams are d/sub max/ of 1.8 and 3.8 cm and percentage depth dose of 68% and 80% at 10-cm depth and 100-cm source--surface distance for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ for 6 and 20 MV, respectively. The 6 and 20 MV beams were found to correspond to nominal accelerating potentials of 4.7 and 17 MV, respectively. The stability of output is within +- 1% and flatness and symmetry are within +- 3%. These figures compare favorably with the manufacturer's specifications.

  3. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O'Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic-photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided.

  4. Photon Scattering from the Stable Even-Mass Mo Isotopes Below the Neutron-Separation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C.; Hammond, S.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Wagner, A.

    2008-10-01

    We present results from photon-scattering experiments on the stable even-mass molybdenum isotopes below the neutron-separation energy carried out with bremsstrahlung at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE at the Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf in Germany, and with monoenergetic photon beams at the HIγS facility at TUNL. We applied statistical methods in order to correct for the branching and cascade transitions and to determine the photoabsorption cross section. The obtained results allowed us to extend the tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance below the (,) threshold down to 4 MeV. The photoabsorption cross sections deduced from the present experiments show that the dipole strength increases with the neutron number of the Mo isotopes. The experimental results are discussed in the frame of Quasiparticle-Random-Phase-Approximation in a deformed basis which describe the increasing strength as a result of the deformation.

  5. Attosecond pulses at kiloelectronvolt photon energies from high-order harmonic generation with core electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian; Ullrich, Joachim; Keitel, Christoph H; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z

    2013-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in simultaneous intense near-infrared (NIR) laser light and brilliant x rays above an inner-shell absorption edge is examined. A tightly bound inner-shell electron is transferred into the continuum. Then, NIR light takes over and drives the liberated electron through the continuum until it eventually returns to the cation leading in some cases to recombination and emission of a high-harmonic photon that is upshifted by the x-ray photon energy. We develop a theory of this scenario and apply it to 1s electrons of neon atoms. The boosted high-harmonic light is used to generate a single attosecond pulse in the kiloelectronvolt regime. Prospects for nonlinear x-ray physics and HHG-based spectroscopy involving core orbitals are discussed.

  6. PEPX-type lattice design and optimization for the High Energy Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of storage ring-based light source, called diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR), with the emittance approaching the diffraction limit for multi-keV photons by using the multi-bend achromat lattice, has attracted worldwide and extensive studies of several laboratories, and been seriously considered as a goal of upgrading the existing facilities in the imminent future. Among various DLSR proposals, the PEPX design based on the third-order achromat concept and with the special design of a high-beta injection straight section demonstrated that, it is feasible to achieve sufficient ring acceptance for off-axis injection in a DLSR. For the High Energy Photon Source planned to be built in Beijing, PEPX-type lattice has been designed and continuously improved. In this paper, we report the evolution of the PEPX-type design, and discuss the main issues relevant to the linear optics design and nonlinear optimization.

  7. Off-Shell Longitudinal Photon Light-Cone Wavefunction in the Low-Energy Effective Theory of QCD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Kai; LIU Jue-Ping; YU Ran

    2006-01-01

    @@ Within the framework of the low-energy effective theory arising from the instanton vacuum model of QCD, thelongitudinal virtual photon light-cone wavefunction, φγ‖ (u, P2), corresponding to the nonlocal quark-antiquarkvector current is calculated at the low-energy scale. The coupling constant, Fγ(P2) or equivalently fγ(P2), ofthe quark-antiquark vector current to the virtual photon state is also obtained by imposing the normalizationcondition to the photon wavefunction. The behaviour of the coupling constant as well as the obtained photonwavefunction is discussed.

  8. Positronium energy levels at order $m \\alpha^7$: light-by-light scattering in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    CERN Document Server

    Adkins, Gregory S; Salinger, M D; Wang, Ruihan; Fell, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    Recent and ongoing experimental work on the positronium spectrum motivates new efforts to calculate positronium energy levels at the level of three loop corrections. We have obtained results for one set of such corrections involving light-by-light scattering of the photons produced in a two-photon virtual annihilation process. Our result is an energy shift $1.58377(8) m \\alpha^7/\\pi^3$ for the n=1 singlet state, correcting the ground state hyperfine splitting by -6.95 kHz. We also obtained a new and more precise result for the light-by-light scattering correction to the real decay of parapositronium into two photons.

  9. Energy conservation of small and medium-sized businesses in the Netherlands; MKB houdt niet van energiebesparen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, A. [ed.

    2001-05-17

    According to a report of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) in Petten, Netherlands, knowledge and attitudes of small and medium-sized businesses (SME's) with respect to energy conservation should change. Contrary to what SME-representatives believe there are profitable options for them to save energy, to be stimulated by branch organizations for SME's.

  10. X-ray grating interferometry at photon energies over 180 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Yaniz, M., E-mail: maite.ruiz-yaniz@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Koch, F.; Meyer, P.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J. [Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zanette, I. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rack, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Hipp, A. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Plank Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Pfeiffer, F. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 München (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    We report on the implementation and characterization of grating interferometry operating at an x-ray energy of 183 keV. With the possibility to use this technique at high x-ray energies, bigger specimens could be studied in a quantitative way. Also, imaging strongly absorbing specimens will benefit from the advantages of the phase and dark-field signals provided by grating interferometry. However, especially at these high photon energies the performance of the absorption grating becomes a key point on the quality of the system, because the grating lines need to keep their small width of a couple of micrometers and exhibit a greater height of hundreds of micrometers. The performance of high aspect ratio absorption gratings fabricated with different techniques is discussed. Further, a dark-field image of an alkaline multicell battery highlights the potential of high energy x-ray grating based imaging.

  11. The local energy production rates of GRB photons and of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    In a recent analysis it was found that the local (z=0) rate at which gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce energy in 1 MeV photons, Q_GRB(z=0), is 300 times lower than the local energy production rate in ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. This may appear to be in contradiction with earlier results, according to which Q_GRB(z=0) is similar to the local energy production rate in >10^{19} eV cosmic-rays, Q_{10EeV}(z=0). This short (1 page) note identifies the origin of the apparent discrepancy and shows that Q_GRB(z=0) Q_{10EeV}(z=0) holds.

  12. Energy response of an aluminium oxide detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams: an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyingi, Ephraim O; Mobit, Paul N; Sandison, George A

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the energy response of an aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams relative to (60)Co gamma rays has been performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitive volume of the Al(2)O(3) detector was simulated as a disc of diameter 2.85 mm and thickness 1 mm. The phantom material was water and the irradiation depth chosen was 2.0 cm in kilovoltage photon beams and 5.0 cm in megavoltage photon beams. The results show that the energy response of the Al(2)O(3) detector is constant within 3% for photon beam energies in the energy range of (60)Co gamma rays to 25 MV X rays. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector shows an enhanced energy response for kilovoltage photon beams, which in the case of 50 kV X rays is 3.2 times higher than that for (60)Co gamma rays. There is essentially no difference in the energy responses of LiF and Al(2)O(3) detectors irradiated in megavoltage photon beams when these Al(2)O(3) results are compared with literature data for LiF thermoluminescence detectors. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector has a much higher enhanced response compared with LiF detectors in kilovoltage X-ray beams, more than twice as much for the case of 50 kV X rays.

  13. Charge exchange of medium energy H and He ions emerging from solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsudo, Y.; Shibuya, K.; Nishimura, T.; Hoshino, Y.; Vickridge, I.; Kido, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Charge exchange of medium energy H and He ions emerging from clean solid surfaces is studied extensively using a toroidal electrostatic analyzer with an excellent energy resolution. The charge distributions of He ions scattered from sub-monolayers near a surface are non-equilibrated, resulting in a surface peak even for poly-crystal solids. By solving simultaneous rate equations numerically, we derive electron capture and loss cross sections for Ni and Au surfaces. Based on a free electron gas model, non-equilibrated He+ fractions dependent on emerging angle reveals uniform electronic surfaces for metals and corrugated surfaces for Si and graphite with covalent bonds. It is also found that equilibrium charge fractions of H+ are independent of surface materials (Z2) and in contrast equilibrium He+ fractions depend pronouncedly on Z2. The data obtained are compared with semi-empirical formulas.

  14. MINOS+: a Proposal to FNAL to run MINOS with the medium energy NuMI beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanankos, G.; /Athens U.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; /Brookhaven; Escobar, C.O.; Gomes, R.A.; Gouffon, P.; /Campinas State U. /Goias U. /Sao Paulo U.; Blake, A.; Thomson, M.; /Cambridge U.; Patterson, R.B.; /Caltech; Adamson, P.; Childress, S.; /Fermilab /IIT, Chicago /Los Alamos /Minnesota U. /Minnesota U., Duluth /Bhubaneswar, NISER /Iowa State U.

    2011-05-01

    This is a proposal to continue to expose the two MINOS detectors to the NuMI muon neutrino beam for three years starting in 2013. The medium energy setting of the NuMI beam projected for NO{nu}A will deliver about 18 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target during the first three years of operation. This will allow the MINOS Far Detector to collect more than 10,000 charged current muon neutrino events in the 4-10 GeV energy range and provide a stringent test for non-standard neutrino interactions, sterile neutrinos, extra dimensions, neutrino time-of-flight, and perhaps more. In addition there will be more than 3,000 neutral current events which will be particularly useful in extending the sterile neutrino search range.

  15. Very High Specific Energy, Medium Power Li/CFx Primary Battery for Launchers and Space Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Paul; Godillot, Gerome; Peres, Jean Paul; Corbin, Julien; Espinosa, Amaya

    2014-08-01

    Benchmark with existing technologies shows the advantages of the lithium-fluorinated carbon (Li/CFx) technology for use aboard future launchers in terms of a low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), especially for high energy demanding missions such as re-ignitable upper stages for long GTO+ missions and probes for deep space exploration.This paper presents the new results obtained on this chemistry in terms of electrical and climatic performances, abuse tests and life tests. Studies - co-financed between CNES and Saft - looked at a pure CFx version with a specific energy up to 500 Wh/kg along with a medium power of 80 to 100 W/kg.

  16. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  17. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  18. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  19. Concept study for the next generation medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy mission: MEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbach, Gottfried; Andritschke, Robert; Bloser, Peter F.; Schopper, Florian; Schoenfelder, Volker; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2003-03-01

    A new telescope for Medium Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy, MEGA, is being developed for the energy band 0.4 - 50 MeV as a successor to COMPTEL on CGRO. MEGA aims to improve the sensitivity for astronomical sources by at least an order of magnitude with respect to past instruments and will fill a severe sensitivity gap between already scheduled hard-X-ray and high-energy gamma-ray missions. MEGA records and images gamma rays by completely tracking Compton and pair creation events in a stack of double sided Si-strip track detectors surrounded by a pixelated CsI calorimeter. MEGA will have an effective area of ~100 square cm, a large field of view of ~130 degrees, angular resolution of ~2 degrees, and energy resolution of ~8% (all FWHM at ~2 MeV). Key science objectives for MEGA are the investigation of cosmic high-energy accelerators, nucleosynthesis sites with gamma-ray lines, and the mapping of large-scale structures in the Galaxy and beyond. If operated on a zenith pointing satellite MEGA will be an ideal continuous all-sky monitor for transient sources. This paper describes the development of a small scale prototype and the concept of a space mission for MEGA.

  20. Scalar and vector self-energies of heavy baryons in nuclear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2017-04-01

    The in-medium sum rules are employed to calculate the shifts in the mass and residue as well as the scalar and vector self-energies of the heavy ΛQ ,ΣQ and ΞQ baryons, with Q being b or c quark. The maximum shift in mass due to nuclear matter belongs to the Σc baryon and it is found to be ΔmΣc = - 936 MeV. In the case of residue, it is obtained that the residue of Σb baryon is maximally affected by the nuclear medium with the shift ΔλΣb = - 0.014 GeV3. The scalar and vector self-energies are found to be ΣΛbS = 653 MeV, ΣΣbS = - 614 MeV, ΣΞbS = - 17 MeV, ΣΛcS = 272 MeV, ΣΣcS = - 936 MeV, ΣΞcS = - 5 MeV and ΣΛbν = 436 ± 148 MeV, ΣΣbν = 382 ± 129 MeV, ΣΞbν = 15 ± 5 MeV, ΣΛcν = 151 ± 45 MeV, ΣΣcν = 486 ± 144 MeV and ΣΞcν = 1.391 ± 0.529 MeV.

  1. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Phillips, Thomas J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Broemmelsiek, Daniel R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Brown, Charles N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, David C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Derwent, Paul [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gollwitzer, Keith [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hahn, Alan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stefanski, Ray [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Werkema, Steven [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); White, Herman B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldini, Wander [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Stancari, Giulio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Stancari, Michelle [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Jackson, Gerald P. [Hbar Technologies, Chicago, IL (United States); Kaplan, Daniel M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Torun, Yagmur [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); White, Christopher G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Park, HyangKyu [HyungPook National Univ., DaeGu (Korea, Republic of); Pedlar, Todd K. [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States); Gustafson, H. Richard [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rosen, Jerome [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wayne, Mitchell [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Chakravorty, Alak [St. Xavier Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Dukes, E. Craig [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  2. Search for photons with energies above 1018 eV using the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlín, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zong, Z.

    2017-04-01

    A search for ultra-high energy photons with energies above 1 EeV is performed using nine years of data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory in hybrid operation mode. An unprecedented separation power between photon and hadron primaries is achieved by combining measurements of the longitudinal air-shower development with the particle content at ground measured by the fluorescence and surface detectors, respectively. Only three photon candidates at energies 1-2 EeV are found, which is compatible with the expected hadron-induced background. Upper limits on the integral flux of ultra-high energy photons of 0.027, 0.009, 0.008, 0.008 and 0.007 km-2 sr-1 yr-1 are derived at 95% C.L. for energy thresholds of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 EeV. These limits bound the fractions of photons in the all-particle integral flux below 0.1%, 0.15%, 0.33%, 0.85% and 2.7%. For the first time the photon fraction at EeV energies is constrained at the sub-percent level. The improved limits are below the flux of diffuse photons predicted by some astrophysical scenarios for cosmogenic photon production. The new results rule-out the early top-down models - in which ultra-high energy cosmic rays are produced by, e.g., the decay of super-massive particles - and challenge the most recent super-heavy dark matter models.

  3. Modelling the stellar soft-photon energy density profile of globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Prinsloo, P L; Buesching, I; Kopp, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations by e.g. Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) have revealed globular clusters (GC) to be sources of high-energy (HE) and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. It has been suggested that the presence of large numbers of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) within these clusters may be either directly responsible for these gamma-ray fluxes through emission of pulsed curvature radiation, or indirectly through the injection of relativistic leptons into the cluster. These relativistic particles are plausibly re-accelerated in shocks, created by the collision of stellar winds, before interacting with the soft-photon radiation field set up by the stellar population of the host cluster. Inverse Compton (IC) scattering then produces gamma radiation in the TeV band. In order to calculate the IC spectrum, an accurate profile for the energy density of the soft-photon field is required. We construct such a profile by deriving a radially-dependent expression for the stel...

  4. Indirect Dark Matter Signatures in the Cosmic Dark Ages II. Ionization, Heating and Photon Production from Arbitrary Energy Injections

    CERN Document Server

    Slatyer, Tracy R

    2015-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-alpha photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this note we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the ne...

  5. Energy Level Tuning of Poly(phenylene-alt-dithienobenzothiadiazole)s for Low Photon Energy Loss Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvel, Ruurd; van Franeker, Jacobus J; Janssen, René A J

    2017-03-01

    Six poly(phenylene-alt-dithienobenzothiadiazole)-based polymers have been synthesized for application in polymer-fullerene solar cells. Hydrogen, fluorine, or nitrile substitution on benzo-thiadiazole and alkoxy or ester substitution on the phenylene moiety are investigated to reduce the energy loss per converted photon. Power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 6.6% have been obtained. The best performance is found for the polymer-fullerene combination with distinct phase separation and crystalline domains. This improves the maximum external quantum efficiency for charge formation and collection to 66%. The resulting higher photocurrent compensates for the relatively large energy loss per photon (Eloss = 0.97 eV) in achieving a high PCE. By contrast, the poly-mer that provides a reduced energy loss (Eloss = 0.49 eV) gives a lower photocurrent and a reduced PCE of 1.8% because the external quantum efficiency of 17% is limited by a suboptimal morphology and a reduced driving force for charge transfer.

  6. Relation between lineal energy distribution and relative biological effectiveness for photon beams according to the microdosimetric kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Our cell survival data showed the obvious dependence of RBE on photon energy: The RBE value for 200 kV X-rays was approximately 10% greater than those for mega-voltage photon beams. In radiation therapy using mega-voltage photon beams, the photon energy distribution outside the field is different with that in the radiation field because of a large number of low energy scattering photons. Hence, the RBE values outside the field become greater. To evaluate the increase in RBE, the method of deriving the RBE using the Microdosimetric Kinetic model (MK model) was proposed in this study. The MK model has two kinds of the parameters, tissue-specific parameters and the dose-mean lineal energy derived from the lineal energy distributions measured with a Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC). The lineal energy distributions with the same geometries of the cell irradiations for 200 kV X-rays, (60)Co γ-rays, and 6 MV X-rays were obtained with the TEPC and Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The measured lineal energy distribution for 200 kV X-rays was quite different from those for mega-voltage photon beams. The dose-mean lineal energy of 200 kV X-rays showed the greatest value, 4.51 keV/µm, comparing with 2.34 and 2.36 keV/µm for (60)Co γ-rays and 6 MV X-rays, respectively. By using the results of the TEPC and cell irradiations, the tissue-specific parameters in the MK model were determined. As a result, the RBE of the photon beams (y(D): 2~5 keV/µm) in arbitrary conditions can be derived by the measurements only or the calculations only of the dose-mean lineal energy.

  7. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmoser, M.; Gossiaux, P.-B.; Gousset, T.; Aichelin, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  8. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrmoser, Martin; Gousset, Thierry; Aichelin, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ and the elliptic flow $v_2$, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  9. Amplifying and compressing optical filter based on one-dimensional ternary photonic crystal structure containing gain medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi-Ghaleh, Kazem; Ebrahimpour, Zeinab; Moslemi, Fatemeh

    2015-07-01

    The transmission spectrum properties of the one-dimensional ternary photonic crystal (1DTPC) structure, composed of dielectric (D), metal (M) and gain (G) materials, with three different arrangements of (DGM)N, (GDM)N and (DMG)N, where N is the number of periodicity, were investigated. Two full photonic band gaps and N-1 resonant peaks, localized between them, were observed on transmittance spectra on near-UV spectrum region. When the gained layer was placed in front of the metal, the peaks appeared with higher resolution. There is a peak, localized on the higher band-edge of the first gap, which shows very interesting property than the other peaks. Thus, it amplifies and compresses faster with increase in the N and strength of the gain coefficient. The effects of the gain coefficient and periodicity number are graphically illustrated. This communication presents a PC structure that can be a good candidate to design an amplifying and compressing single or multi-channel optical filter in the UV region.

  10. Energy efficiency model for small/medium geothermal heat pump systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staiger Robert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heating application efficiency is a crucial point for saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Today, EU legal framework conditions clearly define how heating systems should perform, how buildings should be designed in an energy efficient manner and how renewable energy sources should be used. Using heat pumps (HP as an alternative “Renewable Energy System” could be one solution for increasing efficiency, using less energy, reducing the energy dependency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This scientific article will take a closer look at the different efficiency dependencies of such geothermal HP (GHP systems for domestic buildings (small/medium HP. Manufacturers of HP appliances must document the efficiency, so called COP (Coefficient of Performance in the EU under certain standards. In technical datasheets of HP appliances, these COP parameters give a clear indication of the performance quality of a HP device. HP efficiency (COP and the efficiency of a working HP system can vary significantly. For this reason, an annual efficiency statistic named “Seasonal Performance Factor” (SPF has been defined to get an overall efficiency for comparing HP Systems. With this indicator, conclusions can be made from an installation, economy, environmental, performance and a risk point of view. A technical and economic HP model shows the dependence of energy efficiency problems in HP systems. To reduce the complexity of the HP model, only the important factors for efficiency dependencies are used. Dynamic and static situations with HP´s and their efficiency are considered. With the latest data from field tests of HP Systems and the practical experience over the last 10 years, this information will be compared with one of the latest simulation programs with the help of two practical geothermal HP system calculations. With the result of the gathered empirical data, it allows for a better estimate of the HP system efficiency, their

  11. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: application to dual-energy CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F; Li, Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R; Lerma, Fritz A

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z = 2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  12. Impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry of direct photons and free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-Hua; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; SHEN Wen-Qing; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Kun

    2009-01-01

    Hard photon emitted from energetic heavy ion collisions is of very interesting since it does not experience the late-stage nuclear interaction, therefore it is useful to explore the early-stage information of matter phase. In this work, we have calculated the impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry, characterized by directed transverse flow parameter F and elliptic asymmetry coefficient v2, of direct photons and the corresponding free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. It is further shown the anti-correlated azimuthal asymmetry between direct photons and free protons.

  13. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  14. Re-energizing energy supply: Electrolytically-produced hydrogen as a flexible energy storage medium and fuel for road transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, Bernd; Schiebahn, Sebastian; Görner, Klaus; Lindenberger, Dietmar; Markewitz, Peter; Merten, Frank; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    ;Energiewende;, which roughly translates as the transformation of the German energy sector in accordance with the imperatives of climate change, may soon become a byword for the corresponding processes most other developed countries are at various stages of undergoing. Germany's notable progress in this area offers valuable insights that other states can draw on in implementing their own transitions. The German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) is making its own contribution to achieving the Energiewende's ambitious objectives: in addition to funding an array of 'clean and green' projects, the Virtual Institute Power to Gas and Heat was established as a consortium of seven scientific and technical organizations whose aim is to inscribe a future, renewable-based German energy system with adequate flexibility. Thus, it is tasked with conceiving of and evaluating suitable energy path options. This paper outlines one of the most promising of these pathways, which is predicated on the use of electrolytically-produced hydrogen as an energy storage medium, as well as the replacement of hydrocarbon-based fuel for most road vehicles. We describe and evaluate this path and place it in a systemic context, outlining a case study from which other countries and federated jurisdictions therein may draw inspiration.

  15. EleCa: a Monte Carlo code for the propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Settimo, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high energy photons play an important role as an independent probe of the photo-pion production mechanism by UHE cosmic rays. Their observation, or non-observation, may constrain astrophysical scenarios for the origin of UHECRs and help to understand the nature of the flux suppression observed by several experiments at energies above 10$^{19.5}$ eV. Whereas the interaction length of UHE photons above 10$^{17}$ eV is only of a few hundred kpc up to tenths of Mpc, photons can interact with the extragalactic background radiation leading to the development of electromagnetic cascades which affect the fluxes of photons observed at Earth. The interpretation of the current experimental results rely on the simulations of the UHE photon propagation. In this contribution, we present the novel Monte Carlo code "EleCa" to simulate the \\emph{Ele}ctromagnetic \\emph{Ca}scading initiated by high-energy photons and electrons. The distance within which we expect to observe UHE photons is discussed and the flux of GZK pho...

  16. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  17. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  18. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for the graphene microheater on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Siqi; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions, and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene microheater on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, we experimentally demonstrated an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nm/mW and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10% to 90%) were only 750 ns and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding record-low figure of merit of the device was 2.543 nW.s, which is one order of magnitude lower than results reported in previous studies. The influences of the graphene-photonic crystal waveguide interaction length and the shape of the graphene heater were also investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the graphene microheater tuning efficiency.

  19. Photon Events with Missing Energy at $\\sqrt{s}$= 183 to 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Harris, Elisabeth Falk; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The production of single photons has been studiedin the reaction e+e- --> gamma+ invisible particles at centre-of-mass energies of 183~GeV and 189~GeV.A previously published analysis of events with multi-photonfinal states accompanied by missing energy has been updated with 189 GeV data.The data were collected with the DELPHI detector and correspondto integrated luminosities of about 51~pb^{-1}and 158~pb^{-1}at thetwo energies.The number of light neutrino families is measured to be2.86\\pm0.13(stat)\\pm0.14(syst)$. The absence ofan excess of events beyond that expected from Standard Modelprocesses is used to set limits on new physicsas described by supersymmetric and composite models.A limit on the gravitational scale is also determined.

  20. In-phantom neutron dose distribution for bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents an estimation of the neutron dose distribution for common bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons of 15 MV therapy accelerators. Neutron doses were measured in an Alderson phantom, using TLD 700 and 600 thermoluminescence dosimeters, resembling bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons from 15 MV LINAC and having a treatment plan using the four-field pelvic box technique. Thermal neutron dose distribution in the target area and the surrounding tissue was estimated. The sensitivity of all detectors for both gamma and neutrons was estimated and used for correction of the TL reading. TLD detectors were irradiated with a Co60 gamma standard source and thermal neutrons at the irradiation facility of the National Institute for Standards (NIS). The TL to dose conversion factor was estimated in terms of both Co60 neutron equivalent dose and thermal neutron dose. The dose distribution of photo-neutrons throughout each target was estimated and presented in three-dimensional charts and isodose curves. The distribution was found to be non-isotropic through the target. It varied from a minimum of 0.23 mSv/h to a maximum of 2.07 mSv/h at 6 cm off-axis. The mean neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.63 mSv/h, which agrees with other published literature. The estimated average neutron equivalent to the bladder per administered therapeutic dose was found to be 0.39 mSv Gy-1, which is also in good agreement with published literature. As a consequence of a complete therapeutic treatment of 50 Gy high-energy photons at 15 MV, the total thermal neutron equivalent dose to the abdomen was found to be about 0.012 Sv.

  1. Energy Optimization And Calculation Of Dose Absorption Enhancement Factor In Photon Activation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ranjbar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Secondary radiation such as photoelectrons, Auger electrons and characteristic radiations cause a local boost in dose for a tumor when irradiated with an external X-ray beam after being loaded with elements capable of activating the tumor, e.g.; I and Gd. Materials and Methods:  In this investigation, the MCNPX code was used for simulation and calculation of dose enhancement factor for a tumor loaded with activating elements. The designed model comprised the X-ray source, phantom (target tissue and loaded tumor with activating agent, detector, interactions modeling and results. The source was defined as monochromatic and plane surface situated at 50 cm (z = 50. Phantom geometry was a 10 × 10 × 10 cm3 cube centered at (0, 0, 0 with a 2.2 × 2.2 × 2.2 cm3 cubic tumor with a center located at 3 cm depth inside the phantom Results: Dose enhancement factor and optimum energy in radiotherapy are evaluated using the photon activation therapy method. Result show that the dose enhancement factor increases with activating concentration in the tumor. The maximum dose enhancement factor for iodine in the tumor occurs for photons in the energy range of 50-60 keV. Dose uniformity is less for lower energy photons within the activated region inside the tumor. Results indicate that the dose enhancement factor varies linearly with the activating concentration agent. Discussion and Conclusion: In this study, the obtained results point out a considerable enhancement in dose in the presence of activating agents in the tumor regions.

  2. Energy latency tradeoffs for medium access and sleep scheduling in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Lu

    Wireless sensor networks are expected to be used in a wide range of applications from environment monitoring to event detection. The key challenge is to provide energy efficient communication; however, latency remains an important concern for many applications that require fast response. The central thesis of this work is that energy efficient medium access and sleep scheduling mechanisms can be designed without necessarily sacrificing application-specific latency performance. We validate this thesis through results from four case studies that cover various aspects of medium access and sleep scheduling design in wireless sensor networks. Our first effort, DMAC, is to design an adaptive low latency and energy efficient MAC for data gathering to reduce the sleep latency. We propose staggered schedule, duty cycle adaptation, data prediction and the use of more-to-send packets to enable seamless packet forwarding under varying traffic load and channel contentions. Simulation and experimental results show significant energy savings and latency reduction while ensuring high data reliability. The second research effort, DESS, investigates the problem of designing sleep schedules in arbitrary network communication topologies to minimize the worst case end-to-end latency (referred to as delay diameter). We develop a novel graph-theoretical formulation, derive and analyze optimal solutions for the tree and ring topologies and heuristics for arbitrary topologies. The third study addresses the problem of minimum latency joint scheduling and routing (MLSR). By constructing a novel delay graph, the optimal joint scheduling and routing can be solved by M node-disjoint paths algorithm under multiple channel model. We further extended the algorithm to handle dynamic traffic changes and topology changes. A heuristic solution is proposed for MLSR under single channel interference. In the fourth study, EEJSPC, we first formulate a fundamental optimization problem that provides tunable

  3. ERICA: an energy resolving photon counting readout ASIC for X-ray in-line cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, J.-G.; Sarraj, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Moore, T.; Casanova, R.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Prats, X.; Kolstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ERICA (Energy Resolving Inline X-ray Camera) a photon-counting readout ASIC, with 6 energy bins. The ASIC is composed of a matrix of 8 × 20 pixels controlled by a global digital controller and biased with 7 independent digital to analog converters (DACs) and a band-gap current reference. The pixel analog front-end includes a charge sensitive amplifier with 16 mV/ke- gain and dynamic range of 45 ke-. ERICA has programmable pulse width, an adjustable constant current feedback resistor, a linear test pulse generator, and six discriminators with 6-bit local threshold adjustment. The pixel digital back-end includes the digital controller, 8 counters of 8-bit depth, half-full buffer flag for any of the 8 counters, a 74-bit shadow/shift register, a 74-bit configuration latch, and charge sharing compensation processing to perform the energy classification and counting operations of every detected photon in 1 μ s. The pixel size is 330 μm × 330 μm and its average consumption is 150 μW. Implemented in TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, the ASIC pixel's equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 90 e- RMS connected to a 1 mm thickness matching CdTe detector biased at -300 V with a total leakage current of 20 nA.

  4. Missing energy signature from invisible decays of dark photons at the CERN SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    The dark photon (A' ) production through the mixing with the bremsstrahlung photon from the electron scattering off nuclei can be accompanied by the dominant invisible A' decay into dark-sector particles. In this work we discuss the missing energy signature of this process in the experiment NA64 aiming at the search for A'→invisible decays with a high-energy electron beam at the CERN SPS (The Super Proton Synchrotron). We show the distinctive distributions of variables that can be used to distinguish the A'→invisible signal from background. The results of the detailed simulation of the detector response for the events with and without A' emission are presented. The efficiency of the signal event selection is estimated. It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the experiment and show that it allows us to probe the still unexplored area of the mixing strength 10-6≲ɛ ≲10-2 and masses up to MA'≲1 GeV . The results obtained are compared with the results from other calculations. In the case of the signal observation, a possibility of extraction of the parameters MA' and ɛ by using the shape of the missing energy spectrum is discussed.

  5. Single- and Multi-Photon Events with Missing Energy in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    Single- and multi-photon events with missing energy are selected in 619/pb of data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189GeV and 209GeV. The cross sections of the process e^+e^- -> nu nu gamma (gamma) are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, and the number of light neutrino species is determined, including lower energy data, to be N_nu = 2.98 +/- 0.05 +/- 0.04. Selection results are also given in the form of tables which can be used to test future models involving single- and multi-photon signatures at LEP. These final states are also predicted by models with large extra dimensions and by several supersymmetric models. No evidence for such models is found. Among others, lower limits between 1.5TeV and 0.65TeV are set, at 95% confidence level, on the new scale of gravity for the number of extra dimensions between 2 and 8.

  6. Constructing Interfacial Energy Transfer for Photon Up- and Down-Conversion from Lanthanides in a Core-Shell Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Tao, Lili; Chai, Yang; Lau, Shu Ping; Zhang, Qinyuan; Tsang, Yuen Hong

    2016-09-26

    We report a new mechanistic strategy for controlling and modifying the photon emission of lanthanides in a core-shell nanostructure by using interfacial energy transfer. By taking advantage of this mechanism with Gd(3+) as the energy donor, we have realized efficient up- and down-converted emissions from a series of lanthanide emitters (Eu(3+) , Tb(3+) , Dy(3+) , and Sm(3+) ) in these core-shell nanoparticles, which do not need a migratory host sublattice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the Gd(3+) -mediated interfacial energy transfer, in contrast to energy migration, is the leading process contributing to the photon emission of lanthanide dopants for the NaGdF4 @NaGdF4 core-shell system. Our finding suggests a new direction for research into better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale, which would help to stimulate new concepts for designing and improving photon emission of the lanthanide-based luminescent materials.

  7. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  8. Total Cross-sections at very high energies: from protons to photons

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, R M; Pancheri, G; Srivastava, Y N

    2010-01-01

    A model for both proton and photon total cross-sections is presented and compared with data. The model is based on the eikonal representation, with QCD mini-jets to drive the rise and soft gluon kt-resummation into the Infrared region to tame the excessive rise due to low-x perturbative gluons. We discuss the effects of a singular but integrable expression for the Infrared gluon spectrum on the high energy behaviour of the total cross-section expected in this model.

  9. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  10. Energetic Communities: Planning support for sustainable energy transition in small- and medium-sized communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Valeska Sager-Klauss

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The necessity for transition in the energy sector is beyond dispute and high on the political agendas. Climate change, the depletion of fossil fuels and the vulnerability of economies to resource speculation and unreliable political systems in the producing countries lay path for a broad implementation of smart alternative solutions. This means the integration of more sustainable renewable energy sources in the existing supply structures or the displacement of existing systems by new ones. Cities and communities are central players in the energy transition process. Energy demand is determined by the built environment. Renewable energy production needs space. The conflicts between different interest groups often break out in the context of local implementation measures that affect urban planning and the appearance of landscapes.Small- and medium-sized communities might prove to be game-changers in the overall energy transition because many problems have to be solved within their ambit. Urban planning is dealing with the numerous processes of urban change. Energy is a fairly new task to be addressed and many stakeholders lack experience and criteria for strategic decision making. After a period of fierce determination to turn the wheel against climate change, it seems that there is a growing resignation among politicians, planners and the public because some things have not turned out the way we’d expected and the hope for quick solutions fades. Rebound-effects seem to eat up the savings to a good extent, and alternative ideas of how sustainable energy systems may be put into place have not yet been persuasive in many cases. Energy systems have proved to be complex. They are still perceived to be important but in practice there is a growing uneasiness about the right steps to take. The overarching research question of this thesis is: What do decision makers in smalland medium-sized communities need to become more successful in implementing

  11. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  12. Thermoelastic wave propagation in a rotating elastic medium without energy dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Roychoudhuri

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the propagation of time-harmonic plane thermoelastic waves of assigned frequency in an infinite rotating medium using Green-Naghdi model (1993 of linear thermoelasticity without energy dissipation. A more general dispersion equation is derived to examine the effect of rotation on the phase velocity of the modified coupled thermal dilatational shear waves. It is observed that in thermoelasticity theory of type II (Green-Naghdi model, the modified coupled dilatational thermal waves propagate unattenuated in contrast to the classical thermoelasticity theory, where the thermoelastic waves undergo attenuation (Parkus, Chadwick, and Sneddon. The solutions of the more general dispersion equation are obtained for small thermoelastic coupling by perturbation technique. Cases of high and low frequencies are also analyzed. The rotation of the medium affects both quasielastic dilatational and shear wave speeds to the first order in ω for low frequency, while the quasithermal wave speed is affected by rotation up to the second power in ω. However, for large frequency, rotation influences both the quasidilatational and shear wave speeds to first order in ω and the quasithermal wave speed to the second order in 1/ω.

  13. Thermal Impact of Medium Deep Borehole Thermal Energy Storage on the Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Schulte, Daniel O.; Rühaak, Wolfram; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Borehole heat exchanger arrays are a well-suited and already widely applied method for exploiting the shallow subsurface as seasonal heat storage. However, in most of the populated regions the shallow subsurface also comprises an important aquifer system used for drinking water production. Thus, the operation of shallow geothermal heat storage systems leads to a significant increase in groundwater temperatures in the proximity of the borehole heat exchanger array. The magnitude of the impact on groundwater quality and microbiology associated with this temperature rise is controversially discussed. Nevertheless, the protection of shallow groundwater resources has priority. Accordingly, water authorities often follow restrictive permission policies for building such storage systems. An alternative approach to avoid this issue is the application of medium deep borehole heat exchanger arrays instead of shallow ones. The thermal impact on shallow aquifers can be significantly reduced as heat is stored at larger depth. Moreover, it can be further diminished by the installation of a thermally insulating materials in the upper section of the borehole heat exchangers. Based on a numerical simulation study, the advantageous effects of medium deep borehole thermal energy storage are demonstrated and quantified. A finite element software is used to model the heat transport in the subsurface in 3D, while the heat transport in the borehole heat exchangers is solved analytically in 1D. For this purpose, an extended analytical solution is implemented, which also allows for the consideration of a thermally insulating borehole section.

  14. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  15. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Seok Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components.

  16. Beam dynamics and commissioning of low and medium energy H- beam at Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Satri, Masoomeh Yarmohammadi; Lamehi-Rachti , Mohammad

    The First step of the CERN Large Hadron Collider injectors upgrade (LIU) project is Linac4. It accelerates H- ions to 160 MeV in an 80 m long accelerator housed in a tunnel 12 m underground, presently under construction. It will replace the present 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector of the proton accelerator complex to increase the LHC luminosity. It consists of a 45 keV RF volume source, a twosolenoid Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 352.2 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating the beam to 3 MeV, a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The MEBT houses a fast chopper to selectively remove unwanted micro-bunches in the 352 MHz sequence and avoid losses at capture in the CERN PSB (1 MHz). After chopping, the beam acceleration continues by a 50 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a 100 MeV Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac and a Pi-Mode Structure bringing the beam to the final energy of 160 MeV. Linac4 has been commissioned with a temporary source up to 12 MeV. The beam commissioning stages of Linac4 in LEBT...

  17. Gamma-ray Polarimetry with the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2017-08-01

    The All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO) is a next-generation Compton and pair-production telescope. It will allow us to perform sensitive polarimetric observations in the 200keV to 3MeV energy range. Due to its wide field of view it will survey the entire sky every 3 hours, enabling polarization measurements not only of persistent, but also of transient sources such as gamma-ray bursts. The polarization of gamma-rays carries geometric information about compact emission regions that are too small to be imaged at any wavelength, and will thus provide qualitatively new insights. In this paper we discuss AMEGO's polarization sensitivity based on detailed simulations of the instrument. We will use these results to discuss the scientific potential of AMEGO to search for violations of Lorentz invariance. Finally, we present predictions for possible observations based on theoretical models of bright gamma-ray bursts, blazar jets, and the high-energy tail of the galactic black hole binary Cygnus X-1. These predictions will demonstrate AMEGO's ability to distinguish different theoretical models.

  18. Medium Access Control Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks with Energy Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Iannello, Fabio; Spagnolini, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    The design of Medium Access Control (MAC) protocols for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been conventionally tackled by assuming battery-powered devices and by adopting the network lifetime as the main performance criterion. While WSNs operated by energy-harvesting (EH) devices are not limited by network lifetime, they pose new design challenges due to the uncertain amount of harvestable energy. Novel design criteria are thus required to capture the trade-offs between the potentially infinite network lifetime and the uncertain energy availability. This paper addresses the analysis and design of WSNs with EH devices by focusing on conventional MAC protocols, namely TDMA, Framed-ALOHA (FA) and Dynamic-FA (DFA), and by accounting for the performance trade-offs and design issues arising due to EH. A novel metric, referred to as delivery probability, is introduced to measure the capability of a MAC protocol to deliver the measure of any sensor in the network to the intended destination (or fusion center, FC). T...

  19. Design of a ferrite rod antenna for harvesting energy from medium wave broadcast signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Dyo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency (RF energy harvesting is an emerging technology that has the potential to eliminate the need for batteries and reduce maintenance costs of sensing applications. The antenna is one of the critical components that determines its performance and while antenna design has been well researched for the purpose of communication, the design for RF energy harvesting applications has not been widely addressed. The authors present an optimised design for such an antenna for harvesting energy from medium wave broadcast transmissions. They derive and use a model for computing the optimal antenna configuration given application requirements on output voltage and power, material costs and physical dimensions. Design requirements for powering autonomous smart meters have been considered. The proposed approach was used to obtain the antenna configuration that is able to deliver 1 mW of power to 1 kΩ load at a distance of up to 9 km, sufficient to replace batteries on low-power sensing applications. Measurements using a prototype device have been used to verify the authors simulations.

  20. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  1. Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium: Cosmic-ray Energy Density and Ionization Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the energy spectra of cosmic ay nuclei and electrons in the local interstellar medium (LISM) from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem on Voyager 1 (V1). We use four models of the local interstellar spectra of nuclei and one of electrons that are constrained by the observations to compute the energy density and ionization rate of atomic H in the LISM above 3 MeV for electrons and protons and above 3 MeV/nuc for nuclei with Z > 1. We find that the total cosmic-ray energy density is in the range 0.82-0.97 eV/cm3, which includes a contribution of 0.023 eV/cm3 from electrons. We find the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic H to be in the range 1.45-1.58 x 10-17 s-1, which is a factor of more than 10 below the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds based on astrochemistry methods. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Voyager data analysis is supported by NASA Grant NNN12AA012. GALPROP development is supported by NASA Grants NNX13AC47G and NNX10AE78G.

  2. Towards smart energy systems: application of kernel machine regression for medium term electricity load forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Bargiotas, Dimitrios; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Integration of energy systems with information technologies has facilitated the realization of smart energy systems that utilize information to optimize system operation. To that end, crucial in optimizing energy system operation is the accurate, ahead-of-time forecasting of load demand. In particular, load forecasting allows planning of system expansion, and decision making for enhancing system safety and reliability. In this paper, the application of two types of kernel machines for medium term load forecasting (MTLF) is presented and their performance is recorded based on a set of historical electricity load demand data. The two kernel machine models and more specifically Gaussian process regression (GPR) and relevance vector regression (RVR) are utilized for making predictions over future load demand. Both models, i.e., GPR and RVR, are equipped with a Gaussian kernel and are tested on daily predictions for a 30-day-ahead horizon taken from the New England Area. Furthermore, their performance is compared to the ARMA(2,2) model with respect to mean average percentage error and squared correlation coefficient. Results demonstrate the superiority of RVR over the other forecasting models in performing MTLF.

  3. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of the space-time wave mechanics of single photons, a subject with an almost century long history. The Landau-Peierls photon wave function, which is related nonlocally to the electromagnetic field is first described, and thereafter the so-called energy wave function, based...... on the positive-frequency Riemann-Silberstein vectors, is discussed. Recent attempts to understand the birth process of a photon emerging from a single atom are summarized. The polychromatic photon concept is introduced, and it is indicated how the wave mechanics of polychromatic photons can be upgraded to wave...... train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  4. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-energy (approximately 5-200 Mega electron Volts) gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production kinematics limit (approximately 0.6 deg at 70 Mega electron Volts), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front detector (is less than 3 x 10(exp -6) Mega electron Volts per square centimeter per second at 70 Mega electron Volts), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% for a 10 milliCrab source in 10(exp 6) s.

  5. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter , Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo O.; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Ryan, James M.; Son, Seunghee; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-13 energy gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope 14 (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time 15 projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production 16 kinematics limit (~0.6° at 70 MeV), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front 17 detector (<3×10-6 MeV cm-2 s-1 at 70 MeV), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% 18 for a 10 millicrab source in 106 seconds.

  6. Free energy and entropy production rate for a Brownian particle that walks on overdamped medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2016-09-01

    We derive general expressions for the free energy, entropy production, and entropy extraction rates for a Brownian particle that walks in a viscous medium where the dynamics of its motion is governed by the Langevin equation. It is shown that, when the system is out of equilibrium, it constantly produces entropy and at the same time extracts entropy out of the system. Its entropy production and extraction rates decrease in time and saturate to a constant value. In the long-time limit, the rate of entropy production balances the rate of entropy extraction and, at equilibrium, both entropy production and extraction rates become zero. Moreover, considering different model systems, not only do we investigate how various thermodynamic quantities behave in time but also we discuss the fluctuation theorem in detail.

  7. Microstructural Development and Deformation Mechanisms during Cold Rolling of a Medium Stacking Fault Energy TWIP Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.A. Ofei; L. Zhao; J. Sietsma

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic response,microstructural and texture changes occurring during cold rolling of a Fe-14Mn-0.64C-2.4Al-0.25Si medium stacking fault energy TWlP (twinning induced plasticity) steel have been studied by X-ray diffraction and magnetic techniques.The changes in the sub-grain size (Ds),probability of stacking fault formation (Psf) and microstrain in the material as cold rolling progressed were determined by using a modified version of the Williamson and Hall equation.A strong development of the crystallographic texture with increasing deformation was observed.Deformation-induced formation of a small fraction α'-martensite was observed,indicating that the steel also exhibits y → α'-martensite transformation during cold rolling,which is discussed via the changes of the stacking-fault probability and the texture development during cold rolling.

  8. Software-Defined Solutions for Managing Energy Use in Small to Medium Sized Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peffer, Therese [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Council on International Education Exchange (CIEE), Portland, ME (United States); Blumstein, Carl [Council on International Education Exchange (CIEE), Portland, ME (United States); Culler, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS); Modera, Mark [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC); Meier, Alan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-10

    The Project uses state-of-the-art computer science to extend the benefits of Building Automation Systems (BAS) typically found in large buildings (>100,000 square foot) to medium-sized commercial buildings (<50,000 sq ft). The BAS developed in this project, termed OpenBAS, uses an open-source and open software architecture platform, user interface, and plug-and-play control devices to facilitate adoption of energy efficiency strategies in the commercial building sector throughout the United States. At the heart of this “turn key” BAS is the platform with three types of controllers—thermostat, lighting controller, and general controller—that are easily “discovered” by the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. The user interface showcases the platform and provides the control system set-up, system status display and means of automatically mapping the control points in the system.

  9. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  10. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This

  11. Dual energy CT kidney stone differentiation in photon counting computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Henning, A.; Kappler, S.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C. H.; Sedlmair, M. U.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the capabilities of a whole-body photon counting CT system to differentiate between four common kidney stone materials, namely uric acid (UA), calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYS), and apatite (APA) ex vivo. Two different x-ray spectra (120 kV and 140 kV) were applied and two acquisition modes were investigated. The macro-mode generates two energy threshold based image-volumes and two energy bin based image-volumes. In the chesspattern-mode four energy thresholds are applied. A virtual low energy image, as well as a virtual high energy image are derived from initial threshold-based images, while considering their statistically correlated nature. The energy bin based images of the macro-mode, as well as the virtual low and high energy image of the chesspattern-mode serve as input for our dual energy evaluation. The dual energy ratio of the individually segmented kidney stones were utilized to quantify the discriminability of the different materials. The dual energy ratios of the two acquisition modes showed high correlation for both applied spectra. Wilcoxon-rank sum tests and the evaluation of the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves suggest that the UA kidney stones are best differentiable from all other materials (AUC = 1.0), followed by CYS (AUC ≍ 0.9 compared against COM and APA). COM and APA, however, are hardly distinguishable (AUC between 0.63 and 0.76). The results hold true for the measurements of both spectra and both acquisition modes.

  12. EFFECT OF LOW ENERGY VERSUS MEDIUM ENERGY RADIAL SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PLANTER FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Z. Fouda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF is the most common cause of heel pain and it can often be a challenge for clinicians to treat successfully. Radial shock wave therapy (RSWT has been introduced recently for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Different energy levels of shock wave therapy have been used in the literatures for treatment of PF with no clear settled parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was intended to investigate and compare the efficacy of two different energy levels of RSWT on PF patients. Methods: Forty patients having unilateral chronic PF were recruited for the study from orthopedic outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals and National Institute of Neuromotor System Cairo Egypt, with a mean age of (47.15±4.57 years. Patients were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A treated with low intensity level of 1.6 bars (0.16 mJ/mm2 RSWT and group (B treated with medium intensity level of 4 bars (0.38 mJ/mm2 RSWT. Functional assessment of the foot based on Foot Function Index (FFI and Present pain intensity was measured during rest by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: There was as significant decreased in the total FFI scores from (118.42 ±6.51 to (81.37 ±3.46 for group (A and from (118.93 ±6.85 to (58.50 ±3.22 for group (B. Also regarding VAS Scores there was as significant decreased in the pain intensity from (5.11 ±0.41 to (2.85 ±0.31 for group (A and from (4.95 ±0.39 to (2.05 ±0.22 for group (B. Conclusion: Radial shock wave therapy is an effective modality that should be considered in the treatment of chronic PF, while the medium energy level RSWT is better than the low energy level RSWT in regarding to the measured treatment outcomes.

  13. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  14. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance...... materials and detector/filter geometry. Improvements in the energy and angular response of dosemeters for the measurements of doses from beta and low energy photon radiation can be achieved essentially through two different approaches: either by using thin detectors or multi-element dosemeters...

  15. Tagged photon facility at Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore: Possible scenarios

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Pant

    2006-05-01

    Photoproduction of in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn is discussed in the context of medium modification of hadronic properties. Utilization of Indus-2 at CAT, Indore for producing tagged bremsstrahlung photons and laser backscattered photons has been explored with a comparison between the two techniques for producing tagged high energy photons for the first time in the country with emphasis on the ADSS programme to have a precise information of (; ) reactions.

  16. The features of a quantum description of radiation in an optically dense medium

    CERN Document Server

    Tokman, M D; Vdovin, V V

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the theory of quantum electromagnetic field in an optically dense medium. Self-consistent equations describing interaction between a quantum field and a quantum dielectric medium are obtained from the first principles, i.e., outside a phenomenological description. Using these equations, we found a transformation (of the Bogoliubov transformation type) that converts the operators of the "vacuum" field into operators of collective perturbations of the field and an ensemble of atoms, that is, photons in the medium. Transformation parameter is the refractive index of the wave mode considered. It is shown that besides the energy of the collective electromagnetic field, the energy of photons in the medium includes the energy of the internal degrees of freedom of the substance and the energy of near-field dipole interaction between atoms in the polarized medium. The concept of negative energy photons is introduced on the basis of self-consistent equations.

  17. Missing energy signature from invisible decays of dark photons at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, S N; Kirsanov, M M; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2016-01-01

    The dark photon ($A'$) production through the mixing with the bremsstrahlung photon from the electron scattering off nuclei can be accompanied by the dominant invisible $A'$ decay into dark-sector particles. In this work we discuss the missing energy signature of this process in the experiment NA64 aiming at the search for $A'\\to invisible$ decays with a high-energy electron beam at the CERN SPS. We show the distinctive distributions of variables that can be used to distinguish the $A'\\to invisible$ signal from background. The results of the detailed simulation of the detector response for the events with and without $A'$ emission are presented. The efficiency of the signal event selection is estimated. It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the experiment and show that it allows to probe the still unexplored area of the mixing strength $10^{-6}\\lesssim \\epsilon \\lesssim 10^{-2}$ and masses up to $M_{A'} \\lesssim 1$ GeV. The results obtained are compared with the results from other calculations. In the cas...

  18. Characterizing Invisible Electroweak Particles through Single-Photon Processes at High Energy $e^+e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Seong Youl; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-01-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, whose masses are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1/2 Higgsino SU(2)$_L$ doublets, (b) a spin-1/2 wino SU(2)$_L$ triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2)$_L$ doublet. Due to the mass-degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the $e^+ e^-$ collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy $e^+ e^-$ collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at $e^+e^-$ colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy and scattering angle of the assoc...

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, H; Belli, F; Liu, H; Calegari, F; Chavez-Cervantes, M; Li, M T; Lin, C T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J; Cavalleri, A; Travers, J C; Gierz, I

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  1. Heavy quark production in photon-Pomeron interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M. M. [Instituto Federal de Ciencia, Educacao e Tecnologia Farroupilha, Campus Sao Borja, Rua Otaviano Castilho Mendes, 355, CEP 97670-000, Sao Borja, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica - IFM, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The diffractive heavy quark cross sections are estimated considering photon-Pomeron interactions in hadron - hadron at RHIC, Tevatron, and CERN LHC energies. We assume the validity of the hard diffractive factorization and calculate the charm and bottom total cross sections and rapidity distributions using the diffractive parton distribution functions of the Pomeron obtained by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. Such processes are sensitive to the gluon content of the Pomeron at high energies and are a good place to constrain the behavior of this distribution. We also compare our predictions with those obtained using the dipole model, and verify that these processes are a good test of the different mechanisms for heavy quarks diffractive production at hadron colliders.

  2. Lorentz symmetry violating low energy dispersion relations from a dimension-five photon scalar mixing operator

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, Avijit K

    2016-01-01

    Dimension-five photon $(\\gamma )$ scalar $(\\phi)$ interaction terms usually appear in the bosonic sector of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. In these theories the three propagation eigenstates are different from the three field eigenstates. The dispersion relation in an external magnetic field shows that, for a non- zero energy $(\\omega)$, out of the three propagating eigenstates one has superluminal phase velocity $v_p$. During propagation, another eigenstate undergoes amplification or attenuation, showing signs of an unstable system. The remaining one maintains causality. In this paper, using techniques from optics as well as gravity, we identify the energy $(\\omega)$ interval outside which $v_p \\le c$ for the field eigenstates $|\\gamma_{\\parallel} > $ and $ |\\phi > $, and stability of the system is restored. The behavior of group velocity $v_g$ is also explored in the same context. We conclude by pointing out its possible astrophysical implications.

  3. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences; Univ. Coll. London (United Kingdom); Krakow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Applied Computer Science; Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-10-15

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}{sup {gamma}}{sup p}, was determined from e{sup +}p scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the {gamma}p system in the range 194

  4. Energy-bandwidth trade-off in all-optical photonic crystal microcavity switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The performance of all-optical switches is a compromise between the achievable bandwidth of the switched signal and the energy requirement of the switching operation. In this work we consider a system consisting of a photonic crystal cavity coupled to two input and two output waveguides....... As a specific example of a switching application, we investigate the demultiplexing of an optical time division multiplexed signal. To quantify the energy-bandwidth trade-off, we introduce a figure of merit for the detection of the demultiplexed signal. In such investigations it is crucial to consider...... patterning effects, which occur on time scales that are longer than the bit period. Our analysis is based on a coupled mode theory, which allows for an extensive investigation of the influence of the system parameters on the switching dynamics. The analysis is shown to provide new insights into the ultrafast...

  5. Monte carlo diffusion hybrid model for photon migration in a two-layer turbid medium in the frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, G; Farrell, T J; Patterson, M S

    2000-05-01

    We propose a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) diffusion model for calculating the spatially resolved reflectance amplitude and phase delay resulting from an intensity-modulated pencil beam vertically incident on a two-layer turbid medium. The model combines the accuracy of MC at radial distances near the incident beam with the computational efficiency afforded by a diffusion calculation at further distances. This results in a single forward calculation several hundred times faster than pure MC, depending primarily on model parameters. Model predictions are compared with MC data for two cases that span the extremes of physiologically relevant optical properties: skin overlying fat and skin overlying muscle, both in the presence of an exogenous absorber. It is shown that good agreement can be achieved for radial distances from 0.5 to 20 mm in both cases. However, in the skin-on-muscle case the choice of model parameters and the definition of the diffusion coefficient can lead to some interesting discrepancies.

  6. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  7. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Sona, P., E-mail: pietro.sona@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Ballestrero, S. [Department of Physics University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); CERN PH/ADT, Geneve (Switzerland); Uggerhoj, U.I.; Andersen, K.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are established. The separate contributions to spectral distortion of electromagnetic processes other than bremsstrahlung are also studied in detail.

  8. Energy-Efficient Boarder Node Medium Access Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaque

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the design, implementation, and performance analysis of the scalable and mobility-aware hybrid protocol named boarder node medium access control (BN-MAC for wireless sensor networks (WSNs, which leverages the characteristics of scheduled and contention-based MAC protocols. Like contention-based MAC protocols, BN-MAC achieves high channel utilization, network adaptability under heavy traffic and mobility, and low latency and overhead. Like schedule-based MAC protocols, BN-MAC reduces idle listening time, emissions, and collision handling at low cost at one-hop neighbor nodes and achieves high channel utilization under heavy network loads. BN-MAC is particularly designed for region-wise WSNs. Each region is controlled by a boarder node (BN, which is of paramount importance. The BN coordinates with the remaining nodes within and beyond the region. Unlike other hybrid MAC protocols, BN-MAC incorporates three promising models that further reduce the energy consumption, idle listening time, overhearing, and congestion to improve the throughput and reduce the latency. One of the models used with BN-MAC is automatic active and sleep (AAS, which reduces the ideal listening time. When nodes finish their monitoring process, AAS lets them automatically go into the sleep state to avoid the idle listening state. Another model used in BN-MAC is the intelligent decision-making (IDM model, which helps the nodes sense the nature of the environment. Based on the nature of the environment, the nodes decide whether to use the active or passive mode. This decision power of the nodes further reduces energy consumption because the nodes turn off the radio of the transceiver in the passive mode. The third model is the least-distance smart neighboring search (LDSNS, which determines the shortest efficient path to the one-hop neighbor and also provides cross-layering support to handle the mobility of the nodes. The BN-MAC also incorporates a semi

  9. Energy-efficient boarder node medium access control protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaque, Abdul; Elleithy, Khaled M

    2014-03-12

    This paper introduces the design, implementation, and performance analysis of the scalable and mobility-aware hybrid protocol named boarder node medium access control (BN-MAC) for wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which leverages the characteristics of scheduled and contention-based MAC protocols. Like contention-based MAC protocols, BN-MAC achieves high channel utilization, network adaptability under heavy traffic and mobility, and low latency and overhead. Like schedule-based MAC protocols, BN-MAC reduces idle listening time, emissions, and collision handling at low cost at one-hop neighbor nodes and achieves high channel utilization under heavy network loads. BN-MAC is particularly designed for region-wise WSNs. Each region is controlled by a boarder node (BN), which is of paramount importance. The BN coordinates with the remaining nodes within and beyond the region. Unlike other hybrid MAC protocols, BN-MAC incorporates three promising models that further reduce the energy consumption, idle listening time, overhearing, and congestion to improve the throughput and reduce the latency. One of the models used with BN-MAC is automatic active and sleep (AAS), which reduces the ideal listening time. When nodes finish their monitoring process, AAS lets them automatically go into the sleep state to avoid the idle listening state. Another model used in BN-MAC is the intelligent decision-making (IDM) model, which helps the nodes sense the nature of the environment. Based on the nature of the environment, the nodes decide whether to use the active or passive mode. This decision power of the nodes further reduces energy consumption because the nodes turn off the radio of the transceiver in the passive mode. The third model is the least-distance smart neighboring search (LDSNS), which determines the shortest efficient path to the one-hop neighbor and also provides cross-layering support to handle the mobility of the nodes. The BN-MAC also incorporates a semi

  10. Observing the Non-Thermal Universe with the Highest Energy Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Brenda L.; HAWC, VERITAS, CTA

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical sources of relativistic particles radiate gamma rays to such high energies that they can be detected from the ground. The existence of high energy gamma rays implies that even higher energy particles are being accelerated placing strong constraints on these non-thermal accelerators. Within our galaxy, TeV gamma rays have been detected from supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula, x-ray binaries and some yet to be identified sources in the Galactic plane. In addition, these gamma rays have sufficient energy to be attenuated by the interaction with infrared photons producing an electron-positron pair. Thus the spectrum of gamma rays can also constrain the infrared photon density, which for distant extragalactic sources is a direct probe of cosmology. The known extragalactic TeV sources are primarily the blazer class of active galactic nuclei. And TeV gamma rays might even be produced by annihilating dark matter.The US currently supports two ground-based gamma-ray observatories—HAWC and VERITAS—and NSF is developing a prototype for the international Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory just began operation of the full detector in March 2015 and with its wide field of view scans ~2/3 of the sky each day for TeV sources. VERITAS (Very EneRgetic Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that follows individual sources to produce lightcurves and spectra from 85 GeV to > 30 TeV. The combination of both a survey and pointed observatory is very complementary with a broad scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. I will present the current view of the TeV sky and the latest results from HAWC and VERITAS as well as plans for CTA.

  11. Theoretical photoionization spectra in the UV photon energy range for a Mg-like Al+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Soung; Kim, Young Soon

    2008-08-01

    In the present work, we report the photoionization cross sections of the Al+ ion calculated for the photon energy range 20-26 eV and 30-50 eV. We have expanded our previous calculation (2007 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 76 014302) with an optimized admixture of the initial ground state 3s21S and exited states 3s3p1,3P, 3s3d1,3D and 3s4s1,3S, and obtained significantly improved predictions for the main background and autoionizing resonance structures of the reported experimental spectra. The absolute measurements of the photoionization cross sections of the Al+ ion in these energy ranges have been performed by West et al (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 052719), and they reported that the prominent peaks around 21 eV were attributed to the effects of the significant influence of the small fraction of the fourth-order radiation with energies around 84 eV from the synchrotron source. In our previous work, the main shape for these cross sections was calculated assuming an admixture of initial 3s21S and 3s3p3P states, only with a rough overall estimate for the experimental spectra in the photon energy range 20-26 eV, and without these peaks around 21 eV. The report of the experimental assignment attributes these peaks to the excitation of a 2p electron from the core. However, our present results with the new admixture reveal similar peaks without considering the possibility of the core excitation.

  12. Synthetic oligomer analysis using atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry at different photon energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmazières, Bernard; Legros, Véronique; Giuliani, Alexandre; Buchmann, William

    2014-01-15

    Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) followed by mass spectrometric detection was used to ionize a variety of polymers: polyethylene glycol, polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, and polysiloxane. In most cases, whatever the polymer or the solvent used (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, acetone or toluene), only negative ion mode produced intact ions such as chlorinated adducts, with no or few fragmentations, in contrast to the positive ion mode that frequently led to important in-source fragmentations. In addition, it was shown that optimal detection of polymer distributions require a fine tuning of other source parameters such as temperature and ion transfer voltage. Series of mass spectra were recorded in the negative mode, in various solvents (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, toluene, and acetone), by varying the photon energy from 8eV up to 10.6eV using synchrotron radiation. To these solvents, addition of a classical APPI dopant (toluene or acetone) was not necessary. Courtesy of the synchrotron radiation, it was demonstrated that the photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to the ionization energy of the solvent. As commercial APPI sources typically use krypton lamps with energy fixed at 10eV and 10.6eV, the study of the ionization of polymers over a wavelength range allowed to confirm and refine the previously proposed ionization mechanisms. Moreover, the APPI source can efficiently be used as an interface between size exclusion chromatography or reverse phase liquid chromatography and MS for the study of synthetic oligomers. However, the photoionization at fixed wavelength of polymer standards with different molecular weights showed that it was difficult to obtain intact ionized oligomers with molecular weights above a few thousands.

  13. Measurement of the Time-Resolved Reflection Matrix for Enhancing Light Energy Delivery into a Scattering Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngwoon; Hillman, Timothy R.; Choi, Wonjun; Lue, Niyom; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; So, Peter T. C.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Multiple scatterings occurring in a turbid medium attenuate the intensity of propagating waves. Here, we propose a method to efficiently deliver light energy to the desired target depth in a scattering medium. We measure the time-resolved reflection matrix of a scattering medium using coherent time-gated detection. From this matrix, we derive and experimentally implement an incident wave pattern that optimizes the detected signal corresponding to a specific arrival time. This leads to enhanced light delivery at the target depth. The proposed method will lay a foundation for efficient phototherapy and deep-tissue in vivo imaging in the near future. PMID:24483661

  14. Silver sulphide growth on Ag(111): A medium energy ion scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Window, A. J.; Hentz, A.; Sheppard, D. C.; Parkinson, G. S.; Woodruff, D. P.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of S 2 with Ag(111) under ultra-high vacuum conditions has been investigated by medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). 100 keV He + MEIS measurements provide a direct confirmation of a previous report, based on thermal desorption, that the growth of multilayer films of Ag 2S occurs through a continuous corrosion process. These films show a commensurate (√7 × √7)R19° unit mesh in low energy electron diffraction, consistent with the epitaxial growth of (111) layers of the high-temperature F-cubic phase of Ag 2S. The substantial range of co-existing film thicknesses found indicates that the growth must be in the form of variable-thickness islands. The use of 100 keV H + incident ions leads to a very rapid decrease in the sulphide film thickness with increasing exposure that we attribute to an unusual chemical leaching, with implanted H atoms interacting with S atoms and desorption of H 2S from the surface.

  15. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  16. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  17. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Peter; Wojtczak, Lech

    2016-06-01

    Short- and medium-chain fatty acids (SCFAs and MCFAs), independently of their cellular signaling functions, are important substrates of the energy metabolism and anabolic processes in mammals. SCFAs are mostly generated by colonic bacteria and are predominantly metabolized by enterocytes and liver, whereas MCFAs arise mostly from dietary triglycerides, among them milk and dairy products. A common feature of SCFAs and MCFAs is their carnitine-independent uptake and intramitochondrial activation to acyl-CoA thioesters. Contrary to long-chain fatty acids, the cellular metabolism of SCFAs and MCFAs depends to a lesser extent on fatty acid-binding proteins. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate tissue metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, as manifested by a mostly inhibitory effect on glycolysis and stimulation of lipogenesis or gluconeogenesis. SCFAs and MCFAs exert no or only weak protonophoric and lytic activities in mitochondria and do not significantly impair the electron transport in the respiratory chain. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate mitochondrial energy production by two mechanisms: they provide reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain and partly decrease efficacy of oxidative ATP synthesis.

  18. Medium-sized grazing incidence high-energy X-ray telescopes employing continuously graded multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K. D.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.;

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a concept of continuously graded multilayer structures for medium-sized X-ray telescopes which is based on several material combinations. They show that the theoretical reflectivity characteristics of these structures make them very advantageous when applied to high energy X......-ray grazing incidence telescopes. They consider the performance of continuously graded Ni/C multilayers in a multi-focus, Kirkpatrick-Baez, geometry and show a significant improvement when compared to standard coatings of gold. For a total length of 3.3 m, a total aperture of 48 cm by 48 cm and 64 foci......, an effective area of 250 cm2 at 60 keV and a FWHM field of view of 6' is obtained. It is shown that a modular array of conical telescopes (conical approximation to a Wolter-I geometry), with the same length and aperture provides similar effective areas. Energy-dispersive X-ray reflectivity data (15-70 ke...

  19. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  20. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This

  1. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  2. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2016-12-02

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g(-1) tumour, 0.8 mg Au g(-1) normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  3. Monte Carlo Modeling of Dual and Triple Photon Energy Absorptiometry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Kamali-Asl

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which there is a reduction in the amount of bone mineral content leading to an increase in the risk of bone fractures. The affected individuals not only have to go through lots of pain and suffering but this disease also results in high economic costs to the society due to a large number of fractures.  A timely and accurate diagnosis of this disease makes it possible to start a treatment and thus preventing bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Radiographic methods are particularly well suited for in vivo determination of bone mineral density (BMD due to the relatively high x-ray absorption properties of bone mineral compared to other tissues. Materials and Methods: Monte Carlo simulation has been conducted to explore the possibilities of triple photon energy absorptiometry (TPA in the measurement of bone mineral content. The purpose of this technique is to correctly measure the bone mineral density in the presence of fatty and soft tissues. The same simulations have been done for a dual photon energy absorptiometry (DPA system and an extended DPA system. Results: Using DPA with three components improves the accuracy of the obtained result while the simulation results show that TPA system is not accurate enough to be considered as an adequate method for the measurement of bone mineral density. Discussion: The reason for the improvement in the accuracy is the consideration of fatty tissue in TPA method while having attenuation coefficient as a function of energy makes TPA an inadequate method. Conclusion: Using TPA method is not a perfect solution to overcome the problem of non uniformity in the distribution of fatty tissue.

  4. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  5. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  6. Simulation of ultra-high energy photon propagation with PRESHOWER 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, P.; Engel, R.; Pysz, A.; Wilczyński, H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new release of the PRESHOWER program, a tool for Monte Carlo simulation of propagation of ultra-high energy photons in the magnetic field of the Earth. The PRESHOWER program is designed to calculate magnetic pair production and bremsstrahlung and should be used together with other programs to simulate extensive air showers induced by photons. The main new features of the PRESHOWER code include a much faster algorithm applied in the procedures of simulating the processes of gamma conversion and bremsstrahlung, update of the geomagnetic field model, and a minor correction. The new simulation procedure increases the flexibility of the code so that it can also be applied to other magnetic field configurations such as, for example, encountered in the vicinity of the sun or neutron stars. Program summaryProgram title: PRESHOWER 2.0 Catalog identifier: ADWG_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWG_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3968 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 37198 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, FORTRAN 77. Computer: Intel-Pentium based PC. Operating system: Linux or Unix. RAM:Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 173 (2005) 71 Nature of problem: Simulation of a cascade of particles initiated by UHE photon in magnetic field. Solution method: The primary photon is tracked until its conversion into an e+ e- pair. If conversion occurs each individual particle in the resultant preshower is checked for either bremsstrahlung radiation (electrons) or secondary gamma conversion (photons). Reasons for new version: Slow and outdated algorithm in the old version (a significant speed up is possible); Extension of the program to allow

  7. Isotope Effect in Ozone Formation: Assessing the Relationship Between Photon Energy and Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, D. A.; Chakraborty, S.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    While it has been found that the isotopic fractionation of oxygen during processes such as evaporation or precipitation happens mass-dependently (i.e. δ17O = 0.52δ18O), it was discovered in the 1980's that during ozone (O3) formation, fractionation occurs mass-independently (i.e. δ17O = δ18O). The purpose of this series of photolysis experiments was to assess the relationship between incoming photon energy and anomalous oxygen enrichment during the formation of ozone from molecular oxygen, a topic that has not yet been explored in detail, to our knowledge. A UV lamp emitting wavelengths of 184.9 and 253.7 nm was used to photolyze molecular oxygen in a vacuum chamber to form ozone. The ozone was separated from unreacted oxygen by trapping ozone with liquid nitrogen in the reaction chamber finger. After the untrapped oxygen was evacuated, the ozone was collected in a sample tube with molecular sieve, which allows the ozone to break down to molecular oxygen. In these experiments, mass-spectroscopy was performed on molecular oxygen to measure the isotopic composition (δ17O and δ18O). A limited number of experiments were performed using two different collection methods: collection immediately following formation and collection at the end of photon exposure, allowing a certain amount of ozone to dissociate and recycle. We compared the enrichments of against in ozone from the two above mentioned cases. In the former case, the enrichment in δ17O and δ18O follow a linear relationship of 0.92 (normalized to starting composition), consistent with literature data. Whereas for the latter case, the measured slope value was 0.83. The individual δ17O and δ18O values were also relatively higher compared to the first case. Differences for these two cases may arise due to the additional contribution from ozone dissociation (follow a nearly mass-dependent slope, i.e. 0.5) in the second case. More experiments are underway in an attempt to understand the stabilization step of

  8. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek, S [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, R [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, C [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Brahme, A [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O but also {sup 13}N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery

  9. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  10. Electron and photon energy reconstruction in the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075753; Mandelli, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    The Atlas LAr electromagnetic calorimeter is designed to provide a precise measurement of electrons and photons energies, in order to meet the requirements coming from the LHC physics program. This request of precision makes important to understand the behavior of the detector in all its aspect. Of fundamental importance to achieve the best possible performances is the calibration of the EM calorimeter, and this is the topic of this thesis. With detailed Monte Carlo simulations of single electrons and photons in the Atlas detector, we find a method to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter, based only on the informations that come from it. All the informations needed to develop a calibration method come from the simulations made with the technique of the Calibration Hits, that allows to know the en- ergy deposited in all the materials inside the detector volume, and not only in the active layer of each subdetector as possible in the standard simulations. This technique required a big effort for the develop...

  11. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW-1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  12. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-01-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light–matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW−1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10–90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater. PMID:28181531

  13. Energy exchange processes between electrons and photons in the strong radiation fields encountered in some astrophysical objects. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter-Kazarian, G.T.

    1985-05-01

    The relaxation of a nonequilibrium isotropic radiation field which is interacting via multiphoton Compton scattering with a nonrelativistic degenerate equilibrium electron gas is investigated theoretically. It is pointed out that the multiphoton processes are often orders of magnitude more efficient than the single-photon process in astronomical objects such as radio pulsars and the pulsar NP 0532. The time variation of the photon distribution function is described by a kinetic equation which is formulated in terms of effective photons and shown to be consistent with the H theorem of Boltzmann by estimating the total-entropy change in the electron-photon system. The time variation of the total exchange energy and the electron-gas heating and cooling process are also analyzed. 17 references.

  14. Low-energy photon spectroscopy data in support of ASTM method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Boone, S. (Stephanie)

    2002-01-01

    The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry (C-INC) Radioassay Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been in operation since 1948 to measure fission-product and actinide activities from the U.S. weapons testing program. Since the cessation of testing in 1992, the facility has remained in continuous operation by analyzing samples for environmental, bioassay and research projects. In addition to the many gamma spectroscopy systems, two independent planar germanium detectors are employed for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gsunma rays. 'These counters were used to collect data of select isotopes to support the development of a new ASTM standard, 'Standard Practice for High-Resolution Low-Energy Photon Spectrometry of Water'. This standard is being developed by ASTM Subcommittee D19.04 as a tool for measurement of low-energy gamma-rays and x-rays fiom approximately 4 keV to 150 keV. This work describes empirical counting results obtained fkom traceable sources covering the energy range of interest. Specifically, the isotopes used were 5%i, 55Fe, Am, I, Cd, and 57C0 which provide a range of 5.9 to 136 keV. Mixed nuclide sources were also counted for the purpose of providing data for coincidence summing effects. All data is presented in hardcopy and accompanying electronic form.

  15. Co-generation and innovative heat storage systems in small-medium CSP plants for distributed energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaconia, Alberto; Montagnino, Fabio; Paredes, Filippo; Donato, Filippo; Caputo, Giampaolo; Mazzei, Domenico

    2017-06-01

    CSP technologies can be applied for distributed energy production, on small-medium plants (on the 1 MW scale), to satisfy the needs of local communities, buildings and districts. In this perspective, reliable, low-cost, and flexible small/medium multi-generative CSP plants should be developed. Four pilot plants have been built in four Mediterranean countries (Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, and Italy) to demonstrate the approach. In this paper, the plant built in Italy is presented, with specific innovations applied in the linear Fresnel collector design and the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system, based on a single the use of molten salts but specifically tailored for small scale plants.

  16. Integral particle reflection coefficient for oblique incidence of photons as universal function in the domain of initial energies up to 300 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubenov Vladan L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of calculations and analyses of the integral particle reflection coefficient of photons for oblique photon incidence on planar targets, in the domain of initial photon energies from 100 keV to 300 keV. The results are based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the photon reflection from water, concrete, aluminum, iron, and copper materials, performed by the MCNP code. It has been observed that the integral particle reflection coefficient as a function of the ratio of total cross-section of photons and effective atomic number of target material shows universal behavior for all the analyzed shielding materials in the selected energy domain. Analytical formulas for different angles of photon incidence have been proposed, which describe the reflection of photons for all the materials and energies analyzed.

  17. Electric-field-induced energy tuning of on-demand entangled-photon emission from self-assembled quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Böttner, Stefan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    The scalability of quantum dot based non-classical light sources relies on the control over their dissimilar emission energies. Electric fields offer a promising route to tune the quantum dot emission energy through the quantum-confined Stark effect. However, electric fields have been mostly used for tuning the energy of single-photon emission from quantum dots, while electrical control over the energy of entangled-photon emission, which is crucial for building a solid-state quantum repeater using indistinguishable entangled photons, has not been realized yet. Here, we present a method to achieve electrical control over the energy of entangled-photon emission from quantum dots. The device consists of an electrically-tunable quantum diode integrated onto a piezoactuator. We find that, through application of a vertical electric field, the critical uniaxial stress used to eliminate the fine-structure-splitting of quantum dots can be linearly tuned. This allows realization of a triggered source of energy-tunable ...

  18. Photonuclear activation of pure isotopic mediums.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grohman, Mark A.; Lukosi, Eric Daniel

    2010-06-01

    This work simulated the response of idealized isotopic U-235, U-238, Th-232, and Pu-239 mediums to photonuclear activation with various photon energies. These simulations were conducted using MCNPX version 2.6.0. It was found that photon energies between 14-16 MeV produce the highest response with respect to neutron production rates from all photonuclear reactions. In all cases, Pu-239 responds the highest, followed by U-238. Th-232 produces more overall neutrons at lower photon energies then U-235 when material thickness is above 3.943 centimeters. The time it takes each isotopic material to reach stable neutron production rates in time is directly proportional to the material thickness and stopping power of the medium, where thicker mediums take longer to reach stable neutron production rates and thinner media display a neutron production plateau effect, due to the lack of significant attenuation of the activating photons in the isotopic mediums. At this time, no neutron sensor system has time resolutions capable of verifying these simulations, but various indirect methods are possible and should be explored for verification of these results.

  19. Photonic microstructures for energy-generating clear glass and net-zero energy buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail Vasiliev; Ramzy Alghamedi; Mohammad Nur-E-Alam; Kamal Alameh

    2016-01-01

    Transparent energy-harvesting windows are emerging as practical building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), capable of generating electricity while simultaneously reducing heating and cooling demands. By incorporating spectrally-selective diffraction gratings as light deflecting structures of high visible transparency into lamination interlayers and using improved spectrally-selective thin-film coatings, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass windows with minim...

  20. A feasibility study of projection-based energy weighting based on a photon-counting detector in contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-06-01

    Contrast media, such as iodine and gadolinium, are generally used in digital subtraction mammography to enhance the contrast between target and background materials. In digital subtraction mammography, where one image (with contrast medium) is subtracted from another (anatomical background) to facilitate visualization of the tumor structure, tumors can be more easily distinguished after the injection of a contrast medium. In order to have more an effective method to increase the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), we applied a projection-based energy-weighting method. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the projection-based energy-weighting method in digital subtraction mammography. Unlike some other previous studies, we applied the projection-based energy-weighting method to more practical mammography conditions by using the Monte Carlo method to simulate four different iodine solutions embedded in a breast phantom comprised of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues. We also considered an optimal tube voltage and anode/filter combination in digital iodine contrast media mammography in order to maximize the figure-of-merit (FOM). The simulated source energy was from 20 to 45 keV to prevent electronic noise and include the k-edge energy of iodine (33.2 keV). The results showed that the projection-based energy-weighting improved the CNR by factors of 1.05-1.86 compared to the conventionally integrated images. Consequently, the CNR of digital subtraction mammography images can be improved by using projection-based energy-weighting with photon-counting detectors.

  1. Two photon dissociation of benzene, phenylacetylene, and benzaldehyde at 243 nm: translational energy releases in the H atom channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seung Keun; Kim, Hong Lae [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Ryang [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    Hydrogen atom production channels from photodissociation of benzene, phenylacetylene, and benzaldehyde at 243 nm have been investigated by detecting H atoms using two photon absorption at 243.2 nm and induced fluorescence at 121.6 nm. Translational energies of the H atoms were measured by Doppler broadened H atom spectra. By absorption of two photons at 243 nm, the H atoms are statistically produced from benzene and phenylacetylene whereas the H atoms from the aldehyde group in benzaldehyde are produced from different pathways. The possible dissociation mechanisms are discussed from the measured translational energy releases.

  2. A Study on Selection Performance for High Energy Photons in CMS towards the 13 TeV LHC Run

    CERN Document Server

    Scerri, Dale

    2014-01-01

    The 13 TeV run for the LHC is expected to occur in the beginning of 2015 with a higher number of interactions per bunch crossing and a reduced bunch crossing time spacing. These harsher conditions are expected to affect the photon selection performance especially for high energy photons involved in BSM processes like the Graviton decay. This work summarizes a preliminary study of this performance using 13 TeV Monte Carlo Randall Sundrum Graviton samples with different pileup scenarios corresponding to the coming 13 TeV run conditions. Especially the efficiency for the selection and the energy resolution are investigated.

  3. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  4. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

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