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Sample records for medium mass isotopes

  1. Deep spallation of medium mass isotopes by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolsky, K.L.; Karol, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Spallation systematics have been extended into the deep spallation mass region. Production cross sections of scandium radioisotopes from 0.8 GeV protons on 89 Y, 92,96,100 Mo, and 130 Te targets were measured and the cross sections were used to generate isobaric yield curves at A p =47. In the latter target, this corresponds to a mass loss of >80 nucleons. At ∼10 MeV/nucleon and for products outside the multifragmentation region, this is an extreme manifestation of the spallation process. The results prove to fit smooth extrapolations from trends developed in earlier work on less deep spallation. The influence of target composition is still evident even from 130 Te, in contrast to expectations, based on evaporation considerations, that this so-called memory effect would wash out

  2. A dedicated AMS setup for medium mass isotopes at the Cologne FN tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, M.; Altenkirch, R.; Feuerstein, C.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Hackenberg, G.; Herb, S.; Bhandari, P.; Heinze, S.; Stolz, A.; Dewald, A.

    2017-09-01

    AMS measurements of medium mass isotopes, e.g. of 53Mn and 60Fe, are gaining interest in various fields of operation, especially geoscience. Therefore a dedicated AMS setup has been built at the Cologne 10 MV FN tandem accelerator. This setup is designed to obtain a sufficient suppression of the stable isobars at energies around 100 MeV. In this contribution we report on the actual status of the new setup and the first in-beam tests of its individual components. The isobar suppression is done with (dE/dx) techniques using combinations of energy degrader foils with an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) and a time of flight (ToF) system, as well as a (dE/dx),E gas ionization detector. Furthermore, the upgraded ion source and its negative ion yield measurement for MnO- are presented.

  3. Medium Effects in Reactions with Rare Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C A; Karakoç, M

    2012-01-01

    We discuss medium effects in knockout reactions with rare isotopes of weakly-bound nuclei at intermediate energies. We show that the poorly known corrections may lead to sizable modifications of knockout cross sections and momentum dsitributions.

  4. Isobaric yield curves at A=72 from the spallation of medium mass isotopes by intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.J.; Karol, P.J.; Department of Chemistry, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

    1989-01-01

    Cross sections of radionuclides in the A∼72 mass region produced by the interaction 800 MeV protons with 89 Y, /sup 92,96,100/Mo, and 130 Te were measured. Particular emphasis was paid to the measurement of short-lived products far from β stability. The cross sections were used to generate isobaric yield curves at A=72. Precise characterization of these curves showed that the distribution parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness) vary in a regular fashion with target N/Z. For 89 Y, relative isobaric curves produced by 500 and 800 MeV protons were found to be identical within experimental error. The yield distributions for the /sup 92,96,100/Mo targets also scaled with those from an earlier alpha-induced spallation study. These findings lend strong support to the argument that the spallation mechanism is independent of projectile energy and target composition

  5. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  6. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  7. Atomic masses of rare-earth isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Ott, W.D.; Kantus, R.; Runte, E.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is given of decay energies of rare-earth isotopes measured in electron-capture decay by relative Psub(K) ratios, ECsub(K)/β + , and EC/β + ratios. Atomic masses of A = 147 isotopes and of 146 Gd and 148 Dy were derived. The masses of these isotopes and of α-decaying precessors are compared with predictions of current mass formulae. The subshell closure at Z = 64 is shown for N = 82, and 84 isotones. (orig.)

  8. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the isotope separation art and, more particularly, to a selectively photon-induced energy level transition of an isotopic molecule containing the isotope to be separated and a chemical reaction with a chemically reactive agent to provide a chemical compound containing atoms of the isotope desired. In particular a description is given of a method of laser isotope separation applied to the separation of 235 UF 6 from 238 UF 6 . (U.K.)

  9. Recent development in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzner, I.

    1992-01-01

    Within the limited of this review the following topics will be briefly discussed: a) Accuracy, precision, internal relative standard deviation (RISD) and external relative standard deviation (RESD) of isotope ratio measurements. With advanced instrumentation and use of standard reference materials, high accuracy and RESD = 0.002% (or better) may be achieved; b) The advantages of modern automatic isotope ratio mass spectrometer are briefly described. Computer controlled operation and data acquisition, and multiple ion collection are the recent important improvement; c) The isotopic fractionation during the course of isotope ratio measurement is considered as a major source of errors in thermal ionization of metallic elements. The phenomenon in strontium, neodymium, uranium, lead and calcium and methods to correct the measured data are discussed; d) Applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations, the isotope dilution technique, isotope geology, and isotope effects in biological systems are described together with specific applications in various research and technology area. (author)

  10. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    An isotope separation arrangement for separating a preselected isotope from a mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules by either photon-induced pure revibrational or vibronic selective excitation of the molecules containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated from a lower to a higher energy state, and a chemical reaction of the higher energy state molecules with a chemically-reactive agent to form a chemical compound containing primarily the atoms of the isotope to be separated in a physicochemical state different from the physicochemical state of the mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules. The chemical compound containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated may be subsequently processed to obtain the isotope. The laser configuration used to generate the photon beam is fully described

  11. Mass fractionation processes of transition metal isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. K.; Guo, Y.; Williams, R. J. P.; O'Nions, R. K.; Matthews, A.; Belshaw, N. S.; Canters, G. W.; de Waal, E. C.; Weser, U.; Burgess, B. K.; Salvato, B.

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry make it possible to utilise isotope variations of transition metals to address some important issues in solar system and biological sciences. Realisation of the potential offered by these new isotope systems however requires an adequate understanding of the factors controlling their isotope fractionation. Here we show the results of a broadly based study on copper and iron isotope fractionation during various inorganic and biological processes. These results demonstrate that: (1) naturally occurring inorganic processes can fractionate Fe isotope to a detectable level even at temperature ˜1000°C, which challenges the previous view that Fe isotope variations in natural system are unique biosignatures; (2) multiple-step equilibrium processes at low temperatures may cause large mass fractionation of transition metal isotopes even when the fractionation per single step is small; (3) oxidation-reduction is an importation controlling factor of isotope fractionation of transition metal elements with multiple valences, which opens a wide range of applications of these new isotope systems, ranging from metal-silicate fractionation in the solar system to uptake pathways of these elements in biological systems; (4) organisms incorporate lighter isotopes of transition metals preferentially, and transition metal isotope fractionation occurs stepwise along their pathways within biological systems during their uptake.

  12. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  13. Mass measurement of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Scheidenberger, C

    2004-01-01

    The highest precision in mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides is obtained using trapping and cooling techniques. Here, the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI/Darmstadt and the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN play an important role. Status and recent results on mass measurements of radioactive nuclides with ESR and ISOLTRAP are summarized.

  14. Guideline on Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Amy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is used to determine the concentration of an element of interest in a bulk sample. It is a destructive analysis technique that is applicable to a wide range of analytes and bulk sample types. With this method, a known amount of a rare isotope, or ‘spike’, of the element of interest is added to a known amount of sample. The element of interest is chemically purified from the bulk sample, the isotope ratio of the spiked sample is measured by mass spectrometry, and the concentration of the element of interest is calculated from this result. This method is widely used, although a mass spectrometer required for this analysis may be fairly expensive.

  15. Analysis of barium by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Kaiming; Jia Baoting; Liu Xuemei

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic abundance ratios for barium at sub-microgram level are analyzed by thermal surface ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Rhenium trips used for sample preparation are firstly treated to eliminate possible barium background interference. During the preparation of barium samples phosphoric acid is added as an emitting and stabilizing reagent. The addition of phosphoric acid increases the collection efficiency and ion current strength and stability for barium. A relative standard deviation of 0.02% for the isotopic abundance ratio of 137 Ba to 138 Ba is achieved when the 138 Ba ion current is (1-3) x 10 -12 A. The experimental results also demonstrate that the isotope fractionation effect is negligibly small in the isotopic analysis of barium

  16. Principles of isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of magnetic sector field mass spectrometers in isotopic analysis, especially for nitrogen gas, is outlined. Two measuring methods are pointed out: the scanning mode for significantly enriched samples and the double collector method for samples near the natural abundance of 15 N. The calculation formulas are derived and advice is given for corrections. (author)

  17. INTRAMOLECULAR ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN HYDROCARBON MASS SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, D. P.; Schachtschneider, J. H.

    1963-07-15

    Approximate calculations based on the quasi-equilibrium rate theory of the origin of mass spectra are shown to lead to an approximately correct magnitude for the intramolecular ( pi /sup -/) isotope effect on C--H bond dissociation probabilities of various deuterohydrocarbons. (auth)

  18. Calcium isotope fractionation in liquid chromatography with benzo-18-crown-6 resin in aqueous hydrobromic acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takuya; Oi, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography operated in a breakthrough mode was employed to study calcium isotope fractionation in the aqueous hydrobromic acid medium. Highly porous silica beads, the inner pores of which were embedded with a benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin, were used as column packing material. Enrichment of heavier isotopes of calcium was observed in the frontal part of respective calcium chromatograms. The values of the isotope fractionation coefficient were on the order of 10 -3 . The observed isotope fractionation coefficient was dependent on the concentration of hydrobromic acid in the calcium feed solution; a higher HBr concentration resulted in a smaller fractionation coefficient value. The present calcium isotope effects were most probably mass-dependent, indicating that they mostly came from isotope effects based on molecular vibration. Molecular orbital calculations supported the present experimental results in a qualitative fashion. Chromatography operated in aqueous HBr media is a better system of Ca isotope separation than that operated in aqueous HCl media. (author)

  19. Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Kluge, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes 252-254 No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a 48 Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

  20. Hydrogen isotope analysis by quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellefson, R.E.; Moddeman, W.E.; Dylla, H.F.

    1981-03-01

    The analysis of isotopes of hydrogen (H, D, T) and helium ( 3 He, 4 He) and selected impurities using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) has been investigated as a method of measuring the purity of tritium gas for injection into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A QMS was used at low resolution, m/Δm 3 He, and 4 He in HT/D 2

  1. Isotope correlation and mass spectrometry techniques for irradiated fuel assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deron, S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper outlines the methods used to account for fissionable materials in irradiated nuclear fuel elements entering reprocessing plants. Verification is accomplished at three mass balance stations in the plant. Techniques employed fall into two categories: isotopic and isotope dilution analyses by mass spectometry and isotope correlation techniques. These methods are discussed in some detail

  2. A theory of stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, J.F.; McPherson, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    In order to perform quantitative analysis using stable isotope dilution with mass spectrometry, an equation is derived which describes the relationship between the relative proportions of natural and labelled material and measured isotope ratios

  3. Accurate isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Some problems and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bievre, P. de

    1978-01-01

    The review includes reference to 190 papers, mainly published during the last 10 years. It covers the following: important factors in accurate isotope ratio measurements (precision and accuracy of isotope ratio measurements -exemplified by determinations of 235 U/ 238 U and of other elements including 239 Pu/ 240 Pu; isotope fractionation -exemplified by curves for Rb, U); applications (atomic weights); the Oklo natural nuclear reactor (discovered by UF 6 mass spectrometry at Pierrelatte); nuclear and other constants; isotope ratio measurements in nuclear geology and isotope cosmology - accurate age determination; isotope ratio measurements on very small samples - archaeometry; isotope dilution; miscellaneous applications; and future prospects. (U.K.)

  4. New mass spectrometers for hydrogen isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chastagner, P.; Daves, H.L.; Hess, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    Two advanced mass spectrometers for the accurate analysis of mixtures of the hydrogen isotopes are being evaluated by Du Pont personnel at the Savannah River Laboratory. One is a large double-focusing instrument with a resolution of 2000 at mass 4, an abundance sensitivity of > 100,000 for the HT-D 2 doublet, and a sophisticated electronic control and data collection system. The second is a smaller, simpler, stigmatic-focusing instrument in which exceptionally high ion intensities (> 1 x 10 -9 A) result in high signal to noise ratios. A containment facility with sample inlet systems and a standard distribution system was built to permit testing with tritium mixtures. The characteristics of the mass spectrometers under a variety of operating conditions will be presented. Factors to be discussed include: sample equilibration and its elimination; linearity; trimer formation; gas interference; stability; signal to noise ratio; mass discrimination; and anticipated precision and accu sublimed molybdenum collector of Converter No. 262; and (3) demonstration of tungsten CVD onto molybdenum flange using a reuseable graphite mandrel

  5. High mass isotope separation process and arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    An isotope separation arrangement for separating a preselected isotope from a mixture of chemically identical but isotopically different molecules by either photon-induced pure rovibrational or vibronic selective excitation of the molecules containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated from a lower to a higher energy state, and a chemical reaction of the higher energy state molecules with a chemically reactive agent to form a chemical compound containing primarily the atoms of isotope to be separated in a physicochemical state different from the physicochemical state of the mixture of chemically identical but isotopically different molecules. The chemical compound containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated may be subsequently processed to obtain the isotope

  6. Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient xenon isotopes with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilling, J.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.; Bollen, G.; Henry, S.; Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Moore, R.B.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwarz, S.; Sikler, G.; Szerypo, J.

    2002-01-01

    The masses of Xe isotopes with 124≥A≥114 have been measured using the ISOLTRAP spectrometer at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE/CERN. A mass resolving power of 500 000 was chosen resulting in an accuracy of δm∼12 keV for all isotopes investigated. Conflicts with existing mass data of several standard deviations were found

  7. Fission mass yields of excited medium heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Depta, K.; Herrmann, R.; Greiner, W.; Scheid, W.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distributions resulting from the fission of excited medium mass nuclei are discussed on the basis of the fragmentation theory. It is shown that very asymmetric fission events can be expected with rates which are only a few orders of magnitude smaller than the rates for symmetric fission. As an example a calculation of the fission mass distribution of the excited 172 Yb compound nucleus is presented. This mass distribution reveals observable structures over the entire range of the mass asymmetry due to valleys in the potential energy surface for fission fragments with closed proton and neutron shells

  8. Role of stable isotope mass spectroscopy in hydrological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesari, Tirumalesh

    2017-01-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is a specialized technique used to provide information about a given sample about its geographic, chemical, physical and biological origin. The ability to determine the source of water molecule stems from the relative isotopic abundances of its constituent elements, viz., hydrogen and oxygen or sometimes through its dissolved elements such as carbon, nitrogen and sulphur etc. Since the isotope ratios of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen can become locally enriched or depleted through a variety of kinetic and thermodynamic factors, measurement of the isotope ratios can be used to unravel the processes and differentiate water samples which otherwise exhibit similar chemical signatures. For brevity, this article focuses mainly on measurement of water isotopes, common notation for expressing isotope data and standards, theory of isotope hydrology, field applications and advances

  9. Biomedical applications of mass spectrometry. Clinical uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahmer, U.I.; McCloskey, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The review covers typical or important examples of stable isotope usage in clinical fields during the period since the last triennial mass spectrometry conference in 1973. Items are included which involve uses of stable isotopes in human or clinically oriented studies, including measurements carried out on materials of human origin. 163 references. (U.K.)

  10. Isotopic analysis of plutonium by computer controlled mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of plutonium chemically purified by ion exchange is achieved using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. Data acquisition from and control of the instrument is done automatically with a dedicated system computer in real time with subsequent automatic data reduction and reporting. Separation of isotopes is achieved by varying the ion accelerating high voltage with accurate computer control

  11. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C. W.; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J.; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2015-01-01

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although

  12. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Schierbeek, H.; Houtekamer, M.; van Engeland, T.; Derrien, D.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of d13C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although

  13. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Schierbeek, H.; Houtekamer, M.; van Engeland, T.; Derrien, D.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ13C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence,

  14. An improved data acquisition system for isotopic ratio mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, T.K.; Reddy, B.; Nazare, C.K.; Handu, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic ratio mass spectrometers designed and fabricated to measure the isotopic ratios with a precision of better than 0.05%. In order to achieve this precision, the measurement system consisting of ion signal to voltage converters, analog to digital converters, and data acquisition electronics should be at least one order better than the overall precision of measurement. Using state of the art components and techniques, a data acquisition system, which is an improved version of the earlier system, has been designed and developed for use with multi-collector isotopic ratio mass spectrometers

  15. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter 1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution 3,4 . Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division ch...

  16. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  17. Nuclear reactions of high energy deuterons with medium mass targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numajiri, Masaharu; Miura, Taichi; Oki, Yuichi

    1994-01-01

    Formation cross sections of product nuclides in the nuclear reactions of medium mass targets by 10 GeV deuterons were measured with a gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured data were compared with the cross sections of 12 GeV protons. (author)

  18. Mass-independent isotope effects in chemical exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kazushige

    2000-01-01

    Isotope effects of some elements in chemical exchange reaction were investigated by use of liquid-liquid extraction, liquid membrane or chromatographic separation. Cyclic polyether was used for every method. All polyethers used in a series of the studies were made clear that they distinguished the isotopes not only by their nuclear masses but also by their nuclear sizes and shapes. Chromium isotopes, for example, were recognized to have enrichment factors being proportional to δ 2 > which is a parameter to show field shift or the nuclear size and shape of the isotope. It follows that the chromium isotopes are separated not by their masses but by their field shift effects. Nuclear spin also played a great role to separate odd mass number isotopes from even mass number isotopes in even atomic number elements. Contribution of the nuclear spin (I=3/2) of 53 Cr to total enrichment factor, ε 53/52 = -0.00028, for 53 Cr to 52 Cr was observed to be, ε spin = -0.0025. (author)

  19. Accurate masses of unstable rare earth isotopes by ISOLTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.; Ames, F.; Audi, G.

    2000-05-01

    Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes in the vicinity of 146 Gd were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. This paper reports on the measurement of more than 40 isotopes of the elements Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Dy and Ho, that have been measured with a typical accuracy of δm ∼ 14 keV. An atomic mass evaluation has been performed taking into account other experimental mass values via a least-squares adjustment. The results of the adjustment are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Paradigms in isotope dilution mass spectrometry for elemental speciation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meija, Juris; Mester, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry currently stands out as the method providing results with unchallenged precision and accuracy in elemental speciation. However, recent history of isotope dilution mass spectrometry has shown that the extent to which this primary ratio measurement method can deliver accurate results is still subject of active research. In this review, we will summarize the fundamental prerequisites behind isotope dilution mass spectrometry and discuss their practical limits of validity and effects on the accuracy of the obtained results. This review is not to be viewed as a critique of isotope dilution; rather its purpose is to highlight the lesser studied aspects that will ensure and elevate current supremacy of the results obtained from this method

  1. Fem Formulation for Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium can be modelled using three partial differential equations namely, momentum equation, energy equation and mass diffusion. These three equations are coupled to each other by some common terms that turn the whole phenomenon into a complex problem with inter-dependable variables. The current article describes the finite element formulation of heat and mass transfer in porous medium with respect to Cartesian coordinates. The problem under study is formulated into algebraic form of equations by using Galerkin's method with the help of two-node linear triangular element having three nodes. The domain is meshed with smaller sized elements near the wall region and bigger size away from walls.

  2. Mass independent isotope effects and their observations in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiemens, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1983, Thiemens and Heidenreich reported the first chemically produced mass independent isotope effect. A significant feature of the fractionation was that it identically produced the isotopic relation observed in the calcium-aluminum inclusions in the Allende meteorite. This δ 17 O=δ 18 O composition had previously been thought to represent a nucleosynthetic component as no chemical process was capable of producing a mass independent isotopic composition. It now appears nearly certain that the meteoritic oxygen isotopic anomalies were produced by chemical, rather than nuclear, processes. Since oxygen is the major element in stony planets this represents a major event in the formation of the solar system. In a recent review (Thiemens, 1999), it has been shown that mass independent isotopic compositions are pervasive in the Earth's atmosphere. Molecules which have been demonstrated to possess mass independent isotopic compositions include: O 2 , O 3 , CO 2 , CO, and N 2 O. In each case, the specific nature of the mass independent isotopic composition has provided details of their atmospheric chemistry that could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique. Most recently, solid materials have been observed to possess mass independent isotopic composition. In this paper, these observations are briefly discussed. These solid reservoirs include: 1) carbonates and sulphates from Mars, 2) terrestrial aerosol sulphate, 3) sulphides and sulphates from the Earth, ranging in time from 3.8 to 2.2 billion years before present, 4) sulphates from the Namibian desert and 5) the Antartic Dry Valleys. The information obtained from these measurements is extraordinarily wide ranging, extending from understanding the history of Martian atmosphereregolith interaction to the evolution of the oxygen in the Earth's earliest atmosphere. As was the case for gas phase species, this information and insight could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique

  3. New Isotope Analysis Method: Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young

    2011-01-01

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Some fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of artificially produced radioactive isotopes has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10 -10 . In general, radio-chemical method has been applied to detect ultra-trace radio isotopes. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The Accelerator Mass Spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and its selectivity is affected by isobars. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) has the advantage of isobar-effect free characteristics. But the system size is still huge for high isotope selective system. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis) has been successfully applied to detect ultra-trace isotope, Kr-81 and Kr-85. ATTA is the isobar-effect free detection with high isotope selectivity and the system size is small. However, it requires steady atomic beam source during detection, and is not allowed simultaneous detection of several isotopes. In this presentation, we introduce new isotope detection method which is a coupled method of Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry (ATMS). We expect that it can overcome the disadvantage of ATTA while it has both advantages of ATTA and mass spectrometer. The basic concept and the system design will be presented. In addition, the experimental status of ATMS will also be presented

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 59Ni and Fe isotopes at the Argonne superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.; Kutschera, W.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pardo, R.C.; Smither, R.K.; Yntema, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained initial results in an attempt to use the Argonne tandem-linac system for accelerator mass spectrometry of medium-heavy nuclei. Nuclei of the radioisotope 59 Ni (T/sub 1/2 = 7.5 x 10 5 y) and of the stable isotope 58 Fe at low concentrations have been accelerated and clearly identified. The latter experiment is in preparation of a measurement of the half-life of 60 Fe

  5. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; Kasprzyk, G.; Gumolka, L.; Staedter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H 3 PO 4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13 C (1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H 3 PO 4 , in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C (1)- OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13 C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13 C fractionation corresponding to C (2)- C (1) bond scission. The 13 C (1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13 C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C (1) -OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H 3 PO 4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18 O and a primary 18 O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  6. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes using the ISOLTRAP spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lamour, E; Marx, G; Schwarz, S C; Bollen, G; Kellerbauer, A G; Moore, R B; Henry, S

    2000-01-01

    ISOLTRAP is a Penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the on line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. Direct measurements of the masses of short lived radio isotopes are performed using the existing triple trap system. This consists of three electromagnetic traps in tandem: a Paul trap to accumulate and bunch the 60 keV dc beam, a Penning trap for cooling and isobar separation, and a precision Penning trap for the determination of the masses by cyclotron resonance. Measurements of masses of unknown mercury isotopes and in the vicinity of doubly magic /sup 208/Pb are presented, all with an accuracy of delta m/m approximately=1*10/sup -7/. Developments to replace the Paul trap by a radiofrequency quadrupole ion guide system to increase the collection efficiency are presently under way and the status is presented. (10 refs).

  7. Selective laser ionization for mass-spectral isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.; Downey, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Resonant enhancement of the ionization process can provide a high degree of elemental selectivity, thus eliminating or drastically reducing the interference problem. In addition, extension of this method to isotopically selective ionization has the potential for greatly increasing the range of isotope ratios that can be determined experimentally. This gain can be realized by reducing or eliminating the tailing of the signal from the high-abundance isotope into that of the low-abundance isotope, augmenting the dispersion of the mass spectrometer. We briefly discuss the hardware and techniques used in both our pulsed and cw RIMS experiments. Results are presented for both cw ionization experiments on Lu/Yb mixtures, and spectroscopic studies of multicolor RIMS of Tc. Lastly, we discuss practical limits of cw RIMS analysis in terms of detection limits and measurable isotope ratios

  8. Isotope analysis of lithium by thermionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Sarkis, J.E.S.

    1991-04-01

    An analytical mass spectrometric method for the isotope analysis of lithium has been studied. The analysis were carried out by using a single focusing thermoionic mass spectrometer Varian Mat TH5 with 90 sup(0) magnetic sector field and 21.4 cm deflection radius, equipped with a dual Re-filament thermal ionization ion source. The effect of different lithium chemical forms, such as, carbonate, chloride, nitrate and sulfate upon the isotopic ratios sup(6)Li/ sup(7)Li has been studied. Isotopic fractionation of lithium was studied in terms of the time of analysis. The results obtained with lithium carbonate yielded a precision of ±0.1% and an accuracy of ± 0.6%, whereas with other chemical forms yielded precisions of ±0.5% and accuracies of ±2%. A fractionation correction factor, K=1.005, was obtained for different samples of lithium carbonate isotopic standard CBNM IRM 016, which has been considered constant. (author)

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer Model in Freeze-Dried Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfat, Sayahdin; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    There are big problems in agriculture sector every year. One of the major problems is abundance of agricultural product during the peak of harvest season that is not matched by an increase in demand of agricultural product by consumers, this causes a wasted agricultural products. Alternative way was food preservation by freeze dried method. This method was already using heat transfer through conduction and convection to reduce water quality in the food. The main objective of this research was to design a model heat and mass transfer in freeze-dried medium. We had two steps in this research, the first step was design of medium as the heat injection site and the second was simulate heat and mass transfer of the product. During simulation process, we use physical property of some agriculture product. The result will show how temperature and moisture distribution every second. The method of research use finite element method (FEM) and will be illustrated in three dimensional.

  10. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, K.Y.; Veillon, Claude

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g -1 . The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Hot vacuum extraction-isotopic dilution mass spectrometry for determination of hydrogen isotopes in zircaloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Y.; Leeson, P.K.; Wilkin, D.; Britton, A.; Macleod, R.

    2016-01-01

    A hot vacuum extraction-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (HVE-IDMS) was studied for determination of hydrogen isotopes in zirconium metal and alloys as nuclear reactor materials. A theoretical assessment of the completeness of the extraction of hydrogen isotopes under the chosen condition was carried out based on the hydrogen and deuterium solubility data for zirconium. The optimal isotopic spiking condition for conventional IDMS was further explored for the special case IDMS where the isotope abundance of the samples is varied and non-natural. Applying the optimal conditions, the accurate IDMS determination was realized. The agreement between the measured values and the certified or prepared values of standard reference materials and homemade standard materials validate the method developed. (author)

  12. Quantitative mass-spectrometric analysis of hydrogen helium isotope mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, U.

    1998-12-01

    This work deals with the mass-spectrometric method for the quantitative analysis of hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures, with special attention to fusion plasma diagnostics. The aim was to use the low-resolution mass spectrometry, a standard measuring method which is well established in science and industry. This task is solved by means of the vector mass spectrometry, where a mass spectrum is repeatedly measured, but with stepwise variation of the parameter settings of a quadruple mass spectrometer. In this way, interfering mass spectra can be decomposed and, moreover, it is possible to analyze underestimated mass spectra of complex hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures. In this work experimental investigations are presented which show that there are different parameters which are suitable for the UMS-method. With an optimal choice of the parameter settings hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures can be analyzed with an accuracy of 1-3 %. In practice, a low sensitivity for small helium concentration has to be noted. To cope with this task, a method for selective hydrogen pressure reduction has been developed. Experimental investigations and calculations show that small helium amounts (about 1 %) in a hydrogen atmosphere can be analyzed with an accuracy of 3 - 10 %. Finally, this work deals with the effects of the measuring and calibration error on the resulting error in spectrum decomposition. This aspect has been investigated both in general mass-spectrometric gas analysis and in the analysis of hydrogen-helium-mixtures by means of the vector mass spectrometry. (author)

  13. Isotope determination of sulfur by mass spectrometry in soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexssandra Luiza Rodrigues Molina Rossete

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur plays an essential role in plants and is one of the main nutrients in several metabolic processes. It has four stable isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S with a natural abundance of 95.00, 0.76, 4.22, and 0.014 in atom %, respectively. A method for isotopic determination of S by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS in soil samples is proposed. The procedure involves the oxidation of organic S to sulphate (S-SO4(2-, which was determined by dry combustion with alkaline oxidizing agents. The total S-SO4(2- concentration was determined by turbidimetry and the results showed that the conversion process was adequate. To produce gaseous SO2 gas, BaSO4 was thermally decomposed in a vacuum system at 900 ºC in the presence of NaPO3. The isotope determination of S (atom % 34S atoms was carried out by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. In this work, the labeled material (K2(34SO4 was used to validate the method of isotopic determination of S; the results were precise and accurate, showing the viability of the proposed method.

  14. Accurate mass measurements on neutron-deficient krypton isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, D.; Äystö, J.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Herfurth, F.; Jokinen, A.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Oinonen, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schwarz, S.

    2006-01-01

    The masses of $^{72–78,80,82,86}$Kr were measured directly with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. For all these nuclides, the measurements yielded mass uncertainties below 10 keV. The ISOLTRAP mass values for $^{72–75}$Kr being more precise than the previous results obtained by means of other techniques, and thus completely determine the new values in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. Besides the interest of these masses for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure studies, and Standard Model tests, these results constitute a valuable and accurate input to improve mass models. In this paper, we present the mass measurements and discuss the mass evaluation for these Kr isotopes.

  15. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.H.; Ricci, S.A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values

  16. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wienholtz, F; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-01-01

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of $^{51}$Ca and $^{52}$Ca have been validated by direct measurements$^4$, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes $^{53}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our t...

  17. Isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Sarkis, J.E.S.; Souza, I.M.S.

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique through the ion intensity measurement of Na 2 BO + 2 in H 3 BO 3 , B o and B 4 C. The samples were loaded on single tantalum filaments by different methods. In the case of H 3 BO 3 , the method of neutralization with NaOH was used. For B 4 C the alcaline fusion with Na 2 CO 3 and for B o dissolution with 1:1 nitric sulfuric acid mixture followed by neutralization with NaOH was used. The isotopic ratio measurements were obtained by the use of s Faraday cup detector with external precision of ±0,4% and accuracy of ±0,1%, relative to H 3 BO 3 isotopic standard NBS 951. The effects of isotopic fractionation was studied in function of the time during the analyses and the different chemical forms of deposition. (author)

  18. Isotopic analysis of uranium by thermoionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium isotopic ratio measurements by thermoionic spectrometry are presented. Emphasis is given upon the investigation of the parameters that directly affect the precision and accuracy of the results. Optimized procedures, namely, chemical processing, sample loading on the filaments, vaporization, ionization and measurements of ionic currents, are established. Adequate statistical analysis of the data for the calculation of the internal and external variances and mean standard deviation are presented. These procedures are applied to natural and NBS isotopic standard uranium samples. The results obtained agree with the certified values within specified limits. 235 U/ 238 U isotopic ratios values determined for NBS-U500, and a series of standard samples with variable isotopic compositon, are used to calculate mass discrimination factor [pt

  19. Mass spectrometric researches in isotope cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, K.

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of solar system processes, past and present, based on mass spectrometric researches on meteorites and moon samples are reviewed. The topics include the following : (1) Duration of nebular condensation, (2) Terminal stages of nucleosynthesis, (3) Planetary formation and evolution, (4) Heterogeneities in the solar nebula and (5) Solar wind composition. (auth.)

  20. The Varian MAT-250 mass spectrometer. Steady isotopes laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, V.; Tavera D, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This work treats over the performance and applications of the Varian Mat-250 mass spectrometer which is in the environmental isotope laboratory. It can be applied over topics such as: ions formation, acceleration and collimation, ions separation, ions detection, data transformation, sampling, δ notation. (Author)

  1. Cross contamination in dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.A.J.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Visser, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    Since the early days of geochemical isotope ratio mass spectrometry there has always been the problem of cross contamination, i.e. the contamination of the sample gas with traces of reference gas land vice versa) in a dual inlet system and the analyzer itself. This was attributable to valve leakages

  2. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Manuel J.; Weeks, Stephan; Kyle, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  3. Fe and Cu isotope mass balances in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, V.; Albarede, F.; Jaouen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The ranges of the Fe and Cu isotope compositions in the human body are large, i.e. ~3% and ~2%, respectively. Both isotopic fractionations appear to be mainly controlled by redox conditions. The Fe and Cu isotope compositions of the tissues analyzed so far plot on a mixing hyperbolae between a reduced and an oxidized metals pools. The reduced metals pool is composed by erythrocytes, where Fe is bounded to hemoglobin as Fe(II) and Cu to superoxide-dismutase as Cu(I). The oxidized metals pool is composed by hepatocytes, where Fe and Cu are stored as Fe(III) ferritin and as Cu(II) ceruloplasmine, respectively. The position of each biological component in the δ56Fe-δ65Cu diagram therefore reflects the oxidation state of Fe and Cu of the predominant metal carrier protein and allows to quantify Fe and Cu fluxes between organs using mass balance calculations. For instance, serum and clot Fe and Cu isotope compositions show that current biological models of erythropoiesis violates mass conservation requirements, and suggest hidden Fe and Cu pathways during red blood cells synthesis. The results also show that a coupled Fe-Cu strong gender isotopic effect is observed in various organs. The isotopic difference between men and women is unlikely to be due to differential dietary uptake or endometrium loss, but rather reflects the effect of menstrual losses and a correlative solicitation of hepatic stores. We speculate that thorough studies of the metabolism of stable isotopes in normal conditions is a prerequisite for the understanding of the pathological dysregulations.

  4. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  5. Steroid isotopic standards for gas chromatography-combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J; Brenna, J Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis of urinary steroids using gas chromatography-combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) is a recognized test to detect illicit doping with synthetic testosterone. There are currently no universally used steroid isotopic standards (SIS). We adapted a protocol to prepare isotopically uniform steroids for use as a calibrant in GCC-IRMS that can be analyzed under the same conditions as used for steroids extracted from urine. Two separate SIS containing a mixture of steroids were created and coded CU/USADA 33-1 and CU/USADA 34-1, containing acetates and native steroids, respectively. CU/USADA 33-1 contains 5alpha-androstan-3beta-ol acetate (5alpha-A-AC), 5alpha-androstan-3alpha-ol-17-one acetate (androsterone acetate, A-AC), 5beta-androstan-3alpha-ol-11, 17-dione acetate (11-ketoetiocholanolone acetate, 11k-AC) and 5alpha-cholestane (Cne). CU/USADA 34-1 contains 5beta-androstan-3alpha-ol-17-one (etiocholanolone, E), 5alpha-androstan-3alpha-ol-17-one (androsterone, A), and 5beta-pregnane-3alpha, 20alpha-diol (5betaP). Each mixture was prepared and dispensed into a set of about 100 ampoules using a protocol carefully designed to minimize isotopic fractionation and contamination. A natural gas reference material, NIST RM 8559, traceable to the international standard Vienna PeeDee Belemnite (VPDB) was used to calibrate the SIS. Absolute delta(13)C(VPDB) and Deltadelta(13)C(VPDB) values from randomly selected ampoules from both SIS indicate uniformity of steroid isotopic composition within measurement reproducibility, SD(delta(13)C)<0.2 per thousand. This procedure for creation of isotopic steroid mixtures results in consistent standards with isotope ratios traceable to the relevant international reference material.

  6. Precision mass measurements of neutron-rich Co isotopes beyond N =40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, C.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Eibach, M.; Gulyuz, K.; Holt, J. D.; Kelly, J. M.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Valverde, A. A.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2018-01-01

    The region near Z =28 and N =40 is a subject of great interest for nuclear structure studies due to spectroscopic signatures in 68Ni suggesting a subshell closure at N =40 . Trends in nuclear masses and their derivatives provide a complementary approach to shell structure investigations via separation energies. Penning trap mass spectrometry has provided precise measurements for a number of nuclei in this region; however, a complete picture of the mass surfaces has so far been limited by the large uncertainty remaining for nuclei with N >40 along the iron (Z =26 ) and cobalt (Z =27 ) chains because these species are not available from traditional isotope separator online rare isotope facilities. The Low-Energy Beam and Ion Trap Facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is the first and only Penning trap mass spectrometer coupled to a fragmentation facility and therefore presents the unique opportunity to perform precise mass measurements of these elusive isotopes. Here we present the first Penning trap measurements of Co,6968, carried out at this facility. Some ambiguity remains as to whether the measured values are ground-state or isomeric-state masses. A detailed discussion is presented to evaluate this question and to motivate future work. In addition, we perform ab initio calculations of ground-state and two-neutron separation energies of cobalt isotopes with the valence-space in-medium similarity renormalization group approach based on a particular set of two- and three-nucleon forces that predict saturation in infinite matter. We discuss the importance of these measurements and calculations for understanding the evolution of nuclear structure near 68Ni.

  7. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.

    2009-05-01

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235 U(n th ,f), 239 Pu(n th ,f) and 241 Pu(n th ,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239 Pu(n th ,f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  8. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution3,4. Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division chromosomes containing older template DNA are segregated to the daughter destined to remain a stem cell, thus insuring lifetime genetic stability. After labeling mice with 15N-thymidine from gestation through post-natal week 8, we find no 15N label retention by dividing small intestinal crypt cells after 4wk chase. In adult mice administered 15N-thymidine pulse-chase, we find that proliferating crypt cells dilute label consistent with random strand segregation. We demonstrate the broad utility of MIMS with proof-of-principle studies of lipid turnover in Drosophila and translation to the human hematopoietic system. These studies show that MIMS provides high-resolution quantitation of stable isotope labels that cannot be obtained using other techniques and that is broadly applicable to biological and medical research. PMID:22246326

  9. Deformation and shape coexistence in medium mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Emerging evidence for deformed structures in medium mass nuclei is reviewed. Included in this review are both nuclei that are ground state symmetric rotors and vibrational nuclei where there are deformed structures at excited energies (shape coexistence). For the first time, Nilsson configurations in odd-odd nuclei within the region of deformation are identified. Shape coexistence in nuclei that abut the medium mass region of deformation is also examined. Recent establishment of a four-particle, four-hole intruder band in the double subshell closure nucleus 96 Zr 56 is presented and its relation to the nuclear vibron model is discussed. Special attention is given to the N=59 nuclei where new data have led to the reanalysis of 97 Sr and 99 Zr and the presence of the [404 9/2] hole intruder state as isomers in these nuclei. The low energy levels of the N=59 nuclei from Z=38 to 50 are compared with recent quadrupole-phonon model calculations that can describe their transition from near-rotational to single closed shell nuclei. The odd-odd N=59 nuclei are discussed in the context of coexisting shape isomers based on the (p[303 5/2]n[404 9/2])2 - configuration. Ongoing in-beam (t,p conversion-electron) multiparameter measurements that have led to the determination of monopole matrix elements for even-even 42 Mo nuclei are presented, and these are compared with initial estimates using IBA-2 calculations that allow mixing of normal and cross subshell excitations. Lastly, evidence for the neutron-proton 3 S 1 force's influence on the level structure of these nuclei is discussed within the context of recent quadrupole-phonon model calculations. (Auth.)

  10. PYRO - new capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new computational code package called PYRO has been developed to support the IFR fuel recycle demonstration project in the HFEF/S facility at ANL-W. The basic pyrochemical code PYRO1 1 models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions of 48 essential chemical elements involved in the pyroprocess. It has been extended to PYRO1 2 by linking with the ORIGEN code to track more than 1000 isotopic species, their radioactive decays, and related phenomena. This paper first describes the pyroprocess to be modeled and the pyrochemical capability that has been implemented in PYRO1 1 , and then gives a full account on the algorithm of extending it to PYRO1 2 for isotopic mass tracking. Results from several scoping and simulation runs will be discussed to illustrate the significance of modeling in process radioactive decays

  11. PYRO: New capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new computational code package called PYRO has been developed to support the IFR fuel recycle demonstration project in the HFEF/S facility at ANL-W. The basic pyrochemical code PYRO1-1 models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions of 48 essential chemical elements involved in the pyroprocess. It has been extended to PYRO1-2 by linking with the ORIGEN code to track more than 1000 isotopic species, their radioactive decays, and related phenomena. This paper first describes the pyroprocess to be modeled and the pyrochemical capability that has been implemented in PYRO1-1, and then gives a full account on the algorithm of extending it to PYRO1-2 for isotopic mass tracking. Results from several scoping and simulation runs will be discussed to illustrate the significance of modeling in-process radioactive decays. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Isotope-dilution mass spectrometry in the measurement of plutonium isotope half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernathey, R.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope-dilution mass spectrometry has been used at Los Alamos to measure the half-lives of 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 241 Pu. The latter was determined by measuring the rate of decrease of the 241 Pu/ 242 Pu ratio in an appropriate isotopic mixture over a period of several years. The half-lives of the two lighter isotopes are too long to be determined in this manner. They were determined by measuring the rate of production of the uranium daughter relative to a known added 233 U spike. Experimental procedures were designed to control sources of error and to permit a detailed statistical treatment which included all known sources of error and accounted for all covariances. The uncertainties, at the 95% confidence level, associated with the measured half-lives were less than 0.4% for 241 Pu and less than 0.2% for 239 Pu and 240 Pu

  13. Computer automated mass spectrometer for isotope analysis on gas samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamula, A.; Kaucsar, M.; Fatu, C.; Ursu, D.; Vonica, D.; Bendea, D.; Muntean, F.

    1998-01-01

    A low resolution, high precision instrument was designed and realized in the mass spectrometry laboratory of the Institute of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca. The paper presents the vacuum system, the sample inlet system, the ion source, the magnetic analyzer and the ion collector. The instrument is almost completely automated. There are described the analog-to-digital conversion circuits, the local control microcomputer, the automation systems and the performance checking. (authors)

  14. The measurement of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using double isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongguo

    1994-01-01

    The isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are measured by silicagel-thermal ionization mass spectrometry using the double isotope spikers. The double isotope spikers ( 70 Zn and 67 Zn-enriched isotopes) are used to correct the isotope mass fractionation for the zinc isotope ratios, and to certify the zinc concentrations in the unknown samples. The zinc concentrations of these double isotope spikers are surveyed by a spiker made of pure (99.99%) natural zinc metal powder. The correcting factors (f a , f t and f n ) of the zinc isotope ratios in the spiked mixture, spike and unspiked samples for the isotope mass fractionation, and the spike-to-unspiked ratios (X r ) of the zinc isotope r in the spiked mixture samples can be obtained to solve the matrix equations by numerical approximation. The natural zinc isotope ratios are: 64 Zn/ 67 Zn = 11.8498, 66 Zn/ 67 Zn = 6.7977, 68 Zn/ 67 Zn = 4.5730 and 70 Zn/ 67 Zn = 0.1520. The uncertainties determined of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are +- 0.16% and +-0.31%, respectively

  15. Sulfur isotope in nature. Determination of sulfur isotope ratios in coal and petroleum by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derda, M.

    1999-01-01

    Elementary sulfur or in chemical compounds is one of the elements widespread in the earth's crust and biosphere. Its participation in earth's crust amounts to 0.26 % by weight. Measurement of isotope composition of natural samples can deliver many information about origin, creation and transformation ranges of rocks and minerals. Sulfur isotope ratio contained in minerals is variable and for this reason investigation of isotope sulfur composition can deliver useful information about the geochemistry of each component. Therefore in the investigated sample it is necessary to determine not only the content of sulfur but also the isotope composition of each component. Differentiation of contents of sulfur-34 in natural sulfur compounds can reach up to 110 per mile. So large divergences can be explained by a kinetic effect or by bacterial reduction of sulphates. In this report a wide review of the results of investigations of isotope sulfur compositions in coal and petroleum are presented as well as the methods for the preparation of samples for mass spectrometry analysis are proposed. (author)

  16. Issues and opportunities in accelerator mass spectrometry for stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has developed in the last 30 years many notable applications to the spectrometry of radioisotopes, particularly in radiocarbon dating. The instrumentation science of trace element AMS (TEAMS) that analyzes stable isotopes, also called Accelerator SIMS or MegaSIMS, while unique in many features, has also shared in many of these significant advances and has pushed TEAMS sensitivity to concentration levels surpassing many competing mass spectroscopic technologies. This review examines recent instrumentation developments, the capabilities of the new instrumentation and discernable trends for future development. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient xenon isotopes using the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Beck, D; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Moore, R B; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G

    2004-01-01

    The masses of the noble-gas Xe isotopes with 114 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 123 have been directly measured for the first time. The experiments were carried out with the ISOLTRAP triple trap spectrometer at the online mass separator ISOLDE/CERN. A mass resolving power of the Penning trap spectrometer of $m/\\Delta m$ of close to a million was chosen resulting in an accuracy of $\\delta m \\leq 13$ keV for all investigated isotopes. Conflicts with existing, indirectly obtained, mass data by several standard deviations were found and are discussed. An atomic mass evaluation has been performed and the results are compared to information from laser spectroscopy experiments and to recent calculations employing an interacting boson model.

  18. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  19. Automated spike preparation system for Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Clark, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is a method frequently employed to measure dissolved, irradiated nuclear materials. A known quantity of a unique isotope of the element to be measured (referred to as the ''spike'') is added to the solution containing the analyte. The resulting solution is chemically purified then analyzed by mass spectrometry. By measuring the magnitude of the response for each isotope and the response for the ''unique spike'' then relating this to the known quantity of the ''spike'', the quantity of the nuclear material can be determined. An automated spike preparation system was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to dispense spikes for use in IDMS analytical methods. Prior to this development, technicians weighed each individual spike manually to achieve the accuracy required. This procedure was time-consuming and subjected the master stock solution to evaporation. The new system employs a high precision SMI Model 300 Unipump dispenser interfaced with an electronic balance and a portable Epson HX-20 notebook computer to automate spike preparation

  20. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of brines - comparing isotope ratio mass spectrometry and isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Christian; Koeniger, Paul; van Geldern, Robert; Stadler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Today's standard analytical methods for high precision stable isotope analysis of fluids are gas-water equilibration and high temperature pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS). In recent years, relatively new laser-based analytical instruments entered the market that are said to allow high isotope precision data on nearly every media. This optical technique is referred to as isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of this new instrument type for highly saline solutions and a comparison of the analytical results with traditional IRMS analysis. It has been shown for the equilibration method that the presence of salts influences the measured isotope values depending on the salt concentration (see Lécuyer et al, 2009; Martineau, 2012). This so-called 'isotope salt effect' depends on the salt type and salt concentration. These factors change the activity in the fluid and therefore shift the isotope ratios measured by the equilibration method. Consequently, correction factors have to be applied to these analytical data. Direct conversion techniques like pyrolysis or the new laser instruments allow the measurement of the water molecule from the sample directly and should therefore not suffer from the salt effect, i.e. no corrections of raw values are necessary. However, due to high salt concentrations this might cause technical problems with the analytical hardware and may require labor-intensive sample preparation (e.g. vacuum distillation). This study evaluates the salt isotope effect for the IRMS equilibration technique (Thermo Gasbench II coupled to Delta Plus XP) and the laser-based IRIS instruments with liquid injection (Picarro L2120-i). Synthetic salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4) and natural brines collected from the Stassfurt Salt Anticline (Germany; Stadler et al., 2012) were analysed with both techniques. Salt concentrations ranged from seawater salinity

  1. Uranium isotope separation by magnetic field gradient and visible light acting in a liquid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, O.N.

    1985-01-01

    The literature shows that excited uranyl can assume the ''singlet'' and ''triplet'' states, with different magnetic properties. In an aqueous medium, without organic complexity (to hamper dismutation), the action of light reduces uranyl to U(V), which is a radical -ion that can assume the ''doublet'' and ''quartet'' states, also with different magnetic properties. Due to the different constants of velocity of uranium 235 and 238 in the reduction of excited uranyl and in the oxidation of U(V) to UO 2 2+ , there is the probability of forming an isotopic gradient, in the aqueous solution, subjected to a magnetic field gradient, with consequent appropriate extraction. 6 refs

  2. Stable carbon isotopic composition of gasolines determined by isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, B.J.; Philp, R.P.; Allen, J.D. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics

    2002-07-01

    A large number of underground gasoline storage facilities in the United States continuously leak gasoline into the subsurface, which makes gasoline a major groundwater contaminant. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are used currently to characterize contaminated groundwater and soils. Correlations of contaminants with suspected source(s) are extremely difficult by these techniques because many gasolines have similar hydrocarbon distributions. The present study applied the technique of isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (irmGC-MS) to 19 gasoline samples from different areas of the USA. This allows a much better correlation of gasoline contaminants to source. Data obtained indicate a wide range of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C values for 16 ubiquitous compounds in the gasolines. The majority of samples could be distinguished from each other on the basis of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C hydrocarbon composition. The oxygenated additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was present in ten of the gasolines analyzed, and had a relatively narrow range of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C values (-30.4 to -28.3 per mille). Preliminary investigations were also made to determine the extent of carbon isotopic fractionation after simple water washing and evaporation experiments. Results indicate that the majority of compounds did not undergo significant carbon isotopic fractionation as a result of these processes. (author)

  3. Field Sample Preparation Method Development for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibman, C.; Weisbrod, K.; Yoshida, T.

    2015-01-01

    Non-proliferation and International Security (NA-241) established a working group of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to evaluate the utilization of in-field mass spectrometry for safeguards applications. The survey of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mass spectrometers (MS) revealed no instrumentation existed capable of meeting all the potential safeguards requirements for performance, portability, and ease of use. Additionally, fieldable instruments are unlikely to meet the International Target Values (ITVs) for accuracy and precision for isotope ratio measurements achieved with laboratory methods. The major gaps identified for in-field actinide isotope ratio analysis were in the areas of: 1. sample preparation and/or sample introduction, 2. size reduction of mass analyzers and ionization sources, 3. system automation, and 4. decreased system cost. Development work in 2 through 4, numerated above continues, in the private and public sector. LANL is focusing on developing sample preparation/sample introduction methods for use with the different sample types anticipated for safeguard applications. Addressing sample handling and sample preparation methods for MS analysis will enable use of new MS instrumentation as it becomes commercially available. As one example, we have developed a rapid, sample preparation method for dissolution of uranium and plutonium oxides using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). ABF is a significantly safer and faster alternative to digestion with boiling combinations of highly concentrated mineral acids. Actinides digested with ABF yield fluorides, which can then be analyzed directly or chemically converted and separated using established column chromatography techniques as needed prior to isotope analysis. The reagent volumes and the sample processing steps associated with ABF sample digestion lend themselves to automation and field

  4. Advanced mass spectrometers for hydrogen-isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chastagner, P.; Daves, H.L.; Hess, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Two advanced mass spectrometers for the accurate analysis of mixtures of the hydrogen isotopes were evaluated by Du Pont personnel at the Savannah River Laboratory. One is a large double-focusing instrument with a resolution of 2000 at mass 4 and an abundance sensitivity of >100,000 for the HT-D 2 doublet. The second is a smaller, simpler, stigmatic focusing instrument with exceptionally high ion intensities (>1 x 10 - 9 A at 600 resolution and about 1 x 10 - 10 A at 1300 resolution) for high signal-to-noise ratios. Both instruments are computer controlled. Once a scan is started, peak switching, scanning, mass discrimination control, data collection, and data reduction are done without operator intervention. Utility routines control hysteresis effects and instrument calibration. A containment facility, with dual inlet systems and a standard distribution system, permits testing with tritium mixtures. Helium flow standards and tritium activity meters provide independent verification of the mass spectrometer calibrations. A recovery system prevents the release of tritium to the environment. The performance of the mass spectrometers was essentially equal under simulated process control conditions. Precision and accuracy for the D/T ratio was <0.5% (rel 2sigma limits). Performance factors were: sample equilibration <300 ppM; linearity within +-0.3%; and gas interference <0.1%. Mass discrimination was controlled reliably by the computers

  5. Romanian wines characterization with CF-IRMS (Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costinel, Diana; Ionete, Roxana Elena; Vremera, Raluca; Stanciu, Vasile

    2007-01-01

    Wine growing has been known for centuries long in Romania. The country has been favored by its geographical position in south-eastern Europe, by its proximity to the Black Sea, as well as by the specificity of the local soil and climate. Alongside France, Italy, Spain, Germany, countries in this area like Romania could also be called 'a vine homeland' in Europe. High quality wines produced in this region were object of trade ever since ancient times. Under current EU research projects, it is necessary to develop new methods of evidencing wine adulteration and safety. The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the ratios of stable isotopes in bio-molecules now provides the means to prove the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs - and therefore, to authenticate and eliminate fraud. Isotope analysis has been officially adopted by the EU as a means of controlling adulteration of wine. Adulteration of wine can happen in many ways, e.g. addition of non-grape ethanol, addition of non-grape sugar, water or other unauthorized substances, undeclared mixing of wines from different wards, geographical areas or countries, mislabelling of variety and age. The present paper emphasize the isotopic analysis for D/H, 18 O/ 16 O, 13 C/ 12 C from wines, using a new generation Isotope Ratio MS, Finnigan Delta V Plus, coupling with a three flexible continuous flow preparation device (GasBench II, TC Elemental Analyser and GC-C/TC). Therefore authentication of wines is an important problem to which isotopic analysis has made a significant contribution. (authors)

  6. The development of a completely automated oxygen isotope mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    A completely automated mass spectrometer system has been developed to measure the oxygen isotope ratio of carbon dioxide samples. The system has an accuracy of 0.03 percent, and is capable of analyzing more than 100 samples a day. The system uses an Interdata minicomputer as the primary controller. The intelligence of the system is contained within hardware circuits, software within the minicomputer, and firmware written for a Motorola 6802 microprocessor. A microprocessor-based inlet system controller maximizes the throughput of carbon dioxide samples within the inlet system. The inlet system normally contains four different aliquots of carbon dioxide and introduces these samples to the mass spectrometer through a single admittance leak. The system has been used in the analysis of 111 samples of ice taken from the Steele glacier

  7. Mixed-mode chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James S O

    2010-03-15

    Liquid chromatography coupled to molecular mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been a standard technique since the early 1970s but liquid chromatography coupled to high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) has only been available commercially since 2004. This development has, for the first time, enabled natural abundance and low enrichment delta(13)C measurements to be applied to individual analytes in aqueous mixtures creating new opportunities for IRMS applications, particularly for the isotopic study of biological molecules. A growing number of applications have been published in a range of areas including amino acid metabolism, carbohydrates studies, quantification of cellular and plasma metabolites, dietary tracer and nucleic acid studies. There is strong potential to extend these to new compounds and complex matrices but several challenges face the development of LC/IRMS methods. To achieve accurate isotopic measurements, HPLC separations must provide baseline-resolution between analyte peaks; however, the design of current liquid interfaces places severe restrictions on compatible flow rates and in particular mobile phase compositions. These create a significant challenge on which reports associated with LC/IRMS have not previously focused. Accordingly, this paper will address aspects of chromatography in the context of LC/IRMS, in particular focusing on mixed-mode separations and their benefits in light of these restrictions. It aims to provide an overview of mixed-mode stationary phases and of ways to improve high aqueous separations through manipulation of parameters such as column length, temperature and mobile phase pH. The results of several practical experiments are given using proteogenic amino acids and nucleosides both of which are of noted importance in the LC/IRMS literature. This communication aims to demonstrate that mixed-mode stationary phases provide a flexible approach given the constraints of LC/IRMS interface design and acts as a

  8. Calcium isotope effects in ion exchange electromigration and calcium isotope analysis by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Hoshi, J.; Iwamoto, H.; Okamoto, M.; Kakihana, H.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ions were made to electromigrate along a cation exchange membrane. The abundance ratios of the calcium isotopes (Ca-40, 42, 43, 44, 48) in the migrated bands were measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. The lighter isotopes were enriched in the front part of the migrated band. The increments in the isotope abundance ratios were found to be proportional to the mass difference of the isotopes. The observed epsilon-values per unit mass difference (epsilon/ΔM) were 1.26 x 10 -4 (at 20 0 C), 1.85 x 10 -4 (at 25 0 C) and 2.4 x 10 -4 (at 40 0 C). The mass spectrometry was improved by using a low temperature for the evaporation of CaI 2 . (orig.)

  9. Cooling of radioactive isotopes for Schottky mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.; Beckert, K.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.; Reich, H.; Schlitt, B.; Winkler, T.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear masses of radioactive isotopes can be determined by measurement of their revolution frequency relative to the revolution frequency of reference ions with well-known masses. The resolution of neighboring frequency lines and the accuracy of the mass measurement is dependent on the achievable minimum longitudinal momentum spread of the ion beam. Electron cooling allows an increase of the phase space density by several orders of magnitude. For high intensity beams Coulomb scattering in the dense ion beam limits the beam quality. For low intensity beams a regime exists in which the diffusion due to intrabeam scattering is not dominating any more. The minimum momentum spread δp/p=5x10 -7 which is observed by Schottky noise analysis is considerably higher than the value expected from the longitudinal electron temperature. The measured frequency spread results from fluctuations of the magnetic field in the storage ring magnets. Systematic mass measurements have started and can be presently used for ions with half-lives of some ten seconds. For shorter-lived nuclei a stochastic precooling system is in preparation

  10. High-precision mass spectrometric analysis using stable isotopes in studies of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, Henk; van den Akker, Chris H. P.; Fay, Laurent B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes combined with mass spectrometry (MS) provides insight into metabolic processes within the body. Herein, an overview on the relevance of stable isotope methodology in pediatric research is presented. Applications for the use of stable isotopes with MS cover carbohydrate,

  11. Controllable isotope fractionation with thermal ionisation mass-spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebeda, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Isotopic ratios measured with thermal ionisation mass-spectrometers are biased by fractionation effects. A sample must therefore be analyzed according to the same procedures as applied for the analysis of the standard reference material. A comparison of the behaviour of the sample with that of the standard can then be used as a criterion whether the analytical results are acceptable or not. In this way it is possible to obtain reproducibilities similar to those for elements acceptable or not. In this way it is possible to obtain reproducibilities similar to those for elements where the fractionation can be determined by an internal standard. This procedure of controlled fractionation is demonstrated by means of the 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios measured on geological samples and the SRM 987 standard. (orig.)

  12. Equilibrium mass-dependent fractionation relationships for triple oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaobin; Liu, Yun

    2011-12-01

    With a growing interest in small 17O-anomaly, there is a pressing need for the precise ratio, ln 17α/ln 18α, for a particular mass-dependent fractionation process (MDFP) (e.g., for an equilibrium isotope exchange reaction). This ratio (also denoted as " θ") can be determined experimentally, however, such efforts suffer from the demand of well-defined process or a set of processes in addition to high precision analytical capabilities. Here, we present a theoretical approach from which high-precision ratios for MDFPs can be obtained. This approach will complement and serve as a benchmark for experimental studies. We use oxygen isotope exchanges in equilibrium processes as an example. We propose that the ratio at equilibrium, θE ≡ ln 17α/ln 18α, can be calculated through the equation below: θa-bE=κa+(κa-κb){ln18βb}/{ln18α} where 18βb is the fractionation factor between a compound "b" and the mono-atomic ideal reference material "O", 18αa-b is the fractionation factor between a and b and it equals to 18βa/ 18βb and κ is a new concept defined in this study as κ ≡ ln 17β/ln 18β. The relationship between θ and κ is similar to that between α and β. The advantages of using κ include the convenience in documenting a large number of θ values for MDFPs and in estimating any θ values using a small data set due to the fact that κ values are similar among O-bearing compounds with similar chemical groups. Frequency scaling factor, anharmonic corrections and clumped isotope effects are found insignificant to the κ value calculation. However, the employment of the rule of geometric mean (RGM) can significantly affect the κ value. There are only small differences in κ values among carbonates and the structural effect is smaller than that of chemical compositions. We provide κ values for most O-bearing compounds, and we argue that κ values for Mg-bearing and S-bearing compounds should be close to their high temperature limitation (i.e., 0.5210 for

  13. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  14. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  15. Calculation of isotopic mass and energy production by a matrix operator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.E.

    1976-08-01

    The Volterra method of the multiplicative integral is used to determine the isotopic density, mass, and energy production in linear systems. The solution method, assumptions, and limitations are discussed. The method allows a rapid accurate calculation of the change in isotopic density, mass, and energy production independent of the magnitude of the time steps, production or decay rates, or flux levels

  16. Quantitation of DNA adducts by stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Natalia; Goggin, Melissa; Janis, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to endogenous and exogenous chemicals can lead to the formation of structurally modified DNA bases (DNA adducts). If not repaired, these nucleobase lesions can cause polymerase errors during DNA replication, leading to heritable mutations potentially contributing to the development of cancer. Due to their critical role in cancer initiation, DNA adducts represent mechanism-based biomarkers of carcinogen exposure, and their quantitation is particularly useful for cancer risk assessment. DNA adducts are also valuable in mechanistic studies linking tumorigenic effects of environmental and industrial carcinogens to specific electrophilic species generated from their metabolism. While multiple experimental methodologies have been developed for DNA adduct analysis in biological samples – including immunoassay, HPLC, and 32P-postlabeling – isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) generally has superior selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. As typical DNA adducts concentrations in biological samples are between 0.01 – 10 adducts per 108 normal nucleotides, ultrasensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies are required for their analysis. Recent developments in analytical separations and biological mass spectrometry – especially nanoflow HPLC, nanospray ionization MS, chip-MS, and high resolution MS – have pushed the limits of analytical HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies for DNA adducts, allowing researchers to accurately measure their concentrations in biological samples from patients treated with DNA alkylating drugs and in populations exposed to carcinogens from urban air, drinking water, cooked food, alcohol, and cigarette smoke. PMID:22827593

  17. A multielement isotopic study of refractory FUN and F CAIs: Mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kööp, Levke; Nakashima, Daisuke; Heck, Philipp R.; Kita, Noriko T.; Tenner, Travis J.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Park, Changkun; Davis, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the oldest dated objects that formed inside the Solar System. Among these are rare, enigmatic objects with large mass-dependent fractionation effects (F CAIs), which sometimes also have large nucleosynthetic anomalies and a low initial abundance of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (FUN CAIs). We have studied seven refractory hibonite-rich CAIs and one grossite-rich CAI from the Murchison (CM2) meteorite for their oxygen, calcium, and titanium isotopic compositions. The 26Al-26Mg system was also studied in seven of these CAIs. We found mass-dependent heavy isotope enrichment in all measured elements, but never simultaneously in the same CAI. The data are hard to reconcile with a single-stage melt evaporation origin and may require reintroduction or reequilibration for magnesium, oxygen and titanium after evaporation for some of the studied CAIs. The initial 26Al/27Al ratios inferred from model isochrons span a range from <1 × 10-6 to canonical (∼5 × 10-5). The CAIs show a mutual exclusivity relationship between inferred incorporation of live 26Al and the presence of resolvable anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti. Furthermore, a relationship exists between 26Al incorporation and Δ17O in the hibonite-rich CAIs (i.e., 26Al-free CAIs have resolved variations in Δ17O, while CAIs with resolved 26Mg excesses have Δ17O values close to -23‰). Only the grossite-rich CAI has a relatively enhanced Δ17O value (∼-17‰) in spite of a near-canonical 26Al/27Al. We interpret these data as indicating that fractionated hibonite-rich CAIs formed over an extended time period and sampled multiple stages in the isotopic evolution of the solar nebula, including: (1) an 26Al-poor nebula with large positive and negative anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti and variable Δ17O; (2) a stage of 26Al-admixture, during which anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti had been largely diluted and a Δ17O value of ∼-23‰ had been achieved in the CAI formation region; and (3

  18. Reduction of determinate errors in mass bias-corrected isotope ratios measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, W.

    2015-01-01

    A nebulizer-centric instrument response function model of the plasma mass spectrometer was combined with a signal drift model, and the result was used to identify the causes of the non-spectroscopic determinate errors remaining in mass bias-corrected Pb isotope ratios (Tl as internal standard) measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer. Model calculations, confirmed by measurement, show that the detectable time-dependent errors are a result of the combined effect of signal drift and differences in the coordinates of the Pb and Tl response function maxima (horizontal offset effect). If there are no horizontal offsets, then the mass bias-corrected isotope ratios are approximately constant in time. In the absence of signal drift, the response surface curvature and horizontal offset effects are responsible for proportional errors in the mass bias-corrected isotope ratios. The proportional errors will be different for different analyte isotope ratios and different at every instrument operating point. Consequently, mass bias coefficients calculated using different isotope ratios are not necessarily equal. The error analysis based on the combined model provides strong justification for recommending a three step correction procedure (mass bias correction, drift correction and a proportional error correction, in that order) for isotope ratio measurements using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer

  19. Experimental study of mass boiling in a porous medium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents a pore-scale experimental study of convective boiling heat transfer in a two-dimensional porous medium. The purpose is to deepen the understanding of thermohydraulics of porous media saturated with multiple fluid phases, in order to enhance management of severe accidents in nuclear reactors. Indeed, following a long-lasting failure in the cooling system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) or a boiling water reactor (BWR) and despite the lowering of the control rods that stops the fission reaction, residual power due to radioactive decay keeps heating up the core. This induces water evaporation, which leads to the drying and degradation of the fuel rods. The resulting hot debris bed, comparable to a porous heat-generating medium, can be cooled down by reflooding, provided a water source is available. This process involves intense boiling mechanisms that must be modelled properly. The experimental study of boiling in porous media presented in this thesis focuses on the influence of different pore-scale boiling regimes on local heat transfer. The experimental setup is a model porous medium made of a bundle of heating cylinders randomly placed between two ceramic plates, one of which is transparent. Each cylinder is a resistance temperature detector (RTD) used to give temperature measurements as well as heat generation. Thermal measurements and high-speed image acquisition allow the effective heat exchanges to be characterized according to the observed local boiling regimes. This provides precious indications precious indications for the type of correlations used in the non-equilibrium macroscopic model used to model reflooding process. (author) [fr

  20. Optimal sample to tracer ratio for isotope dilution mass spectrometry: the polyisotopic case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszlo, G.; Ridder, P. de; Goldman, A.; Cappis, J.; Bievre, P. de

    1991-01-01

    The Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) measurement technique provides a means for determining the unknown amount of various isotopes of an element in a sample solution of known mass. The sample solution is mixed with an auxiliary solution, or tracer, containing a known amount of the same element having the same isotopes but of different relative abundances or isotopic composition and the induced change in the isotopic composition measured by isotope mass spectrometry. The technique involves the measurement of the abundance ratio of each isotope to a (same) reference isotope in the sample solution, in the tracer solution and in the blend of the sample and tracer solution. These isotope ratio measurements, the known element amount in the tracer and the known mass of sample solution are used to calculate the unknown amount of one isotope in the sample solution. Subsequently the unknown amount of element is determined. The purpose of this paper is to examine the optimization of the ratio of the estimated unknown amount of element in the sample solution to the known amount of element in the tracer solution in order to minimize the relative uncertainty in the determination of the unknown amount of element

  1. Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2017-01-01

    Conventional theories of electromagnetic waves in a medium assume that the energy propagating with the light pulse in the medium is entirely carried by the field. Thus, the possibility that the optical force field of the light pulse would drive forward an atomic mass density wave (MDW...... field. We show that a light pulse having a total electromagnetic energy (h) over bar omega propagating in a nondispersive medium transfers a mass equal to delta m = (n(2) - 1) (h) over bar omega/c(2), where n is the refractive index. MDW, which carries this mass, consists of atoms, which are more......) and the related kinetic and elastic energies is neglected. In this work, we present foundations of a covariant theory of light propagation in a medium by considering a light wave simultaneously with the dynamics of the medium atoms driven by optoelastic forces between the induced dipoles and the electromagnetic...

  2. High-accuracy mass measurements of neutron-rich Kr isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, P; Blaum, K; Carrel, F; George, S; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, D; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2006-01-01

    The atomic masses of the neutron-rich krypton isotopes 84,86-95Kr have been determined with the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 220 ppb. The masses of the short-lived isotopes 94Kr and 95Kr were measured for the first time. The masses of the radioactive nuclides 89Kr and 91Kr disagree by 4 and 6 standard deviations, respectively, from the present Atomic-Mass Evaluation database. The resulting modification of the mass surface with respect to the two-neutron separation energies as well as implications for mass models and stellar nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  3. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-07-15

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported. GC/IRMS with the aldonitrile penta-acetate (ANPA) derivatisation method was compared with LC/IRMS without derivatisation. A large number of glucose standards and a variety of natural samples were analysed for five neutral carbohydrates at natural abundance as well as at (13)C-enriched levels. Gas chromatography/chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC/CIMS) was applied to check for incomplete derivatisation of the carbohydrate, which would impair the accuracy of the GC/IRMS method. The LC/IRMS technique provided excellent precision (±0.08‰ and ±3.1‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively) for the glucose standards and this technique proved to be superior to GC/IRMS (±0.62‰ and ±19.8‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively). For GC/IRMS measurements the derivatisation correction and the conversion of carbohydrates into CO2 had a considerable effect on the measured δ(13)C values. However, we did not find any significant differences in the accuracy of the two techniques over the full range of natural δ(13)C abundances and (13)C-labelled glucose. The difference in the performance of GC/IRMS and LC/IRMS diminished when the δ(13)C values were measured in natural samples, because the chromatographic performance and background correction became critical factors, particularly for LC/IRMS. The derivatisation of carbohydrates for the GC/IRMS method was complete. Although both LC/IRMS and GC/IRMS are reliable techniques for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates (provided that derivatisation is complete and the

  4. Optical spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry: The race for fieldable isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several techniques have been developed to provide on-site isotopic analyses, including decay-counting and mass spectrometry, as well as methods that rely on the accessibility of optical transitions for isotopic selectivity (e.g., laser-induced fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy). The authors have been investigating both mass spectrometry and optogalvanic spectroscopy for several years. Although others have considered these techniques for isotopic analysis, the authors have focussed on the use of a dc glow discharge for atomization and ionization, and a demountable discharge cell for rapid sample exchange. The authors' goal is a fieldable instrument that provides useful uranium isotope ratio information

  5. The calibration of the intramolecular nitrogen isotope distribution in nitrous oxide measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westley, Marian B; Popp, Brian N; Rust, Terri M

    2007-01-01

    Two alternative approaches for the calibration of the intramolecular nitrogen isotope distribution in nitrous oxide using isotope ratio mass spectrometry have yielded a difference in the 15N site preference (defined as the difference between the delta15N of the central and end position nitrogen in NNO) of tropospheric N2O of almost 30 per thousand. One approach is based on adding small amounts of labeled 15N2O to the N2O reference gas and tracking the subsequent changes in m/z 30, 31, 44, 45 and 46, and this yields a 15N site preference of 46.3 +/- 1.4 per thousand for tropospheric N2O. The other involves the synthesis of N2O by thermal decomposition of isotopically characterized ammonium nitrate and yields a 15N site preference of 18.7 +/- 2.2 per thousand for tropospheric N2O. Both approaches neglect to fully account for isotope effects associated with the formation of NO+ fragment ions from the different isotopic species of N2O in the ion source of a mass spectrometer. These effects vary with conditions in the ion source and make it impossible to reproduce a calibration based on the addition of isotopically enriched N2O on mass spectrometers with different ion source configurations. These effects have a much smaller impact on the comparison of a laboratory reference gas with N2O synthesized from isotopically characterized ammonium nitrate. This second approach was successfully replicated and leads us to advocate the acceptance of the site preference value 18.7 +/- 2.2 per thousand for tropospheric N2O as the provisional community standard until further independent calibrations are developed and validated. We present a technique for evaluating the isotope effects associated with fragment ion formation and revised equations for converting ion signal ratios into isotopomer ratios. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-05-20

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  7. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  8. Special features of the isotope ratio determination using mass-spectrometer with induction-bound plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.I.; Ramendik, G.I.; Fatyushina, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    The origin of the errors arising upon measuring relative abundance of Nd, Yb, and Gd isotopes on a HP-4500 mass-spectrometer (USA) is studied. It is shown that the main origin of the error is the different sensitivity of the mass-spectrometer to ions of different masses. Optimal content of the elements in the solutions is established upon determination of their isotopic abundance [ru

  9. Procedure and device for separating isotopes of high mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The invention refers to isotope separation and to selectively photon-induced energy transfer from an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated as well as to a chemical reaction with a reactive agent in order to produce a chemical compound containing atoms of the desired isotope. For example, in the most preferable form of the invention, gaseous UF 6 is contained in a mixture of U 235 F 6 and U 238 F 6 molecules in a reaction chamber. A chemically reactive substance, which for U 235 separation may be gaseous HCl according to the invention, is also introduced into the reaction chamber. (HK) [de

  10. Broadband non-selective excitation of plutonium isotopes for isotope ratio measurements in resonance ionization mass spectrometry: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, M

    2012-10-15

    Making isotope ratio measurements with minimum isotope bias has always been a challenging task to mass spectrometrists, especially for the specific case of plutonium, owing to the strategic importance of the element. In order to use resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) as a tool for isotope ratio measurements, optimization of the various laser parameters and other atomic and system parameters is critical to minimize isotopic biases. Broadband simultaneous non-selective excitation of the isotopes of plutonium in the triple resonance excitation scheme with λ(1) = 420.77 nm, λ(2) = 847.28 nm, and λ(3) = 767.53 nm based on density matrix formalism has been theoretically computed for the determination of isotope ratios. The effects of the various laser parameters and other factors such as the atomization temperature and the dimensions of the atomic beam on the estimation of isotope ratios were studied. The effects of Doppler broadening, and time-dependent excitation parameters such as Rabi frequencies, ionization rate and the effect of non-Lorenztian lineshape have all been incorporated. The average laser powers and bandwidths for the three-excitation steps were evaluated for non-selective excitation. The laser intensity required to saturate the three-excitation steps were studied. The two-dimensional lineshape contour and its features were investigated, while the reversal of peak asymmetry of two-step and two-photon excitation peaks under these conditions is discussed. Optimized powers for the non-selective ionization of the three transitions were calculated as 545 mW, 150 mW and 545 mW and the laser bandwidth for all the three steps was ~20 GHz. The isotopic bias between the resonant and off-resonant isotope under the optimized conditions was no more than 9%, which is better than an earlier reported value. These optimized laser power and bandwidth conditions are better than in the earlier experimental work since these comprehensive calculations yield

  11. Simultaneous stable carbon isotopic analysis of wine glycerol and ethanol by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2010-01-27

    A novel procedure was established for the simultaneous characterization of wine glycerol and ethanol (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio, using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Several parameters influencing separation of glycerol and ethanol from wine matrix were optimized. Results obtained for 35 Spanish samples exposed no significant differences and very strong correlations (r = 0.99) between the glycerol (13)C/(12)C ratios obtained by an alternative method (gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology, and between the ethanol (13)C/(12)C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The accuracy of the proposed method varied from 0.01 to 0.19 per thousand, and the analytical precision was better than 0.25 per thousand. The new developed LC-IRMS method it is the first isotopic method that allows (13)C/(12)C determination of both analytes in the same run directly from a liquid sample with no previous glycerol or ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with complex sample treatment and improving in terms of simplicity and speed.

  12. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry: some present limitations and possibilities to overcome these

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bievre, P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic mass spectrometry still has great potential for more precise and accurate measurements but it is going to place tremendous requirements on (1) the chemical purity of the samples we measure, (2) the temperature of both ionization and the filaments and (3) the number of molecular species being handled in ion sources which could increase to several dozen for one type of isotopic analysis. The lack of control by mass spectrometrists over the chemical preparation of the samples for isotopic analysis is an inherent limitation to further improvement of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. A limiting factor in isotope dilution is the ability to measure the ratio. At present, uranium isotopic reference materials are 0.1% and recently one was prepared at 0.05%. As these serve to calibrate isotope ratio measurements one cannot do better than these valves. There is no way in which isotope dilution can be improved until these reference values improve. For plutonium there are not even absolute isotope ratio standards. An agreement has been established between CBNM, Geel and the National Bureau of Standards, Washington, to prepare isotope ratio reference materials jointly so that they will be common to both communities. It is recommended that common batches of reference be established and stored at several places to guarantee accessibility at all times

  13. The asymmetric rotator model applied to odd-mass iridium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepenbring, R.

    1980-04-01

    The method of inversion of the eigenvalue problem previously developed for nuclei with axial symmetry is extended to asymmetric equilibrium shapes. This new approach of the asymmetric rotator model is applied to the odd-mass iridium isotopes. A satisfactory and coherent description of the observed energy spectra is obtained, especially for the lighter isotopes

  14. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with adjustable mass accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html.

  15. Study of the matrix specific mass discrimination effects during inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, E.; Quetel, Ch.R.

    2004-01-01

    Sample matrix related effects on mass discrimination during inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) isotope ratio measurements have only been rarely reported. However, they can lead to errors larger than the uncertainty claimed on the ratio results when not properly taken into account or corrected for. These matrix specific affects were experienced during an Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) campaign we carried out for the certification of the Cd amount content in some food digest samples (7% acidity and salts content around 450μg g -1 ). Dilution was not possible for Cd only present at the low ng g -1 level. Up to 1% difference was observed on Cd isotope ratio results between measurements performed directly or after matrix separation. This was a significant difference considering that less than 1.5% relative combined uncertainty was eventually estimated for these IDMS measurements. Similar results could be obtained either way after the implementation of necessary corrections. The direct measurement approach associated to a correction for mass discrimination effects using the food digest sample itself (and the IUPAC table values as reference for the natural Cd isotopic composition) was preferred as it was the easiest. Consequently, the impact of matrix effects on mass discrimination during isotope ratio measurements with two types of ICP- MS (quadrupole and magnetic sector instruments) was studied for 4 elements (Li, Cu, Cd and Tl). Samples of varying salinity (up to 0.25%) and acidity (up to 7%) characteristics were prepared using isotopic certified reference materials of these elements. The long term and short-term stability, respectively reproducibility and repeatability, of the results, as well as the evolution of the difference to certified ratio values were monitored. As expected the 13 investigated isotopic ratios were all sensitive to variations in salt and acid concentrations. Our experiments also showed that simultaneous variation

  16. Stable isotopic mass balance in sandstone-shale couplets. An example from the Neogene Pannonian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyas, J.; Geologisches Institut.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic ratios of carbonate cements in the Neogene sandstones of the Pannonian Basin show distinct variations: early calcites 3-6 per mille lighter than the late calcites from the same location and depth. This shift is thought to be related to the isotopically heavy oxygen released from the mixed-layer illite/smectite during illitisation. For sandstones dominated by compactional flow, closed system mass balance calculations predict an isotopic shift comparable to that deducted from petrographic and geochemical observations. The model suggests that variations of geothermal gradient has little effect on isotopic evolution; much more significant is the sandstone: shale ratio in the couplets. (author)

  17. Precise measurements of mass of Rb isotopes with A=91-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhazov, G.D.; Belyaev, B.N.; Domkin, V.D.; Korobulin, Yu.G.; Lukashevich, V.V.; Mukhin, V.S.; AN SSSR, Leningrad

    1989-01-01

    A new scheme of the experiment on measuring the short-living nuclide atom masses, based on applying the isobar doublet method for mass scale gauging, is proposed. Results of measuring masses of Rb isotope atom with A=91-97, performed using a prism mass-spectrometer on line with the LiYaF mass-separator and synchrocyclotron with 30-80 keV error are presented

  18. Analysis of [U-13C6]glucose in human plasma using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry compared with two other mass spectrometry techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, H.; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; van den Akker, C.H.P.; te Braake, F.W.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.; van Goudoever, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    The use of stable isotope labelled glucose provides insight into glucose metabolism. The 13C-isotopic enrichment of glucose is usually measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). However, in both techniques

  19. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-01-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid

  20. Mass-dependent and non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone photolysis: Resolving theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Amanda S.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the anomalous 17 O and 18 O isotope effects in the three-body ozone formation reaction O+O 2 +M, isotope effects in the destruction of ozone by photolysis may also play a role in determining the isotopic composition of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. While previous experiments on ozone photolysis at 254 nm were interpreted as evidence for preferential loss of light ozone that is anomalous (or 'non-mass-dependent'), recent semiempirical theoretical calculations predicted a preferential loss of heavy ozone at that wavelength that is mass dependent. Through photochemical modeling results presented here, we resolve this apparent contradiction between experiment and theory. Specifically, we show that the formation of ozone during the UV photolysis experiments is not negligible, as had been assumed, and that the well-known non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation can account for the non-mass-dependent enrichment of the heavy isotopologs of ozone observed in the experiment. Thus, no unusual non-mass-dependent fractionation in ozone photolysis must be invoked to explain the experimental results. Furthermore, we show that theoretical predictions of a mass-dependent preferential loss of the heavy isotopologs of ozone during UV photolysis are not inconsistent with the experimental data, particularly if mass-dependent isotope effects in the chemical loss reactions of ozone during the photolysis experiments or experimental artifacts enrich the remaining ozone in 17 O and 18 O. Before the calculated fractionation factors can be quantitatively evaluated, however, further investigation of possible mass-dependent isotope effects in the reactions of ozone with O( 1 D), O( 3 P), O 2 ( 1 Δ), and O 2 ( 1 Σ) is needed through experiments we suggest here

  1. Laser ionization time of flight mass spectrometer for isotope mass detection and elemental analysis of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar; Ahmed, Rizwan; Umar, Z. A.; Aslam Baig, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the construction and modification of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer to improve its mass resolution. This system consists of a laser ablation/ionization section based on a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 500 mJ, 5 ns pulse duration) integrated with a one meter linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with an electric sector and a magnetic lens and outfitted with a channeltron electron multiplier for ion detection. The resolution of the system has been improved by optimizing the accelerating potential and inserting a magnetic lens after the extraction region. The isotopes of lithium, lead and cadmium samples have been resolved and detected in accordance with their natural abundance. The capability of the system has been further exploited to determine the elemental composition of a brass alloy, having a certified composition of zinc and copper. Our results are in excellent agreement with its certified composition. This setup is found to be extremely efficient and convenient for fast analyses of any solid sample.

  2. Determination of isotope ratio of elements by mass distribution in molecules of varied chemical compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, I.S.; Babichev, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    The procedure and program for calculation of isotope ratio of elements involving in the compound being studied using data of mass spectrometry were elaborated. The methods developed for the O 2 , SiH 4 , Cd(CH 3 ) 2 molecules were demonstrated for the illustration. The results of calculation provide support for the efficiency of the program and satisfactory reliability of the results during calculation of the isotope and complex compound concentrations. The program may be used for the estimation of the degree of nonequilibrium isotope distributions, it may indicate on the errors of the mass spectroscopy results [ru

  3. Isotope effects in mass-spectrometry; Les effets isotopiques en spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicknam, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de physico-chimie, service des isotopes stables, section de spectrometrie de masse

    1967-05-01

    In the first part, a review is made of the work concerning the influence of isotopic substitution on the stabilities of ionised molecules and the bond-breaking probabilities; metastable transitions are also affected by this substitution. A model based on the Franck-Condon principle accounts for the experimentally observed isotopic effects for diatomic molecules; to a certain extent it is possible to generalise the calculation for the case of isotopic molecules of carbon dioxide gas. For deuterated polyatomic molecules there exist a {pi} effect making it possible to compare the relative stabilities of the X-H and X-D bonds, and a {gamma} effect which characterizes the different behaviours of the X-H bond in a normal molecule and in its partially deuterated homologue. Usually there is a very marked {pi} effect (e.g. the C-D bonds are more difficult to break than the homologous C-H bonds) and a {gamma} effect, the partial deuteration of a molecule leading in general to an increase in the probability of breakage of a given bond. An interpretation of {pi} and {gamma} effects based on Rosenstock near-equilibrium theory accounts for the observed phenomena, qualitatively at least, in the case of propane and acetylene. In the second part are gathered together results concerning isotopic effects produced during the formation of rearranged ions. The existence of cyclic transition ions has made it possible for Mc Lafferty to explain the existence of these ions in the mass spectrum; isotopic substitution leads to a modification of the rearrangement mechanism, the bonding forces being no longer the same. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, on rassemble les travaux concernant l'influence de la substitution isotopique sur les stabilites des molecules ionisees et les probabilites de rupture des liaisons; les transitions metastables sont egalement modifiees par cette substitution. Un modele base sur le principe de Franck-Condon rend compte des effets isotopiques

  4. Isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen as probes of nucleosynthesis, stellar mass losses and galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.; Lequeux, J.; Vigroux, L.

    1975-01-01

    Evidences for a 12 C/ 13 C ratio different in the interstellar medium and in the solar system (40 instead of 89) and for a large N/O ratio in the centers of galaxies are reviewed and are explained by an enrichment of the interstellar medium in 13 C and N by mass loss of stars of various masses [fr

  5. Mass medium

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Two scientists have developed a radical new theory that could explain the nature of inertia and abolish gravity. They believe that inertia and gravity are the results of electric and magnetic forces originating in the quantum vacuum (2 pages).

  6. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  7. GasBench/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: a carbon isotope approach to detect exogenous CO(2) in sparkling drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabañero, Ana I; San-Hipólito, Tamar; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    A new procedure for the determination of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios, using direct injection into a GasBench/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GasBench/IRMS) system, has been developed to improve isotopic methods devoted to the study of the authenticity of sparkling drinks. Thirty-nine commercial sparkling drink samples from various origins were analyzed. Values of delta(13)C(cava) ranged from -20.30 per thousand to -23.63 per thousand, when C3 sugar addition was performed for a second alcoholic fermentation. Values of delta(13)C(water) ranged from -5.59 per thousand to -6.87 per thousand in the case of naturally carbonated water or water fortified with gas from the spring, and delta(13)C(water) ranged from -29.36 per thousand to -42.09 per thousand when industrial CO(2) was added. It has been demonstrated that the addition of C4 sugar to semi-sparkling wine (aguja) and industrial CO(2) addition to sparkling wine (cava) or water can be detected. The new procedure has advantages over existing methods in terms of analysis time and sample treatment. In addition, it is the first isotopic method developed that allows (13)C/(12)C determination directly from a liquid sample without previous CO(2) extraction. No significant isotopic fractionation was observed nor any influence by secondary compounds present in the liquid phase. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs

  9. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in forensic science and food adulteration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (SIRMS) is an established technique for the determination of origin of geological, biological, chemical and physio-chemical samples/materials. With the development of highly precise mass spectrometers, the stable isotope ratio determination of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have gained considerable interest in the fields of forensic science and food authentication. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of lighter elements occur due to fractionation effects, resulting in the finger printing of specific isotope ratio values that are characteristic of the origin, purity, and manufacturing processes of the products and their constituents. Forensic science uses scientific and technical methods to investigate traceable evidence of criminal acts. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been applied to numerous aspects of the forensic science. The analysis of explosives such as ammonium nitrate, gun powder and tri-nitro-toluene (TNT), cases of murder, armed robbery, drug smuggling, terrorism, arson and hit and run traffic accidents are a few of them. The main types of geological evidences in such cases are mud, soil, rocks, sand, gravel, dust particles, biological materials, organic particles and anthropogenic components. Stable isotopes are used as tools to corroborate and confirm the evidential leads in the investigation of such crimes. The variation in natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic ratios δ 13 C and δ 15 N can identify links between items found at crime scene with those of suspect. The paper discusses the applications of SIRMS in the field of forensic science and food adulteration research

  10. Masses of new isotopes in the fp shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davids, C.N.

    1979-01-01

    A total of four new neutron-rich isotopes were studied including 53 Ti, 57 Cr, 59 Mn, and 60 Mn. The bombardment of 58 Ni by various heavy ion beams resulted in the discovery of proton-rich 67 As and permitted extensive measurements of the superallowed decays of 62 Ge, 66 As, and 70 Br. 13 references

  11. Mass spectrometric measurement of hydrogen isotope fractionation for the reactions of chloromethane with OH and Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloromethane (CH3Cl is an important provider of chlorine to the stratosphere but detailed knowledge of its budget is missing. Stable isotope analysis is a potentially powerful tool to constrain CH3Cl flux estimates. The largest degree of isotope fractionation is expected to occur for deuterium in CH3Cl in the hydrogen abstraction reactions with its main sink reactant tropospheric OH and its minor sink reactant Cl atoms. We determined the isotope fractionation by stable hydrogen isotope analysis of the fraction of CH3Cl remaining after reaction with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals in a 3.5 m3 Teflon smog chamber at 293 ± 1 K. We measured the stable hydrogen isotope values of the unreacted CH3Cl using compound-specific thermal conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The isotope fractionations of CH3Cl for the reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals were found to be −264±45 and −280±11 ‰, respectively. For comparison, we performed similar experiments using methane (CH4 as the target compound with OH and obtained a fractionation constant of −205±6 ‰ which is in good agreement with values previously reported. The observed large kinetic isotope effects are helpful when employing isotopic analyses of CH3Cl in the atmosphere to improve our knowledge of its atmospheric budget.

  12. Language Policy-Making in Multilingual Education: Mass Media and the Framing of Medium of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, James W.

    2015-01-01

    In some settings, medium of instruction (MOI) policies in multilingual education break out into public debates in mass media involving politicians, business leaders, government officials, parents, and school children. These public discussions of MOI often index struggles over the distribution of political power and economic resources, and issues…

  13. New Balancing Equipment for Mass Production of Small and Medium-Sized Electrical Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argeseanu, Alin; Ritchie, Ewen; Leban, Krisztina Monika

    2010-01-01

    The level of vibration and noise is an important feature. It is good practice to explain the significance of the indicators of the quality of electrical machines. The mass production of small and medium-sized electrical machines demands speed (short typical measurement time), reliability...

  14. Non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model for the design of boron isotopes chemical exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peng; Fan, Kaigong; Guo, Xianghai; Zhang, Haocui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model instead of a distillation equilibrium model to calculate boron isotopes separation. • We apply the model to calculate the needed column height to meet prescribed separation requirements. - Abstract: To interpret the phenomenon of chemical exchange in boron isotopes separation accurately, the process is specified as an absorption–reaction–desorption hybrid process instead of a distillation equilibrium model, the non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model is put forward and a mass transfer enhancement factor E is introduced to find the packing height needed to meet the specified separation requirements with MATLAB.

  15. Mass spectrometric studies of stable isotope-labelled carboxylic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.Aa.; Dinger, F.; Dinh-Nguyen, N.

    1975-01-01

    Low resolution mass spectra of deuterium and carbon-13 labelled fatty acid pyrrolidides are discussed. The simple fragmentation pattern of pyrrolidides makes them superior to other derivatives, regarding location of isotopes. Deuteriation of ethylenic fatty acid pyrrolidides therefore seems to be an improved method to locate carbon-carbon double bonds by mass spectrometry. (author)

  16. Interlaboratory determinations of isotopically enriched metals by field desorption mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, U.; Schulten, H.R.; Achenbach, C.; Ziskoven, R.

    1982-01-01

    The isotopic distribution of stable isotopes in six enriched metals (calcium, copper, barium, rubidium, strontium and thallium) has been determined by field desorption mass spectrometry. A first evaluation of the interlaboratory reproducibility of the application of this method for trace determination of metals was made using three different types of mass spectrometers in three different laboratories. The standard deviations for the most abundant isotopes of the metals investigated are between +-0.1 and +-0.5%. Within these standard deviations, the values obtained by the three mass spectrometry groups are the same. To support the accuracy of our quantification, thermal ionization mass spectrometry has been employed and confirms the results of the field desorption method. (orig.) [de

  17. Prediction, Detection, and Validation of Isotope Clusters in Mass Spectrometry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Treutler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a key analytical platform for metabolomics. The precise quantification and identification of small molecules is a prerequisite for elucidating the metabolism and the detection, validation, and evaluation of isotope clusters in LC-MS data is important for this task. Here, we present an approach for the improved detection of isotope clusters using chemical prior knowledge and the validation of detected isotope clusters depending on the substance mass using database statistics. We find remarkable improvements regarding the number of detected isotope clusters and are able to predict the correct molecular formula in the top three ranks in 92 % of the cases. We make our methodology freely available as part of the Bioconductor packages xcms version 1.50.0 and CAMERA version 1.30.0.

  18. Diode laser based resonance ionization mass spectrometry for spectroscopy and trace analysis of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, the upgrade and optimization of a diode laser system for high-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry is described. A frequency-control system, based on a double-interferometric approach, allowing for absolute stabilization down to 1 MHz as well as frequency detunings of several GHz within a second for up to three lasers in parallel was optimized. This laser system was used for spectroscopic studies on uranium isotopes, yielding precise and unambiguous level energies, total angular momenta, hyperfine constants and isotope shifts. Furthermore, an efficient excitation scheme which can be operated with commercial diode lasers was developed. The performance of the complete laser mass spectrometer was optimized and characterized for the ultra-trace analysis of the uranium isotope 236 U, which serves as a neutron flux dosimeter and tracer for radioactive anthropogenic contaminations in the environment. Using synthetic samples, an isotope selectivity of ( 236 U)/( 238 U) = 4.5(1.5) . 10 -9 was demonstrated.

  19. In-medium NN interactions and nucleon and meson masses studied with nucleon knockout reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Noro, T; Akiyoshi, H; Daito, I; Fujimura, H; Hatanaka, K; Ihara, F; Ishikawa, T; Ito, M; Kawabata, M; Kawabata, T; Maeda, Y; Matsuoka, N; Morinobu, S; Nakamura, M; Obayashi, E; Okihana, A; Sagara, K; Sakaguchi, H; Takeda, H; Taki, T; Tamii, A; Tamura, K; Yamazaki, H; Yoshida, H; Yoshimura, M; Yosoi, M

    2000-01-01

    Spin observables have been measured for (p, 2p) reactions aiming at studying medium effects on NN interactions in nuclear field. Observed strong density-dependent reduction of the analyzing power is consistent with a model calculation where reduction of nucleon and meson masses are taken into account. On the other hand, calculations with g-matrices in the Shroedinger framework does not predict the reduction. The spin-transfer coefficients, which data are not reproduced by the model calculation, are found to be sensitive to reduction rate of each meson mass and have a possibility to test scaling lows in mass reductions.

  20. Thermal mass impact on energy performance of a low, medium and heavy mass building in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Bojan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy mass materials used in building structures and architecture can significantly affect building energy performance and occupant comfort. The purpose of this study was to investigate if thermal mass can improve the internal environment of a building, resulting in lower energy requirements from the mechanical systems. The study was focused on passive building energy performance and compared annual space heating and cooling energy requirements for an office building in Belgrade with several different applications of thermal mass. A three-dimensional building model was generated to represent a typical office building. Building shape, orientation, glazing to wall ratio, envelope insulation thickness, and indoor design conditions were held constant while location and thickness of building mass (concrete was varied between cases in a series of energy simulations. The results were compared and discussed in terms of the building space heating and cooling energy and demand affected by thermal mass. The simulation results indicated that with addition of thermal mass to the building envelope and structure: 100% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space heating energy requirements, 67% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space cooling energy requirements, 83% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space heating demand and 50% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space cooling demand. The study demonstrated that there exists a potential for reducing space heating and cooling energy requirements with heavy mass construction in the analyzed climate region (Belgrade, Serbia.

  1. High precision analysis of trace lithium isotope by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lei; Liu Xuemei; Long Kaiming; Liu Zhao; Yang Tianli

    2010-01-01

    High precision analysis method of ng lithium by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is developed. By double-filament measurement,phosphine acid ion enhancer and sample pre-baking technique,the precision of trace lithium analysis is improved. For 100 ng lithium isotope standard sample, relative standard deviation is better than 0.086%; for 10 ng lithium isotope standard sample, relative standard deviation is better than 0.90%. (authors)

  2. Decay of new mass-separated neutron-deficient La and Ce isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevey, J.; Gizon, A.; Idrissi, N.; Weiss, B.; Beraud, R.; Charvet, A.; Duffait, R.; Emsallem, A.; Meyer, M.; Ollivier, T.; Redon, N.

    1987-01-01

    By use of a He jet system coupled to a Bernas-Nier ion-source, several new mass-separated A = 122 - 127 isotopes reached in heavy ion fusion reactions at SARA have been identified and studied. From experimental decay properties of La isotopes, systematics of low-lying energy levels have been extended for even-even and odd-A barium. New informations on Ce decay schemes are briefly reported

  3. Measurement parameter selection for quantitative isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, B.N.; Rosecrance, A.E.; Colby, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    By use of the two-isotope model of isotope dilution, selection criteria were developed for identifying optimum m/z's for quantitation of compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, it was possible to predict the optimum ratio of naturally abundant to labeled compound and to identify appropriate data reduction methods. The validity of these predictions was confirmed by using experimental GC/MS data for several organic compounds

  4. Development and application of liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lijun

    2014-02-19

    Stable isotope analysis has found widespread applications in various disciplines such as archaeology, geochemistry, biology, food authenticity, and forensic science. Coupling chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a trend, as it provides several advantages over bulk isotope analysis, e.g., relatively simple sample preparation, the ability to measure individual compounds in a complex mixture in one run, and the reduced sample size required for precise isotope analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) has been well-established for compound-specific isotope analysis of volatile organic compounds within the last two decades. However, an interface combining liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) was not commercially available until 2004. The current design of the interface requires using a carbon-free eluent in chromatographic separation. This requirement limits the application of the most frequently used reversed-phase liquid chromatography in CSIA, because the elution strength of water at room temperature is too low to serve as mobile phase in reversed-phase separations. In order to increase the elution strength of water, we propose using high temperature water for chromatographic elution. The polarity of water decreases with an increase of temperature, yielding increased elution strength in reversed-phase columns. Therefore, high temperature water can be used as eluent instead of organic solvent for combining reversed-phase liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (RPLC/IRMS). Additionally, temperature gradients can replace organic solvent gradients to increase chromatographic resolution. This is very important for LC/IRMS analysis, as precise isotope analysis requires baseline separation of analytes. In this thesis, high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography was coupled to, and for the first time carefully

  5. Development and application of liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has found widespread applications in various disciplines such as archaeology, geochemistry, biology, food authenticity, and forensic science. Coupling chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a trend, as it provides several advantages over bulk isotope analysis, e.g., relatively simple sample preparation, the ability to measure individual compounds in a complex mixture in one run, and the reduced sample size required for precise isotope analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) has been well-established for compound-specific isotope analysis of volatile organic compounds within the last two decades. However, an interface combining liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) was not commercially available until 2004. The current design of the interface requires using a carbon-free eluent in chromatographic separation. This requirement limits the application of the most frequently used reversed-phase liquid chromatography in CSIA, because the elution strength of water at room temperature is too low to serve as mobile phase in reversed-phase separations. In order to increase the elution strength of water, we propose using high temperature water for chromatographic elution. The polarity of water decreases with an increase of temperature, yielding increased elution strength in reversed-phase columns. Therefore, high temperature water can be used as eluent instead of organic solvent for combining reversed-phase liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (RPLC/IRMS). Additionally, temperature gradients can replace organic solvent gradients to increase chromatographic resolution. This is very important for LC/IRMS analysis, as precise isotope analysis requires baseline separation of analytes. In this thesis, high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography was coupled to, and for the first time carefully

  6. Isotope ratio analysis by a combination of element analyzer and mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichlmayer, F.

    1987-06-01

    The use of stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur as analytical tool in many fields of research is of growing interest. A method has therefore been developed, consisting in essential of coupling an Elemental Analyzer with an Isotope Mass Spectrometer, which enables the gas preparation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide from any solid or liquid sample in a fast and easy way. Results of carbon isotope measurements in food analysis are presented, whereat it is possible to check origin and treatment of sugar, oils, fats, mineral waters, spirituous liquors etc. and to detect adulterations as well. Also applications in the field of environmental research are given. (Author)

  7. Studies in the determination of lead isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, A.R.; Yuk Ying Cheung

    1987-01-01

    The application of ICP-MS to the determination of lead isotope ratios in geological materials is described. Data presented for a series of lead mineral concentrates are compared with reference values obtained by conventional solid source thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. The simultaneous determination of lead isotope ratios and trace elements is carried out in a rapid analysis mode. The application of an electrothermal vaporisation technique for small solution aliquots is described. Lead isotope ratio data for the United States Geological Survey standard reference silicate rock BCR-1, obtained without separation of lead from the matrix, are compared with previously published values obtained after separation. (author)

  8. Mass and heat transfer on B7 ordered packing in hydrogen isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Pop, Floarea; Titescu, Gheorghe; Stefanescu, Ioan; Trancota, Dan; Peculea, Marius

    2002-01-01

    This work presents theoretical and experimental data referring to mass and heat transfer on B7 ordered packing in deuterium isotope separation by distillation. The first part is devoted to the study of mass transfer in hydrogen isotopic distillation while the second one treats the mass and heat transfer in water isotopic distillation. A stationary mathematical model for the mass and heat transfer was developed based on multitubular column model with wet wall. This model allowed the calculation starting from theoretical data of the ordered packing efficiency, expressed by the transfer unit height, TUH. Also, from theoretical data the mass and heat transfer coefficients were determined. A test of the mathematical model was performed with the experimental data obtained from two laboratory installations for hydrogen isotope separation by distillation. From the first installation, experimental data concerning the B7 ordered packing efficiency were obtained for the deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation at the - 250 deg C level. With the second one data referring to the mass and heat transfer on the same packing were obtained for the deuterium separation by water distillation under vacuum at the 60 deg C level. The values of TUH, mass and heat transfer coefficients as theoretically evaluate and experimentally checked are in agreement with the respective values obtained in separation processes in chemical industry. This is the fact which endorses utilization of the model of multitubular column with wet wall for describing the transfer processes in distillation columns equipped with B7 ordered packing

  9. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  10. Trace isotope analysis using resonance ionization mass spectrometry based on isotope selection with doppler shift of laser ablated atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    We have proposed a novel isotope selective Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) concept, which can avoid the Doppler broadening on solid sample direct measurement based on laser ablation technique. We have succeeded in experimentally demonstrating the principle of our RIMS concept. Through comparison between the simulated and experimental results, we have validated the simulation model. It would be concluded from these results that we could achieve the isotope selectivity defined as the ratio of 41 Ca to 40 Ca sensitivity to be 4.5x10 10 by adopting the multi-step excitation scheme in the present method. As future works, we will try to experimentally perform the multi-step excitation scheme and improve the detection efficiency by modifying the ion extraction configuration. (author)

  11. Applications of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Sports Drug Testing Accounting for Isotope Fractionation in Analysis of Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The misuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports aiming at enhancing athletic performance has been a challenging matter for doping control laboratories for decades. While the presence of a xenobiotic AAS or its metabolite(s) in human urine immediately represents an antidoping rule violation, the detection of the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone necessitates comparably complex procedures. Concentration thresholds and diagnostic analyte ratios computed from urinary steroid concentrations of, e.g., testosterone and epitestosterone have aided identifying suspicious doping control samples in the past. These ratios can however also be affected by confounding factors and are therefore not sufficient to prove illicit steroid administrations. Here, carbon and, in rare cases, hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has become an indispensable tool. Importantly, the isotopic signatures of pharmaceutical steroid preparations commonly differ slightly but significantly from those found with endogenously produced steroids. By comparing the isotope ratios of endogenous reference compounds like pregnanediol to that of testosterone and its metabolites, the unambiguous identification of the urinary steroids' origin is accomplished. Due to the complex urinary matrix, several steps in sample preparation are inevitable as pure analyte peaks are a prerequisite for valid IRMS determinations. The sample cleanup encompasses steps such as solid phase or liquid-liquid extraction that are presumably not accompanied by isotopic fractionation processes, as well as more critical steps like enzymatic hydrolysis, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, and derivatization of analytes. In order to exclude any bias of the analytical results, each step of the analytical procedure is optimized and validated to exclude, or at least result in constant, isotopic fractionation. These efforts are explained in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of molybdenum in plant reference material by thermal-ionization isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saumer, M.; Gantner, E.; Reinhardt, J.; Ache, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the determination of the concentration and the isotopic composition of molybdenum in plant samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. After microwave acid digestion and liquid-liquid extractive separation with Amberlite LA-2, the molybdenum isotopes are measured as MoO 3 - -ions in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In all cases, the relative standard deviation of the measurements of both natural and spike molybdenum was better than 3% for all ratios measured. The concentration of molybdenum found in three different plant reference materials agreed well with the certified values. (orig.)

  13. Determination of isotopic composition of uranium in microparticles by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veniaminov, N.N.; Kolesnikov, O.N.; Stebel'kov, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    Aerosol particles including uranium in their composition are specific atmospheric polutants. Uranium is used as nuclear fuel in atomic power stations and in spacecraft power units, and also as a component of nuclear warheads. In order to monitor the discharge of uranium-containing aerosol particles to the atmosphere, they must first be identified. As an example, one may cite an investigation of the elemental composition and radioactivity of particles formed in the accident at the Chernobyl atomic power station. One of the most informative indicators of the origin of uranium-containing aerosol particles is the isotopic composition of the uranium. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) offers unique possibilities for the measurement of isotope ratios in individual microscopic objects. At the same time, a measurement of isotope ratios of sulfur in microsection of galenite PbS 2 has shown that the application of SIMS for these purposes is seriously limited by the difference in yield of secondary ions for isotopes with different masses. These discrimination effects, in the case of light elements such as boron, may result in distortion of the isotope ratios by several percent. In the case of heavy elements, however, the effect is less significant, amounting to about 0.5% for lead isotopes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to liquid and gas chromatography for wine ethanol characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2008-10-01

    Two new procedures for wine ethanol 13C/12C isotope ratio determination, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS and GC/IRMS), have been developed to improve isotopic methods dedicated to the study of wine authenticity. Parameters influencing separation of ethanol from wine matrix such as column, temperature, mobile phase, flow rates and injection mode were investigated. Twenty-three wine samples from various origins were analyzed for validation of the procedures. The analytical precision was better than 0.15 per thousand, and no significant isotopic fractionation was observed employing both separative techniques coupled to IRMS. No significant differences and a very strong correlation (r = 0.99) were observed between the 13C/12C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The potential advantages of the developed methods over the traditional one are speed (reducing time required from hours to minutes) and simplicity. In addition, these are the first isotopic methods that allow 13C/12C determination directly from a liquid sample with no previous ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with sample treatment.

  15. Reduction of chemical formulas from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2003-03-15

    A method has been developed for the reduction of the chemical formulas of compounds in complex mixtures from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra. The method is based on the principle that the observed isotopic peak distribution of a mixture of compounds is a linear combination of the isotopic peak distributions of the individual compounds in the mixture. All possible chemical formulas that meet specific criteria (e.g., type and number of atoms in structure, limits of unsaturation, etc.) are enumerated, and theoretical isotopic peak distributions are generated for each formula. The relative amount of each formula is obtained from the accurately measured isotopic peak distribution and the calculated isotopic peak distributions of all candidate formulas. The formulas of compounds in simple spectra, where peak components are fully resolved, are rapidly determined by direct comparison of the calculated and experimental isotopic peak distributions. The singular value decomposition linear algebra method is used to determine the contributions of compounds in complex spectra containing unresolved peak components. The principles of the approach and typical application examples are presented. The method is most useful for the characterization of complex spectra containing partially resolved peaks and structures with multiisotopic elements.

  16. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--discrimination of ammonium nitrate sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Roux, Claude

    2009-06-01

    An evaluation was undertaken to determine if isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) could assist in the investigation of complex forensic cases by providing a level of discrimination not achievable utilising traditional forensic techniques. The focus of the research was on ammonium nitrate (AN), a common oxidiser used in improvised explosive mixtures. The potential value of IRMS to attribute Australian AN samples to the manufacturing source was demonstrated through the development of a preliminary AN classification scheme based on nitrogen isotopes. Although the discrimination utilising nitrogen isotopes alone was limited and only relevant to samples from the three Australian manufacturers during the evaluated time period, the classification scheme has potential as an investigative aid. Combining oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope values permitted the differentiation of AN prills from three different Australian manufacturers. Samples from five different overseas sources could be differentiated utilising a combination of the nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen isotope values. Limited differentiation between Australian and overseas prills was achieved for the samples analysed. The comparison of nitrogen isotope values from intact AN prill samples with those from post-blast AN prill residues highlighted that the nitrogen isotopic composition of the prills was not maintained post-blast; hence, limiting the technique to analysis of un-reacted explosive material.

  17. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcai Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from -19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰ with a mean value of 2.61±11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems.

  18. High-precision measurements of seawater Pb isotope compositions by double spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maxence; Bridgestock, Luke; Rehkämper, Mark; van DeFlierdt, Tina; Weiss, Dominik

    2015-03-10

    A new method for the determination of seawater Pb isotope compositions and concentrations was developed, which combines and optimizes previously published protocols for the separation and isotopic analysis of this element. For isotopic analysis, the procedure involves initial separation of Pb from 1 to 2L of seawater by co-precipitation with Mg hydroxide and further purification by a two stage anion exchange procedure. The Pb isotope measurements are subsequently carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using a (207)Pb-(204)Pb double spike for correction of instrumental mass fractionation. These methods are associated with a total procedural Pb blank of 28±21 pg (1sd) and typical Pb recoveries of 40-60%. The Pb concentrations are determined by isotope dilution (ID) on 50 mL of seawater, using a simplified version of above methods. Analyses of multiple aliquots of six seawater samples yield a reproducibility of about ±1 to ±10% (1sd) for Pb concentrations of between 7 and 50 pmol/kg, where precision was primarily limited by the uncertainty of the blank correction (12±4 pg; 1sd). For the Pb isotope analyses, typical reproducibilities (±2sd) of 700-1500 ppm and 1000-2000 ppm were achieved for (207)Pb/(206)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (207)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, respectively. These results are superior to literature data that were obtained using plasma source mass spectrometry and they are at least a factor of five more precise for ratios involving the minor (204)Pb isotope. Both Pb concentration and isotope data, furthermore, show good agreement with published results for two seawater intercomparison samples of the GEOTRACES program. Finally, the new methods were applied to a seawater depth profile from the eastern South Atlantic. Both Pb contents and isotope compositions display a smooth evolution with depth, and no obvious outliers. Compared to previous Pb isotope data for seawater, the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratios are well correlated

  19. High-Precision Direct Mass Determination of Unstable Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The extension of systematic high-precision measurements of the nuclear mass to nuclei far from the valley of $\\beta$ stability is of great interest in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The mass, or binding energy, is a fundamental gross property and a key input parameter for nuclear matter calculations. It is also a sensitive probe for collective and single-particle effects in nuclear structure. \\\\ \\\\ For such purposes, nuclear masses need to be known to an accuracy of about 10$^{-7}$ (i.e. $\\Delta$M~$\\leq$~10~keV for A~=~100). To resolve a particular mass from its nuclear isomers and isobars, resolving power of 10$^6$ are often required. To achieve this, the ions delivered by the on-line mass separator ISOLDE are confined in a Penning quadrupole trap. This trap is placed in the very homogeneous and stable magnetic field of a superconducting magnet. Here, the cyclotron frequency and hence the mass are determined. \\\\ \\\\ The first measurements using this new technique have been completed for a long chain of Cs ...

  20. Quantitation of stable isotopic tracers of calcium by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.; Smith, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumentation and methodology developed for quantitation of stable isotopic traces in urine are described. Calcium is isolated from urine as the insoluble oxalate salt which is subsequently dissolved in hydrochloric acid. The isotopic content of the acid solution is determined by use of a conventional mass spectrometer equipped with a fast atom bombardment ion source. Calcium ions are desorbed from the sample surface by a beam of high-energy xenon atoms and detected with a high-resolution mass spectrometer. A data acquisition system has been developed to control the mass spectrometer and record the ion signals. Detailed analysis of potential sources of error indicates that the precision of the method is presently limited primarily by an isotope effect that occurs during ion desorption. Results presented here demonstrate that the relative abundances of calcium isotopes in urine can be determined with high precision (coefficient of variation < 0.2%) and that the method is a viable alternative to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The method is especially attractive because it uses a conventional high-resolution mass spectrometer which is routinely used for analysis of organic substances

  1. Mass spectrometric investigation of the isotopes of ozone in the laboratory and the stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Morton, J.; Schueler, B.

    1991-01-01

    During the last few years information on the isotope anomalies of ozone has substantially increased. Whenever ozone is formed in a gas phase reaction, an enhancement in its heavy isotopes is found of magnitude 12-14% ( 50 O 3 ) above the statistically expected values. The mass-independent enhancement decreases toward higher pressures and also shows a pronounced temperature dependence. Toward lower temperatures the enhancement becomes less. Studies of all possible ozone isotopes have shown that molecular symmetry plays a major role. Even large enhancements, above the laboratory results, have been occasionally measured in the stratosphere using a number of different experimental techniques. A correlation between very high heavy ozone enhancement (> 30%) and high solar activity may exist. The behavior of ozone isotopes will provide information about the ozone formation process

  2. Essentials of iron, chromium, and calcium isotope analysis of natural materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantle, M.S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of isotopes to understand the behavior of metals in geological, hydrological, and biological systems has rapidly expanded in recent years. One of the mass spectrometric techniques used to analyze metal isotopes is thermal ionization mass spectrometry, or TIMS. While TIMS has been a useful analytical technique for the measurement of isotopic composition for decades and TIMS instruments are widely distributed, there are significant difficulties associated with using TIMS to analyze isotopes of the lighter alkaline earth elements and transition metals. Overcoming these difficulties to produce relatively long-lived and stable ion beams from microgram-sized samples is a non-trivial task. We focus here on TIMS analysis of three geologically and environmentally important elements (Fe, Cr, and Ca) and present an in-depth look at several key aspects that we feel have the greatest potential to trouble new users. Our discussion includes accessible descriptions of different analytical approaches and issues, including filament loading procedures, collector cup configurations, peak shapes and interferences, and the use of isotopic double spikes and related error estimation. Building on previous work, we present quantitative simulations, applied specifically in this study to Fe and Ca, that explore the effects of (1) time-variable evaporation of isotopically homogeneous spots from a filament and (2) interferences on the isotope ratios derived from a double spike subtraction routine. We discuss how and to what extent interferences at spike masses, as well as at other measured masses, affect the double spike-subtracted isotope ratio of interest (44Ca/40Ca in the case presented, though a similar analysis can be used to evaluate 56Fe/54Fe and 53Cr/52Cr). The conclusions of these simulations are neither intuitive nor immediately obvious, making this examination useful for those who are developing new methodologies. While all simulations are carried out in the context of a

  3. Natural convection boundary layer with suction and mass transfer in a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestman, A.R.

    1989-03-01

    The free convection boundary layer flow with simultaneous heat and mass transfer in a porous medium is studied when the boundary wall moves in its own plane with suction. The study also incorporates chemical reaction for the very simple model of a binary reaction with Arrhenius activation energy. For large suction asymptotic approximate solutions are obtained for the flow variables for various values of the activation energy. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  4. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xin Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  5. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Xin, E-mail: hxwang@iphy.me [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhan, Liang; Li, Yu-Feng; Cao, Guo-Fu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Shen-Jian [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-05-15

    We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  6. Meson effective mass in the isospin medium in hard-wall AdS/QCD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamedov, Shahin [Gazi University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey); Baku State University, Institute for Physical Problems, Baku (Azerbaijan); Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-02-15

    We study a mass splitting of the light vector, axial-vector, and pseudoscalar mesons in the isospin medium in the framework of the hard-wall model. We write an effective mass definition for the interacting gauge fields and scalar field introduced in gauge field theory in the bulk of AdS space-time. Relying on holographic duality we obtain a formula for the effective mass of a boundary meson in terms of derivative operator over the extra bulk coordinate. The effective mass found in this way coincides with the one obtained from finding of poles of the two-point correlation function. In order to avoid introducing distinguished infrared boundaries in the quantization formula for the different mesons from the same isotriplet we introduce extra action terms at this boundary, which reduces distinguished values of this boundary to the same value. Profile function solutions and effective mass expressions were found for the in-medium ρ, a{sub 1}, an π mesons. (orig.)

  7. Determination of trace quantities of uranium in rocks mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, Mauricio Hiromitu

    1980-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation on the thermionic emission of uranium deposited on a single flat type rhenium filament has been carried out. The study was aimed at determining the influence of various forms of deposition on the emission sensitivity and thermal stability of U + , UO + and UO 2 + ions. Based on these investigations, a technique, involving an addition of a small quantity of colloidal suspension of graphite on top of the uranyl nitrate sample deposited, was chosen because of its higher, emission sensitivity for uranium metal ions. The experimental parameters of the technique were optimised and the technique was employed in the determination of trace quantities of uranium in rock samples using mass spectrometric isotope dilution method. For the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic standard NBS-U 970 was employed as a tracer, where as the mass discrimination effect in the uranium isotope analysis was corrected using the uranium isotopic standard NBS-U500. Uranium was determined in each of the seven granite samples from Wyoming, USA and two USGS standard rocks. The precision of the analysis was found to be ±1% . The uranium values obtained on the rock samples were compared with the analyses of other investigators. Influence of the sample splitting on the uranium analysis was discussed in the light of the analytical results obtained.(author)

  8. Differentiation of endogenous and exogenous steroids by gas chromatography-combustion-mass spectrometry isotope ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes de Oca Porto, Rodny; Rosado Perez, Aristides; Correa Vidal, Margarita Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Urinary steroids profiles are used to control the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. The testosterone/epistestosterone ratio, measured by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, is used to control testosterone administration. When T/E ratio is higher than 4, consumption of testosterone or its precursors is suspected. Recent researches have demonstrated the effectiveness of Carbon Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry to detect and confirm endogenous steroids administration. The ratio of the two stable carbon isotopes 1 3 C and 1 2 C allows the differentiation of natural and synthetic steroids because synthetic steroids have lower 1 3 C abundance. In fact, the carbon isotope ratios can be used to determine endogenous steroids administration even when testosterone/epistestosterone ratio is at its normal value. In the current work, some of the most important aspects related to differentiation of endogenous and exogenous steroids by means of Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry are discussed. Also, this article provides a review about the purification and sample preparation previous to the analysis, and diet effects on carbon isotope ratio of endogenous anabolics steroids is presented too

  9. Green and efficient extraction strategy to lithium isotope separation with double ionic liquids as the medium and ionic associated agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jingjing; Li Zaijun; Gu Zhiguo; Wang Guangli; Liu Junkang

    2013-01-01

    The paper reported a green and efficient extraction strategy to lithium isotope separation. A 4-methyl-10-hydroxybenzoquinoline (ROH), hydrophobic ionic liquid-1,3-di(isooctyl)imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([D(i-C 8 )IM][PF 6 ]), and hydrophilic ionic liquid-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (ILCl) were used as the chelating agent, extraction medium and ionic associated agent. Lithium ion (Li + ) first reacted with ROH in strong alkali solution to produce a lithium complex anion. It then associated with IL + to form the Li(RO) 2 IL complex, which was rapidly extracted into the organic phase. Factors for effect on the lithium isotope separation were examined. To obtain high extraction efficiency, a saturated ROH in the [D(i-C 8 )IM][PF 6 ] (0.3 mol l -1 ), mixed aqueous solution containing 0.3 mol l -1 lithium chloride, 1.6 mol l -1 sodium hydroxide and 0.8 mol l -1 ILCl and 3:1 were selected as the organic phase, aqueous phase and phase ratio (o/a). Under optimized conditions, the single-stage extraction efficiency was found to be 52 %. The saturated lithium concentration in the organic phase was up to 0.15 mol l -1 . The free energy change (ΔG), enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) of the extraction process were -0.097 J mol -1 , -14.70 J mol K -1 and -48.17 J mol -1 K -1 , indicating a exothermic process. The partition coefficients of lithium will enhance with decrease of the temperature. Thus, a 25 deg C of operating temperature was employed for total lithium isotope separation process. Lithium in Li(RO) 2 IL was stripped by the sodium chloride of 5 mol l -1 with a phase ratio (o/a) of 4. The lithium isotope exchange reaction in the interface between organic phase and aqueous phase reached the equilibrium within 1 min. The single-stage isotope separation factor of 7 Li- 6 Li was up to 1.023 ± 0.002, indicating that 7 Li was concentrated in organic phase and 6 Li was concentrated in aqueous phase. All chemical reagents used can be well recycled

  10. Determination of 90Sr and Pu isotopes in contaminated groundwater samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoriy, Miroslav V.; Ostapczuk, Peter; Halicz, Ludwik; Hille, Ralf; Becker, J. Sabine

    2005-04-01

    A sensitive analytical method for determining the artificial radionuclides 90Sr, 239Pu and 240Pu at the ultratrace level in groundwater samples from the Semipalatinsk Test Site area in Kazakhstan by double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was developed. In order to avoid possible isobaric interferences at m/z 90 for 90Sr determination (e.g. 90Zr+, 40Ar50Cr+, 36Ar54Fe+, 58Ni16O2+, 180Hf2+, etc.), the measurements were performed at medium mass resolution under cold plasma conditions. Pu was separated from uranium by means of extraction chromatography using Eichrom TEVA resin with a recovery of 83%. The limits of detection for 90Sr, 239Pu and 240Pu in water samples were determined as 11, 0.12 and 0.1 fg ml-1, respectively. Concentrations of 90Sr and 239Pu in contaminated groundwater samples ranged from 18 to 32 and from 28 to 856 fg ml-1, respectively. The 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio in groundwater samples was measured as 0.17. This isotope ratio indicates that the most probable source of contamination of the investigated groundwater samples was the nuclear weapons tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site conducted by the USSR in the 1960s.

  11. A versatile method for simultaneous stable carbon isotope analysis of DNA and RNA nucleotides by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Brasser, J.; de Ruiter, G.; Houtekamer, M.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALELiquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) is currently the most accurate and precise technique for the measurement of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (C-13/C-12) in biological metabolites, at their natural abundance. However, until now this technique

  12. On the interference of Kr during carbon isotope analysis of methane using continuous-flow combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Bock, M; van der Veen, C.; Möller, L.; Sapart, C.J.; Prokopiou, M.; Sowers, T.; Röckmann, T.; Fischer, H

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane ( 13C of CH4) on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography (GC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled to a

  13. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  14. Origins of mass-dependent and mass-independent Ca isotope variations in meteoritic components and meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Gussone, N.; Mezger, K.; Krause, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Ca isotope composition of meteorites and their components may vary due to mass-dependent and/or -independent isotope effects. In order to evaluate the origin of these effects, five amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), three calcium aluminum inclusions (CAIs), five chondrules (C), a dark inclusion from Allende (CV3), two dark fragments from North West Africa 753 (NWA 753; R3.9), and a whole rock sample of Orgueil (CI1) were analyzed. This is the first coupled mass-dependent and -independent Ca isotope dataset to include AOAs, a dark inclusion, and dark fragments. Where sample masses permit, Ca isotope data are reported with corresponding petrographic analyses and rare earth element (REE) relative abundance patterns. The CAIs and AOAs are enriched in light Ca isotopes (δ44/40Ca -5.32 to +0.72, where δ44/40Ca is reported relative to SRM 915a). Samples CAI 5 and AOA 1 have anomalous Group II REE patterns. These REE and δ44/40Ca data suggest that the CAI 5 and AOA 1 compositions were set via kinetic isotope fractionation during condensation and evaporation. The remaining samples show mass-dependent Ca isotope variations which cluster between δ44/40Ca +0.53 and +1.59, some of which are coupled with unfractionated REE abundance patterns. These meteoritic components likely formed through the coaccretion of the evaporative residue and condensate following Group II CAI formation or their chemical and isotopic signatures were decoupled (e.g., via nebular or parent-body alteration). The whole rock sample of Orgueil has a δ44/40Ca +0.67 ± 0.18 which is in agreement with most published data. Parent-body alteration, terrestrial alteration, and variable sampling of Ca-rich meteoritic components can have an effect on δ44/40Ca compositions in whole rock meteorites. Samples AOA 1, CAI 5, C 2, and C 4 display mass-independent 48/44Ca anomalies (ε48/44Ca +6 to +12) which are resolved from the standard composition. Other samples measured for these effects (AOA 5, CAI 1, CAI 2

  15. Determination of the isotopic ratio 235U/238U in UF6 using quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusahara, Helena Sueco

    1979-01-01

    In this work measurements of isotope ratios 235 U / 23 '8U in uranium hexafluoride are carried out using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The operational parameters, which affect the final precision of the results, are standardized. Optimized procedures for the preparation of uranium hexafluoride samples by fluorination of uranium oxides using cobalt trifluoride method are established. Careful attention is given to the process of purification of uranium hexafluoride samples by fractional distillation. Adequate statistical methods for analysing the results obtained for single ratio measurements as well as the ratio ' of isotopic ratios of sample and standard ar.e developed. A precision of about 10 -4 for single ratio measurements and accuracy of about 0,3% for the ratio of sample and standard ratios are obtained. These results agree with the values which have been obtained using magnetic mass spectrometers. The procedures and methods established in this work can be employed in the systematic uranium isotope analysis in UF 6 form. (author)

  16. Stable Isotope Quantitative N-Glycan Analysis by Liquid Separation Techniques and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermayr, Stefan; Albrecht, Simone; Váradi, Csaba; Millán-Martín, Silvia; Bones, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Liquid phase separation analysis and subsequent quantitation remains a challenging task for protein-derived oligosaccharides due to their inherent structural complexity and diversity. Incomplete resolution or co-detection of multiple glycan species complicates peak area-based quantitation and associated statistical analysis when optical detection methods are used. The approach outlined herein describes the utilization of stable isotope variants of commonly used fluorescent tags that allow for mass-based glycan identification and relative quantitation following separation by liquid chromatography (LC) or capillary electrophoresis (CE). Comparability assessment of glycoprotein-derived oligosaccharides is performed by derivatization with commercially available isotope variants of 2-aminobenzoic acid or aniline and analysis by LC- and CE-mass spectrometry. Quantitative information is attained from the extracted ion chromatogram/electropherogram ratios generated from the light and heavy isotope clusters.

  17. Continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) and its applications in hydrocarbon research and exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpana, G.; Patil, D.J.; Kumar, B.

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers have been widely used to determine the isotopic ratios of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur. Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CFIRMS) provides reliable data on nanomole amount of sample gas without the need for cryogenic trapping using cold fingers as in dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer. High sample throughput is achieved as the system is configured with automated sample preparation devices and auto samplers. This paper presents a brief description of CFIRMS exploration

  18. Isotope analysis of micro metal particles by adopting laser-ablation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Ha, Young Kyung; Han, Sun Ho; Park, Yong Joon; Kim, Won Ho

    2005-01-01

    The isotope analysis of microparticles in environmental samples as well as laboratory samples is an important task. A special concern is necessary in particle analysis of swipe samples. Micro particles are normally analyzed either by dissolving particles in the solvents and adopting conventional analytical methods or direct analysis method such as a laser-ablation ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), SIMS, and SNMS (sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). But the LA-ICPMS uses large amount of samples because normally laser beam is tightly focused on the target particle for the complete ablation. The SIMS and SNMS utilize ion beams for the generation of sample ions from the particle. But the number of ions generated by an ion beam is less than 5% of the total generated particles in SIMS. The SNMS is also an excellent analytical technique for particle analysis, however, ion beam and frequency tunable laser system are required for the analysis. Recently a direct analysis of elements as well as isotopes by using laser-ablation is recognized one of the most efficient detection technology for particle samples. The laser-ablation mass spectrometry requires only one laser source without frequency tuneability with no sample pretreatment. Therefore this technique is one of the simplest analysis techniques for solid samples as well as particles. In this study as a part of the development of the new isotope analysis techniques for particles samples, a direct laser-ablation is adopted with mass spectrometry. Zinc and gadolinium were chosen as target samples, since these elements have isotopes with minor abundance (0.62% for Zn, and 0.2% for Gd). The preliminary result indicates that isotopes of these two elements are analyzed within 10% of natural abundance with good mass resolution by using direct laser-ablation mass spectrometry

  19. Recharge Estimation Using Water, Chloride and Isotope Mass Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, S.; Firmani, G.; Hedley, P.; Skrzypek, G.; Grierson, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    Discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may elevate groundwater levels and alter the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers but it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid subtropical Hamersley Basin that has received continuous mine discharge for more than five years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 74 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.24‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ~ 65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ~35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the creek has not extended beyond 27 km from the discharge point. Our approach using a combination of hydrochemical and isotope methods coupled with classical surface flow hydraulic modelling allowed evaluation of components of water budget otherwise not possible in a highly dynamic system that is mainly driven by infrequent but large episodic

  20. Mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios and its corrections for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongguo

    1989-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios by the use of uranyl nitrate added to magnesium samples to act as a binding agent is reported. Prebaking empty filaments and preheating filaments with deposited magnesium samples on its surface in a vacuum are employed to reduce the Na signal from the thenium-ribbon. Methods for correcting magnesium isotopic ratios for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation are described in detail. The results of the determination of natural magnesium isotopic ratios are 25 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.12660 (1±0.01%) and 26 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.13938 (1±0.10%). The magnesium isotopic ratios of rich - 26 Mg-2 sample and rich- 25 Mg-1 sample are 24 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.003463 (1±0.2%), 25 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.001656 (±0.2%) and 24 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.006716 (1±0.2%), 26 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.007264 (1±0.2%) respectively

  1. The measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in trace samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingliang

    1989-01-01

    An experiment study on the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in the trace gaseous sample is discussed by using the gas purification line designed by the authors and model VG-5400 static-vacuum noble gas mass spectrometer imported and air helium as a standard. The results show that the amount of He and Ne in natural gas sample is 99% after purification. When the amount of He in Mass Spectrometer is more than 4 x 10 -7 cm 3 STP, it's sensitivity remains stable, about 10 -4 A/cm 3 STP He and the precision of 3 He/ 4 He ratio within the following 17 days is 1.32%. The 'ABA' pattern and experiment condition in the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of He isotope are presented

  2. Mass measurements of neutron-rich indium isotopes toward the N =82 shell closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, C.; Klawitter, R.; Leistenschneider, E.; Lascar, D.; Barquest, B. R.; Finlay, A.; Foster, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Hunt, P.; Kootte, B.; Lan, Y.; Paul, S. F.; Phan, M. L.; Reiter, M. P.; Schultz, B.; Short, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Brodeur, M.; Dillmann, I.; Gwinner, G.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leach, K. G.; Dilling, J.

    2018-02-01

    Precise mass measurements of the neutron-rich In-130125 isotopes have been performed with the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. TITAN's electron beam ion trap was used to charge breed the ions to charge state q =13 + thus providing the necessary resolving power to measure not only the ground states but also isomeric states at each mass number. In this paper, the properties of the ground states are investigated through a series of mass differentials, highlighting trends in the indium isotopic chain as compared to its proton-magic neighbor, tin (Z =50 ). In addition, the energies of the indium isomers are presented. The (8-) level in 128In is found to be 78 keV lower than previously thought and the (21 /2- ) isomer in 127In is shown to be lower than the literature value by more than 150 keV.

  3. Online Stable Isotope Analysis of Dissolved Organic Carbon Size Classes Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled to an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Malik, A.; Scheibe, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Gleixner, G.

    size classes by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to online isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). This represents a significant methodological contribution to DOC research. The interface...

  4. The research of sub-picogram plutonium's quantitative analysis by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lei; Long Kaiming; Yang Tianli; Liu Xuemei

    2005-10-01

    By using active carbon powder as emission matter, the detect sensitivity of 239 Pu was 0.5 pg (1 ± 0.15, 95% confidence level), improved 20 times compared with the sensitivity 10 pg (1 ± 0.5) of the tradition method. The sub-picogram plutonium sample was determined quantatively by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). (authors)

  5. Collective effects in even-mass samarium isotopes by polarized-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit, R.M.A.L.; Hall, van P.J.; Klein, S.S.; Moonen, W.H.L.; Nijgh, G.J.; Overveld, van C.W.A.M.; Poppema, O.J.

    1993-01-01

    The even-mass samarium isotopes 148,...,152Sm have been investigated by polarized proton scattering at 20.4 MeV beam energy. The data have been analysed with an 'extended' optical model, where the intensities of the first maxima of the main inelastic channels are fitted in a coupled-channels

  6. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry for nuclear material accountability measurements: dreams and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deron, S.; )

    1996-01-01

    Gravimetry, titration, coulometry and isotope dilution mass spectrometry are alternative techniques which can be used to obtain elemental assays of the desirable accuracy. The communication briefly describes the characteristics of the procedure and summarizes a wealth of experience accumulated during actual accountability verification activities

  7. Isotopic abundance measurements on solid nuclear-type samples by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, M.; Rasmussen, G.; Koch, L.

    1996-01-01

    A double-focusing glow discharge mass spectrometer (GDMS) installed in a glovebox for nuclear sample screening has been employed for isotopic measurements. Isotopic compositions of zirconium, silicon, lithium, boron, uranium and plutonium which are elements of nuclear concern have been determined. Interferences arising from the matrix sample and the discharge gas (Ar) for each of these elements are discussed. The GDMS results are compared with those from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). For boron and lithium at μg/g-ng/g levels, the two methods gave results in good agreement. In samples containing uranium the isotopic composition obtained by GDMS was in agreement with those from TIMS independently of the enrichment. Attempts for the determination of plutonium isotopic composition were also made. In this case, due to the interferences of uranium at mass 238 and americium at mass 241, the GDMS raw data are complementary with those values obtained from physical non-destructive techniques. (orig.). With 2 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of stable carbon isotopes in abiogenic and biogenic natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.I.; Ahmed, M.; Tasneem, M.A.; Khan, I.A.; Latif, Z.

    1989-07-01

    This report describes the general methodology of sup/13/ carbon analysis on mass spectrometer and various preparation systems developed for conversion of samples into isotopically non-fractionated and purified carbon dioxide. Laboratory standards required for sup/13/ C analysis have been calibrated against international standards. The reproducibility/accuracy of sample preparation and analysis on mass spectrometer for sup/13/ C or sup/12/ C measurement is well within the internationally acceptable limits. (author)

  9. Evaluation of precision in measurements of uranium isotope ratio by thermionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de; Rodrigues, C.

    1977-01-01

    The parameters which affect the precision and accuracy of uranium isotopic ratios measurements by thermionic mass spectrometry are discussed. A statistical designed program for the analysis of the internal and external variances are presented. It was done an application of this statistical methods, in order to get mass discrimination factor, and its standard mean deviation, by using some results already published for 235 U/ 238 U ratio in NBS uranium samples, and natural uranium [pt

  10. In-medium Modifications of Hadron Masses and Chemical Freeze-out in Ultra-relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Broniowski, W.

    1999-10-01

    We confront the hypothesis of chemical freeze-out in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions with the hypothesis of large modifications of hadron masses in nuclear medium. We find that the thermal-model predictions for the ratios of particle multiplicities are sensitive to the values of in-medium hadronic masses. In particular, the π + /p ratio decreases by 35% when the masses of all hadrons (except for pseudo-Goldstone bosons) are scaled down by 30%. (author)

  11. Precise determination of dissolved silica in seawater by ion-exclusion chromatography isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonose, Naoko; Cheong, Chikako; Ishizawa, Yukari; Miura, Tsutomu; Hioki, Akiharu

    2014-08-20

    Ion exclusion chromatograph (IEC) isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (IEC-ID-ICP-MS) was developed for measurement of dissolved silica in seawater, which was applied to production of certified reference materials (CRMs) of three concentration levels of nutrients (high, medium and low levels). IEC-ICP-MS has been employed to separate dissolved silica from seawater matrix. In the present study, in order to solve substantial problems due to spectral interference in ICP-MS and to improve the accuracy of IEC-ICP-MS beyond standard addition or conventional calibration methods, ID method was coupled with ICP-sector field mass spectrometry (operated under medium resolution,i.e., m/Δm=4000). In addition, effects of various operating parameters in ICP-MS on a silicon background level were also investigated to obtain lower background equivalent concentration (BEC). As a result, 3 ng g(-1) of the BEC and 0.5 % of relative standard uncertainties were achieved in the analyses of dissolved silica in seawater samples at concentration levels from 4.0 mg kg (-1) to 0.8 mg kg(-1) as silicon. The developed method was successfully validated by analyses of an artificial seawater containing a known amount of silicate and the seawater certified reference material MOOS-2 produced by the National Research Council Canada. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariou, Ronan, E-mail: laberca@oniris-nantes.fr; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(−)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. - Highlights: • We address the screening of halogenated compounds in large Full Scan HRMS datasets. • The workflow involves peak picking, pairing script and review of paired features. • The pairing script is based on exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. • H/Cl scale mass defect plots are used to

  13. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariou, Ronan; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(−)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. - Highlights: • We address the screening of halogenated compounds in large Full Scan HRMS datasets. • The workflow involves peak picking, pairing script and review of paired features. • The pairing script is based on exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. • H/Cl scale mass defect plots are used to

  14. Neutron-proton mass difference in a baryonic medium and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiolhais, M.; Christov, C.; Neuber, T.; Bergmann, M.; Goeke, K.

    1991-01-01

    The neutron-proton mass difference ΔM np = M n - M p in a baryonic medium is evaluated in the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. It is demonstrated that ΔM np (ρ) increases with increasing medium density, ρ, a trend being opposite to the one required to explain the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly as suggested by Henley and Krein. In the same conceptual framework the quantity M n (ρ n ) - M p (ρ p ) is evaluated which takes into account that the valence orbits of the proton and the neutron are different. The calculations show that this quantity goes into the right direction, but the effect is an order of magnitude larger than needed to explain the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly. (orig.)

  15. Thallium determination in reference materials by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) using thermal ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidmann, E.; Hilpert, K.; Stoeppler, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) with thermal ionization, thallium concentrations were determined in reference materials from NIST and BCR, from other sources, and reference materials from the German Environmental Specimen Bank 203 Tl spike solution is applied for the isotope dilution technique. Thallium concentrations in the investigated materials range from 2.67 μg Tl.kg -1 to 963 μg Tl.kg -1 with a relative standard deviation from 0.14 to 10%. The detection limit was 0.1 ng thallium for this work. (orig.)

  16. Isotope ratio measurements with multiple collection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzner, I.T.; Segal, I.; Halicz, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the studies summarized in this review, it has been shown that IRM of lead in silicates can be carried out without lead separation and purification. Because of time independent mass discrimination and lack of chemical interaction at high plasma temperatures, simple interference corrections are feasible. This data further support the observation that MC-ICP-MS provides data with superior precision comparing to TIMS. Furthermore, it should be noted that the multi collection instrumental configuration exhibits the capability to perform a single IRM with excellent precision and high accuracy for elements with a large number of isotopes. Four of the discussed elements have six (Er) and seven (Dy, Yb, Os) isotopes

  17. Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) applied to tracer studies and isotope dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Heck, H.d'A.; McReynolds, J.H.; St John, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The nonfragmenting nature of field ionization mass spectrometry makes it a preferred technique for the isotopic analysis of multilabeled organic compounds. The possibility of field ionization of nonvolatile thermolabile materials significantly extends the potential uses of this technique beyond those of conventional ionization methods. Multilabeled tracers may be studied in biological systems with a sensitivity comparable to that of radioactive tracers. Isotope dilution analysis may be performed reliably by this technique down to picogram levels. These techniques will be illustrated by a number of current studies using multilabeled metabolites and drugs. The scope and limitations of the methodology are discussed

  18. Error analysis of isotope dilution mass spectrometry method with internal standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizhinskii, M.W.; Vitinskii, M.Y.

    1989-02-01

    The computation algorithms of the normalized isotopic ratios and element concentration by isotope dilution mass spectrometry with internal standard are presented. A procedure based on the Monte-Carlo calculation is proposed for predicting the magnitude of the errors to be expected. The estimation of systematic and random errors is carried out in the case of the certification of uranium and plutonium reference materials as well as for the use of those reference materials in the analysis of irradiated nuclear fuels. 4 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Recent Developments in Trace, Ultratrace and Isotope Ratio Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, N. F.

    2004-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Laser Ablation (LA-ICP-MS) are recent techniques for trace, ultratrace and isotope ratio measurements. Main features of these techniques and their figure of merit and capabilities are discussed. An overview of ICP-MS instrument is presented in addition to its precision, accuracy and detection limits. Uses of ICP-MS in environmental monitoring in some cases for detection of some radio nuclides are presented. Two geological applications namely, zircon grains analysis and age dating of Rb-Sr method are presented. Zn elemental and isotopic analyses in blood and serum as a biological application is shown. (Author)

  20. A mechanical system design of the iridium-192 isotope wire in cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Sanda; Tri Harjanto; Atang Susila

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, brachytherapy engineering development activities have a purpose to establish a detailed design of the cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate. The brachytherapy will use an Iridium-92 source with the emitting radiation of 5 to 10 Curies. The source is wrapped in SS-316 capsule and carried by a SS-316 wire having diameter of about 1 mm dan length of 1800 mm. As part of this activity, the preliminary design of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source has been developed. The technical specifications for the main components of the mechanical drive system have been successfully determined. This is started by studying the concept design, performing calculations, determining technical specifications, and finally defining the main components. From the evaluation, some components were decided: a stepper motor PK264A1-SG10, needle bearing NKI-10/20, spiral tube in SS316-1/8'' with 120 mm in diameter, rubber-based belts with a width of 20 mm, and aluminium drum with a diameter of 100 mm. Not all components could be identified in detail, especially for the components that do not exist in the marketplace and have to be created ourself Since the main components have been identified, the detailed design step of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source can be performed. (author)

  1. The mechanical system design of the iridium-192 isotope wire in cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Sanda; Tri Harjanto; Atang Susila

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, brachytherapy engineering activities have a purpose to establish a detailed design of the cervical cancer brachytherapy with medium dose rate. The brachytherapy will use an Iridium-92 source with the emiting radiation of 5 to 10 Curies. The source is wrapped in SS-316 capsule and carried by a SS-316 wire having diameter of about 1 mm dan length of 1800 mm. As part of this activity, the preliminary design of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source has been developed. The technical specifications for the main components of the mechanical drive system have been successfully determined. This is started by studying the concept design, performing calculations, determining technical specifications, and finally defining the main components. From the evaluation, some components were decided: a stepper motor PK264A1-SG10, needle bearing NKI-10/20, spiral tube in SS316-1/8'' with 120 mm in diameter, rubber-based belts with a width of 20 mm, and aluminium drum with a diameter of 100 mm. Not all components could be identified in detail, especially for the components that do not exist in the market place and have to be created ourself. Since the main components have been identified, the detailed design step of the mechanical drive systems for the isotope source can be performed. (author)

  2. Mass spectrometic isotope dilution analysis of Am and Cm in spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantschik, M.; Koch, L.; Commission of the European Communities, Karlsruhe; Ganser, B.

    1983-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuels contain Am and Cm in the 10 ppb to 100 ppm range. Because of this low abundance and the necessity of handling small samples of the highly toxic fuel material only a mass-spectrometric isotope dilution analysis can give sufficiently accurate results. Since suitable spikes and/or standards have been lacking, this method has not been applied. Using known masses (+- 0.1%) of Am-241 and Cm-244 metal, Am-243 and Cm-248 spikes were calibrated to an accuracy of better than 0.2%. The standards were reanalysed by chemical titration and several radiometric techniques. The chemical conditioning is based on ionexchange chromatography with alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid. A sample size of 10 -7 g is sufficient. For the mass-spectrometric measurement 10 -9 g of the elements are required. The accuracy for the determination of the main isotope is 0.5%. (orig./BRB)

  3. C-12/C-13 isotope ratio of the interstellar medium in the neighborhood of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.; Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Data from observations of Xi Per, P Cyg, 20 Tau, and 23 Tau, obtained at 4232 and 3957 A using a coude spectrograph and a 1872-element reticon on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory during 1984-1985, are combined with data on Zeta Oph (Hawkins et al., 1985) and used to estimate the C isotope ratio of the ISM near the sun. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+) abundance ratios toward the five stars are found to agree to within 12 percent and shown to be representative of the C-12/C-13 ratios in the gas, strongly indicating that the local ISM is homogeneous. The difference between the ISM ratio (43 + or - 4) and the solar-system value (89) is attributed to the chemical evolution of the ISM in the 4.9 Gyr since the formation of the sun. 78 references

  4. A review on the determination of isotope ratios of boron with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; You, Chen-Feng

    2017-07-01

    The present review discusses different mass spectrometric techniques-viz, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)-used to determine 11 B/ 10 B isotope ratio, and concentration of boron required for various applications in earth sciences, marine geochemistry, nuclear technology, environmental, and agriculture sciences, etc. The details of the techniques-P-TIMS, which uses Cs 2 BO 2 + , N-TIMS, which uses BO 2 - , and MC-ICPMS, which uses B + ions for bulk analysis or B - and B + ions for in situ micro-analysis with SIMS-are highlighted. The capabilities, advantages, limitations, and problems in each mass spectrometric technique are summarized. The results of international interlaboratory comparison experiments conducted at different times are summarized. The certified isotopic reference materials available for boron are also listed. Recent developments in laser ablation (LA) ICPMS and QQQ-ICPMS for solids analysis and MS/MS analysis, respectively, are included. The different aspects of sample preparation and analytical chemistry of boron are summarized. Finally, the future requirements of boron isotope ratios for future applications are also given. Presently, MC-ICPMS provides the best precision and accuracy (0.2-0.4‰) on isotope ratio measurements, whereas N-TIMS holds the potential to analyze smallest amount of boron, but has the issue of bias (+2‰ to 4‰) which needs further investigations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:499-519, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of synthetic peptide standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Sergio Cueto; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge, E-mail: ruizjorge@uniovi.es; García Alonso, J. Ignacio, E-mail: jiga@uniovi.es

    2014-09-24

    Highlights: • Purity assessment of peptide standards applicable to any water soluble peptide. • Online {sup 13}C isotope dilution mass spectrometry. • Mass flow chromatogram from measured 44/45 isotope ratios. • Validation by the analysis of NIST 8327. - Abstract: We present a novel method for the purity assessment of peptide standards which is applicable to any water soluble peptide. The method is based on the online {sup 13}C isotope dilution approach in which the peptide is separated from its related impurities by liquid chromatography (LC) and the eluent is mixed post-column with a continuous flow of {sup 13}C-enriched sodium bicarbonate. An online oxidation step using sodium persulfate in acidic media at 99 °C provides quantitative oxidation to {sup 12}CO{sub 2} and {sup 13}CO{sub 2} respectively which is extracted to a gaseous phase with the help of a gas permeable membrane. The measurement of the isotope ratio 44/45 in the mass spectrometer allows the construction of the mass flow chromatogram. As the only species that is finally measured in the mass spectrometer is CO{sub 2}, the peptide content in the standard can be quantified, on the base of its carbon content, using a generic primary standard such as potassium hydrogen phthalate. The approach was validated by the analysis of a reference material (NIST 8327), and applied to the quantification of two commercial synthetic peptide standards. In that case, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using alternative methods, such as amino acid analysis and ICP-MS. The results obtained proved the value of the method for the fast, accurate and precise mass purity assignment of synthetic peptide standards.

  6. Mass-reduced quantum numbers: application to the isotopic lithium hydrides (X1B+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.C.; Stwalley, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The massed-reduced quantum number (MRQN) method of combining isotopic data is applied to the lithium hydride X 1 Σ + ground state. The ΔG(eta) = μ/sup 1 / 2 / ΔG(v), B(eta) = μB(v) and D(eta) = μ 2 D(v) isotopically-combined functions are obtained. An isotopically-combined Rydberg-Klein Rees (ICRKR) potential is constructed using the G(eta) and B(eta) functions. Evidence for breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is presented and examined. The Dunham, Simons-Parr-Finlan, and Thakkar methods of potential expansion are also applied to lithium hydride and compared to the RKR Potential

  7. Analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry for the isotopic analysis of very small amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialle, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the French transmutation project of nuclear wastes, experiments consisted in the irradiation in a fast neutron reactor of few milligrams of isotopically enriched powders. Hence, the isotopic analysis of very small amount of irradiation products is one of the main issues. The aim of this study was to achieve analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry in order to accurately analyze these samples. Several axes were studied including the new total evaporation method, deposition techniques, electron multiplier potentialities and comparison between different isotope measurement techniques. Results showed that it was possible to drastically decrease the amounts needed for analysis, especially with Eu and Nd, while maintaining an uncertainty level in agreement with the project requirements. (author) [fr

  8. Mass-Dependent and -Independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes in Aquatic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Joel, B. D.; Jude, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed and highly toxic pollutant. Although Hg is a proven health risk, much of the natural cycle of Hg is not well understood and new approaches are needed to track Hg and the chemical transformations it undergoes in the environment. Recently, we demonstrated that Hg isotopes exhibit two types of isotope fractionation: (1) mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and (2) mass independent fractionation (MIF) of only the odd isotopes (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). The observation of large MIF of Hg isotopes (up to 5 permil) is exciting because only a few other isotopic systems have been documented to display large MIF, the most notable of which are oxygen and sulfur. In both cases, the application of MIF has proven very useful in a variety of fields including cosmochemistry, paleoclimatology, physical chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemistry. Both MDF and MIF isotopic signatures are observed in natural samples, and together they open the door to a new method for tracing Hg pollution and for investigating Hg behavior in the environment. For example, fish record MDF that appears to be related to size and age. Additionally, fish display MIF signatures that are consistent with the photo-reduction of methylmercury (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). If the MDF and MIF in ecosystems can be understood, the signatures in fish could inform us about the sources and processes transforming Hg and why there are differences in the bioaccumulation of Hg in differing ecosystems and populations of fish. This requires sampling of a variety of ecosystems, the sampling of many components of the ecosystems, and the use of other tracers such as carbon and nitrogen isotopes. We have expanded our studies of aquatic ecosystems to include several lakes in North America. Similar to other isotopic systems used to study food web dynamics and structure (i.e., C and N), the MDF of Hg in fish appears to be related to size and age. The MDF recorded in fish likely reflects

  9. A comparative study of isotopic analysis of plutonium from organic and aqueous media by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Radhika M.; Mirashi, Nirupama N.; Khodade, P.S.; Shah, P.M.; Parab, A.R.; Govindan, R.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    For isotopic analysis of plutonium (Pu) in irradiated nuclear fuel samples, it is normally separated from Am, U and fission products by anion exchange method in nitrate medium. However, stripping of Pu from the column by dilute HNO 3 acid is slow due to tailing which requires long elution times and reduces the concentration of Pu in the eluted solution. The desorption of Pu from the column can be enhanced by using more dilute HNO 3 but there are problems of hydrolysis and polymer formation. Formic acid and ascorbic acid in formic acid are reported to be promising eluents for plutonium. Formic acid is also a good solvent for Pu. Further, the presence of ascorbic acid helps in reducing Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby leading to faster elution as well as better recovery in smaller volumes of the eluant and hence higher Pu concentrations in the collected fraction. This would circumvent the need of subsequent concentration steps allowing direct loading of Pu on the filament for analysis by TIMS. The aim of the present work was to compare the elution behaviour and mass spectrometric analysis of Pu using formic acid, formic acid + ascorbic acid and nitric acid with respect to ion current behaviour and isotopic ratios obtained

  10. Total β-decay energies and masses of tin, antimony and tellurium isotopes in the vicinity of 50132Sn82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, E.; Aleklett, K.; Rudstam, G.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental β-decay energies for short-lived isotopes of tin, antimony and tellurium are presented. Mass-separated sources were produced at the on-line isotope separator OSIRIS. By applying β-γ coincidence methods, total β-decay energies have been determined for the following nuclides: 127-131 Sn, 128 130 131 134 Sb and 134 135 Te. The atomic mass excess has been derived for these nuclei, and comparisons are made with mass formula predictions. (Auth.)

  11. Design of a compact permanent magnet Cyclotron Mass Spectrometer for the detection and measurement of trace isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.; Bertsche, K.J.; Clark, D.J.; Halbach, K.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y.

    1992-07-01

    A technique for the detection of trace amounts of rare isotopes, Cyclotron mass Spectrometry (CMS), is described. This technique uses the relationships between particle mass, charge, magnetic field strength and cyclotron orbital frequency to provide high mass resolution. The instrument also has high sensitivity and is capable of measuring isotopes with abundances of - 12 . Improvements now being implemented will lead to further increases in the sensitivity and enhance operating parameters such as cost, portability, and sample throughput

  12. Optimization of the isotopic analysis of UF6 by quadrupole mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Peterson

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a procedure for determination of the isotopic ratio 238 U/ 235 U in UF 6 samples was established using a quadrupole mass spectrometer with ionization by electron impact and ion detection by Faraday cup or electron multiplier. For this, the following items were optimized in the spectrometer: the parameters in the ion source that provided the most intense peak, with good shape, for the corresponding mass of the most abundant isotope; the resolution that reduced the non linear effects and the number of analytic cycles that reduced the uncertainty in the results. The measurement process was characterized with respect to the effects of mass discrimination, linearity and memory effect. The mass discrimination showed to be linearly dependent of the sample pressure in the batch volume, for the pressure ranges from 0.15 to 0.30 mbar and from 0.30 to 0.40 mbar. The spectrometer was shown linear in the measurement of isotopic ratios between 0.005 and 0.045. The memory factor for the ion source and for the introduction system were, respectively, 1.000 ± 0.001 and 1.003 ± 0.003; the first one can be ignored, the second one can be eliminated by washing the batch volume with the new sample. A methodology for routine analysis of UF 6 samples and the determination of the uncertainties were set up in details as well. (author)

  13. Stable Isotope Analyses of water and Aqueous Solutions by Conventional Dual-inlet Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Juske [ORNL; Kendall, C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

    2004-01-01

    The foundation of various analytical methods for the stable isotope composition of water and other aqueous samples (natural abundance, {sup 1}H : {sup 2}H (D) = 99.985 : 0.015 atom%, and {sup 16}O : {sup 17}O : {sup 18}O = 99.762 : 0.038 : 0.200 atom%) was established during the Manhatten Project in the U.S.A., when large amounts of heavy water were produced for nuclear reactors (see Kirshenbaum, 1951, for a detailed account). From early on, there was great interest in the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water, because they are the ideal tracers of water sources and reactions. The increased analytical precisions made possible by the subsequent development of modern gas-source isotope-ratio mass spectrometers with dual-inlets and multi-collectors, have caused the proliferation of new analytical methods and applications for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water. These stable isotopes have found wide applications in basic as well as applied sciences (chemistry, geology, hydrology, biology, medical sciences, and food sciences). This is because water is ubiquitous, is an essential and predominant ingredient of living organisms, and is perhaps the most reactive compound in the Earth.

  14. Technical developments for an upgrade of the LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometry facility for rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, M.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S. E.; Campbell, C. M.; Ferrer, R.; Gehring, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Lincoln, D. L.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.

    2011-07-01

    The LEBIT (Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap) facility is the only Penning trap mass spectrometry (PTMS) facility to utilize rare isotopes produced via fast-beam fragmentation. This technique allows access to practically all elements lighter than uranium, and in particular enables the production of isotopes that are not available or that are difficult to obtain at isotope separation on-line facilities. The preparation of the high-energy rare-isotope beam produced by projectile fragmentation for low-energy PTMS experiments is achieved by gas stopping to slow down and thermalize the fast-beam ions, along with an rf quadrupole cooler and buncher and rf quadrupole ion guides to deliver the beam to the Penning trap. During its first phase of operation LEBIT has been very successful, and new developments are now underway to access rare isotopes even farther from stability, which requires dealing with extremely short lifetimes and low production rates. These developments aim at increasing delivery efficiency, minimizing delivery and measurement time, and maximizing use of available beam time. They include an upgrade to the gas-stopping station, active magnetic field monitoring and stabilization by employing a miniature Penning trap as a magnetometer, the use of stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) to most effectively remove unwanted ions, and charge breeding.

  15. Technical developments for an upgrade of the LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometry facility for rare isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redshaw, M.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S. E.; Campbell, C. M.; Ferrer, R.; Gehring, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Lincoln, D. L.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.

    2011-01-01

    The LEBIT (Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap) facility is the only Penning trap mass spectrometry (PTMS) facility to utilize rare isotopes produced via fast-beam fragmentation. This technique allows access to practically all elements lighter than uranium, and in particular enables the production of isotopes that are not available or that are difficult to obtain at isotope separation on-line facilities. The preparation of the high-energy rare-isotope beam produced by projectile fragmentation for low-energy PTMS experiments is achieved by gas stopping to slow down and thermalize the fast-beam ions, along with an rf quadrupole cooler and buncher and rf quadrupole ion guides to deliver the beam to the Penning trap. During its first phase of operation LEBIT has been very successful, and new developments are now underway to access rare isotopes even farther from stability, which requires dealing with extremely short lifetimes and low production rates. These developments aim at increasing delivery efficiency, minimizing delivery and measurement time, and maximizing use of available beam time. They include an upgrade to the gas-stopping station, active magnetic field monitoring and stabilization by employing a miniature Penning trap as a magnetometer, the use of stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) to most effectively remove unwanted ions, and charge breeding.

  16. Traceability of different apple varieties by multivariate analysis of isotope ratio mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimmo, Tanja; Camin, Federica; Bontempo, Luana; Capici, Calogero; Tagliavini, Massimo; Cesco, Stefano; Scampicchio, Matteo

    2015-11-15

    The awareness of customers of the origin of foods has become an important issue. The growing demand for foods that are healthy, safe and of high quality has increased the need for traceability and clear labelling. Thus, this study investigates the capability of C and N stable isotope ratios to determine the geographical origin of several apple varieties grown in northern Italy. Four apple varieties (Cripps Pink, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith) have been sampled in orchards located in the Districts of Bolzano, Ferrara, Verona and Udine (northern Italy). Carbon (δ(13) C) and nitrogen (δ(15) N) isotope values of the whole apple fruits and three sub-fractions (peel, pulp and seed) have been determined simultaneously by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of apples and apple sub-fractions, such as peel, seed and pulp, were significantly affected by the geographical origin and the fruit variety. The four varieties could be distinguished to a certain extent only within each district. A 99% correct identification of the samples according to their origin was, however, achieved by cross validation with the 'leave-one-out' method. This study proves the potential of stable isotopes to discriminate the geographical origin of apples grown in orchards located only a few hundreds of kilometres apart. Stable isotopes were also able to discriminate different apple varieties, although only within small geographical areas. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements on atmospheric methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brass

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS technique for high-precision δD and δ13C measurements of atmospheric methane on 40 mL air samples. CH4 is separated from other air components by utilizing purely physical processes based on temperature, time and mechanical valve switching. Chemical agents are avoided. Trace amounts of interfering compounds can be separated by gas chromatography after pre-concentration of the CH4 sample. The purified sample is then either combusted to CO2 or pyrolyzed to H2 for stable isotope measurement. Apart from connecting samples and refilling liquid nitrogen as coolant the system is fully automated and allows an unobserved, continuous analysis of samples. The analytical system has been used for analysis of air samples with CH4 mixing ratios between ~100 and ~10 000 ppb, for higher mixing ratios samples usually have to be diluted.

  18. Separation of uranium and plutonium isotopes for measurement by multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, R.E.; Hamilton, T.F.; Kehl, S.R.; Williams, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with 233 U and 242 Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA R column coupled to a UTEVA R column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of 234 U/ 235 U, 238 U/ 235 U, 236 U/ 235 U, and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment. (author)

  19. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry quantifies stem cell division and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Bailey, Andrew P; Senyo, Samuel E; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S; Gould, Alex P; Lee, Richard T; Lechene, Claude P

    2012-01-15

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter, but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with submicrometre resolution. Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice and humans. We test the 'immortal strand hypothesis', which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division chromosomes containing older template DNA are segregated to the daughter destined to remain a stem cell, thus insuring lifetime genetic stability. After labelling mice with (15)N-thymidine from gestation until post-natal week 8, we find no (15)N label retention by dividing small intestinal crypt cells after a four-week chase. In adult mice administered (15)N-thymidine pulse-chase, we find that proliferating crypt cells dilute the (15)N label, consistent with random strand segregation. We demonstrate the broad utility of MIMS with proof-of-principle studies of lipid turnover in Drosophila and translation to the human haematopoietic system. These studies show that MIMS provides high-resolution quantification of stable isotope labels that cannot be obtained using other techniques and that is broadly applicable to biological and medical research.

  20. Direct isotope determination of isotopically labelled lipids by field desorption mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, W.D.; Kessler, M.

    1982-01-01

    Lipids labelled with deuterium or carbon-14 have been investigated by field desorption mass spectrometry for determination of their degree of labelling. This application is demonstrated for free fatty acids, cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and L-α-phosphatidylcholines. Comparison of the molecular ion groups of the non-labelled and of the labelled compounds enables a fast and reliable determination of the degree of labelling. For multiply labelled compounds the label distribution is also obtained from the molecular ion group. In addition, for cholesteryl esters and for phosphatidylcholines structurally significant fragment ions provide information about the position of the label. Several hundred nanograms of the compound are typically required for a single analysis with a relative standard error of 0.5-2% in the value calculated for atom% hydrogen-2 or for the specific carbon-14 activity. (orig.) [de

  1. The future of the accelerator mass spectrometry of rare long-lived radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerators, originally designed for nuclear physics, can be added to mass spectrometric apparatus to increase the sensitivity so that isotope ratios in the range 10 -12 to 10 -15 can be measured routinely. This significant improvement of high-sensitivity mass spectrometry has been called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The present article addresses the basic principles of accelerator mass spectrometry and some recent applications which show its versatility. In particular, it is noted that accelerator mass spectrometry could play an increasing role in the measurement of the levels of long lived radioactivities in the environment, including the actinides, which result from human activities such as the use of nuclear power. To fulfill this promise, continued research and development is necessary to provide ion sources, various types of heavy ion accelerators and peripheral magnetic and electric analysers. (N.K.)

  2. Approach for domestic preparation of standard material (LSD spike) for isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Fumitaka; Sumi, Mika; Chiba, Masahiko; Suzuki, Toru; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kuno, Yusuke

    2008-01-01

    The accountancy analysis of the nuclear fuel material at Plutonium Fuel Development Center of JAEA is performed by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS; Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry). IDMS requires the standard material called LSD spike (Large Size Dried spike) which is indispensable for the accountancy in the facilities where the nuclear fuel materials are handled. Although the LSD spike and Pu source material have been supplied from foreign countries, the transportation for such materials has been getting more difficult recently. This difficulty may affect the operation of nuclear facilities in the future. Therefore, research and development of the domestic LSD spike and base material has been performed at JAEA. Certification for such standard nuclear materials including spikes produced in Japan is being studied. This report presents the current status and the future plan for the technological development. (author)

  3. Determination of total uranium by mass spectrometry utilizing the isotopic dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretella, R.F.; Noutary, C.J.; Servant, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic dilution associated to mass spectrometry is a high-sensitivity technique that allows to work with microquantities of the sample, making it possible to analize the content in highly radioactive solutions with excellent accuracy and minimum risk. The proposed technique is described and its results are discussed through the analysis of: 1) A synthetic sample that simulates dissolved spent fuel elements; 2) Uranium dioxide of nuclear purity and 3) Uranium concentrate. 233 U(ORNL) was employed as a tracer and a Nuclide 12-90-SU mass spectrometer of simple magnetic focus as measurement instrument. The accuracy reached in the analyses is better than 0.5% with a reliability of 95%. The analysis of the errors shows that their main contributing source are the errors in the measurement of the isotopic ratios. (M.E.L.) [es

  4. New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass-spectrometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1982-08-01

    The computer programs described in New Computer Programs to Acquire and Process Isotopic Mass Spectrometric Data have been revised. This report describes in some detail the operation of these programs, which acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data. Both functional and overall design aspects are addressed. The three basic program units - file manipulation, data acquisition, and data processing - are discussed in turn. Step-by-step instructions are included where appropriate, and each subsection is described in enough detail to give a clear picture of its function. Organization of file structure, which is central to the entire concept, is extensively discussed with the help of numerous tables. Appendices contain flow charts and outline file structure to help a programmer unfamiliar with the programs to alter them with a minimum of lost time

  5. Extermination Of Uranium Isotopes Composition Using A Micro Computer With An IEEE-488 Interface For Mass Spectrometer Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajitno; Taftazani, Agus; Yusuf

    1996-01-01

    A mass spectrometry method can be used to make qualitative or quantitative analysis. For qualitative analysis, identification of unknown materials by a Mass Spectrometer requires definite assignment of mass number to peak on chart. In quantitative analysis, a mass spectrometer is used to determine isotope composition material in the sample. Analysis system of a Mass Spectrometer possession of PPNY-BATAN based on comparison ion current intensity which enter the collector, and have been used to analyse isotope composition. Calculation of isotope composition have been manually done. To increase the performance and to avoid manual data processing, a micro computer and IEEE-488 interface have been installed, also software packaged has been made. So that the determination of the isotope composition of material in the sample will be faster and more efficient. Tile accuracy of analysis using this program on sample standard U 3 O 8 NBS 010 is between 93,87% - 99,98%

  6. Development of a dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Gall', L. N.; Sachenko, V. M.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2013-06-01

    A dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori using the isotope respiratory test is developed. A low-aberration mass analyzer is calculated, an input system that makes it possible to eliminate the memory effects is developed, and a small-size ion detector is constructed. The mass spectrometer is created, and the tests are performed. The measurement accuracy of the 13C/12C and 16O/18O isotope ratios are 1.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. Preliminary medical tests show that the spectrometer can be employed for the desired diagnostics.

  7. Evidence for mass-independent and mass-dependent fractionation of the stable isotopes of mercury by natural processes in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Togwell A.; Whittle, D. Michael; Evans, Marlene S.; Muir, Derek C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic and chemical analyses were performed on crustaceans, forage fish, top predator fish, and sediment cores from Lake Ontario and two boreal forest lakes to investigate fractionation of the stable isotopes of Hg in aquatic ecosystems. Multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry was used to determine Hg isotope abundances. The Hg isotope data for all three lakes showed mass-independent variation in the organisms but only mass-dependent variation in the sediments. The mass-independent isotope effect was characterised by (1) selective enrichment in isotopes of odd mass number ( 199 Hg and 201 Hg), (2) enrichment in 201 Hg relative to 199 Hg, (3) an inverse relationship between isotopes of odd and even mass number in fish, and (4) a positive correlation with methylHg (CH 3 Hg + ) concentration, and hence with trophic level (although lake whitefish were consistently anomalous, possibly owing to biochemical demethylation). Isotope signatures of species at the same trophic level varied with habitat and diet, differentiating between planktonic and benthic crustaceans and their predators, and between fish that frequent deep, cold water and fish of similar diet that prefer warmer, shallower water, because of corresponding differences in CH 3 Hg + and inorganic Hg content. Isotopic analysis of CH 3 Hg + and inorganic Hg extracted from lake trout proved that the mass-independent isotope effect was due to anomalously high abundances of 199 Hg and 201 Hg in CH 3 Hg + , as implied by the data for whole organisms, suggesting mass-independent fractionation during microbial methylation of Hg. The purely mass-dependent variation in the sediments is attributable to the fact that Hg in sediments is mostly inorganic. The mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes can be explained by effects of nuclear spin or nuclear field shift, or both, and penetration of the inner electron shells of Hg by valence electrons of Hg-binding ligands. The results of the research

  8. Application of mass-predictions to isotope-abundances in breeder-reactor cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, G

    1981-01-01

    The decay-heat and isotope composition of breeder reactor-cores is calculated at normal shut-down, and a core disintegration event. Using the ORIGEN-code, the influence of the most neutron-rich fission-yield nuclei is studied. Their abundances depend on the assumption about the nuclear data (mass and half-lives). The total decay-heat is not changed from any technical viewpoint. (15 refs).

  9. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass {sup 115,117}I isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dhanvir, E-mail: singh1472phy@gmail.com; Kumar, Amit, E-mail: akbcw2@gmail.com; Sharma, Chetan, E-mail: chetan24101985@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India); Singh, Suram, E-mail: suramsingh@gmail.com [Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, Govt. Degree College, Kathua-184101 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti-2003@yahoo.co.in [Professor, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India)

    2016-05-06

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich {sup 115,117}I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  10. An Update on the Non-Mass-Dependent Isotope Fractionation under Thermal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Mass flow and compositional gradient (elemental and isotope separation) occurs when flu-id(s) or gas(es) in an enclosure is subjected to a thermal gradient, and the phenomenon is named thermal diffusion. Gas phase thermal diffusion has been theoretically and experimentally studied for more than a century, although there has not been a satisfactory theory to date. Nevertheless, for isotopic system, the Chapman-Enskog theory predicts that the mass difference is the only term in the thermal diffusion separation factors that differs one isotope pair to another,with the assumptions that the molecules are spherical and systematic (monoatomic-like structure) and the particle collision is elastic. Our previous report indicates factors may be playing a role because the Non-Mass Dependent (NMD) effect is found for both symmetric and asymmetric, linear and spherical polyatomic molecules over a wide range of temperature (-196C to +237C). The observed NMD phenomenon in the simple thermal-diffusion experiments demands quantitative validation and theoretical explanation. Besides the pressure and temperature dependency illustrated in our previous reports, efforts are made in this study to address issues such as the role of convection or molecular structure and whether it is a transient, non-equilibrium effect only.

  11. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  12. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills.

  13. Constraints on continental crustal mass loss via chemical weathering using lithium and its isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Liu, X. M.

    2012-04-01

    The continental crust has an "intermediate" bulk composition that is distinct from primary melts of peridotitic mantle (basalt or picrite). This mismatch between the "building blocks" and the "edifice" that is the continental crust points to the operation of processes that preferentially remove mafic to ultramafic material from the continents. Such processes include lower crustal recycling (via density foundering or lower crustal subduction - e.g., relamination, Hacker et al., 2011, EPSL), generation of evolved melts via slab melting, and/or chemical weathering. Stable isotope systems point to the influence of chemical weathering on the bulk crust composition: the oxygen isotope composition of the bulk crust is distinctly heavier than that of primary, mantle-derived melts (Simon and Lecuyer, 2005, G-cubed) and the Li isotopic composition of the bulk crust is distinctly lighter than that of mantle-derive melts (Teng et al., 2004, GCA; 2008, Chem. Geol.). Both signatures mark the imprint of chemical weathering on the bulk crust composition. Here, we use a simple mass balance model for lithium inputs and outputs from the continental crust to quantify the mass lost due to chemical weathering. We find that a minimum of 15%, a maximum of 60%, and a best estimate of ~40% of the original juvenile rock mass may have been lost via chemical weathering. The accumulated percentage of mass loss due to chemical weathering leads to an average global chemical weathering rate (CWR) of ~ 1×10^10 to 2×10^10 t/yr since 3.5 Ga, which is about an order of magnitude higher than the minimum estimates based on modern rivers (Gaillardet et al., 1999, Chem. Geol.). While we cannot constrain the exact portion of crustal mass loss via chemical weathering, given the uncertainties of the calculation, we can demonstrate that the weathering flux is non-zero. Therefore, chemical weathering must play a role in the evolution of the composition and mass of the continental crust.

  14. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  15. The analysis of uranium in environmental sample by mass spectrometer combined with isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhonghua; Jia Baoting; Han Jun

    2003-01-01

    Uranium in the environmental sample was analyzed by mass spectrometer combined with isotopic dilution. Before mass spectrometer analysis, samples were dissolved in a concentrated acidic solution containing HNO 3 , HF and HClO 4 and chemically processed to suit the analysis requirement. Analysis results indicated that the uranium content was 0.08 μg/g in river water, 0.1 μg/g in evergreen foliage, and 5-11 μg/g in surface soil respectively. (authors)

  16. Triaxiality in the even-mass Hg isotopes: A discontinuity at 200Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, I.; Spear, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The mass dependence of excitation energies of the 2 + 1 , 2 + 2 , and 4 + 1 states of the even-mass Hg isotopes, and of some related B(E2) values, shows a marked discontinuity at 200 Hg. Analysis of B(E2;0 + 1 →2 + 1 ) values in terms of an extended interacting boson approximation model suggests that this discontinuity is due to a change in the proton and neutron distributions at 200 Hg. Apart from 200 Hg, the data favor γ-soft models rather than the rigid triaxial-rotor model

  17. Improved environmental and forensics measurements using multiple ion counters in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, S.A.; Richter, S.; Schwieters, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A new detector system designed for isotope ratio mass spectrometers provides improved precision on measurements of samples with very low amounts ( -11 grams) of analyte. An array of continuous dynode electron multipliers has been installed on a new ThermoFinnigan MAT Triton thermal ionization mass spectrometer acquired by the New Brunswick Laboratory. These ion counters are modifications of miniaturized, commercially-available continuous dynode electron multipliers. They can be readily installed to replace individual Faraday cups in a multi-detector mass spectrometer or bundled together and located along the detector plane with a set of Faraday cups. On the New Brunswick Laboratory mass spectrometer, nine Faraday cups, one conventional discrete dynode electron multiplier, and seven miniaturized ion counters were installed. Six of the small ion counters were bundled together and positioned on the high mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. One additional ion counter was positioned on the low mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. This arrangement allows for the simultaneous measurement of all uranium (including 233 U) or plutonium (including 244 Pu) isotopes, and allows for the measurement of larger 238 U intensities on the Faraday cup if needed. Unit mass spacing of U, Pu, or other actinides is readily achieved by the use of a mass dispersion zoom lens. The advantage of multiple ion counting is the simultaneous collection of isotopes. It overcomes many of the problems such as transient signal variation in sample emission and ionization. For a given sample, multiple ion counting generates a greater number of counts for each isotope relative to single detector ion counting and provides improved counting statistics by a factor of two or more. Initial tests indicate that the multiple ion counters exhibit high counting efficiency, a dark noise of less than 10 counts per minute and typically less than 1 count per minute, and show linear response characteristics over

  18. Decoding mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in modern atmosphere using cosmogenic 35S: A five-isotope approach and possible implications for Archean sulfur isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Huang, X.; Chen, K.; Zhang, Z.; Tao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The signature of sulfur isotopic mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) observed in Archean sediments have been interpreted as a proxy of the origins and evolution of atmospheric oxygen and early life on Earth [1]. Photochemistry of SOx in the short (negative Δ36S. After eliminating combustion impacts, the obtained Δ36S/Δ33S slope of -4.0 in the modern atmosphere is close to the Δ36S/Δ33S slope (-3.6) in some records from Paleoarchean [4], an era probably with active volcanism [5]. The significant role of volcanic OCS in the Archean atmosphere has been called for in terms of its ability to provide a continual SO2 high altitude source for photolysis [2]. The strong but previously underappreciated stratospheric signature of S-MIF in tropospheric sulfates suggests that a more careful investigation of wavelength-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation at different altitudes are required. The combustion-induced negative Δ36S may be linked to recombination reactions of elemental sulfur [6], and relevant experiments are being conducted to test the isotope effect. Although combustion is unlikely in Archean, recombination reactions may occur in other previously unappreciated processes such as volcanism and may contribute in part to the heavily depleted 36S in some Paleoarchean records [5,7]. The roles of both photochemical and non-photochemical reactions in the variability of Archean S-MIF records require further analysis in the future. Refs: [1] Farquhar et al., Science 2000; [2] Shaheen et al., PNAS 2014; [3] Lin et al., PNAS 2016; [4] Wacey et al., Precambrian Res 2015; [5] Muller et al., PNAS 2016; [6] Babikov, PNAS 2017; [7] Shen et al., EPSL, 2009.

  19. Quantifying the effect of medium composition on the diffusive mass transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals through unstirred boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Karlson, U.; Christensen, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    Unstirred boundary layers (UBLs) often act as a bottleneck for the diffusive transport of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in the environment. Therefore, a microscale technique was developed for quantifying mass transfer through a 100-μm thin UBL, with the medium composition of the UBL...... as the controllable factor. The model compound fluoranthene had to (1) partition from a contaminated silicone disk (source) into the medium, (2) then diffuse through 100 μm of medium (UBL), and finally (3) partition into a clean silicone layer (sink). The diffusive mass transfer from source to sink was monitored over...... of magnitude. These results demonstrate that medium constituents, which normally are believed to bind hydrophobic organic chemicals, actually can enhance the diffusive mass transfer of HOCs in the vicinity of a diffusion source (e.g., contaminated soil particles). The technique can be used to evaluate...

  20. Fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions of spontaneously fissioning plutonium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) distributions are evaluated in a quantum mechanical framework using elongation, mass asymmetry, neck degree of freedom as the relevant collective parameters in the Fourier shape parametrization recently developed by us. The potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic model based on the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD), the Yukawa-folded (YF) single-particle potential and a monopole pairing force. The PES are presented and analysed in detail for even-even Plutonium isotopes with A = 236-246. They reveal deep asymmetric valleys. The fission-fragment mass and TKE distributions are obtained from the ground state of a collective Hamiltonian computed within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the WKB approach by introducing a neck-dependent fission probability. The calculated mass and total kinetic energy distributions are found in good agreement with the data.

  1. Using GC-combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry for confirming steroid administration from urinary metabolites in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A.; Churchman, D.; Davis, S.

    2000-01-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) was used to study the incorporation of exogenous testosterone enanthate into excreted urinary 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α, 17β-diols

  2. Calibration and Data Processing in Gas Chromatography Combustion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Sacks, Gavin L.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) is a powerful technique for the sourcing of substances, such as determination of the geographic or chemical origin of drugs and food adulteration, and it is especially invaluable as a confirmatory tool for detection of the use of synthetic steroids in competitive sport. We review here principles and practices for data processing and calibration of GCC-IRMS data with consideration to anti-doping analyses, with a focus on carbon isotopic analysis (13C/12C). After a brief review of peak definition, the isotopologue signal reduction methods of summation, curve-fitting, and linear regression are described and reviewed. Principles for isotopic calibration are considered in the context of the Δ13C = δ13CM – δ13CE difference measurements required for establishing adverse analytical findings for metabolites relative to endogenous reference compounds. Considerations for the anti-doping analyst are reviewed. PMID:22362612

  3. Hand Grip Strength in Low, Medium, and High Body Mass Index Males and Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hand grip strength (HGS is a predictor of upper extremity function and changes in muscle strength, physical movement and ability to undertake activities of daily living. Body mass index (BMI is a critical indicator of physical health; however, the relationship between HGS and BMI has not yet been thoroughly examined. Objectives The current study aims to compare HGS in low, medium, and high BMI males and females in both hands, and also investigates the correlation between HGS and anthropometric characteristics among the three BMI groups. Patients and Methods The study included 200 participants who were divided into three groups based on their BMI (60 low, 58 medium, and 82 high. HGS was assessed using a hand-held Jamar dynamometer. BMI was assessed by an electric body-weight height analysis machine. Data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics at P 0.05. Weight and height strongly correlated with HGS for hands (correlation (r ranged from 0.000 - 0.775. Regression analysis showed that when using sex and BMI as independent variables for predicting the dependent variable HGS, the coefficient of the determinant R2 was 0.753 (P < 0.001. Conclusions The current study revealed that a significant difference existed in HGS among the low, medium, and high BMI groups. A positive correlation existed between HGS and weight and height, while sex was the most significant factor affecting HGS. These findings can serve as a reference to assess HGS prediction, whereby the sex effect should be considered.

  4. Detection of counterfeit antiviral drug Heptodin and classification of counterfeits using isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Hearn, Ruth; Wolff, Jean-Claude

    2009-06-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) are highly important techniques that can provide forensic evidence that otherwise would not be available. MC-ICP-MS has proved to be a very powerful tool for measuring high precision and accuracy isotope amount ratios. In this work, the potential of combining isotope amount ratio measurements performed by MC-ICP-MS and IRMS for the detection of counterfeit pharmaceutical tablets has been investigated. An extensive study for the antiviral drug Heptodin has been performed for several isotopic ratios combining MC-ICP-MS and an elemental analyser EA-IRMS for stable isotope amount ratio measurements. The study has been carried out for 139 batches of the antiviral drug and analyses have been performed for C, S, N and Mg isotope ratios. Authenticity ranges have been obtained for each isotopic system and combined to generate a unique multi-isotopic pattern only present in the genuine tablets. Counterfeit tablets have then been identified as those tablets with an isotopic fingerprint outside the genuine isotopic range. The combination of those two techniques has therefore great potential for pharmaceutical counterfeit detection. A much greater power of discrimination is obtained when at least three isotopic systems are combined. The data from these studies could be presented as evidence in court and therefore methods need to be validated to support their credibility. It is also crucial to be able to produce uncertainty values associated to the isotope amount ratio measurements so that significant differences can be identified and the genuineness of a sample can be assessed.

  5. Decay studies and mass measurements on isobarically pure neutron-rich Hg and Tl isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Schweikhard, L C; Savreux, R P; Hager, U D K; Beck, D; Blaum, K

    2007-01-01

    We propose to perform mass measurements followed by $\\beta$- and $\\gamma$-decay studies on isobarically pure beams of neutron-rich Hg and Tl isotopes, which are very poorly known due to a large contamination at ISOL-facilities with surface-ionised francium. The aim is to study the binding energies of mother Hg and Tl nuclides, as well as the energies, spins and parities of the excited and ground states in the daughter Tl and Pb isotopes. The proposed studies will address a new subsection of the nuclear chart, with Z 126, where only 9 nuclides have been observed so far. Our studies will provide valuable input for mass models and shell-model calculations: they will probe the proton hole-neutron interaction and will allow to refine the matrix elements for the two-body residual interaction. Furthermore, they also give prospects for discovering new isomeric states or even new isotopes, for which the half-lives are predicted in the minute- and second-range.\\\\ To reach the isobaric purity, the experiments will be p...

  6. Isotope Dilution - Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Tin in a Fly Ash Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, C.; Fernandez, M.; Quejido, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    Isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) analysis has been applied to the determination of tin in a fly ash sample supplied by the EC Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy). The proposed procedure includes the silica gel/phosphoric acid technique for tin thermal ionisation activation and a strict heating protocol for isotope ratio measurements. Instrumental mass discrimination factor has been previously determined measuring a natural tin standard solution. Spike solutions has been prepared from 112Sn-enriched metal and quantified by reverse isotope dilution analysis. Two sample aliquots were spiked and tin was extracted with 4,5 M HCI during 25 min ultrasound esposure time. Due to the complex matrix of this fly ash material, a two-steps purification stage using ion-exchange chromatography was required prior TIMS analysis. Obtained results for the two sample-spike blends (10,10 + - 0,55 y 10,50 + - 0,64 imolg-1) are comprarable, both value and uncertainty. Also a good reproducibility is observed between measurements. The proposed ID-TIMS procedure, as a primary method and due to the lack of fly ash reference material certified for tin content, can be used to validate more routine methodologies applied to tin determination in this kind of materials. (Author) 75 refs

  7. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry as a tool for source inference in forensic science: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Natacha; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Esseiva, Pierre; Doyle, Sean; Zollinger, Kurt; Delémont, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used in numerous fields of forensic science in a source inference perspective. This review compiles the studies published on the application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to the traditional fields of forensic science so far. It completes the review of Benson et al. [1] and synthesises the extent of knowledge already gathered in the following fields: illicit drugs, flammable liquids, human provenancing, microtraces, explosives and other specific materials (packaging tapes, safety matches, plastics, etc.). For each field, a discussion assesses the state of science and highlights the relevance of the information in a forensic context. Through the different discussions which mark out the review, the potential and limitations of IRMS, as well as the needs and challenges of future studies are emphasized. The paper elicits the various dimensions of the source which can be obtained from the isotope information and demonstrates the transversal nature of IRMS as a tool for source inference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A STUDY ON CARBON ISOTOPE OF CO2 AND CH4 IN WESTERN DIENG PLATEU BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY- ISOTOPE RATIO MASS SPECTROMETER (GC-IRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon isotope can be used to evaluate volcanism phenomenon of volcano. The study of carbon isotope of CO2 and CH4 was carried out in western Dieng Plateau by mass-spectrometer. Before analysis, sampel was separated by gas chromatography using a Porapak-Q column and a FID (Flame Ionization Detector detector. The gas was oxidized by copper oxide at 850oC before being ionized in mass-spectrometer for isotope analysis. The CO2 content in Candradimuka crater (-4.10 O/OO, indicated that the gas may be as volcanic gas. The other CO2 from Sumber and western Gua Jimat, had isotope value  of -10.05 and -12.07 O/OO, respectively, indicating contamination from crustal and subduction material. The carbon isotope of CH4 gas from Pancasan village was -63.42 O/OO, that may be categorized as biogenic gas.   Keywords: isotope, CO2, CH4, Dieng.

  9. Contribution of bulk mass spectrometry isotopic analysis to characterization of materials in the framework of CMX-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchkin, A.; Stebelkov, V.; Zhizhin, K.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Kardinal, Ch.; Loi, E.; Keegan, E.; Kristo, M.J.

    2018-01-01

    Seven laboratories used the results of bulk uranium isotopic analysis by either inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) or thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for characterization of the samples in the Nuclear Forensic International Technical Working Group fourth international collaborative material exercise, CMX-4. Comparison of the measured isotopic compositions of uranium in three exercise samples is implemented for identifying any differences or similarities between the samples. The role of isotopic analyses in the context of a real nuclear forensic investigation is discussed. Several limitations in carrying out ICP-MS or TIMS analysis in CMX-4 are noted. (author)

  10. Selective isotope determination of lanthanum by diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    A diode-laser step has been incorporated into a resonance-ionization mass spectrometry optical excitation process to enhance the isotopic selectivity of the technique. Lanthanum isotope ratio enhancements as high as 10 3 were achieved by use of a single-frequency cw diode laser tuned to excite the first step of a three-step excitation--ionization optical process; the subsequent steps were excited by use of a pulsed dye laser. Applying the same optical technique, we measured atomic hyperfine constants for the high-lying even-parity 4 D 5/2 state of lanthanum at 30 354 cm --1 . The general utility of this spectral approach is discussed

  11. The effect of isotopic mass on the velocity of sound in liquid Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAlister, S.P.; Crozier, E.D.; Cochran, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for the velocity of ultrasound in liquid 6 Li- 7 Li alloys of composition 4.5, 49.7 and 99.9 at % Li for temperatures up to 700 0 C. At the melting point the ratio of the velocity of sound in 6 Li to that in 7 Li was found within experimental error to equal (M 7 /M 6 )sup(1/2), the result expected for classical liquids which differ only in the isotopic mass M. In the alloy of 49.7 at % 7 Li the sound velocity exceeded by 0.6% the value expected for a thermodynamically ideal alloy. This result is discussed in terms of the theoretical treatment by Parrinello et al, (J. Phys. C.: Solid St. Phys.; 7:2577 (1974)) of collective excitations in binary isotopic fluids. (author)

  12. Distribution of oxygen isotopes in the water masses of Drake Passage and the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Grose, Katie E.; McDonagh, Elaine L.; Heywood, Karen J.; Frew, Russell D.; Dennis, Paul F.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of oxygen (18O and 16O) from samples collected on World Ocean Circulation Experiment sections SR1b (eastern Drake Passage) and A11 (Punta Arenas to Cape Town) are used, together with hydrographic data, to deduce information about the formation and variability of South Atlantic and Southern Ocean water masses. The Drake Passage surface waters south of the Polar Front (PF) are isotopically light (δ18O around -0.4‰) owing to the influence of meteoric waters. The salinity and δ18O of the A11 surface waters yield an apparent freshwater end-member which is much isotopically lighter than the local precipitation, thus advection of these waters from farther south dominates over local effects in determining the surface water properties. The Drake Passage section shows unusual proximity of the two main fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (the PF and Subantarctic Front (SAF)), and we observe cold, fresh, and isotopically light water derived from the temperature-minimum Winter Water at the SAF. This water is of the correct density to freshen the intermediate water north of the SAF and thus play a role in the formation of the comparatively fresh Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) of the South Atlantic. This confirms the role of Antarctic water in forming the South Atlantic variety of AAIW. Across the A11 section the oxygen isotope and salinity data at the AAIW core show very similar traces, with waters in the Malvinas Current loop showing lowest values of both. At the eastern boundary of the South Atlantic, the input of Red Sea Water from east of South Africa is observed via the presence of anomalously isotopically heavy AAIW. We deduce potentially significant temporal variability in the isotopic composition of Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW) by comparing the Drake Passage data to earlier data covering the outflow of the Weddell Sea. The A11 data show WSDW consistent with such variability, indicating that its effects could

  13. Lead in prehistoric, historic and contemporary Japanese: stable isotopic study by ICP mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Morita, M.; Yoneda, M.; Yoshinaga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Lead concentration and isotopic composition of prehistoric (middle and latest Jomon era, 2000-4500 BP, n=6), historic (Edo era, 130-400 BP, n=10), and contemporary (died in 1987-88, n=15) Japanese bones, and deciduous teeth from contemporary Japanese children born during 1985-88 (n=17) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lead concentration was lowest in Jomon bones and was higher in rural Edo, contemporary, and urban Edo, in that order. Elevated Pb concentration in historic Edo people, as reported previously, was reconfirmed. The average isotopic ratios ( 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb) in excavated (prehistoric and historic) bones, contemporary bones, and deciduous teeth were different from each other. The contemporary bones had the least radiogenic composition (mean 207 Pb/ 206 Pb: 0.879; mean 208 Pb/ 206 Pb: 2.126) while the excavated bones the most (0.848; 2.098), and teeth intermediate (0.866; 2.111). The comparison with the literature data of isotopic compositions of environmental samples showed that the isotopic composition of the excavated bones was within the range of Japanese ores, rocks and soils, indicating the absence of foreign Pb sources in preindustrialized Japan. That of the contemporary bones was closer to the average gasoline Pb, the use of which had been banned in the late 1970s, than to the Pb in airborne particulate matter or refuse incineration ash of 1980s. The average Pb isotopic ratios in the deciduous teeth was close to the isotopic ratios of Pb in airborne particulate matter and refuse incineration ash. These data indicated that the contemporary Japanese population was exposed to foreign Pb which had different isotopic composition from domestic Pb. Exposure to Pb of foreign origin was particularly evidently recorded in people born before the leaded gasoline ban. The history of human Pb contamination in Japan is discussed based on the present results and other previously published data. (Copyright (c) 1998

  14. The interlaboratory experiment IDA-72 on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Drosselmeyer, E.

    1975-07-01

    Volume II of the report on the IDA-72 experiment contains papers written by different authors on a number of special topics connected with the preparation, performance and evaluation of the interlaboratory test. In detail the sampling procedures for active samples of the reprocessing plant and the preparation of inactive reference and spike solution from standard material are described as well as new methods of sample conditioning by evaporation. An extra chapter is devoted to the chemical sample treatment as a preparation for mass spectrometric analysis of the U and Pu content of the solutions. Special topics are also methods for mass discrimination corrections, α-spectrometer measurements as a supplement for the determination of Pu-238 and the comparison of concentration determinations by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis with those performed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The last part of this volume contains papers connected with the computerized statistical evaluation of the high number of data. (orig.) [de

  15. Total cholesterol in serum determined by isotope dilution/mass spectrometry, with liquid-chromatographic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Akiko; Nishi, Sueo

    1988-01-01

    We describe an accurate, precise method for determination of total serum cholesterol by isotope dilution/mass spectrometry (IDMS) with liquid chromatographic separation. After adding [3,4- 13 C] cholesterol to serum and hydrolyzing the cholesterol esters, we extract the total cholesterol. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used to separate the extracted cholesterol for measurement by electron-impact mass spectrometry with use of a direct-insertion device. To evaluate the specificity and the accuracy of this method, we also studied the conventional IDMS method, which involves converting cholesterol to the trimethylsilyl ether and assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with use of a capillary column. The coefficient of variation for the HPLC method was a little larger than for the conventional method, but mean values by each method agreed within 1% for all sera tested. (author)

  16. The role of symmetry in the mass independent isotope effect in ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Greg; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the internal distribution of “anomalous” isotope enrichments has important implications for validating theoretical postulates on the origin of these enrichments in molecules such as ozone and for understanding the transfer of these enrichments to other compounds in the atmosphere via mass transfer. Here, we present an approach, using the reaction NO2− + O3, for assessing the internal distribution of the Δ17O anomaly and the δ18O enrichment in ozone produced by electric discharge. The Δ17O results strongly support the symmetry mechanism for generating mass independent fractionations, and the δ18O results are consistent with published data. Positional Δ17O and δ18O enrichments in ozone can now be more effectively used in photochemical models that use mass balance oxygen atom transfer mechanisms to infer atmospheric oxidation chemistry. PMID:19307571

  17. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  18. High-precision lead isotope ratio measurement by inductively coupled plasma multiple collector mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walder, A.J.; Furuta, Naoki.

    1993-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ion source coupled to a magnetic sector mass analyser equipped with seven Faraday detectors has been used to measure the lead isotope ratios in solutions of Sanshiro Pond sediment collected at the University of Tokyo, airborne particulates collected at Shinjuku in Tokyo and Merck multielement standard product number 97279494. A thallium correction technique was utilized to allow a simultaneous correction for mass bias. This work followed an earlier interlaboratory comparison study of the above-mentioned solutions using ICP quadrupole mass spectrometry, and has demonstrated a considerable improvement in analytical precision. The following isotope ratio measurements were recorded. Pond sediment solution containing 82 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=17.762±0.014; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.1424±0.0009; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=37.678±0.034. Airborne particulate solution containing 45 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=17.969±0.006; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.1528±0.0003; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=37.915±0.021. Merck multielement standard solution containing 100 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=19.255±0.015; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.2238±0.0004; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=38.476±0.021 (All errors are given as ±2 standard deviations). (author)

  19. Non-constant relative atomic masses due to varying isotopic abundance of polynuclidic elements and their effect on the accuracy of analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Alterations of actual relative atomic masses occur in natural samples by natural isotope ratio shifts of polynuclidic elements. Therefore, using nuclear properties for gaining a measuring signal, isotopic shifts of certain elements may lead to significant measuring errors

  20. Isotope dilution surface ionization mass spectrometry of silver in environmental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murozumi, M; Nakamura, S; Suga, K [Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan)

    1981-03-01

    Surface ionization mass spectrometry has been developed to measure isotopic abundances and concentrations of silver in commercial high-purity metals, environmental materials such as rocks and plants, and /sup 109/Ag and /sup 107/Ag spikes. A minute amount of silver is extracted into a dithizone chloroform solution from a nitric acid solution of above samples. After the silver is back-extracted into 6.0 ml of a 7 mol/l HNO/sub 3/ solution, the solution is evaporated to dryness under the nitrogen atmosphere. Silver nitrate thus formed is dissolved in a mixture of 60 ..mu..l of an 0.003% silica gel suspended water and 5 ..mu..l of a 2% phosphoric acid. An aliquot of this solution is applied to the mass spectrometry using a rhenium single filament as an ion emitter. The proposed method can detect the presence of 10/sup -14/ g of silver on the ion emitter, and measure the /sup 109/Ag//sup 107/Ag isotopic ratio in environmental materials with the accuracy of 0.1 -- 0.2% in the coefficient of variation. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a /sup 107/Ag spike has revealed the silver concentration in the environmental standard materials, which were prepared by the National Bureau of Standards, U.S.A. and National Institute of Environmental Studies of Japan, as follows; 27.9 +- 0.2 ppb for the Orchard Leaves and 34.3 +- 0.3 ppb in the Pepper Bush. The determined values of silver in the Granodiorite, JG-1, and Basalt, JB-1 powders made by the Geological Survey of Japan are 25.4 +- 0.4 ppb and 41.3 +- 0.1 ppb respectively. Silver concentration in a coastal sea water sample is found to be at the level of 2.5 +- 0.4 ppt.

  1. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, B.D.; Ognibene, T.; Vogel, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of 14 C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14 C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14 C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14 C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS

  2. Sr isotope geochemistry of East Alpine mineral deposits and mass spectrometric analyses of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grum, W.

    1995-05-01

    Strontium isotope geochemistry and deformational history of selected carbonate-hosted deposits from different tectonic positions in the Eastern Alps were studied. In this context an equipment has been constructed to analyze the composition of volatile components of fluid inclusions (FI). Based on the results of Sr-isotopic investigations two groups of deposits are discriminated: Deposits formed by formation waters and/or metamorphogenic fluids: Tux (magnesite, scheelite), Otterzug (barite), Lassing (magnesite), Rabenwald (talc), Laussa and Mooseck (fluorite). The mineralizing fluids are derived from different sedimentary rock series and therefore 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios vary between 0.707 and 0.719. Deposits situated along fault zones: Lassing (talc), Gasteiner Tal (Silberpfennig area; gold), Schlaining (stibnite) and Waldenstein (specularite). Sr isotope ratios of the mineralizing fluids from Lassing, Waldenstein and Schlaining ranges from 0.7112 to 0.7127 and are therefore thought to have scavenged the East Alpine crystalline. The mineralizing solutions of the Gasteiner Tal deposit may either have equilibrated with low radiogenic sedimentary or with (ultra-)basic rocks. A cracking chamber has been constructed in order to open FI by cracking for mass spectrometric analysis of volatile components. Gases are analysed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The desorption of gas from metal and sample surfaces during cracking can be neglected. The amount of gas released from the mineral lattices was studied. With that fast method ore bearing from barren host rocks have been distinguished by different composition of the FI at the Brixlegg barite mineralization (Eastern Alps). Within the Galway fluorite deposit (Ireland) different fluids were involved and mass spectrometric analysis were carried out to characterize these different fluids and to identify their origin. (author)

  3. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  4. Food authenticity studies via multi-elemental and isotopic pattern using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, R.; Brunner, M.; Abranko, L.; Prohaska, T.; Stefanka, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The aim of our study has been the development of an analytical method based on Sr isotope and elemental fingerprint analysis for discriminating food samples from different geographical origin. Several types of foods were involved in the investigation representing different stages of food processing such as pulverized spicy paprika (sparsely processed food product) and wine samples (processed product). Independent inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like ICP-SFMS, ICP-CCMS, and MC-ICPMS were used for method validation and investigation of the geographical origin. The advantage and limitations of the developed methods are discussed critically. (author)

  5. Experimental determination of isotope enrichment factors – bias from mass removal by repetitive sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchner, Daniel; Jin, Biao; Ebert, Karin

    2017-01-01

    to account for mass removal and for volatilization into the headspace. In this study we use both synthetic and experimental data to demonstrate that the determination of ε-values according to current correction methods is prone to considerable systematic errors even in well-designed experimental setups....... Application of inappropriate methods may lead to incorrect and inconsistent ε-values entailing misinterpretations regarding the processes underlying isotope fractionation. In fact, our results suggest that artifacts arising from inappropriate data evaluation might contribute to the variability of published ε...

  6. Stable isotope dilution analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, A.; Raaphorst, J.G. van

    1984-01-01

    The combination of stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is in use for lead and uranium determination at milligram per kilogram levels for over 20 years. However, several other elements can also be determined accurately by SIDA/TIMS. In this study the determinations of cadmium and copper are described. Details of the digestion, electrochemical and ion-exchange separations and the loading of the elements on a filament are given. The advantages of the SIDA/TIMS technique are shown and illustrated with results for several certified reference materials. (orig.) [de

  7. Quantitation of Poly(ADP-Ribose) by Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubel, Tabea; Martello, Rita; Bürkle, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    PARP inhibitors, which represent a novel class of promising chemotherapeutics. Previously, we have developed a bioanalytical platform based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to quantify cellular PAR with unequivocal chemical specificity in absolute terms with femtomol sensitivity...... research, as well as in drug development (Martello et al. ACS Chem Biol 8(7):1567-1575, 2013; Mangerich et al. Toxicol Lett 244:56-71, 2016). Here, we present an improved and adjusted version of the original protocol by Martello/Mangerich et al., which uses UPLC-MS/MS instrumentation....

  8. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL rf spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Toader, C F; Borcea, C; Doubre, H; Duma, M; Jacotin, M; Henry, S; Képinski, J F; Lebée, G; Le Scornet, G; Lunney, M D; Monsanglant, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C

    1999-01-01

    The MISTRAL experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  9. New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data: Operator's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.

    1993-09-01

    This TM is one of a pair that describes ORNL-developed software for acquisition and processing of isotope ratio mass spectral data. This TM is directed at the laboratory analyst. No technical knowledge of the programs and programming is required. It describes how to create and edit files, how to acquire and process data, and how to set up files to obtain the desired results. The aim of this TM is to serve as a utilitarian instruction manual, a open-quotes how toclose quotes approach rather than a open-quotes why?close quotes

  10. Stable Isotope Mass Balance of the Laurentian Great Lakes to Constrain Evaporative Losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasechko, S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario and Alberta Innovates, Technology Futures, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Gibson, J. J. [Canada Alberta Innovates, Technology Futures, Victoria, British Columbia and Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Pietroniro, A. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Edwards, T.W D. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    Evaporation is an important yet poorly constrained component of the water budget of the Laurentian Great Lakes, but is known historically to have a significant impact on regional climate, including enhanced humidity and downwind lake effect precipitation. Sparse over lake climate monitoring continues to limit ability to quantify bulk lake evaporation and precipitation rates by physical measurements, impeded by logistical difficulties and costs of instrumenting large areas of open water (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} km2). Measurements of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in water samples of precipitation and surface waters within the great lakes basin are used to better understand the controls on the region's water cycle. A stable isotope mass balance approach to calculate long term evaporation as a proportion of input to each lake is discussed. The approach capitalizes on the well understood systematic isotopic separation of an evaporating water body, but includes added considerations for internal recycling of evaporated moisture in the overlying atmosphere that should be incorporated for surface waters sufficiently large to significantly influence surrounding climate. (author)

  11. A Stable-Isotope Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Footprinting Approach to Analyze Exudates from Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Viant

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton exudates play an important role in pelagic ecology and biogeochemical cycles of elements. Exuded compounds fuel the microbial food web and often encompass bioactive secondary metabolites like sex pheromones, allelochemicals, antibiotics, or feeding attractants that mediate biological interactions. Despite this importance, little is known about the bioactive compounds present in phytoplankton exudates. We report a stable-isotope metabolic footprinting method to characterise exudates from aquatic autotrophs. Exudates from 13C-enriched alga were concentrated by solid phase extraction and analysed by high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. We used the harmful algal bloom forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense to prove the method. An algorithm was developed to automatically pinpoint just those metabolites with highly 13C-enriched isotope signatures, allowing us to discover algal exudates from the complex seawater background. The stable-isotope pattern (SIP of the detected metabolites then allowed for more accurate assignment to an empirical formula, a critical first step in their identification. This automated workflow provides an effective way to explore the chemical nature of the solutes exuded from phytoplankton cells and will facilitate the discovery of novel dissolved bioactive compounds.

  12. Electrochemical separation and isotopic determination of thallium at the nanogram level by surface ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid low-blank procedure is described for the co-separation of thallium and lead by sequential cathodic and anodic electrodeposition from natural samples, especially complex natural silicates, for subsequent mass spectrometry. A micro anion-exchange procedure is also described for the separation of thallium and lead. Ion currents of 10 - 10 A can be obtained from 1 ng of thallium. The isotopic composition of 1 ng of thallium can be measured on a Faraday detector with a precision of 0.05-0.1%. The total procedural blank is 3 pg. By using stable isotope dilution, 0.2 ng of thallium can be measured with a precision of 0.6% with only a 2% blank correction. This allows the accurate determination of thallium in natural samples down to concentration levels of about 50 pg g - 1 . The detection limit is 50 fg. This procedure has been applied to meteorites and terrestrial rocks. The stable isotope dilution technique is suitable for geochemical, environmental and toxicological studies requiring a highly sensitive, accurate and precise method for the determination of thallium. (Auth.)

  13. Detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in environmental samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, Karin; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez Guzman, Jose Manuel; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Shinonaga, Taeko [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Plutonium isotopes {sup 239}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=2.4.10{sup 4}a), {sup 240}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=6.5.10{sup 3}a) and {sup 242}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=3.7.10{sup 5}a) are anthropogenic radionuclides emitted into the environment by nuclear activities. Pu is accumulated in the human body and hence, poses a considerable hazard to human health. Due to the long half-lives, these isotopes are present in the biosphere on large time scales and a build-up can be expected. Therefore it is important to study the contamination pathway of Pu into the drinking water. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich a method to detect long-lived Pu isotopes by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being developed. AMS requires only few milligrams of sample material, which is a substantial advantage over decay counting techniques. Consequently, more samples from different locations can be taken which is essential when searching for locally increased Pu concentrations as in the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident in March 2011. Samples from different locations in the Pacific Ocean and from the snow-hydrosphere are planned to be investigated by AMS. The principle detection method using AMS and an overview of the status of the project is presented.

  14. Determination of Trace Iron in Red Wine by Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry Using Multiple-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Wang Jun; Lu Hai; Zhou Yuanjing; Li Haifeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces determination of trace iron in red wine certified reference material by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method using a multiplecollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, equipped with a hexapole collision cell. The measurement procedure of iron isotopic abundance ratios was deeply researched. Reduced polyatomic ion interferences to iron isotopes ion by collision reaction using Ar and H 2 gas, high precise isotopic abundance ratios were achieved. Two relative measurement methods (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) were used to analyze trace iron in red wine. The results are compared with IDMS results, which indicate that they are accordant. The uncertainty analyses include each uncertainty factor in whole experiment and the uncertainty of used certified reference material and it shows that the procedure blank is not neglectable to detect limit and precision of the method. The establishment of IDMS method for analysis of trace iron in red wine supports the certification of certified reference materials. (authors)

  15. The mid-cretaceous water bearer: Isotope mass balance quantification of the Albian hydrologic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    A latitudinal gradient in meteoric ??18O compositions compiled from paleosol sphaerosiderites throughout the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) (34-75??N paleolatitude) exhibits a steeper, more depleted trend than modern (predicted) values (3.0??? [34??N latitude] to 9.7??? [75??N] lighter). Furthermore, the sphaerosiderite meteoric ??18O latitudinal gradient is significantly steeper and more depleted (5.8??? [34??N] to 13.8??? [75??N] lighter) than a predicted gradient for the warm mid-Cretaceous using modern empirical temperature-??18O precipitation relationships. We have suggested that the steeper and more depleted (relative to the modern theoretical gradient) meteoric sphaerosiderite ??18O latitudinal gradient resulted from increased air mass rainout effects in coastal areas of the KWIB during the mid-Cretaceous. The sphaerosiderite isotopic data have been used to constrain a mass balance model of the hydrologic cycle in the northern hemisphere and to quantify precipitation rates of the equable 'greenhouse' Albian Stage in the KWIB. The mass balance model tracks the evolving isotopic composition of an air mass and its precipitation, and is driven by latitudinal temperature gradients. Our simulations indicate that significant increases in Albian precipitation (34-52%) and evaporation fluxes (76-96%) are required to reproduce the difference between modern and Albian meteoric siderite ??18O latitudinal gradients. Calculations of precipitation rates from model outputs suggest mid-high latitude precipitation rates greatly exceeded modern rates (156-220% greater in mid latitudes [2600-3300 mm/yr], 99% greater at high latitudes [550 mm/yr]). The calculated precipitation rates are significantly different from the precipitation rates predicted by some recent general circulation models (GCMs) for the warm Cretaceous, particularly in the mid to high latitudes. Our mass balance model by no means replaces GCMs. However, it is a simple and effective means of obtaining

  16. Determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in a candidate reference materials using isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Luis; Gras, Nuri; Quejido, Alberto; Fernandez, Marta

    2001-01-01

    The growing demands placed on analytical laboratories to ensure the reliability of their results, due to the introduction of systems of quality and to the increasing use of metrology in chemical measurements has led most laboratories to validate their methodologies and to control them statistically. One of the techniques used most often for these purposes is based on the use of reference materials. The proper use of these materials means that laboratory results may be traced to the International System of Units, analytical methodologies can be validated, instruments calibrated and chemical measurements harmonized. One of the biggest challenges in developing reference materials is that of certifying their properties, a process that has been defined as assigning a concentration value that is as close as possible to the true value together with its uncertainty. Organizations that produce reference materials use several options for their certification process, and among these is the use of a primary method. Among the primary methods recognized by the International Office of Weights and Measures is the Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry technique. The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, through its Reference Materials Program, has prepared a reference material of clam tissue, which has been chemically defined by different analytical methodologies applied in different national and international laboratories. This work describes the methodology developed with the CIEMAT for determining the elements lead, cadmium and zinc in the clam tissue reference material using the primary technique of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry. The calculation is described for obtaining the spike amounts to be added to the sample and the procedure is explained for carrying out the isotopic exchange. The isotopic relationships 204 Pb/ 205 Pb, 111 Cd/ 114 Cd and 66 Zn/ 67 Zn were determined in an atomic emission spectrometer with a plasma source with the following characteristics: plasma

  17. Hepatoblastoma Biology Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Utility of a Unique Technique for the Analysis of Oncological Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-07-07

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common primary liver tumor in children. However, it occurs rarely, with an incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases per million children. There is no clear explanation of the relationship between clinicopathologic features, therapy, and outcome in hepatoblastoma cases, so far. One of the most widely accepted prognostic factors in hepatoblastoma is histology of the tumor. The aim of the study was to determine the potential differences in biology of hepatoblastoma histological subtypes at the atomic level using the unique method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which is especially valuable in examination of small groups of biological samples. Twenty-four measurements of nitrogen stable isotope ratio, carbon stable isotope ratio and total carbon to nitrogen mass ratio in fetal and embryonal hepatoblastoma tissue were performed using a Sercon 20-22 Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (CF-IRMS) coupled with a Sercon SL elemental analyzer for simultaneous carbon-nitrogen-sulfur (NCS) analysis. A difference of about 1.781‰ in stable nitrogen isotope 15N/14N ratio was found between examined hepatoblastoma histological subtypes. The prognosis in liver tumors cases in children may be challenging particularly because of the lack of versatile methods of its evaluation. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry allows one to determine the difference between hepatoblastoma histological subtypes and clearly indicates the cases with the best outcome.

  18. Hepatoblastoma Biology Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Utility of a Unique Technique for the Analysis of Oncological Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Taran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatoblastoma is the most common primary liver tumor in children. However, it occurs rarely, with an incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases per million children. There is no clear explanation of the relationship between clinicopathologic features, therapy, and outcome in hepatoblastoma cases, so far. One of the most widely accepted prognostic factors in hepatoblastoma is histology of the tumor. The aim of the study was to determine the potential differences in biology of hepatoblastoma histological subtypes at the atomic level using the unique method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which is especially valuable in examination of small groups of biological samples.Material/Methods: Twenty-four measurements of nitrogen stable isotope ratio, carbon stable isotope ratio and total carbon to nitrogen mass ratio in fetal and embryonal hepatoblastoma tissue were performed using a Sercon 20-22 Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (CF-IRMS coupled with a Sercon SL elemental analyzer for simultaneous carbon-nitrogen-sulfur (NCS analysis.Results: A difference of about 1.781‰ in stable nitrogen isotope 15N/14N ratio was found between examined hepatoblastoma histological subtypes.Conclusions: The prognosis in liver tumors cases in children may be challenging particularly because of the lack of versatile methods of its evaluation. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry allows one to determine the difference between hepatoblastoma histological subtypes and clearly indicates the cases with the best outcome.

  19. Non-mass-dependent fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes during UV photolysis of sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Aranh

    Since the discovery of anomalous sulfur isotope abundance in the geological record in sulfate and sulfide minerals (Farquhar et al., 2000), much effort has been put into understanding their origin to provide new insights into the environmental conditions on the early Earth (Farquhar et al., 2001; Pavlov and Kasting, 2002; Ono et al., 2003; Zahnle et al., 2006; Farquhar et al., 2007; Lyons, 2007; Lyons, 2008). This discovery gained immense interest because of its implications for both the lack of oxygen in the atmosphere during the Archean era 2.5-3.8 Gya (billion years ago), and for rise of oxygen, or the "Great Oxidation Event", that occurred 2.2-2.4 Gya (Holland, 2002). These signatures are believed to be produced in an anticorrelation to oxygen abundance in the early atmosphere, which will aid in quantifying the rate of oxygenation during the "Great Oxidation Event". According to Farquhar et al. (2000), the non-mass-dependent (NMD), or anomalous, fractionation signatures were produced by photochemical reactions of volcanic sulfur species in Earth's early atmosphere (> 2.3 Gya) due to the lack of an oxygen and ozone shield, resulting in an atmosphere transparent to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Farquhar et al., 2001). Interpretation of the anomalous rock records, though, depends on the identification of (1) chemical reactions that can produce the NMD signature (Farquhar and Wing, 2003); and (2) conditions necessary for conversion of the gas-phase products into solid minerals (Pavlov and Kasting, 2002). The focus of my research addresses the first step, which is to determine whether the chemical reactions that occurred in Earth's early atmosphere, resulting in NMD fractionation of sulfur isotopes, were due to broadband UV photochemistry, and to test isotopic self-shielding as the possible underlying mechanism. In this project, our goals were to test isotopic self-shielding during UV photolysis as a possible underlying mechanism for anomalous sulfur isotopic

  20. Evaluation of lead isotope compositions of NIST NBS 981 measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometer and multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because Pb isotopes can be used for tracing, they are widely used in many disciplines. The detection and analysis of Pb isotopes of bulk samples are usually conducted using thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS and multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS, both of which need external reference materials with known isotopic compositions to correct for the mass discrimination effect produced during analysis. NIST NBS 981 is the most widely used reference material for Pb isotope analysis; however, the isotopic compositions reported by various analytical laboratories, especially those using TIMS, vary from each other. In this study, we statistically evaluated 229 reported TIMS analysis values collected by GeoReM in the last 30 years, 176 reported MC-ICP-MS analysis values, and 938 MC-ICP-MS analysis results from our laboratory in the last five years. After careful investigation, only 40 TIMS results were found to have double or triple spikes. The ratios of the overall weighted averages, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb, obtained from 40 spiked TIMS reports and 1114 MC-ICP-MS results of NIST NBS 981 isotopes were 16.9406 ± 0.0003 (2s, 15.4957 ± 0.0002 (2s, and 36.7184 ± 0.0007 (2s, respectively.

  1. Nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich heavy nuclei by mass measurements of francium and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbusch, Marco [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLTRAP-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The mass is a unique property of an atomic nucleus reflecting its binding energy and thus the sum of all interactions at work. Precise measurements of nuclear masses especially of short-lived exotic nuclides provide important input for nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, tests of the Standard Model, and weak interaction studies. The Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN has been set up for precision mass measurements and continuously improved for accessing more exotic nuclides. The mass uncertainty is typically δm / m=10{sup -8} and the accessible half-life has been reduced to about 50 ms. In this contribution, the results of a measurement campaign of neutron-rich francium and radium isotopes will be presented, i.e. the masses of the isotopic chain of {sup 224-233}Fr and {sup 233,234}Ra, one of the most neutron-rich ensemble obtainable at ISOL facilities. The mass {sup 234}Ra denotes the heaviest mass ever measured with ISOLTRAP. Experimental data in the neutron-rich, heavy mass region is of great interest for studies of structural evolution far from stability, especially because the knowledge from nuclear mass models is scarce. The impact of the new data on the physics in this mass region as well as recent technical developments of ISOLTRAP are discussed.

  2. Automated gravimetric sample pretreatment using an industrial robot for the high-precision determination of plutonium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surugaya, Naoki; Hiyama, Toshiaki; Watahiki, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    A robotized sample-preparation method for the determination of Pu, which is recovered by extraction reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is described. The automated system uses a six-axis industrial robot, whose motility is very fast, accurate, and flexible, installed in a glove box. The automation of the weighing and dilution steps enables operator-unattended sample pretreatment for the high-precision analysis of Pu in aqueous solutions. Using the developed system, the Pu concentration in a HNO 3 medium was successfully determined using a set of subsequent mass spectrometric measurements. The relative uncertainty in determining the Pu concentration by IDMS using this system was estimated to be less than 0.1% (k=2), which is equal to that expected of a talented analysis. The operation time required was the same as that for a skilled operator. (author)

  3. Burn-up determination of irradiated thoria samples by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.; Shah, R.V.; Sant, V.L.; Sasibhushan, K.; Parab, A.R.; Alamelu, D.

    2010-03-01

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for two samples from ThO 2 bundles irradiated in KAPS-2. This involved quantitative dissolution of the irradiated fuel samples followed by separation and determination of Th, U and a stable fission product burn-up monitor in the dissolved fuel solution. Stable fission product 148 Nd was used as a burn-up monitor for determining the number of fissions. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using natural U, 229 Th and enriched 142 Nd as spikes was employed for the determination of U, Th and Nd, respectively. Atom % fission values of 1.25 ± 0.03 were obtained for both the samples. 232 U content in 233 U determined by alpha spectrometry was about 500 ppm and this was higher by a factor of 5 compared to the theoretically predicted value by ORIGEN-2 code. (author)

  4. Serum/plasma methylmercury determination by isotope dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Douglas C., E-mail: douglas.baxter@alsglobal.com [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Faarinen, Mikko [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Osterlund, Helene; Rodushkin, Ilia [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Division of Geosciences, Lulea University of Technology, 977 87 Lulea (Sweden); Christensen, Morten [ALS Scandinavia AB, Maskinvaegen 2, 183 53 Taeby (Sweden)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {center_dot} We determine methylmercury in serum and plasma using isotope dilution calibration. {center_dot} Separation by gas chromatography and detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. {center_dot} Data for 50 specimens provides first reference range for methylmercury in serum. {center_dot} Serum samples shown to be stable for 11 months in refrigerator. - Abstract: A method for the determination of methylmercury in plasma and serum samples was developed. The method uses isotope dilution with {sup 198}Hg-labeled methylmercury, extraction into dichloromethane, back-extraction into water, aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap collection, thermal desorption, separation by gas chromatography, and mercury isotope specific detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By spiking 2 mL sample with 1.2 ng tracer, measurements in a concentration interval of (0.007-2.9) {mu}g L{sup -1} could be performed with uncertainty amplification factors <2. A limit of quantification of 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1} was estimated at 10 times the standard deviation of concentrations measured in preparation blanks. Within- and between-run relative standard deviations were <10% at added concentration levels of 0.14 {mu}g L{sup -1}, 0.35 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 2.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with recoveries in the range 82-110%. Application of the method to 50 plasma/serum samples yielded a median (mean; range) concentration of methylmercury of 0.081 (0.091; <0.03-0.19) {mu}g L{sup -1}. This is the first time methylmercury has been directly measured in this kind of specimen, and is therefore the first estimate of a reference range.

  5. Analysis of Cattaneo-Christov heat and mass fluxes in the squeezed flow embedded in porous medium with variable mass diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farooq

    Full Text Available This research article investigates the squeezing flow of Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity over a stretchable sheet inserted in Darcy porous medium. Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion models are implemented to scrutinize the characteristics of heat and mass transfer via variable thermal conductivity and variable mass diffusivity. These models are the modification of conventional laws of Fourier’s and Fick’s via thermal and solutal relaxation times respectively. The homotopy analysis Method (HAM is being utilized to provide the solution of highly nonlinear system of coupled partial differential equations after converted into dimensionless governing equations. The behavior of flow parameters on velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions are sketched and analyzed physically. The result indicates that both concentration and temperature distributions decay for higher solutal and thermal relaxation parameters respectively. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Porous medium, Variable viscosity, Cattaneo-Christov heat and mass flux models, Variable thermal conductivity, Variable mass diffusivity

  6. Development of precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for experimental and environmental studies of their behavior. In order to obtain precise isotopic data using MC-ICP-MS, the mass discrimination effect was corrected by an exponential law correction method. The resulting isotopic data demonstrated that highly precise isotopic analyses (better than 0.1 per mille as 2SD) could be achieved. We also adopted a de-solvating nebulizer system to improve the sensitivity. This system could minimize the water load into the plasma and provided about five times larger intensity of analyte than a conventional nebulizer system did. (author)

  7. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric determination of carbon isotope composition in unpurified samples: methamphetamine example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, I A; Liu, R H; Legendre, M G; Piotrowski, E G; Furner, R L

    1986-10-01

    A gas chromatograph/quadrupole mass spectrometer system, operated in electron impact/selected ion monitoring mode, is used to determine the intensity ratio of the m/z 59 and the m/z 58 ions of the [C3H8N]+ fragment derived from methamphetamine samples synthesized with varying amounts of 13C-labeled methylamine. Crude products are introduced into the gas chromatograph without prior cleanup. The ratios measured were in excellent agreement with those calculated. A change in 0.25% use of 13C-methylamine is sufficient for product differentiation. The feasibility of using isotope labeling and subsequent mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurement as the basis of a compound tracing mechanism is discussed. Specifically, if methamphetamine samples manufactured from legal sources are asked to incorporate distinct 13C compositions, their sources can be traced when samples are diverted into illegal channels. Samples derived from illicit preparations can also be traced if the manufacturers of a precursor (methylamine in this case) incorporate distinct 13C compositions in their products.

  8. Statistical Optimization of Medium Compositions for High Cell Mass and Exopolysaccharide Production by Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Zalina Othman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 is known as a good producer of water soluble exopolysaccharide. Therefore, the aim of this study is to optimize the medium composition concurrently for high cell mass and exopolysaccharide production by Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014. Since both are useful for food and pharmaceutical application and where most studies typically focus on one outcome only, the optimization process was carried out by using molasses as cheaper carbon source.Material and Methods: The main medium component which is known significantly give high effect on the cell mass and EPS production was selected as variables and statistically optimized based on Box-Behnken design in shake flask levels. The optimal medium for cell mass and exopolysaccharide production was composed of (in g l -1: molasses, 40; yeast extract, 16.8; phosphate, 2.72; sodium acetate, 3.98. The model was found to be significant and subsequently validated through the growth kinetics studies in un-optimized and optimized medium in the shake flask cultivation.Results and Conclusion: The maximum cell mass and exopolysaccharide in the new optimized medium was 4.40 g l-1 and 4.37 g l-1 respectively after 44 h of the cultivation. As a result, cell mass and exopolysaccharide production increased up to 4.5 and 16.5 times respectively, and the maximal exopolysaccharide yield of 1.19 per gram of cells was obtained when molasses was used as the carbon source. In conclusion, molasses has the potential to be a cheap carbon source for the cultivation of Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 concurrently for high cell mass and exopolysaccharide production.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Measurement of Muscle Protein Fractional Synthetic Rate by Capillary Gas Chromatography/Combustion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J.; Bier, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of skeletal muscle protein fractional synthetic rate using an infusion of (1-13C)leucine and measuring the isotopic abundance of the tracer in skeletal muscle protein by preparative gas chromatography (GC)/ninhydrin isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is laborious and subject to errors owing to contamination by 12C. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle (13C)leucine enrichment measured with the conventional preparative GC/ninhydrin IRMS approach to a new, continuo...

  10. Sequencing of Isotope-Labeled Small RNA Using Femtosecond Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Ando, Yoshinari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A novel method for the analysis of sequences of small RNAs using nucleotide triphosphates labeled with stable isotopes has been developed using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy combined with femtosecond laser ablation (fsLA-TOF-MS). Small RNAs synthesized with nucleotides enriched in 13C and 15N were efficiently atomized and ionized by single-shot fsLA and the isotope ratios 13C/12C and 15N/14N were evaluated using the TOF-MS method. By comparing the isotope ratios among four different configurations, the number of nucleotide contents of the control RNA sample were successfully reproduced.

  11. Demonstration of isotope-mass balance approach for water budget analyses of El-burulus Lake, Nile Delta, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The major elements of El-Burulus lake water system are rainfall, agricultural drainage discharge, groundwater, human activities, evaporation and water interaction between the lake and the Mediterranean sea. The principal input sources are agricultural drainage (8 drains at the southern borders of the lake), sea water as well as some contribution of precipitation, groundwater and human activities. Water is lost from the lake through evaporation and surface outflow. The present study has been conducted using isotopic / mass balance approach to investigate the water balance of El-Burulus lake and to emphasize the relative contribution of different input / output components which affect the environmental and hydrological terms of the system. An isotopic evaporation pan experiment was performed to estimate the parameters of relevance to water balance (isotopic composition of free air moisture and evaporating flux) and to simulate the isotopic enrichment of evaporation under atmospheric and hydraulic control. The isotopic mass balance approach employed herein facilitated the estimation of groundwater inflow to the lake, evaporated fraction of total lake inflow (E/I) and its fraction to outflow (E/O), ratio of surface inflow to surface outflow (I/O) as well as residence time of lake water. The isotopic mass balance approach has been validated by comparing the values of estimated parameters with the previous hydrological investigations; a quite good match has been indicated, the relevance of this approach is related to its integrative scale and the more simply implementation

  12. Online stable carbon isotope ratio measurement in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol in water by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    A suitable analysis condition was determined for high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) while making sequential measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios of δ 13 C in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol dissolved in water. For this online column separation method, organic reagents are not applicable due to carbon contamination; thus, water and KH 2 PO 4 at low concentrations were tested as mobile phase in combination with a HyPURITY AQUASTAR TM column. Formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol were separated when 2 mM KH 2 PO 4 aqueous solution was used. Under the determined analysis condition for HPLC-IRMS, carbon concentrations could be measured quantitatively as well as carbon isotope ratio when carbon concentration was higher than 0.4 mM L for each chemical

  13. Isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and symmetry energy in isotopic nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Fei; Chen, Peng-Hui; Niu, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Jin, Gen-Ming; Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2017-10-01

    Within an isospin and momentum dependent transport model, the dynamics of isospin particles (nucleons and light clusters) in Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions are investigated for constraining the isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities. The impacts of the isoscalar and isovector parts of the momentum dependent interaction on the emissions of isospin particles are explored, i.e., the mass splittings of and (). The single and double neutron to proton ratios of free nucleons and light particles are thoroughly investigated in the isotopic nuclear reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at incident energies of 50 and 120 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is found that both the effective mass splitting and symmetry energy impact the kinetic energy spectra of the single ratios, in particular at the high energy tail (larger than 20 MeV). The isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass slightly impacts the double ratio spectra at the energy of 50 MeV/nucleon. A soft symmetry energy with stiffness coefficient of γ s=0.5 is constrained from the experimental data with the Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program in China (2014CB845405, 2015CB856903), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11722546, 11675226, 11675066, U1332207) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  14. Simultaneous measurement of total Estradiol and Testosterone in human serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wang, Yuesong; Gatcombe, Matthew; Farris, Jacob; Botelho, Julianne C.; Caudill, Samuel P.; Vesper, Hubert W.

    2017-01-01

    Reliable measurement of total testosterone and estradiol is critical for their use as biomarkers of hormone related disorders in patient care and translation research. We developed and validated a mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify these analytes in human serum without chemical derivatization. Serum is equilibrated with isotopic internal standards and treated with acidic buffer to release hormones from their binding proteins. Lipids are isolated and polar impurities are removed by two serial liquid-liquid extraction steps. Total testosterone and estradiol are measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in combination of positive and negative electrospray ionization modes. The method shows broad analytical measurement range for both testosterone 0.03–48.5 nM (0.75–1400 ng/dL) and estradiol 11.0–5138 pM (2.99–1400 pg/mL) and excellent agreement with certified reference materials (mean bias less than 2.1% to SRM 971, BCR 576, 577, and 578) and a high order reference method (mean bias 1.25% for testosterone and −0.84% for estradiol). The high accuracy of the method was monitored and certified by CDC Hormone Standardization (HoSt) Program for two years with mean bias −0.7% (95%CI: −1.6% to 0.2%) for testosterone and 0.1% (95%CI: −2.2% to 2.3%) for estradiol. The method precision over a 2-year period for Quality Control pools at low, medium and high concentrations was 2.7–2.9% for testosterone and 3.3–5.3% for estradiol. With the consistently excellent accuracy and precision, this method is readily applicable for high-throughput clinical and epidemiological studies. PMID:28801832

  15. A Computational Drug Metabolite Detection Using the Stable Isotopic Mass-Shift Filtering with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Pioglitazone and Flurbiprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Miyamoto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS. We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery.

  16. PALOMA : an isotope analyzer using static mass spectrometry, coupled with cryogenic and chemical trapping, for the MSL mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassefiere, E.; Jambon, A.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Goulpeau, G.; Leblanc, F.; Montmessin, F.; Sarda, P.; Agrinier, P.; Fouchet, T.; Waite, H.

    The technique of GCMS analysis has to be completed by static mass spectrometry for precise in-situ measurements of the isotopic composition of planetary atmospheres (noble gases, stable isotopes), and volatile outgassed products from solid sample pyrolysis. Static mass spectrometry, coupled with gas separation by cryo-separation and gettering, is commonly used in the laboratory to study volatiles extracted from terrestrial and meteoritic samples. Such an instrument (PALOMA) is presently developed in our laboratories, and it will be coupled with a Pyr-GCMS analyzer (MACE), built by a US consortium of science laboratories and industrials (University of Michigan, Southwest Research Institute, JPL, Ball Aerospace). The MACE/PALOMA experiment will be proposed on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission, planned to be launched in 2009. The scientific objectives of PALOMA, coupled with MACE, may be listed as follows : (i) search for isotopic signatures of past life in atmosphere, rock, dust and ice samples, with emphasis on carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen; (ii) accurately measure isotopic composition of atmospheric noble gases, and stable isotopes, in order to better constrain past escape, surface interaction, outgassing history and climate evolution; (iii) precisely measure diurnal/ seasonal variations of isotopic ratios of H2O, CO2, and N2, for improving our understanding of present and past climate, and of the role of water cycle. Main measurement objectives are : (i) C, H, O, N isotopic composition in both organic evolved samples (provided by MACE pyrolysis system) and atmosphere with high accuracy (a few per mil at 1-s level); (ii) noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) and stable (C, H, O, N) isotope composition in atmosphere with high accuracy (a few per mil at 1-s level); (iii) molecular and isotopic composition of inorganic evolved samples (salts, hydrates, nitrates, {ldots}), including ices; (iv) diurnal and seasonal monitoring of D/H in water vapor, and water ice.

  17. Precision mass measurements for studies of nucleosynthesis via the rapid neutron-capture process. Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium and caesium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Dinko

    2016-07-06

    Although the theory for the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) was developed more than 55 years ago, the astrophysical site is still under a debate. Theoretical studies predict that the r-process path proceeds through very neutron-rich nuclei with very asymmetric proton-to-neutron ratios. Knowledge about the properties of neutron-rich isotopes found in similar regions of the nuclear chart and furthermore suitable for r-process studies is still little or even not existing. The basic nuclear properties such as binding energies, half-lives, neutron-induced or neutron-capture reaction cross-sections, play an important role in theoretical simulations and can vary or even drastically alternate results of these studies. Therefore, a considerable effort was put forward to access neutron-rich isotopes at radioactive ion-beam facilities like ISOLDE at CERN. The goal of this PhD thesis is to describe the experimental work done for the precision mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium ({sup 129-131}Cd) and caesium ({sup 132,146-148}Cs) isotopes. Measurements were done at the on-line radioactive ion-beam facility ISOLDE by using the four-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The cadmium isotopes are key nuclides for the synthesis of stable isotopes around the mass peak A = 130 in the Solar System abundance.

  18. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel B.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over ∼2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 ± 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 ± 0.5 per mille amu –1 for Ne and 2.6 ± 0.5 per mille amu –1 for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  19. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 25, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bochsler, Peter [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bern, Sidlerstasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); McKeegan, Kevin D. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Box 951567, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Neugebauer, Marcia [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Reisenfeld, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: heber@ess.ucla.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  20. Calculation and mitigation of isotopic interferences in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry assays and its application in supporting microdose absolute bioavailability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huidong; Wang, Jian; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Jiang, Hao; Zeng, Jianing; Easter, John; Wang, Jun-sheng; Dockens, Randy; Bifano, Marc; Burrell, Richard; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-06-05

    A methodology for the accurate calculation and mitigation of isotopic interferences in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assays and its application in supporting microdose absolute bioavailability studies are reported for the first time. For simplicity, this calculation methodology and the strategy to minimize the isotopic interference are demonstrated using a simple molecule entity, then applied to actual development drugs. The exact isotopic interferences calculated with this methodology were often much less than the traditionally used, overestimated isotopic interferences simply based on the molecular isotope abundance. One application of the methodology is the selection of a stable isotopically labeled internal standard (SIL-IS) for an LC-MS/MS bioanalytical assay. The second application is the selection of an SIL analogue for use in intravenous (i.v.) microdosing for the determination of absolute bioavailability. In the case of microdosing, the traditional approach of calculating isotopic interferences can result in selecting a labeling scheme that overlabels the i.v.-dosed drug or leads to incorrect conclusions on the feasibility of using an SIL drug and analysis by LC-MS/MS. The methodology presented here can guide the synthesis by accurately calculating the isotopic interferences when labeling at different positions, using different selective reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions or adding more labeling positions. This methodology has been successfully applied to the selection of the labeled i.v.-dosed drugs for use in two microdose absolute bioavailability studies, before initiating the chemical synthesis. With this methodology, significant time and cost saving can be achieved in supporting microdose absolute bioavailability studies with stable labeled drugs.

  1. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  2. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Judge, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dirmyer, Matthew R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Campbell, Keri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Applied Spectra Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  3. Comparison of Pu isotopic composition between gamma and mass spectrometry: Experience from IAEA-SAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parus, J.L.; Raab, W.

    1998-01-01

    About 2000 Pu containing samples have been analysed during the last 8 years at SAL using gamma spectrometry (GS) in parallel with mass spectrometry (MS). Four different detectors have been used for the measurement of gamma-ray spectra and several versions of the MGA program have been used for spectra evaluation. The results of Pu isotopic composition obtained by both methods have neem systematically compared. Attempts to improve the agreement between GS and MS are described. This was done by adjustment of the emission probabilities for some gamma energies and the development of a new correlation equation for 242 Pu. These improvements have been applied for evaluation of two sets containing 320 and 404 samples, respectively analysed in 1991 and in 1992-93. The mean differences and their standard deviations between MS and GS were calculated, showing mean relative differences for 238-241 Pu isotopes in the range from 0.1 to 0.5% with standard deviations within ± 0.4 to ±1%. For 242 Pu these values are about 0.5% and ± 5%, respectively. (author)

  4. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George Joseph; McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Judge, Elizabeth; Dirmyer, Matthew R.; Campbell, Keri; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235 U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  5. High precision measurements of carbon isotopic ratio of atmospheric methane using a continuous flow mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Morimoto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-precision measurement system for the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric CH4 (δ^(13CH_4 was developed using a pre-concentration device for CH4 and a gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS. The measurement system required 100 mlSTP of an atmospheric air sample, corresponding to approximately 0.18μlSTP of CH_4, to determine the δ^(13CH_4 value with a reproducibility of 0.07‰. Replicated analyses of a CH_4-in-air standard gas during the period from 2002 to 2008 indicated that the value of δ^(13CH_4 measured by this system was consistent within the measurement reproducibility. To evaluate the δ^(13CH_4 measurement system, thus developed, diurnal variations of the atmospheric CH_4 concentration and δ^(13CH_4 were observed in the northern part of the Tokyo metropolitan area. From the relationship between the CH_4 concentration and δ^(13CH_4, dominant sources of the observed CH4 fluctuations were identified.

  6. [Determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongli; Lin, Ying; Xiong, Zhili; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-07-01

    A method for the determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma was developed by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The plasma samples were analyzed after protein precipitation, evaporation, derivatization by hexafluoroacetone (HFAA), and clean-up on a Florisil SPE column. The GC-MS analysis utilized stable isotope d8-agmatine as internal standard. The samples after treatme were tested by negative chemical ionization with selected ion monitoring (SIM) which was set at m/z 492 (molecular ion of agmatine) and m/z 500 (molecular ion of internal standard). The limit of detection (LOD) of agmatine standard solution was 0.005 7 ng/mL. The calibration curve of the agmatine spiked in rat plasma showed a good linear relationship at the range of 1.14-57.0 ng/mL (r = 0.997). The recoveries of agmatine spiked in rat plasma ranged from 92.3% to 109.8%. Inter-day and intra-day precisions were less than 15%. The average concentration level of agmatine in rat plasma was (22 +/- 9) ng/mL, and there was no significant difference between male and female SD rats (p > 0.05). The method is high sensitive and specific, and can be used for the determination of endogenous agmatine in plasma. It provides a strong support for the subsequent research of agmatine.

  7. Isotopic mass balance of Manzala Lake as indicators of present and past hydrogeological processes in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, M.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Lakes are very important part of the aquatic ecosystem, which represent about 15% of the total commercial fishing areas in Egypt. Manzala lake is considered one of the largest lakes in Egypt. It is located in the north-eastern edge of the Nile delta and suffering from industrial and agricultural pollutions. The most serious source of pollution may be from Port Said and Damietta wastes, which dumped regularly into the lake. The main object of the present study is to investigate the hydrochemical and isotopic features of the lake waters and to compare the parameters deduced in the present and previous investigations in order to improve the current knowledge of the dynamic change during this time. The stable isotope (oxygen-18) component mass balance approach was used to find out the evaporation rate and the seepage from the groundwater to the lake. The data showed that the seepage rate from the groundwater to the lake was 305.54 x 106 m3/y (about 2% higher than previous study) since the amounts of drainage water became higher. The evaporation rate was 2185.844 x 106 m3/y (about 5% less than previous study). This is due to the reduction in the lake size. Although these rates are relatively small, yet they indicate an alarm for pollution propagation around the lake, which would increase with time

  8. Determination of sulfur in steels by isotope dilution mass spectrometry after dissolution with sealed tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    The scaled tube dissolution technique was studied for the complete conversion of sulfur in steels to sulfate. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry was used for the determination of sulfur in the sulfate. Sample (0.5 g) was dissolved in nitric acid (7 ml) and hydrochloric acid (3 ml) in a scaled borosilicate glass tube on being heated above 180 0 C overnight. Nitrate ions were removed by repeated evaporation with hydrochloric acid. The residue was dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Sulfate was reduced with a mixture of hydrochloric, hydroiodic and hypophosphorous acids; hydrogen sulfide evolved was absorbed in cadmium acetate solution, then converted to silver sulfide, which was burned to sulfur dioxide in pure oxygen at low pressure, for isotopic analysis. Analytical blank in whole procedure was 0.8 μg of sulfur. This technique was applied to the determination of sulfur in NBS low alloy steels. The principal cause of low values obtained by the open beaker dissolution technique was evaporation losses of sulfur as sulfur dioxide during the dissolution. (author)

  9. In-medium proton-neutron mass difference and the systematics of the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, T.D.; Furnstahl, R.J.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate a recent suggestion that the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly can be resolved if the in-medium proton-neutron mass difference is substantially changed from its free space value. In a number of hadronic models, such an effect is a natural consequence of partial chiral restoration in the nuclear medium. This suggestion is meaningful in the context of a local-density approximation, which has strong implications for the systematics of the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly over a range of nuclei. We show that such a mechanism predicts both noticeable shell effects and modest variations in the anomaly as the nuclear size is changed

  10. The analysis study of plutonium in the environmental sample by mass spectrum combined with isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jun; Fu Zhonghua; Mao Xingen; Meng Fanben

    2004-01-01

    The technology of the rhenium filament carbonization was used to increase the ionization efficiency in this paper. The plutonium in the environmental sample was analyzed by Mass Spectrum combined with isotope dilution. Analysis of the 239 Pu blank in the process: The analysis of 239 Pu from the chemical process was carried out in order to establish the influence of the 239 Pu introduced from the process. The analysis results were shown in Table 1 sample 1 was not gone through the process, sample 2 and sample 3 were gone through the process. It was clear that there was no influence of the 239 Pu from the process within the deviation. Results and Discussions: The environmental samples which were dealed with the chemical method were prepared the sample of mass spectrum, The atomic ratio of the 239 Pu and 242 Pu in the environmental samples was measured by Mass Spectrum. The atomic ratio in the tracer 242 Pu was 0.01476±0.00007.The results for nuclide content in environment were given in Table 2. The content of 239 Pu in the tracer was high, so the existing of 239 Pu in the environmental samples can be determined by the changing of the atomic ratio of 242 Pu to 239 Pu. It was clear that there was 239 Pu in the environmental samples except the cypress leaves-2 and the pine leaves-3 within the deviation, and the content of 239 Pu were given in Table 2. Conclusion: a. Plutonium was separated and purified from the impurity by the anion-exchange and the electrodeposition, it was possible to provide the eligible mass spectrum sample. b. The measurement of plutonium in the environmental samples was not influenced by the flow of the background in the experiment. c. As the technology of the rhenium carbonization was used to increase the ionization efficiency, the content of plutonium which was about 10 -13 g in the environmental sample could be quantitatively analyzed by Mass Spectrum combined with isotope dilution. (authors)

  11. Using Lanthanide Nanoparticles as Isotopic Tags for Biomarker Detection by Mass Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengpeng

    The development of robust, versatile, and high-throughput biosensing techniques has widespread implications for early disease detection and accurate diagnosis. An innovative technology, mass cytometry, has been developed to use isotopically-labelled antibodies to simultaneously study multiple parameters of single cells. The current detection sensitivity of mass cytometry is limited by the number of copies of a given isotope that can be attached to a given antibody. This thesis describes research on the synthesis, characterization, and bioconjugation of a new class of nanoparticle-based labelling agents to be employed for the detection of low-abundance biomarkers by mass cytometry. Hydrophobic lanthanide nanoparticles (Ln NPs) have been prepared by the Winnik group. To render the NPs water-soluble for biological applications, we coated the NP surface with a first generation of multidentate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands via ligand exchange. We measured the size, morphology, and polydispersity of these hydrophilic NPs by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The colloidal stability of the NPs was determined at various pH and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Tetradentate-PEG-coated NPs (Tetra-NPs) exhibited the best stability at pH 3 to 9, and in PBS. However, when cells were treated with Tetra-NPs in preliminary in vitro studies, significant undesirable non-specific binding (NSB) was observed. In order to tackle the NSB issue presented in the Tetra-NPs, we prepared a second generation of polymer-based ligands using ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). A small library of ROMP polymers was synthesized, characterized, and used to stabilize NPs in aqueous solutions. The ROMP-NPs were found to have significantly reduced NSB to cells by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). To further modify the NPs, amine groups were introduced as functional handles to both the tetradentate-PEG and

  12. Progress of the AVNG System - Attribute Verification System with Information Barriers for Mass Isotopics Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnikov, D.; Bulatov, M.; Jarikhine, I.; Lebedev, B.; Livke, A.; Modenov, A.; Morkin, A.; Razinkov, S.; Tsaregorodtsev, D.; Vlokh, A.; Yakovleva, S.; Elmont, T.H.; Langner, D.C.; MacArthur, D.W.; Mayo, D.R.; Smith, M.K.; Luke, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency @ 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC PLUS . The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 3 He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  13. Rapid assay of resveratrol in red wine by paper spray tandem mass spectrometry and isotope dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donna, Leonardo; Taverna, Domenico; Indelicato, Serena; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni; Mazzotti, Fabio

    2017-08-15

    A rapid analytical approach for the assay of resveratrol in red wines, based on Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry (PS-MS) and Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) is described. The assay involves the use of the stable isotope dilution method. The analytical parameters calculated analyzing fortified samples confirm the reliability of the proposed approach, with accuracy values about 100%, and LOD and LOQ values calculated at 0.5 and 0.8μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, both the recovery, which was quantitative for the analyte, and the reproducibility (RSD%), checked on different days on the same wine, always below 7%, highlighted the consistency of the methodology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mass spectrometric isotope dilution analyses of palladium, silver, cadmium and tellurium in carbonaceous chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss, R.D.; Rosman, K.J.R.; De Laeter, J.

    1984-01-01

    The mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique was used to measure the elemental abundances of Pd, Ag, Cd and Te in Orgueil (C1), Ivuna (C1), Murray (C2) and Allende (C3) chondrites. The Pd abundance of 554 ppb for the Cl chondrites is almost identical to the recommended value of Anders and Ebihara (1982); that for Cd (712 ppb) is approximately 5% higher, whereas that for Ag (198 ppb) is approximately 10% lower than the recommended values. A smooth distribution for the abundances of the odd-A nuclides between 65 128 Te and 130 Te to lie approximately 30% above the r-process peak at A = 130, whereas the new value fits smoothly into the general trend. (author)

  15. Analysis of hydrogen isotopes in materials by secondary ion mass spectrometry and nuclear microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Only two techniques are really appropriate for the depth profiling of hydrogen isotopes: nuclear microanalysis (NMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The intent of this paper is to give an up to date review of both techniques and to show how they can be used in conjunction. Both techniques (SIMS and NMA) will be described briefly. NMA will divided into two different categories: nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and elastic recoil detection (ERD). Both techniques (SIMS and NMA) will be discussed in terms of sensitivity, resolution, probing depth, quantitative measurement, generality and selectivity, beam induced effects and surface roughness effects. The principal advantages and disadvantages of each of these techniques will be specified, supporting the contention that SIMS and NMA are complementary and should be used in conjunction. Finally, some examples of, and perspectives for, the complementary use of both techniques will be presented. (Author)

  16. Certification of mercury in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene by using isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Hai; Ma Liandi; Wei Chao; Zhou Tao; Wang Jun; Zhao Motian; Li Jinying

    2008-01-01

    Under the framework of a co-certification system for the development of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) among China, Japan and Korea, the 1st co-certification campaign of mercury in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) for Japanese CRMs was taken. In this campaign isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) was used. First, all abundances of Hg in spike 202 Hg, CRM and ABS were analyzed by MC-ICP-MS before the certification. Then the concentrations of 202 Hg and Hg in ABS were determined with IDMS by Q-ICP-MS. A new procedure to reduce memory effect was used. first, dilute with 5 μg/g Au solution for 1 min; then, 5 μg/g EDTA solution for 2 min. The results accord to each other very well and this implies that the co-certification system can run swimmingly. (authors)

  17. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  18. Study of mass transfer at the air-water interface by an isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlivat, L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown by analysing the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes distribution in liquid and water vapor, that the processes taking place on a very small scale near the liquid can be investigated. The effect of molecular mass transfer is directly obtained without having to perform difficult measurements in the air in the immediate vicinity of the water surface. Experiments are carried out in the air-water tunnel especially designed for the simulation of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges. The wind velocities vary from 0.7 to 7m/sec. The experimental results obtained do not support the classical Reynolds' analogy between momentum and mass transfer down to the interface and the theory proposed by Sheppard, but they are in agreement with Sverdrup's, Kitaigorodskiy and Volkov's and Brutsaert's theories, all of which involve a layer just above the air-water interface through which mass transfer is dominated by molecular diffusion. The thickness of this layer in the two first theories is shown to decrease with increasing wind velocity. Direct application of Brutsaert's theory for roughness Reynolds numbers smaller than one is in good agreement with the experimental data obtained [fr

  19. Application of the mass spectrometry-isotope dilution technique for the determination of uranium contents in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Iyer, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Application of the spectrometric isotope dilution technique for the accurate determination of parts per million range of uranium in rock samples is described. The various aspects of the method like sample dissolution, ion exchange separation, mass spectrometric procedures are discussed. A single filament ionization source was employed for the isotope analysis. A carbon reduction method was used to reduce uranium oxide ions to uranium metal ions. The tracer solution for isotope dilution was prepared from National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic Standard NBS U-970. Uranium contents are meassured for nine rock samples and the values obtained are compared with the uranium values measured by others workers. Errors caused in the uranium determination due to sample splitting problems as well as the incomplete acid digestion of the samples are discussed. (Author) [pt

  20. Application of isotope dilution for the determination of thorium in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yasuhito; Shiraishi, Kunio; Takaku, Yuichi; Masuda, Kimihiko; Seki, Riki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) was examined for Th in biological samples. A naturally occurring isotope of Th(Th-230) was used as the spiking isotope. The concentration of Th-230 in the final sample solution was about 50 - 60 pg/ml; an isotope ratio of 232/230 could be measured with a relative standard deviation of less than 2%. The error magnification depended on the amount of Th-232 being concomitant with the Th-230. Though it was shown that one ng of Th-232 could be determined with reasonable precision with a tracer of the present purity, more care should be taken to reduce any source of systematic error. (author)

  1. Determination of strontium and lead isotope ratios of grains using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with single collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinozaki, Miyuki; Ariyama, Kaoru; Kawasaki, Akira; Hirata, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    A method for determining strontium and lead isotope ratios of grains was developed. The samples investigated in this study were rice, barley and wheat. The samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and heated in a heating block. Strontium and lead were separated from the matrix by adding an acid digested solution into a column packed with Sr resin, which has selectivity for the absorption of strontium and lead. Strontium and lead isotope ratios were determined using a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS) with a single collector. The intraday relative standard deviations of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and lead isotope ratios ( 204 Pb/ 206 Pb, 207 Pb/ 206 Pb, 208 Pb/ 206 Pb) by HR-ICP-MS measurements were < 0.06% and around 0.1%, respectively. This method enabled us to determine strontium and lead isotope ratios in two days. (author)

  2. Introduction to Body Composition Assessment Using the Deuterium Dilution Technique with Analysis of Urine Samples by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA has fostered the more widespread use of a stable isotope technique to assess body composition in different population groups to address priority areas in public health nutrition in Member States. It has done this by supporting national and regional nutrition projects through its technical cooperation programme and coordinated research projects over many years. This publication was developed by an international group of experts to provide practical hands-on guidance in the use of this technique in settings where analysis of stable isotope ratios in biological samples is to be made by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The publication is targeted at new users of this technique, for example nutritionists, analytical chemists and other professionals. More detailed information on the theoretical background and the practical applications of state of the art methodologies to monitor changes in body composition can be found in IAEA Human Health Series No. 3, Assessment of Body Composition and Total Energy Expenditure in Humans by Stable Isotope Techniques

  3. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis, E-mail: alkiviadis.gourgiotis@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Ducasse, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Barker, Evelyne [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of {sup 29}Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O{sub 2} as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO{sup +} and SiO{sub 2}{sup +} ion species was performed, and we found that SiO{sup +} ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO{sub 3}). For SiO{sub 2}{sup +}, no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. {sup 28}Si{sup 16}O{sup 18}O{sup +}, {sup 30}Si{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup +}). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different {sup 29}Si

  4. Drift effect and "negative" mass transport in an inhomogeneous medium: limiting case of a two-component lattice gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanets, Sergei P; Kliushnychenko, Oleksandr V

    2010-11-01

    The mass transport in an inhomogeneous medium is modeled as the limiting case of a two-component lattice gas with excluded volume constraint and one of the components fixed. In the long-wavelength approximation, the density relaxation of mobile particles is governed by diffusion and interaction with a medium inhomogeneity represented by the static component distribution. It is shown that the density relaxation can be locally accompanied by density distribution compression, i.e., the local mass transport directed from low-to high-density regions. The origin of such a "negative" mass transport is shown to be associated with the presence of a stationary drift flow defined by the medium inhomogeneity. In the quasi-one-dimensional case, the compression dynamics manifests itself in the hoppinglike motion of packet front position of diffusing substance due to staged passing through inhomogeneity barriers, and it leads to fragmentation of the packet and retardation of its spreading. The root-mean-square displacement reflects only the averaged packet front dynamics and becomes inappropriate as the transport characteristic in this regime. In the stationary case, the mass transport throughout the whole system may be directed from the boundary with lower concentration towards the boundary with higher concentration. Implications of the excluded volume constraint and particle distinguishability for these effects are discussed.

  5. On the interference of Kr during carbon isotope analysis of methane using continuous-flow combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmitt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane (δ13C of CH4 on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography (GC isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS coupled to a combustion-preconcentration unit. This report shows that the atmospheric trace gas krypton (Kr can severely interfere during the mass spectrometric measurement, leading to significant biases in δ13C of CH4, if krypton is not sufficiently separated during the analysis. According to our experiments, the krypton interference is likely composed of two individual effects, with the lateral tailing of the doubly charged 86Kr peak affecting the neighbouring m/z 44 and partially the m/z 45 Faraday cups. Additionally, a broad signal affecting m/z 45 and especially m/z 46 is assumed to result from scattered ions of singly charged krypton. The introduced bias in the measured isotope ratios is dependent on the chromatographic separation, the krypton-to-CH4 mixing ratio in the sample, the focusing of the mass spectrometer as well as the detector configuration and can amount to up to several per mil in δ13C. Apart from technical solutions to avoid this interference, we present correction routines to a posteriori remove the bias.

  6. Biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry-isotope measurements at the level of the atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J; Garner, R C

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a nuclear physics technique developed about twenty years ago, that uses the high energy (several MeV) of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to measure very small quantities of rare and long-lived isotopes. Elements that are of interest in biomedicine and environmental sciences can be measured, often to parts per quadrillion sensitivity, i.e. zeptomole to attomole levels (10(-21)-10(-18) mole) from milligram samples. This is several orders of magnitude lower than that achievable by conventional decay counting techniques, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC). AMS was first applied to geochemical, climatological and archaeological areas, such as for radiocarbon dating (Shroud of Turin), but more recently this technology has been used for bioanalytical applications. In this sphere, most work has been conducted using aluminium, calcium and carbon isotopes. The latter is of special interest in drug metabolism studies, where a Phase 1 adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study can be conducted using only 10 nanoCurie (37 Bq or ca. 0.9 microSv) amounts or less of 14C-labelled drugs. In the UK, these amounts of radioactivity are below those necessary to request specific regulatory approval from the Department of Health's Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC), thus saving on valuable development time and resources. In addition, the disposal of these amounts is much less an environmental issue than that associated with microCurie quantities, which are currently used. Also, AMS should bring an opportunity to conduct "first into man" studies without the need for widespread use of animals. Centre for Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CBAMS) Ltd. is the first fully commercial company in the world to offer analytical services using AMS. With its high throughput and relatively low costs per sample analysis, AMS should be of great benefit to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology

  7. Pb and Sr isotope measurements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer: efficient time management for precision improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monna, F.; Loizeau, J.-L.; Thomas, B. A.; Guéguen, C.; Favarger, P.-Y.

    1998-08-01

    One of the factors limiting the precision of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is the counting statistics, which depend upon acquisition time and ion fluxes. In the present study, the precision of the isotopic measurements of Pb and Sr is examined. The time of measurement is optimally shared for each isotope, using a mathematical simulation, to provide the lowest theoretical analytical error. Different algorithms of mass bias correction are also taken into account and evaluated in term of improvement of overall precision. Several experiments allow a comparison of real conditions with theory. The present method significantly improves the precision, regardless of the instrument used. However, this benefit is more important for equipment which originally yields a precision close to that predicted by counting statistics. Additionally, the procedure is flexible enough to be easily adapted to other problems, such as isotopic dilution.

  8. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Johnson, Matthew Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores......, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes...... plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling...

  9. Microscopic structure of a new type of collective excitation in odd-mass Mo, Ru, I, Cs and La isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Atsushi; Okamoto, Ryoji; Marumori, Toshio; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi.

    1975-01-01

    With the aid of microscopic theory of collective excitations in spherical odd-mass nuclei proposed by Kuriyama, Marumori and Matsuyanagi, structures of low-lying collective 5/2 + states in odd-mass I, Cs and La isotopes and of collective 3/2 + states in odd-mass Mo and Ru isotopes are investigated. These collective 5/2 + and 3/2 + states, which are hard to understand within the framework of the conventional quasi-particle-phonon-coupling theory, are identified as a new kind of fermion-type collective excitation mode. The change in microscopic structure of these states depending on the mass number is also investigated in relation with the shell structure. (auth.)

  10. Stable carbon isotope analyses of nanogram quantities of particulate organic carbon (pollen) with laser ablation nano combustion gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, Appy; Laks, Jelmer J.; Reichart, Gert‐Jan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Analyses of stable carbon isotope ratios (δ 13C values) of organic and inorganic matter remains have been instrumental for much of our understanding of present and past environmental and biological processes. Until recently, the analytical window of such analyses has been limited to samples containing at least several μg of carbon. Methods Here we present a setup combining laser ablation, nano combustion gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA/nC/GC/IRMS). A deep UV (193 nm) laser is used for optimal fragmentation of organic matter with minimum fractionation effects and an exceptionally small ablation chamber and combustion oven are used to reduce the minimum sample mass requirement compared with previous studies. Results Analyses of the international IAEA CH‐7 polyethylene standard show optimal accuracy, and precision better than 0.5‰, when measuring at least 42 ng C. Application to untreated modern Eucalyptus globulus (C3 plant) and Zea mays (C4 plant) pollen grains shows a ~ 16‰ offset between these species. Within each single Z. mays pollen grain, replicate analyses show almost identical δ 13C values. Conclusions Isotopic offsets between individual pollen grains exceed analytical uncertainties, therefore probably reflecting interspecimen variability of ~0.5–0.9‰. These promising results set the stage for investigating both δ 13C values and natural carbon isotopic variability between single specimens of a single population of all kinds of organic particles yielding tens of nanograms of carbon. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27766694

  11. Investigation of mercury-containing proteins by enriched stable isotopic tracer and size-exclusion chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Junwen; Feng Weiyue; Wang Meng; Zhang Fang; Li Bai; Wang Bing; Zhu Motao; Chai Zhifang

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate trace mercury-containing proteins in maternal rat and their offspring, a method of enriched stable isotopic tracer ( 196 Hg and 198 Hg) combined with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) was developed. Prior to the analysis, 196 Hg- and 198 Hg-enriched methylmercury was administrated to the pregnant rats. Then the mercury-containing proteins in serum and brain cytosol of the dam and pup rats were separated by size-exclusion columns and the mercury was detected by ICP-MS. The ICP-MS spectrogram of the tracing samples showed significantly elevated 196 Hg and 198 Hg isotopic signals compared with the natural ones, indicating that the detection sensitivity could be increased by the tracer method. The contents of mercury in chromatographic fractions of the dam and pup rat brain cytosol were quantitatively estimated by post-column reverse ID-ICP-MS. The quantitative speciation differences of mercury in brain cytosol between the dam and pup rats were observed, indicating that such studies could be useful for toxicological estimation. Additionally, the isotopic ratio measurement of 198 Hg/ 202 Hg in the tracing samples could be used to identify the artifact mercury species caused in the analytical procedure. The study demonstrates that the tracer method combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-IDMS could provide reliably qualitative and quantitative information on mercury-containing proteins in organisms

  12. Experimental study of high spin states in low-medium mass nuclei by use of charge particle induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenius, N.G.

    1975-01-01

    For the test of nuclear models the study of the properties of nuclear states of high angular momentum is especially important, because such states can often be given very simple theoretical descriptions. High spin states are easily populated by use of reactions initiated by alpha particles or heavy ions. In this thesis a number of low-medium mass nuclei have been studied, with emphasis on high spin states. (Auth.)

  13. Novel method for measurement of glutathione kinetics in neonates using liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, Henk; te Braake, Frans; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    A novel analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) was developed for measuring the fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of glutathione (GSH) in neonates after infusion of [1-(13)C]-glycine as a tracer. After transformation of GSH into GSSG, its

  14. Determination of uranium in urine - Measurement of isotope ratios and quantification by use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, Petra; Ritsema, R.

    2002-01-01

    For analysis of uranium in urine determination of the isotope ratio and quantification were investigated by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). The instrument used (ThermoFinniganMAT ELEMENT2) is a single-collector MS and, therefore, a stable sample-introduction

  15. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  16. The Varian MAT-250 mass spectrometer. Steady isotopes laboratory; Espectrometro de masas Varian MAT-250. Laboratorio de isotopos estables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, V.; Tavera D, M.L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    This work treats over the performance and applications of the Varian Mat-250 mass spectrometer which is in the environmental isotope laboratory. It can be applied over topics such as: ions formation, acceleration and collimation, ions separation, ions detection, data transformation, sampling, {delta} notation. (Author)

  17. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  18. MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretchable disk in a porous medium with heat and mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rauf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the simultaneous impacts of heat and mass transfer of an incompressible electrically conducting micropolar fluid generated by the stretchable disk in presence of porous medium. The thermal radiation effect is accounted via Rosseland’s approximation. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into dimensionless form by employing the suitable similarity transformations. A finite difference base algorithm is utilized to obtain the solution expressions. The impacts of physical parameters on dimensionless axial velocity, radial velocity, micro-rotation, temperature and concentrations profiles are presented and examined carefully. Numerical computation is performed to compute shear stress, couple stress, heat and mass rate at the disk.

  19. MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretchable disk in a porous medium with heat and mass transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk; Meraj, M. A. [Department of Mathematics, CIIT Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M.; Batool, K. [Department of CASPAM, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Hussain, M. [Department of Sciences & Humanities, National University of computer & Emerging Sciences, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-07-15

    This article studies the simultaneous impacts of heat and mass transfer of an incompressible electrically conducting micropolar fluid generated by the stretchable disk in presence of porous medium. The thermal radiation effect is accounted via Rosseland’s approximation. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into dimensionless form by employing the suitable similarity transformations. A finite difference base algorithm is utilized to obtain the solution expressions. The impacts of physical parameters on dimensionless axial velocity, radial velocity, micro-rotation, temperature and concentrations profiles are presented and examined carefully. Numerical computation is performed to compute shear stress, couple stress, heat and mass rate at the disk.

  20. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of 29 Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O 2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO + and SiO 2 + ion species was performed, and we found that SiO + ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO 3 ). For SiO 2 + , no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. 28 Si 16 O 18 O + , 30 Si 16 O 16 O + ). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different 29 Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be

  1. Isotopic distributions, element ratios, and element mass fractions from enrichment-meter-type gamma-ray measurements of MOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Parker, J.L.; Haycock, D.L.; Dragnev, T.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectra from ''infinitely'' thick mixed oxide samples have been measured. The plutonium isotopics, the U/Pu ratio, the high-Z mass fractions (assuming only plutonium, uranium, and americium), and the low-Z mass fraction (assuming the matrix is only oxygen) can be determined by carefully analyzing the data. The results agree well with the chemical determination of these parameters. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Modelling mass diffusion for a multi-layer sphere immersed in a semi-infinite medium: application to drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Elliot J; Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    2018-04-12

    We present a general mechanistic model of mass diffusion for a composite sphere placed in a large ambient medium. The multi-layer problem is described by a system of diffusion equations coupled via interlayer boundary conditions such as those imposing a finite mass resistance at the external surface of the sphere. While the work is applicable to the generic problem of heat or mass transfer in a multi-layer sphere, the analysis and results are presented in the context of drug kinetics for desorbing and absorbing spherical microcapsules. We derive an analytical solution for the concentration in the sphere and in the surrounding medium that avoids any artificial truncation at a finite distance. The closed-form solution in each concentric layer is expressed in terms of a suitably-defined inverse Laplace transform that can be evaluated numerically. Concentration profiles and drug mass curves in the spherical layers and in the external environment are presented and the dependency of the solution on the mass transfer coefficient at the surface of the sphere analyzed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fingerprinting North Atlantic water masses near Iceland using Nd-isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Norbert [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, INF229, Heidelberg (Germany); Waldner, Astrid [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Montagna, Paolo [CNR - ISMAR, Bologna (Italy); Colin, Christophe [IDES, Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Wu, Qiong [State Key Laboratory, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-01

    The radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio of seawater is a valuable tracer of north Atlantic circulation pathways, driven by continental runoff (freshwater and Aeolian dust), boundary exchange and advection and thus mixing patterns. A region of particular interest in the North Atlantic is the overflow across the Iceland-Scotland Ridge injecting water from the Arctic Ocean into the Iceland basin (Iceland Scotland Overflow Water). However, Iceland itself constitutes a local source for Nd due to possible leaching of young volcanic basalts adding radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd to seawater. We have conducted an intense survey of physical properties and Nd-isotope composition between Iceland and the Azores that allows to fingerprint different water masses of the North Atlantic through the {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio and that demonstrates the very local influence of volcanic material to the seawater Nd cycle. A first local transect is achieved from the open ocean to the outflow of the Vatnajoekull glacier. Runoff influences seawater Nd in close vicinity (< 40 km near the outflow). A along shelf transect provide a similar observation. From Iceland to the Azores, however, water masses of the sub-tropical and sub-polar gyre are clearly distinguishable.

  4. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239 Pu(n th ,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  5. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  6. Determination of iodine in oyster tissue by isotope dilution laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassett, J.D.; Murphy, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been combined with isotope dilution analysis to determine iodine in oyster tissue. The long-lived radioisotope, 129I, was used to spike the samples. Samples were equilibrated with the 129I, wet ashed under controlled conditions, and iodine separated by coprecipitation with silver chloride. The analyte was dried as silver ammonium iodide upon a tantalum filament from which iodine was thermally desorbed in the resonance ionization mass spectrometry instrument. A single-color, two-photon resonant plus one-photon ionization scheme was used to form positive iodine ions. Long-lived iodine signals were achieved from 100 ng of iodine. The precision of 127I/129I measurement has been evaluated by replicate determinations of the spike, the spike calibration samples, and the oyster tissue samples and was 1.0%. Measurement precision among samples was 1.9% for the spike calibration and 1.4% for the oyster tissue. The concentration of iodine determined in SRM 1566a, Oyster Tissue, was 4.44 micrograms/g with an estimate of the overall uncertainty for the analysis of +/- 0.12 microgram/g

  7. Very fast isotopic and mass balance calculations used for strategic planing of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    Owing to the prevalence in France of nuclear generated electricity, the french utility, EDF focuses much research on fuel cycle strategy. In this context, analysis of scenarios combining problems related to planning and economics, but also reactor physics, necessitate a relatively thorough understanding of fuel response to irradiation. The main purpose of the fuel strategy program codes is to predict mass balance modifications with time for the main actinides involved in the cycle, including the minor actinides associated with the current back end fuel cycle key issues. Considering the large number of calculations performed by a strategy code in an iterative process covering a range of about a hundred years, it was important to develop basic computation modules for both the ''reactor'' and ''fabrication'' items. These had to be high speed routines, but on an accuracy level compatible with the strategy code efficiency. At the end of 1992, the EDF Research and Development Division (EDF/DER) developed a very simple, extremely fast method of calculating transuranian isotope masses. This approach, which resulted in the STRAPONTIN software, considerably increased the scope of the EDF/DER fuel strategy code TIRELIRE without undue impairment of machine time requirements for a scenario. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  8. Daily cortisol production rate in man determined by stable isotope dilution/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, N.V.; Loughlin, T.; Yergey, A.L.; Zawadzki, J.K.; Booth, J.D.; Winterer, J.C.; Loriaux, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Growth retardation as well as the development of Cushingoid features in adrenally insufficient patients treated with the currently accepted replacement dose of cortisol (33-41 mumol/day.m2; 12-15 mg/m2.day) prompted us to reevaluate the cortisol production rate (FPR) in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome, using a recently developed thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The stable isotope [9,12,12-2H3]cortisol was infused continuously for 31 h at about 5% of the anticipated FPR. Blood samples were obtained at 20-min intervals for 24 h, spun, and pooled in 4-h groups. Tracer dilution in plasma was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated with controlled infusions in 6 patients with adrenal insufficiency. Results from 12 normal volunteers revealed a FPR of 27.3 +/- 7.5 mumol/day (9.9 +/- 2.7 mg/day) or 15.7 mumol/day.m2; 5.7 mg/m2. day. A previously unreported circadian variation in FPR was observed. Patients with Cushing's syndrome demonstrated unequivocal elevation of FPR and cortisol concentration correlated during each sample period in normal volunteers, indicating that cortisol secretion, rather than metabolism, is mainly responsible for changes in plasma cortisol. Our data suggest that the FPR in normal subjects may be lower than previously believed

  9. A 233U/236U/242Pu/244Pu spike for isotopic and isotope dilution analysis by mass spectrometry with internal calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.; Belyaev, B.; Buljanitsa, L.

    1989-11-01

    The Khlopin Radium Institute prepared on behalf of the IAEA a synthetic mixture of 233 U, 236 U, 242 Pu and 244 Pu isotopes. The isotopic composition and elemental concentration of uranium and plutonium were certified on the basis of analyses done by four laboratories of the IAEA Network, using mass spectrometry with internal standardization. The certified values for 233 U/ 236 U ratio and the 236 U chemical concentration have a coefficient of variation of 0.05%. The latter is fixed by the uncertainty in the 235 U/ 238 U ratio of NBS500 used as internal standard. The coefficients of variation of the 244 Pu/ 242 Pu ratio and the 242 Pu chemical concentration are respectively 0.10% and 0.16% and limited by the uncertainty in the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio of NBS947. This four isotope mixture was used as an internal standard as well as a spike, to analyze 30 batches of LWR spent fuel solutions. The repeatability of the mass spectrometric measurements have a coefficient of variation of 0.025% for the uranium concentration, and of 0.039% for the plutonium concentration. The spiking and treatment errors had a coefficient of variation of 0.048%. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhardt, Brett H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  11. Absolute quantification of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in human tumor cell lines and tissues by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry using both isotopic and non-isotopic internal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Mengqiu; Li, Yingchun; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Huiying; Cheng, Xuefang [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Xu, Lin [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Guangji, E-mail: guangjiwang@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hao, Haiping, E-mail: hhp_770505@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The peptide fingerprint map of NQO1 has been defined by using TripleTOF. ► Signature peptide of NQO1 can be quickly quantified within 10 min. ► Analysis is performed with non-isotopic analog and compared with isotopic method. ► This method is adequate for NQO1 quantitation from human cancer cells and tissues. -- Abstract: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase) is a prognostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for various tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to develop a robust method for the absolute quantification of NQO1. This study aimed to develop and validate a LC–MS/MS based method and to test the appropriateness of using non-isotopic analog peptide as the internal standard (IS) by comparing with a stable isotope labeled (SIL) peptide. The chromatographic performance and mass spectra between the selected signature peptide of NQO1 and the non-isotopic peptide were observed to be very similar. The use of the two internal standards was validated appropriate for the absolute quantification of NQO1, as evidenced by satisfactory validation results over a concentration range of 1.62–162 fmol μL{sup −1}. This method has been successfully applied to the absolute quantification of NQO1 expression in various tumor cell lines and tissues. NQO1 expression in human tumor tissues is much higher than that in the neighboring normal tissues in both the cases of lung and colon cancer. The quantitative results obtained from the isotopic and non-isotopic methods are quite similar, further supporting that the use of non-isotopic analog peptide as internal standard is appropriate and feasible for the quantification of NQO1. By comparing with a classical isotopic IS, the present study indicates that the use of a non-isotopic peptide analog to the proteotypic peptide as the internal standard can get equal accuracy and preciseness in measuring NQO1. The universal applicability of the non-isotopic IS approach for the

  12. High-precision measurement of variations in calcium isotope ratios in urine by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J.L.L.; Gordon, G.W.; Arrua, R.C.; Skulan, J.L.; Anbar, A.D.; Bullen, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new chemical separation method to isolate Ca from other matrix elements in biological samples, developed with the long-term goal of making high-precision measurement of natural stable Ca isotope variations a clinically applicable tool to assess bone mineral balance. A new two-column procedure utilizing HBr achieves the purity required to accurately and precisely measure two Ca isotope ratios (44Ca/42Ca and 44Ca/43Ca) on a Neptune multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) in urine. Purification requirements for Sr, Ti, and K (Ca/Sr > 10000; Ca/Ti > 10000000; and Ca/K > 10) were determined by addition of these elements to Ca standards of known isotopic composition. Accuracy was determined by (1) comparing Ca isotope results for samples and standards to published data obtained using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), (2) adding a Ca standard of known isotopic composition to a urine sample purified of Ca, and (3) analyzing mixtures of urine samples and standards in varying proportions. The accuracy and precision of δ44/42Ca measurements of purified samples containing 25 μg of Ca can be determined with typical errors less than ±0.2‰ (2σ).

  13. Review: Current applications and challenges for liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; McCullagh, James S O

    2011-10-30

    High-precision isotope analysis is recognized as an essential research tool in many fields of study. Until recently, continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) was available via an elemental analyzer or a gas chromatography inlet system for compound-specific analysis of light stable isotopes. In 2004, however, an interface that coupled liquid chromatography with IRMS (LC/IRMS) became commercially available for the first time. This brought the capability for new areas of application, in particular enabling compound-specific δ(13)C analysis of non-volatile, aqueous soluble, compounds from complex mixtures. The interface design brought with it several analytical constraints, however, in particular a lack of compatibility with certain types of chromatography as well as limited flow rates and mobile phase compositions. Routine LC/IRMS methods have, however, been established for measuring the δ(13)C isotopic ratios of underivatized individual compounds for application in archeology, nutrition and physiology, geochemistry, hydrology, soil science and food authenticity. Seven years after its introduction, we review the technical advances and constraints, methodological developments and new applications of liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. First one-line mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and mass determinations of neutron-rich Fr and Ra isotopes at ISOLTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    SHIPTRAP is an ion trap facility behind the velocity lter SHIP at GSI/Darmstadt. Its aim are precision studies of transuranium nuclides produced in a fusion reaction and separated by SHIP. The current set-up for high-precision mass measurements consists of three main functional parts: (i) a gas cell for stopping the energetic ions from SHIP, (ii) radiofrequency quadrupole structures to cool and to bunch the ions extracted from the gas cell, and (iii) a superconducting magnet with two cylindrical Penning traps at a eld strength of 7 T. In this work the Penning trap system has been installed and extensively characterized. The rst on-line mass measurements of short-lived nuclides were carried out and the masses of 147 Er and 148 Er could be experimentally determined for the rst time. Here a relative mass uncertainty of δm/m of about 1 x 10 -6 was achieved. Furthermore the masses of heavy neutron-rich 229-232 Ra and 230 Fr isotopes have been determined with a relative mass uncertainty of about 1 x 10 -7 with the ISOLTRAP mass spectometer at ISOLDE/CERN. The isotope 232 Ra is the heaviest unstable nuclide ever investigated with a Penning trap. Underlying nuclear structure effects of these nuclides far from β-stability were studied by a comparison of the resulting two-neutron separation energies S 2n with those given by the theoretical Infinite Nuclear Mass model. (orig.)

  15. Alternatives to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the measurement of deuterium content of body water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluck, L.J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of breast milk intake using the isotope dilution techniques is now well established. The methodology involves the administration of a bolus of tracer followed by observation of the kinetics of its passage though the system. For example in the popular 'dose to the mother' method a dose of labeled water is administered to the mother, and over the following days samples of body fluids are taken and the concentration of tracer determined in order to establish the rate of loss of tracer from her body. Likewise samples are taken from the breast fed infant in order to determine the rates of tracer intake and subsequent loss. Deuterium is the tracer of choice for these experiments since it is non-radioactive, and therefore suitable for use in these vulnerable subject groups, and also because of its relative cheapness. Conventionally isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used for the determination of the amount of deuterium in the body fluids. However this methodology is expensive (an instrument might typically cost US$ 150,000), and it requires a considerable amount of dedicated technical expertise for its operation. Consequently such instrumentation is not widely available, and this has limited the number and scope of studies using this technique. Recently there have been reports of possible alternative technologies for the determination of deuterium in body water which appear attractive because of the wider general availability of the equipment required. It is the purpose of this report to assess these reported methods for their suitability for breast milk intake measurements

  16. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Masaki, E-mail: m-oohata@aist.go.jp; Miura, Tsutomu

    2014-07-21

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH{sub 3} solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH{sub 3}) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH{sub 3} solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  17. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohata, Masaki; Miura, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH 3 solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH 3 ) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH 3 solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive

  18. Ca and Sr isotope records support ocean acidification during end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Jacobson, A. D.; Zhang, H.; Ramezani, J.; Sageman, B. B.; Hurtgen, M.; Bowring, S. A.; Shen, S.

    2017-12-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction represents the most devastating loss of biodiversity during the Phanerozoic. A negative carbon isotope (δ13C) excursion that accompanies the event suggests a significant perturbation to the global carbon cycle, likely induced by CO2 emissions during eruption of the Siberian Traps large igneous province. The carbon cycle is linked with the Ca and Sr cycles through chemical weathering and carbonate precipitation. Therefore, analyses of Ca (δ44/40Ca), radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr), and stable Sr (δ88/86Sr) isotope abundance variations in marine carbonate rocks spanning the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) can reveal key information about biogeochemical changes that occurred during this time. We report δ44/40Ca, 87Sr/86Sr, and δ88/86Sr records analyzed by TIMS for the Meishan and Dajiang sections in China. δ44/40Ca values exhibit similar patterns in both sections. The values remain unchanged across the extinction event layer (EXT) and then decrease by 0.20‰ before increasing by 0.20‰ to 0.40‰ around the PTB. In the Meishan section, 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase after the EXT and return to pre-excursion levels by the PTB. Simultaneously, δ88/86Sr values decrease by 0.12‰ across the EXT and increase by 0.08‰ by the PTB. The patterns of our data support the hypothesis that elevated atmospheric CO2 levels enhanced chemical weathering inputs and might have caused transient ocean acidification, with an "alkalinity overshoot" and increased carbonate deposition occurring after the extinction. Additional measurements and model calculations are underway to help refine and improve these preliminary interpretations.

  19. Determination of serum calcium levels by 42Ca isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingqing; Ge, Menglei; Zhao, Haijian; Yan, Ying; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Zhou, Weiyan; Zhang, Jiangtao; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chuanbao

    2017-11-27

    Serum calcium level is an important clinical index that reflects pathophysiological states. However, detection accuracy in laboratory tests is not ideal; as such, a high accuracy method is needed. We developed a reference method for measuring serum calcium levels by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID ICP-MS), using 42Ca as the enriched isotope. Serum was digested with 69% ultrapure nitric acid and diluted to a suitable concentration. The 44Ca/42Ca ratio was detected in H2 mode; spike concentration was calibrated by reverse IDMS using standard reference material (SRM) 3109a, and sample concentration was measured by a bracketing procedure. We compared the performance of ID ICP-MS with those of three other reference methods in China using the same serum and aqueous samples. The relative expanded uncertainty of the sample concentration was 0.414% (k=2). The range of repeatability (within-run imprecision), intermediate imprecision (between-run imprecision), and intra-laboratory imprecision were 0.12%-0.19%, 0.07%-0.09%, and 0.16%-0.17%, respectively, for two of the serum samples. SRM909bI, SRM909bII, SRM909c, and GBW09152 were found to be within the certified value interval, with mean relative bias values of 0.29%, -0.02%, 0.10%, and -0.19%, respectively. The range of recovery was 99.87%-100.37%. Results obtained by ID ICP-MS showed a better accuracy than and were highly correlated with those of other reference methods. ID ICP-MS is a simple and accurate candidate reference method for serum calcium measurement and can be used to establish and improve serum calcium reference system in China.

  20. Detecting animal by-product intake using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, D A F; Biscola, N P; Dos Santos, L D; Sartori, M M P; Denadai, J C; da Silva, E T; Ducatti, C; Bicudo, S D; Barraviera, B; Ferreira, R S

    2016-11-01

    Sheep are used in many countries as food and for manufacturing bioproducts. However, when these animals consume animal by-products (ABP), which is widely prohibited, there is a risk of transmitting scrapie - a fatal prion disease in human beings. Therefore, it is essential to develop sensitive methods to detect previous ABP intake to select safe animals for producing biopharmaceuticals. We used stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) for 13 C and 15 N to trace animal proteins in the serum of three groups of sheep: 1 - received only vegetable protein (VP) for 89 days; 2 - received animal and vegetable protein (AVP); and 3 - received animal and vegetable protein with animal protein subsequently removed (AVPR). Groups 2 and 3 received diets with 30% bovine meat and bone meal (MBM) added to a vegetable diet (from days 16-89 in the AVP group and until day 49 in the AVPR group, when MBM was removed). The AVPR group showed 15 N equilibrium 5 days after MBM removal (54th day). Conversely, 15 N equilibrium in the AVP group occurred 22 days later (76th day). The half-life differed between these groups by 3.55 days. In the AVPR group, 15 N elimination required 53 days, which was similar to this isotope's incorporation time. Turnover was determined based on natural 15 N signatures. IRMS followed by turnover calculations was used to evaluate the time period for the incorporation and elimination of animal protein in sheep serum. The δ 13 C and δ 15 N values were used to track animal protein in the diet. This method is biologically and economically relevant for the veterinary field because it can track protein over time or make a point assessment of animal feed with high sensitivity and resolution, providing a low-cost analysis coupled with fast detection. Isotopic profiles could be measured throughout the experimental period, demonstrating the potential to use the method for traceability and certification assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Precise determination of sodium in serum by simulated isotope dilution method of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ying; Zhang Chuanbao; Zhao Haijian; Chen Wenxiang; Shen Ziyu; Wang Xiaoru; Chen Dengyun

    2007-01-01

    A new precise and accurate method for the determination of sodium in serum by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed. Since 23 Na is the single isotope element, 27 Al is selected as simulated isotope of Na. Al is spiked into serum samples and Na standard solution. 23 Na/ 27 Al ratio in the Na standard solution is determined to assume the natural Na isotope ratio. The serums samples are digested by purified HNO 3 /H 2 O 2 and diluted to get about 0.6 μg·g -1 Al solutions, and the 23 Na/ 27 Al ratios of the serum samples are obtained to calculate the accurate Na concentrations basing on the isotope dilution method. When the simulated isotope dilution method of ICP-MS is applied and Al is selected as the simulated isotope of Na, the precise and accurate Na concentrations in the serums are determined. The inter-day precision of CV<0.13% for one same serum sample is obtained during 3 days 4 measurements. The spike recoveries are between 99.69% and 100.60% for 4 different serum samples and 3 days multi-measurements. The results of measuring standard reference materials of serum sodium are agree with the certified value. The relative difference between 3 days is 0.22%-0.65%, and the relative difference in one bottle is 0.15%-0.44%. The ICP-MS and Al simulated isotope dilution method is proved to be not only precise and accurate, but also quick and convenient for measuring Na in serum. It is promising to be a reference method for precise determination of Na in serum. Since Al is a low cost isotope dilution reagent, the method is possible to be widely applied for serum Na determination. (authors)

  2. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--preliminary study on TATP and PETN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Roux, Claude

    2009-06-01

    The application of isotopic techniques to investigations requiring the provision of evidence to a Court is limited. The objective of this research was to investigate the application of light stable isotopes and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to solve complex forensic cases by providing a level of discrimination not achievable utilising traditional forensic techniques. Due to the current threat of organic peroxide explosives, such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP), research was undertaken to determine the potential of IRMS to differentiate samples of TATP that had been manufactured utilising different starting materials and/or manufacturing processes. In addition, due to the prevalence of pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) in detonators, detonating cord, and boosters, the potential of the IRMS technique to differentiate PETN samples from different sources was also investigated. Carbon isotope values were measured in fourteen TATP samples, with three definite groups appearing in the initial sample set based on the carbon data alone. Four additional TATP samples (in a second set of samples) were distinguishable utilising the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions individually, and also in combination with the oxygen isotope values. The 3D plot of the carbon, oxygen and hydrogen data demonstrated the clear discrimination of the four samples of TATP. The carbon and nitrogen isotope values measured from fifteen PETN samples, allowed samples from different sources to be readily discriminated. This paper demonstrates the successful application of IRMS to the analysis of explosives of forensic interest to assist in discriminating samples from different sources. This research represents a preliminary evaluation of the IRMS technique for the measurement of stable isotope values in TATP and PETN samples, and supports the dedication of resources for a full evaluation of this application in order to achieve Court reportable IRMS results.

  3. Stable isotope ratiometer-multiple ion detector (SIRMID) unit for quantitative and qualitative stable isotope studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Haumann, J.R.; Hachey, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    A stable isotope ratiometer-multiple ion detector (SIRMID) unit which can drive existing gas chromatograph-quadrupole or magnetic sector mass spectrometers to monitor up to six ions in turn is described. Each of the three pairs of ions can be selected for quantitation; thus three different or successive components can be analyzed in a single GC run. A background subtraction option permits the ion intensity in the absence of sample to be subtracted automatically during sample measurement. Displays of accumulated counts and isotope ratio are updated twice per second during the measurement and can be printed out at its conclusion. All six ions can be monitored in the analog mode by parallel outputs to a multipen recorder. Experience gained in the construction of this prototype indicates that SIRMID units could be commercially available for $10K, or about 1 / 3 rd to 1 / 6 th of the cost of even an inexpensive computer system. (U.S.)

  4. A linear postaccelerator with superconducting helix resonators for medium mass ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingwersen, H.; Jaeschke, E.; Repnow, R.; Walcher, T.; Hochschild, G.; Lehmann, W.; Piosczyk, B.; Spath, F.; Vetter, J.E.

    1978-05-01

    The concept is presented of a linear accelerator equiped with short superconducting resonators as accelerating elements. Saving high-frequency power remarkably reduces the operating costs as compared with normal conducting resonators. Booster systems of this type can be used to further accelerate medium heavy ions having passed on MP tandem after their charge state has been increased. (orig.) 891 WL [de

  5. Elemental and isotopic characterization of Japanese and Philippine polished rice samples using instrumental neutron activation analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.; Mendoza, Norman dS.; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a staple food for most Asian countries such as the Philippines and Japan and as such its elemental and isotopic content are of interest to the consumers. Its elemental content may reflect the macro nutrient reduction during milling or probable toxic elements uptake. Three Japanese and four Philippine polished rice samples in his study mostly came from rice bought from supermarkets.These rice samples were washed, dried and ground to fine powder. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a very sensitive non-destructive multi-element analytical technique, was used for the elemental analysis of the samples and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to obtain the isotopic signatures of the samples. Results show that compared with the unpolished rice standard NIES CRM10b, the polished Japanese and Philippine rice sampled show reduced concentrations of elements by as much as 1/3 to 1/10 of Mg, Mn, K and Na. Levels of Ca and Zn are not greatly affected. Arsenic is found in all the Japanese rice tested at an average concentration of 0.103 μg/g and three out of four of the Philippine rice at an average concentration of 0.070 μg/g. Arsenic contamination may have been introduced from the fertilizer used in rice fields. Higher levels of Br are seen in two of the Philippine rice at 14 and 34 μg/g with the most probable source being the pesticide methyl bromide. Isotopic ratio of ae 13 C show signature of a C3 plant with possible narrow distinguishable signature of Japanese rice within -27.5 to -28.5 while Philippine rice within -29 to -30. More rice samples will be analyzed to gain better understanding of isotopic signatures to distinguish inter-varietal and/or geographical differences. Elemental composition of soil samples of rice samples sources will be determined for better understanding of uptake mechanisms. (author)

  6. Application and evaluation of the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique in the determination of rare earths in geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de.

    1988-01-01

    Establishment of the experimental procedures employed in the rare earth element determination of geological samples by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis is discussed in the present work. The procedures involve preparation and calibration of the isotope tracers isotope dilution, dissolution in a teflon pressure vessel, chemical separation and isotope analysis using a fully automated Micromass VG ISOTOPES model 354 thermal ionization mass spectrometer. For the initial chemical separation of total rare earths the cationic resin was employed and HC1 and HNO 3 acids as eluents. In the second step rare earths elements were separated into individual (La, Ce and Nd) and subgroups (Sm-Eu-Gd, Yb-Er-Dy) fractions using the same cationic resin and α-HIBA as eluent. Nine elements La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er and Yb are determined by this method in the ''United States Geological Survey'' (USGS) standard samples GSP-1, AGV-1 and G-2, with an overall precision of +- 1 to 2% and an accuracy of 5%. The concentration of rare earth element determined in the standard sample PCC-1 showed that the total analytical blanks are in submicrogram levels. The concentration of rare earth elements in the same USGS standard samples were also determined by Instrumental neutron activation analysis, neutron activation analysis with chemical separation before irradiation and inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy. The chemical procedures employed for these methods are the same as that used for mass spectrometric isotope dilution. Based on the results obtained, each method was evaluated pointing out their merits and defects. The study clearly showed that the chemical procedure employed for all these techniques was satisfactory. (author) [pt

  7. The influence of Oort clouds on the mass and chemical balance of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.A.; Shull, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The contribution of stellar encounters and interstellar erosion to comet cloud mass injection to the ISM is calculated. It is shown that evaporative mass loss from passing stars and SNe results in an average Galactic mass injection rate of up to 10 to the -5th solar mass/yr if such clouds are frequent around solar-type stars. Cometary erosion by interstellar grains produces an injection rate of 10 to the -5th to 10 to the -4th solar mass/yr. An injection rate of 2 x 10 to the -5th solar mass/yr is calculated. Each of these rates could be increased by a factor of about 15 if the comet clouds contain a significant amount of smaller debris. It is concluded that the total mass injection rate of material to the ISM by comet clouds is small compared to other ISM mass injection sources. Comet cloud mass loss to the ISM could be responsible for a sizeable fraction of the metal and dust abundances of the ISM if Oort clouds are common. 50 refs

  8. Heat and mass transfer from the mantle: heat flow and He-isotope constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Polyak

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial heat flow density, q, is inversely correlated with the age, t, of tectono-magmatic activity in the Earth's crust (Polyak and Smirnov, 1966; etc.. «Heat flow-age dependence» indicates unknown temporal heat sources in the interior considered a priori as the mantle-derived diapirs. The validity of this hypothesis is demonstrated by studying the helium isotope ratio, 3He/4He = R, in subsurface fluids. This study discovered the positive correlation between the regionally averaged (background estimations of R- and q-values (Polyak et al., 1979a. Such a correlation manifests itself in both pan-regional scales (Norhtern Eurasia and separate regions, e.g., Japan (Sano et al., 1982, Eger Graben (Polyak et al., 1985 Eastern China rifts (Du, 1992, Southern Italy (Italiano et al., 2000, and elsewhere. The R-q relation indicates a coupled heat and mass transfer from the mantle into the crust. From considerations of heat-mass budget this transfer can be provided by the flux consisting of silicate matter rather than He or other volatiles. This conclusion is confirmed by the correlation between 3He/ 4He and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the products of the volcanic and hydrothermal activity in Italy (Polyak et al., 1979b; Parello et al., 2000 and other places. Migration of any substance through geotemperature field transports thermal energy accumulated within this substance, i.e. represents heat and mass transfer. Therefore, only the coupled analysis of both material and energy aspects of this transfer makes it possible to characterise the process adequately and to decipher an origin of terrestrial heat flow observed in upper parts of the earth crust. An attempt of such kind is made in this paper.

  9. The effects of the 'key' molar mass on the design of a cascade handling a multi-isotopic mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichura, R.C.; Al-Janabi, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The parameters required for describing the characteristics of separating units and cascades handling a multi-isotope mixture are first reviewed from previous work and then expressed in terms of a newly defined parameter called the 'Key' molar mass. The effects of the latter on the operating and economic parameters of a gas centrifuge cascade handling a multi-isotopic mixture are studied. Only cascades of the 'primitive' type, i.e. those in which the feed of a stage is made up of the light and heavy fractions of neighbouring stages, are considered. The costs incurred in obtaining outputs with specified concentrations are then discussed. (author)

  10. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  11. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting self-similarity of the circumgalactic medium with virial mass using Mg II absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.

    2013-01-01

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT) and showed that the mean Mg II λ2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, W r (2796)∝(D/R vir ) –2 , with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the Mg II absorption covering fraction is effectively invariant with galaxy virial mass, M h , over the range 10.7 ≤ log M h /M ☉ ≤ 13.9. In this work, we explore multivariate relationships between W r (2796), virial mass, impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T = 10 4 -10 4.5 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the Mg II absorbing gas such that the mean W r (2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ≅ 0.3 R vir , independent of both virial mass and minimum absorption threshold; inside this region, and perhaps also in the region 0.3 < D/R vir ≤ 1, the mean W r (2796) is independent of virial mass. Contrary to absorber-galaxy cross-correlation studies, we show there is no anti-correlation between W r (2796) and virial mass. We discuss how simulations and theory constrained by observations support self-similarity of the cool/warm CGM via the physics governing star formation, gas-phase metal enrichment, recycling efficiency of galactic scale winds, filament and merger accretion, and overdensity of local environment as a function of virial mass.

  12. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting self-similarity of the circumgalactic medium with virial mass using Mg II absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Nielsen, Nikole M. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT) and showed that the mean Mg II λ2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, W{sub r} (2796)∝(D/R {sub vir}){sup –2}, with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the Mg II absorption covering fraction is effectively invariant with galaxy virial mass, M {sub h}, over the range 10.7 ≤ log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 13.9. In this work, we explore multivariate relationships between W{sub r} (2796), virial mass, impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T = 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4.5} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the Mg II absorbing gas such that the mean W{sub r} (2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ≅ 0.3 R {sub vir}, independent of both virial mass and minimum absorption threshold; inside this region, and perhaps also in the region 0.3 < D/R {sub vir} ≤ 1, the mean W{sub r} (2796) is independent of virial mass. Contrary to absorber-galaxy cross-correlation studies, we show there is no anti-correlation between W{sub r} (2796) and virial mass. We discuss how simulations and theory constrained by observations support self-similarity of the cool/warm CGM via the physics governing star formation, gas-phase metal enrichment, recycling efficiency of galactic scale winds, filament and merger accretion, and overdensity of local environment as a function of virial mass.

  13. Characterization of methane oxidation in a simulated landfill cover system by comparing molecular and stable isotope mass balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Marcel; Jochmann, Maik A; Gehrke, Tobias; Thom, Andrea; Ricken, Tim; Denecke, Martin; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2017-11-01

    Biological methane oxidation may be regarded as a method of aftercare treatment for landfills to reduce climate relevant methane emissions. It is of social and economic interest to estimate the behavior of bacterial methane oxidation in aged landfill covers due to an adequate long-term treatment of the gas emissions. Different approaches assessing methane oxidation in laboratory column studies have been investigated by other authors recently. However, this work represents the first study in which three independent approaches, ((i) mass balance, (ii) stable isotope analysis, and (iii) stoichiometric balance of product (CO 2 ) and reactant (CH 4 ) by CO 2 /CH 4 -ratio) have been compared for the estimation of the biodegradation by a robust statistical validation on a rectangular, wide soil column. Additionally, an evaluation by thermal imaging as a potential technique for the localization of the active zone of bacterial methane oxidation has been addressed in connection with stable isotope analysis and CO 2 /CH 4 -ratios. Although landfills can be considered as open systems the results for stable isotope analysis based on a closed system correlated better with the mass balance than calculations based on an open system. CO 2 /CH 4 -ratios were also in good agreement with mass balance. In general, highest values for biodegradation were determined from mass balance, followed by CO 2 /CH 4 -ratio, and stable isotope analysis. The investigated topsoil proved to be very suitable as a potential cover layer by removing up to 99% of methane for CH 4 loads of 35-65gm -2 d -1 that are typical in the aftercare phase of landfills. Finally, data from stable isotope analysis and the CO 2 /CH 4 -ratios were used to trace microbial activity within the reactor system. It was shown that methane consumption and temperature increase, as a cause of high microbial activity, correlated very well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. First direct mass measurements of stored neutron-rich 129,130,131Cd isotopes with FRS-ESR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Knöbel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 410 MeV/u 238U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission in a beryllium target placed at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated by the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without Bρ-tagging at the high-resolution central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with Bρ-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined with an accuracy of 2⋅10−4. A new method of data analysis, which uses a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided experimental mass values of 25 rare isotopes for the first time. The high sensitivity and selectivity of the method have given access to nuclides detected with a rate of a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the 129,130,131Cd isotopes mass values directly measured for the first time. The experimental mass values of cadmium as well as for tellurium and tin isotopes show a pronounced shell effect towards and at N=82. Shell quenching cannot be deduced from a single new mass value, nor by a better agreement with a theoretical model which explicitly takes into account a quenching feature. This is in agreement with the conclusion from γ-ray spectroscopy and confirms modern shell-model calculations.

  15. The COS-Halos survey: physical conditions and baryonic mass in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Tumlinson, Jason; Peeples, Molly S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Thom, Christopher; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Lehner, Nicolas; O'Meara, John M.; Ford, Amanda Brady; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel; Weinberg, David H.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T ∼10 4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of L ∼ L* galaxies at z ∼ 0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n H II /n H ≳ 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background. Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R vir , we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n H = (10 –4.2±0.25 )(R/R vir ) –0.8±0.3 . Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the H I column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M CGM cool >6.5×10 10 M ☉ for the volume within R < R vir . Allowing for an additional warm-hot, O VI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10 12 M ☉ scale.

  16. Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF): Multidimensional Protein Chromatography Coupled to Stable Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Bovee, R. J.; Mohr, W.; Tang, T.

    2012-12-01

    As metagenomics increases our insight into microbial community diversity and metabolic potential, new approaches are required to determine the biogeochemical expression of this potential within ecosystems. Because stable isotopic analysis of the major bioactive elements (C, N) has been used historically to map flows of substrates and energy among macroscopic food webs, similar principles may apply to microbes. To address this challenge, we have developed a new analytical approach called Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF). P-SIF generates natural stable isotopic fingerprints of microbial individual or community proteomes. The main advantage of P-SIF is the potential to bridge the gap between diversity and function, thereby providing a window into the "black box" of environmental microbiology and helping to decipher the roles of uncultivated species. Our method implements a three-way, orthogonal scheme to separate mixtures of whole proteins into subfractions dominated by single or closely-related proteins. Protein extracts first are isoelectrically focused in a gel-free technique that yields 12 fractions separated over a gradient of pH 3-10. Each fraction then is separated by size-exclusion chromatography into 20 pools, ranging from >100kD to ~10kD. Finally, each of these pools is subjected to HPLC and collected in 40 time-slices based on protein hydrophobicity. Theoretical calculation reveals that the true chromatographic resolution of the total scheme is 5000, somewhat less than the 9600 resulting fractions. High-yielding fractions are subjected to δ13C analysis by spooling-wire microcombustion irMS (SWiM-irMS) optimized for samples containing 1-5 nmol carbon. Here we will present the method, results for a variety of pure cultures, and preliminary data for a sample of mixed environmental proteins. The data show the promise of this method for unraveling the metabolic complexity hidden within microbial communities.

  17. Mass spectrometric methods for studying nutrient mineral and trace element absorption and metabolism in humans using stable isotopes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crews, H.M.; Eagles, J.; Mellon, F.A.; Luten, J.B.; McGaw, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for determining stable isotopes of nutrient minerals and trace elements in human metabolic studies are described and discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the techniques of electron ionization, fast atom bombardment, thermal ionization, and inductively coupled plasma and gas chromatography mass spectrometry are evaluated with reference to their accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and convenience, and the demands of human nutrition research. Examples of specific applications are described and the significance of current developments in mass spectrometry are discussed with reference to present and probable future research needs. (Author)

  18. Mass dependence of spectral and angular distributions of Cherenkov radiation from relativistic isotopes in solid radiators and its possible application as mass selector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Rozhkova, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Kuzminchuk-Feuerstein, N.

    2018-02-01

    The first proof of principle experiment with a prototype of a Time-of-Flight (TOF) - Cherenkov detector of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) exploiting a liquid Iodine Naphthalene radiator has been performed at Cave C at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). A conceptual design for a liquid Cherenkov detector was proposed as a prototype for the future TOF measurements at the Super-FRS by detection of total number of Cherenkov photons. The ionization energy loss of RHI in a liquid radiator decreases only slightly this number, while in a solid radiator changes sufficiently not the total number of ChR photons, but ChR angular and spectral distributions. By means of computer simulations, we showed that these distributions are very sensitive to the isotope mass, due to different stopping powers of isotopes with initial equal relativistic factors. The results of simulations for light (Li, Be) and heavy (Xe) isotopes at 500-1000 MeV/u are presented indicating the possibility to use the isotopic effect in ChR of RHI as the mass selector.

  19. Isotopic abundance analysis of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur with a combined elemental analyzer-mass spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichlmayer, F.; Blochberger, K.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio measurements of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur are of growing interest as analytical tool in many fields of research, but applications were somewhat hindered in the past by the fact that cumbersome sample preparation was necessary. A method has therefore been developed, consisting in essential of coupling an elemental analyzer with an isotope mass spectrometer, enabling fast and reliable conversion of C-, N- and S-compounds in any solid or liquid sample into the measuring gases carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide for on-line isotopic analysis. The experimental set-up and the main characteristics are described in short and examples of application in environmental research, food analysis and clinical diagnosis are given. (orig.)

  20. An application of nitrogen microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry to isotope dilution analysis of selenium in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirasaki, Toshihiro [Hitachi Instruments Engineering Co. Ltd., Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan); Yoshinaga, Jun; Morita, Masatoshi; Okumoto, Toyoharu; Oishi, Konosuke

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry was studied for its applicability to the isotope dilution analysis of selenium in biological samples. Spectroscopic interference by calcium, which is present in high concentrations in biological samples, was investigated. No detectable background spectrum was observed for the major selenium isotopes of {sup 78}Se and {sup 80}Se. No detectable interferences by sodium, potassium, calcium and phosphorus on the isotope ratio {sup 80}Se/{sup 78}Se were observed up to concentration of 200 mg/ml. The method was applied to the analysis of selenium in biological reference materials of marine organisms. The results showed good agreement between the certified and found values. (author).

  1. Development of a mass spectrometrical isotope dilution analysis for determination of trace iodine levels and its application for food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindlmeier, W.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometrical isotope dilution procedure for the determination of trace amounts of iodine in various materials was developed using 129 I as indicator isotope, based on the determination of the 129 I/ 127 I isotope relationship. Negative thermionization was used as ionization method. The analysis procedure, which worked with a standard deviation of between 0,1 and 10% (depending on material tested), was used to determine the iodine level of table salt - both iodized and normal salt (3-6 ppm and less than 0,006 ppm respectively), and food samples with an organic matrix. For comparison the iodine levels were also measured with an iodine-selective electrode. Special preparation and separation procedures were done to suit the sample material. A comparison of the levels of iodine concentration in various powdered milks which were measured by international collaborators using varying methods shows the superior reproducibility of the MS-IDA. (RB) [de

  2. Discrimination of geographical origin of lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) using isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, F; Casiello, G; Cortese, M; Perini, M; Camin, F; Catucci, L; Agostiano, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the geographic origin of lentils by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with chemometrics. Lentil samples from two origins, i.e. Italy and Canada, were analysed obtaining the stable isotope ratios of δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and δ(34)S. A comparison between median values (U-test) highlighted statistically significant differences (porigin but with overlapping zones; consequently, two supervised discriminant techniques, i.e. partial least squares discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbours algorithm were used. Both models showed good performances with external prediction abilities of about 93% demonstrating the suitability of the methods developed. Subsequently, isotopic determinations were also performed on the protein and starch fractions and the relevant results are reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultra-trace determination of neptunium-237 and plutonium isotopes in urine samples by compact accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, X.; Christl, M.; Kramer-Tremblay, S., E-mail: sheila.kramer-tremblay@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Synal, H-A. [ETH Zurich, Lab. of Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Ultra-trace analysis of actinides, such as Pu isotopes and {sup 237}Np, in bioassay samples is often needed for radiation protection programs at nuclear facilities. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), particularly the compact ETH Zurich system “Tandy”, has evolved over the years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analysis. Employment of the AMS technique can reduce the demands on sample preparation chemistry and increase sample analysis throughput, due to very low instrumental detection limit, high rejection of interferences, and low susceptibility to adverse sample matrices. Initial research and development tests were performed to explore and demonstrate the analytical capability of AMS for Pu and Np urine bioassay. In this study, urine samples spiked with femtogram levels of Np and Pu isotopes were prepared and measured using compact ETH AMS system and the results showed excellent analytical capability for measuring Np and Pu isotopes at femtogram/litre levels in urine. (author)

  4. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loge, G.

    1994-09-01

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U3O8. Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF4 were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF6. This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid.

  5. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  6. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10 13 - 2 x 10 15 h -1 M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to ∼5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  7. Initial mass function and global rates of mass, momentum, and energy input to the interstellar medium via stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buren, D.

    1985-01-01

    Using the Michigan HD catalog volumes I--III, the all-sky sample of O stars of Garmany, Conti, and Chiosi, Lucke's map of the distribution of obscuring material within 2 kpc, and an amalgam of recent stellar evolution calculations, the number of stars formed kpc -2 yr -1 [log (M/M/sub sun/)] -1 (IMF) is psi = 5.4 x 10 -4 (M/M/sub sun/)/sup -1.03/. A calibration of mass-loss rates with stellar parameters based on published data yields m = 2.0 x 10 -13 (L/L/sub sun/)/sup 1.25/M/sub sun/ yr -1 . Energy injection into the ISM by winds and supernovae balances mechanical energy dissipation via cloud-cloud collisions. For stars M>5 M/sub sun/ there is near balance between the rate at which mass is turned into stars and the rate at which it is lost from them, implying small remnant masses

  8. Emerging techniques in vegetable oil analysis using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the ‘light’ bio-elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound- and position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils.A medida que la práctica de la adulteración de aceites vegetales se hace más sofisticada, las posibilidades de evitar la detección utilizando técnicas tradicionales como la cromatografía de gases en columna capilar aumentan. Una de las técnicas más poderosas que más se utilizan en los estudios de autentificación de alimentos es la espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas, que utiliza diferencias en la abundancia natural de isótopos estables de elementos ligeros biológicos hidrógeno, nitrógeno, carbón, oxigeno y azufre para detectar fraude en los alimentos. La espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas ha encontrado aplicación en la autentificación de una amplia gama de alimentos, incluyendo zumos de frutas, vinos, bebidas alcohólicas de alta graduación, miel, y en la detección de la adulteración de los compuestos aromáticos con sus análogos de origen sintético. Este trabajo

  9. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  10. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: an initial assessment of the VG isotopes Plasmaquad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.; Pickford, C.J.

    1985-04-01

    The Chemical Analysis Group has been approached by a British Scientific instrument maker regarding the possibility of the group participating in a Department of Trade and Industry sponsored scheme whereby we would have a 12 month period to assess the advantages and disadvantages of a new analytical technique, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. This report details our initial assessment of the instrument, carried out in order to decide whether to participate in the scheme. We have attempted to discover whether the instrument meets the claims made of it in advertising literature, and have attempted to compare the technique with another, proven technique, Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy. The Plasmaquad offers excellent sensitivity for almost all of the elements of the periodic table, giving a distinct improvement over the Chemical Analysis Group's present capabilities for many elements. The isotope ratio measuring ability is important, as the Group has no such capability at the moment and a demand for this type of measurement is foreseen. Our conclusions, while inevitably somewhat subjective, form the basis for recommending Harwell to participate in the scheme. (author)

  11. Determination of Dibutyltin in Sediments Using Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Yong Hyeon; Park, Ji Youn; Han, Myung Sub; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Byung Joo; Lim, Young Ran; Hwang, Eui Jin; So, Hun Young

    2005-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of dibutyltin (DBT) in sediment by isotope dilution using liquid chromatography inductively-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (LC-ICP/MS). To achieve the highest accuracy and precision, special attentions are paid in optimization and evaluation of overall processes of the analysis including extraction of analytes, characterization of the standards used for calibration and LC-ICP/MS conditions. An approach for characterization of natural abundance DBT standard has been developed by combining inductively-coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES) and LC-ICP/MS for the total Sn assay and the analysis of Sn species present as impurities, respectively. An excellent LC condition for separation of organotin species was found, which is suitable for simultaneous DBT and tributyltin (TBT) analysis as well as impurity analysis of DBT standards. Microwave extraction condition was also optimized for high efficiency while preventing species transformation. The present method determines the amount contents of DBT in sediments with expanded uncertainty of less than 5% and its result shows high degree of equivalence with reference values of an international inter-comparison and a certified reference material (CRM) within stated uncertainties

  12. Determination of Dibutyltin in Sediments Using Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Yong Hyeon; Park, Ji Youn; Han, Myung Sub; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Byung Joo; Lim, Young Ran; Hwang, Eui Jin; So, Hun Young [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    A method is described for the determination of dibutyltin (DBT) in sediment by isotope dilution using liquid chromatography inductively-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (LC-ICP/MS). To achieve the highest accuracy and precision, special attentions are paid in optimization and evaluation of overall processes of the analysis including extraction of analytes, characterization of the standards used for calibration and LC-ICP/MS conditions. An approach for characterization of natural abundance DBT standard has been developed by combining inductively-coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES) and LC-ICP/MS for the total Sn assay and the analysis of Sn species present as impurities, respectively. An excellent LC condition for separation of organotin species was found, which is suitable for simultaneous DBT and tributyltin (TBT) analysis as well as impurity analysis of DBT standards. Microwave extraction condition was also optimized for high efficiency while preventing species transformation. The present method determines the amount contents of DBT in sediments with expanded uncertainty of less than 5% and its result shows high degree of equivalence with reference values of an international inter-comparison and a certified reference material (CRM) within stated uncertainties.

  13. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R.Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14 C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided. (orig.)

  14. Precise isotope analysis. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to human sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Isotope 14 C is a radioisotope with a half-life of 5,730 years, and the measurement of its concentration makes it possible to calculate 'carbon 14 age.' This paper introduces up-to-date accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), which is used in 14 C concentration measurement, and outlines its applied researches in pharmaceutical and medical fields. AMS technique has been applied in Europe and the United States to microdose clinical tests. In Japan, implementation foundation has been ready through the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, five years behind Europe and the United States. Although conventional AMS measurement of 14 C required an acceleration voltage of 3 million volts or more, technological development has enabled a high accuracy of 14 C concentration measurement with the low acceleration voltage of about 400,000 volts. A sample for AMS method is graphitized, transformed to carbon ions ( 12 C-, 13 C-, and 14 C-) through negative ionization with cesium irradiation, accelerated under 450 kV, bombarded with argon gas, charge-converted to 12 C+, 13 C+, and 14 C+, and measured. Biological samples for microdose study are plasma, urine, feces, and biological tissue. Model tests showed a very good linearity between the concentrations of 14 C-containing compounds and 14 C concentrations. Applied research on microdose clinical tests is expected to increase its usability in the future, as an effective means of drug development. (A.O.)

  15. Quantification of four artificial sweeteners in Finnish surface waters with isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkola, Noora; Sainio, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners sucralose (SCL), acesulfame (ACS), saccharin (SAC), and cyclamate (CYC) have been detected in environmental waters in Europe and North America. Higher environmental levels are expected in view of the increasing consumption of these food additives. In this study, an isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) LC–MS/MS method was developed and validated for quantifying the four artificial sweeteners in boreal lakes (n = 3) and rivers (n = 12). The highest concentrations of ACS, SAC, CYC and SCL were 9,600, 490, 210 and 1000 ng/L, respectively. ACS and SAC were detected in all studied samples, and CYC and SCL in 98% and 56% of the samples. Seasonal trends of ACS and SAC were observed in some rivers. ACS and SCL concentrations in rivers correlated linearly with population equivalents of the wastewater treatment plants in the catchment areas, whereas SAC and CYC concentrations depend more on the source. -- Highlights: • A reliable method for analysing artificial sweeteners in water was validated. • Artificial sweeteners were quantified in boreal rivers and lakes. • Most concentrations were in accordance with previous European studies. • Acesulfame and saccharine concentrations were high in the most contaminated rivers. • Correlation observed between concentrations and mean water throughflow in rivers. -- High concentrations of artificial sweeteners were obtained, which indicates slow or negligible degradation of these compounds in boreal surface waters

  16. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided.

  17. A high precision mass spectrometer for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.; Prahallada Rao, B.S.; Handu, V.K.; Satam, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    A high precision mass spectrometer with two ion collector assemblies and direct on line reduction facility (with uranium at 700 0 C) for water samples for hydrogen isotopic analysis has been designed and developed. The ion source particularly gives high sensitivity and at the same tike limits the H 3 + ions to a minimum. A digital ratiometer with a H 2 + compensator has also been developed. The overall precision obtained on the spectrometer is 0.07% 2sub(sigmasub(10)) value. Typical results on the performance of the spectrometer, which is working since a year and a half are given. Possible methods of extending the ranges of concentration the spectrometer can handle, both on lower and higher sides are discussed. Problems of memory between samples are briefly listed. A multiple inlet system to overcome these problems is suggested. This will also enable faster analysis when samples of highly varying concentrations are to be analyzed. A few probable areas in which the spectrometer will be shortly put to use are given. (auth.)

  18. The interlaboratory experiment IDA-72 on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Drosselmeyer, E.

    1975-07-01

    Within the framework of the Safeguards Project of the Federal Republic of Germany at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe an analytical intercomparison program was carried out in cooperation with 22 laboratories of 13 countries or international organizations. The main objective was the acquisition of basic data on the errors involved in the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis if it is applied to the determination of uranium and plutonium in diluted active feed solutions of reprocessing plants in routine operation. The results were evaluated by statistical methods mainly in regard to the calculation of the estimates of the variances for the different error components contributing to the total error of this analytical technique. Furthermore, the performance of two new methods for sample conditioning suggested by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, and the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EURATOM), Karlsruhe, was successfully tested. The results of some investigations on the stability of diluted high active feed solutions and on comparison analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are also included. Data on the analytical efforts (manhours) invested in this study are reported as well as general experiences made in the organization and performance of an experiment on such an extended international level. (orig.) [de

  19. Quantitative determination of cyclobutane thymine dimers in DNA by stable isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podmore, I.D.; Cooke, M.S.; Herbert, K.E.; Lunec, J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to understand the role of UV-induced DNA lesions in biological processes such as mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, it is essential to detect and quantify DNA damage in cells. In this paper we present a novel and both highly selective and sensitive assay using capillary gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) for the detection and accurate quantitation of a major product of UV-induced DNA damage (cis-syb cyclobutadithymine). Quantitation of the cyclobutane thymine dimer was achieved by the use of an internal standard in the form of a stable 2 H-labeled analogue. Both isotopically labeled and nonlabeled dimers were prepared directly from their corresponding monomers. Each was identified as their trimethylsilyl ether derivative by GC-MS. Calibration plots were obtained for known quantities of both nonlabeled and analyte and internal standard. Quantitation of cis-syn cyclobutadithymine was demonstrated in DNA exposed to UVC radiation over a dose range of 0 3500 J m -2 . Under the conditions used, the limit of detection was found to be 20-50 fmol on column (equivalent to 0.002-0.005 nmol dimer per mg DNA). The results of the present study indicate that capillary GC-MS is an ideally suited technique for selective and sensitive quantification of cis-syn cyclobutadithymine in DNA and hence UV-induced DNA damage. (author)

  20. Immunocapture isotope dilution mass spectrometry in response to a pandemic influenza threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Carrie L; Williams, Tracie L; Santana, Wanda I; Levine, Marnie; Chen, Li-Mei; Cooper, Hans C; Solano, Maria I; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Marasco, Wayne A; Fang, He; Donis, Ruben O; Barr, John R

    2017-09-05

    As a result of recent advances in mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation methods, these techniques are now poised to play a critical role in rapid formulation of pandemic influenza vaccines. Analytical techniques that have been developed and validated on seasonal influenza strains can be used to increase the quality and decrease the time required to deliver protective pandemic vaccines to the global population. The emergence of a potentially pandemic avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in March of 2013, prompted the US public health authorities and the vaccine industry to initiate production of a pre-pandemic vaccine for preparedness purposes. To this end, we evaluated the feasibility of using immunocapture isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IC-IDMS) to evaluate the suitability of the underlying monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies (mAbs and pAbs) for their capacity to isolate the H7 hemagglutinin (HA) in this new vaccine for quantification by IDMS. A broad range of H7 capture efficiencies was observed among mAbs tested by IC-IDMS with FR-545, 46/6, and G3 A533 exhibiting the highest cross-reactivity capabilities to H7 of A/Shanghai/2/2013. MAb FR-545 was selected for continued assessment, evaluated by IC-IDMS for mAb reactivity against H7 in the H7N9 candidate vaccine virus and compared with/to reactivity to the reference polyclonal antiserum in allantoic fluid, purified whole virus, lyophilized whole virus and final detergent-split monovalent vaccine preparations for vaccine development. IC-IDMS assessment of FR-545 alongside IC-IDMS using the reference polyclonal antiserum to A/Shanghai/2/2013 and with the regulatory SRID method showed strong correlation and mAb IC-IDMS could have played an important role in the event a potential surrogate potency test was required to be rapidly implemented. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and physical comparison for the forensic examination of grip-seal plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erica; Carter, James F; Hill, Jenny C; Morton, Carolyn; Daeid, Niamh Nic; Sleeman, Richard

    2008-05-20

    Plastic bags are frequently used to package drugs, explosives and other contraband. There exists, therefore, a requirement in forensic casework to compare bags found at different locations. This is currently achieved almost exclusively by the use of physical comparisons such as birefringence patterns. This paper discusses some of the advantages and shortcomings of this approach, and presents stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) as a supplementary tool for effecting comparisons of this nature. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic data are presented for sixteen grip-seal plastic bags from a wide range of sources, in order to demonstrate the range of values which is likely to be encountered. Both isotopic and physical comparison (specifically birefringence) techniques are then applied to the analysis of rolls of bags from different manufacturing lots from a leading manufacturer. Both approaches are able to associate bags from a common production batch. IRMS can be applied to small fragments which are not amenable to physical comparisons, and is able to discriminate bags which could be confused using birefringence patterns alone. Similarly, in certain cases birefringence patterns discriminate bags with similar isotopic compositions. The two approaches are therefore complementary. When more than one isotopically distinct region exists within a bag (e.g. the grip-seal is distinct from the body) the ability to discriminate and associate bags is greatly increased.

  2. Trends and problems on the studies by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry for verifying the geographical origin of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenaga, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The multi-stable isotopic analysis method has employed to solve food authenticity problems. Stable isotope ratio of the light elements such as H, C, N, and O in food samples (e.g., rice, beef, and eel) were precisely analyzed by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Those samples were mainly taken from four different countries; Japan, United States of America, Australia, and China as comparison. All the rice samples were grown in the presence of either natural and or artificial fertilizer. The beef samples were taken from three different countries; Japan, United States of America, and Australia. Imported beef samples were also presented from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan, and compared with a correlation equation. The eel samples were taken from the three different countries and areas; Japan, China, and Taiwan. δX values showing some differences, all the Japanese food samples were clearly distinctive from the United States of America, Australia, China, and Taiwan samples. The results may be explained by the regional differences in isotope signatures of the climate, utilized nutrition, and/or quality of irrigation water among the farming countries. The statistical distinction could be one of the useful metrics to extract the food samples (rice, meat, fish, etc.) grown in Japan from those grown in the other countries. The dynamics analysis studies on stable isotopic behavior (i.e., Isotopomics) in human metabolism may be looking forward to establish a new science in near future. (author)

  3. New tendencies in isotopic analysis of pesticide residues from wines by mass spectrometry in concordance with the European standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costinel, Diana; Lazar, Roxana Elena; Vremera, Raluca; Irimescu, Rodica; Saros-Rogobete, Gili

    2006-01-01

    Multi-isotope analysis, the determination of isotope ratios by mass spectrometry or magnetic resonance spectroscopy, becomes increasingly used in the food industry and by national food control laboratories as a method of authenticating both raw materials and finished products. These highly sophisticated techniques are capable of determining the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs, thus providing a means of detecting product adulteration and controlling mislabelling practices which are virtually impossible to circumvent. The European Union has officially adopted the used of isotope analysis as a means of controlling sugar addition in wines. Its successful implementation in the wine-producing Member States has considerably reduced the financial losses which the Community had incurred due to over - capitalisation. Coupling mass spectrometer with gas chromatograph is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of traces of pesticides from food. The presence of pesticides in foods is harmful for the nervous system, the cardiovascular apparatus and decreases the immunity of human body. In addition, ensuring the foods quality and safety is a requirement, which must be fulfilled for the integration in EU. The subject of this paper is the presentation of the tests results of the isotopic analysis for pesticide residues in wines, in concordance with European Standard. (authors)

  4. On-line double isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of solid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Malherbe, Julien; García-Fonseca, Sergio; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-12-03

    We report on the determination of trace elements in solid samples by the combination of on-line double isotope dilution and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a certified natural abundance standard by on-line IDMS using the same isotopically-enriched spike solution. In this way, the mass fraction of the analyte in the sample can be directly referred to the certified standard so the previous characterization of the spike solution is not required. To validate the procedure, Sr, Rb and Pb were determined in certified reference materials with different matrices, including silicate glasses (SRM 610, 612 and 614) and powdered samples (PACS-2, SRM 2710a, SRM 1944, SRM 2702 and SRM 2780). The analysis of powdered samples was carried out both by the preparation of pressed pellets and by lithium borate fusion. Experimental results for the analysis of powdered samples were in agreement with the certified values for all materials. Relative standard deviations in the range of 6-21% for pressed pellets and 3-21% for fused solids were obtained from n=3 independent measurements. Minimal sample preparation, data treatment and consumption of the isotopically-enriched isotopes are the main advantages of the method over previously reported approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--part 1: instrument validation of the DELTAplusXP IRMS for bulk nitrogen isotope ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Hill, David M; Maynard, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of research has been conducted into the use of stable isotopes to assist in determining the origin of various materials. The research conducted in the forensic field shows the potential of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to provide a level of discrimination not achievable utilizing traditional forensic techniques. Despite the research there have been few, if any, publications addressing the validation and measurement uncertainty of the technique for forensic applications. This study, the first in a planned series, presents validation data for the measurement of bulk nitrogen isotope ratios in ammonium nitrate (AN) using the DELTA(plus)XP (Thermo Finnigan) IRMS instrument equipped with a ConFlo III interface and FlashEA 1112 elemental analyzer (EA). Appropriate laboratory standards, analytical methods and correction calculations were developed and evaluated. A validation protocol was developed in line with the guidelines provided by the National Association of Testing Authorities, Australia (NATA). Performance characteristics including: accuracy, precision/repeatability, reproducibility/ruggedness, robustness, linear range, and measurement uncertainty were evaluated for the measurement of nitrogen isotope ratios in AN. AN (99.5%) and ammonium thiocyanate (99.99+%) were determined to be the most suitable laboratory standards and were calibrated against international standards (certified reference materials). All performance characteristics were within an acceptable range when potential uncertainties, including the manufacturer's uncertainty of the technique and standards, were taken into account. The experiments described in this article could be used as a model for validation of other instruments for similar purposes. Later studies in this series will address the more general issue of demonstrating that the IRMS technique is scientifically sound and fit-for-purpose in the forensic explosives analysis field.

  6. Investigation of mercury-containing proteins by enriched stable isotopic tracer and size-exclusion chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Junwen [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Feng Weiyue [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]. E-mail: fengwy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Wang Meng [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Fang [Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Bai [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Bing; Zhu Motao [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chai Zhifang [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Institute of Nuclear Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)]|[Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanosafety, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China)

    2007-01-30

    In order to investigate trace mercury-containing proteins in maternal rat and their offspring, a method of enriched stable isotopic tracer ({sup 196}Hg and {sup 198}Hg) combined with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) was developed. Prior to the analysis, {sup 196}Hg- and {sup 198}Hg-enriched methylmercury was administrated to the pregnant rats. Then the mercury-containing proteins in serum and brain cytosol of the dam and pup rats were separated by size-exclusion columns and the mercury was detected by ICP-MS. The ICP-MS spectrogram of the tracing samples showed significantly elevated {sup 196}Hg and {sup 198}Hg isotopic signals compared with the natural ones, indicating that the detection sensitivity could be increased by the tracer method. The contents of mercury in chromatographic fractions of the dam and pup rat brain cytosol were quantitatively estimated by post-column reverse ID-ICP-MS. The quantitative speciation differences of mercury in brain cytosol between the dam and pup rats were observed, indicating that such studies could be useful for toxicological estimation. Additionally, the isotopic ratio measurement of {sup 198}Hg/{sup 202}Hg in the tracing samples could be used to identify the artifact mercury species caused in the analytical procedure. The study demonstrates that the tracer method combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-IDMS could provide reliably qualitative and quantitative information on mercury-containing proteins in organisms.

  7. Estimation of the specific mass effect in the isotope shifts of energy levels in the optical spectrum of Ba I and Ba II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendrill, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A graphical method for separating mass and volume effects from purely optical isotope shift data is presented and compared with King's ''bunching'' method. Recent experimental data on isotope shifts for a wide range of spectral lines in the naturally abundant isotopes of Ba I and Ba II are analysed. Some agreement is found with muonic X-ray data concerning the nuclear size for the isotopes 136, 137 and 138, but there is disagreement (over 20%) for the other isotopes. The level isotope shifts are further parameterised in terms of a linear model, and the specific mass effect is decomposed into sums of one-electron and two-electron shift parameters with respect to the inert-gas like ground state of Ba III. (orig.)

  8. Dansylation isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for parallel profiling of human urinary and fecal submetabolomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xiaoling [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Wang, Nan [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Chen, Deying [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Li, Yunong [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Lu, Yingfeng [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Huan, Tao [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Xu, Wei [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Li, Lanjuan, E-mail: ljli@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory and Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Human urine and feces can be non-invasively collected for metabolomics-based disease biomarker discovery research. Because urinary and fecal metabolomes are thought to be different, analysis of both biospecimens may generate a more comprehensive metabolomic profile that can be better related to the health state of an individual. Herein we describe a method of using differential chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for parallel metabolomic profiling of urine and feces. Dansylation labeling was used to quantify the amine/phenol submetabolome changes among different samples based on {sup 12}C-labeling of individual samples and {sup 13}C-labeling of a pooled urine or pooled feces and subsequent analysis of the {sup 13}C-/{sup 12}C-labeled mixture by LC-MS. The pooled urine and pooled feces are further differentially labeled, mixed and then analyzed by LC-MS in order to relate the metabolite concentrations of the common metabolites found in both biospecimens. This method offers a means of direct comparison of urinary and fecal submetabolomes. We evaluated the analytical performance and demonstrated the utility of this method in the analysis of urine and feces collected daily from three healthy individuals for 7 days. On average, 2534 ± 113 (n = 126) peak pairs or metabolites could be detected from a urine sample, while 2507 ± 77 (n = 63) peak pairs were detected from a fecal sample. In total, 5372 unique peak pairs were detected from all the samples combined; 3089 and 3012 pairs were found in urine and feces, respectively. These results reveal that the urine and fecal metabolomes are very different, thereby justifying the consideration of using both biospecimens to increase the probability of finding specific biomarkers of diseases. Furthermore, the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to perform parallel quantitative analysis of urine and feces, resulting in more complete coverage of the human metabolome

  9. Dansylation isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for parallel profiling of human urinary and fecal submetabolomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Xiaoling; Wang, Nan; Chen, Deying; Li, Yunong; Lu, Yingfeng; Huan, Tao; Xu, Wei; Li, Liang; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Human urine and feces can be non-invasively collected for metabolomics-based disease biomarker discovery research. Because urinary and fecal metabolomes are thought to be different, analysis of both biospecimens may generate a more comprehensive metabolomic profile that can be better related to the health state of an individual. Herein we describe a method of using differential chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for parallel metabolomic profiling of urine and feces. Dansylation labeling was used to quantify the amine/phenol submetabolome changes among different samples based on "1"2C-labeling of individual samples and "1"3C-labeling of a pooled urine or pooled feces and subsequent analysis of the "1"3C-/"1"2C-labeled mixture by LC-MS. The pooled urine and pooled feces are further differentially labeled, mixed and then analyzed by LC-MS in order to relate the metabolite concentrations of the common metabolites found in both biospecimens. This method offers a means of direct comparison of urinary and fecal submetabolomes. We evaluated the analytical performance and demonstrated the utility of this method in the analysis of urine and feces collected daily from three healthy individuals for 7 days. On average, 2534 ± 113 (n = 126) peak pairs or metabolites could be detected from a urine sample, while 2507 ± 77 (n = 63) peak pairs were detected from a fecal sample. In total, 5372 unique peak pairs were detected from all the samples combined; 3089 and 3012 pairs were found in urine and feces, respectively. These results reveal that the urine and fecal metabolomes are very different, thereby justifying the consideration of using both biospecimens to increase the probability of finding specific biomarkers of diseases. Furthermore, the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to perform parallel quantitative analysis of urine and feces, resulting in more complete coverage of the human metabolome. - Highlights: • A

  10. Cellular Lipid Extraction for Targeted Stable Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Mesaros, A. Clementina; Blair, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA), results in the formation of oxidized bioactive lipids, including numerous stereoisomers1,2. These metabolites can be formed from free or esterified fatty acids. Many of these oxidized metabolites have biological activity and have been implicated in various diseases including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, asthma, and cancer3-7. Oxidized bioactive lipids can be formed enzymatically or by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enzymes that metabolize fatty acids include cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO), and cytochromes P450 (CYPs)1,8. Enzymatic metabolism results in enantioselective formation whereas ROS oxidation results in the racemic formation of products. While this protocol focuses primarily on the analysis of AA- and some LA-derived bioactive metabolites; it could be easily applied to metabolites of other fatty acids. Bioactive lipids are extracted from cell lysate or media using liquid-liquid (l-l) extraction. At the beginning of the l-l extraction process, stable isotope internal standards are added to account for errors during sample preparation. Stable isotope dilution (SID) also accounts for any differences, such as ion suppression, that metabolites may experience during the mass spectrometry (MS) analysis9. After the extraction, derivatization with an electron capture (EC) reagent, pentafluorylbenzyl bromide (PFB) is employed to increase detection sensitivity10,11. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is used to increase the selectivity of the MS analysis. Before MS analysis, lipids are separated using chiral normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC conditions are optimized to separate the enantiomers and various stereoisomers of the monitored lipids12. This specific LC-MS method monitors prostaglandins (PGs), isoprostanes (isoPs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), oxoeicosatetraenoic

  11. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Garbak, J.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., 14 C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level 14 C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of 14 C in living things ( 14 C/C = 1.2 x 10 -12 or 110 fmol 14 C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of 14 C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopic elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase 14 C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of 14 C. In each case, the virtual absence of 14 C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low 14 C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM can be oxidized with catalysts in the exhaust stream to further decrease PM. The effectiveness

  12. Mass measurement and structure studies of neutron-rich isotopes of Zn, Ni, Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessagne, P.

    1982-01-01

    With the Orsay MP Tandem, the reaction ( 14 C, 16 O) on 58 - 60 - 62 - 64 Ni, 64 - 66 - 68 - 70 Zn, 74 - 76 Ge and 82 Se targets, and the reaction ( 14 C, 15 O) on 60 - 62 - 64 Ni, 68 - 70 Zn, 76 Ge targets, have been investigated at 72 MeV bombarding energy. The mass excess of neutron rich nuclei: 63 Fe (-55.19+-.06MeV), 69 Ni(-60.14+-.06 MeV), 75 Zn(.62.7+-08 MeV) have been measured for the first time, and those of 62 Fe, 68 Ni, 74 Zn, 80 Ge have been remeasured. A new equipment has been designed in order to perform measurements at zero degree. From the angular distribution around 0 0 for the 70 Zn( 14 C, 16 O) reaction, the first state of 68 Ni observed for the first time (1.77 MeV +- .04 MeV) has been shown to be a 0 + . This result establishes a new case of 2 1+ - 0 2+ inversion. The systematics of the ( 14 C, 16 O) measurements on the even Ni and Zn isotopes have shown a different behaviour with two series. For the Ni → Fe (g.s.) transitions, the ratio σsub(exp)/σsub(DWBA) increases by a factor of four when the neutron number varies from 30 to 36. Whereas for the Zn → Ni (gs) transitions this ratio remains constant for the first three isotopes and decrease by a factor of two when N=40. For the Ni → Fe transitions, axial and spherical symmetries have been used. In agreement with the shell model no change are found with the spherical symmetry. For the axial symmetry a variation is observed but strongly dapendant of the sub-shell. Hence no clear conclusion can be deduced for the cross section estimate. For the Zn → Ni transitions, the spherical symmetry has been used. One configuration prevails, leading to a qualitative agreement with the experimental results [fr

  13. MHD heat and mass diffusion flow by natural convection past a surface embedded in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical study of the transient hydromagnetic natural convection flow past a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium, taking account of the presence of mass diffusion and fluctuating temperature about time at the plate. The governing equations are solved in closed form by the Laplace-transform technique. The results are obtained for temperature, velocity, penetration distance, Nusselt number and skin-friction. The effects of various parameters are discussed on the flow variables and presented by graphs.

  14. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelik, M.L.; Shlomo, S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Tulupov, B.A. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Urin, M.H., E-mail: urin@theor.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The particle–hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in {sup 208}Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron–nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  15. Mass return to the interstellar medium from highly-evolved carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latter, W.B.; Thronson, H.A. Jr.; Hacking, P.; Bally, J.; Black, J.; Bell Telephone Labs. Inc., Holmdel, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    Data produced by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) was surveyed at the mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. Visually-identified carbon stars in the 12/25/60 micron color-color diagram were plotted, along with the location of a number of mass-losing stars that lie near the location of the carbon stars, but are not carbon rich. The final sample consisted of 619 objects, which were estimated to be contaminated by 7 % noncarbon-rich objects. The mass return rate was estimated for all evolved circumstellar envelopes. The IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC) was also searched for the entire class of stars with excess emission. Mass-loss rates, lifetimes, and birthrates for evolved stars were also estimated

  16. Precision mass measurements of very short-lived, neutron-rich Na isotopes using a radiofrequency spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lunney, M D; Doubre, H; Henry, S; Monsanglant, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C; Toader, C F; Borcea, C; Bollen, G

    2001-01-01

    Mass measurements of high precision have been performed on sodium isotopes out to $^{30}$Na using a new technique of radiofrequency excitation of ion trajectories in a homogeneous magnetic field. This method, especially suited to very short-lived nuclides, has allowed us to significantly reduce the uncertainty in mass of the most exotic Na isotopes: a relative error of 5x10$^{-7}$ was achieved for $^{28}$Na having a half-life of only 30.5 ms and 9x10$^{-7}$ for the weakly produced $^{30}$Na. Verifying and minimizing binding energy uncertainties in this region of the nuclear chart is important for clarification of a long standing problem concerning the strength of the $N$=20 magic shell closure. These results are the fruit of the commissioning of the new experimental program Mistral.

  17. Mechanical Design of the Radio-Isotope Source Driver Module for an Initial Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Tri Harjanto; Hendra Prasetia

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy equipment for therapy against cervical cancer is developed by empowering local products. An Iridium-192 with 5 Curies of energy is used. The source is wrapped in a capsule and combined with a wire diameter of 1 mm and length 1800 mm. The therapy is carried out by inserting the radiation source into the patient's body through an applicator. The system for loading-unloading the isotope source is divided into three modules: the source driver module, the source container modules, and channel distributor module. In this paper, the discussion is focused on engineering activities of the first module that serves to drive forward and backward position of the Iridium-192 isotope sources. The activity begins with the development of preliminary design sketches that produces drawings of mechanical components required. Furthermore, the calculations are carried out in order to establish the main component specifications. From this stage, a stepper motor type M66-A50K-G10 as a mechanical driver is chosen. The next stage is developing the detailed design and producing detailed drawings for all components. The fabrication of each component refers to the detailed design drawings. All components are assembled completely into the source driver module. Test also shows that the module works manually well. By rotating the manual handle in both directions, the tip of the wire moves alternately in forward and backward directions. (author)

  18. Mass transport mechanism in the collision of sulphur on medium-weight nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeune, A.; Richert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The reactions of 32 S on 59 Co, 65 Cu, 74 Ge, 79 Br, 85 Rb, 89 Y are studied. An explanation for the specific shape of the double differential cross sections as a function of the scattering angle and the mass asymmetry is given in the framework of a transport model. Conclusions about the reaction mechanism are drawn

  19. An early modern mass medium : The adventures of Cartouche in Dutch penny prints (1700-1900)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salman, J.L.

    2018-01-01

    This article demonstrates the social and cultural significance of eighteenth and nineteenth century Dutch penny prints – one of the first mass media in European history. By using a combination of media and cultural historical approaches (Henry Jenkins, John Fiske) and an anthropological perspective

  20. Determination of trace sulfur in biodiesel and diesel standard reference materials by isotope dilution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amais, Renata S. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Long, Stephen E. [Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Charleston, SC (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Christopher, Steven J., E-mail: steven.christopher@nist.gov [Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-01-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Sulfur mass fractions are measured below 10 mg kg{sup −1} in diesel fuel materials. •SF-ICP-MS resolves molecular interferences, including oxygen and sulfur hydrides. •A detection limit of 0.7 mg kg{sup −1} (in the fuel sample) was obtained. -- Abstract: A method is described for quantification of sulfur at low concentrations on the order of mg kg{sup −1} in biodiesel and diesel fuels using isotope dilution and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-SF-ICP-MS). Closed vessel microwave-assisted digestion was employed using a diluted nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide decomposition medium to reduce sample dilution volumes. Medium resolution mode was employed to eliminate isobaric interferences at {sup 32}S and {sup 34}S related to polyatomic phosphorus and oxygen species, and sulfur hydride species. The method outlined yielded respective limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.7 mg kg{sup −1} S and 2.5 mg kg{sup −1} S (in the sample). The LOD was constrained by instrument background counts at {sup 32}S but was sufficient to facilitate value assignment of total S mass fraction in NIST SRM 2723b Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil at 9.06 ± 0.13 mg kg{sup −1}. No statistically significant difference at a 95% confidence level was observed between the measured and certified values for certified reference materials NIST SRM 2773 B100 Biodiesel (Animal-Based), CENAM DRM 272b and NIST SRM 2723a Sulfur in Diesel Fuel Oil, validating method accuracy.

  1. In-medium reduction of the η' mass √sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sziklai J.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A reduction of the mass of the η' (958 meson may indicate the restoration of the UA(1 symmetry in a hot and dense hadronic matter, corresponding to the return of the 9th, "prodigal" Goldstone boson. We report on an analysis of a combined PHENIX and STAR data set on the intercept parameter of the two-pion Bose-Einstein correlation functions, as measuremed in √sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. To describe this combined PHENIX and STAR dataset, an in-medium η' mass reduction of at least 200 MeV is needed, at the 99.9 % confidence level in a broad model class of resonance multiplicities. Energy, system size and centrality dependence of the observed effect is also discussed.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Ingenol in Euphorbia species via Validated Isotope Dilution Ultra-high Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Béres, T.; Dragull, K.; Pospíšil, Jiří; Tarkowská, Danuše; Dančák, M.; Bíba, Ondřej; Tarkowski, P.; Doležal, K.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2018), s. 23-29 ISSN 0958-0344 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-14007S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Euphorbia genus * ingenol * isotope-dilution method * mass spectrometry * ultra-high performance liquid chromatography Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2016

  3. The problems of geological interpretation of mass spectroscopic isotope ratio data through the example of carbon dioxide genetic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecskes, A.; Izsof, K.; Cornides, I.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of the origin of carbon dioxide occurences in Slovakia is presented to point out the difficulties encountered when the results of mass spectrometric isotope geochemical investigations are to be interpreted. It is shown that two mechanisms may be responsible for the occurence of deep-seated carbon dioxide. The data and their frequency distribution curves indicate the importance of the juvenile CO 2 in this area. (author)

  4. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and environment. SIMS as applied to the detection of stable and radioactive isotopes in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassard-Bouchaud, C.; Escaig, F.; Hallegot, P.

    1984-01-01

    Several marine species of economical interest, Crustacea (crabs and prawns) and Molluscs (common mussels and oysters) were collected from coastal waters of France: English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and of Japan. Microanalyses which were performed at the tissue and cell levels, using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, revealed many contaminants; stable isotopes as well as radioactive actinids such as uranium were detected. Uptake, storage and excretion target organs were identified [fr

  5. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  6. 3D Multi-isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Penetration of 18O-Trehalose in Mouse Sperm Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Lechene, Claude P.; Lee, Gloria Y.; Poczatek, J. Collin; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of genetically engineered mice in medical research has led to ever increasing storage costs. Trehalose has a significant beneficial effect in preserving the developmental potential of mouse sperm following partial desiccation and storage at temperatures above freezing. Using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry, we are able to image and measure trehalose in individual spermatozoa. We provide the first evidence that trehalose penetrates the nucleus of a mammalian cell, permit...

  7. THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM WITH GALAXY VIRIAL MASS: IMPLICATIONS FOR COLD-MODE ACCRETION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2013-02-01

    We apply halo abundance matching to obtain galaxy virial masses, M{sub h}, and radii, R{sub vir}, for 183 'isolated' galaxies from the 'Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog'. All galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts (0.07 {<=} z {<=} 1.12) and their circumgalactic medium (CGM) is probed in Mg II absorption within projected galactocentric distances D {<=} 200 kpc. We examine the behavior of equivalent width, W{sub r} (2796), and covering fraction, f{sub c} , as a function of D, D/R{sub vir}, and M{sub h}. Bifurcating the sample at the median mass log M{sub h}/M{sub Sun} = 12, we find (1) systematic segregation of M{sub h} on the W{sub r} (2796)-D plane (4.0{sigma}); high-mass halos are found at higher D with larger W{sub r} (2796) compared to low-mass halos. On the W{sub r} (2796)-D/R{sub vir} plane, mass segregation vanishes and we find W{sub r} (2796){proportional_to}(D/R{sub vir}){sup -2} (8.9{sigma}). (2) High-mass halos have larger f{sub c} at a given D, whereas f{sub c} is independent of M{sub h} at all D/R{sub vir}. (3) f{sub c} is constant with M{sub h} over the range 10.7 {<=} log M{sub h}/M{sub Sun} {<=} 13.9 within a given D or D/R{sub vir}. The combined results suggest the Mg II absorbing CGM is self-similar with halo mass, even above log M{sub h}/M{sub Sun} {approx_equal} 12, where cold mode accretion is predicted to be quenched. If theory is correct, either outflows or sub-halos must contribute to absorption in high-mass halos such that low- and high-mass halos are observationally indistinguishable using Mg II absorption strength once impact parameter is scaled by halo mass. Alternatively, the data may indicate predictions of a universal shut down of cold-mode accretion in high-mass halos may require revision.

  8. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  9. Comparison of mass-spectrometry and α-counting in analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irleweck, K.; Pichlmayer, F.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of trace amounts of U and Pu isotopes is of interest in environmental and personal monitoring programmes. Commonly after preconcentration and separation of the radionuclides a proper sample is prepared electrolytically and the measurements are performed by alpha spectrometry. Some investigations on uranium isotopic abundances and on plutonium fallout deposition in soil have been carried out in this way. It is impossible to distinguish between the isotopes 239 Pu and 240 Pu by alpha spectrometry, however, because their α-energies are too close together. Such determinations can only be carried out by mass spectrometry. Specific Pu emissions, e.g. from nuclear production plants, can be discriminated from the global fallout level. Mass spectrometry is the more sensitive method for measuring long-lived nuclides compared with α-spectrometry. In the case of soil analysis, however, Pu detection is obstructed by the high natural uranium content, usually in the range 0.2 to 2.0 ppm which exceeds the trace amounts of plutonium by several orders of magnitude. This work describes a chemical procedure which separates U/Pu sufficiently for alpha spectrometry as well as for mass spectrometry, and compares results of environmental analysis applying both methods. (author)

  10. Validation of methods to measure uranium isotopes using magnetic sector mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, H.; Rios L, M. J.; Romero G, E. T.

    2017-10-01

    The mass spectrometry technique with inductively coupled plasma source (Icp-Ms) has been widely used to measure isotopic ratios of elements toxic to human health. Reason for which, in this work several measurement methods for the analysis of uranium isotopes in different matrices were implemented using magnetic sector mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma source (Icp-SFMS). Groundwater, sediment, soil and urine were the matrices analyzed, which were supplied by intercomparison tests conducted by the IAEA and Association for the Promotion of Quality Control of Medical Biology Analysis in Radio-toxicology. The procedures used in the treatment of soil, sediment and water samples were based on US EPA methods. In the case of the urine sample, the preparation was rapid (1:20 dilution). The average of the results obtained in yield of each matrix was 94, 71, 72 and 78% for water, urine, soil and sediment respectively. In addition, the precision in terms of standard relative deviation was less than 5% and the accuracy was less than 4%. In conclusion, the Icp-SFMS is a very sensitive technique for measuring isotopes of U in different matrices. However, careful tuning is necessary, especially in the mass regions of interest 234, 235 and 238 if an external quantification is considered using natural U solutions. (Author)

  11. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of uranium hexafluoride by double standard single-collector gas mass spectrometer method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This is a quantitative test method applicable to determining the mass percent of uranium isotopes in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) samples with 235U concentrations between 0.1 and 5.0 mass %. 1.2 This test method may be applicable for the entire range of 235U concentrations for which adequate standards are available. 1.3 This test method is for analysis by a gas magnetic sector mass spectrometer with a single collector using interpolation to determine the isotopic concentration of an unknown sample between two characterized UF6 standards. 1.4 This test method is to replace the existing test method currently published in Test Methods C761 and is used in the nuclear fuel cycle for UF6 isotopic analyses. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appro...

  12. Development of chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for silkworm hemolymph metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Weifeng; Han, Wei; Li, Yunong; Meng, Zhiqi; Cai, Leiming; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a very useful target insect for evaluation of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs) due to mature breeding techniques, complete endocrine system and broad basic knowledge on developmental biology. Comparative metabolomics of silkworms with and without EDC exposure offers another dimension of studying EDCs. In this work, we report a workflow on metabolomic profiling of silkworm hemolymph based on high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and demonstrate its application in studying the metabolic changes associated with the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure in silkworm. Hemolymph samples were taken from mature silkworms after growing on diet that contained DDT at four different concentrations (1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.001 ppm) as well as on diet without DDT as controls. They were subjected to differential "1"2C-/"1"3C-dansyl labeling of the amine/phenol submetabolome, LC-UV quantification of the total amount of labeled metabolites for sample normalization, and LC-MS detection and relative quantification of individual metabolites in comparative samples. The total concentration of labeled metabolites did not show any significant change between four DDT-treatment groups and one control group. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolome data set showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the five groups. Out of the 2044 detected peak pairs, 338 and 1471 metabolites have been putatively identified against the HMDB database and the EML library, respectively. 65 metabolites were identified by the dansyl library searching based on the accurate mass and retention time. Among the 65 identified metabolites, 33 positive metabolites had changes of greater than 1.20-fold or less than 0.83-fold in one or more groups with p-value of smaller than 0.05. Several useful biomarkers including serine, methionine, tryptophan, asymmetric dimethylarginine, N

  13. Development of chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for silkworm hemolymph metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Weifeng [Key Laboratory of Detection for Pesticide Residues, Ministry of Agriculture (China); Sericultural Research Institute, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Han, Wei; Li, Yunong [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Meng, Zhiqi [Sericultural Research Institute, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Cai, Leiming, E-mail: cailm@mail.zaas.ac.cn [Institute of Quality and Standard for Agro-products, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-10-26

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a very useful target insect for evaluation of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs) due to mature breeding techniques, complete endocrine system and broad basic knowledge on developmental biology. Comparative metabolomics of silkworms with and without EDC exposure offers another dimension of studying EDCs. In this work, we report a workflow on metabolomic profiling of silkworm hemolymph based on high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and demonstrate its application in studying the metabolic changes associated with the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure in silkworm. Hemolymph samples were taken from mature silkworms after growing on diet that contained DDT at four different concentrations (1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.001 ppm) as well as on diet without DDT as controls. They were subjected to differential {sup 12}C-/{sup 13}C-dansyl labeling of the amine/phenol submetabolome, LC-UV quantification of the total amount of labeled metabolites for sample normalization, and LC-MS detection and relative quantification of individual metabolites in comparative samples. The total concentration of labeled metabolites did not show any significant change between four DDT-treatment groups and one control group. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolome data set showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the five groups. Out of the 2044 detected peak pairs, 338 and 1471 metabolites have been putatively identified against the HMDB database and the EML library, respectively. 65 metabolites were identified by the dansyl library searching based on the accurate mass and retention time. Among the 65 identified metabolites, 33 positive metabolites had changes of greater than 1.20-fold or less than 0.83-fold in one or more groups with p-value of smaller than 0.05. Several useful biomarkers including serine, methionine, tryptophan, asymmetric dimethylarginine, N

  14. Isotopic analysis of calcium in blood plasma and bone from mouse samples by multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Takafumi; Tanoshima, Mina; Suga, Akinobu; Tanaka, Yu-ki; Nagata, Yuichi; Shinohara, Atsuko; Chiba, Momoko

    2008-01-01

    The biological processing of Ca produces significant stable isotope fractionation. The level of isotopic fractionation can provide key information about the variation in dietary consumption or Ca metabolism. To investigate this, we measured the 43 Ca/ 42 Ca and 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratios for bone and blood plasma samples collected from mice of various ages using multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratio in bones was significantly (0.44 - 0.84 per mille) lower than the corresponding ratios in the diet, suggesting that Ca was isotopically fractionated during Ca metabolism for bone formation. The resulting 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratios for blood plasma showed almost identical, or slightly higher, values (0.03 - 0.2 per mille) than found in a corresponding diet. This indicates that a significant amount of Ca in the blood plasma was from dietary sources. Unlike that discovered for Fe, there were not significant differences in the measured 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratios between female and male specimens (for either bone or blood plasma samples). Similarity, the 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratios suggests that there were no significant differences in Ca dietary consumption or Ca metabolism between female and male specimens. In contrast, the 44 Ca/ 42 Ca ratios of blood plasma from mother mice during the lactation period were significantly higher than those for all other adult specimens. This suggests that Ca supplied to infants through lactation was isotopically lighter, and the preferential supply of isotropically lighter Ca resulted in isotopically heavier Ca in blood plasma of mother mice during the lactation period. The data obtained here clearly demonstrate that the Ca isotopic ratio has a potential to become a new tool for evaluating changes in dietary consumption, or Ca metabolism of animals. (author)

  15. The potential of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) and gas chromatography-IRMS analysis of triacetone triperoxide in forensic explosives investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, K.D.B.; Koeberg, M.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Driel, C.A. va; Blaga, C.; Bruinsma, J.; Asten, A.C. van

    2016-01-01

    Studying links between triacetone triperoxide (TATP) samples from crime scenes and suspects can assist in criminal investigations. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and gas chromatography (GC)-IRMS were used to measure the isotopic compositions of TATP and its precursors acetone and hydrogen

  16. Development of versatile isotopic labeling reagents for profiling the amine submetabolome by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ruokun; Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two new reagents were developed for chemical isotope labeling mass spectrometry (MS). • They could be used to label amine-containing metabolites in a metabolomic sample. • The labeled metabolites could be detected with much improved sensitivity in MS. • One of the reagents could also help generate useful MS/MS spectra for structural analysis. • These reagents should be useful for quantitative metabolomics. - Abstract: Metabolomic profiling involves relative quantification of metabolites in comparative samples and identification of the significant metabolites that differentiate different groups (e.g., diseased vs. controls). Chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is an enabling technique that can provide improved metabolome coverage and metabolite quantification. However, chemical identification of labeled metabolites can still be a challenge. In this work, a new set of isotopic labeling reagents offering versatile properties to enhance both detection and identification are described. They were prepared by a glycine molecule (or its isotopic counterpart) and an aromatic acid with varying structures through a simple three-step synthesis route. In addition to relatively low costs of synthesizing the reagents, this reaction route allows adjusting reagent property in accordance with the desired application objective. To date, two isotopic reagents, 4-dimethylaminobenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (DBAA-NHS) and 4-methoxybenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (MBAA-NHS), for labeling the amine-containing metabolites (i.e., amine submetabolome) have been synthesized. The labeling conditions and the related LC–MS method have been optimized. We demonstrate that DBAA labeling can increase the metabolite detectability because of the presence of an electrospray ionization (ESI)-active dimethylaminobenzoyl group. On the other hand, MBAA labeled metabolites can be fragmented

  17. Development of versatile isotopic labeling reagents for profiling the amine submetabolome by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ruokun; Huan, Tao; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Two new reagents were developed for chemical isotope labeling mass spectrometry (MS). • They could be used to label amine-containing metabolites in a metabolomic sample. • The labeled metabolites could be detected with much improved sensitivity in MS. • One of the reagents could also help generate useful MS/MS spectra for structural analysis. • These reagents should be useful for quantitative metabolomics. - Abstract: Metabolomic profiling involves relative quantification of metabolites in comparative samples and identification of the significant metabolites that differentiate different groups (e.g., diseased vs. controls). Chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is an enabling technique that can provide improved metabolome coverage and metabolite quantification. However, chemical identification of labeled metabolites can still be a challenge. In this work, a new set of isotopic labeling reagents offering versatile properties to enhance both detection and identification are described. They were prepared by a glycine molecule (or its isotopic counterpart) and an aromatic acid with varying structures through a simple three-step synthesis route. In addition to relatively low costs of synthesizing the reagents, this reaction route allows adjusting reagent property in accordance with the desired application objective. To date, two isotopic reagents, 4-dimethylaminobenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (DBAA-NHS) and 4-methoxybenzoylamido acetic acid N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester (MBAA-NHS), for labeling the amine-containing metabolites (i.e., amine submetabolome) have been synthesized. The labeling conditions and the related LC–MS method have been optimized. We demonstrate that DBAA labeling can increase the metabolite detectability because of the presence of an electrospray ionization (ESI)-active dimethylaminobenzoyl group. On the other hand, MBAA labeled metabolites can be fragmented

  18. Estimation of Plutonium-240 Mass in Waste Tanks Using Ultra-Sensitive Detection of Radioactive Xenon Isotopes from Spontaneous Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, Theodore W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gesh, Christopher J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Daniel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johns, Jesse M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lukins, Craig D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meacham, Joseph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendoza, Donaldo P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olsen, Khris B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prinke, Amanda M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reid, Bruce D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevigny, Gary J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Woods, Vincent T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-24

    This report details efforts to develop a technique which is able to detect and quantify the mass of 240Pu in waste storage tanks and other enclosed spaces. If the isotopic ratios of the plutonium contained in the enclosed space is also known, then this technique is capable of estimating the total mass of the plutonium without physical sample retrieval and radiochemical analysis of hazardous material. Results utilizing this technique are reported for a Hanford Site waste tank (TX-118) and a well-characterized plutonium sample in a laboratory environment.

  19. The odd-proton effects on the potential energy surfaces of odd mass Tl, Au, Ir and Re isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    De Wieclawik, W; Larsson, S E; Leander, G; Vieu, C; Dionisio, J S

    1976-01-01

    The total potential energy surfaces of thallium, gold, iridium and rhenium odd mass isotopes are calculated microscopically as functions of the quadrupole deformation, epsilon /sub 2/, when the odd protons occupy definite orbitals. The nuclear shapes and the static equilibrium deformations of these nuclei are deduced from the results of these calculations for the proton orbitals nearest to the Fermi level. The influence of the hexadecapole deformation, epsilon /sub 4/, on these results is investigated too. Finally, a few experimental data available for these odd mass nuclei are correlated to the corresponding theoretical results. (16 refs).

  20. Design of a compact thermal ionization mass spectrometer for isotopic ratio measurement of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Ravisankar, E.; Nataraju, V.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio analysis of materials of interest in nuclear and geological applications is carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) technique. One of the important mandates of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been developing these instruments and several TIMS instruments have been developed and deployed at user sites covering a wide range material of interest relevant to various stages of the nuclear power cycle. The instrument designs for above applications are based on two geometries of magnetic sector ie., 15 cm sector radius and 30 cm sector radius with resolutions as 200 and 400 respectively. There has been a conscious effort to improve the the sensitivity and precision of these models by modifying the designs of the sub-systems. In the recent past, a new ion optical element viz., variable dispersion zoom optics (VDZO) was introduced in the collector system of the standard model with 30cm radius magnet, to increase the dispersion of the ion beams which enabled to fix the locations of the Faraday cups (upto 6 nos.) instead of the conventional movable ones. After establishing the usefulness of VDZO, an attempt is being made to design and develop a 20 cm magnet based TIMS which will have a much smaller foot print compared to the standard 30 cm model and also covers the usual range of elements (viz. Li - U). The ion optical design was optimized using computer simulations with SIMION 7.0 software and subsequently the mechanical design was carried out using Autocad computer software. Some of the details of this new design are presented in this abstract

  1. The COS-Halos survey: physical conditions and baryonic mass in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Tumlinson, Jason; Peeples, Molly S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Thom, Christopher; Bordoloi, Rongmon [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lehner, Nicolas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States); O' Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael' s College, Colchester, VT (United States); Ford, Amanda Brady [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Davé, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Weinberg, David H., E-mail: jwerk@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T ∼10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of L ∼ L* galaxies at z ∼ 0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n {sub H} {sub II}/n {sub H} ≳ 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background. Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R {sub vir}, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n {sub H} = (10{sup –4.2±0.25})(R/R {sub vir}){sup –0.8±0.3}. Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the H I column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M{sub CGM}{sup cool}>6.5×10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} for the volume within R < R {sub vir}. Allowing for an additional warm-hot, O VI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} scale.

  2. Realization of an electromagnetic isotope separator. Application to the isotopes of the mass 93 from the molybdenum and the technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, R.

    1954-07-01

    Analysis of focusing properties of a homogeneous magnetic field leads the author to use a magnetic sector of 60 deg, for the realization of an electromagnetic separator. The sources of realized ions provide ionic debits of 10 mA. The currents ionic detached isotopes to the collector vary from 1 to 5 mA. The separation efficiency is of 125 for a current collected of 1 mA. A survey of the neutralization of the space charge permitted to specify the role of the negative ions in this phenomenon. A method of neutralization of the space charge is proposed and gave excellent results. A report will be given of the separations of some elements: mercury, bromine, thorium, etc... The application of the separator to the study of the isomeric transfers in the molybdenum and the technetium permitted to assign definitely for 93 Mo and 93 Tc two radiances γ of respective energies 260 and 390 keV. A new process of fast chemical separation Mo/Tc is described. (author) [fr

  3. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdré S.

    2014-03-01

    Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100 models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  4. Determination of the Isotope Ratio for Metal Samples Using a Laser Ablation/Ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Cha, Hyung Ki; Kim, Duk Hyeon; Min, Ki Hyun

    2004-01-01

    The laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is applied to the isotopic analysis of solid samples using a home-made instrument. The technique is convenient for solid sample analysis due to the onestep process of vaporization and ionization of the samples. The analyzed samples were lead, cadmium, molybdenum, and ytterbium. To optimize the analytical conditions of the technique, several parameters, such as laser energy, laser wavelength, size of the laser beam on the samples surface, and high voltages applied on the ion source electrodes were varied. Low energy of laser light was necessary to obtain the optimal mass resolution of spectra. The 532 nm light generated mass spectra with the higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with the 355 nm light. The best mass resolution obtained in the present study is ∼1,500 for the ytterbium

  5. Precision mass measurements on neutron-rich Zn isotopes and their consequences on the astrophysical r-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruah, Sudarshan

    2008-07-15

    The rapid neutron-capture or the r-process is responsible for the origin of about half of the neutron-rich atomic nuclei in the universe heavier than iron. For the calculation of the abundances of those nuclei, atomic masses are required as one of the input parameters with very high precision. In the present work, the masses of the neutron rich Zn isotopes (A=71 to 81) lying in the r-process path have been measured in the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN. The mass of {sup 81}Zn has been measured directly for the rst time. The half-lives of the nuclides ranged from 46.5 h ({sup 72}Zn) down to 290 ms ({sup 81}Zn). In case of all the nuclides, the relative mass uncertainty ({delta}m=m) achieved was in the order of 10{sup -8} corresponding to a 100-fold improvement in precision over previous measurements. (orig.)

  6. Precision mass measurements on neutron-rich Zn isotopes and their consequences on the astrophysical r-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, Sudarshan

    2008-07-01

    The rapid neutron-capture or the r-process is responsible for the origin of about half of the neutron-rich atomic nuclei in the universe heavier than iron. For the calculation of the abundances of those nuclei, atomic masses are required as one of the input parameters with very high precision. In the present work, the masses of the neutron rich Zn isotopes (A=71 to 81) lying in the r-process path have been measured in the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN. The mass of 81 Zn has been measured directly for the rst time. The half-lives of the nuclides ranged from 46.5 h ( 72 Zn) down to 290 ms ( 81 Zn). In case of all the nuclides, the relative mass uncertainty (Δm=m) achieved was in the order of 10 -8 corresponding to a 100-fold improvement in precision over previous measurements. (orig.)

  7. JASPAS programme task JC-4: Isotopic and isotope dilution analysis of spent fuel solutions by resin bead mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Terakado, S.; Kuno, Y.

    1988-05-01

    The use of resin beads for mass spectrometry of U and Pu has been extensively developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA and tested in a number of intercomparison experiments between the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) of the IAEA and the Power Reactor and Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) - Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) in Japan. Resin beads represent a convenient way to concentrate the U and Pu in spent fuel dissolver solution samples from reprocessing facilities, with the added advantage that fission product elements and other actinides such as Am are removed. Measurements on the resin bead samples at SAL were performed on the ORNL-designed 2-Stage Mass Spectrometer. For the dried tracer samples, the U measurements were obtained on the VG54E instrument and the Pu results were obtained with the Finnigan MAT 261 of SAL. PNC/TRP used a VG54 mass spectrometer and obtained their mass fractionation correction factor for the resin bead measurements from the mixed tracer plus chemical standard resin bead samples. The Safeguards Laboratory (NMCC) used their MAT 260 instrument and obtained the fractionation correction factor from resin bead standards provided with the TIGR-82 programme. Both PNC/TRP and NMCC reported problems with obtaining a sufficient ion beam intensity with the resin bead samples. This problem was overcome by both labs and further improvements in the loading and measurement techniques can be expected to yield even better results. It has been demonstrated that the resin bed sampling method can provide results of sufficient quality for safeguards purposes. 2 refs, 3 figs, 16 tabs

  8. ISOTOPE-DILUTION AMMONIA CHEMICAL-IONIZATION MASS FRAGMENTOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF URINARY 3-O-METHYLATED CATECHOLAMINE METABOLITES - RAPID SAMPLE CLEANUP BY DERIVATIZATION AND EXTRACTION OF LYOPHILIZED SAMPLES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KEMA, IP; MEIBORG, G; NAGEL, GT; STOB, GJ; MUSKIET, FAJ

    1993-01-01

    We developed a method for simultaneous quantification of the urinary 3-O-methylated catecholamine metabolites 3-methoxytyramine, normetanephrine and metanephrine by stable isotope-dilution ammonia chemical ionization mass fragmentography. Prepurification of lyophilized samples was done by

  9. Direct measurement of burn up monitor by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) followed by Isotopic Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajimol, R.; Manoravi, P.; NaIini, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Joseph, M.

    2012-01-01

    Burn-up measurement is an important aspect in the assessment of fuel performance especially for experimental nuclear fuels. Conventional mass spectrometric technique offer the best accuracy for determination of burn-up but they suffer from the labour intensive and time consuming chemical separation procedures followed by mass spectrometric analysis. Our laboratory has reported a potential laser mass spectrometric technique with advantages of (i) direct and fast measurement of ion intensities of selected rare earth element and residual heavy element atoms to deduce burn up and (ii) adaptability to remote handling of radioactive samples. Direct quantification of burn up monitor element in fuel in the form of pellet as well as liquid was probed by pulsed laser deposition followed by Isotopic Dilution Mass Spectrometric technique (IDMS). The procedure involving laser ablation of heavy element (namely U and Pu) and fission product (Nd, La etc) from a simulated spent fuel matrix followed by isotopic dilution mass spectrometry using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been presently attempted to arrive at the rare earth element to heavy element ratio to deduce burn up using the methodology described in our earlier work. The details of IDMS technique has been reviewed by Heumann et al. Accurately weighed amounts of major rare earth fission products such as Nd, La, Ce and Sm in solution form were mixed with known quantity of uranium solution (all the weights are corresponding to their fission yields and the residual heavy element atoms after a given burn up) and mixed together to attain uniformity. The solution is then dried and resulting powder was pelletized and sintered. Subsequently, the pellet was ablated with pulsed laser (8 ns, 532 nm, Nd-YAG) and the plume was deposited on a glass plate. This deposit was dissolved in minimum amount of nitric acid. A known volume of the solution was mixed with spike (for e.g., 150 Nd/ 142 Nd, 233 U/ 238 U in this study

  10. The selenium isotopic variations in chondrites are mass-dependent; Implications for sulfide formation in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; König, S.; Kurzawa, T.; Yierpan, A.; Schoenberg, R.

    2018-01-01

    Element transfer from the solar nebular gas to solids occurred either through direct condensation or via heterogeneous reactions between gaseous molecules and previously condensed solid matter. The precursors of altered sulfides observed in chondrites are for example attributed to reactions between gaseous hydrogen sulfide and metallic iron grains. The transfer of selenium to solids likely occurred through a similar pathway, allowing the formation of iron selenides concomitantly with sulfides. The formation rate of sulfide however remains difficult to assess. Here we investigate whether the Se isotopic composition of meteorites contributes to constrain sulfide formation during condensation stages of our solar system. We present high precision Se concentration and δ 82 / 78 Se data for 23 chondrites as well as the first δ 74 / 78 Se , δ 76 / 78 Se and δ 77 / 78 Se data for a sub-set of seven chondrites. We combine our dataset with previously published sulfur isotopic data and discuss aspects of sulfide formation for various types of chondrites. Our Se concentration data are within uncertainty to literature values and are consistent with sulfides being the dominant selenium host in chondrites. Our overall average δ 82 / 78 Se value for chondrites is - 0.21 ± 0.43 ‰ (n = 23, 2 s.d.), or - 0.14 ± 0.21 ‰ after exclusion of three weathered chondrites (n = 20, 2 s.d.). These average values are within uncertainty indistinguishable from a previously published estimate. For the first time however, we resolve distinct δ 82 / 78 Se between ordinary (- 0.14 ± 0.07 ‰, n = 9, 2 s.d.), enstatite (- 0.27 ± 0.05 ‰, n = 3, 2 s.d.) and CI carbonaceous chondrites (- 0.01 ± 0.06 ‰, n = 2, 2 s.d.). We also resolve a Se isotopic variability among CM carbonaceous chondrites. In addition, we report on δ 74 / 78 Se , δ 76 / 78 Se and δ 77 / 78 Se values determined for 7 chondrites. Our data allow evaluating the mass dependency of the δ 82 / 78 Se variations. Mass

  11. Determination of uranium in urine - measurement of isotope ratios and quantification by use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krystek, P.; Ritsema, R.

    2002-01-01

    For analysis of uranium in urine determination of the isotope ratio and quantification were investigated by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). The instrument used (ThermoFinniganMAT ELEMENT2) is a single-collector MS and, therefore, a stable sample-introduction system was chosen. The methodical set-up was optimized to achieve the best precision for both the isotope ratio and the total uranium concentration in the urine matrix.Three spiked urine samples from an European interlaboratory comparison were analyzed to determine the 235 U/ 238 U isotope ratio. The ratio was found to be in the range 0.002116 to 0.007222, the latter being the natural uranium isotope ratio. The first ratio indicates the abundance of depleted uranium.The effect of storage conditions and the stability for the matrix urine were investigated by using ''real-life'' urine samples from unexposed persons in the Netherlands. For samples stored under refrigeration and acidified the results (range 0.8 to 5.3 ng L -1 U) were in the normal fluctuation range whereas a decrease in uranium concentration was observed for samples stored at room temperature without acidification. (orig.)

  12. Using Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry to Determine the Fractionation Factor for H2 Production by Hydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hui; Ghandi, H.; Shi, Liang; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2, and they are key enzymes in the biological cycling of H2. H isotopes should be a very useful tool in quantifying proton trafficking in biological H2 production processes, but there are several obstacles that have thus far limited the use of this tool. In this manuscript, we describe a new method that overcomes some of these barriers and is specifically designed to measure isotopic fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed H2 evolution. A key feature of this technique is that purified hydrogenases are employed, allowing precise control over the reaction conditions and therefore a high level of precision. A custom-designed high-throughput gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometer is employed to measure the isotope ratio of the H2. Using this method, we determined that the fractionation factor of H2 production by the (NiFe)-hydrogenase from Desulfivibrio fructosovran is 0.27. This result indicates that, as expected, protons are highly favored over deuterons during H2 evolution. Potential applications of this new method are discussed.

  13. The IDA-80 measurement evaluation programme on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis of uranium and plutonium. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Golly, W.; Spannagel, G.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.; Bievre, P. de; Wolters, W.

    1984-12-01

    The main objective was the acquisition of basic data on the uncertainties involved in the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis as applied to the determination of uranium and plutonium in active feed solutions of reprocessing plants. The element concentrations and isotopic compositions of all test materials used were determined by CBNM and NBS with high accuracy. The more than 60000 analytical data reported by the participating laboratories were evaluated by statistical methods applied mainly to the calculation of estimates of the variances for the different uncertainty components contributing to the total uncertainty of this analytical technique. Attention was given to such topics as sample ageing, influence of fission products, spike calibration, ion fractionation, Pu-241 decay correction, minor isotope measurement and errors in data transfer. Furthermore, the performance of the 'dried sample' technique and the 'in-situ' spiking method of undiluted samples of reprocessing fuel solution with U-235/Pu-242 metal alloy spikes, were tested successfully. Considerable improvement of isotope dilution analysis in this safeguards relevant application during the last decade is shown as compared to the results obtained in the IDA-72 interlaboratory experiment, organized by KfK in 1972 on the same subject. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Direct determination of mercury in cosmetic samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after dissolution with formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ying; Shi, Zeming; Zong, Qinxia; Wu, Peng; Su, Jing [Sichuan Provincial Key Laboratory of Nuclear Technology in Geology, College of Nuclear Technology and Automation Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liur.ray@gmail.com [Mineral Resources Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, sensitive, and accurate method is established for mercury determination in cosmetics. •The sample preparation procedure is highly simplified. •Isotope dilution efficiently eliminates matrix effect. •First report of using formic acid based method in combination with PVG-ID-ICP MS for mercury quantitation in cosmetics. -- Abstract: A new method was proposed for the accurate determination of mercury in cosmetic samples based on isotopic dilution (ID)-photochemical vapor generation (PVG)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) measurement. Cosmetic samples were directly dissolved in formic acid solution and subsequently subjected to PVG for the reduction of mercury into vapor species following by ICP MS detection. Therefore, the risks of analyte contamination and loss were avoided. Highly enriched {sup 201}Hg isotopic spike is added to cosmetics and the isotope ratios of {sup 201}Hg/{sup 202}Hg were measured for the quantitation of mercury. With ID calibration, the influences originating from sample matrixes for the determination of mercury in cosmetic samples have been efficiently eliminated. The effects of several experimental parameters, such as the concentration of the formic acid, and the flow rates of carrier gas and sample were investigated. The method provided good reproducibility and the detection limits were found to be 0.6 pg mL{sup −1}. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of mercury in six cosmetic samples and a spike test was performed to verify the accuracy of the method.

  15. A miniaturized laser-ablation mass spectrometer for in-situ measurements of isotope composition on solar body surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Tulej, M.; Neuland, M.; Bieler, A.; Iakovleva, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The in-situ analysis of extraterrestrial material onboard planetary rovers and landers is of considerable interest for future planetary space missions. Due to the low detection sensitivity of spectroscopic instruments, e.g. α-particle X-ray, γ-ray or neutron spectrometers, it is frequently possible to measure only major/minor elements in extraterrestrial materials. Nevertheless, the knowledge of minor/trace elements is of considerable interest to cosmochemistry. Chemistry puts constraints on the origin of solar system and its evolution enabling also a deeper inside to planetary transformation processes (e.g. volcanic surface alteration, space weathering). The isotopes play special role in analysis of the origin and transformation of planetary matter. They are robust tracers of the early events because their abundances are less disturbed as the elemental once. Nevertheless, if the isotope abundance ratios are fractionated, the underlying chemical and physical processes can be then encoded from the variations of abundance ratios. A detailed analysis of isotopic patterns of radiogenic elements can allow age dating of minerals and temporal evolution of planetary matter. High accuracy and sensitive measurements of isotopic pattern of bio-relevant elements, i.e., sulfur, found on planetary surfaces can be helpful for the identification of possible past and present extraterrestrial life in terms of biomarker identification. Our group has designed a self-optimizing miniaturized laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS) for in situ planetary measurements (Wurz et al., 2012; Rohner et al., 2003). Initial studies utilizing IR laser radiation for ablation, atomization and ionization of solid materials indicated a high instrumental performance in terms of sensitivity and mass resolution (Tulej et al., 2011). Current studies are conducted with a UV radiation and a high spatial resolution is achieved by focussing the laser beam to 20µm spots onto the sample. The

  16. Compound-Specific Chlorine Isotope Analysis of Tetrachloromethane and Trichloromethane by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry vs Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry: Method Development and Evaluation of Precision and Trueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Benjamin; Rodríguez-Fernández, Diana; Torrentó, Clara; Meyer, Armin; Palau, Jordi; Domènech, Cristina; Rosell, Mònica; Soler, Albert; Hunkeler, Daniel; Elsner, Martin

    2017-03-21

    Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of tetrachloromethane (CCl 4 ) and trichloromethane (CHCl 3 ) was explored by both, gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) and GC-quadrupole MS (GC-qMS), where GC-qMS was validated in an interlaboratory comparison between Munich and Neuchâtel with the same type of commercial GC-qMS instrument. GC-IRMS measurements analyzed CCl isotopologue ions, whereas GC-qMS analyzed the isotopologue ions CCl 3 , CCl 2 , CCl (of CCl 4 ) and CHCl 3 , CHCl 2 , CHCl (of CHCl 3 ), respectively. Lowest amount dependence (good linearity) was obtained (i) in H-containing fragment ions where interference of 35 Cl- to 37 Cl-containing ions was avoided; (ii) with tuning parameters favoring one predominant rather than multiple fragment ions in the mass spectra. Optimized GC-qMS parameters (dwell time 70 ms, 2 most abundant ions) resulted in standard deviations of 0.2‰ (CHCl 3 ) and 0.4‰ (CCl 4 ), which are only about twice as large as 0.1‰ and 0.2‰ for GC-IRMS. To compare also the trueness of both methods and laboratories, samples from CCl 4 and CHCl 3 degradation experiments were analyzed and calibrated against isotopically different reference standards for both CCl 4 and CHCl 3 (two of each). Excellent agreement confirms that true results can be obtained by both methods provided that a consistent set of isotopically characterized reference materials is used.

  17. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds.

  18. Quarkonium spectral function in medium at next-to-leading order for any quark mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnier, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    The vector channel spectral function at zero spatial momentum is calculated at next-to-leading order in thermal QCD for any quark mass. It corresponds to the imaginary part of the massive quark contribution to the photon polarisation tensor. The spectrum shows a well-defined transport peak in contrast to both the heavy quark limit studied previously, where the low frequency domain is exponentially suppressed at this order, and the naive massless case where it vanishes at leading order and diverges at next-to-leading order. From our general expressions, the massless limit can be taken and we show that no divergences occur if done carefully. Finally, we compare the massless limit to results from lattice simulations. (orig.)

  19. Classifying wine according to geographical origin via quadrupole-based ICP-mass spectrometry measurements of boron isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coetzee, Paul P. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Chemistry, Johannesburg (South Africa); Vanhaecke, Frank [Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2005-11-01

    The potential of quadrupole-based ICP-MS as a tool for B-isotopic analysis of wines and its usefulness in provenance determinations were assessed. A precision of 0.1-0.25% RSD (corresponding to a relative standard deviation of the mean of three replicate measurements of 0.06-0.12%) was sufficient to establish small differences in the B isotope ratios in wines from different geographical origins. Each sample measurement was bracketed by measurements of a standard and mass bias drift correction made by interpolation. Sample preparation was kept to a minimum to avoid possible fractionation. Dilution of the wine samples by a factor of 100 with 0.65% HNO{sub 3} was found to reduce matrix-induced mass discrimination substantially. Wines from three wine-producing regions, Stellenbosch, Robertson, and Swartland, in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and wines from specific regions in France (Bergerac) and Italy (Valpolicella) were analyzed by ICP-QMS for their B-isotopic compositions. It was concluded that the {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios can be used to characterize wines from different geographical origins. Average {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios in red wines from South Africa (Stellenbosch), France (Bergerac), and Italy (Valpolicella) were found to differ by between 0.5 and 1.5%. (orig.)

  20. Identification of fission-like events in the 16O + 181Ta system: Mass and isotopic yield distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kumar, R.; Golda, K. S.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, nuclear reaction cross sections for 24 fission-like fragments (30≤Z≤60) have been measured for the 6.5 MeV/A 16 O + 181 Ta system. The recoil-catcher activation technique was employed followed by off-line γ spectroscopy. The isotopic yield distributions for yttrium and indium isotopes have been obtained from the experimental data. The variance of the presently measured isotopic yield distributions have been found to be in agreement with the literature values. However, the variance of the mass distribution of fission residues has found to be narrower as compared to other relatively heavier systems. A self-consistent approach to determining the isobaric charge dispersion parameters has been adopted. The measured fission cross sections at 97 and 100 MeV are satisfactorily described by a statistical model code. An attempt has been made to explain the production cross sections of intermediate mass residues in the fission of heavy residues populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion processes.

  1. Classifying wine according to geographical origin via quadrupole-based ICP-mass spectrometry measurements of boron isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coetzee, Paul P.; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The potential of quadrupole-based ICP-MS as a tool for B-isotopic analysis of wines and its usefulness in provenance determinations were assessed. A precision of 0.1-0.25% RSD (corresponding to a relative standard deviation of the mean of three replicate measurements of 0.06-0.12%) was sufficient to establish small differences in the B isotope ratios in wines from different geographical origins. Each sample measurement was bracketed by measurements of a standard and mass bias drift correction made by interpolation. Sample preparation was kept to a minimum to avoid possible fractionation. Dilution of the wine samples by a factor of 100 with 0.65% HNO 3 was found to reduce matrix-induced mass discrimination substantially. Wines from three wine-producing regions, Stellenbosch, Robertson, and Swartland, in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and wines from specific regions in France (Bergerac) and Italy (Valpolicella) were analyzed by ICP-QMS for their B-isotopic compositions. It was concluded that the 11 B/ 10 B ratios can be used to characterize wines from different geographical origins. Average 11 B/ 10 B ratios in red wines from South Africa (Stellenbosch), France (Bergerac), and Italy (Valpolicella) were found to differ by between 0.5 and 1.5%. (orig.)

  2. A continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for high precision determination of dissolved gas ratios and isotopic composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charoenpong, C. N.; Bristow, L. A.; Altabet, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). A continuous flow of He carrier gas completely degasses the sample, and passes through the preparation and purification system before entering the IRMS for analysis. The use of this continuous He carrier permits short analysis times (less than 8 min per sample......) as compared with current high-precision methods. In addition to reference gases, calibration is achieved using air-equilibrated water standards of known temperature and salinity. Assessment of reference gas injections, air equilibrated standards, as well as samples collected in the field shows the accuracy...

  3. Mass measurements of neutron rich isotopes in the Fe region and electron capture processes in neutron star crusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A.M.; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Experimental knowledge of nuclear masses of exotic nuclei is important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of stability, and as a direct input into astrophysical models. Electron capture processes in the crust of accreting neutron stars have been proposed as a heat source that can affect the thermal structure of the star. Nuclear masses of very neutron-rich nuclides are necessary inputs to model the electron capture process. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurement technique allows measurements on very short-lived nuclei. It has been effectively applied using the fast fragment beams produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) to reach masses very far from stability. Measurements were performed for neutron-rich isotopes in the region of the N=32 and N=40 subshells, which coincides with the mass range of carbon superburst ashes. We discuss reaction network calculations performed to investigate the impact of our new measurements and to compare the effect of using different global mass models in the calculations. It is observed that the process is sensitive to the differences in the odd-even mass staggering predicted by the mass models, and our new result for 66Mn has a significant impact on the distribution of heat sources in the crust.

  4. Single-step transesterification with simultaneous concentration and stable isotope analysis of fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Robert J; Jahren, A Hope

    2011-05-30

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is increasingly applied to food and metabolic studies for stable isotope analysis (δ(13) C), with the quantification of analyte concentration often obtained via a second alternative method. We describe a rapid direct transesterification of triacylglycerides (TAGs) for fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by GC-C-IRMS demonstrating robust simultaneous quantification of amount of analyte (mean r(2) =0.99, accuracy ±2% for 37 FAMEs) and δ(13) C (±0.13‰) in a single analytical run. The maximum FAME yield and optimal δ(13) C values are obtained by derivatizing with 10% (v/v) acetyl chloride in methanol for 1 h, while lower levels of acetyl chloride and shorter reaction times skewed the δ(13) C values by as much as 0.80‰. A Bland-Altman evaluation of the GC-C-IRMS measurements resulted in excellent agreement for pure oils (±0.08‰) and oils extracted from French fries (±0.49‰), demonstrating reliable simultaneous quantification of FAME concentration and δ(13) C values. Thus, we conclude that for studies requiring both the quantification of analyte and δ(13) C data, such as authentication or metabolic flux studies, GC-C-IRMS can be used as the sole analytical method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Determination of carbon isotope ratios for honey samples by means of a liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system coupled with a post-column pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Suto, Momoka; Suto, Nana

    2018-05-20

    Liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) has been used to authenticate and trace products such as honey, wine, and lemon juice, and compounds such as caffeine and pesticides. However, LC/IRMS has several disadvantages, including the high cost of the CO 2 membrane and blocking by solidified sodium persulfate. Here, we developed an improved system for determining carbon isotope ratios by LC/IRMS. The main improvement was the use of a post-column pump. Using the improved system, we determined δ 13 C values for glucose with high accuracy and precision (0.1‰ and 0.1‰, respectively; n = 3). The glucose, fructose, disaccharide, trisaccharide, and organic acid constituents of the honey samples were analyzed by LC/IRMS. The δ 13 C values for glucose, fructose, disaccharides, trisaccharides, and organic acids ranged from -27.0 to -24.2‰, -26.8 to -24.0‰, -28.8 to -24.0‰, -27.8 to -22.8‰, and -30.6 to -27.4‰, respectively. The analysis time was 1/3-1/2 the times required for analysis by previously reported methods. The column flow rate could be arbitrarily adjusted with the post-column pump. We applied the improved method to 26 commercial honey samples. Our results can be expected to be useful for other researchers who use LC/IRMS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Isotopic ratio measurement using a double focusing magnetic sector mass analyser with an inductively coupled plasma as an ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma source was coupled to a magnetic sector mass analyser equipped with seven Faraday detectors. An electrostatic filter located between the plasma source and the magnetic sector was used to create a double focusing system. Isotopic ratio measurements of uranium and lead standards revealed levels of internal and external precision comparable to those obtained using thermal inonization mass spectrometry. An external precision of 0.014% was obtained from the 235 U: 238 U measurement of six samples of a National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Material (SRM) U-500, while an RSD of 0.022% was obtained from the 206 Pb: 204 Pb measurement of six samples of NBS SRM Pb-981. Measured isotopic ratios deviated from the NBS value by approximately 0.9% per atomic mass unit. This deviation approximates to a linear function of mass bias and can therefore be corrected for by the analysis of standards. The analysis of NBS SRM Sr-987 revealed superior levels of internal and external precision. The normalization of the 87 Sr: 86 Sr ratio to the 86 Sr: 88 Sr ratio reduced the RSD to approximately 0.008%. The measured ratio was within 0.01% of the NBS value and the day-to-day reproducibility was consistent within one standard deviation. (author)

  7. Fully developed natural convection heat and mass transfer in a vertical annular porous medium with asymmetric wall temperatures and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    This work examines the effects of the modified Darcy number, the buoyancy ratio and the inner radius-gap ratio on the fully developed natural convection heat and mass transfer in a vertical annular non-Darcy porous medium with asymmetric wall temperatures and concentrations. The exact solutions for the important characteristics of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are derived by using a non-Darcy flow model. The modified Darcy number is related to the flow resistance of the porous matrix. For the free convection heat and mass transfer in an annular duct filled with porous media, increasing the modified Darcy number tends to increase the volume flow rate, total heat rate added to the fluid, and the total species rate added to the fluid. Moreover, an increase in the buoyancy ratio or in the inner radius-gap ratio leads to an increase in the volume flow rate, the total heat rate added to the fluid, and the total species rate added to the fluid

  8. Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Materials Using Nuclear Fission Track Registration Technique and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Young Sin; Pyo, Hyeong Yeol; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyu Seok; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2007-05-01

    It is very important to develope the technology for the determination of isotopic ratios of hot particles( 234 U, 235 U, 236 U etc.) detected from swipe samples of various nuclear facilities. This technology is highly competitive internationally and has to be established independently as long as our government maintains atomic energy and treats nuclear materials. In this text, sample pretreatment procedure, gamma-ray counting, alpha or fission track techniques, isotopic analysis of U and Pu, background problems and detection limits for mass determination, and their application to the real swipe sample were described with detailed procedure. This technology would contribute to the Korean economy's high growth rate as well as to superiority of government's leading research and development programs if successfully established

  9. Matrix separation by chelation to prepare biological materials for isotopic zinc analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, S.F.; Krushevska, A.; Amarasiriwardena, D.; Argentine, M.D.; Romon-Guesnier, S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Following an evaluation of three chelating resins [Chelex-100, poly(dithiocarbamate) (PDTC) and carboxymethylated poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(methylenepolyphenylene) isocyanate (CPPI)], a procedure was established with the last of these for the separation of Zn from biological matrix elements prior to 70 Zn: 68 Zn isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was verified by establishing Zn recoveries and by determining its effectiveness in removing Cl and Na from buffered test solutions. Calcium, Na, and Zn concentration data were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Chlorine was measured by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS. The efficacy of the technique was demonstrated by the determination of zinc isotope ratios in bovine milk and human urine. (Author)

  10. Amino acid δ13C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavan, Maanasa; McCullagh, James S. O.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel method for the chromatographic separation and measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios (delta(13)C) of individual amino acids in hair proteins and bone collagen using the LC-IsoLink system, which interfaces liquid chromatography (LC) with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS......). This paper provides baseline separation of 15 and 13 of the 18 amino acids in bone collagen and hair proteins, respectively. We also describe an approach to analysing small hair samples for compound-specific analysis of segmental hair sections. The LC/IRMS method is applied in a historical context...... by the delta(13)C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen recovered from six individuals from Uummannaq in Greenland. The analysis of hair and bone amino acids from the same individual, compared for the first time in this study, is of importance in palaeodietary reconstruction. If hair proteins can be used...

  11. Determination of Cd and Pb in human blood by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry : International comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Joon; Suh, Jeong Ki; Lee, Sang Hwa

    1996-01-01

    Inorganic analytical laboratory of Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science participated in an interlaboratory comparison program operated by Quebec Toxicology Centre of Canada in 1994 and again in 1995. The objective of this program is to enable participating laboratories to assess reproducibility and accuracy of their analytical results for trace toxic elements in human biological fluids. This laboratory determined Cd and Pb concentrations in 3 levels of human blood samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. 0.5 mL of blood sample is added to the digestion bomb together with 2 mL of nitric acid and enriched spike isotopes and then decomposed in the microwave digestion system. The decomposed sample is diluted to 10 mL and nebulized into ICP-MS. The Cd and Pb values reported by all participating laboratories are presented and compared. The values reported by this laboratory are within the acceptable range of target values. (author)

  12. Direct quantification of creatinine in human urine by using isotope dilution extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xue [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Jiangxi Key Laboratory for Mass Spectrometry and Instrumentation, Applied Chemistry Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Fang Xiaowei [Jiangxi Key Laboratory for Mass Spectrometry and Instrumentation, Applied Chemistry Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Yu Zhiqiang; Sheng Guoying [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resource Utilization, State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wu Minghong [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Fu Jiamo [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resource Utilization, State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen Huanwen, E-mail: chw8868@gmail.com [Jiangxi Key Laboratory for Mass Spectrometry and Instrumentation, Applied Chemistry Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High throughput analysis of urinary creatinine is achieved by using ID-EESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urine sample is directly analyzed and no sample pre-treatment is required. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accurate quantification is accomplished with isotope dilution technique. - Abstract: Urinary creatinine (CRE) is an important biomarker of renal function. Fast and accurate quantification of CRE in human urine is required by clinical research. By using isotope dilution extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (EESI-MS/MS) a high throughput method for direct and accurate quantification of urinary CRE was developed in this study. Under optimized conditions, the method detection limit was lower than 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Over the concentration range investigated (0.05-10 mg L{sup -1}), the calibration curve was obtained with satisfactory linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.9861), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) values for CRE and isotope-labeled CRE (CRE-d3) were 7.1-11.8% (n = 6) and 4.1-11.3% (n = 6), respectively. The isotope dilution EESI-MS/MS method was validated by analyzing six human urine samples, and the results were comparable with the conventional spectrophotometric method (based on the Jaffe reaction). Recoveries for individual urine samples were 85-111% and less than 0.3 min was taken for each measurement, indicating that the present isotope dilution EESI-MS/MS method is a promising strategy for the fast and accurate quantification of urinary CRE in clinical laboratories.

  13. Direct quantification of creatinine in human urine by using isotope dilution extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xue; Fang Xiaowei; Yu Zhiqiang; Sheng Guoying; Wu Minghong; Fu Jiamo; Chen Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High throughput analysis of urinary creatinine is achieved by using ID-EESI–MS/MS. ► Urine sample is directly analyzed and no sample pre-treatment is required. ► Accurate quantification is accomplished with isotope dilution technique. - Abstract: Urinary creatinine (CRE) is an important biomarker of renal function. Fast and accurate quantification of CRE in human urine is required by clinical research. By using isotope dilution extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (EESI–MS/MS) a high throughput method for direct and accurate quantification of urinary CRE was developed in this study. Under optimized conditions, the method detection limit was lower than 50 μg L −1 . Over the concentration range investigated (0.05–10 mg L −1 ), the calibration curve was obtained with satisfactory linearity (R 2 = 0.9861), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) values for CRE and isotope-labeled CRE (CRE-d3) were 7.1–11.8% (n = 6) and 4.1–11.3% (n = 6), respectively. The isotope dilution EESI–MS/MS method was validated by analyzing six human urine samples, and the results were comparable with the conventional spectrophotometric method (based on the Jaffe reaction). Recoveries for individual urine samples were 85–111% and less than 0.3 min was taken for each measurement, indicating that the present isotope dilution EESI–MS/MS method is a promising strategy for the fast and accurate quantification of urinary CRE in clinical laboratories.

  14. Compound-specific isotope analysis of light elements using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) and its application to geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Keita; Matsumoto, Kohei; Ishiwatari, Ryoshi

    1997-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has been developed recently using gas chromatography/combustion/mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). This paper summarizes principles and progress of GC/C/IRMS, and reviews recent some important works using this new method. GC/C/IRMS is a novel tool for (1) biomarker analysis in sediments and living matter, (2) paleoenvironment analysis including reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes, (3) geochemical cycle study of organic compounds in a terrestrial-marine system, (4) evaluation of maturity and diagenesis of organic matter including petroleum formation, (5) ecological analysis, (6) evaluation of anthropologenic pollution in environment, (7) detection of extraterrestrial organic compounds and the formation mechanism study, (8) tracer studies in environment. (author)

  15. Correction for the 17O interference in δ(13C) measurements when analyzing CO2 with stable isotope mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Assonov, Sergey S.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of δ(13C) determined on CO2 with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) must be corrected for the amount of 17O in the CO2. For data consistency, this must be done using identical methods by different laboratories. This report aims at unifying data treatment for CO2 IRMS by proposing (i) a unified set of numerical values, and (ii) a unified correction algorithm, based on a simple, linear approximation formula. Because the oxygen of natural CO2 is derived mostly from the global water pool, it is recommended that a value of 0.528 be employed for the factor λ, which relates differences in 17O and 18O abundances. With the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) of 0.011 180(28) in VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) reevaluation of data yields a value of 0.000 393(1) for the oxygen isotope ratio N(17O)/N(16O) of the evolved CO2. The ratio of these quantities, a ratio of isotope ratios, is essential for the 17O abundance correction: [N(17O)/N(16O)]/[N(13C)/N(12C)] = 0.035 16(8). The equation [δ(13C) ≈ 45δVPDB-CO2 + 2 17R/13R (45δVPDB-CO2 – λ46δVPDB-CO2)] closely approximates δ(13C) values with less than 0.010 ‰ deviation for normal oxygen-bearing materials and no more than 0.026 ‰ in extreme cases. Other materials containing oxygen of non-mass-dependent isotope composition require a more specific data treatment. A similar linear approximation is also suggested for δ(18O). The linear approximations are easy to implement in a data spreadsheet, and also help in generating a simplified uncertainty budget.

  16. Higher mass-independent isotope fractionation of methylmercury in the pelagic food web of Lake Baikal (Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Vincent; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Epov, Vladimir N; Husted, Søren; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2012-06-05

    Mercury undergoes several transformations that influence its stable isotope composition during a number of environmental and biological processes. Measurements of Hg isotopic mass-dependent (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in food webs may therefore help to identify major sources and processes leading to significant bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg). In this work, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, concentration of Hg species (MeHg, inorganic Hg), and stable isotopic composition of Hg were determined at different trophic levels of the remote and pristine Lake Baikal ecosystem. Muscle of seals and different fish as well as amphipods, zooplankton, and phytoplankton were specifically investigated. MDF during trophic transfer of MeHg leading to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the predators was clearly established by δ(202)Hg measurements in the pelagic prey-predator system (carnivorous sculpins and top-predator seals). Despite the low concentrations of Hg in the ecosystem, the pelagic food web reveals very high MIF Δ(199)Hg (3.15-6.65‰) in comparison to coastal fish (0.26-1.65‰) and most previous studies in aquatic organisms. Trophic transfer does not influence MIF signature since similar Δ(199)Hg was observed in sculpins (4.59 ± 0.55‰) and seal muscles (4.62 ± 0.60‰). The MIF is suggested to be mainly controlled by specific physical and biogeochemical characteristics of the water column. The higher level of MIF in pelagic fish of Lake Baikal is mainly due to the bioaccumulation of residual MeHg that is efficiently turned over and photodemethylated in deep oligotrophic and stationary (i.e., long residence time) freshwater columns.

  17. Heat and mass transfer by free convection in a porous medium along a surface of arbitrary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.A.; Nakayama, A.

    1993-06-01

    Free convection flow of a viscous incompressible fluid in the presence of species concentration along a surface of arbitrary shape embedded in a saturated porous medium is investigated with non-uniform surface temperature and surface concentration distributions. The equations governing the flow, derived in the form of local similarity and nonsimilarity equations, are integrated numerically using the implicit finite difference approximation together with the Keller box method. Exact solutions of the local similarity equations are also obtained and compared with the finite difference solutions. All the solutions are shown graphically in terms of local Nusselt number, Nu χ , and local Sherwood number, Sh χ , against the physical parameter ξ (which characterizes the streamwise distance along the surface from the leading edge) taking the value of the Lewis number, Le, equals 1 0, 5, and 10 while N (which defines the ratio between the buoyancy forces arise due to thermal and mass diffusion) is unity. (author). Refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  18. The influence of magnetic field on the cold neutral medium mass fraction and its alignment with density structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, M. A.; Gazol, A.

    2018-06-01

    To contribute to the understanding of the magnetic field's influence on the segregation of cold neutral medium (CNM) in the solar neighbourhood we analyse magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include the main physical characteristics of the local neutral atomic interstellar medium. The simulations have a continuous solenoidal Fourier forcing in a periodic box of 100 pc per side and an initial uniform magnetic field (B_0) with intensities ranging between ˜0.4 and ˜8 μG. Our main results are as follows. (i) The CNM mass fraction diminishes with the increase in magnetic field intensity. (ii) There is a preferred alignment between CNM structures and B in all our B0 range but the preference weakens as B0 increases. It is worth noticing that this preference is also present in two-dimensional projections making an extreme angle (0 or π / 2) with respect to B_0 and it is only lost for the strongest magnetic field when the angle of projection is perpendicular to B_0. (iii) The aforementioned results are prevalent despite the inclusion of self-gravity in our continuously forced simulations with a mean density similar to the average value of the solar neighbourhood. (iv) Given a fixed B0 and slightly higher mean densities, up to double, the effects of self-gravity are still not qualitatively significant.

  19. Determination of the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaebler, H.E.; Bahr, A.; Mieke, B.

    1999-01-01

    An isotope dilution technique using enriched stable isotopes is applied to determine the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils. Metals in two soil samples are extracted at constant pH, with water, NH 4 NO 3 , and EDTA. A spike of enriched stable isotopes is added to the suspension of sample and eluant at the beginning of the extraction. The heavy-metal fraction which exchanges with the added spike during the extraction is called the interchangeable fraction. The extractable heavy-metal fractions are obtained from the heavy-metal concentrations in the eluates. Isotope ratios and concentrations are determined by HR-ICP-MS. The isotope dilution technique described enables both the extractable and the interchangeable heavy-metal fractions to be determined in the same experiment. The combination of both results gives additional information on elemental availability under different conditions that cannot be obtained by analyzing the extractable heavy-metal fractions alone. It is demonstrated that in some cases different eluants just shift the distribution of the interchangeable fraction of an element between the solid and liquid phases (e.g., Pb and Cd in a topsoil sample) while the amount of the interchangeable fraction itself remains constant. For other elements, as Ni, Zn, and Cr, the use of different eluants (different pH, complexing agents) sometimes enlarges the interchangeable fraction. (orig.)

  20. Chemical reaction effects on unsteady MHD free convective flow in a rotating porous medium with mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindarajan Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of unsteady MHD free convective flow and mass transfer during the motion of a viscous incompressible fluid through a porous medium, bounded by an infinite vertical porous surface, in a rotating system is presented. The porous plane surface and the porous medium are assumed to rotate in a solid body rotation. The vertical surface is subjected to uniform constant suction perpendicular to it and the temperature at this surface fluctuates in time about a non-zero constant mean. Analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained using the perturbation technique. The effects of R (rotation parameter, k0 (permeability parameter, M (Hartmann number and w (frequency parameter on the flow characteristics are discussed. It is observed that the primary velocity component decreases with the increase in either of the rotation parameter R, the permeability parameter k0, or the Hartmann number M. It is also noted that the primary skin friction increases whenever there is an increase in the Grashof number Gr or the modified Grashof number Gm. It is clear that the heat transfer coefficient in terms of the Nusselt number decreases in the case of both air and water when there is an increase in the Hartmann number M. It is observed that the magnitude of the secondary velocity profiles increases whenever there is an increase in either of the Grashof number or the modified Grashof number for mass transfer or the permeability of the porous media. Concentration profiles decreases with an increase in the Schmidt number.

  1. The evolution of interstellar medium mass probed by dust emission: Alma observations at z = 0.3-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, N.; Manohar, S.; Aussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Scott, K. S.; Sanders, D.; Ivison, R.; Pope, A.; Capak, P.; Vanden Bout, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Robertson, B.; Lilly, S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of submillimeter dust continuum emission to probe the mass of interstellar dust and gas in galaxies is empirically calibrated using samples of local star-forming galaxies, Planck observations of the Milky Way, and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies. All of these objects suggest a similar calibration, strongly supporting the view that the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust emission can be used as an accurate and very fast probe of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. We present ALMA Cycle 0 observations of the Band 7 (350 GHz) dust emission in 107 galaxies from z = 0.2 to 2.5. Three samples of galaxies with a total of 101 galaxies were stellar-mass-selected from COSMOS to have M * ≅ 10 11 M ☉ : 37 at z ∼ 0.4, 33 at z ∼ 0.9, and 31 at z = 2. A fourth sample with six infrared-luminous galaxies at z = 2 was observed for comparison with the purely mass-selected samples. From the fluxes detected in the stacked images for each sample, we find that the ISM content has decreased by a factor ∼6 from 1 to 2 × 10 10 M ☉ at both z = 2 and 0.9 down to ∼2 × 10 9 M ☉ at z = 0.4. The infrared-luminous sample at z = 2 shows a further ∼4 times increase in M ISM compared with the equivalent non-infrared-bright sample at the same redshift. The gas mass fractions are ∼2% ± 0.5%, 12% ± 3%, 14% ± 2%, and 53% ± 3% for the four subsamples (z = 0.4, 0.9, and 2 and infrared-bright galaxies).

  2. Some major deviations for biomass determination by indirect method and estimation based on alkali consumption. [Ratio of cell mass produced and alkali consumed; diesel fuel culture medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concone, B R.V.; Doin, P A; Pinto, A G

    1978-01-01

    Some factors like the variation of the liquid volume, the variation of cellular nitrogen content and the mass of cells taken with the samples during batch cultivation of microorganisms on diesel oil, were considered for the computation of the ratio between cell mass produced and the mass of alkali consumed to maintain constant the pH of the fermentation medium. The results obtained showed that if such ratios are computed with cell concentration instead of cell mass the deviations can be of the order of 27% caused by the variation of the liquid medium volume. Otherwise, the results showed also that those ratios are variable during batch cultivation on diesel oil probably because of the variations on the nitrogen content of microorganisms. The relative difference between the mass of cells measured and the mass of cells calculated from the alkali consumption curve can be of the order of 63%.

  3. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  4. An experimental study of odd mass promethium isotopes using proton stripping and pickup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, O.

    1979-11-01

    Odd Pm isotopes have been studied by one proton pick-up and stripping reactions. Spin assignment and spectroscopic factors have been obtained for a number of energy levels. In the stripping reactions, the relative cross-sections have been measured with an unusually high precision by the use of a target of natural neodymium. The spectroscopic strengths have been extracted using standard distorted wave methods. The nuclear structures of these promethium isotopes fall into three categories. The spherical approach seems valid for 143 Pm and 145 Pm and the deformed regime covers 151 Pm and 153 Pm, while 147 Pm and 149 Pm remain as transitional nuclei. (Auth.)

  5. Geochemical thermodynamic and kinetic modeling that take into account the mass transfer phenomena in saturated porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, Frederic

    1996-01-01

    The mass transport mechanisms (advection. mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion) have been introduced into the thermodynamic and kinetic geochemical code KINDIS. This innovative approach to couple chemical and transport mass transfers has allowed us to develop a reactive transport or hydrochemical code named KIRMAT, which naturally preserve the comprehensive geochemical functions of KINDIS. Mass transport phenomena through the total connected porosity of a water-saturated porous medium are solved over one spatial dimension (ID). The finite difference method is used. An explicit or forward time scheme is computed. The advective finite difference expression may be either centered or upstream weighted. Thus, ail of the hydrodynamic conditions may be modeled (from the pure advection to pure diffusion). The mass transport and geochemical flux are solved simultaneously (one-step algorithm). Moreover. the code KIRMAT is designed to quantify reactive mass transport through a double or dual porosity medium, in which the flow porosity (filled by free water) and the diffusion porosity (containing stagnant water) are viewed as two distinct sub mediums or Systems. Under some given conditions, the need to solve one or the other mass transport equation is a function of the water-rock System size. The accuracy of the kinetic constraint has been improved in KIRMAT. Two new kinetic rate laws have been introduced for the dissolution of the most abundant silicates (alkali feldspars, silica. etc.). These rate laws integrate the quantitatively important inhibitor and catalytic effects involved with some dissolved chemical elements that are ubiquitous in natural aqueous solutions. The basic step. the numerical verification of the code, has been tackled with two complementary approaches. The numerical results from KIRMAT have been compared to those calculated from an exact solution and a new method has been developed and used. We have compared the numerical results of KIRMAT in

  6. Segmentation of Multi-Isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for Semi-Automatic Detection of Regions of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczatek, J. Collin; Turck, Christoph W.; Lechene, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) associates secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with detection of several atomic masses, the use of stable isotopes as labels, and affiliated quantitative image-analysis software. By associating image and measure, MIMS allows one to obtain quantitative information about biological processes in sub-cellular domains. MIMS can be applied to a wide range of biomedical problems, in particular metabolism and cell fate [1], [2], [3]. In order to obtain morphologically pertinent data from MIMS images, we have to define regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs are drawn by hand, a tedious and time-consuming process. We have developed and successfully applied a support vector machine (SVM) for segmentation of MIMS images that allows fast, semi-automatic boundary detection of regions of interests. Using the SVM, high-quality ROIs (as compared to an expert's manual delineation) were obtained for 2 types of images derived from unrelated data sets. This automation simplifies, accelerates and improves the post-processing analysis of MIMS images. This approach has been integrated into “Open MIMS,” an ImageJ-plugin for comprehensive analysis of MIMS images that is available online at http://www.nrims.hms.harvard.edu/NRIMS_ImageJ.php. PMID:22347386

  7. Simultaneous analysis of (13)C-glutathione as its dimeric form GSSG and its precursor [1-(13)C]glycine using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, Henk; Rook, Denise; te Braake, Frans W. J.; Dorst, Kristien Y.; Voortman, Gardi; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination of glutathione kinetics using stable isotopes requires accurate measurement of the tracers and tracees. Previously, the precursor and synthesized product were measured with two separate techniques, liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) and gas

  8. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. [16,16(-2)H2]Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize [2H5]testosterone to [2H4]estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine

  9. Determination of isotope ratios of metals (and metalloids) by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for provenancing purposes - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcaen, L.; Moens, L.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2010-01-01

    Since considerable time, isotopic analysis of different elements present in a sample, material or object (such as the 'light' elements H, C, N, O and S and 'heavy' elements, such as Sr and Pb), has been used in provenancing studies, as several factors - defined by 'the environment' or origin of the sample - can lead to measurable differences in their isotopic composition. For the light elements, traditionally, (gas source) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS) is used, while for a long period of time, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) was considered as the only technique capable of detecting subtle variations in the isotopic composition of the 'heavier' elements. However, since the introduction of the first inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICP-MS), considerable attention has been