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Sample records for medicine ward clinical

  1. Epidemiology, microbiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of candidemia in internal medicine wards-a retrospective study.

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    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Babaoff, Roi; Yahav, Dafna; Yanai, Shirly; Shaked, Hila; Bishara, Jihad

    2016-11-01

    The clinical characteristics of internal medicine ward (IMW) patients with candidemia are unclear. The aim of this study was to define the clinical characteristics of candidemic IMW patients and to study the incidence, species distribution, and outcomes of these patients compared to surgical and intensive care unit (ICU) candidemic patients. A retrospective cohort of candidemic patients in IMWs, general surgery wards, and an ICU at Beilinson Hospital during the period 2007-2014 was analyzed. A total of 118 patients with candidemia were identified in six IMWs, two general surgery wards, and one ICU in the hospital. Candida albicans was the leading causative agent (41.1%). Higher proportions of Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis isolates were observed in the IMW patients. IMW patients were significantly older, with poorer functional capacity, and had more frequently been exposed to antibiotic therapy within 90 days, in particular β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and cephalosporins. At onset of candidemia, a significantly lower number of IMW patients were mechanically ventilated (p48h. IMW candidemic patients account for a substantial proportion of candidemia cases and have unique characteristics and high mortality rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Nutritional status influences the length of stay and clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients in internal medicine wards

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    Ana Manuela Ordoñez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the nutritional status (NS and clinical outcome and length of stay (LOS among patients admitted to the internal medicine ward. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study performed with the data of clinical patients collected during a one year period. The NS was assessed using: subjective global assessment (SGA, body mass index (BMI, triceps skinfold thickness (TST, muscle arm circumference (MAC and combined tools. Statistical analysis was performed with a confidence interval of 95% (p < 0.05. For categories comparison the chi-square test was used. To examine the association between length of stay and variables related to the NS Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests was used with multiple comparisons. Results: 396 patients were included in the study, 42.2% were over 60 years of age, what was associated with the presence of hypertension (p < 0.001, diabetes mellitus (p = 0.003 and required diet with modifications consistency (p = 0.003. According to combined diagnostic tools, 45.7% of patients were malnourished. Decreased food intake (p = 0.01, malnutrition according to SGA (p = 0.02 and MAC (p = 0.03 were associated with increased mortality. Patients with tertiary level of care (p = 0.01, decreased food intake (p = 0.001, who died (p = 0.004 and diagnosed with malnutrition by SGA (p = 0.001 and by the combined tools (p = 0.001 had a longer LOS. Conclusions: Patients who were malnourished by SGA and who presented decrease food intake at admission had longer LOS and poorer clinical outcomes (highest number of deaths. The diagnosis of malnutrition by MAC was also related to higher mortality.

  3. Nosocomial candidemia in patients admitted to medicine wards compared to other wards: a multicentre study.

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    Luzzati, Roberto; Merelli, Maria; Ansaldi, Filippo; Rosin, Chiara; Azzini, Annamaria; Cavinato, Silvia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Vedovelli, Claudio; Cattelan, Annamaria; Marina, Busetti; Gatti, Giuseppe; Concia, Ercole; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for nosocomial candidemia, severity of sepsis, treatment, and outcome were compared between patients admitted to medicine wards and those to surgical and intensive care units (ICUs). Data were retrospectively collected from patients belonging to six referral hospitals in Italy between January 2011 and December 2013. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated in the whole patient population. A total of 686 patients (mean age 70 ± 15 years) with candidemia were included. 367 (53.5 %) patients were in medicine wards, and 319 in surgery and ICUs. Host-related risk factors for candidemia were more common in medicine patients whereas healthcare-related factors in surgery/ICU patients. These patients showed severe sepsis and septic shock more commonly (71.7 %) than medicine patients (59.9 %) (p 0.003). The latter underwent central venous catheter (CVC) removal and adequate antifungal therapy less frequently than surgery/ICU patients. 149 (40.6 %) patients died with candidemia in medicine wards and 69 (21.6 %) in other wards (p candidemia was different between medicine patients and those in other wards. Despite the lower severity of candidemia in medicine patients, their mortality turned out to be higher than in surgery or ICU patients. Awareness of the best management of candidemia should be pursued, especially in medicine wards.

  4. Lernen durch aktive Partizipation in der klinischen Patientenversorgung - Machbarkeitsstudie einer internistischen PJ-Ausbildungsstation [Learning by active participation in clinical care - a feasibility study of a clinical education ward in internal medicine

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    Tauschel, Diethard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background and aims: The final year of the undergraduate medical curriculum in Germany consists of three 16-week rotations including one hospital-based rotation in internal medicine. The final-year program is supposed to be oriented toward real-world practice and competency-based learning. A Clinical Education Ward (CEW was developed to promote contextual and self-directed learning among medical students during their final-year rotation in internal medicine. The goal of multisource evaluation is to analyze the implications of this model in terms of patient care, ward organization, and the learning progress of medical students. Prerequisites for a “learning organization” should be established. Methods: At the CEW, final-year medical students were acting as “doctors under supervision” and taking care of patients in a ward for internal medicine. Students were instructed and closely supervised by clinical tutors. All patients admitted to the CEW were surveyed using a questionnaire to assess the implications of student involvement in clinical care. Clinical staff members (physicians, nurses, therapists were asked about changes in terms of ward organization and interprofessional teamwork. Students assessed themselves at the beginning and at the end of the rotation in terms of clinical competencies, which were developed in cooperation with the students in preparation for the CEW.The project is part of the Integrated Studies of Anthroposophic Medicine program at the University of Witten/Herdecke (Germany, which aims to foster self-directed learning. Results: Fifty-six patients on the CEW were asked to complete a survey; 34 (60.7% responded. The majority (71% saw positive implications of student involvement in clinical care. Staff members (n = 28, return: 23 or 82% were in favor of the continued implementation of the CEW as a permanent institution. Medical students of the first two rotations (n = 9 self-assessed progress in all

  5. Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

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    Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65 years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3 %) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8 %) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies.

  6. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

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    Krautter M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Sven Andreesen,2 Nadja Köhl-Hackert,2 Katja Hoffmann,3 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, University of Heidelberg, 2Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, 3Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Peer-assisted learning (PAL has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective.Purpose: To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors.Methods: A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80. The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants. The discussions were analyzed using content analysis.Results: The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available.Conclusion: On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance

  7. Ward leadership: balancing the clinical and managerial roles.

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    Firth, Kate

    2002-04-01

    This qualitative study investigated ward managers' experiences of combining a clinical leadership role with the managerial and administrative parts of their job. Ward managers saw their main task as one of developing their staff and improving the quality of their service, yet found balancing their different roles problematic.

  8. Clinical characteristics of very old patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards for heart failure: a sub-analysis of the FADOI-CONFINE Study Group

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    Paolo Biagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of chronic heart failure are increasing worldwide, as is the number of very old patients (>85 years affected by this disease. The aim of this sub-analysis of the multicenter, observational CONFINE study was to detect clinical and therapeutic peculiarities in patients with chronic heart failure aged >85 years. We recruited patients admitted with a diagnosis of chronic heart failure and present in the hospital in five index days, in 91 Units of Internal Medicine. The patients’ clinical characteristics, functional and cognitive status, and the management of the heart failure were analyzed. A total of 1444 subjects were evaluated, of whom 329 (23.1% were over 85 years old. Signs and symptoms of chronic heart failure were more common in very old patients, as were severe renal insufficiency, anemia, disability and cognitive impairment. The present survey found important age-related differences (concomitant diseases, cognitive status among patients with chronic heart failure, as well as different therapeutic strategies and clinical outcome for patients over 85 years old. Since these patients are usually excluded from clinical trials and their management remains empirical, specific studies focused on the treatment of very old patients with chronic heart failure are needed.

  9. The Effect of Early Clinical Exposure Program on Attitude Change of Undergraduate Medical Students toward their preparation for Attending Clinical Setting in Internal Medicine, Surgery and Pediatrics Wards during 2013-2014

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    M.A. Seifrabei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early clinical exposure on medical students’ attitude toward their preparation for attending clinical setting. Material & Methods: In an interventional before -after study, 52 fourth semester medical students studying at Hamadan University of medical sciences were enrolled in the study. The participants filled out a self-structured questionnaire before and after taking part in a 4 month course in three different wards including: surgery, pediatric and internal wards . The staff’s opinions about the program were also gathered. Result: Mean attitude score increased significantly after taking part in the course in these areas: satisfaction about basic science lessons (P=0.019, understanding social determinants of health (P= 0.03 and understanding clinical thinking and simple clinical skills (P= 0.01. Passing the course did not have any significant effect in communication skills and current semester scores (P.0.05 in both issues. Forty one percent of the academic staff in the mentioned wards believed in the necessity of early clinical exposure in basic science stage, 29.5% denied it's necessity and 29.5% did not express their opinions. Conclusion: It seems that despite the mean score increase of some items, early clinical exposure program doesn’t have any positive effect on the measured items. Therefore, it is recommended to change the medical education program. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016; 22 (4 :323-330

  10. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

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    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  11. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

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    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  12. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

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    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  13. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

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    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  14. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

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    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  15. 'Real life' clinical learning on an interprofessional training ward.

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    Freeth, D; Reeves, S; Goreham, C; Parker, P; Haynes, S; Pearson, S

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the multi-method evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and an extension of pioneering work in Sweden (Wahlström et al. 1997, Wahlstroöm & Sandén 1998), this interprofessional clinical placement allowed senior pre-qualifying students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop both their profession-specific skills in a real-world setting and the quality of their interprofessional teamwork. Student teams were supported by facilitators who led reflective sessions and acted as a resource for the students' problem-based learning. The training ward was evaluated by a multi-method approach, incorporating interviews, observations and questionnaires with students, patients and clinical staff. The evaluation findings have been grouped into a number of themes which offer an insight into the varying perspectives of training ward students, patients and staff. This paper pays particular attention to the nursing perspective of the interprofessional training ward pilot.

  16. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

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    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  17. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

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    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  18. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

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    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  19. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum.

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    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members' experience on Ward Round Teaching content. This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  20. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

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    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Alemayehu Berhanie; Habtamu Tigistu; Yishak Abraham; Yosheph Getachew; Tahir Mehmood Khan; Chandrashekhar Unakal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital.Method:medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors.Result:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications.Conclusion:We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  1. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

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    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content...... construct validity, an observer assessed 4 groups of doctors during performance of a complete ward round (n = 32). The nurse who accompanied the doctor on rounds made a global assessment of the performance. RESULTS: The response rate to the questionnaire was 80.7%. The respondents found that all 10 items...... on the checklist were relevant to ward round performance and that the item collection was comprehensive. Checklist mean-item scores differed between levels of expertise: junior house officers 1.4 (1.0-1.9); senior house officers 2.0 (1.5-2.9); specialist trainees 2.5 (1.8-2.8), and specialists 2.7 (2...

  2. Clinical ethics ward rounds: building on the core curriculum.

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    Parker, Lisa; Watts, Lisa; Scicluna, Helen

    2012-08-01

    The clinical years of medical student education are an ideal time for students to practise and refine ethical thinking and behaviour. We piloted a new clinical ethics teaching activity this year with undergraduate medical students within the Rural Clinical School at the University of New South Wales. We used a modified teaching ward round model, with students bringing deidentified cases of ethical interest for round-table discussion. We found that students were more engaged in the subject of clinical ethics after attending the teaching sessions and particularly appreciated having structured time to listen to and learn from their peers. Despite this, we found no change in student involvement in managing or planning action in situations that they find ethically challenging. A key challenge for educators in clinical ethics is to address the barriers that prevent students taking action.

  3. Workplace learning: an analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine.

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    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students' ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students' expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a longitudinal manner. The data suggest that the

  4. Workplace Learning: An analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine

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    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students’ ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students’ expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Methods: Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. Results: We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. Conclusion: For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a

  5. Epidemiology and outcome of candidemia in internal medicine wards: A regional study in Italy.

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    Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Giannella, Maddalena; Bartoletti, Michele; Cristini, Francesco; Cioni, Giorgio; Ambretti, Simone; Carretto, Edoardo; Sambri, Vittorio; Sarti, Mario; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-10-01

    More than one-third of candidemia episodes occur in Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs) but only few studies have focused on this setting and specific data about epidemiology, clinical characteristics and risk factors for mortality are scant. To describe epidemiology and to assess risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with candidemia in IMWs. Multicenter retrospective cohort study on patients with candidemia cared for in IMWs of an Italian region (Emilia Romagna) from January 2012 to December 2013. Non survivors were compared with survivors; variables with p≤0.1 at univariate analysis were entered into a multivariate Cox regression model. 232 patients were included. Overall candidemia incidence was 2.2 cases/1000 admissions. Candida albicans accounted for 59% of cases. Antifungal treatment was started 72h from blood cultures in 47%, 27% and 12% of patients, respectively; 13.8% of patients received no antifungal treatment. In-hospital mortality was 40%. At multivariate analysis, chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease (HR 2.72, 95%CI 1.66-4.45, pcandidemia in IMWs, with a worrisome rate of inappropriateness in patient management. Specific interventions aimed to increase awareness of IMWs about candidemia are needed. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interprofessional collaboration on an internal medicine ward: role perceptions and expectations among nurses and residents.

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    Virginie Muller-Juge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective interprofessional collaboration requires that team members share common perceptions and expectations of each other's roles. OBJECTIVE: Describe and compare residents' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of their own and each other's professional roles in the context of an Internal Medicine ward. METHODS: A convenience sample of 14 residents and 14 nurses volunteers from the General Internal Medicine Division at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, were interviewed to explore their perceptions and expectations of residents' and nurses' professional roles, for their own and the other profession. Interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. The same respondents also filled a questionnaire asking their own intended actions and the expected actions from the other professional in response to 11 clinical scenarios. RESULTS: Three main themes emerged from the interviews: patient management, clinical reasoning and decision-making processes, and roles in the team. Nurses and residents shared general perceptions about patient management. However, there was a lack of shared perceptions and expectations regarding nurses' autonomy in patient management, nurses' participation in the decision-making process, professional interdependence, and residents' implication in teamwork. Results from the clinical scenarios showed that nurses' intended actions differed from residents' expectations mainly regarding autonomy in patient management. Correlation between residents' expectations and nurses' intended actions was 0.56 (p=0.08, while correlation between nurses' expectations and residents' intended actions was 0.80 (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: There are discordant perceptions and unmet expectations among nurses and residents about each other's roles, including several aspects related to the decision-making process. Interprofessional education should foster a shared vision of each other's roles and clarify the boundaries

  7. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...... demo will show the HyPR device and setup in order for conference attendees to experience the technology `in action'....

  8. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors

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    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not yet established. However, given the substantial incidence of preventable ADEs in Dutch hospitals found in recent studies, appears warranted. Therefore, "Ward-Oriented Pharmacy", an on-ward service tailored to the Dutch hospital setting, will be developed. This service will consist of multifaceted interventions implemented in the Internal Medicine wards by hospital pharmacists. The effect of this service on preventable ADEs in elderly inpatients will be measured. Elderly patients are at high risk for ADEs due to multi-morbidity, concomitant disabilities and polypharmacy. Most studies on the incidence and preventability of ADEs in elderly patients have been conducted in the outpatient setting or on admission to a hospital, and fewer in the inpatient setting. Moreover, recognition of ADEs by the treating physicians is challenging in elderly patients because their disease presentation is often atypical and complex. Detailed information about the performance of the treating physicians in ADE recognition is scarce. Methods/Design The design is a multi-centre, interrupted time series study. Patients of 65 years or older, consecutively admitted to Internal Medicine wards will be included. After a pre-measurement, a Ward-Oriented Pharmacy service will be introduced and the effect of this service will be assessed during a post-measurement. The primary outcome measures are the ADE prevalence on admission and ADE incidence during hospital stay. These outcomes will be assessed using structured

  9. The Effect on mortality of fluconazole or echinocandins treatment in candidemia in internal medicine wards [corrected].

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    Francesco G De Rosa

    Full Text Available The incidence of candidemia has increased over the past two decades, with an increased number of cases in Internal Medicine and a prevalence ranging from 24% to 57%. This single-center retrospective study was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and the risk factors associated with mortality of candidemia in patients admitted to Internal Medicine wards (IMWs of the City of Health and Sciences, Molinette Hospital, Turin, from January 2004 to December 2012. For each patient, demographic, clinical and microbiological data were collected. A case of candidemia was defined as a patient with at least one blood culture positive for Candida spp. Amongst 670 episodes of candidemia, 274 (41% episodes occurred in IMWs. The mortality was 39% and was associated at multivariate analysis with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst removal of central venous catheter ≤48h was significantly associated with survival. In the 77 patients treated with early antifungal therapy the mortality was 29% and was not significantly different with caspofungin or fluconazole, whilst in patients with definitive therapy the mortality was significantly lower with echinocandins compared to fluconazole (11.7% Vs. 39%; p=0.0289, a finding confirmed by multivariate analysis. The mortality was significantly associated with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst CVC removal ≤48h was associated with survival. In patients with early therapy, fluconazole or caspofungin were equally effective. However, echinocandins were significantly more effective as definitive treatment, a finding not explained by differences in treatment delays. Further studies are needed to understand the full potential of these different therapeutic strategies in IMWs.

  10. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

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    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  11. Census of Ligurian Internal Medicine Wards of non-teaching hospitals

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    Micaela La Regina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is the future of internal medicine in Italy? Which competencies? Which potentialities? To this aim Ligurian FADOI Regional Society performed a census among 18 Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs in non-teaching Ligurian Hospital. We administered, by email, a questionnaire to the heads of IMWs. Data about staffing, equipment, skills, competencies and productivity during 2011 were collected from 1st to 31st November 2012. A total of 15/18 (83.3% chiefs answered to the questionnaire. The number of beds was largely variable among the wards. In 2011, mean diagnosis-related group (DRG-weight was 1.09 (range 0.91-1.6 and that revenues/costs ratio much higher than 1.5. Staff was quite adequate to standards defined by current law, only 33% has got a doctor:patients ratio superior to 1:6.4. However, annual hospitalizations exceed the availability of beds in medicine and the complexity of the patients would require a lower doctor:patients ratio, at least for a group of patients. In fact, 4 wards have a progressive care organization with a defined area for more seriously ill patients. Mean length of stay was 10 days. Expertise was wide, covering almost all medical sub-specialties. Acquired skills such as abdominal, heart and vascular ultrasounds, invasive procedures and their comprehensive knowledge make internists complete and cost-effective specialists. IMWs, as a concentrate of medical knowledge and skills, are the natural destination of current patients with co-morbidities. Staffing and number of beds should be revised according to this new demand. Their revenues/costs ratio resulted favorable and their global approach to patients and not to disease can be useful for resource rationalization. Wider and further studies are needed to improve the awareness of stakeholders about Internal Medicine.

  12. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good...... sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43% resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47% of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time...

  13. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

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    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  14. Spreadsheets in Clinical Medicine

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    Croll, Grenville J

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that the continued and widespread use of untested spreadsheets in business gives rise to regular, significant and unexpected financial losses. Whilst this is worrying, it is perhaps a relatively minor concern compared with the risks arising from the use of poorly constructed and/or untested spreadsheets in medicine, a practice that is already occurring. This article is intended as a warning that the use of poorly constructed and/or untested spreadsheets in clinical medicine cannot be tolerated. It supports this warning by reporting on potentially serious weaknesses found while testing a limited number of publicly available clinical spreadsheets.

  15. Is clinical competence perceived differently for student daily performance on the wards versus clerkship grading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmers, Paul F; Kanter, Steven L; Splinter, Ted A W; Schmidt, Henk G

    2008-12-01

    Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical teachers consider the same competencies important for clerkship grading, a survey that consisted of 21 different student characteristics was administered to clinical teachers. Two independent factor analyses using structural equation modeling were conducted to abstract underlying latent relationships among the different student characteristics and to define a clinical competence profile for daily performance of students on the wards and clerkship grading. Differences between the degree of importance for student daily ward performance and clerkship grading are considered and discussed. The results of the survey indicate that the degree of importance of competencies are rated different for daily performance of students on the wards and clerkship grades. Competencies related to the diagnostic process are more important for clerkship grading, whereas interpersonal skills, professional qualities, and motivation are more important for daily ward performance. It is concluded that the components of clinical competence considered important for adequate performance are not necessarily in alignment with what is required for grading. Future research should focus on an explanation why clinical educators think differently about the importance of competencies for student examination in contrast to what is required for adequate daily performance on the wards.

  16. Oxygen therapy multicentric study--a nationwide audit to oxygen therapy procedures in internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, J T; Lobão, M J

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a common and important treatment in Internal Medicine wards, however, several studies report that it isn't provided accordingly with the best of care. The goal of this work is to evaluate oxygen therapy procedures in Portuguese Internal Medicine wards, comparing them to the standards established by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) in its consensus statement "BTS guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients". Between September 3rd and 23rd 2010, each one of the 24 enrolled hospitals audited the oxygen therapy procedures for one randomly chosen day. All Internal Medicine inpatients under oxygen therapy or with oxygen prescription were included. Data was collected regarding oxygen prescription, administration and monitoring. Of the 1549 inpatients, 773 met inclusion criteria. There was an oxygen prescription in 93,4%. Most prescriptions were by a fixed dose (82,4%), but only 11,6% of those stated all the required parameters. Absence of oxygen therapy duration and monitoring were the most frequent errors. Oxygen was administered to only 77,0% of the patients with fixed dose prescriptions. FiO(2) or flow rate and the delivery device were the same as prescribed in 70,9 and 89,2% of the patients, respectively. Out of the 127 patients with oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range, 82,7% were on the prescribed SatO(2) objective range. Several errors were found in oxygen therapy procedures, particularly regarding fixed dose prescriptions, jeopardizing the patients. Although recommended by BTS, oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range are still a minority.

  17. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist's interventions in an infectious diseases ward and impact on patient's direct medication cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Mirzabeigi, Parastoo; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2013-04-01

    A clinical pharmacist is a key member of the antimicrobial multidisciplinary team involved in patients' pharmacotherapy monitoring. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of medication errors, the type of clinical pharmacy interventions, acceptance of pharmacist interventions by health-care provider team, nursing staff satisfaction with clinical pharmacy services, and the probable impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on decreasing direct medication costs at an infectious diseases ward in Iran. All clinical pharmacist interventions such as preventing medication errors were recorded in a previously designed pharmacotherapy monitoring forms. Direct medication cost of patients admitted during the study period was compared with that of subjects hospitalized at the same ward during the year before the intervention period to determine the impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on direct medication costs. The 3 most frequent medication error types were incorrect dose (35.5%), omission error (24.3%), and incorrect medication (14.3%). The mean number of clinical pharmacist intervention per patient was 3.2. Forty percent of clinical pharmacists' interventions are moderate to major clinical significant. Thirty nine percent of clinical pharmacist's interventions had moderate to major financial benefits in present study. The direct medication cost per patient was decreased about 3.8% following clinical pharmacist's interventions. Our data demonstrated that incorrect dose was the most frequent medication error in the infectious diseases ward. Major portion of clinical pharmacist interventions were accepted by physicians and nursing staff. Clinical pharmacist interventions non-significantly decreased the direct medication cost of patients. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial contamination of the hands of doctors: A study in the medicine and dermatology wards

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    Rudrajit Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctors′ hands are a common source of bacterial contamination. Often, these organisms are found to be virulent species with multidrug-resistance patterns. These are the sources of nosocomial infections in many patients. Aims: The present study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of bacterial contamination in the hands of doctors in the Medicine and Dermatology wards of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The hands of 44 doctors were swabbed and cultured at entry to ward and at exit. Then, tap water and alcohol swab wash techniques were used and further swabs were done at each step. Thus, each doctor was sampled four-times for the study. The antibiotic-sensitivity pattern of the organisms was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results: There was a significant contamination of the doctors′ hands at entry (59.1% and at exit (90.9%. Overall, Staphylococcus was the predominant organism (59% at entry and 85% at exit; coagulase-negative ones were more prevalent at entry (32% and coagulase-positive ones were more prevalent at exit (54%. There was no difference in the hand contamination rates of junior and senior doctors. Also, the contamination rates were similar in the Medicine and Dermatology wards. Among the Gram negative organisms, Escherichia coli (4.5%, Pseudomonas (4.5%, Enterococci (13.6% and Klebsiella (9% were the main ones isolated. Gram negative organisms were significantly more prevalent at exit (P = 0.009 compared with their numbers at entry. Hand washing techniques reduced the contamination rates significantly, 76% with tap water wash and further 16.5% with alcohol swab. The removal rate for both groups of organisms was similar. Also, coagulase-positive and -negative Staphylococci showed equal rates of removal with hand washing (P = 0.9793. The organisms were found to be resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics; the beta-lactam group was especially largely resistant both for Gram positive and Gram

  19. Candidemia in Patients with Body Temperature Below 37°C and Admitted to Internal Medicine Wards: Assessment of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascini, Carlo; Falcone, Marco; Bassetti, Matteo; De Rosa, Francesco G; Sozio, Emanuela; Russo, Alessandro; Sbrana, Francesco; Ripoli, Andrea; Merelli, Maria; Scarparo, Claudio; Carmassi, Franco; Venditti, Mario; Menichetti, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    An increasing number of candidemia episodes has been reported in patients cared for in internal medicine wards. These usually older and frail patients may not be suspected as having candidemia because they lack fever at the onset of the episode. To identify the risk factors associated with the lack of fever at the onset of candidemia (ie, the collection of the first positive blood culture for Candida spp.) in patients cared for in internal medicine wards, we compared 2 group of patients with or without fever. We retrospectively review data charts from 3 tertiary care, university hospitals in Italy, comparing patients with or without fever at onset of candidemia. Consecutive candidemic episodes in afebrile patients and matched febrile controls were identified during the 3-year study period. Patient baseline characteristics and several infection-related variables were examined. Random forest analysis was used, given the number of predictors to be considered and the potential complexity of their relations with the onset of fever. We identified 147 candidemic episodes without fever at onset and 147 febrile candidemia episodes. Factors associated with the lack of fever at onset of candidemia were diabetes, Clostridium difficile infection, and a shorter delta time from internal medicine wards admission to the onset of candidemia. The only variable associated with fever was the use of intravascular devices. Quite unexpectedly, antifungal therapy was administered more frequently to patients without fever, and no differences on 30-day mortality rate were documented in the 2 study groups. Clinicians should be aware that an increasing number of patients with invasive candidiasis cared for in internal medicine wards may lack fever at onset, especially those with diabetes and C. difficile infection. Candidemia should be suspected in patients with afebrile systemic inflammatory response syndrome or in worsening clinical condition: blood cultures should be taken, and a timely

  20. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

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    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  1. Is Clinical Competence Perceived Differently for Student Daily Performance on the Wards versus Clerkship Grading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Kanter, Steven L.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical teachers…

  2. Biomarkers in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-He; Huang, Shuwen; Kerr, David

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers have been used in clinical medicine for decades. With the rise of genomics and other advances in molecular biology, biomarker studies have entered a whole new era and hold promise for early diagnosis and effective treatment of many diseases. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention (1). They can be classified into five categories based on their application in different disease stages: 1) antecedent biomarkers to identify the risk of developing an illness, 2) screening biomarkers to screen for subclinical disease, 3) diagnostic biomarkers to recognize overt disease, 4) staging biomarkers to categorise disease severity, and 5) prognostic biomarkers to predict future disease course, including recurrence, response to therapy, and monitoring efficacy of therapy (1). Biomarkers can indicate a variety of health or disease characteristics, including the level or type of exposure to an environmental factor, genetic susceptibility, genetic responses to environmental exposures, markers of subclinical or clinical disease, or indicators of response to therapy. This chapter will focus on how these biomarkers have been used in preventive medicine, diagnostics, therapeutics and prognostics, as well as public health and their current status in clinical practice.

  3. Pharmacogenetics: transforming clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W G

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics, the study of genetic variation relevant to drug metabolism, is a rapidly evolving area of medicine. This brief review will consider some of the recent advances where inherited genetic variants have been associated with either drug efficacy or toxicity. Examples of where pharmacogenetic testing has been adopted into clinical practice will be provided as well as a look at its likely development over the next decade. Finally, the large increase in genetic testing of tumour tissue samples to predict response to molecularly targeted treatments in cancer will be considered.

  4. Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Eva

    2015-09-01

    To describe nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards. A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants. Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicators, regular assessment of patients' swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results. Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure, process and outcome components must be addressed. The use of care pathways, standard care plans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist recommendations in the geriatric ward of a Belgian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somers A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Annemie Somers,1 Hugo Robays,1 Peter De Paepe,2 Georges Van Maele,3 Katrina Perehudoff,4 Mirko Petrovic41Department of Pharmacy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 4Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, BelgiumObjective: To evaluate the type, acceptance rate, and clinical relevance of clinical pharmacist recommendations at the geriatric ward of the Ghent university hospital.Methods: The clinical pharmacist evaluated drug use during a weekly 2-hour visit for a period of 4 months and, if needed, made recommendations to the prescribing physician. The recommendations were classified according to type, acceptance by the physician, prescribed medication, and underlying drug-related problem. Appropriateness of prescribing was assessed using the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI before and after the recommendations were made. Two clinical pharmacologists and two clinical pharmacists independently and retrospectively evaluated the clinical relevance of the recommendations and rated their own acceptance of them.Results: The clinical pharmacist recommended 304 drug therapy changes for 100 patients taking a total of 1137 drugs. The most common underlying drug-related problems concerned incorrect dose, drug–drug interaction, and adverse drug reaction, which appeared most frequently for cardiovascular drugs, drugs for the central nervous system, and drugs for the gastrointestinal tract. The most common type of recommendation concerned adapting the dose, and stopping or changing a drug. In total, 59.7% of the recommendations were accepted by the treating physician. The acceptance rate by the evaluators ranged between 92.4% and 97.0%. The mean clinical relevance of the recommendations was assessed as possibly important (53.4%, possibly low relevance (38.1%, and possibly

  6. Use and performance of non-invasive ventilation in Internal Medicine ward: a real-life study

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    Francesco Ventrella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled trials demonstrated efficacy and safety of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in treatment of acute respiratory failure, initially in Intensive Care Units, then in other care settings (semi-intensive care units, emergency departments, and also in the wards, more often pneumological ones. Few studies have been published about NIV in Italian wards of Internal Medicine with full self-management of NIV by internists in a normal ward setting. We performed a prospective real-life study about the use of NIV in Internal Medicine ward devoid of a critical area of semi-intensive therapy, with the aim of confirming, in this setting, the effectiveness of NIV. During a period of 13 months, 42 patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure of different etiology and acidosis (pH<7.25were treated by NIV. NIV was successful in 81% of patients. In-hospital mortality was 9.5%. Safety of NIV is demonstrated by the absence of serious complications: only 7 patients showed poor compliance and 2 patients had facial pressure ulcer due to the mask. There were not statistical differences in success rate of NIV according to severity of acidosis at admission (pH<7.25 vs pH>7.25, neither according to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and the national early warning score, but the modified early warning score only showed statistically significant difference with lower values in the success group: 2.82±1.57 vs 4.13±1.46 (P<0.05. NIV has proven to be effective and safe in Internal Medicine ward.

  7. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  8. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses' clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alisha M; Smith, Sheree M S

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory patients. 17 guidelines were identified in our systematic review. The quality assessment demonstrated variability in these guidelines. Common core knowledge and technical and non-technical skills were identified. These include pathophysiology, understanding of physiological measurements and monitoring, education, counselling, and ward and patient management. The knowledge and skills extracted from respiratory clinical guidelines may inform a curriculum for ward-based respiratory nursing to ensure optimal care of adult patients.

  9. Detection of prescription errors by a unit-based clinical pharmacist in a nephrology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessal, Ghazal

    2010-02-01

    To determine the impact of a clinical pharmacist on detection and prevention of prescription errors at the nephrology ward of a referral hospital. Nephrology ward of a major referral hospital in Southern Iran. During a 4-month period, a clinical pharmacist was assigned to review medication order sheets and drug orders three times a week at the nephrology ward. Besides chart review, the clinical pharmacist participated in medical rounds once a week. The occurrence of prescribing errors, and related harm was determined on hospitalized patients in this ward during the 4 month period. When an error was detected, intervention was made after agreement of the attending physician. Number and types of prescribing errors, level of harm, and number of interventions were determined. Seventy six patient charts were reviewed during the 4-month period. A total of 818 medications were ordered in these patients. Eighty six prescribing errors were detected in 46 hospital admissions. The mean age of the patients was 47.7 +/- 17.2. Fifty five percent were male while 45% were female. Different types of prescribing errors and their frequencies were as follows: wrong frequency (37.2%), wrong drug selection (19.8%), overdose (12.8%), failure to discontinue (10.5%), failure to order (7 %), under- dose (3.5%), wrong time (3.5%), monitoring (3.5%), wrong route (1.2%), and drug interaction (1.2 %). The attending physician agreed to 96.5% of the prescription errors detected, and interventions were made. Although 89.5% of the detected errors caused no harm, 4(4.7%) of the errors increased the need for monitoring, 2 (2.3%) increased length of stay, and 2 (2.3%) led to permanent patient harm. presence of a clinical pharmacist at the nephrology ward helps in early detection of prescription errors, and therefore potential prevention of negative consequences due to drug administration.

  10. Theoretical fundament modifications performed in the evaluation system at the Internal Medicine ward round performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The medical clinic department in the medicine school located in Cienfuegos city, Cuba performed modifications to the evaluation system in the subject Internal Medicine during the academic course 1999-2000. The main ideas are shown in this investigation constituting the theoretical backgrounds of the changes performed due to the identified deficiencies found and based on the actual pedagogical concepts and acceptation. It is emphasized on the need that the whole system of evaluation should be pertinent, productive, wide, profound, and conformed by the diversity of instruments, so that its instructive, educative, oriented, motivated, and feedback functions should be accomplished.

  11. Increasing access to clinical information on hospital wards.

    OpenAIRE

    Eames, C. H.; Klein, M S

    1994-01-01

    Medical library information resources can make a positive contribution to the clinical information needs of health care professionals. To increase availability of knowledge-based information and transfer information to its point of use, a CD-ROM resource library was networked and interfaced with the existing hospital information system at Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, Michigan. Clinicians in 21 patient care areas now have access to the patient record, full-text pediatric journal...

  12. Standardized sign-out reduces intern perception of medical errors on the general internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Stephen M; Arnett, Michael V; Domanski, Jeremy P

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on reducing variation in housestaff handoff procedures have depended on proprietary checkout software. Use of low-technology standardization techniques has not been widely studied. We wished to determine if standardizing the process of intern sign-out using low-technology sign-out tools could reduce perception of errors and missing handoff data. We conducted a pre-post prospective study of a cohort of 34 interns on a general internal medicine ward. Night interns coming off duty and day interns reassuming care were surveyed on their perception of erroneous sign-out data, mistakes made by the night intern overnight, and occurrences unanticipated by sign-out. Trainee satisfaction with the sign-out process was assessed with a 5-point Likert survey. There were 399 intern surveys performed 8 weeks before and 6 weeks after the introduction of a standardized sign-out form. The response rate was 95% for the night interns and 70% for the interns reassuming care in the morning. After the standardized form was introduced, night interns were significantly (p intern. However, the day teams thought there were significantly less perceived errors on the part of the night intern (p = .001) after introduction of the standardized sign-out sheet. There was no difference in mean Likert scores of resident satisfaction with sign-out before and after the intervention. Standardized written sign-out sheets significantly improve the completeness and effectiveness of handoffs between night and day interns. Further research is needed to determine if these process improvements are related to better patient outcomes.

  13. A quantitative comparison of ward-based clinical pharmacy activities in 7 acute UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onatade, Raliat; Miller, Gavin; Sanghera, Inderjit

    2016-12-01

    Background Several clinical pharmacy activities are common to UK hospitals. It is not clear whether these are provided at similar levels, and whether they take similar amounts of time to carry out. Objective To quantify and compare clinical pharmacist ward activities between different UK hospitals. Setting Seven acute hospitals in the Greater London area (UK). Methods A list of common ward activities was developed. On five consecutive days, pharmacists visiting hospital wards documented total time spent and how many of each activity they undertook. Results were analysed by hospital. The range and number of activities per 100 occupied bed days, and per 24 beds were compared. Main outcome measure Time spent on wards and numbers of each activity undertaken. Results Pharmacists logged a total of 2291 h carrying out 40,000 activities. 4250 changes to prescriptions were made or recommended. 5901 individual medication orders were annotated for clarity or safety. For every 24 beds visited, mean time spent was 230 min-seeing 6.2 new patients, carrying out 3.9 calculations and 1.3 patient consultations, checking and authorising 1.8 discharge prescriptions, and providing staff with information twice. Other activities varied significantly, not all could be explained by differences in hospital specialties or Information Technology systems. Conclusion This is the first detailed comparison of clinical pharmacy ward activities between different hospitals. There are some typical levels of activities carried out. Wide variations in other activities could not always be explained. Despite a large number of contacts, pharmacists reported very few consultation sessions with patients.

  14. Role of clinical pharmacists' interventions in detection and prevention of medication errors in a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Farsaei, Shadi; Rezaee, Haleh; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2011-04-01

    Frequency and type of medication errors and role of clinical pharmacists in detection and prevention of these errors were evaluated in this study. During this interventional study, clinical pharmacists monitored 861 patients' medical records and detected, reported, and prevented medication errors in the infectious disease ward of a major referral teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. Error was defined as any preventable events that lead to inappropriate medication use related to the health care professionals or patients regardless of outcomes. Classification of the errors was done based on Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation drug-related problem coding. During the study period, 112 medication errors (0.13 errors per patient) were detected by clinical pharmacists. Physicians, nurses, and patients were responsible for 55 (49.1%), 54 (48.2%), and 3 (2.7%) of medication errors, respectively. Drug dosing, choice, use and interactions were the most causes of error in medication processes, respectively. All of these errors were detected, reported, and prevented by infectious diseases ward clinical pharmacists. Medication errors occur frequently in medical wards. Clinical pharmacists' interventions can effectively prevent these errors. The types of errors indicate the need for continuous education and implementation of clinical pharmacist's interventions.

  15. Maintaining connections: some thoughts on the value of intensive care unit rounding for general medicine ward teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D

    2011-09-06

    When established ward patients are unexpectedly transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU), the ward team should continue to follow them. Although there may be reasons not to do so, the advantages outweigh the obstacles. Great pedagogic value can be gained from following patients after acute decompensation, but a more important reason is that by following patients into the ICU, the ward team can enact for both patients and their families the twin virtues of caring and continuity. Doing so also demonstrates the highest ideals of medicine-that we are focused not on defined areas of turf, but on our patient's well-being. It shows that we are not merely doing narrowly defined "shift work," but that we truly care about our patients. Rounding on established patients who have been transferred into the ICU is the sort of behavior that undergirds the fundamental bases of professionalism. It takes a few minutes from a busy day, but it can be incredibly beneficial for families, patients, and the ideals of medicine.

  16. Doctors and nurses on wards with greater access to clinical dietitians have better focus on clinical nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoresen, L.; Rothenberg, E.; Beck, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    , as well as to 678 clinical dietitians working in Scandinavian hospitals. The response rate of clinical dietitians, nurses and doctors were 53%, 46% and 29%, respectively. Nurses and doctors who saw clinical dietitians often found it less difficult to identify undernourished patients and found that insight...... into the importance of adequate nutrition was better than those who saw clinical dietitians seldom. Clinical nutrition had a higher priority in units with frequent visits by clinical dietitians. The present study shows that doctors and nurses on wards with greater access to clinical dietitians had better focus...

  17. Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Eshraghi, Azadeh; Sahraei, Zahra

    2013-08-07

    Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs) that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each). Wrong frequency 71 (27%), forget to order 37 (14.1%), wrong selection 33 (12.5%), drug interactions 26 (9.9%), forget to discontinue 25 (9.5%) and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5%) were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6%) followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%). Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists.

  18. Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasinazari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each. Wrong frequency 71 (27%, forget to order 37 (14.1%, wrong selection 33 (12.5%, drug interactions 26 (9.9%, forget to discontinue 25 (9.5% and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5% were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6% followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%. Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists.

  19. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Soltani Arabshahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons. The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability. Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher (concern about patient′s welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems, factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system′s monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource. Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  20. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-03-01

    Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  1. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  2. Results of prospective multicenter study on heart failure on Campania Internal Medicine wards: the FASHION study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gallucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is characterized by a high prevalence and hospitalization rate with considerable health and social impact; the knowledge of its epidemiological features remains the mainstay to assess adequacy of the health care needs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HF in Internal Medicine Units of the Campania region (Italy and patients’ characteristics. We recruited all patients with HF admitted between April 1 and June 30, 2014, in 23 Units of Internal Medicine: 975 patients (19.5% of 5000 admissions, 518 women and 457 men, mean age 76.9±9.9 (range 34-100 with 741 (76% older than 70 years. The mean age was higher in women than men; 35.8% of patients had atrial fibrillation, with higher prevalence in women than in men. Coronary artery disease represented the leading etiology while prevalence of non-ischemic heart failure was higher in women. New York Heart Association class was indicated in 926 patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was measured in 503 patients; 18.4% of patients had a severely reduced LVEF<35%, mostly men (P=0.0001 and 67.4% presented a LVEF>40%. At least one hospital admission in the previous 12 months was registered in 39.6% of patients. One, two and more than two relevant comorbidities were present in 8.6%, 24.7% and 64.8% of patients, respectively. Arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease were more frequent in female. In conclusion, advanced age and clinical complexity were the main characteristics of HF patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine Units in Campania. Gender differences also emerged from the analysis of demographic parameters and etiopathogenetic features. Some diagnostic and therapeutic aspects not in line with that recommended by the most recent HF international guidelines were registered.

  3. Clinical Service of Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The clinical practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) faces three major challenges:(1)How to enhance its contribution on overall medical service quality? (2) How to best address the unmet medical needs in the contemporary society? (3)How to guarantee that the traditional perspective for disease diagnosis and treatment not be neglected in clinical practice?

  4. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Stanislaw; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy internal medicine ward.

  5. [Scientific concepts in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, G

    2003-11-28

    The understanding of the scientific basis and the theory of knowledge are surprisingly heterogeneous in practical and clinical medicine. It is frequently influenced or based on the philosophical theory of critical rationalism founded by Sir Karl Popper. Because the theory of knowledge and the understanding of scientific truth is the central basis for cautious and good clinical practise it is necessary to discuss both points to avoid unscientific auto-immunisation against critique in a type of medicine that regards herself as science-based. Evidence-based medicine would not be possible without interpretation and explanation of existing data into the individual treatment context. Besides an inductive or deductive logic the historical and situative side-conditions of the gathering of knowledge and of experiments are of central importance for their interpretation and their relevance in clinical practice. This historical and situative context warrants reflection but must also be paid attention to in the reflections on medical ethics.

  6. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A; Petersen, L F; Rasmussen, L S

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory rate is among the first vital signs to change in deteriorating patients. The aim was to investigate the agreement between respiratory rate measurements by three different methods. This prospective observational study included acutely admitted adult patients in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM) was considered a clinically relevant difference. We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -13.3 (95% CI: -17.2 to -9.5) BPM and 16.8 (95% CI: 13.0 to 20.6) BPM. A concerning lack of agreement was found between a wireless monitoring system and a standardised clinical approach. Ward staff's measurements also seemed to be inaccurate. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of team-versus ward-aligned clinical pharmacy on unintentional medication discrepancies at admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Sharon M; Grimes, Tamasine C; Jago-Byrne, Marie-Claire; Galvin, Mairéad

    2017-02-01

    Background Medication reconciliation at admission to hospital reduces the prevalence of medication errors. Strategies are needed to ensure timely and efficient delivery of this service. Objective To investigate the effect of aligning clinical pharmacy services with consultant teams, by pharmacists attending post-admission ward rounds, in comparison to a ward-based service, on prevalence of unintentional unresolved discrepancies 48 h into admission. Setting A 243-bed public university teaching hospital in Ireland. Method A prospective, uncontrolled before-after observational study. A gold standard preadmission medication list was completed for each patient and compared with the patient's admission medication prescription and discrepancies were noted. Unresolved discrepancies were examined at 48 h after admission to determine if they were intentional or unintentional. Main outcome measured Number of patients with one or more unintentional, unresolved discrepancy 48 h into admission. Results Data were collected for 140 patients, of whom 73.5% were over 65 years of age. There were no differences between before (ward-aligned) and after (team-aligned) groups regarding age, number of medications or comorbidities. There was a statistically significant reduction in the prevalence of unintentional, unresolved discrepancy(s) per patient (67.3 vs. 27.3%, p medication (13.7 vs. 4.1%, p medications and comorbidities (adjusted odds ratio 4.9, 95% confidence interval 2.3-10.6). Conclusion A consultant team-based clinical pharmacy service contributed positively to medication reconciliation at admission, reducing the prevalence of unintentional, unresolved discrepancy(s) present 48 h after admission.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Po-Liang; Siu, L K; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Ma, Ling; Chiang, Wen-Gin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chen, Tyen-Po

    2009-10-01

    Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282) contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  9. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbabazi Pamela K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33 plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies. Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species followed by roots (13 species while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further

  10. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A.

    2016-01-01

    in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM......) was considered a clinically relevant difference. RESULTS: We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal...... of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits...

  11. [Contemporary clinical medicine--assurances and uncertainties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacovský, V

    2009-01-01

    Selected topics in the contemporary clinical medicine are reflected. The main fields of interest and characteristic features unifying theory and praxis are outlined; specificities of clinical thinking and decision making, and conception of clinical medicine as a scientific discipline are presented. Author deals with assurances, various forms of irresolution in clinical medicine and with problems resulting from the scientific progress.

  12. A work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip; Gilding, Moorene; Seewooruttun, Khooseal; Walsh, Hannah

    2016-09-14

    Background With a rise in the number of unqualified staff providing health and social care, and reports raising concerns about the quality of care provided, there is a need to address the learning needs of clinical support workers. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project that involved a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards. Aim To investigate and identify insights in relation to the content and process of learning using a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers. Method This was a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project involving 25 clinical support workers at the seven mental health inpatient units in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Three clinical skills tutors were appointed to develop, implement and evaluate the work-based learning approach. Four sources of data were used to evaluate this approach, including reflective journals, qualitative responses to questionnaires, three focus groups involving the clinical support workers and a group interview involving the clinical skills tutors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The work-based learning approach was highly valued by the clinical support workers and enhanced learning in practice. Face-to-face learning in practice helped the clinical support workers to develop practice skills and reflective learning skills. Insights relating to the role of clinical support workers were also identified, including the benefits of face-to-face supervision in practice, particularly in relation to the interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusion A work-based learning approach has the potential to enhance care delivery by meeting the learning needs of clinical support workers and enabling them to apply learning to practice. Care providers should consider how the work-based learning approach can be used on a systematic, organisation-wide basis in the context of budgetary

  13. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini

    2008-01-01

    ; appropriate feeds were not present in any of the hospitals. A diagnosis of HIV-AIDS was made in only two cases while approximately 5% children admitted were expected to be infected with HIV in this area. CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment of children admitted to paediatric wards is disturbingly poor...... outpatient consultations were observed, and a record of care was extracted from the case notes of children on the paediatric ward. Additional data were collected from inspection of ward supplies and hospital reports. FINDINGS: Of 1181 outpatient consultations, basic clinical signs were often not checked; e.......g. of 895 children with a history of fever, temperature was measured in 57%, and of 657 of children with cough or dyspnoea only 57 (9%) were examined for respiratory rate. Among 509 inpatients weight was recorded in the case notes in 250 (49%), respiratory rate in 54 (11%) and mental state in 47 (9...

  14. Transition of care: A set of pharmaceutical interventions improves hospital discharge prescriptions from an internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, Marine; Dobrinas, Maria; Maurer, Sophie; Tagan, Damien; Sautebin, Annelore; Blanc, Anne-Laure; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Continuity of care between hospitals and community pharmacies needs to be improved to ensure medication safety. This study aimed to evaluate whether a set of pharmaceutical interventions to prepare hospital discharge facilitates the transition of care. This study took place in the internal medicine ward and in surrounding community pharmacies. The intervention group's patients underwent a set of pharmaceutical interventions during their hospital stay: medication reconciliation at admission, medication review, and discharge planning. The two groups were compared with regards to: number of community pharmacist interventions, time spent on discharge prescriptions, and number of treatment changes. Comparison between the groups showed a much lower (77% lower) number of community pharmacist interventions per discharge prescription in the intervention (n=54 patients) compared to the control group (n=64 patients): 6.9 versus 1.6 interventions, respectively (phospital physician. The number of medication changes at different steps was also significantly lower in the intervention group: 40% fewer (phospital admission and discharge, 66% fewer (phospital discharge and community pharmacy care, and 25% fewer (p=0.002) between community pharmacy care and care by a general practitioner. An intervention group underwent significantly fewer medication changes in subsequent steps in the transition of care after a set of interventions performed during their hospital stay. Community pharmacists had to perform fewer interventions on discharge prescriptions. Altogether, this improves continuity of care. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of risk factors for candidemia in non-neutropenic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine wards: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, M; Tiseo, G; Tascini, C; Russo, A; Sozio, E; Raponi, G; Rosin, C; Pignatelli, P; Carfagna, P; Farcomeni, A; Luzzati, R; Violi, F; Menichetti, F; Venditti, M

    2017-06-01

    An increasing prevalence of candidemia has been reported in Internal Medicine wards (IMWs). The aim of our study was to identify risk factors for candidemia among non-neutropenic patients hospitalized in IMWs. A multicenter case-control study was performed in three hospitals in Italy. Patients developing candidemia (cases) were compared to patients without candidemia (controls) matched by age, time of admission and duration of hospitalization. A logistic regression analysis identified risk factors for candidemia, and a new risk score was developed. Validation was performed on an external cohort of patients. Overall, 951 patients (317 cases of candidemia and 634 controls) were included in the derivation cohort, while 270 patients (90 patients with candidemia and 180 controls) constituted the validation cohort. Severe sepsis or septic shock, recent Clostridium difficile infection, diabetes mellitus, total parenteral nutrition, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concomitant intravenous glycopeptide therapy, presence of peripherally inserted central catheter, previous antibiotic therapy and immunosuppressive therapy were factors independently associated with candidemia. The new risk score showed good area under the curve (AUC) values in both derivation (AUC 0.973 95% CI 0.809-0.997, pcandidemia. A new risk score with a good performance could facilitate the identification of candidates to early antifungal therapy. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ling

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs, the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282 contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  18. Patients' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward--an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2014-07-02

    It is well known that patients' involvement in health care students' learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students' learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students' learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients

  19. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between

  20. Chemical restraint in routine clinical practice: a report from a general hospital psychiatric ward in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papamichael Georgios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies regarding chemical restraint in routine clinical psychiatric practice. There may be wide variations between different settings and countries. Methods A retrospective study on chemical restraint was performed in the 11-bed psychiatric ward of the General Hospital of Arta, in northwestern Greece. All admissions over a 2-year-period (from March 2008 to March 2010 were examined. Results Chemical restraint was applied in 33 cases (10.5% of total admissions. From a total of 82 injections, 22 involved a benzodiazepine and/or levomepromazine, whereas 60 injections involved an antipsychotic agent, almost exclusively haloperidol (96.7% of cases, usually in combination with a benzodiazepine (61.7% of cases. In 36.4% of cases the patient was further subjected to restraint or seclusion. Conclusions In our unit, clinicians prefer the combined antipsychotic/benzodiazepine regimen for the management of patients' acute agitation and violent behaviour. Conventional antipsychotics are administrated almost exclusively and in a significant proportion of cases further coercive measures are applied. Studies on the practice of chemical restraint should be regularly performed in clinical settings.

  1. [Delivering bad news in a Swiss internal medicine ward: a medical and nurse partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castioni, J; Teike Lüthi, F; Boretti, S Moser; Vollenweider, P

    2015-11-01

    Delivering bad news to a patient has a major impact for patients, their relatives and caregivers. The way this information is delivered can affect the way the patient sees his disease and potentially how he adheres to its treatment. To improve this communication with the patient the service of internal medicine at the Swiss university hospital of Lausanne set up a process including the coordination between all involved caregivers, and to break the bad news in a setting including a medical and nurse partnership. It also underscores that the resident in charge of the patient remains the coordinator of delivering new information. Moreover, the service provides communication tools to the caregivers to improve the communication skills.

  2. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidemia among Internal Medicine Wards of community hospitals of Udine province, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Silvestri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Candidemia is an emerging problem among patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine Wards (IMW. We performed a retrospective study to assess the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidaemia recorded over a 3-year period (2010-2012 among IMW of community hospitals of Udine province in Italy: forty-eight patients were identified, with an overall incidence of 1.44 cases/1000 hospital admissions/year. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, followed by Candida parapsilosis that accounted for 42.9% of Tolmezzo cases. All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin and caspofungin, while 11.4% of strains were not-susceptible to voriconazole and 14.3% to fluconazole. Crude mortality was 41.7%. In conclusion, in community hospitals overall incidence of candidemia is similar to tertiary care hospitals, but 80% of cases are detected in IMW. Candida species distribution is overlapping, but differences in local epidemiology were found and should be taken into consideration. No resistance to amphotericin and caspofungin was found while resistance to azoles was observed. Knowledge of this data might be useful when planning the best therapeutic strategy.

  3. Theory of mind in schizophrenia: correlation with clinical symptomatology, emotional recognition and ward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Kyeong; Kim, Yong Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have suggested the presence of a theory of mind (ToM) deficit in schizophrenic disorders. This study examined the relationship of emotion recognition, theory of mind, and ward behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Fifty-five patients with chronic schizophrenia completed measures of emotion recognition, ToM, intelligence, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Nurse's Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Theory of mind sum score correlated significantly with IQ, emotion recognition, and ward behavior. Ward behavior was linked to the duration of the illness, and even more so to theory of mind deficits. Theory of mind contributed a significant proportion of the amount of variance to explain social behavior on the ward. Considering our study results, impaired theory of mind contributes significantly to the understanding of social competence in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Clinical-Homeopathic Profile in the Pediatric Ward at the University Hospital – Brazil

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    Debora Alves dos Santos Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2004, the deployment of Homeopathy in the pediatric ward at the University Hospital of Gaffrée Guinle – UNIRIO (HUGG at the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro was initiated in conjunction with both the Pediatric and Homeopathy Service. A research project approved by the HUGG Ethics and Research Committee was prepared to survey the most prevalent diseases. A team composed of medical students and doctors participating in the homeopathy course was formed and underwent training, enabling them to use the established protocols of action. A partnership was established with the Fluminense Federal University(Universidade Federal Fluminense – UFF, for the supply of drugs. In early 2009, the research project started, followed by homeopathic treatment in the pediatric ward. Aim: To demonstrate the diseases and treatment using homeopathic therapy on patients in the pediatric ward at the HUGG-UNIRIO-Brazil. Methodology: A sectional clinical study was carried out on patients participating in a research approved and registered by the Brazilian Research Ethics Committee, named,"The study of the effect of Homeopathic Treatment as an Adjunct Therapy on patients Hospitalized in the Pediatric Ward of HUGG". Criteria of Inclusion: Newborns up to the age of 16 of both sexes were admitted to the pediatric ward of HUGG, from May to October 2009. The diagnosis for admission being: respiratory, gastrointestinal and/or dermatologic diseases. A consent form had to be accepted and signed by the person responsible. Inclusion depended on the availability of having the appropriate homeopathic medicine in stock. Criteria of Exclusion: Cases of discontinuation of the homeopathic treatment or medical records not completed correctly. The medical records were analyzed individually. Microsoft Office Excel 2007 was used for data collection and analysis. Results: 32 patients admitted: 80% treated with

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Adolescent Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine — giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs — is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity — through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents — all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused

  6. Would artificial neural networks implemented in clinical wards help nephrologists in predicting epoetin responsiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marone Claudio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its strong intra- and inter-individual variability, predicting the ideal erythropoietin dose is a difficult task. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the impact of the main parameters known to influence the responsiveness to epoetin beta and to test the performance of artificial neural networks (ANNs in predicting the dose required to reach the haemoglobin target and the monthly dose adjustments. Methods We did a secondary analysis of the survey on Anaemia Management in dialysis patients in Switzerland; a prospective, non-randomized observational study, enrolling 340 patients of 26 centres and in order to have additional information about erythropoietin responsiveness, we included a further 92 patients from the Renal Services of the Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, Bellinzona, Switzerland. The performance of ANNs in predicting the epoetin dose was compared with that of linear regressions and of nephrologists in charge of the patients. Results For a specificity of 50%, the sensitivity of ANNs compared with linear regressions in predicting the erythropoietin dose to reach the haemoglobin target was 78 vs. 44% (P P P Conclusion In predicting the erythropoietin dose required for an individual patient and the monthly dose adjustments ANNs are superior to nephrologists' opinion. Thus, ANN may be a useful and promising tool that could be implemented in clinical wards to help nephrologists in prescribing erythropoietin.

  7. The derivation and validation of a simple model for predicting in-hospital mortality of acutely admitted patients to internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Ali; Saliba, Walid; Schwartz, Naama; Bisharat, Naiel

    2017-06-01

    Limited information is available about clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality in acute unselected medical admissions. Such information could assist medical decision-making.To develop a clinical model for predicting in-hospital mortality in unselected acute medical admissions and to test the impact of secondary conditions on hospital mortality.This is an analysis of the medical records of patients admitted to internal medicine wards at one university-affiliated hospital. Data obtained from the years 2013 to 2014 were used as a derivation dataset for creating a prediction model, while data from 2015 was used as a validation dataset to test the performance of the model. For each admission, a set of clinical and epidemiological variables was obtained. The main diagnosis at hospitalization was recorded, and all additional or secondary conditions that coexisted at hospital admission or that developed during hospital stay were considered secondary conditions.The derivation and validation datasets included 7268 and 7843 patients, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate averaged 7.2%. The following variables entered the final model; age, body mass index, mean arterial pressure on admission, prior admission within 3 months, background morbidity of heart failure and active malignancy, and chronic use of statins and antiplatelet agents. The c-statistic (ROC-AUC) of the prediction model was 80.5% without adjustment for main or secondary conditions, 84.5%, with adjustment for the main diagnosis, and 89.5% with adjustment for the main diagnosis and secondary conditions. The accuracy of the predictive model reached 81% on the validation dataset.A prediction model based on clinical data with adjustment for secondary conditions exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. We provide a proof of concept that there is an added value for incorporating secondary conditions while predicting probabilities of in-hospital mortality. Further improvement of the model performance

  8. Role of Clinical Pharmacists in Early Detection, Reporting and Prevention of Medication Errors in a Medical Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Hassani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization evaluation (DUE is an effective process in order to identifying variability in drug use and subsequent application of effective interventions for improving  patient outcomes. In this study, appropriate uses of drugs were evaluated by pharmacy service.Methods: A prospective, interventional study was designed for determining frequency and type of clinical pharmacists’ interventions and medication errors occurred in the infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 8 months. Results: During the 8 months of the study period, 498 errors were detected among 419 patients that admitted to infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital. Most common errors were related to DVT prophylaxis, SUP and vancomycin monitoring. Discussion: Our result showed that clinical pharmacy interventions can have an important role in reducing adverse drug events and their activities can be effective for reducing of medication error.

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Ling; Chen Tun-Chieh; Siu LK; Lu Po-Liang; Chiang Wen-Gin; Chen Yen-Hsu; Lin Sheng-Fung; Chen Tyen-Po

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of h...

  10. Clinical features of severe malnutrition at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barus, S T; Rani, R; Lubis, N U; Hamid, E D; Tarigan, S

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study on severe malnutrition concerning children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1 to December 31, 1988 was conducted. Patients less than five years old were included in this study. The purpose of this study was to know the incidence of severe malnutrition, its symptoms and signs, the immunization status, feeding pattern and socio-economic factors. Out of the 3370 hospitalized patients, 2453 (72.78%) were children under five years old. Of these, 312 (12%) suffered from severe malnutrition. It consisted of marasmus 131 (41.9%), marasmic kwashiorkor 94 (30.1%) and kwashiorkor 87 (27.8%). The highest incidence was found in the age group of 0-2 years (58%). Clinical manifestation of marasmus were old man face (131 or 100%), muscular hypotrophy (118 or 71.9%) and decreased subcutaneous fat (116 or 71.1%) in marasmic kwashiorkor children 46 or 50% had their hair easily picked out, 45 or 46.3% showed hyperpigmentation and 48 or 52% had pretibial edema in the kwashiorkor group 29 or 63% had moon face, 52 or 60.4% showed crazy pavement dermatosis, 77 or 51.3% had hepatomegaly and 87 or 48% pretebial edema. Moon face was seen in 29 (63%), crazy Pavement Dermatosis in 52 (60.4%), hepatomegaly in 77 (51.3%), and pretebial edema in 87 (48%) of kwashiorkor cases. The accompanying diseases were mostly diarrhea (95%) and bronchopneumonia (22%). Immunization status showed that BCG comprised 50.6%, while DPT III and OPV III in 13.7% and 10.5% respectively and measles only 0.64%. More than half (59.6%) of them were breast-fed up to 6 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Graduate Program Organization in Clinical Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Graduate training in clinical veterinary medicine is discussed. The options available to the student and problems that must be dealt with are presented, along with the requirements to accomplish a finely structured program that satisfies the needs of both the trainee and clinical veterinary medicine. (Author/MLW)

  12. Moral maps and medical imaginaries: clinical tourism at Malawi's College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, Claire L

    2012-01-01

    At an understaffed and underresourced urban African training hospital, Malawian medical students learn to be doctors while foreign medical students, visiting Malawi as clinical tourists on short-term electives, learn about “global health.” Scientific ideas circulate fast there; clinical tourists circulate readily from outside to Malawi but not the reverse; medical technologies circulate slowly, erratically, and sometimes not at all. Medicine's uneven globalization is on full display. I extend scholarship on moral imaginations and medical imaginaries to propose that students map these wards variously as places in which—or from which—they seek a better medicine. Clinical tourists, enacting their own moral maps, also become representatives of medicine “out there”: points on the maps of others. Ethnographic data show that for Malawians, clinical tourists are colleagues, foils against whom they construct ideas about a superior and distinctly Malawian medicine and visions of possible alternative futures for themselves.

  13. The team builder: the role of nurses facilitating interprofessional student teams at a Swedish clinical training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisabeth, Carlson; Ewa, Pilhammar; Christine, Wann-Hansson

    2011-09-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an educational strategy attracting increased interest as a method to train future health care professionals. One example of IPE is the clinical training ward, where students from different health care professions practice together. At these wards the students work in teams with the support of facilitators. The professional composition of the team of facilitators usually corresponds to that of the students. However, previous studies have revealed that nurse facilitators are often in the majority, responsible for student nurses' profession specific facilitation as well as interprofessional team orientated facilitation. The objective of this study was to describe how nurses act when facilitating interprofessional student teams at a clinical training ward. The research design was ethnography and data were collected through participant observations and interviews. The analysis revealed the four strategies used when facilitating teams of interprofessional students to enhance collaborative work and professional understanding. The nurse facilitator as a team builder is a new and exciting role for nurses taking on the responsibility of facilitating interprofessional student teams. Future research needs to explore how facilitating nurses balance profession specific and team oriented facilitating within the environment of an interprofessional learning context.

  14. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove;

    2016-01-01

    roles, responsibility. Conclusion: Before using PAR it is crucial to investigate if the organization and the participants at all levels are suited and agree to participate actively. The findings indicate, that to carry out PAR in a busy medical ward, it is necessary to evaluate whether the necessary...

  15. The Romano-Ward syndrome: a case presenting as near drowning with a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E M; Knapp, J F; Sharma, V

    1992-10-01

    Patients with the Romano-Ward syndrome, a form of congenital long Q-T syndrome (LQTS), present with syncopal episodes and are at risk for sudden death. Patients with LQTS may be misdiagnosed if the physician is unaware of this entity. The risk of sudden death makes recognition important so that appropriate therapy can be initiated. A case is discussed in which the patient presented following a near-drowning episode. Family history revealed a familial "seizure disorder." After analysis of the patient's and father's ECGs, the diagnosis of Romano-Ward syndrome was made. A review of the literature was done, concentrating on presentation, pathophysiology, electrocardiographic findings, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of congenital LQTS. This paper is presented to emphasize the importance of physician awareness of LQTS because of the risk of sudden death. Proper diagnosis can lead to treatment that is effective in reducing mortality by more than 90%.

  16. To Investigate the Quality Nursing Ward Neural Department of Internal Medicine%神经内科病房开展优质护理的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢霖

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of unfolding high quality of nursing in Department of internal medicine ward neural work pat ern, and car ies on the appraisal to the quality care carried out in neural Department of internal medicine work. To car y out the quality of nursing in Department of internal medicine ward nerve can obviously daily nursing work quality and improve the patients' satisfaction in nursing care for patients with various services, nursing staf unanimously gave praise, up the new image of good for hospital and nursing industry tree.%探讨分析在神经内科病房中开展优质护理的工作模式,并对在神经内科开展的优质护理工作进行评价。在神经内科病房中开展优质护理可以明显日常的护理工作的质量和提高患者对护理工作的满意度,患者对于护理人员的各项服务一致给予了好评,为医院及护理行业树起了良好的新形象。

  17. Adaptation of the organizational strategy of the learning evaluation system in the internal medicine wards round performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available After having identified the difficulties in the development of abilities in the first state exam of medicine, the members of the Medical Clinical Department carried out some innovations in the system of evaluation in Internal medicine which included the introduction of computarized simulations as a way to assess the residents partially in the subject and the substitution of the objectively structural clinical exam of the final test for an integral exam of performance and a written test. The changes were put into practice from 1999 to the year 2000 and it was observable that the results of the exam of performance of the second state exam were superior. There was also an improvement in the results of the state exam when compared with the other exams. This strategy offers a more real and objective certificate of the resident´s competence in the fulfilment of their professional tasks and stimulates a process of learning directed to guarantee the application of knowledge and to form the students integrally

  18. [Design of a Curriculum Clinical Social Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostomzyk, J G; Simoes, E; Mittelstaedt, G V

    2015-09-01

    The economic transformation of health care systems, which is supported by both the economic and the political sector, is in demand of constant humane correction. Legal regulations of social systems securing health corresponding to the code of social law are guard rails for a responsible use of limited resources and are subject to constant development. All doctors caring for patients should be in a position to reflect the real life context of their patients as both causal and modifying influence for health and disease from a social medical perspective, apart from their specific medical field of expertise.Accordingly 3 parts of sub-specialization training are suggested: clinical tasks of social medicine as detailed in the code of social law, clinical social medicine in health care according to the 5(th) book of the code of social law and social medicine in clinical social medicine/participation. Higher level-of-care hospitals, as well as rehabilitation clinics, should offer sub-specialization in social medicine without interruption of employment contracts. Corresponding criteria for the regulation on further education should be formulated by the German Society of Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP) as the competent scientific association and presented to the committee on further education of the Federal Medical Association. This aims at strengthening social medicine in clinical care.

  19. Nuclear medicine therapy principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aktolun, Cumali

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews nuclear medicine techniques and technology for therapy of malignant and benign diseases, covering scientific principles and clinical applications, and trials of experimental agents for treating tumors involving virtually every organ system.

  20. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays bloo

  1. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  2. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  3. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium.

  4. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward. PMID:28164113

  5. The role of the internal medicine specialist in the management of infective complications in general surgical wards

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    Patrizia Zoboli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Internal medicine specialists are often asked to evaluate a patient before surgery. Perioperative risk evaluation for elderly patients is important, because complications increase with age. The increasing age of the general population increases the probabilities of surgery in the older patients. The manifestation of a surgical problem, is more likely to be severe and complicated in the elderly patients. In fact, emergency surgery treatment occurs more frequently in the elderly (e.g., it is much more common to see intestinal obstruction complicating colorectal cancer in the elderly compared with a younger population. Old age is an independent factor for long hospital stay after surgery. The role of the preoperative medical consultant is to identify and evaluate a patient’s current medical status and provide a clinical risk profile, in order to decide whether further tests are indicated prior to surgery, and to optimise the patient’s medical condition in the attempt of reducing the risk of complications. The medical consultant must know which medical condition could eventually influence the surgery, achieve a good contact and communication between the medical and surgical team, in order to obtain the best management planning. AIM OF THE STUDY This paper focuses on the rational use of antibiotic prophylaxis and on the treatment of the complications of post-surgery infections (e.g., pulmonary complication, peritonitis, intra-abdominal infection. Specific aspects of pre-operative risk evaluation and peri and post-operative management are discussed. CONCLUSIONS The internal medicin specialist in collaboration with the surgical team is necessary in the peri and post-surgery management.

  6. Clinical practice on the horizon: personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the human genome project, we have never known so much about the uniqueness of individuals. Personalized medicine is poised to use this genetic and genomic information along with the impact of environment and clinical presentation to provide healthcare from an individual perspective. This offers the opportunity to improve our ability to diagnose and predict disease, provide earlier intervention, identify new treatment regimens, and address the safety and efficacy of drug use. The impact of personalized medicine to our current model of healthcare delivery is tremendous, and although strides have been made, there are still challenges and barriers to overcome before personalized medicine can be fully implemented. Advanced practice nurses may not be fully aware of the personalized medicine initiative or may not be well versed on genetic and genomic content, which is a key concept of personalized medicine. The role of advanced practice nurses is an integral part of the healthcare system, and as such, they are poised to be key providers and contributors to personalized medicine. The personalized medicine initiative is discussed along with examples of genetic and genomic information that lend to our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, as well as the role and responsibilities of advanced practice nurses. Resources for personalized medicine and genetic and genomic content are provided.

  7. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

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    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  8. Clinical holistic medicine: applied consciousness-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2004-03-03

    Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense) turning back to the "old medicine", where the family physician was the all-concerned "old country doctor" who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as "exceptional".

  9. [Impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment among geriatric patients treated on internal medicine wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Gábor; Hamar, Mátyás; Bíró, László; Kovács, Gábor; Gazdag, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

  10. Planning for a School of Clinical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creditor, Morton C.

    1976-01-01

    Describes briefly the objectives, problem-oriented educational process, 4-phase curriculum, and resources of a new 3-year School of Clinical Medicine, part of a decentralized and regionalized scheme of medical education designed to improve geographic distribution of graduates, increase incentive to enter primary care specialties, and assure…

  11. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense) turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic...

  12. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Metastatic Cancer

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that the consciousness-based/holistic medical toolbox has a serious additional offer to cancer patients and, as a consequence, designed a treatment for the patient with metastasized cancer. From a holistic perspective, cancer can be understood as a simple disturbance of the cells, arising from the tissue holding on to a trauma with strong emotional content. This is called “a blockage”, where the function of the cells is allocated from their original function in the tissue to a function of holding emotions. We hope to be able not only to improve the quality of life, but also to improve survival and in some cases even induce spontaneous remission of the metastasized cancer. This paper describes how work with a patient with metastasized cancer can be done in the holistic clinical practice in 14 days on an individual basis, helping the patient to recover her human character, purpose of life, coherence, and will to live, thus improving quality of life and possibly also survival time. The holistic therapeutic work includes (1 teaching existential theory, (2 working with life perspective and philosophy of life, (3 helping the patient to acknowledge the state of the disease and the feelings connected to it, and finally (4 getting the patient into the holistic state of healing: (a feeling old repressed emotions, (b understanding why she got sick from a holistic point of view, and finally (c letting go of the negative beliefs and decisions that made her sick according to the holistic theory of nongenetic diseases. The theory of the human character, the quality of life theories, the holistic theory of cancer, the holistic process theory of healing, the theory of (Antonovsky coherence, and the life mission theory are the most important theories for the patient to find hope and mobilize the will to fight the cancer and survive. The patient went through the following phases: (1 finding the purpose of life and hidden resources; (2 confronting

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as “exceptional”.

  14. [Brief psychotherapy in clinical medicine patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, M

    1992-01-01

    The criteria that "illness is biographical crisis od the individual" and that the only medicine is "personal medicine" is stressed. Clinical medicine, which covers medicine in its entirety, demands conceptual and doctrinal reaffirmations so that gradually the patient can come to be dealt with as a human being fron a holistic point of view, which commences with his complaint and consultation, continues with the interview and semiology, to finish with the diagnosis and therapy which, although in some cases it may be surgical, is still medical and integral. All the steps mentioned are bio-socio-cultural thus, whether in the practice of general clinical medicine or in the most specialized and technologically sophisticated clinical medicine, the animist component is not lacking and demands a minimum degree of "psychosomatic" Knowledge. The use of a psychotherapeutic technique is proposed which, while based on the psychoanalysis theory, is distanced technically from it as a "psychotherapy on limited time and goals", which abbreviates the disease, and is projected not as the "focus" of therapeutic work, but as a re-evaluation of the "life style" of each individual, and tends to help to develop a "project for life" suited to the possible personal, familiar and social well-being of the "patient". Technically speaking, this modality of brief psychotherapy is based on the nonuse of transferential interpretations, on impeding the regression od the patient, on facilitating a cognitice-affective development of his conflicts and thus obtain an internal object mutation which allows the transformation of the "past" into true history, and the "present" into vital perspectives. This technique is within reach of every health professional.

  15. ACCELERATIVE AND RADIONUCLIDE TECHNOLOGIES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

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    A. P. Chernyaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods based on accelerative and radionuclide technologies are more and more invading clinical practice of modern medicine. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the role of nuclear physics techniques for treatment and diagnostics of various disorders. We analyzed data published in the last 50 years in research papers, reports and other open sources considering particulars of electron accelerators and heavy charged particles in radiation and nuclear medicine and presenting the information on prevalence of accelerators and other high-tech medical equipment in Russia and worldwide.

  16. Sex and gender differences in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Seeland, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in frequent diseases are more widespread than one may assume. In addition, they have significant yet frequently underestimated consequences on the daily practice of medicine, on outcomes and effects of therapies. Gender medicine is a novel medical discipline that takes into account the effects of sex and gender on the health of women and men. The major goal is to improve health and health care for both, for women as well as for men. We give in this chapter an overview on sex and gender differences in a number of clinical areas, in cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary diseases, gastroenterology and hepatology, in nephrology, autoimmune diseases, endocrinology, hematology, neurology. We discuss the preferential use of male animals in drug development, the underrepresentation of women in early and cardiovascular clinical trials, sex and gender differences in pharmacology, in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, in management and drug use. Most guidelines do not include even well-known sex and gender differences. European guidelines for the management of cardiovascular diseases in pregnancy have only recently been published. Personalized medicine cannot replace gender-based medicine. Large databases reveal that gender remains an independent risk factor after ethnicity, age, comorbidities, and scored risk factors have been taken into account. Some genetic variants carry a different risk in women and men. The sociocultural dimension of gender integrating lifestyle, environment, stress, and other variables cannot be replaced by a sum of biological parameters. Because of this prominent role of gender, clinical care algorithms must include gender-based assessment.

  17. Incorporation of fasting therapy in an integrative medicine ward: evaluation of outcome, safety, and effects on lifestyle adherence in a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Hoffmann, Barbara; Moebus, Susanne; Bäcker, Markus; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to implement fasting therapy in an inpatient integrative medicine ward and to evaluate safety, acceptance, and effects on health-related outcomes and lifestyle adherence. This was a prospective observational study with consecutive inpatients over 3 [corrected] years. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for fasting therapy were checked by treating physicians and recommendations given. After receiving full information patients decided whether they would participate in fasting. Outcomes were assessed on admission, at discharge, and 3 and 6 months after discharge. The study took place in an integrative medicine department of an academic teaching hospital. Subjects were newly admitted inpatients with chronic internal diseases and chronic pain syndromes, with lengths of hospital stay of >3 days. All patients received intensive integrative treatments including Mind/Body Medicine, acupuncture, nutritional/lifestyle education, and hydrotherapy. Fasting patients participated in a 7-day juice fast (intake fasting, severity of main complaint, quality of life (QOL, MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey), safety, lifestyle adherence to recommendations given (relaxation, diet, exercise). Of 2121 patients with complete discharge questionnaires, 952 patients participated in fasting, 873 had a normocaloric vegetarian diet, and 296 patients had other diets and were excluded. Response rates were 71% and 56% at 3- and 6-month follow-up. The main disease-related complaint at discharge was significantly greater improved in fasters versus nonfasters (p Fasting was well tolerated and no serious fasting-related adverse effects were reported. In all, 743 (78%) of fasting patients reported improvement of their health through fasting. Descriptors of lifestyle adherence showed higher levels of related activities in the 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Fasting can safely and successfully be implemented in an inpatient integrative medicine concept and is perceived as a health

  18. Cryogenic Thermophysical Studies for Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华泽钊

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenic technology has been widely used in clinical medicine and in pharmaceutics, so thermophysical studies are extremely important to solve problems during freezing and thawing. This paper reports some recent research in clinical medicine, including cryo-injury, cryosurgery, and cryopreservation of some important cells and tissues. Microscopic images of the freezing process with a cryomicroscope system show that the dendritic ice growth is affected by the solution concentration, the cooling rate, and the number of embryos. An enthalpy method is used for the freeze-thaw analysis of the cryosurgery with a program developed to predict the temperature profile and the interface motion, which compares well with experimental results. A very rapid cooling technique is developed by quenching the samples into subcooled liquid nitrogen for vitrification of cells and tissues. An analytical method developed to prevent the fracture of arteries during freezing has been verified by the electronic microscopic investigation.

  19. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students, Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Gorski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students, targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards. Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization, received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  20. Nursing students’ perception of clinical learning experiences as provided by the nursing staff in the wards

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    N. R. C. TIakula

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive survey was carried out, using convenience and systematic sampling in order to better understand the manner in which student nurses perceive their clinical experience in the hospital. Data were collected from 80 subjects in 4 nursing colleges using a critical incident technique. Positive and negative experiences are described,

  1. [Undergraduate teaching project on clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaba, Hiroyuki

    2003-11-01

    Undergraduate teaching in clinical laboratory medicine is at the center of contemporary medical education. Students are expected to learn advanced laboratory medicine and basic diagnostic skills such as blood sampling, peripheral blood cell counting, blood typing, cross match test, urinalysis, electrocardiography, and bacteriological examinations through their training program. In our department, we have compulsory lectures, a basic practical training course and an advanced training course for the medical students. The compulsory lectures are programmed for the students in the fourth grade to obtain basic knowledge of clinical laboratory medicine and the patho-physiology of diseases. The teaching staff makes every effort to make their lectures exciting and interesting. As we experienced as medical students in the past, boring lectures give students nothing but a nap. For every senior teaching staff in our school, it is obligatory to be evaluated on their lectures by the students and other teaching staff every year to improve their teaching skills and materials. Teaching materials utilizing personal computers and the Internet are becoming more and more important. The basic practical training course is for the students in the fifth grade. The laboratory technicians help us teach students basic diagnostic skills in this program. The students in the advanced training course have to attend morning conferences in the department, including reverse clinico-pathological conferences and laboratory investigations. The reversed clinico-pathological conferences are popular among the students. Through our training programs, we hope that the students raise many questions that they solve themselves in the future, as well as learning established clinical laboratory medicine.

  2. [Clinical medicine of the western medicine in the 18th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, C

    2001-07-01

    The 18th century is an important turning point not only in human history, but also in medical history. G. B. Morgagni was an Italian who founded the organic pathology in the 18th century, which was a bridge between basic medicine and clinical medicine of western medicine. H. Boerhaave called for "paying attention to the development of clinical medicine", and under this situation, western clinical medicine was attached importance and developed again in the 18th century. However, at the same time, the mechanical materialism was also infiltrated into western clinical medicine.

  3. Analogies and metaphors in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukume, Gwinyai; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-02-01

    Medicine is traditionally known as an 'art', and not an exact 'science'. Medical images of clinical signs and pathology were communicated through 'metaphors' in the 19th and early 20th centuries to make recognition easier in anticipation of the clinical counterpart when encountered in medical practice. They have served as teaching aids, enhancing memory retention for medical students, nurses and doctors and have withstood the test of time. Standard medical textbooks contain metaphors that have become entrenched in teaching, learning and examining in medical schools and hospitals worldwide. The continued use of metaphors has given rise to an ongoing debate, particularly in Africa, due to the usage of inappropriate or unfamiliar metaphors which are not locally or culturally relevant. Despite this, medical analogies will no doubt continue to be useful for medical education, clinical practice and 'aide memoirs' for examinations, and bring light humour, for a long time to come.

  4. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Cofield,Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment...

  5. Clinical features of severe malnutrition at the pediatric ward of Tembakau Deli Hospital, Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panggabean, G; Faisal; Nasution, R; Loebis, M S; Siregar, Z

    1990-01-01

    Six hundred and fifty seven hospitalized patients under five in Child Health Department Hospital Tembakau Deli Medan, from January 1988 until December 1988 had been investigated retrospectively. Severe PCM are found 12 (1.8%), consisting of 7 (58.3%) boys and 5 (41.7%) girls. Most cases were found at the age of 1-2 years (33.3%). Marasmus were found in 5 cases (41.7%), Marasmic kwashiorkor in 4 (54%), while Kwashiorkor in 3 cases (25%). Clinical features of the patients are as follow: hepatomegaly 7 (58.3%), anorexia 6 (50%), old man face 5 (41.7%), subcutaneous fat decrease 5 (41.7%), thinsparse easily pick hairs 5 (41.7%), muscle hypotrophy 5 (41.7%), edema of the lower extremity 4 (33.3%), crazy pavement dermatosis 2 (16.7%). All patients were hospitalized combined with other diseases as chronic diarrhea 6 (50%), bronchopneumonia 5 (41.7%) and ascariasis 4 (33.3%). Mortality in 1 patient.

  6. [Clinical psychopathological research on late-onset schizophrenia--mainly patients with schizophrenia from a hospital psychiatric ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Manabu; Kato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the field of clinical psychiatry, cases of late-onset schizophrenia are often observed in the population of 40 years or older. Female patients seem to significantly predominate those diagnosed with late-onset schizophrenia. Generally, paranoid delusions of reference with family members, neighbors, and friends are observed as clinical features of such late-onset schizophrenia conditions. Medical treatment for such a condition is often effective and considered to improve the prognosis. The authors conducted clinical research at Jichi Medical University Hospital psychiatric ward involving 38 late-onset schizophrenia patients (7 males; 31 females) diagnosed over the age of 40 using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. Subjects were selected from 316 schizophrenia patients (164 males; 152 females) admitted to the hospital for schizophrenia treatment at some time during the 13 years from April 1, 1993 to March 31, 2006. Also, another 14 late-onset schizophrenia patients diagnosed over the age of 40 (1 male; 13 females), with additional investigation, were selected from 130 cases (50 males; 80 females) treated in related facilities at some time during the 2 years from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2006. The investigation revealed the following results: (1) Cases showing an onset after the age of 40 comprised 12% of the total population. Female cases comprised 20.4%, being significantly higher than that of male cases (4.3%). Within the psychiatric ward, cases showing an onset after 40 made up 10.8% of the total population. Female cases comprised 16.3%, being significantly higher than that of male cases (2.0%). (2) The paranoid type comprised 55.3% of the total population of late-onset cases, being significantly higher than in early-onset cases younger than 40 years old. A total of 55.3% of late-onset cases also showed depressive symptoms, being significantly higher than in early-onset cases. (3) For late-onset, 55.3% of patients showed an introverted premorbid character, while

  7. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment and retention issues with specific strategies will help researchers deal with these issues in their funding applications and in turn develop the necessary infrastructure to participate in emergency medicine clinical trials. PMID:21040112

  8. Etiological study of fever of unknown origin in patients admitted to medicine ward of a teaching hospital of Eastern India

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    Dipanjan Bandyopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a developing country, infectious disease remains the most important cause of fever, but the noncommunicable diseases, like malignancy, are fast becoming important differential diagnoses. An important clinical problem is the cases labeled as fever of unknown origin (FUO, which often evade diagnosis. Objective: The present study was undertaken to find the cause of FUO in a tertiary care hospital of eastern India. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of inpatients, with regard to both clinical signs and investigations. Results: The main diagnosis in the end was tuberculosis, closely followed by hematological malignancy. A substantial number of cases remained undiagnosed despite all investigations. The provisional diagnosis matched with the final in around two thirds of the cases. While for younger patients leukemia was a significant diagnosis, for older ones, extra-pulmonary tuberculosis was a main concern. Interpretation: In India, infectious disease still remains the most important cause of fever. Thus the initial investigations should always include tests for that purpose in a case of FUO. Conclusion: Geographic variations and local infection profiles should always be considered when investigating a case of FUO. However, some of the cases always elude diagnosis, although the patients may respond to empirical therapy.

  9. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  10. Prescribing patterns of antibiotics and sensitivity patterns of common microorganisms in the Internal Medicine ward of a teaching hospital in Western Nepal: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easow Joshy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about antibiotic use and resistance patterns of common microorganisms are lacking in hospitals in Western Nepal. Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. The parameter: Defined daily dose/100 bed-days, provides an estimate of consumption of drugs among hospital in-patients. This study was carried out to collect relevant demographic information, antibiotic prescribing patterns and the common organisms isolated including their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Methods The study was carried out over a 3-month period (01.04.2002 to 30.06.2002 at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Western Nepal. The median number of days of hospitalization and mean ± SD cost of antibiotics prescribed during hospital stay were calculated. The use of antibiotics was classified for prophylaxis, bacteriologically proven infection or non-bacteriologically proven infection. Sensitivity patterns of the common organisms were determined. Defined daily dose/100 bed-days of the ten most commonly prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Results 203 patients were prescribed antibiotics; 112 were male. Median duration of hospitalization was 5 days. 347 antibiotics were prescribed. The most common were ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and benzylpenicillin. Mean ± SD cost of antibiotics was 16.5 ± 13.4 US$. Culture and sensitivity testing was carried out in 141 patients. The common organisms isolated were H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem in the Internal Medicine ward. Formulation of a policy for hospital antibiotic use and an educational programme especially for junior doctors is required.

  11. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states.

  12. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  13. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Blacklock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design: All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results: A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5% were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%. Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8% of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%. Intravenous (IV fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%, including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS was given to 629 (78.8% patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6% patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%, and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%. Discussion: This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions: Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  14. Tasks of research in forensic medicine - different study types in clinical research and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Saukko, Pekka; Musshoff, Frank

    2007-01-17

    In the last years the research output of forensic medicine has sometimes been regarded as insufficient and as of poor quality, especially when parameters as impact factors and external funding were taken into account. However, forensic medicine has different tasks compared to clinical medicine. The main difference between basic subjects, clinical and forensic medicine is not a lack of scientific efficiency in forensic medicine but is a result of the questions asked, the available methods and specific aims. In contrast to natural-scientific research, forensic science has furthermore important intersections with arts and socio-scientific disciplines. Etiologic and pathogenetic research is of only limited relevance in forensic medicine. Thus, forensic medicine is excluded from these research fields, which are mainly supported by external funding. In forensic medicine research mainly means applied research regarding findings, the probative value and reconstruction as well as examination at different points of intersection between medicine and law. Clinical types of research such as controlled randomised, prospective cross-sectional, cohort or case-control studies can only rarely be applied in forensic medicine due to the area specific research fields (e.g. thantatology, violent death, vitality, traffic medicine, analytical toxicology, hemogenetics and stain analysis). The types of studies which are successfully established in forensic medicine are comparison of methods, sensitivity studies, validation of methods, kinetic examinations etc. Tasks of research in forensic medicine and study types, which may be applied will be addressed.

  15. A short note on probability in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Ross E G

    2013-06-01

    Probability claims are ubiquitous in clinical medicine, yet exactly how clinical events relate to interpretations of probability has been not been well explored. This brief essay examines the major interpretations of probability and how these interpretations may account for the probabilistic nature of clinical events. It is argued that there are significant problems with the unquestioned application of interpretation of probability to clinical events. The essay concludes by suggesting other avenues to understand uncertainty in clinical medicine.

  16. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Integrative medicine: a tale of two clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachan Natasha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrative medicine (blending the best of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM with conventional medicine is becoming increasingly popular. Objectives The objectives of this paper are to compare and contrast the development of two teams that set out to establish integrative medical clinics, highlighting key issues found to be common to both settings, and to identify factors that appear to be necessary for integration to occur. Methods At St Michael's Hospital (an inner-city teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada, a total of 42 interviews were conducted between February 2004 and August 2006 wi18 key participants (4 administrators, 2 chiropractors, 2 physiotherapists and 10 family physicians. At the CARE (Complementary and Alternative Research and Education Program at Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Canada, 44 interviews were conducted with 24 people on four occasions: June 2004, March 2005, November 2006, and June 2007. Basic content analysis was used to identify the key themes from the transcribed interviews. Results Despite the contextual differences between the two programs, a striking number of similar themes emerged from the data. The five most important shared themes were: 1 the necessity of "champions" and institutional facilitators to conceive of, advocate for, and bring the programs to fruition; 2 the credibility of these champions and facilitators (and the credibility of the program being established was key to the acceptance and growth of the program in each setting; 3 the ability to find the "right" practitioners and staff to establish the integrative team was crucial to each program's ultimate success; 4 the importance of trust (both the trustworthiness of the developing program as well as the trust that developed between the practitioners in the integrative team; and 5 the challenge of finding physical space to house the programs. Conclusion The programs were ultimately successful because of the

  18. Clinical documentation and data transfer from Ebola and Marburg virus disease wards in outbreak settings: health care workers' experiences and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-02-19

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

  19. Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Bühler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories. Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

  20. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  1. Introduciton to Clinical Medicine: Description of a Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteur, Peter G.

    1979-01-01

    The Introduction to Clinical Medicine course developed at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis) early in 1973 is described, which, in part, was the product of a revision of two previous courses: clinical diagnosis and physical diagnosis. The new course stresses techniques of bedside data collection, communication of data, and data…

  2. Goal-setting in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E H; Bogardus, S T; Tinetti, M E; Inouye, S K

    1999-07-01

    The process of setting goals for medical care in the context of chronic disease has received little attention in the medical literature, despite the importance of goal-setting in the achievement of desired outcomes. Using qualitative research methods, this paper develops a theory of goal-setting in the care of patients with dementia. The theory posits several propositions. First, goals are generated from embedded values but are distinct from values. Goals vary based on specific circumstances and alternatives whereas values are person-specific and relatively stable in the face of changing circumstances. Second, goals are hierarchical in nature, with complex mappings between general and specific goals. Third, there are a number of factors that modify the goal-setting process, by affecting the generation of goals from values or the translation of general goals to specific goals. Modifying factors related to individuals include their degree of risk-taking, perceived self-efficacy, and acceptance of the disease. Disease factors that modify the goal-setting process include the urgency and irreversibility of the medical condition. Pertinent characteristics of the patient-family-clinician interaction include the level of participation, control, and trust among patients, family members, and clinicians. The research suggests that the goal-setting process in clinical medicine is complex, and the potential for disagreements regarding goals substantial. The nature of the goal-setting process suggests that explicit discussion of goals for care may be necessary to promote effective patient-family-clinician communication and adequate care planning.

  3. Herbal Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Firenzuoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the use of medicinal plants for prevention and treatment of diseases: it ranges from traditional and popular medicines of every country to the use of standardized and tritated herbal extracts. Generally cultural rootedness enduring and widespread use in a Traditional Medical System may indicate safety, but not efficacy of treatments, especially in herbal medicine where tradition is almost completely based on remedies containing active principles at very low and ultra low concentrations, or relying on magical-energetic principles.

  4. [Eluding clinical medicine: a phenomenon that can be stopped].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benor, Dan E

    2010-04-01

    A study published in this issue (Lotan et at.) reveals distressing data on the percentage of 4th year students, after their first clerkship, that regret their choice of medicine as a career and contemplate a non-clinical vocational path. This phenomenon, entitled "eluding clinical medicine", is analyzed in terms of early professional socialization of the students toward sciences and their difficulty to tolerate ambiguity and uncertainty, so typical to clinical medicine. Also discussed is the student's incapability to integrate acquired knowledge across disciplines and to interweave it into clinical reality. Rectification of this escape from clinical medicine" may require modification of the pattern of the students' professional socialization during their first years of studies by such measures as early clinical exposure, interdisciplinary integration and practice in decision-making and problem-solving throughout the so-called "preclinical phase". The alarming findings presented in the above-mentioned study call for immediate response.

  5. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field.

  6. [Job stress and burnout among nurses and care workers in psychiatric wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzaki, Toshiki; Tanihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the actual state of job stress and burnout among nurses and care workers working in psychiatric wards by comparing them with those who serve in internal medicine wards. A survey was conducted of female ward nurses and care workers working at two psychiatric hospitals and two general hospitals in the Chugoku area using the brief job stress questionnaire and the Maslach burnout inventory-Japanese version. A total of 232 female nurses and care workers were analyzed, 125 from psychiatric wards and 107 from internal medicine wards. Job stressors of stress due to workplace environment, job control, skill utilization, job aptitude and worthwhileness of working life were significantly greater in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. Stress of quantitative and qualitative workloads, however, was significantly lower in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. For job stress reaction, vigor was significantly lower in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. For burnout, psychiatric wards scored significantly higher in depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment compared with internal medicine wards. Reviewing these results and their association with stress control policy in psychiatric wards, we suggest that three factors are important: maintaining working environment, enhancing conferences, and providing learning opportunities.

  7. Compliance of energy-dense, small volume oral nutritional supplements in the daily clinical practice on a geriatric ward--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, K; van Steijn, J; Schuur, T; Kuhn, M; Rouws, C; Huinink, E-L; van der Hooft, C; van Asselt, D

    2014-07-01

    Compliance is important in optimizing the clinical effectiveness of oral nutritional supplements (ONS). Small volume, energy-dense ONS (ED-ONS; ≥ 2 kcal/ml) have been shown to improve compliance in clinical trial settings. However, data from clinical practice is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ED-ONS on the compliance in an observational set-up to obtain data from daily clinical practice on a geriatric ward. Geriatric inpatients, undernourished or at risk of undernutrition received two servings of either ED-ONS (125 ml, 2.4 kcal/ml: Nutridrink Compact Energy, Nutricia) or a standard ONS (S-ONS; 200 ml, 1.5 kcal/ml: Nutridrink) as part of their daily routine care. Patients were allocated to a group according to availability of beds and placement on the ward. Compliance (kcal/day and % of prescribed volume) was assessed by weighing returned bottles. Data were analyzed via Mixed Model for Repeated Measures. Forty-seven patients received ED-ONS, and 61 patients received S-ONS. Compliance was significantly higher with ED-ONS in geriatric inpatients compared to S-ONS ( 378 ± 14.0 kcal/day vs. 337 ± 13.6 kcal/day (mean ± SEM), p = 0.039, 63.0 ± 2.34% vs. 56.2 ± 2.26%, p = 0.039). Moreover, a trend (p=0.078) was observed towards an increasing difference in compliance over time. This study shows that compliance to ED-ONS is significantly better than to S-ONS in daily clinical practice. Although small, the difference in compliance seems to increase over time, suggesting clinical relevance with longer treatment.

  8. Clinical practice in community medicine: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical practice with community health perspective makes community medicine a unique specialty. In their health centers, community physicians not only implement disease prevention programs, assess community health needs, manage healthcare teams and advocate for health promoting policies but also diagnose and treat diseases. However, participation of community medicine faculty in the delivery of clinical care varies from place to place due to administrative constraints. Health centers attached with medical college are not dependent on community medicine faculty for clinical service as these centers have their own medical and paramedical staff; whereas, other clinical departments in medical colleges depend on their faculty for delivery of clinical care in the hospital. Consequently, a perception is gaining ground that community medicine is a para-clinical specialty. Strategies for a fixed tenured rotation of faculty in the health centers should be evolved. All faculty members of community medicine must also provide clinical care in the health centers and the quantum of clinical services provided by each one of them should be reported widely to all stakeholders. Community medicine residency programs must ensure that trainee community physicians acquire competency to deliver comprehensive primary health care (promotive, preventive, curative, and rehabilitative in a health center.

  9. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

  10. Ⅰ期临床试验病房规范化管理的探讨%Study of Standardized Management of Phase Ⅰ Clinical Trial Ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠; 黄海涛; 王蓝天; 黄娟; 雍小兰

    2012-01-01

    目的:规范药物Ⅰ期临床试验病房的各项管理标准.方法:分析、总结Ⅰ期临床试验研究人员、受试者、试验药物、病房监护等方面的管理经验和体会.其中受试者管理包括受试者的招募、知情同意、筛选、入住、饮食、用药、观察及采血、出组,试验药物的管理包括试验药物的验收、存放、领用、使用和回收处理.结果:通过分析、总结Ⅰ期临床试验病房的各个管理环节中可能存在的问题,提出规范化、系统化的管理要求.Ⅰ期临床试验研究人员应经过系统化的GCP培训,严格按照试验方案执行;受试者应在全面知情同意后参加试验,并遵守病房各项规章制度;试验药物应按照要求妥善保管,在各个环节监控和记录试验药物的流向;病房监护应做到抢救设备定期维护,抢救药品定期更换,专人负责保管.结论:通过规范化流程和系统管理,能够有效地降低Ⅰ期临床试验存在的风险.%Objective: To standardize the management of phase I clinical trial ward. Methods: The experiences of management of phase I clinical trial ward were analyzed and summarized from the researchers, subjects, experimental drugs and guardianship of ward. The management of subjects included recruitment, informed consent, screening, check-in, diet, medications, observation and blood collection and removal. The management of experimental drugs included acceptance, deposit, receiving, use and reclamation. Results: Standardized and systematic management requirements were proposed by means of the analysis and summary of the problems of management of phase I clinical trial ward. Researchers should be trained with GCP systematically, and should implement the trial strictly according to study protocol. Subjects should take part in the trial after understanding the informed consent comprehensively, and comply with the rules of the trial. Experimental drugs should be kept as required

  11. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  12. Toxicological considerations of herbal medicines in clinical use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IkegF; FujiY

    2002-01-01

    Based on herbal crude drugs listed in WHO monographs,the clinical uses and toxicity such as acute,chronic and mutagenic of 16 herbal medicines among 210 medicinal prescriptions used in present-day Japan are summarized.These herbal medicines are claddified into two categories:8 kinds of prescription containing Bupleurum root such as Sho-saiko-to and Saiko-keishi-to,or 8 kinds of prescription not containing Bupleurum root such as Juzen-taiho-to and Ninjin-yoei-to.Some potential interactions between herbal medicine and the Western drugs are also described.

  13. 伦理查房在临床工作中的应用%The Application of Ethical Ward Round in Clinical Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖绮霞; 贺小伶; 刘俊荣; 吴晓东

    2011-01-01

    Requirements for the ethical ward round in clinical practice include feasible systemic regulations, specific countermeasures, and emphasis on practical effects. Concrete measures are raised such as strengthening medical ethics education and improving the evaluation mechanism of ethical ward round, thus to promote and facilitate the medical services from an ethical angle. This article also put forward suggestions including implementation of the privacy protection, performance of informed consent, and improvement of environment and facilities in medical institutions in order to harmonize the relationship between doctors and patients.%医疗机构进行伦理查房工作,需构建可行的医学伦理查房体系;落实医学伦理查房措施;注重医学伦理查房实效.采取加强医学伦理学教育、完善伦理查房评价机制等途径,从伦理学的角度去促进、完善医疗服务,并提出构建和谐医患关系应切实做好隐私保护操作、履行知情告知及完善环境布局设施等建议.

  14. Significance of Evidence-based Medicine in the Assessment of Chinese Medicine Clinical Efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-yao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires the integration of the best research evidence with our clinical expertise and our patient's unique values and circumstances.The best evidence is valid and clinically relevant,especially from patient-centered clinical research.The clinical expertise means the ability to use our clinical skills and past experiences to rapidly identify each patient's unique health state and diagnosis,their individual risks,and the benefits of interventions (1)..

  15. A Deliberation for Evaluating Clinical Effects in Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-liang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese medicine (CM) has several thousands of years of history and has made a great contribution to human health and disease prevention in the world.Since there are so many differences between CM and Western medicine (WM) on their theory and methods in disease diagnosis and treatment,how to evaluate the clinical effects exactly and correctly in clinical practice becomes one bottleneck problem in CM.This is also the primary theme of the 369th Xiangshan Seminar,2010,Beijing.

  16. Motivation of clinical teachers at Schools of Sports Medicine:

    OpenAIRE

    Rosety-Rodríguez, Manuel; Ordoñez, Francisco; Alvero-Cruz, José; Rosety,Ignacio; Fornieles,Gabriel; Díaz, Antonio; Rosety, Miguel; CAMACHO, ALEJANDRA; García-Domingo, Jerónimo; Vaz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This was the first study to focus on what factors may motivate clinical teachers in Sports Medicine Schools. These findings would be of particular interest at a time of decreasing resources for Schools of Sports Medicine to reward teaching. Material and methods A total of 32 clinical teachers (13 females [40%]; 19 males [60%]) volunteered for this observational, cross-sectional study. Conventional Q-methodology so that participants rank-ordered 69 numbered stateme...

  17. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy.

  18. [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine: status of clinical laboratory medicine education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Wataru; Chihara, Junichi

    2010-03-01

    Education in laboratory medicine is important. However, many medical students and doctors cannot understand this importance. This problem may be caused by the unclear character of laboratory medicine in research as well as hospital work, resulting in a lack of staff in the Department of Laboratory Medicine. One of the characters of laboratory medicine is its all-inclusive actions unrestrained by medical specialty. Thus, we tell medical students that the staff of laboratory medicine are suitable members of the infection control team (ICT) and nutrition support team (NST) in lectures. Moreover, we also teach allergy, immunology, infection, and sex-specific medicine, which are some subjects the topics of research. Many students in Akita University recognize that the staff of the Department of Laboratory Medicine are specialists of infection and allergy. On the other hand, young doctors can also receive postgraduate clinical training and conduct research not restricted to allergy and infection. We have a policy whereby the Department of Laboratory Medicine always opens its door widely to everyone including students and doctors. Nine staff joined the Department of Laboratory Medicine of Akita University about ten years, and now, can fully provide students with medical education. To solve some problems regarding education in laboratory medicine, we should promote our roles in medical education as well as in hospitals, and increase the number of staff.

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: When Biomedicine is Inadequate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern physician is using pharmaceuticals as his prime tool. Unfortunately, this tool is much less efficient than you might expect from the biochemical theory. The belief in drugs as the solution to the health problems of mankind, overlooking important existing knowledge on quality of life, personal development, and holistic healing seems to be one good reason why approximately every second citizen of our modern society is chronically ill. The biomedical paradigm and the drugs are certainly useful, because in many situations we could not do without the drugs (like antibiotics, but curing infections or diseases in young age is not without consequences, as the way we perceive health and medicine is influenced by such experiences. When we get a more severe disease in midlife, we also believe drugs will make us healthy again. But at this age, the drugs do not work efficiently anymore, because we have turned older and lost much of the biological coherence that made us heal easily when we were younger. Now we need to assume responsibility, take learning, and improve our quality of life. We need a more holistic medicine that can help us back to life by allowing us to access our hidden resources. The modern physician cannot rely solely on drugs, but must also have holistic tools in his medical toolbox. This is the only way we can improve the general health of our populations. Whenever NNT (Number Needed to Treat is 2 or higher, the likelihood of the drug to cure the patient is less than 50%, which is not satisfying to any physician. In this case, he must ethically try something more in order to cure his patients, which is the crossroads where both traditional manual medicine and the tools of a scientific holistic medicine are helpful.

  20. Clinical applications of Personalized Medicine: a new paradigm and challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sanzo, Mariantonia; Fineschi, Vittorio; Borro, Marina; La Russa, Raffaele; Santurro, Alessandro; Scopetti, Matteo; Simmaco, Maurizio; Frati, Paola

    2017-02-23

    The personalized medicine is an emergent and rapidly developing method of clinical practice that uses new technologies to provide decisions in regard to the prediction, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. The continue evolution of technology and the developments in molecular diagnostics and genomic analysis increased the possibility of an even more understanding and interpretation of the human genome and exome, allowing a "personalized" approach to clinical care, so that the concepts of "Systems Medicine" and "System Biology" are increasingly actual. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the personalized medicine about its indications and benefits, actual clinical applications and future perspectives as well as its issues and health care implications. It was made a careful review of the scientific literature on this field that highlighted the applicability and usefulness of this new medical approach as well as the fact that personalized medicine strategy is even more increasing in numerous fields of applications.

  1. Placebos used in clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guan D; We, Ding A; Chung, Leung P; Fai, Cheng K

    2008-06-01

    One of the important components in randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is blinding. The gold standard of clinical trials is to achieve a double blind design. However, only a small number of randomized controlled trials in traditional Chinese medicine have been reported, most of them are of poor quality in methodology including placebo preparation and verification. The purpose of the article is to review the validity of placebo used in blinded clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in recent years and related patents. We searched the Wanfang Database (total of 827 Chinese journals of medicine and/or pharmacy, from 1999 to 2005) and 598 full-length articles related to placebo clinical trials were found. 77 placebo blinded clinical trials for Chinese medicine were extracted by manual search from the 598 articles. After reviewing the 77 full-length articles, we found that nearly half of the clinical trials did not pay attention to the physical quality of the testing drug and placebo and whether they were of comparable physical quality. The rest provided very limited placebo information so that blinding assurance could not be assumed. Only 2 articles (2.6%) specifically validated the comparability between the testing drug and the placebo. Researchers in Chinese medicine commonly ignored the quality of the placebo in comparison to the test drug. This may be causing bias in the clinical trials. Quality specifications and evaluation of the placebo should deserve special attention to reduce bias in randomized controlled trials in TCM study.

  2. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The review on the International Symposium on radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research in Bad Hofgastein, Austria, 9-12 January 2008, contains 42 papers and 29 poster contributions on the following topics: radiopharmaceutical sciences; radiopharmaceutical sciences in oncology and cardiology; therapy; endocrinology; molecular imaging; clinical PET; physics: image processing; instrumentation, neurology, psychiatry.

  3. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Zhang; Shu-Li Guo; Li-Na Han; Tie-Ling Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine.Data Sources:Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015.Study Selection:Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining's application in the medical field were selected.Results:This review characterized the basic theories and technologies of big data mining including fuzzy theory,rough set theory,cloud theory,Dempster-Shafer theory,artificial neural network,genetic algorithm,inductive learning theory,Bayesian network,decision tree,pattern recognition,high-performance computing,and statistical analysis.The application of big data mining in clinical medicine was analyzed in the fields of disease risk assessment,clinical decision support,prediction of disease development,guidance of rational use of drugs,medical management,and evidence-based medicine.Conclusion:Big data mining has the potential to play an important role in clinical medicine.

  4. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Gammack, Julie K; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2013-12-01

    This is the seventh article in the series of Clinical Updates on Nursing Home Care. The topics covered are antiresorptive drugs, hip fracture, hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, depression, undernutrition, anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, exercise, pain, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

  5. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  6. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  7. [Contemplation on the application of big data in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Medicine is another area where big data is being used. The link between clinical treatment and outcome is the key step when applying big data in medicine. In the era of big data, it is critical to collect complete outcome data. Patient follow-up, comprehensive integration of data resources, quality control and standardized data management are the predominant approaches to avoid missing data and data island. Therefore, establishment of systemic patients follow-up protocol and prospective data management strategy are the important aspects of big data in medicine.

  8. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Shergis Johannah L; Parker Shefton; Coyle Meaghan E; Zhang Anthony L; Xue Charlie C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM) in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an establishe...

  9. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2012-09-01

    This article is the sixth in the series of clinical updates on nursing home care. The topics covered are management of hypertension, antidepressant medications in people with dementia, peripheral arterial disease, probiotics in prevention, and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, frailty, and falls.

  10. Role of Clinical Pharmacists in Early Detection, Reporting and Prevention of Medication Errors in a Medical Ward

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solmaz Hassani; Azadeh Eshraghi; Farzaneh Hematian; Morteza Taheri; Zahra Sahraei

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, appropriate uses of drugs were evaluated by pharmacy service.Methods: A prospective, interventional study was designed for determining frequency and type of clinical pharmacists...

  11. 老年病房真菌分布及耐药性分析%Clinical distribution and drug resistance of fungi from geriatric wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚美亮; 周玉; 李玉茹; 白洁; 蔡力力; 徐雅萍; 李晓霞

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the clinical distribution and drug resistance characteristics of pathogens from eldly fungal infection patients to provide the gist for clinical therapy. METHODS The clinical isolates gathered from inpatients in geriatric ward during Jun 2010 to Jun 2011 were identified and tested for drug resistance: RESULTS Among 2 290 strains of fungi, 1322 strains were Candida albicans(57. 7%) , 336 strains were C. Trop-icalisdi. 7%)and.328 strains were C. Glabrata (14. 3%). The clinical departments with highest infective rate was department of Respiratory; The highest detection rate of 78. 3% was in sputum specimens, followed by 10. 1% in the urine. Susceptibility results showed that amphotericin B was the most sensitive drug with the sensitivity rate of 99.0%. CONCLUSION In geriatric wards, the majority isolated fungal strain is C. Albicans. The fungal infection is severe. It should pay attention to the fungi detection and rational use of antifungal agents.%目的 探讨老年患者真菌感染的分布及耐药性,为临床合理用药提供依据.方法 收集医院老年病房2010年6月-2011年6月临床送检标本,进行真菌分离、鉴定和药敏试验.结果 2290株真菌中,白色假丝酵母菌占57.7%,光滑假丝酵母菌占14.3%;真菌分离率较高的科室为呼吸科;检出真菌标本痰液占78.6%,尿液标本占10.1%;真菌对两性霉素B和5-氟胞嘧啶敏感率分别为99.0%和98.4%.结论 老年病房真菌感染以白色假丝酵母菌为主,真菌感染率较高,应重视真菌病原学检查及药敏检测,为临床合理用药提供依据.

  12. Comparison of PCR/Electron Spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for Active Surveillance of Organisms Contaminating High-Use Surfaces in a Burn Intensive Care Unit, an Orthopedic Ward and Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Enterobacter spp., Streptococcus spp. (68% viridans group), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii -calcoaceticus complex; the proportions of these...Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates. BMC Infect Dis 2009, 9...Cursino MR, Sinto S: Environmental contamination by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an intensive care unit. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe a holistic approach to problems in childhood and adolescence will benefit the child, adolescent, and the whole family. As a rule, children have far less to say in the family than their parents. Therefore, it is the parents who set the agenda and decide how things are done at home and in relation to the child. Most often, it is also the parents who have a problem when the child is not thriving. The child thus acts as the thermometer of the family. When children are not feeling well or are sick, the parents are not doing well either. Most problems arising from dysfunctional patterns are almost impossible for the parents to solve on their own, but with help and support from the holistically oriented physician, we believe that many problems can be discovered and solved. Not only can health problems be addressed, but also problems of poor thriving in the family in general. With the physician in the role of a coach, the family can be provided with relevant exercises that will change the patterns of dysfunction. Consciousness-based medicine also seems to be efficient with children and adolescents, who are much more sensitive to the psychosocial dimensions than adults. Five needs seem to be essential for the thriving and health of the child: attention, respect, love, acceptance (touch, and acknowledgment. The physician should be able to see if the child lacks fulfillment in one or more of these needs, and he can then demonstrate to the parents how these needs should be handled. This should be followed by simple instructions and exercises for the parents in the spirit of coaching. This approach is especially relevant when the child is chronically ill.

  14. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine use in a pediatric neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Samah K; Khader, Yousef S; Alzoubi, Karem; Sawalha, Noor

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children attending a pediatric neurology clinic in North Jordan, a parent completed questionnaire survey of children attending the pediatric neurology clinic at King Abdullah University Hospital from March to July 2008 was conducted. A review of 176 completed questionnaires showed that 99 parents (56%) had used CAM for their child's specific neurological illness. The most common modalities were prayer/reciting the Quran (77%), religious healers (30%), massage with olive oil (32%), and consumption of honey products (29%). The most common reason was religious beliefs in 68%. None reported lack of trust in conventional medicine as the reason behind seeking CAM. Factors significantly associated with CAM use were speech delay, belief in its usefulness, father's age more than 30 years, and mothers with education less than high school. CAM had a supplementary role in relation to traditional western medicine use.

  16. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine.

  17. Methodology guideline for clinical studies investigating traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-10-01

    This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy. TCM therapy refers to one of the followings or their combination: herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, Taichi/Qigong, and Guasha,Tuina (therapeutic massage). It is also suitable for research and development of ethnopharmaceuticals or folk medicine.

  18. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergis Johannah L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an established research culture and the ability to maximise participant recruitment. This article identifies the key challenges and limitations of conducting CM clinical trials in Australian hospitals.

  19. Echocardiography as a Research and Clinical Tool in Veterinary Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, D G

    1982-01-01

    Echocardiography is the accepted term for the study of cardiac ultrasound. Although a relatively new tool for the study of the heart in man it has already found wide acceptance in the area of cardiac research and in the study of clinical cardiac disease. Animals had often been used in the early experiments with cardiac ultrasound, but only recently has echocardiography been used as a research and clinical tool in veterinary medicine. In this report echocardiography is used in the research of ...

  20. Clinical Next Generation Sequencing for Precision Medicine in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ling; Wang, Wanheng; Li, Alvin; Kansal, Rina; Chen, Yuhan; Hong CHEN; Li, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in genomic medicine has been driven by low cost, high throughput sequencing and rapid advances in our understanding of the genetic bases of human diseases. Today, the NGS method has dominated sequencing space in genomic research, and quickly entered clinical practice. Because unique features of NGS perfectly meet the clinical reality (need to do more with less), the NGS technology is becoming a driving force to realize the dream of precision ...

  1. Integrative Medicine in Clinical Practice:From Pattern Differentiation in Traditional Chinese Medicine to Disease Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕爱平; 陈可冀

    2009-01-01

    Pattern(syndrome) differentiation is the key theory in traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) and the important diagnostic principle for TCM therapy.More and more medical researchers recognize that the combination of disease diagnosis in biomedicine and pattern differentiation in TCM is essential for the clinical practice, and it has been a common practice model in China since it will produce better clinical effects.

  2. Review of splanchnic oximetry in clinical medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean M.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2016-09-01

    Global tissue perfusion and oxygenation are important indicators of physiologic function in humans. The monitoring of splanchnic oximetry through the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging method used to assess tissue oxygenation status. Splanchnic tissue oxygenation (SrS) is thought to be potentially of high value in critically ill patients because gastrointestinal organs can often be the first to suffer ischemic injury. During conditions of hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or decreased oxygen-carrying capacity, blood flow is diverted toward vital organs, such as the brain and the heart at the expense of the splanchnic circulation. While monitoring SrS has great potential benefit, there are limitations to the technology and techniques. SrS has been found to have a relatively high degree of variability that can potentially make it difficult to interpret. In addition, because splanchnic organs only lie near the skin surface in children and infants, and energy from currently available sensors only penetrates a few centimeters deep, it can be difficult to use clinically in a noninvasive manner in adults. Research thus far is showing that splanchnic oximetry holds great promise in the ability to monitor patient oxygenation status and detect disease states in humans, especially in pediatric populations.

  3. Notes on "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hodelín Tablada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future" is a book written by Professor Alfredo Darío Espinosa Brito and published by Medical Sciences in 2011. It was awarded the prize of the Cuban Academy of Sciences. This article aims to encourage reading this book, a veritable compendium of the past, present and future of internal medicine. It outlines the issues addressed, from the structure designed for them to a fairly comprehensive assessment of the elements that define the scientific and literary value of this work.

  4. Technical Developments and Clinical Use of Telemedicine in Sleep Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bruyneel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of assistive technology and telemedicine is likely to continue to shape our medical practice in the future, notably in the field of sleep medicine, especially within developed countries. Currently, the number of people suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is increasing. Telemedicine (TM can be used in a variety of ways in sleep medicine: telediagnostics, teleconsultation, teletherapy and telemonitoring of patients being treated with positive pressure devices. In this review, we aim to summarize the recent scientific progresses of these techniques and their potential clinical applications and give consideration to the remaining problems related to TM application.

  5. Reproductive medicine involving genome editing: clinical uncertainties and embryological needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing based on site-directed nucleases facilitated efficient and versatile genetic modifications in human cells. However, recent reports, demonstrating CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in human embryos have raised profound concerns worldwide. This commentary explores the clinical justification and feasibility of reproductive medicine using germline genome editing. Despite the perceived utility of reproductive medicine for treating intractable infertility, it is difficult to justify germline genome editing from the perspective of the prospective child. As suggested by the UK legalization regarding mitochondrial donation, the prevention of genetic disease in offspring by genome editing might be acceptable in limited cases of serious or life-threatening conditions, where no alternative medicine is available. Nonetheless, the mosaicism underlying human embryos as well as the off-target effect by artificial nucleases will likely hamper preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to embryo transfer. Such considerations suggest that this type of reproductive medicine should not be developed toward a clinical application. However, the clinical uncertainties underscore the need for embryology that can address fundamental questions regarding germline aneuploidy and mosaicism using genome editing. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Smoller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians.

  7. Challenges of Identifying Clinically Actionable Genetic Variants for Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic medicine have the potential to change the way we treat human disease, but translating these advances into reality for improving healthcare outcomes depends essentially on our ability to discover disease- and/or drug-associated clinically actionable genetic mutations. Integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a big data infrastructure can provide an efficient and effective way to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for personalized treatments and reduce healthcare costs. We review bioinformatics processing of next-generation sequencing (NGS data, bioinformatics infrastructures for implementing precision medicine, and bioinformatics approaches for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  8. [Application of Delphi method in traditional Chinese medicine clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ying-fei; Mao, Jing-yuan

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, Delphi method has been widely applied in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical research. This article analyzed the present application situation of Delphi method in TCM clinical research, and discussed some problems presented in the choice of evaluation method, classification of observation indexes and selection of survey items. On the basis of present application of Delphi method, the author analyzed the method on questionnaire making, selection of experts, evaluation of observation indexes and selection of survey items. Furthermore, the author summarized the steps of application of Delphi method in TCM clinical research.

  9. Contemporary art in medicine: the Cleveland Clinic art collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Fine art is good medicine. It comforts, elevates the spirit, and affirms life and hope. Art in the healthcare setting, combined with outstanding care and service, creates an environment that encourages healing and supports the work of medical professionals. As one of the world’s great medical centers, Cleveland Clinic has always included the arts in its healing environment. The four founders and subsequent leadership encouraged artistic and musical expression by employees. Distinguished artworks have long hung on the walls. In 1983, an Aesthetics Committee was officially formed at Cleveland Clinic to address issues of art and design in Cleveland Clinic facilities. PMID:24282686

  10. Contemporary art in medicine: the Cleveland Clinic art collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Fine art is good medicine. It comforts, elevates the spirit, and affirms life and hope. Art in the healthcare setting, combined with outstanding care and service, creates an environment that encourages healing and supports the work of medical professionals. As one of the world's great medical centers, Cleveland Clinic has always included the arts in its healing environment. The four founders and subsequent leadership encouraged artistic and musical expression by employees. Distinguished artworks have long hung on the walls. In 1983, an Aesthetics Committee was officially formed at Cleveland Clinic to address issues of art and design in Cleveland Clinic facilities.

  11. Traditional Chinese medicine: potential for clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudgil, Kamal D; Berman, Brian M

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disease affecting people worldwide. Increasing numbers of RA patients in the west are resorting to various complementary and alternative medicine modalities for relief of symptoms and well-being. Herbal products and acupuncture representing traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are two of the most commonly used forms of complementary and alternative medicine. Frequently, their efficacy against RA and safety have been inferred from anecdotal experience or pilot testing on a relatively small number of patients following inadequate study designs. Accordingly, significant efforts need to be invested in objectively testing TCM in clinical trials that are sufficiently powered, randomized, blinded, possess appropriate controls and follow standard criteria for assessment of the outcomes. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory and other antiarthritic activities of TCM modalities need to be better defined. These efforts would help validate the scientific rationale for the use of TCM for the management of RA.

  12. Nutritional status influences the length of stay and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Ana Manuela; Madalozzo Schieferdecker, Maria Eliana; Cestonaro, Talita; Cardoso Neto, João; Ligocki Campos, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Vincular el estado nutricional (EN) con la evolución clínica y la duración de la estancia de los pacientes ingresados en las clínicas médicas de un hospital universitario. Métodos: Estudio observacional retrospectivo en el que los datos analíticos se obtuvieron de los pacientes ingresados durante el período de un año. Para la evaluación del EN se utilizaron: la valoración global subjetiva (VGS), el índice de masa corporal (IMC), el pliegue cutáneo triciptal (PCT), la circunferencia muscular del brazo (CMB) y el diagnostico del estado nutricional por la combinación de métodos (VGS, medidas de antropometría y bioquímicas). El análisis estadístico se realizó con el poder de confianza del 95% (p Ser mayor se asoció con la presencia de hipertensión arterial (p <0,001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0,003) y requerir cambios en la consistencia de la dieta (p = 0,003). Al final de la evaluación el 45,7% eran desnutridos. Presentar disminución de la ingesta de alimentos (p = 0,01), malnutrición según el SGA (p = 0,02) y la CMB (p = 0,03) se asoció con mortalidad. Estuvieron más tiempo hospitalizados los pacientes con nivel terciario de atención (p = 0,01), disminución de la ingestión de alimentos (p = 0,001), que murieron (p = 0,004), con un diagnóstico de desnutrición por VGS (p = 0,001) y por la combinación de métodos (p = 0,001). Conclusión: pacientes desnutridos según VGS y con disminución de la ingestión de alimentos al comienzo de la hospitalización se mantuvieron más tiempo en el hospital y tuvieron peores resultados clínicos (mayor número de muertes). El diagnóstico de la desnutrición por CMB también se relacionó con una mayor frecuencia de muertes.

  13. AN INTERNAL MEDICINE SIMULATED PRACTICAL EXAM FOR ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL COMPETENCY IN 3RD YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodamer, Cheryl; Feldman, Moshe; Kushinka, Jeffrey; Brock, Ellen; Dow, Alan; Evans, Jessica A.; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Achieving standardized assessment of medical student competency in patient care is a challenge. Simulation may provide unique contributions to overall assessment. We developed an Internal Medicine Standardized Simulation Based Examination (SSBE) for the 3rd year clerkship to assess students’ medical knowledge, diagnostic skills, and clinical management skills. We assessed convergent and test-criterion validity by comparing the relationship of SSBE scores with USMLE Step 2 clinical knowledge, shelf exam, eQuiz, OSCE, ward evaluation scores, and overall clerkship grades. We hypothesize that use of the SSBE will allow for a more reliable assessment of these competencies and add value to existing assessments. Methods A prospective study design was used. The SSBE consisted of a computer based photo quiz and cases on high fidelity simulators. Performance on the SSBE was compared to standardized examinations, clinical evaluations, and overall clerkship grades. Students completed an evaluation of the experience. Results Two hundred seven students completed the SSBE, with a mean score of 76.69 (SD 7.78). SSBE performance was positively related to other assessments of medical knowledge (eQuiz scores (r(203) =.33, p< .01), shelf exam scores (r(158) =.53, p< .01), and clinical performance (ward scores) (r(163) =.31, p<.01) but not to OSCE scores. There was a positive relationship to final class grades (r(163) = .45, p<.01), shelf exam (r (158) =.52, p<.01) and Step 2 clinical knowledge scores (r(76) =.54, p<.01). The majority (93%) of students agreed that it was a fair exam. Conclusion Our results provide validity evidence for the SSBE as an additional assessment tool that uses a novel approach for evaluating competency in patient care at the clerkship level. PMID:26650701

  14. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations.

  15. Formal errors in non-pharmaceutical medicine (CAM): clinical medicine, mind-body medicine, body-psychotherapy, holistic medicine, clinical holistic medicine and sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies five formal errors in non-drug medicine including most types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). These are based on five central principles of healing from the curriculum of the EU master in complementary, psychosocial and integrated health sciences (EU-MSc-CAM) from the Interuniversity College in Graz, Austria. An error is defined, as a therapeutic intervention that judged from established scientific knowledge should have been done differently. We found formal errors regarding: 1) The principle of salutogenesis, 2) The principle of similarity, 3) The principle that healing happens in surplus of resources, 4) The principle of using as little force as possible (primum non nocere), 5) The Hering's law of cure (you will get well in the opposite order of the way you got ill). From the primary errors secondary errors can be identified: A) Focusing on the patient's consciousness instead of the patient's unconscious, B) Wasting time on taking anamnesis and giving diagnoses, C) To ignore that the therapy does not help, D) Not to refer a patient that you know cannot be helped by you, E) Not to observe that a close relationship does not develop between therapist and patient, F) To work on a patient that you are not competent to help, G) Not to support the development of the patient into an independent person, H) Not letting go of the patient. None of the errors caused harm to the patient but slowed down healing. The presented list of errors is ideal for training and supervision.

  16. Clinical uses of the medicinal leech: A practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Porshinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an excellent example of the use of invertebrates in the treatment of human disease. Utilized for various medical indications since the ancient times, the medicinal leech is currently being used in a narrow range of well-defined and scientifically-grounded clinical applications. Hirudotherapy is most commonly used in the setting of venous congestion associated with soft tissue replantations and free flap-based reconstructive surgery. This is a comprehensive review of current clinical applications of hirudotherapy, featuring a comprehensive search of all major medical search engines (i.e. PubMed, Google Scholar, ScientificCommons and other cross-referenced sources. The authors focus on indications, contraindications, practical application/handling of the leech, and therapy-related complications.

  17. Properties and clinical application of zirconia bioceramics in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čedomir Oblak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A group of inorganic non-metal biomaterials, that are commonly used in clinical medicine to replace or repair tissues, can be classified as a bioceramics. This group includes bioactive glasses, glass-ceramics, hydroxy-apatite and some other calcium phosphates. In addition, some bio-inert engineering ceramics materials have become increasingly utilised, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide and their composites being the most popular. With the developement of yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconium oxide ceramics (Y-TZP medical community received a high strength biomaterial that is currently a material of choice for the manufacturing of medical devices. Y-TZP ceramics is becoming also increasingly used in dental medicine, where frameworks are manufactured by the use of computer-assisted technology.Conclusions: The article describes the basic properties of zirconia oxide ceramics important for the use in clinical medicine; high strength and fracture toughness, biocompatibility and negligible radiation. The ageing issue of this particular material, which is attributable to the thermo-dynamical instability of tetragonal zirconium oxide in hydrothermal conditions, is also discussed. When exposed to an aqueous environment over long periods of time, the surface of the Y-TZP ceramic will start transforming spontaneously into the monoclinic structure. The mechanism leading to the t-m transformation is temperature-dependent and is accompanied by extensive micro-cracking, which ultimately leads to strength degradation. The degradation might influence the clinical success rate of medical devices and therefore Y-TZP femoral heads are no longer made of pure zirconium oxide. Composites of zirconium and aluminium oxides are used instead, that are currently the strongest ceramic materials used in clinical medicine. In this work the clinical application of zirconia oxide ceramics in dental medicine is also presented. Conventional porcelain fused to metal

  18. A systematic review of clinical audit in companion animal veterinary medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rose, Nicole; Toews, Lorraine; Pang, Daniel S J

    2016-01-01

    .... In contrast, in veterinary medicine there appear to have been a limited number of clinical audits published, indicating that while clinical audit is recognised, its adoption in veterinary medicine...

  19. [Examples of the use of music in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskja, A; Lindbaek, M

    2000-04-10

    Music has been an element in medical practice throughout history. There is growing interest in music as a therapeutic tool. Since there is no generally accepted standard for how, when and where music should be applied within a medical framework, this literature study endeavours to present an overview of central areas of application of music in medicine. It further attempts to find tentative conclusions that may be drawn from existing clinical research on the efficacy of music as a medical tool. Traditionally, music has been linked to the treatment of mental illness, and has been used successfully to treat anxiety and depression and improve function in schizophrenia and autism. In clinical medicine several studies have shown analgetic and anxiolytic properties that have been used in intensive care units, both in diagnostic procedures like gastroscopy and in larger operations, in preoperative as well as postoperative phases, reducing the need for medication in several studies. The combination of music with guided imagery and deep relaxation has shown reduction of symptoms and increased well-being in chronic pain syndromes, whether from cancer or rheumatic origin. Music has been used as support in pregnancy and gestation, in internal medicine, oncology, paediatrics and other related fields. The use of music with geriatric patients could prove to be especially fruitful, both in its receptive and its active aspect. Studies have shown that music can improve function and alleviate symptoms in stroke rehabilitation, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. The role of music in medicine is primarily supportive and palliative. The supportive role of music has a natural field of application in palliative medicine and terminal care. Music is well tolerated, inexpensive, with good compliance and few side effects.

  20. Andragogy in clinical medicine: implications for medical educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Geetha Mani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Medical education, the final desired outcome is to prepare the students to meet the challenges in delivering health care to individuals and the community in the most competent and professional manner. Application of Andragogy in medical education especially clinical medicine will enrich the learning experience of students with respect to diagnosing their needs, acquiring knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes. Various strategies such as problem based learning, clinically associated teaching, critical reflection, role modeling and constructive feedback can be used to enhance the students’ competence and inculcate professionalism among the students.

  1. Application of virtual reality technology in clinical medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Dongquan; Shi, Jianping; Tian, Zongjun; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the application of virtual reality (VR) technology in clinical medicine, especially in surgical training, pain management and therapeutic treatment of mental illness. We introduce the common types of VR simulators and their operational principles in aforementioned fields. The clinical effects are also discussed. In almost every study that dealt with VR simulators, researchers have arrived at the same conclusion that both doctors and patients could benefit from this novel technology. Moreover, advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of VR technology in each field were discussed, and the future research directions were proposed. PMID:28979666

  2. [The practical medicine and its reformation in XVII-XIX centuries, report 2: the becoming of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the becoming of clinical medicine in chronologic scope from 1800 to middle 1870s. The major scientific achievements related to the application of practical medicine such methods as clinical anatomical comparison, laboratory experiment, chemical analysis, physical, instrumental, functional, laboratory diagnostics are discussed.

  3. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them.

  4. Chinese medicine pattern differentiation and its implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Arthur Sá; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2011-11-01

    Chinese medicine practitioners apply the differentiation reasoning for decision-making. The wide scope of Chinese medicine intervention provides coverage of methods and techniques with applications to primary, secondary and tertiary levels of prevention. The rapid evolution of mathematical and computational techniques allowed the implementation of several models for pattern differentiation that were tested for several physiologic systems. Concurrently, it is argued that pattern differentiation might improve the efficacy of either traditional or conventional medical interventions. This article reviewed the influence of pattern differentiation into clinical practice organized by medical field: general pattern differentiation; genitourinary (recurrent cystitis); cardiovascular (coronary heart disease; arterial hypertension; angina pectoris); neurology (stroke); surgery; metabolic (diabetes mellitus); hepatic (cirrhosis); gastrointestinal (chronic superficial gastritis); orthopedic (low back pain; rheumatoid arthritis; cervical spondylosis; elbow arthritis); oncology (gastric mucosal dysplasia; lung cancer); gynecologic and obstetric manifestations (nausea and vomiting). The reviewed studies presented achievements that have contributed to the integration of Chinese medicine and evidence-based medicine in the treatment of many mild and severe diseases. Target diseases considered as major public health problems were also investigated and the results are promising regarding the possibility to treat guided by pattern differentiation.

  5. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training.

  6. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  7. Anatomy of the ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient's narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient's right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  8. [Gender medicine. Sex- and gender-specific aspects of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Willer, A

    2014-09-01

    Gender medicine studies sex- and gender-based differences in the development and prevention of diseases, the awareness and presentation of symptoms, and the effectiveness of therapy. Gender medicine is part of personalized medicine, considering differences in biological and psychosocial factors individually. There are differences in genes, chromosomes, hormones, and metabolism as well as differences in culture, environment, and society. Lifelong interactions between physical and psychosocial factors will influence the health and ill-health of men and women in different ways. Epigenetic modifications provide evidence of the impact of environment and lifestyle during vulnerable phases on biological processes, effecting future generations. Maternal lifestyle and environmental factors during pregnancy can impact the health of offspring in later life already in utero in a sex-specific way. Pain, stress, and coping styles differ between men and women. Women experience more dramatic physical changes during their lifetime, which are associated with specific burdens and psychosocial alterations. Women with multiple roles and responsibilities suffering from stress develop depression more frequently. However, men are often not diagnosed and treated appropriately in cases of depression or osteoporosis, diseases that are typically considered "female." There are prominent differences between men and women in medicine regarding the immune system, inflammation, and noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Women experience more often autoimmune diseases and suffer more frequently from (chronic) pain, neurodegenerative changes, and functional disabilities. Men have shorter life expectancy but relatively more healthy years of life, which is in greater part ascribed to psychosocial determinants. State-of-the-art clinical medicine comprises individual risk factors based on sex- and gender-sensitive health programs in order to

  9. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  10. Castle Ward, County Down

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Fisher was a painter and engraver in Ireland, working after the Dutch and Italian landscape painting tradition. He is best known by engravings after his designs, of which a large number were produced during his career.[notes from Irish Paintings in the `National Gallery of Ireland?, 2001]The present painting depicts Castle Ward in the distance, an 18th century dwelling famed for its mix of Classical and Gothic architecture.

  11. Comorbid depression in dementia on psychogeriatric nursing home wards: which symptoms are prominent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide insight into the prevalence and clinically relevant symptoms of comorbid depression among dementia patients in psychogeriatric nursing home wards, to enhance depression recognition. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of multicenter diagnostic data. SETTING: Psychogeriatric wards

  12. The clinical practice of emergency medicine in Mahajanga, Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay C. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This is the first descriptive study of the clinical practice of emergency medicine in Mahajanga, Madagascar. It provides both the Malagasy and international medical communities with an objective analysis of the practice of emergency care in Madagascar from both diagnostic and therapeutic standpoints. Emergency care here focuses on the management of traumatic injury and infectious disease. The diagnostic imaging, pharmacologic and procedural therapeutic interventions reflect the burdens placed upon this institution by these diseases. We hope this study will provide guidance for the further development of Malagasy-specific emergency care systems.

  13. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  14. Careers in clinical academic medicine: new opportunities or old threats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D

    2007-01-01

    Academic medicine may have been in crisis but it is now starting to flourish again. In the words of Eric Thomas: "Clinical academia has a rosy future if you really celebrate and respect it as an activity, if you ensure a supply of graduates committed to research, if you get the relationship right with the key partners, if you get the best facilities for prosecuting research". It looks as though many of these 'ifs' will now be fulfilled within the reforming agenda of MMC.

  15. Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja E. Raaum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two United States academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. Methods: In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100% were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%. The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2% was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44 (33.0%, P<0.001. The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1% than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%, P=0.035, and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6% in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%, P= 0.001. The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5% than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P=0.044. Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use. Conclusion: Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.

  16. Comparison of Patient Health History Questionnaires Used in General Internal and Family Medicine, Integrative Medicine, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Justin G R; Shapiro, Martin F

    2017-05-01

    Health history questionnaires (HHQs) are a set of self-administered questions completed by patients prior to a clinical encounter. Despite widespread use, minimal research has evaluated the content of HHQs used in general internal medicine and family medicine (GIM/FM), integrative medicine, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; chiropractic, naturopathic, and Traditional Chinese Medicine [TCM]) clinics. Integrative medicine and CAM claim greater emphasis on well-being than does GIM/FM. This study investigated whether integrative medicine and CAM clinics' HHQs include more well-being content and otherwise differ from GIM/FM HHQs. HHQs were obtained from GIM/FM (n = 9), integrative medicine (n = 11), naturopathic medicine (n = 5), chiropractic (n = 4), and TCM (n = 7) clinics in California. HHQs were coded for presence of medical history (chief complaint, past medical history, social history, family history, surgeries, hospitalizations, medications, allergies, review of systems), health maintenance procedures (immunization, screenings), and well-being components (nutrition, exercise, stress, sleep, spirituality). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of well-being components was 1.4 (standard deviation [SD], 1.4) compared with 4.0 (SD, 1.1) for integrative medicine (p medicine (p = 0.04), 2.0 (SD, 1.4) for chiropractic (p = 0.54), and 2.0 (SD, 1.5) for TCM (p = 0.47). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of medical history components was 6.4 (SD, 1.9) compared with 8.3 (SD, 1.2) for integrative medicine (p = 0.01), 9.0 (SD, 0) for naturopathic medicine (p = 0.01), 7.1 (SD, 2.8) for chiropractic (p = 0.58), and 7.1 (SD, 1.7) for TCM (p = 0.41). Integrative and naturopathic medicine HHQs included significantly more well-being and medical history components than did GIM/FM HHQs. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal HHQ content to support the clinical and preventive

  17. Critical thinking in clinical medicine: what is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mona; Upshur, Ross

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we explore the recent emphasis, in various medical contexts, of the term 'critical' or the notion of 'being critical'. We identify various definitions of being critical and note that they differ strikingly. What are these different uses of the term trying to capture that is important in clinical medicine and medical education? We have analysed these qualities as responsibilist, epistemic virtues. We believe that a virtues approach is best able to make sense of the non-cognitive elements of 'being critical', such as the honesty and courage to question claims in the face of persuasion, authority or social pressure. Medical educators and professional bodies seem to agree that being critical is important and desirable. Yet, it is unclear how this quality can be optimally fostered and balanced with the constraints that act upon individual practitioners in the context of institutional medicine including professional standards and the demands of the doctor-patient relationship. Other constraints such as authoritarianism, intimidation and financial pressures may act against the expression of being critical or even the cultivation of critical thinking. The issue of the constraints on critical thinking and the potential hazards it entails will require further consideration by those who encourage being critical in medicine.

  18. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Classic Art of Healingor the Therapeutic Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  19. Quality of natural product clinical trials: a comparison of those published in alternative medicine versus conventional medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Zara Risoldi; Gregory, Philip; Wilson, Amy

    2011-06-01

    To compare the quality of natural product clinical trials published in alternative medicine journals versus those published in conventional medicine journals. Systematic search and review of the literature. Randomized controlled trials of natural products were included if they were published in English between 2003 and 2008. Articles were categorized by their journal of publication (alternative medicine versus conventional medicine). Two independent reviewers evaluated study quality using guidelines from the Cochrane Collaboration. The results with respect to the primary outcome (positive or negative) were also assessed. Thirty articles were evaluated, 15 published in alternative medicine journals and 15 in conventional medicine journals. Of articles published in alternative medicine journals, 33.33% (n = 5) were considered low quality, and none were considered high quality. Of articles published in conventional medicine journals, 26.67% (n = 4) were considered low quality and 6.67% (n = 1) were considered high quality. Two thirds of all trials reviewed were of unclear quality, due to inadequate reporting of information relating to the study's methodology. Similar proportions of positive and negative primary outcomes were found in alternative and conventional medicine journals, and low-quality articles were not more likely to report a positive primary outcome (Fisher's exact test, two-tailed p = .287). The quality of natural product randomized controlled trials was similar among alternative and conventional medicine journals. Efforts should be made to improve the reporting of natural product clinical trials for accurate determinations of study quality to be possible.

  20. The future of functional MRI in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, Ed

    2012-08-15

    In the last 20 years or so, functional MRI has matured very rapidly from being an experimental imaging method in the hands of a few labs to being a very widely available and widely used workhorse of cognitive neuroscience and clinical neuroscience research internationally. FMRI studies have had a considerable impact on our understanding of brain system phenotypes of neurological and psychiatric disorders; and some impact already on development of new therapeutics. However, the direct benefit of fMRI to individual patients with brain disorders has so far been minimal. Here I provide a personal perspective on what has already been achieved, and imagine how the further development of fMRI over the medium term might lead to even greater engagement with clinical medicine.

  1. [Quality inspection of clinical research in traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Weng, Wei-liang; Tian, Yuan-xiang; Li, Qiu-yan; Lu, Fang

    2010-05-01

    Beginning with 4-level quality control measures of clinical research in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), we elaborated the implementation process and demands of quality control measures of each level, including quality control, monitoring, auditing, and inspection. On the basis of joint inspection experience of 41 projects of the "Prevention and Treatment of Difficult and Complicated Diseases of TCM" plan of the "11th Five-year National Key Technology R&D Program", we analyzed the ensuring effect of 4-level quality control system and joint inspection model, and then pointed out the existing problems in the executing process of quality control system at different levels and joint inspection model. Finally we investigated what should be revised in the quality control system and joint inspection model, thus providing the theoretical support for quality inspection improvement of TCM clinical research.

  2. Ethical Diversity and the Role of Conscience in Clinical Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Genuis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a climate of plurality about the concept of what is “good,” one of the most daunting challenges facing contemporary medicine is the provision of medical care within the mosaic of ethical diversity. Juxtaposed with escalating scientific knowledge and clinical prowess has been the concomitant erosion of unity of thought in medical ethics. With innumerable technologies now available in the armamentarium of healthcare, combined with escalating realities of financial constraints, cultural differences, moral divergence, and ideological divides among stakeholders, medical professionals and their patients are increasingly faced with ethical quandaries when making medical decisions. Amidst the plurality of values, ethical collision arises when the values of individual health professionals are dissonant with the expressed requests of patients, the common practice amongst colleagues, or the directives from regulatory and political authorities. In addition, concern is increasing among some medical practitioners due to mounting attempts by certain groups to curtail freedom of independent conscience—by preventing medical professionals from doing what to them is apparently good, or by compelling practitioners to do what they, in conscience, deem to be evil. This paper and the case study presented will explore issues related to freedom of conscience and consider practical approaches to ethical collision in clinical medicine.

  3. Acupuncture in clinical and experimental reproductive medicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franconi, G; Manni, L; Aloe, L; Mazzilli, F; Giambalvo Dal Ben, G; Lenzi, A; Fabbri, A

    2011-04-01

    Acupuncture has been used as treatment for infertility for hundreds of years, and recently it has been studied in male and female infertility and in assisted reproductive technologies, although its role in reproductive medicine is still debated. To review studies on acupuncture in reproductive medicine, in experimental and clinical settings. Papers were retrieved on PubMed and Google Scholar and were included in the review if at least the abstract was in English. There is evidence of benefit mainly when acupuncture is performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) in the live birth rate. Benefit is also evident when acupuncture is performed for female infertility due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is some evidence of sperm quality improvement when acupuncture is performed on males affected by idiopathic infertility. Experimental studies suggest that acupuncture effects are mediated by changes in activity of the autonomic nervous system and stimulation of neuropeptides/neurotransmitters which may be involved in the pathogenesis of infertility. Acupuncture seems to have beneficial effects on live birth rate when performed on the day of ET, and to be useful also in PCOS as well as in male idiopathic infertility, with very low incidence of side effects. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the clinical results and to expand our knowledge of the mechanisms involved.

  4. [From classification medicine to clinical medicine (the end of the XVIII century--1870s). Communication 2. The first stage of clinical medicine development: introduction of the method of clinico-anatomic correlations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The first stage of clinical medicine development is analysed which covers the period from early 1800s to middle 1870s. Considered are basic research achievements associated with introduction of the method of clinico-anatomic correlations into practical medicine.

  5. Severe acute pancreatitis: clinical findings and therapeutic tools in Internal Medicine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recent advances in pathophysiology and therapeutic measures suggest that patients suffering from acute pancreatitis (AP should undergo an early evaluation and treatment in Internal Medicine wards. Severe AP, usually associated with pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic fluid collections, may be frequently complicated by distant organ(s involvement. RESULTS The dreadful multi-organ failure may occur as an early event (during the first week of the disease or in association with the infection of pancreatic necrosis in a later stage. So, during the clinical outcome, physicians may be compelled to counteract cardio-circulatory, pulmonary, renal, hepatic, haematological and hydro-electrolytic complex derangements. Arterial hypotension and shock may be consequence of hypovolemia and/or hearth failure or septic shock syndrome. Pleural effusions are frequent in the early phase of the disease as well as pulmonary densifications and renal insufficiency. Urinary, pulmonary, and biliary infections may intervene during all phases of the disease whereas pancreatic necrosis and fluid collections infections are more frequent after the second week of hospitalization. Prognostic evaluation should be obtained by simple and precise scoring system such as the modified Marshall score and CT-scan severity index. CONCLUSIONS Treatment must be initiated as soon as possible with special focusing on fluid and nutritional supplementation, pain control, cardio-respiratory support, antiproteases and antibiotics. Invasive procedures such as endoscopic sphincterotomy in biliary AP with cholangitis and/or obstruction and percutaneous drainage should be utilized in specific cases. Surgical necrosectomy is mandatory in patients with documented infection of pancreatic necrosis.

  6. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Acid-base balance, serum electrolytes and need for non-invasive ventilation in patients with hypercapnic acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to an internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Alfonso; Renis, Maurizio; Polverino, Mario; Iannuzzi, Arcangelo; Polverino, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Hypoventilation produces or worsens respiratory acidosis in patients with hypercapnia due to acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). In these patients acid-base and hydroelectrolite balance are closely related. Aim of the present study was to evaluate acid-base and hydroelectrolite alterations in these subjects and the effect of non-invasive ventilation and pharmacological treatment. We retrospectively analysed 110 patients consecutively admitted to the Internal Medicine ward of Cava de' Tirreni Hospital for acute exacerbation of hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On admission all patients received oxygen with a Venturi mask to maintain arterial oxygen saturation at least >90 %, and received appropriate pharmacological treatment. Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) was started when, despite optimal therapy, patients had severe dyspnea, increased work of breathing and respiratory acidosis. Based on Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) data, we divided the 110 patients in 3 groups: A = 51 patients with compensated respiratory acidosis; B = 36 patients with respiratory acidosis + metabolic alkalosis; and C = 23 patients with respiratory acidosis + metabolic acidosis. 55 patients received only conventional therapy and 55 had conventional therapy plus NIV. The use of NIV support was lower in the patients belonging to group B than in those belonging to group A and C (25 %, vs 47 % and 96 % respectively; p respiratory acidosis due to AECOPD, differently from previous studies, the metabolic alkalosis is not a negative prognostic factor neither determines greater NIV support need, whereas the metabolic acidosis in addition to respiratory acidosis is an unfavourable element, since it determines an increased need of NIV and invasive mechanical ventilation support.

  8. Practice and Experience of Clinical Pharmacist Participating in Ward Round of Cardiovascular Department%临床药师参与心血管内科查房的实践和体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秋琴; 王君萍; 杜贯涛

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss and summarize the necessary knowledge, focus and experiences when clinical pharmacists take part in the ward round in cardiovascular department of our hospital. METHODS; Several examples on important issues clinical pharmacists concerned were analyzed, such as rational drug use, drug interaction, adverse drug reactions, use of antibiotics. RE-SULTS&CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacists participating in ward round could improve medical quality. Clinical pharmacists should hold the opportunity and greet the challenge, improve pharmaceutical and medical professional level to provide high quality and brand new pharmaceutical care for medical staffs and patients.%目的:总结我院临床药师参与心内科查房的体会,探讨临床药师查房的必要知识准备及应关注的重点.方法:对临床药师关注的重点如合理用药、药物相互作用、不良反应、抗生素使用等进行举例分析.结果与结论:临床药师参与临床查房能提高医疗质量.临床药师应抓住机遇,迎接挑战,不断提高药学和医学专业水平,为医护人员和患者提供高质量的、全新的药学服务.

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that holistic medicine can be used for patient's with mental health disorders. With holistic psychiatry, it is possible to help the mentally ill patient to heal existentially. As in holistic medicine, the methods are love or intense care, winning the trust of the patient, getting permission to give support and holding, and daring to be fully at the patient's service. Our clinical experiences have led us to believe that mental health patient's can heal if only you can make him or her feel the existential pain at its full depth, understand what the message of the suffering is, and let go of all the negative attitudes and beliefs connected with the disease. Many mentally ill young people would benefit from a few hours of existential holistic processing in order to confront the core existential pains. To help the mentally ill patient, you must understand the level of responsibility and help process the old traumas that made the patient escape responsibility for his or her own life and destiny. To guide the work, we have developed a responsibility scale going from (1 free perception over (2 emotional pain to (3 psychic death (denial of life purpose further down to (4 escape and (5 denial to (6 destruction of own perception and (7 hallucination further down to (8 coma, suicide, and unconsciousness. This scale seems to be a valuable tool to understand the state of consciousness and the nature of the process of healing that the patient must go through.

  10. The clinical application of mobile technology to disaster medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Timothy; Morrison, Cecily; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2012-10-01

    Mobile health care technology (mHealth) has the potential to improve communication and clinical information management in disasters. This study reviews the literature on health care and computing published in the past five years to determine the types and efficacy of mobile applications available to disaster medicine, along with lessons learned. Five types of applications are identified: (1) disaster scene management; (2) remote monitoring of casualties; (3) medical image transmission (teleradiology); (4) decision support applications; and (5) field hospital information technology (IT) systems. Most projects have not yet reached the deployment stage, but evaluation exercises show that mHealth should allow faster processing and transport of patients, improved accuracy of triage and better monitoring of unattended patients at a disaster scene. Deployments of teleradiology and field hospital IT systems to disaster zones suggest that mHealth can improve resource allocation and patient care. The key problems include suitability of equipment for use in disaster zones and providing sufficient training to ensure staff familiarity with complex equipment. Future research should focus on providing unbiased observations of the use of mHealth in disaster medicine.

  11. Epigenetic therapies - a new direction in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R A

    2014-07-01

    A major biomedical advance from recent years was the finding that gene expression and phenotypic traits may be shaped by potentially reversible and heritable modifications that occur without altering the sequence of the nucleotides, and became known as epigenetic changes. The term 'epigenetics' dates back to the 1940s, when it was first used in context of cellular differentiation decisions that are made during development. Since then, our understanding of epigenetic modifications that govern development and disease expanded considerably. The contribution of epigenetic changes to shaping phenotypes brings at least two major clinically relevant benefits. One of these, stemming from the reversibility of epigenetic changes, involves the possibility to therapeutically revert epigenetic marks to re-establish prior gene expression patterns. The strength and the potential of this strategy are illustrated by the first four epigenetic drugs that were approved in recent years and by the additional candidates that are at various stages in preclinical studies and clinical trials. The second particularity is the finding that epigenetic changes precede the appearance of histopathological modifications. This has the potential to facilitate the emergence of epigenetic biomarkers, some of which already entered the clinical arena, catalysing a major shift in prophylactic and therapeutic strategies, and promising to fill a decades-old gap in preventive medicine.

  12. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David

    2012-10-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causation requires population-based studies of adverse events (including information from large clinical trials), which attempt to link unequivocally the adverse outcome to the drug in question. Pharmacovigilance is closely linked to postmarketing surveillance and is important for determining issues such as the long-term effects of drugs, identification of low-frequency ADRs, the effectiveness of drugs for their licensed indications or in new indications and other factors which may modify the efficacy and effectiveness of the drug in question. The related field of drug utilization developed in parallel with the study of adverse drug reactions, in recognition of the dramatic increase in the marketing of new drugs, the wide variations in the patterns and extent of drug prescribing, the growing concern about ADRs and the increasing costs of drugs. With the ever increasing number of recognized adverse effects of drugs, prescribing errors, patients' expectations concerning drug safety and the need for appropriate new drug appraisal, the clinical pharmacologist will play an important role both in the introduction of new drugs and in improving the safe and effective use of established drugs.

  13. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, David

    2012-10-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causation requires population-based studies of adverse events (including information from large clinical trials), which attempt to link unequivocally the adverse outcome to the drug in question. Pharmacovigilance is closely linked to postmarketing surveillance and is important for determining issues such as the long-term effects of drugs, identification of low-frequency ADRs, the effectiveness of drugs for their licensed indications or in new indications and other factors which may modify the efficacy and effectiveness of the drug in question. The related field of drug utilization developed in parallel with the study of adverse drug reactions, in recognition of the dramatic increase in the marketing of new drugs, the wide variations in the patterns and extent of drug prescribing, the growing concern about ADRs and the increasing costs of drugs. With the ever increasing number of recognized adverse effects of drugs, prescribing errors, patients\\' expectations concerning drug safety and the need for appropriate new drug appraisal, the clinical pharmacologist will play an important role both in the introduction of new drugs and in improving the safe and effective use of established drugs.

  14. [Artificial intelligence to assist clinical diagnosis in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo; Maldonado-Colín, Guadalupe; Murata, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is one of the fields of knowledge that would most benefit from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classification and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we shift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  15. Clinical Study on Treatment of Depression with Combined Acupuncture & Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong; WANG Qiao-chu; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe and compare the curative effects of combined acupuncture and medicine with simple herbal medicine on treatment of depression. Method Altogether 63 cases were enrolled according to the determination of internationally accepted self-evaluation depression scales (SDS), among them 33 cases were treated with combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine (acupuncture-medicine group) and the other 30 cases were in treated with herbal medicine alone (herbal medicine group) Results The total effective rate of acupuncture-medicine group was 90.9% and that of herbal group was 80.0%. And there was significant statistics difference between the curative effects of two groups (P <0.05) without obvious adverse reaction. Conclusion Combination of acupuncture and medicine has better effect in treating depression than herbal medicine group.

  16. The clinical application of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance of the inpatient wards%住院病区抗生素的临床应用与细菌耐药状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王素英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical applicatlon of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance status of inpatient wards in the hospital. Methods To investigate retrospectively the clinical applicatlon of antibiotics and the situation of antibiotic resist-ance of inpatient wards in 2014. Results Due to the frequent use of broud spectrum antimicrobial gents,accelerating the occur-rence of bacterial resistance and bacterial resistance was increasing in recent years. Conclusion In order to avoid the rapid growth of antibiotic resistance,we should strengthen supervision and maragement of the clinical applicatlon of antibiotics,using antibiotics rationally is the key.%目的:了解医院住院病区抗生素的临床应用及细菌耐药状况,指导临床合理用药。方法对2014年住院病区抗生素的临床应用及细菌耐药情况进行回顾性调查。结果由于广谱抗生素的频繁使用,加速了细菌耐药的进程,细菌耐药呈逐年递增的趋势。结论为避免细菌耐药的快速发展,应加强抗生素临床应用的监督和管理,合理使用抗生素是关键。

  17. Appropriate Use of Drug Testing in Clinical Addiction Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Margaret; Williams, Jessica; Hurford, Matthew; Lindsay, Dawn; Lincoln, Piper; Giles, Leila; Luongo, Peter; Safarian, Taleen

    : Biological drug testing is a tool that provides information about an individual's recent substance use. Like any tool, its value depends on using it correctly; that is, on selecting the right test for the right person at the right time. This document is intended to clarify appropriate clinical use of drug testing in addiction medicine and aid providers in their decisions about drug testing for the identification, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery of patients with, or at risk for, addiction. The RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) process for combining scientific evidence with the collective judgment of experts was used to identify appropriate clinical practices and highlight areas where research is needed. Although consensus panels and expert groups have offered guidance on the use of drug testing for patients with addiction, very few addressed considerations for patients across settings and in different levels of care. This document will focus primarily on patients in addiction treatment and recovery, where drug testing is used to assess patients for a substance use disorder, monitor the effectiveness of a treatment plan, and support recovery. Inasmuch as the scope includes the recognition of addiction, which often occurs in general healthcare settings, selected special populations at risk for addiction visiting these settings are briefly included.

  18. New trends for clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Hong-cai; LI You-ping; CHEN Jing; ZHANG Jun-hua; ZHANG Bo-li

    2008-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: In former times, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) individualized its treatment protocol or clinical practice without considering the principles of modern medicine.The standard methodology of random selection, blinding and placebo control, followed by statistical analysis was generally overlooked. This had a negative effect on the development of TCM.Recently, the volume of applied research in Chinese medicine is growing rapidly and the quality is improving.1 There is good evidence supporting the use of some Chinese patent medicine treatments.2-4 Further, there is a more open attitude to Chinese medicine among conventional health professionals, partly explained by the rise of evidence-based medicine (EBM).

  19. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo E Marchiori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5 + 13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

  20. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, S�o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5±13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance. PMID:21808869

  1. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  2. A clinically meaningful theory of outcome measures in rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massof, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research in rehabilitation medicine requires the development and validation of clinically meaningful and scientifically rigorous measurements of patient states and theories that explain and predict outcomes of intervention. Patient traits are latent (unobservable) variables that can be measured only by inference from observations of surrogate manifest (observable) variables. In the behavioral sciences, latent variables are analogous to intensive physical variables such as temperature and manifest variables are analogous to extensive physical variables such as distance. Although only one variable at a time can be measured, the variable can have a multidimensional structure that must be understood in order to explain disagreements among different measures of the same variable. The use of Rasch theory to measure latent trait variables can be illustrated with a balance scale metaphor that has randomly added variability in the weights of the objects being measured. Knowledge of the distribution of the randomly added variability provides the theoretical structure for estimating measures from ordinal observation scores (e.g., performance measures or rating scales) using statistical inference. In rehabilitation medicine, the latent variable of primary interest is the patient's functional ability. Functional ability can be estimated from observations of surrogate performance measures (e.g., speed and accuracy) or self-report of the difficulty the patient experiences performing specific activities. A theoretical framework borrowed from project management, called the Activity Breakdown Structure (ABS), guides the choice of activities for assessment, based on the patient's value judgments, to make the observations clinically meaningful. In the case of low vision, the functional ability measure estimated from Rasch analysis of activity difficulty ratings was discovered to be a two-dimensional variable. The two visual function dimensions are independent

  3. Evolution of the Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine: 1979 to Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counselman, Francis L; Beeson, Michael S; Marco, Catherine A; Adsit, Susan K; Harvey, Anne L; Keehbauch, Julia N

    2017-02-01

    The Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine (the EM Model) is a three-dimensional representation of the clinical practice of emergency medicine. It is a product of successful collaboration involving the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM), the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM), the Emergency Medicine Residents' Association (EMRA), the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD), the Residency Review Committee for Emergency Medicine (RRC-EM), and the American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). In 2017, the most recent update and revision of the EM Model will be published. This document will represent the culmination of nearly 40 years of evolution, from a simple listing of presenting patient complaints, clinical symptoms, and disease states into a three-dimensional representation of the clinical practice of emergency medicine. These dimensions include conditions and components, physician tasks, and patient acuity. In addition, over the years, two other documents have been developed, the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) and the Emergency Medicine Milestones. Both serve as related and complementary educational and assessment tools. This article will review the development of the EM Model from its inception in 1979 to today. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. [Process and key points of clinical literature evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The clinical literature evaluation of the post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine is a comprehensive evaluation by the comprehensive gain, analysis of the drug, literature of drug efficacy, safety, economy, based on the literature evidence and is part of the evaluation of evidence-based medicine. The literature evaluation in the post-marketing Chinese medicine clinical evaluation is in the foundation and the key position. Through the literature evaluation, it can fully grasp the information, grasp listed drug variety of traditional Chinese medicines second development orientation, make clear further clinical indications, perfect the medicines, etc. This paper discusses the main steps and emphasis of the clinical literature evaluation. Emphasizing security literature evaluation should attach importance to the security of a comprehensive collection drug information. Safety assessment should notice traditional Chinese medicine validity evaluation in improving syndrome, improveing the living quality of patients with special advantage. The economics literature evaluation should pay attention to reliability, sensitivity and practicability of the conclusion.

  5. Usage report of pharmacopuncture in musculoskeletal patients visiting Korean medicine hospitals and clinics in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Hwa Dong; Lee, Yoonmi; Hong, Jungwan; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacopuncture is a relatively new acupuncture therapy combining acupuncture with herbal medicine. While pharmacopuncture is applied extensively in Korean medicine treatment, there are no clinical reports regarding what types of pharmacopuncture are used for which diseases. Methods Data was extracted retrospectively from the electronic medical records of all inpatients and outpatients at 12 Korean medicine hospitals and clinics during the period of December 17, 2010 to October 2,...

  6. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

  7. Evidence-based medicine: the design and interpretation of noninferiority clinical trials in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, K J; Lin, T-L; Fan, T M; Recta, V; Clark, T P

    2013-01-01

    Noninferiority trials are clinical studies designed to demonstrate that an investigational drug is at least as effective as an established treatment within a predetermined margin. They are conducted, in part, because of ethical concerns of administering a placebo to veterinary patients when an established effective treatment exists. The use of noninferiority trial designs has become more common in veterinary medicine with the increasing number of established veterinary therapeutics and the desire to eliminate potential pain or distress in a placebo-controlled study. Selecting the appropriate active control and an a priori noninferiority margin between the investigational and active control drug are unique and critical design factors for noninferiority studies. Without reliable historical knowledge of the disease response in the absence of treatment and of the response to the selected active control drug, proper design and interpretation of a noninferiority trial is not possible. Despite the appeal of conducting noninferiority trials to eliminate ethical concerns of placebo-controlled studies, there are real limitations and possible ethical conundrums associated with noninferiority trials. The consequences of incorrect study conclusions because of poor noninferiority trial design need careful attention. Alternative trial designs to typical noninferiority studies exist, but these too have limitations and must also be carefully considered.

  8. [Traditional Chinese medicine injection clinical use management model for evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Ma, Rong; Liao, Xing; Chai, Shi-Wei

    2012-09-01

    Discussion on assessment and intervention models to promote the rational use of medicines of Chinese medicine injection effect. Using systematic prescription assessment and intervention work mode, formed expert group guide established assessment standard, developed the prescription audit specification, and extracted all Chinese medicine injection prescription of outpatient 2010 first quarter (in front of intervention) and 2011 first quarter (behind intervention), respectively for 2 543 and 3 122. The percent of the non-indication of medication in front of intervention outpatient fell from 3.44% to behind intervention of 2.66% (PChinese medicine injections.

  9. Historic images in nuclear medicine: 1976: the first issue of clinical nuclear medicine and the first human FDG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-08-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone of this evolving and exciting discipline.

  10. [Why Strive after Clinical Social Medicine? From Epidemiological Association to Personalized Social Medicine: a Case of Breast Cancer Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, E; Sokolov, A N; Graf, J; Pavlova, M A; Brucker, S Y; Wallwiener, D; Schmahl, F W; Bamberg, M

    2016-02-01

    Advances in biomedicine, especially molecular biology and genetics, gave rise to the concept of personalized medicine targeting the patient's individual characteristics and needs to ensure the best possible therapy and healthcare. This concept, however, can be successfully implemented only if due consideration is given to (psycho-)social factors, as is shown for instance by considerably reduced post-therapy survival rates among cancer patients in regions with lower socioeconomic status, How breast cancer patients, for instance, find their way back to daily life and work after initial treatment at a breast center is substantially determined by multiple factors going beyond pure medical care. These factors critically affect health status and therapy outcomes, but are missing in current research agenda. A profound expertise in social medicine is required to respond in ways tailored to the individual's healthcare needs that go beyond just medical therapy. This expertise comprises, in particular, knowledge of inequality of access to healthcare due to varying health competence that in turn, results in inequality of health outcome and care. Competence in social medicine both in the clinic and outpatient care can help to individually target negative factors that originate from the social environment as well as from deficits in communication and coordination in the healthcare system and have an effect on the health status of patients..This, however, requires institutionalization of (clinical) social medicine and in particular, better opportunities for advanced training in social medicine in clinical departments and outpatient units.

  11. Ward identity in noncommutative QED

    OpenAIRE

    Mariz, T.; Pires, C. A. de S.; R F Ribeiro

    2002-01-01

    Although noncommutative QED presents a nonabelian structure, it does not present structure constants. In view of this we investigate how Ward identity is satisfied in pair annihilation process and $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ scattering in noncommutative QED.

  12. Evidence-based medicine and values-based medicine: partners in clinical education as well as in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peile, Ed

    2013-02-15

    The best clinical decisions are based on both evidence and values in what is known as the 'two-feet principle'. Anecdotally, educationalists find teaching clinicians to become more evidence based is relatively simple in comparison to encouraging them to become more values based. One reason is likely to be the importance of values awareness. As values-based practice is premised on a mutual respect for the diversity of values, clinicians need to develop the skills to ascertain patient values and to get in touch with their own beliefs and preferences in order to understand those at play in any consultation. Only then can shared decision-making processes take place within a shared framework of values. In a research article published in BMC Medicine, Altamirano-Bustamante and colleagues highlight difficulties that clinicians face in getting in touch with their own values. Despite finding that healthcare personnel's core values were honesty and respect, autonomy was initially low ranked by participants. One significant aspect of this work is that this group has demonstrated that the extent to which clinicians value 'autonomy' and 'openness to change' can both be positively influenced by well designed education.

  13. [Construction and thinking of data element standard directory of traditional Chinese medicine clinical pharmacy information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xia; Jin, Zhong-Zheng; Guo, Gui-Ming; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Jin, Shi-Yuan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the data element standard directory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical pharmacy information, to provide application standards and models of TCM clinical pharmacy for the electronic medical record (EMR). The developed line of work is as follows: initially establish research through four forms: literature analysis, questionnaires, discussion groups, expert advice. The research range from the Chinese herbal medicine research, herbal origin, harvesting, processing, identification of traits, physical and chemical identification, modern research, character, taste, Indications, clinical application, processing, dispensing medicine, Chinese medicine specifications, usage, dosage, caution, efficacy indications to small packaging applications, drug research, management and other related issues, including traditional Chinese medicine theory, application and hospital management information; according to the general and part 16 content of the national "Health Information Data Element Standards", and the basic method of extracting data element to study and develop the data element of TCM clinical pharmacy information from the defining content. Correspondingly propose the ideas and methods of construction of the "Data Element Standard Directory of TCM Clinical Pharmacy Information", sort out medicine clinical information data element standard catalog, divided into basic categories, clinical application class, management class three parts, and set norms and standards of identifying data elements, definitions, allowable value of traditional Chinese medicine clinical information, and discuss the sources and standards of information collection, leaving the interface, standardized and scientific terminology, docking with the existing standards, maintenance and management program and oter issues.

  14. Practice of clinical forensic medicine in Sri Lanka: does it need a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodikara, Sarathchandra

    2012-07-01

    Clinical forensic medicine is a sub-specialty of forensic medicine and is intimately associated with the justice system of a country. Practice of clinical forensic medicine is evolving, but deviates from one jurisdiction to another. Most English-speaking countries practice clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology separately while most non-English-speaking countries practice forensic medicine which includes clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Unlike the practice of forensic pathology, several countries have informal arrangements to deal with forensic patients and there are no international standards of practice or training in this discipline. Besides, this is rarely a topic of discussion. In the adversarial justice system in Sri Lanka, the designated Government Medical Officers practice both clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Practice of clinical forensic medicine, and its teaching and training in Sri Lanka depicts unique features. However, this system has not undergone a significant revision for many decades. In this communication, the existing legal framework, current procedure of practice, examination for drunkenness, investigations, structure of referrals, reports, subsequent legal procedures, undergraduate, in-service, and postgraduate training are discussed with suggestions for reforms.

  15. [From classification medicine to clinical medicine (the end of the XVIII century--70-ies of the XIX century). Communication 1. Beginning of the new style of medical thinking (clinical thinking)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2011-01-01

    This communication is devoted to appearance of a qualitatively different methodological approach to problems of practical medicine in 1890s. This approach gave rise to formation of a new style of medical thinking (clinical thinking) and development of clinical medicine.

  16. Regulatory and clinical aspects of psychotropic medicinal products bioequivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa; Cessak, Grzegorz; Kuzawińska, Olga; Sejbuk-Rozbicka, Katarzyna; Rokita, Konrad; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2015-07-01

    Introduction of generic medicinal products to the market has increased access to modern therapies but also enabled significant reduction in their cost, leading to containment of public expenditures on medicinal products reimbursement. The critical assessment of bioequivalence of any reference medicinal product and its counterpart is based on comparison of their rate and extent of absorption. It is assumed that two medicinal products are bioequivalent when their rate and extent of absorption do not show significant differences when administered at the same dose under similar experimental conditions. Bioequivalent medicinal products are declared to be also therapeutically equivalent and can be used interchangeably. However, despite regulatory declaration, switching from reference to generic drugs is often associated with concerns of healthcare providers about decreased treatment effectiveness or occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The aim of this article is to provide a description of rules that guide registration of generic medicinal products in the European Union and to analyze specific examples from the scientific literature concerning therapeutic equivalence of reference and generic antidepressant and antipsychotic medicinal products.

  17. Clinical Holistic Medicine: The Patient with Multiple Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, patients can present with many different diseases, often both somatic and mental. Holistic medicine will try to see the diseases as a whole, as symptoms of a more fundamental imbalance in the state of being. The holistic physician must help the patient to recover existence and a good relationship with self. According to the life mission theory, theory of character, and holistic process theory of healing, recovering the purpose of life (the life mission is essential for the patient to regain life, love, and trust in order to find happiness and realize the true purpose of life. We illustrate the power of the holistic medical approach with a case study of an invalidated female artist, aged 42 years, who suffered from multiple severe health problems, many of which had been chronic for years. She had a combination of neurological disturbances (tinnitus, migraine, minor hallucinations, immunological disturbances (recurrent herpes simplex, phlegm in the throat, fungal infection in the crotch, hormonal disturbances (14 days of menstruation in each cycle, muscle disturbances (neck tensions, mental disturbances (tendency to cry, inferiority feeling, mild depression, desolation, anxiety, abdominal complaints, hemorrhoids, and more. The treatment was a combined strategy of improving the general quality of life, recovering her human character and purpose of life (“renewing the patients life energy”, “balancing her global information system”, and processing the local blockages, thus healing most of her many different diseases in a treatment using 30 h of intense holistic therapy over a period of 18 months.

  18. Regulatory acceptance of animal models of disease to support clinical trials of medicines and advanced therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Joy; Silva Lima, Beatriz

    2015-07-15

    The utility of animal models of disease for assessing the safety of novel therapeutic modalities has become an increasingly important topic of discussion as research and development efforts focus on improving the predictive value of animal studies to support accelerated clinical development. Medicines are approved for marketing based upon a determination that their benefits outweigh foreseeable risks in specific indications, specific populations, and at specific dosages and regimens. No medicine is 100% safe. A medicine is less safe if the actual risks are greater than the predicted risks. The purpose of preclinical safety assessment is to understand the potential risks to aid clinical decision-making. Ideally preclinical studies should identify potential adverse effects and design clinical studies that will minimize their occurrence. Most regulatory documents delineate the utilization of conventional "normal" animal species to evaluate the safety risk of new medicines (i.e., new chemical entities and new biological entities). Animal models of human disease are commonly utilized to gain insight into the pathogenesis of disease and to evaluate efficacy but less frequently utilized in preclinical safety assessment. An understanding of the limitations of the animal disease models together with a better understanding of the disease and how toxicity may be impacted by the disease condition should allow for a better prediction of risk in the intended patient population. Importantly, regulatory authorities are becoming more willing to accept and even recommend data from experimental animal disease models that combine efficacy and safety to support clinical development.

  19. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...

  20. Reducing weight in an internal medicine outpatient clinic using a lifestyle medicine approach: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; Cesana, Giovanna; Vigo, Chiara; Malacarne, Mara; Pagani, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases represent the major drivers of disease burden, being responsible for the majority of health care cost and deaths. Almost half of premature deaths is due to behaviors amenable to change. Accordingly, addressing behavior might represent a strategic change in the health delivery system. Improving lifestyle requires a specific strategy embedding the active collaboration of individuals with a multilevel team-oriented medical practice. With the present study we sought to assess whether the implementation of cognitive-behavioral strategies, following the principles of lifestyle medicine in an outpatient clinic provides better results in weight reduction as compared to simpler strategies as presently executed in General Practitioners' offices. This is an observational study on 173 subjects (age 53.1 ± 11.5), comparing three different groups of preventive practice: a personalized lifestyle medicine, combining cognitive behavioral strategies with patient tailored prescription of exercise and nutrition (Group A); a semi-structured approach with generic counseling (Group B); and an unstructured advice (Group C). At the end of the intervention period (17-20 months), group A showed an average weight loss of 5.4 ± 5.1 kg, which was significantly (pinternal medicine clinics. This methodology appears more efficacious in inducing weight reduction after more than a year as compared to usual family medicine approaches. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of clinical pharmacy services in China on the quality use of medicines: a systematic review in context of China's current healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penm, Jonathan; Li, Yan; Zhai, Suodi; Hu, Yongfang; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2014-10-01

    Recently, China initiated an ambitious healthcare reform aiming to provide affordable and equitable basic health care to all by 2020. To meet these goals, new policies issued by China's Ministry of Health mandate clinical pharmacy services be integrated into China's hospitals. This review aims to highlight the impact of clinical pharmacy services on the quality use of medicines in hospitals in China. Both English and Chinese databases were used. For the English databases, Web of Science, Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and Embase were searched using the following keywords ('pharmacists' OR 'pharmacy' OR 'pharmaceutical services/pharmaceutical care') AND ('China'). For the Chinese database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database on disc was searched using the following keywords ('clinical pharmacist' OR 'clinical pharmacy' OR 'pharmaceutical care' OR 'pharmaceutical services'). Articles were then retrieved from WanFang database and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. A total of 75 published papers were included in this review. The majority of studies were conducted in the inpatient setting (68%), which included clinical pharmacy interventions such as educating doctors and patients, evaluating and monitoring the implementation of hospital policies and/or reviewing medications on the ward. In the outpatient setting, the majority of studies conducted involved educating patients. Clinical pharmacy services frequently focused on antimicrobials (44%). More than half of these studies employed an administrative intervention alongside the clinical pharmacy service. Clinical pharmacy services in China, with its unique healthcare system and cultural nuances, appear to positively influence patient care and the appropriate use of medications. From the published literature, it is expected that clinical pharmacy services can make a strong contribution to China's healthcare reform with further governmental and educational support. Published by Oxford

  2. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Sami Isaac; Bandana Saini; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Background Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal–known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many oth...

  3. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Isaac

    Full Text Available Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy.Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software.Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients.This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future

  4. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Tools for a Medical Science Based on Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedicine focuses on the biochemistry of the body, while consciousness-based medicine — holistic medicine — focuses on the individual's experiences and conscious whole (Greek: holos, whole. Biomedicine perceives diseases as mechanical errors at the micro level, while consciousness-based medicine perceives diseases as disturbances in attitudes, perceptions, and experiences at the macro level — in the organism as a whole. Thus, consciousness-based medicine is based on the whole individual, while biomedicine is based on its smallest parts, the molecules. These two completely different points of departure make the two forms of medicine very different; they represent two different mind sets and two different frames of reference or medical paradigms. This paper explains the basic tools of clinical holistic medicine based on the life mission theory and holistic process theory, with examples of holistic healing from the holistic medical clinic.

  5. A Lifestyle Medicine Clinic in a Community Pharmacy Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lenz, PharmD, MA, PAPHS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases continue to be a significant burden to the health care system. Pharmacists have been able to show that drugtherapy for patients with chronic diseases can be improved through medication therapy management (MTM services but have yet to become significantly involved in implementing lifestyle modification programs to further control and prevent chronic conditions. A novel and innovative lifestyle medicine program was started by pharmacists in a community pharmacy in 2008 to more comprehensively prevent and manage chronic conditions. The lifestyle medicine program consists of designing seven personalized programs for patients to address physical activity, nutrition, alcohol consumption, weight control, stress management, sleep success, and tobacco cessation (if needed. The lifestyle medicine program complements existing MTM services for patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes. This program is innovative because pharmacists have developed and implemented amethod to combine lifestyle medicine with MTM services to not only manage chronic conditions, but prevent the progression of those conditions and others. Several innovative tools have also been developed to enhance the effectiveness of a lifestyle medicine program. This manuscript describes the program’s pharmacy setting, pharmacy personnel, participants and program details as well as the tools used to integrate a lifestyle medicine program with MTM services.

  6. Patient Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines in an Outpatient Pediatric Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Daniel; Jenkins, Sarah; Youssef, Paul; Kotagal, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the use of complementary and alternative medicines in an outpatient pediatric neurology clinic, and assesses family attitudes toward the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicines versus prescription medications. Complementary and alternative medicine is an important element of the modern health care landscape. There is limited information about whether, and to what extent, families perceive its utility in childhood neurological disorders. Surveys were distributed to 500 consecutive patients at a child neurology clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Questions pertained to the child's diagnoses, use of complementary and alternative medicines, and the specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities that were used. Opinions were also gathered on the perceived efficacy of complementary and alternative medicines and prescription medications. Data were compared using χ(2) or Fisher exact tests as indicated. A total of 484 surveys were returned, of which 327 were usable. Only 17.4% admitted to use of complementary and alternative medicine to treat neurological problems. However, in follow-up questioning, actually 41.6% of patients recognized that they were using one or more types of complementary and alternative medicines. Disorders associated with a statistically significant increased prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use were headache (50.8% with headache used complementary and alternative medicine versus 35.7% without headache; P = 0.008, Fisher exact test), chronic fatigue (63.2% vs 38.8%; P = 0.005, Fisher exact test), and sleep disorders (77.1% vs 37.3%; P pediatric neurology patients in our clinic are also using complementary and alternative medicine. Only 38.5% of these recognize themselves as using complementary and alternative medicine, underlining the need to inquire in-depth about its use. Patients who are less satisfied with their prescription medications are more likely to use complementary and

  7. Clinical chemistry: challenges for analytical chemistry and the nanosciences from medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine can look back over more than 150 years of eventful history. The subject encompasses all the medicinal disciplines as well as the remaining natural sciences. Clinical chemistry demonstrates how new insights from basic research in biochemical, biological, analytical chemical, engineering, and information technology can be transferred into the daily routine of medicine to improve diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and prevention. This Review begins with a presentation of the development of clinical chemistry. Individual steps between the drawing of blood and interpretation of laboratory data are then illustrated; here not only are pitfalls described, but so are quality control systems. The introduction of new methods and trends into medicinal analysis is explored, along with opportunities and problems associated with personalized medicine.

  8. [From classificational medicine to clinical medicine (the end of the XVIII century to 1870s). Communication 3. The second stage of clinical medicine development: introduction of methods of laboratory experiment and chemical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2011-01-01

    The article concerns the end stage of clinical medicine establishment covering the period from early 1840s to the middle 1870s of the XIX century. Basic scientific achievements related to introduction into practical medicine of the methods of laboratory experiment and chemical analysis are reviewed.

  9. Hippocrates of Kos, the father of clinical medicine, and Asclepiades of Bithynia, the father of molecular medicine. Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapijakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos (460-377 Before Common Era, BCE) is universally recognized as the father of modern medicine, which is based on observation of clinical signs and rational conclusions, and does not rely on religious or magical beliefs. Hippocratic medicine was influenced by the Pythagorean theory that Nature was made of four elements (water, earth, wind and fire), and therefore, in an analogous way, the body consisted of four fluids or 'humors' (black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood). The physician had to reinstate the healthy balance of these humors by facilitating the healing work of 'benevolent Nature'. The Hippocratic Oath contains the Pythagorean duties of justice, secrecy, respect for teachers and solidarity with peers. The clinical and ethical basics of medical practice as well as most clinical terms used even today have their origins in Hippocrates. His contribution in clinical medicine is immense. Asclepiades of Bithynia (124-40 BCE) was the first physician who established Greek medicine in Rome. Influenced by the Epicurean philosophy, he adhered to atomic theory, chance and evolution, and did not accept the theory of a 'benevolent Nature'. He suggested that the human body is composed of molecules and void spaces, and that diseases are caused by alteration of form or position of a patient's molecules. Asclepiades favored naturalistic therapeutic methods such as a healthy diet, massage and physical exercise. Above all, he introduced the friendly, sympathetic, pleasing and painless treatment of patients into medical practice, influenced by the teachings of Epicurus on pleasure and friendship. He was the first who made the highly important division of diseases into acute and chronic ones and to perform an elective non-emergency tracheotomy. As the founder of the Methodic School, Asclepiades was the first known physician who spoke about what is known today as molecular medicine.

  10. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated and multi pluripotent cells which can differentiate into a variety of mature cells and tissues such as nervous tissue, muscle tissue, epithelial tissue, skeletal tissue and etc. Stem cells from all different source have three unique features: 1 Proliferative capability: Stem cells are capable of self dividing and self renewing for long periods or more than six months at least that called immortalization. 2 Undifferentiated nature: It’s considered as one of the essential characteristics of stem cell, so it doesn't have any tissue-specific construction. 3 Differentiation to the different cells from all organs: This ability can Induced by tissue specific transcription factors. Because of that, they are so important in prevention and treatment of human disease. Depending on the sources from which they derive, they have different types which can be used to produce special cells and tissues. The most significant types of stem cells are; embryonic stem cells (ESCs which are derived from embryos, adult stem cells (ASCs which are derived from differentiated cells in a specific tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs which are produced from adult differentiated cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to act resemble to an embryonic stem cell and cord blood stem cells which contains haematopoietic stem cells and derived from the umbilical cord after gestation. By providing a medium containing of special growth factor, it is possible to orientated stem cell differentiation pathway and gained certain cells from them. The important uses of stem cells includes damaged heart tissue cells improvements and bone tissue repairing, cancer treatment, damaged neurological and spinal tissue repairing, improving burns and injuries and the treatment of diabetes, infertility and spermatogenesis dysfunction. Furthermore, the application of them in gene therapy is an important issue in the modern medicine science due to the role

  11. Molecular characterization of the bla(KPC-2) gene in clinical isolates of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from the pediatric wards of a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wan, La-Gen; Jiang, Wei-Yan; Li, Fang-Qu; Yang, Jing-Hong

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted to confirm the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae associated with a nosocomial outbreak in a Chinese pediatric hospital. From July 2009 to January 2011, 124 nonduplicated K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from specimens from patients of pediatric units in the hospital. Twelve of the 124 isolates possessed the bla(KPC-2) gene and showed 7 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Meanwhile, 16S rRNA methylase, acc(6')-Ib-cr, and several types of β-lactamases were also produced by the majority of the KPC-producing isolates. Class 1 integron-encoded intI1 integrase gene was subsequently found in all strains, and amplification, sequencing, and comparison of DNA between 5' conserved segment and 3' conserved segment region showed the presence of several known antibiotic resistance gene cassettes of various sizes. The conjugation and plasmid-curing experiments indicated some KPC-2-encoding genes were transmissible. In addition, conjugal cotransfer of multidrug-resistant phenotypes with KPC-positive phenotypes was observed in KPC-producing strains. Restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA hybridization with a KPC-specific probe showed that the bla(KPC-2) gene was carried by plasmid DNA from K. pneumoniae of PFGE pattern B. The overall results indicate that the emergence and outbreak of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae in our pediatric wards occurred in conjunction with plasmids coharboring 16S rRNA methylase and extended-spectrum β-lactamases.

  12. [N.D. Strazhesko and his role in the development of modern clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskiĭ, L N

    2008-01-01

    The article presents information on academician N.D.Strazheshko- the founder of one of key native therapeutic schools with its new, original features. In the article was shown an important contribution of the scientist to the study of significant questions related to internal medicine and his role in the development of current clinical medicine.

  13. Clinical governance and clinical competence to support new scenarios and role of internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Mazzone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex patient, who has often multiple, chronic and progressive disorders, who has undergone polytherapy, should be evaluated totally with respect not only to medical side, but also to psychological and clinical side. The shortage of specialists in disciplines that require technical skills, obtained by training and performing a sufficient number of annual procedures, contributes to the need for reorganizing health care; in this background the Internist devolves less time to charitable activities in favor of competences related to the processes. The knowledge of the clinical governance (CG should be the common heritage of all the actors of the health system, that need to be made up of professionals able to coordinate and make easy the implementation and the spread the CG culture. At least initially we propose to focus the testing strictly on the medical department. As already mentioned above, the natural Internist predisposition, cultural and training, leads him to a multidisciplinary vision of medicine that allows acquiring more easily the tools that make up the structure of CG, being able to facilitate the application. The acquisitions of professional competence and clinical governance play a key role in the Internist culture. The purpose of an Internist with professional skills and managerial capacity, is to act within the department to facilitate and simplify the horizontal interaction among other similar corporate structures and to help the Management to improve structural and clinical appropriateness in Hospital and to better the relations between hospital and territory, identifying the critical issues and the possible solutions.

  14. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  15. Promoting integrative medicine by computerization of traditional Chinese medicine for scientific research and clinical practice: The SuiteTCM Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arthur de Sá Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Chinese and contemporary Western medical practices evolved on different cultures and historical contexts and,therefore,their medical knowledge represents this cultural divergence.Computerization of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is being used to promote the integrative medicine to manage,process and integrate the knowledge related to TCM anatomy,physiology,semiology,pathophysiology,and therapy.METHODS:We proposed the development of the SuiteTCM software,a collection of integrated computational models mainly derived from epidemiology and statistical sciences for computerization of Chinese medicine scientific research and clinical practice in all levels of prevention.The software includes components for data management (DataTCM),simulation of cases (SimTCM),analyses and validation of datasets (SciTCM),clinical examination and pattern differentiation (DiagTCM,Tongue TCM,and Pulse TCM),intervention selection (AcuTCM,HerbsTCM,and DietTCM),management of medical records (ProntTCM),epidemiologic investigation of sampled data (ResearchTCM),and medical education,training,and assessment (StudentTCM).DISCUSSION:The SuiteTCM project is expected to contribute to the ongoing development of integrative medicine and the applicability of TCM in worldwide scientific research and health care.The SuiteTCM 1.0 runs on Windows XP or later and is freely available for download as an executable application.

  16. [Literature survey on botanical origin and clinical application of traditional Tibetan medicine "Shengdeng"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Dao; Meng, Xian-Hua; Zhang, Ying-Shan; Chen, Gen-Ping; Huang, Yu-Lan

    2012-10-01

    "Shengdeng" is its Tibetan transliteration referring to many medicines. Tibetan doctors and pharmacists in different areas use different drugs in formulation and clinical application, which are easily confused. In order to grasp the formula and clinical application accurately, we conduct a literature survey on history and current state of botanical origin and clinical application of "Shengdeng", making clear the application of various herbs named "Shengdeng" and providing reference to all Tibetan researchers and clinical workers in formulation and clinical application.

  17. Another Fine MeSH: Clinical Medicine Meets Information Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Alan; Booth, Andrew; Ford, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Discusses evidence-based medicine (EBM) and the need for systematic use of databases like MEDLINE with more sophisticated search strategies to optimize the retrieval of relevant papers. Describes an empirical study of hospital libraries that examined requests for information and search strategies using both structured and unstructured forms.…

  18. The business of palliative medicine--part 6: clinical operations in a comprehensive integrated program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2011-03-01

    The medical care of individuals with advanced disease is complex and has historically been fragmented and suboptimal. Palliative medicine attempts to address these needs. The Harry R. Horvitz Center for Palliative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic is an established comprehensive integrated program. Structured and seamless clinical operations are important to ensure the best delivery of high-quality medical care and continuity for those affected by life-limiting illness.

  19. Changing the Face of Veterinary Medicine: Research and Clinical Developments at AAVMC Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F; Hagstrom, Melena R

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a 50-year overview of research and clinical advances in AAVMC member colleges in four representative fields of veterinary medicine: oncology, vaccine development, production medicine, and public health. Though emphasis is on the progress since the mid-1960s, the salient background and associated personnel in each field are also identified to the extent that their description informs more recent events. Advances in board certification and post-graduate clinical and research educational opportunities are also described.

  20. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  1. [Consumption of medicinal herbs in patients attending a gastroenterology outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa Jordà, F; Pellicer Bataller, J; Ferrando Ginestar, J; Borghol Hariri, A; Bustamante Balén, M; Ortuño Cortés, J; Ferrando Marrades, I; Llobera Bertran, C; Sala Lajo, A; Miñana Morell, M; Nolasco Bonmatí, A; Fresquet Febrer, J L

    2004-04-01

    The consumption of medicinal herbs is one of the most important topics in alternative and complementary medicine. The widespread use of these substances among the general population gives rise to the possibility of therapeutic or toxic effects in patients seeking conventional medical assistance. To determine the frequency of medicinal herb use, the species consumed and the profile of medicinal herb consumers among patients with gastrointestinal disorders, patients attending the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of the Francesc de Borja district hospital (Gandía, Spain) over a 5-month period were interviewed and 539 valid questionnaires were obtained. A total of 34.7% of the interviewees had taken medicinal herbs at some time and 26.9% had used them in the last year. Self-prescription was reported by 67.1%. Medicinal herbs were mainly obtained in the pharmacy or herbalist's (74.7%). The results of medicinal herb therapy were considered good or excellent by 80.3% of the interviewees, average by 18.6% and poor by 1.1%. In the univariate analysis, medicinal herb consumption was positively associated with female sex (p Mentha pulegium (4.4%) and Valeriana officinalis (4.4%). The results show that consumption of medicinal herbs is frequent among patients attending the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of a district hospital. The probable profile of those showing maximum consumption is: female sex, university education, lower gastrointestinal disorder, functional gastrointestinal disorder, psychotropic drug consumption and use of TE.

  2. The medical ethos and social responsibility in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    The medical profession will face many challenges in the new millennium. As medicine looks forward to advances in molecular genetics and the prospect of unprecedented understanding of the causes and cures of human disease, clinicians, scientists and bioethicists may benefit from reflection upon the origins of the medical ethos and its relevance to postmodern medicine. Past distortions of the medical ethos, such as Nazism and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, as well as more recent experience with the ethical challenges of employer-based market driven managed care, provide important lessons as medicine contemplates the future. Racial and ethnic disparities in health status and access to care serve as a reminders that the racial doctrines that fostered the horrors of the Holocaust and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study have not been completely removed from contemporary thinking. Inequalities in health status based on race and ethnicity, as well as socioeconomic status, attest to the inescapable reality of racism in America. When viewed against a background of historical distortions and disregard for the traditional tenets of the medical ethos, persistent racial and ethnic disparities and health and the prospect of genetic engineering raise the specter of discrimination because of genotype, a postmodern version of "racist medicine" or of a "new eugenics." There is a need to balance medicine's devotion to the wellbeing of the patient and the primacy of the patient-physician relationship against with the need to meet the health care needs of society. The challenge facing the medical profession in the new millennium is to establish an equilibrium between the responsibility to assure quality health care for the individual patient while affecting societal changes to achieve "health for all." PMID:11405593

  3. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... Atmosphere' is the focal point developed through the study. Primarily, the model frames the study and serves as a design tool for creating the light atmosphere in hospital wards. First, brain storming is used to open up the field supported by theoretical aspects based on Gernot Böhmes' concept of atmosphere...

  4. Ergonomics in the psychiatric ward towards workers or patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana, Salerno; Laura, Forcella; Ursula, Di Fabio; Irene, Figà Talamanca; Paolo, Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Patient's aggressive behavior is one of the major problem in the psychiatric ward. Here we present the preliminary results of a psychiatric ward case-study, of a public hospital in the Chieti province, in order to plan ergonomic improvement. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies in the psychiatric ward in order to study the relationship between organized hospital work and nurses wellbeing in a 24 hour shifts. We observed 58 main phases in the three work shifts. The technical actions are mainly those of any hospital wards (shift briefing, preparing and administering drugs, recording data on clinical charts, etc.). We found important differences mainly due to the nurses overcontrol activities on the patients behavior (preventing suicides or self destructive behavior), the occurrence of restraint procedure towards patients, the pollution due to patient's cigarette smoke. The fear of patient's self destructive behavior or other aggressive behaviour are the main cognitive and social aspects of this hospital ward. Nurses working in this psychiatric ward have to accept: locked doors, poor and polluted environment, restraint procedure with high risk of aggression and no availability of mental health care programs. A new interdisciplinary concept for ergonomics in psychiatry setting may represent a challenge for both nurses and patients and the community.

  5. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  6. Job satisfaction of clinical nurses working in the High Quality Nursing Service Demonstration Wards%优质护理示范病区护士工作满意度调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘经纬; 李虹; 王志农

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate job satisfaction of nurses working in the High Quality Nursing Service Demonstration Wards, and to provide evidence for promoting quality of nursing. Methods One hundred and fifty clinical nurses working in 9 High Quality Nursing Service Demonstration Wards of 3 hospitals in Nantong were surveyed by using McCloskey/Muller Satisfaction Scale. Results The nurse to bed ratios in the 9 wards ranged from 1: 0.30 to 1: 0.46; the total score of job satisfaction averaged (3.12± 0.48), with the scores of 8 dimensions ranging from 2.18± 0.62 to 3.91 ± 0.33; the scores of job satisfaction of nurses from different level of hospitals and with different educational backgrounds showed statistical differences (P<0.05 for all). Conclusion The nurse to bed ratio is low in High Quality Nursing Service Demonstration Wards, and nurses' job satisfaction is at low level, and they are especially disatisfied with welfare and professional development. And nurses working in secondary hospital and with high educational background tend to have lower satisfaction. To enhance job satisfaction of nurses, we should rationally allocate human resources, increase nursing fee and promote welfare for nurses.%目的 了解优质护理示范病区护士工作满意度现状,为稳步推进示范病区工作,提高护理质量提供实证依据.方法 采用护士工作满意度量表对南通市3所医院的9个优质护理示范病区的150名护士进行问卷调查.结果 9个优质护理示范病区的床护比为1∶0.30~1∶0.46,护士工作满意度得分3.12±0.48,8个维度得分为2.18±0.62~3.91±0.33;不同级别医院及不同学历护士得分比较,差异有统计学意义(均P<0.05).结论 优质护理示范病区床护比偏低,护士工作满意度偏低,其中护士对福利待遇、专业发展机会最不满;二级甲等综合医院和高学历护士满意度相对低于相应类别者.应合理配置护理人力资源,增加护理项目收费,改

  7. [Plea for a strengthening of clinical social medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, E; Gostomzyk, J G; Schmahl, F W; Bamberg, M; Brucker, S Y; Wallwiener, D

    2014-09-01

    Social medicine is concerned--in the midst of a constantly changing society--with the social and economic conditions that influence health, disease and medical care. A comprehensive medical care therefore requires medical doctors who, beyond the biomedical issues, realize diseases in the context of the social needs of the individual person and systematically include these in their prevention, treatment and rehabilitation concepts.The system of social security, particularly the health care system, depends on medical doctors' expertise in helping patients for the appropriate use of services from the system of social security. According to the German professional education regulations for doctors the additional specialization in "social medicine" also includes the competence for "assessment of the nature and extent of health disorders and their classification in the framework of social security systems". This judgment is one part of the tasks of the Medical Services belonging to the various branches of the social security system. It is also provided in practice by medical doctors with competence in social medicine working in acute care facilities.

  8. Adaptation of the organizational strategy of the learning evaluation system in the internal medicine wards round performance. Adecuación de la estrategia organizativa del sistema de evaluación del aprendizaje en la estancia de medicina interna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rivero Berovides

    Full Text Available After having identified the difficulties in the development of abilities in the first state exam of medicine, the members of the Medical Clinical Department carried out some innovations in the system of evaluation in Internal medicine which included the introduction of computarized simulations as a way to assess the residents partially in the subject and the substitution of the objectively structural clinical exam of the final test for an integral exam of performance and a written test. The changes were put into practice from 1999 to the year 2000 and it was observable that the results of the exam of performance of the second state exam were superior. There was also an improvement in the results of the state exam when compared with the other exams. This strategy offers a more real and objective certificate of the resident´s competence in the fulfilment of their professional tasks and stimulates a process of learning directed to guarantee the application of knowledge and to form the students integrally
    A partir de deficiencias en el desarrollo de habilidades, identificadas en el primer examen estatal de Medicina, la cátedra de Clínica Médica realizó adecuaciones en el sistema de evaluación de la estancia de medicina interna, que consistieron de forma general, en la introducción de la simulación computadorizada como forma de evaluación parcial, y en la sustitución del examen clínico objetivamente estructurado como forma de evaluación final, por un examen integral de desempeño y un examen escrito. Los cambios fueron aplicados a partir del curso 1999-2000; observamos mejores resultados en el examen de desempeño del segundo examen estatal; también hubo mejoría en los resultados del examen estatal en comparación con los de la estancia. Como beneficios más evidentes señalamos que con la nueva estrategia se logra una certificación más segura, real y objetiva de la competencia de los estudiantes para la ejecuci

  9. Navigating legal constraints in clinical data warehousing: a case study in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Benjamin R; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Neri, Elias; Chang, David C W; Shamardin, Lev; Hänold, Stefanie; Graf, Norbert; Forgó, Nikolaus; Coveney, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine relies in part upon comprehensive data on patient treatment and outcomes, both for analysis leading to improved models that provide the basis for enhanced treatment, and for direct use in clinical decision-making. A data warehouse is an information technology for combining and standardizing multiple databases. Data warehousing of clinical data is constrained by many legal and ethical considerations, owing to the sensitive nature of the data being stored. We describe an unconstrained clinical data warehousing architecture, some of the legal constraints that have led us to reconsider this architecture, and the legal and technical solutions to these constraints developed for the clinical data warehouse in the personalized medicine project p-medicine. We also propose some changes to the legal constraints that will further enable clinical research.

  10. Navigating legal constraints in clinical data warehousing: a case study in personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Benjamin R.; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Neri, Elias; Chang, David C. W.; Shamardin, Lev; Hänold, Stefanie; Graf, Norbert; Forgó, Nikolaus; Coveney, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine relies in part upon comprehensive data on patient treatment and outcomes, both for analysis leading to improved models that provide the basis for enhanced treatment, and for direct use in clinical decision-making. A data warehouse is an information technology for combining and standardizing multiple databases. Data warehousing of clinical data is constrained by many legal and ethical considerations, owing to the sensitive nature of the data being stored. We describe an unconstrained clinical data warehousing architecture, some of the legal constraints that have led us to reconsider this architecture, and the legal and technical solutions to these constraints developed for the clinical data warehouse in the personalized medicine project p-medicine. We also propose some changes to the legal constraints that will further enable clinical research. PMID:24427531

  11. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  12. Polanyi's tacit knowing and the relevance of epistemology to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G

    2010-04-01

    Most clinicians take for granted a simple, reductionist understanding of medical knowledge that is at odds with how they actually practice medicine; routine medical decisions incorporate more complicated kinds of information than most standard accounts of medical reasoning suggest. A better understanding of the structure and function of knowledge in medicine can lead to practical improvements in clinical medicine. This understanding requires some familiarity with epistemology, the study of knowledge and its structure, in medicine. Michael Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is advanced as the basis for developing a more accurate understanding of medical knowledge. Tacit knowing, which explores the taken-for-granted background knowledge that underlies all human knowing, is explained in detail with a focus on its relevance for clinical medicine. The implications of recognizing tacit knowing in medicine and medical decisions are discussed. These include the ability to explain the importance of the clinical encounter in medical practice, mechanisms for analysing patient and doctor as persons, and the need for humility given the uncertainty that the tacit dimension injects into all medical decisions. This more robust medical epistemology allows clinicians to better articulate the nature and importance of patient-centred care, to avoid pitfalls inherent in reductionist approaches to medical knowledge, and to think more clearly about the relationships between medicine and health care at the individual and population levels.

  13. Significance of Kampo, Japanese Traditional Medicine, in the Treatment of Obesity: Basic and Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Yamakawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of obesity includes genetic and environmental factors, including cytokines derived from adipocytes (adipo-cytokines. Although drug therapy is available for obesity, it is highly risky. Our main focus in this review is on the traditional form of Japanese medicine, Kampo, in the treated of obesity. Two Kampo formulas, that is, bofutsushosan (防風通聖散 and boiogito (防己黄耆湯, are covered by the national health insurance in Japan for the treatment of obesity. Various issues related to their action mechanisms remain unsolved. Considering these, we described the results of basic experiments and presented clinical evidence and case reports on osteoarthritis as examples of clinical application of their two Kampo medicine. Traditional medicine is used not only for treatment but also for prevention. In clinical practice, it is of great importance to prove the efficacy of combinations of traditional medicine and Western medicine and the utility of traditional medicine in the attenuation of adverse effects of Western medicine.

  14. [Education Program of Kampo-medicine for Undergraduates in Preparation for Clinical Setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Kampo-medicine has become popular in Japanese medical practice combined with western medicine. For example, Daikenchu-To for intestinal obstruction after surgical operation, Shakuyakukanzo-To and Goshajinki-Gan for anti-cancer agents-induced neuropathy, and Yokkan-San for behavioral psychological symptoms of dementia are alternatively used in addition to conventional treatments in Japan. However, combined use of Kampo-medicine and western medicine may cause unexpected adverse events including undesirable drug-drug interactions because Kampo-medicine was not originally developed to be used with western medicine. Although adverse effects of Kampo-medicine are rare compared with those of western medicine, severe events such as liver dysfunction and interstitial pneumonia have been reported in increasing trends. Medical staff including pharmacists, therefore, should be aware of the onset of adverse events before the patients' symptoms become severe. Several adverse effects are caused by chemical constituents such as glycyrrhizin in licorice for pseudoaldosteronism and geniposide in Gardeniae fructus for mesenteric phlebosclerosis. To understand the adverse effects of Kampo-medicine, pharmacists should learn trends in current medication as well as pharmacology and toxicology of the chemical constituents in pharmacognosy. These issues should also be addressed in educational materials for students of clinical pharmacy and pharmacy practice.

  15. Systematic review of emergency medicine clinical practice guidelines: Implications for research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Savage, Dan; Sandefur, Benjamin; Bernard, Kenneth R; Rothenberg, Craig; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2017-01-01

    Over 25 years, emergency medicine in the United States has amassed a large evidence base that has been systematically assessed and interpreted through ACEP Clinical Policies. While not previously studied in emergency medicine, prior work has shown that nearly half of all recommendations in medical specialty practice guidelines may be based on limited or inconclusive evidence. We sought to describe the proportion of clinical practice guideline recommendations in Emergency Medicine that are based upon expert opinion and low level evidence. Systematic review of clinical practice guidelines (Clinical Policies) published by the American College of Emergency Physicians from January 1990 to January 2016. Standardized data were abstracted from each Clinical Policy including the number and level of recommendations as well as the reported class of evidence. Primary outcomes were the proportion of Level C equivalent recommendations and Class III equivalent evidence. The primary analysis was limited to current Clinical Policies, while secondary analysis included all Clinical Policies. A total of 54 Clinical Policies including 421 recommendations and 2801 cited references, with an average of 7.8 recommendations and 52 references per guideline were included. Of 19 current Clinical Policies, 13 of 141 (9.2%) recommendations were Level A, 57 (40.4%) Level B, and 71 (50.4%) Level C. Of 845 references in current Clinical Policies, 67 (7.9%) were Class I, 272 (32.3%) Class II, and 506 (59.9%) Class III equivalent. Among all Clinical Policies, 200 (47.5%) recommendations were Level C equivalent, and 1371 (48.9%) of references were Class III equivalent. Emergency medicine clinical practice guidelines are largely based on lower classes of evidence and a majority of recommendations are expert opinion based. Emergency medicine appears to suffer from an evidence gap that should be prioritized in the national research agenda and considered by policymakers prior to developing future quality

  16. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morphet J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Morphet,1 Kerry Hood,2 Robyn Cant,2 Julie Baulch,3 Alana Gilbee,3 Kate Sandry4 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 3Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 4Dandenong Emergency Department, Monash Health, David St, Dandenong, Victoria, Australia Abstract: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38, students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice

  17. Precision manufacturing for clinical-quality regenerative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David J; Thomas, Robert J; Hourd, Paul C; Chandra, Amit; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth; Liu, Yang; Rayment, Erin A; Archer, J Richard

    2012-08-28

    Innovations in engineering applied to healthcare make a significant difference to people's lives. Market growth is guaranteed by demographics. Regulation and requirements for good manufacturing practice-extreme levels of repeatability and reliability-demand high-precision process and measurement solutions. Emerging technologies using living biological materials add complexity. This paper presents some results of work demonstrating the precision automated manufacture of living materials, particularly the expansion of populations of human stem cells for therapeutic use as regenerative medicines. The paper also describes quality engineering techniques for precision process design and improvement, and identifies the requirements for manufacturing technology and measurement systems evolution for such therapies.

  18. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Leach, Camilla; Kitsell, Fleur; Griffith, Jacki

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative

  19. An Australian hospital-based student training ward delivering safe, client-centred care while developing students' interprofessional practice capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Margo L; Stewart-Wynne, Edward G

    2013-11-01

    Royal Perth Hospital, in partnership with Curtin University, established the first interprofessional student training ward in Australia, based on best practice from Europe. Evaluation of the student and client experience was undertaken. Feedback from all stakeholders was obtained regularly as a key element of the quality improvement process. An interprofessional practice program was established with six beds within a general medical ward. This provided the setting for 2- to 3-week clinical placements for students from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social work, pharmacy, dietetics and medical imaging. Following an initial trial, the training ward began with 79 students completing a placement. An interprofessional capability framework focused on the delivery of high quality client care and effective teamwork underpins this learning experience. Quantitative outcome data showed not only an improvement in students' attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration but also acquisition of a high level of interprofessional practice capabilities. Qualitative outcome data from students and clients was overwhelmingly positive. Suggestions for improvement were identified. This innovative learning environment facilitated the development of the students' knowledge, skills and attitudes required for interprofessional, client centred collaborative practice. Staff reported a high level of compliance with clinical safety and quality.

  20. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Whiplash, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic treatment of the highly complex, “new diseases” are often possible with the tools of consciousness-based medicine. The treatment is more complicated and the cure usually takes longer than for less-complex diseases. The problem with these patients is that they have less easily accessible resources than most patients, as they suffer from a combined socio-psycho-physical problem with depression, poor social standing, low confidence, and low self-esteem. Often, they have also already tried most of the specialist and alternative treatments on the market. To cure them, the most important thing is to coach them to improve their social life by changing their behavior to be of more value to others. Holding and processing must be especially careful and the contract with the patients must be extremely explicit in order to work on their personal development for 6—12 months. The new diseases can be cured with consciousness-based medicine if the patients are motivated and keep their appointments and agreements. Low responsibility, low personal energy, little joy of life, and limited insight into self and existence are some of the features of the new diseases that make them difficult to cure. The important thing is to keep a pace the patient can follow and give the patient a row of small successes and as few failures as possible. The new diseases are a challenge, a unique chance to improve communication, holding, and processing skills.

  1. [Construction of Research-Oriented State Key Clinical Department by Highlighting the Characteris- tics and Advantages of Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-yu; Guo, Li-heng; Han, Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Min-zhou

    2016-04-01

    As the largest research-oriented specialty department in national traditional Chinese medicine hospitals, the Department of Critical Care Medicine in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine insists on the development mode combined with clinical medicine and scientific research. By taking clinical and basic researches for integrative medicine preventing and treating acute myocardial in-farction and sepsis as a breakthrough, authors explored key problems of Chinese medicine in improving the prognosis related diseases and patients' quality of life. In recent 3 years our department has successively become the principal unit of the national key specialties cooperative group of critical care medicine (awarded by State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine), the key clinical specialties (awarded by National Health and Family Planning Commission), and Guangzhou key laboratory construction unit, and achieved overall lap in clinical medical treatment, personnel training, scientific research, and social service.

  2. Clinical oncology and palliative medicine as a combined specialty--a unique model in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rebecca; Wong, Kam-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Keung; Wong, Ka-Yan; Yau, Yvonne; Lo, Sing-Hung; Liu, Rico

    2015-07-01

    The importance of early integration of palliative care (PC) into oncology treatment is increasingly being recognized. However, there is no consensus on what is the optimal way of integration. This article describes a unique model in Hong Kong where clinical oncology and palliative medicine (PM) is integrated through the development of PM as a subspecialty under clinical oncology.

  3. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  4. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  5. Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

  6. [Reasons for Hospital Treatment of Psychiatric Patients before and after the Opening of a Satellite Ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-04-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within the catchment area that is administered by a psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to approach community treatment on the one hand and somatic medicine on the other hand, consequently diminishing the threshold for hospital treatment. This study investigated whether the diagnostic, psychopathologic and social reasons for admissions changed from this catchment area due to the lower threshold of a satellite ward. The results were controlled with another catchment area's admissions to the 30 km distant psychiatric hospital. The opening of the satellite ward was followed by an 81 % increase of admissions. In particular, admissions of patients with neuroses and personality disorders were more frequent. There was no change of the severity code of psychopathology at admission. From the catchment area of the satellite ward less patients were admitted involuntarily whereas more admissions happened due to social reasons and after patients' own decision.

  7. Practice and considerations of teaching reform of integrated nervous system course for the clinical medicine program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan LI; Liang ZHU; Feng LI; Wen-long DING

    2015-01-01

    Basic Medicine Faculty of Shanghai Jiao Tong University organically integrates basic medicine courses relevant to the central nervous system(including anatomy,physiology,pathology,and pharmacology)and clinical medicine courses(including imaging and diagnostics)into the nervous system module according to course arrangement of domestic and abroad medical schools and has offered to students of eight-year clinical medicine program since 2009.This paper summarizes experiences of the teaching team of nervous system course in nearly six years,explores the development and optimization of the integrated nervous system course from perspectives of arrangement of teaching contents,development of the teaching team,reform of teaching models,and optimization of teaching resources,and considers existing problems and countermeasures during the course development,so as to provide strategic guidance for further optimization and perfection of the integrated nervous system course.

  8. Beyond the myth of expensive clinical study: assessment of traditional medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Falquet, Jacques

    2007-09-25

    Clinical studies with human subjects represent the only assessment of effectiveness and safety that can translate into medical practice, and national or local health policy. There are several reasons why traditional medicines (in fact medicinal plants and other alternative or complementary medicines) should be subjected to more clinical research with patient observation and follow-up: firstly, this would help to select products of interest for further investigations in ethnopharmacology; secondly, it could translate into immediate recommendations for the population using the assessed local treatments. Contrary to a commonly held myth, clinical studies can be conducted at relatively low cost, if one works with local/regional research institutes and with doctoral students, focusing on meaningful clinical measures rather than sophisticated laboratory analyses. This paper describes special designs of clinical studies, appropriate for traditional medicines and tested in the field, including: the retrospective treatment-outcome population survey, the prognosis- outcome method (with modern physicians observing progress of patients treated by a traditional healer), the dose-escalating prospective study (detecting a dose-response phenomenon in humans). It is suggested that this approach offers the best cost-effective course of action for obtaining maximal benefits from traditional medicines, especially those used for treating endemic diseases.

  9. Interpretation of biomonitoring data in clinical medicine and the exposure sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan L; Barr, Dana B; Wright, J Michael; Buckley, Brian; Magsumbol, Melina S

    2008-11-15

    Biomonitoring has become a fundamental tool in both exposure science and clinical medicine. Despite significant analytical advances, the clinical use of environmental biomarkers remains in its infancy. Clinical use of environmental biomarkers poses some complex scientific and ethical challenges. The purpose of this paper is compare how the clinical and exposure sciences differ with respect to their interpretation and use of biological data. Additionally, the clinical use of environmental biomonitoring data is discussed. A case study is used to illustrate the complexities of conducting biomonitoring research on highly vulnerable populations in a clinical setting.

  10. MEDICINAL HERBS USED BY CLIENTS ATTENDING CLINICAL UNITS OF SANTA MARCELINA, PORTO VELHO RO BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano, Rosemeiry Soares; FACULDADE SÃO LUCAS; de Souza, Ana Cristina Ramos; FACULDADE SÃO LUCAS; Feitoza, Leiliane Ferreira; FACULDADE SÃO LUCAS

    2014-01-01

    Many people are currently using medicinal herbs as a therapeutic alternative. Current paper tries to recover and analyze popular lore on the use of medicinal plants to cure diseases. Methodology consists of data collection by interviews with clients of clinical units of the Santa Marcelina Community in Porto Velho RO Brazil. Seventy-nine species and 46 botanic families were identified with special reference to Asteraceae and Lamiaceae with 10 and 8 species each. The most mentioned species wer...

  11. Clinical medicine for Intensive Care especialists. Questions to an expert.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Darío Espinosa Brito

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conception, organization, and development of Intensive Care Medicine is one of the greatest contribution that medical care services brought to the professional practice of doctors and paramedic personnel in the second part of the 20th centrury. In our country, since the 70’s years, this field was incorporated in our National Health System to the daily work of our professionals as to the patients expectations, in an almost an imperceptible way. Twenty polemical questions were asked to an expert, about several current dilemmas in this field. The questions and the answes are only a motivation for new debates in medical services, in medical education activities and in research.

  12. Clinical Research Informatics for Big Data and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, C; Kahn, M G

    2016-11-10

    To reflect on the notable events and significant developments in Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) in the year of 2015 and discuss near-term trends impacting CRI. We selected key publications that highlight not only important recent advances in CRI but also notable events likely to have significant impact on CRI activities over the next few years or longer, and consulted the discussions in relevant scientific communities and an online living textbook for modern clinical trials. We also related the new concepts with old problems to improve the continuity of CRI research. The highlights in CRI in 2015 include the growing adoption of electronic health records (EHR), the rapid development of regional, national, and global clinical data research networks for using EHR data to integrate scalable clinical research with clinical care and generate robust medical evidence. Data quality, integration, and fusion, data access by researchers, study transparency, results reproducibility, and infrastructure sustainability are persistent challenges. The advances in Big Data Analytics and Internet technologies together with the engagement of citizens in sciences are shaping the global clinical research enterprise, which is getting more open and increasingly stakeholder-centered, where stakeholders include patients, clinicians, researchers, and sponsors.

  13. Integration of evidence based medicine into the clinical years of a medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Ferwana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM helps medical students to develop their decision making skills based on current best evidence, especially when it is taught in a clinical context. Few medical schools integrate Evidence Based Medicine into undergraduate curriculum, and those who do so, do it at the academic years only as a standalone (classroom teaching but not at the clinical years. The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences was established in January 2004. The college adopted a four-year Problem Based Learning web-based curriculum. The objective of this paper is to present our experience in the integration of the EBM in the clinical phase of the medical curriculum. We teach EBM in 3 steps: first step is teaching EBM concepts and principles, second is teaching the appraisal and search skills, and the last step is teaching it in clinical rotations. Teaching EBM at clinical years consists of 4 student-centered tutorials. In conclusion, EBM may be taught in a systematic, patient centered approach at clinical rounds. This paper could serve as a model of Evidence Based Medicine integration into the clinical phase of a medical curriculum.

  14. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Chiquete, Erwin; Boyko, Alexey; Beran, Roy G; Strauch, Jorge Barahona; Milojevic, Snezana; Frider, Nadina

    2016-01-01

    Both proprietary and nonproprietary medicines are expected to undergo rigorous preapproval testing and both should meet stringent health authority regulatory requirements related to quality to obtain approval. Nonproprietary (also known as copy, or generic) medicines, which base their authorization and use on the proprietary documentation and label, are often viewed as a means to help lower the cost and, thus, increase patient access. If these medicines fail to meet quality standards, such as good manufacturing practice and bioequivalence (in humans), they are then defined as substandard copies and can pose serious risks to patients in terms of safety and efficacy. Potentially noncontrolled or different manufacturing process and excipients in nonproprietary medicines may result in poor batch-to-batch reproducibility (accurate and consistent quantity of each ingredient in each capsule/tablet) and lower quality. Substandard, nonproprietary copies of medicines that are immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive are of concern to patients due to their possible untoward safety and lack of efficacy events. This article reviews the potential risks associated with nonproprietary medicines that do not meet the regulatory requirements of the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency, or the World Health Organization. The clinical implications for patients are described. This article focuses on nonproprietary medicines for multiple sclerosis, particularly fingolimod, that are not identical to proprietary versions and could thus fail to meet efficacy expectations or have different impact on the safety of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:27418809

  15. Student attitudes towards clinical teaching resources in complementary medicine: a focus group examination of Australian naturopathic medicine students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan Lee; Sarris, Jerome

    2014-06-01

    Complementary medicine is forming an increasingly large part of health care in developed countries and is increasingly being formally taught in tertiary academic settings. An exploratory study of naturopathic student perceptions of, use of and attitudes towards teaching resources in naturopathic clinical training and education. Focus groups were conducted with current and recent students of 4-year naturopathic degree programmes in Brisbane and Sydney to ascertain how they interact with clinical teaching materials, and their perceptions and attitudes towards teaching materials in naturopathic education. Naturopathic students have a complex and critical relationship with their learning materials. Although naturopathic practice is often defined by traditional evidence, students want information that both supports and is critical of traditional naturopathic practices, and focuses heavily on evidence-based medicine. Students remain largely ambivalent about new teaching technologies and would prefer that these develop organically as an evolution from printed materials, rather than depart from dramatically and radically from these previously established materials. Findings from this study will assist publishers, librarians and academics develop clinical information sources that appropriately meet student expectations and support their learning requirements. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  16. Trend and impact of international collaboration in clinical medicine papers published in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Kabir, M A; Koh, Ai Peng; Sinnasamy, Janaki

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration is the way forward in order to improve quality and impact of its research findings. International research collaboration has resulted in international co-authorship in scientific communications and publications. This study highlights the collaborating research and authorship trend in clinical medicine in Malaysia from 2001 to 2010. Malaysian-based author affiliation in the Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded) and clinical medicine journals (n = 999) and articles (n = 3951) as of 30th Oct 2011 were downloaded. Types of document analyzed were articles and reviews, and impact factors (IF) in the 2010 Journal Citation Report Science Edition were taken to access the quality of the articles. The number of publications in clinical medicine increased from 4.5 % (n = 178) in 2001 to 23.9 % (n = 944) in 2010. The top three contributors in the subject categories are Pharmacology and Pharmacy (13.9 %), General and Internal Medicine (13.6 %) and Tropical Medicine (7.3 %). By journal tier system: Tier 1 (18.7 %, n = 738), Tier 2 (22.5 %, n = 888), Tier 3 (29.6 %, n = 1170), Tier 4 (27.2 %, n = 1074), and journals without IF (2.1 %, n = 81). University of Malaya was the most productive. Local collaborators accounted for 60.3 % and international collaborations 39.7 %. Articles with international collaborations appeared in journals with higher journal IFs than those without international collaboration. They were also cited more significantly than articles without international collaborations. Citations, impact factor and journal tiers were significantly associated with international collaboration in Malaysia's clinical medicine publications. Malaysia has achieved a significant number of ISI publications in clinical medicine participation in international collaboration.

  17. Future: new strategies for hospitalists to overcome challenges in teaching on today's wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shannon K; Farnan, Jeanne M; Arora, Vineet M

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the clinical learning environment under resident duty hours restrictions have introduced a number of challenges on today's wards. Additionally, the current group of medical trainees is largely represented by the Millennial Generation, a generation characterized by an affinity for technology, interaction, and group-based learning. Special attention must be paid to take into account the learning needs of a generation that has only ever known life with duty hours. A mnemonic for strategies to augment teaching rounds for hospitalists was created using an approach that considers time limitations due to duty hours as well as the preferences of Millennial learners. These strategies to enhance learning during teaching rounds are Flipping the Wards, Using Documentation to Teach, Technology-Enabled Teaching, Using Guerilla Teaching Tactics, Rainy Day Teaching, and Embedding Teaching Moments into Rounds (FUTURE). Hospitalists serving as teaching attendings should consider these possible strategies as ways to enhance teaching in the post-duty hours era. These techniques appeal to the preferences of today's learners in an environment often limited by time constraints. Hospitalists are well positioned to champion innovative approaches to teaching in a dynamic and evolving clinical learning environment. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  19. Insider action research and the microsystem of a Danish surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Mørcke, Anne Mette; Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This insider action research project aimed to improve interprofessional team performance at a surgical ward. The purpose of the project was (1) to critically appraise potential deficiencies in staffs’ identification, clinical judgment, and management of deteriorating ward patients, (2) to develop...

  20. Clinical characteristics of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infection in geriatric wards%老年病房院内真菌性尿路感染的临床特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢少玲; 钱芸娟; 余枫; 胡文学; 刘伟; 吴燕华; 方晓武; 郝文科

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors and pathogenic characteristics of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infection (NFUTI) in the geriatric wards. Methods All the 1 122 patients with urinary tract infection in our geriatric wards from January 2009 to December 2014 were enrolled in this study. According to the collected clinical data, they were divided into NFUTI and non-NFUTI groups. Their infectious conditions in the urinary tract were analyzed. Results There were significant differences in the serum levels of hemoglobin and albumin, the patient numbers of intensive care unit (ICU), previous indwelling catheterization, and previous use of antibiotics between the NFUTI group and non-NFUTI group (P<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis showed ICU hospitalization, previous use of antibiotics, lower level of serum albumin were the risk factors for NFUTI. Among NFUTI, the common fungi isolated from the urine samples were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida famata in order. The proportions of fungal infection and non-Candida albicans infection were significantly higher in the patients of ICU than those in non-ICU (both P<0.05). Conclusion In geriatric wards, effective surveillances in ICU, strictly following antibiotic indications and enhancing nutritional support may decrease the incidence of NFUTI. Fungi, especially non-Candida abicans, have a higher detection rate in ICU, which should be paid more attention by the clinicians.%目的:探讨近年来老年病房院内真菌性尿路感染(NFUTI)的危险因素及病原学特点。方法将广东省人民医院老年病房2009年1月至2014年12月收治的1122例院内尿路感染(NUTI)的患者分为NFUTI与非NFUTI患者,并对两组患者尿路感染情况进行分析。结果两组重症监护室(ICU)患者数、感染前留置尿管患者数、感染前使用抗生素患者数、患者血红蛋白水平及白蛋白水平

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D

    2014-09-25

    There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Using a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q), a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three rural family medicine clinics. All patients and those accompanying patients who met inclusion criteria were eligible to participate. Data were entered into SPSS Statistics and analyzed for use by age, gender, and location. Of the 519 respondents who participated in the project, 415 participants reported CAM use in the past 12 months (80.0%). When prayer is excluded, the prevalence of CAM use drops to 77.3% in the past year, or 403 respondents. The most common forms of CAM used by respondents were pain relief pads (n = 170, 32.8%), herbal medicines/supplements (n = 167, 32.2%), and massage by self or family (n = 166, 32.0%). Female respondents, individuals with higher levels of education, and those with poorer overall health status were more likely to use CAM than respondents without these characteristics. Only 22.8% of CAM therapies used were reported to physicians by survey participants. These data indicate that CAM use in rural Japan is common. The results are consistent with previous studies that show that Japanese individuals are more interested in forms of CAM such as pain relief pads and massage, than in mind-body forms of CAM like relaxation and meditation. Due to the high utilization of certain CAM practices, and given that most CAM users do not disclose their CAM use to their doctors, we conclude that physicians in rural Japan would benefit by asking about CAM use

  2. Occurrence of hypoxia in the wards of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Appearance of hypoxia in a patient may be an indicator of a serious medical condition that can have grave consequences. Clinical evaluation fails to detect majority of the patients of hypoxia, and therefore, it may remain unnoticed in the wards. We planned to assess the magnitude of hypoxia in different wards of our tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: We studied all the patients admitted in various medical and surgical wards during 1 week of study. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 was measured with the help of a pulse oximeter in all the patients who remained admitted for at least 24 h. Hypoxia was diagnosed in a patient when he had SpO 2 less than 90%. Results: During the study period, 1167 patients were admitted in various wards of the hospital. Hypoxia was detected in 121 patients (10.36%. Among them, 7 (0.59% patients were already having a diagnosis of respiratory failure, but were not on oxygen therapy while 5 (0.42% patients were having SpO 2 less than 90% despite of oxygen therapy. In 109 (9.34% patients, hypoxia was detected incidentally. Conclusion: Unnoticed hypoxia was detected in a significant number of the patients admitted in the wards of the hospital. Therefore, it is concluded that oxygen saturation measurements should be included with other vital parameters like pulse, temperature, and blood pressure, in the monitoring chart of all the admitted patients.

  3. Family Medicine needs assessment: Studying the clinical work of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    change of activity by clicking a start and stop button on an electronic tablet. ... demographic questions. At the end of each day, .... as a satisfying, long-term career choice. The reflections of the ... perhaps reflecting the specialized nature of some clinics in the latter. ... care, the burden of care delivery has been shifted largely.

  4. The emergence of trust in clinics of alternative medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Hansen, Vibeke Holm; Grünenberg, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    qualitative studies and informing the empirical findings with a sociological concept of trust, this article provides new empirical insights on how trust emerges in Danish clinics of acupuncture, reflexology and homeopathy. The analysis demonstrates how trust is situational and emerges through both clients...

  5. Designing clinically useful systems: examples from medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, S

    2003-12-01

    Despite promising results in medical informatics research and the development of a large number of different systems, few systems get beyond a prototype state and are really used in practice. Among other factors, the lack of explicit user focus is one main reason. The research projects presented in this paper follow a user-centered system development approach based on extensive work analyses in interdisciplinary working groups, taking into account human cognitive performance. Different medical and health-care specialists, together with researchers in human-computer interaction and medical informatics, specify future clinical work scenarios. Special focus is put on analysis and design of the information and communication flow and on exploration of intuitive visualization and interaction techniques for clinical information. Adequate choice of the technical access device is made depending on the user's work situation. It is the purpose of this paper to apply this method in two different research projects and thereby to show its potential for designing clinically useful systems that do support and not hamper clinical work. These research projects cover IT support for chairside work in dentistry (http://www.dis.uu.se/mdi/research/projects/orquest) and ICT support for home health care of elderly citizens (http://www.medsci.uu.se/mie/project/closecare).

  6. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Rape and Incest Trauma

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that at least 15% of the female population in western countries has experienced sexual abuse and severe sexual traumas. This paper explains how even serious sexual abuse and trauma can be healed when care and resources encourage the patient to return to the painful life events. When the physician cares and receives the trust of the patient, emotional holding and processing will follow quite naturally. Spontaneous regression seems to be an almost pain-free way of integrating the severe traumas from earlier experiences of rape and incest. This technique is a recommended alternative to classical timeline therapy using therapeutic commands. When traumatized patients distance themselves from their soul (feelings, sexuality, and existential depth, they often lose their energy and enjoyment of life. However, this does not mean that they are lost to life. Although it may seem paradoxical, a severe trauma may be a unique opportunity to regain enjoyment of life. The patient will often be richly rewarded for the extensive work of clearing and sorting out in order to experience a new depth in his or her existence and emotional life, with a new ability to understand life in general and other people in particular. So what may look like a tragedy can be transformed into a unique gift; if the patient gets sufficient support, there is the possibility of healing and learning. Consciousness-based medicine seems to provide severely traumatized patients with the quality of support and care needed for their soul to heal.

  7. The clinical effects of music therapy in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Legrand, Susan B

    2006-08-01

    This study was to objectively assess the effect of music therapy on patients with advanced disease. Two hundred patients with chronic and/or advanced illnesses were prospectively evaluated. The effects of music therapy on these patients are reported. Visual analog scales, the Happy/Sad Faces Assessment Tool, and a behavior scale recorded pre- and post-music therapy scores on standardized data collection forms. A computerized database was used to collect and analyze the data. Utilizing the Wilcoxon signed rank test and a paired t test, music therapy improved anxiety, body movement, facial expression, mood, pain, shortness of breath, and verbalizations. Sessions with family members were also evaluated, and music therapy improved families' facial expressions, mood, and verbalizations. All improvements were statistically significant (Presponse to music therapy. Objective data were obtained for a large number of patients with advanced disease. This is a significant addition to the quantitative literature on music therapy in this unique patient population. Our results suggest that music therapy is invaluable in palliative medicine.

  8. Integrating clinical medicine into biomedical graduate education to promote translational research: strategies from two new PhD programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn L; Jarrett, Marcia; Bierer, S Beth

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a barrier has existed between research and clinical medicine, making it difficult for aspiring scientists to gain exposure to human pathophysiology and access to clinical/translational research mentors during their graduate training. In 2005, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute announced the Med Into Grad initiative to support graduate programs that integrate clinical knowledge into PhD biomedical training, with the goal of preparing a new cadre of translational researchers to work at the interface of the basic sciences and clinical medicine. Two institutions, Baylor College of Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University, developed new PhD programs in translational biology and/or molecular medicine. These programs teach the topics and skills that today's translational researchers must learn and expose students to clinical medicine. In this article, the authors compare and contrast the history, implementation, and evaluation of the Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine program at Baylor College of Medicine and the Molecular Medicine program at the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University. The authors also demonstrate the feasibility of creating a multidisciplinary graduate program in molecular medicine that integrates pathophysiology and clinical medicine without extending training time. They conclude with a discussion of the similarities in training approaches that exist despite the fact that each program was independently developed and offer observations that emerged during their collaboration that may benefit others who are considering developing similar programs.

  9. Chinese herbal medicine for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C-X; Yan, L-J; Lewith, G; Liu, J-P

    2013-12-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss has great impact on quality of life. Many clinical trials using Chinese herbal medicine for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss have been conducted and reported beneficial results. However, there is no critical appraised evidence on efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss to inform clinical use. To assess the beneficial effect and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. Seven electronic databases and two trial registries were searched for all eligible trials from inception to January 2013. Two authors independently selected trials and extracted data. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was utilised to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. revman 5.2 software was applied for data analysis with effect estimate presented as risk ratio and mean difference with its 95% confidence interval. Forty-one randomised clinical trials involving 3560 participants were identified. Five kinds of Chinese herbal medicine were trialed. All trials compared conventional therapies of steroids, vasodilators, anticoagulants, nutritional supplements or hyperbaric oxygen with or without herbal medicine. No trial was identified that compared herbal medicine alone with placebo. No trial was identified that blinded the participants or the observers to their herbal medication. Only one trial adequately reported its method of randomisation. No trial reported the sample size calculated to show an effect. All trials had material other defects giving a high likelihood of bias. Because of the overall poor quality of all 41 trials, it was concluded that there was no level-one evidence to support the use of Chinese herbal medicine, alone or in addition to conventional therapies, to improve the hearing in adults with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Two trials reported adverse

  10. Ideal ward round making in neurosurgical practice.

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    Pathak A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of a perfect ward round lies in the role of the consultant leading the ′round making group′ (RMG as well as the hallmark of effective questioning and participation of each member. Twelve senior consultants with more than 10 years′ experience in neurosurgical practice at three different university hospitals were observed during round making by a participant observer. Observations were made on the group climate of the RMG, the leadership pattern and language expressed by the clinician conducting the round and the effectiveness in his performance as a leader during clinical discussions. The group climate showed evidence of good productivity and flexibility with 92% and 75% consultants, pleasantness of climate was above average with only 50% (6/12 and poor objectivity with 42% (5/12 consultants. Forty two percent of the consultants were not always very well comprehensible, while only 50% (6/12 spoke exactly fitting the occasion. Only 33% (4/12 of the consultants used humour effectively, while 42% (5/12 spoke unnecessarily in between discussion and were poor in introducing the problems of patient to the round making group. Ward round making in neurosurgical practice needs a holistic approach with motivation, planning, leadership skills and structured curriculum to fulfill its objectives.

  11. Hospital-acquired Pneumonia due to Achromobacter spp. in a Geriatric Ward in China: Clinical Characteristics, Biofilm Production, Antibiotic Resistance and Integrons of Isolated Strains.

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    Xiangqun eFang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP due to Achromobacter has become a substantial concern in recent years. However, HAP due to Achromobacter in the elderly is rare.Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 15 elderly patients with HAP due to Achromobacter spp., in which the sequence types (STs, integrons, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance of the Achromobacter spp. were examined. Results: The mean age of the 15 elderly patients was 88.8±5.4 years. All patients had at least 3 underlying diseases and catheters. Clinical outcomes improved in 10 of the 15 patients after antibiotic and/or mechanical ventilation treatment, but three patients had chronic infections lasting more than 1 year. The mortality rate was 33.3% (5/15. All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, aztreonam, nitrofurantoin, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (except ceftazidime and cefoperazone. Six new STs were detected. The most frequent ST was ST306. ST5 was identified in two separate buildings of the hospital. ST313 showed higher MIC in cephalosporins, quinolones and carbapenems, which should be more closely considered in clinical practice. All strains produced biofilm and had integron I and blaOXA-114-like. The main type was blaOXA-114q. The variable region of integron I was different among strains, and the resistance gene of the aminoglycosides was most commonly inserted in integron I. Additionally, blaPSE-1 was first reported in this isolate. Conclusion: Achromobacter spp. infection often occurs in severely ill elders with underlying diseases. The variable region of integrons differs, suggesting that Achromobacter spp. is a reservoir of various resistance genes.

  12. [Research on establishment of clinical safety intensive hospital monitoring net of traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Fei

    2012-09-01

    The establishment of clinical safety monitoring net of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injection is the one of the key issues of the monitoring work. The monitoring net is including varieties of types of net, such as clinical monitoring net, multimedia network platform, the net of experts or talents. The paper will introduce the establishing method of clinical safety monitoring net, the establishing of clinical safety monitoring net, and the establishing of network based on the internet, the knowledge network construction of experts, the net construction of talents are all included, to assure the development for clinical safety monitoring work.

  13. A systematic review of clinical audit in companion animal veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nicole; Toews, Lorraine; Pang, Daniel S J

    2016-02-26

    Clinical audit is a quality improvement process with the goal of continuously improving quality of patient care as assessed by explicit criteria. In human medicine clinical audit has become an integral and required component of the standard of care. In contrast, in veterinary medicine there appear to have been a limited number of clinical audits published, indicating that while clinical audit is recognised, its adoption in veterinary medicine is still in its infancy. A systematic review was designed to report and evaluate the veterinary literature on clinical audit in companion animal species (dog, cat, horse). A systematic search of English and French articles using Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (February 6, 2014), CAB Abstracts (March 21, 2014 and April 4, 2014), Scopus (March 21, 2014), Web of Science Citation index (March 21, 2014) and OVID Medline (March 21, 2014) was performed. Included articles were those either discussing clinical audit (such as review articles and editorials) or reporting parts of, or complete, audit cycles. The majority of articles describing clinical audit were reviews. From 89 articles identified, twenty-one articles were included and available for review. Twelve articles were reviews of clinical audit in veterinary medicine, five articles included at least one veterinary clinical audit, one thesis was identified, one report was of a veterinary clinical audit website and two articles reported incomplete clinical audits. There was no indication of an increase in the number of published clinical audits since the first report in 1998. However, there was evidence of article misclassification, with studies fulfilling the criteria of clinical audit not appropriately recognised. Quality of study design and reporting of findings varied considerably, with information missing on key components, including duration of study, changes in practice implemented between audits, development of explicit criteria and appropriate statistical

  14. A call to the use of the clinical method in the practice of perinatal medicine

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    Carlos Esteban Zerquera Álvarez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A reflection on the appropriateness and current application of the clinical method, defined as the diagnostic process inherent to the practice of human medicine is presented. Considerations about the scientific nature of the clinical method and its application in perinatal medicine along with its specific characteristics in this field are stated. Several considerations about the impact of high technology and the risk of its use when the appropriate balance is not achieved, which could lead to dehumanization and medical malpractice are proposed.

  15. Clinical challenges and opportunities of mesenchymal stem cells in musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The use of stem cells in orthopedics has been researched for many years, with robust animal data that show efficacy in cartilage healing, tendon repair, and intervertebral disk treatment. Early clinical data are also just starting to be published, and these results are encouraging. Safety data in large case series, some that lasted for many years, have also been published. The field of tissue engineering with stem cells in musculoskeletal impairments has the potential to reduce morbidity and improve clinical outcomes. The regulatory environment for this area of medicine is still developing. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The clinical role of nuclear medicine in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, K. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Rheumatology); Van der Linden, E. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology); Pauwels, E.K.J. (Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Division of Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis activity is the dominant clinical variable that determines the therapeutic approach. At present, the amount of painful and swollen joint assessed by physical examination, is generally used to measure the degree of synovitis activity is not available. The availability of an objective and reproducible method to evaluate synovitis activity in RA would be of great value in patient management and in examination of therapeutic effects. An advantage of the use of radiopharmaceuticals in detection of arthritis activity, compared with other imaging techniques, is the possibility to depict all joints in a single image. Furthermore the technique may image joints which are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically and may also detect joint inflammation in an early phase. In this overview different scintigraphic techniques are compared with each other and with other diagnostic imaging modalities.

  17. Superman meets Don Quixote: stereotypes in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, Rosa Lynn

    1986-01-01

    Drawing in part on her experiences as a "humanist-in-residence" on a neurological surgery service, the author discusses how stereotypic views held by and toward physicians and humanists interfere with the teaching of ethics to physicians and, indirectly, to the general public. She traces the development of these stereotypes over the past hundred years and suggests ways that they can be overcome to permit more effective working relationships between physicians and clinical ethicists.

  18. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Mental Disorders in a Holistic Perspective

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available From a holistic perspective, psychiatric diseases are caused by the patient’s unwillingness to assume responsibility for his life, existence, and personal relations. The loss of responsibility arises from the repression of the fundamental existential dimensions of the patients. Repression of love and purpose causes depersonalization (i.e., a lack of responsibility for being yourself and for the contact with others, loss of direction and purpose in life. Repression of strength in mind and emotions leads to derealization (the breakdown of the reality testing, often with mental delusions and hallucinations. The repression of joy and gender leads to devitalization (emotional emptiness, loss of joy, personal energy, sexuality, and pleasure in life.The losses of existential dimensions are invariably connected to traumas with life-denying decisions. Healing the wounds of the soul by holding and processing will lead to the recovery of the person's character, purpose of life, and existential responsibility. It can be very difficult to help a psychotic patient. The physician must first love his patient unconditionally and then fully understand the patient in order to meet and support the patient to initiate the holistic process of healing. It takes motivation and willingness to suffer on behalf of the patients in order to heal, as the existential and emotional pain of the traumas resulting in insanity is often overwhelming. We believe that most psychiatric diseases can be alleviated or cured by the loving and caring physician who masters the holistic toolbox. Further research is needed to document the effect of holistic medicine in psychiatry.

  19. What does «integrative medicine» provide to daily scientific clinical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataller-Sifre, R; Bataller-Alberola, A

    2015-11-01

    Integrative medicine is an ambitious and noble-minded attempt to address the shortcomings of the current public health systems in our Western societies, which is restricted by the limited time available, especially in outpatient clinics. Integrative medicine also does not limit the possibilities of useful therapies that have been tested over the centuries (from China, India, etc.) or of certain resources that do not achieve the level of desired scientific credibility but that present certain therapeutic support in specific cases (homeopathy, acupuncture, etc.) but still require a scientific approach. Finally, the resource of botanical products (phytotherapy) constitutes a wide range of possibilities that universities can (and do) make progress on by providing drug brands for these products through the use of the scientific method and evidence-based medical criteria. This approach will help avoid the irrationality of the daily struggle between conventional scientific medicine (which we apply to the immense majority of patients) and the other diagnostic-therapeutic «guidelines» (natural medicine, alternative medicine, complementary medicine, patient-focused medicine and others). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi

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    Thokozani Bvumbwe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item “nursing staff provided constructive feedback” (P=0.162. Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978. The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment.

  1. Limitaciones de esfuerzos terapéuticos: Resultados de un registro prospectivo en una sala de clínica médica Limitation of life-sustaining treatment: A prospective study developed in a clinical ward

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    Abel Novillo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir el proceso de limitación de los esfuerzos terapéuticos (LET en los pacientes internados en una sala general. Para ello se realizó un estudio prospectivo descriptivo, desarrollado en la sala de internación general de un hospital universitario. Fueron evaluados pacientes que tuviesen alguna LET, asistidos por el servicio de clínica médica en un período de 60 días consecutivos. Durante el mismo se hospitalizaron 402 pacientes, 62 (15% tuvieron algún tipo de LET. Este último grupo estaba compuesto por un 66% de mujeres, la mediana de edad fue de 86 años (78-90 y de la duración de hospitalización de 12 días (8-18. La mala calidad de vida fue la causa más frecuente de LET (69%. Se brindó información acerca de las limitaciones a 43 familias (69% y 8 pacientes (13%. En la decisión participaron el médico de cabecera (50%, médicos de planta (50%, residentes (40%, la familia (42% y los propios pacientes (11%. En 7 casos hubo constancia en la historia clínica (11%. Diecisiete pacientes (27% con LET fallecieron durante la internación, mientras que 44 (71% fueron dados de alta. En conclusión, la limitación de esfuerzos terapéuticos en nuestros pacientes constituyó un hecho frecuente. No se logró identificar un proceso uniforme o sistematizado para la toma de la decisión de LET. Resulta innegable la necesidad de normativas que guíen al equipo de salud en la toma de decisiones, tranquilicen a familiares y acompañen a los pacientes en sus reales necesidades.The purpose of this study is to describe the limiting life-sustaining treatment process of patients admitted to a general ward. A prospective descriptive study was designed. The setting was the general ward of universitary hospital. Study participants were patients assisted by the internal medicine department during a 60- consecutive days period who had limitations of life sustaining treatments. During the study period, 402 patients were

  2. Year-End Clinic Handoffs: A National Survey of Academic Internal Medicine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Erica; Harris, Christina; Lee, Wei Wei; Pincavage, Amber T; Ouchida, Karin; Miller, Rachel K; Chaudhry, Saima; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-06-01

    While there has been increasing emphasis and innovation nationwide in training residents in inpatient handoffs, very little is known about the practice and preparation for year-end clinic handoffs of residency outpatient continuity practices. Thus, the latter remains an identified, yet nationally unaddressed, patient safety concern. The 2014 annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey included seven items for assessing the current year-end clinic handoff practices of internal medicine residency programs throughout the country. Nationwide survey. All internal medicine program directors registered with APDIM. Descriptive statistics of programs and tools used to formulate a year-end handoff in the ambulatory setting, methods for evaluating the process, patient safety and quality measures incorporated within the process, and barriers to conducting year-end handoffs. Of the 361 APDIM member programs, 214 (59%) completed the Transitions of Care Year-End Clinic Handoffs section of the survey. Only 34% of respondent programs reported having a year-end ambulatory handoff system, and 4% reported assessing residents for competency in this area. The top three barriers to developing a year-end handoff system were insufficient overlap between graduating and incoming residents, inability to schedule patients with new residents in advance, and time constraints for residents, attendings, and support staff. Most internal medicine programs do not have a year-end clinic handoff system in place. Greater attention to clinic handoffs and resident assessment of this care transition is needed.

  3. Ambulatório de foniatria infantil: características clínicas e epidemiológicas Pediatric phoniatry outpatient ward: clinical and epidemiological characteristics

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    Mariana Lopes Fávero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Crianças com alteração de linguagem ou aprendizagem e audição normal necessitam uma avaliação foniátrica para analisar os vários aspectos da comunicação e do desenvolvimento visando o diagnóstico diferencial e as indicações terapêuticas. OBJETIVO: Caracterizar clínica e epidemiologicamente uma população pediátrica atendida em ambulatório foniátrico. MÉTODO: Forma de Estudo: coorte histórica com corte transversal. Sessenta e oito pacientes submetidos à consulta foniátrica. As medidas de desfecho foram idade, sexo, origem do encaminhamento para a consulta foniátrica, diagnóstico, idade média dos indivíduos em cada diagnóstico, riscos neonatais, antecedentes familiares para distúrbios da comunicação e encaminhamentos realizados. RESULTADOS: 70,58% do sexo masculino e 29,42% do feminino com idade média de 6,85 ± 2,49 anos. 63,23% oriundos de serviços externos e 45,59% sem diagnóstico auditivo. Foram realizados 14 diagnósticos diferentes. 50% receberam diagnóstico de Paralisia Cerebral, Distúrbio Específico de Linguagem e Transtorno Invasivo do Desenvolvimento. A diferença entre as idades médias foi estatisticamente significativa (F = 4,369 p = 0,00. 50% apre-sentaram história familiar para distúrbios da comunicação e 51,47% de risco neonatal. 51,47% foram encaminhados para uma consulta neurológica e 79,41% para terapias. CONCLUSÃO: A população atendida é predominantemente masculina, com alterações mais complexas de desenvolvimento de linguagem por provável etiologia multifatorial, muitos sem diagnóstico auditivo.Children with language or learning impairment and normal hearing need phoniatric assessment to analyse various communication and development aspects targeting the differential diagnosis and therapeutic indications. OBJECTIVE: Characterize clinical and epidemiological features of a pediatric population treated in a phoniatric outpatient clinic. METHOD: A cross-sectional historical cohort

  4. Clinical application of somatosensory amplification in psychosomatic medicine

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    Nakao Mutsuhiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many patients with somatoform disorders are frequently encountered in psychosomatic clinics as well as in primary care clinics. To assess such patients objectively, the concept of somatosensory amplification may be useful. Somatosensory amplification refers to the tendency to experience a somatic sensation as intense, noxious, and disturbing. It may have a role in a variety of medical conditions characterized by somatic symptoms that are disproportionate to demonstrable organ pathology. It may also explain some of the variability in somatic symptomatology found among different patients with the same serious medical disorder. It has been assessed with a self-report questionnaire, the Somatosensory Amplification Scale. This instrument was developed in a clinical setting in the U.S., and the reliability and validity of the Japanese and Turkish versions have been confirmed as well. Many studies have attempted to clarify the specific role of somatosensory amplification as a pathogenic mechanism in somatization. It has been reported that somatosensory amplification does not correlate with heightened sensitivity to bodily sensations and that emotional reactivity exerts its influence on somatization via a negatively biased reporting style. According to our recent electroencephalographic study, somatosensory amplification appears to reflect some aspects of long-latency cognitive processing rather than short-latency interoceptive sensitivity. The concept of somatosensory amplification can be useful as an indicator of somatization in the therapy of a broad range of disorders, from impaired self-awareness to various psychiatric disorders. It also provides useful information for choosing appropriate pharmacological or psychological therapy. While somatosensory amplification has a role in the presentation of somatic symptoms, it is closely associated with other factors, namely, anxiety, depression, and alexithymia that may also influence the same

  5. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Provide Valid Clinical Skills Assessment in Emergency Medicine Education

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    Wallenstein, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluation of emergency medicine (EM learners based on observed performance in the emergency department (ED is limited by factors such as reproducibility and patient safety. EM educators depend on standardized and reproducible assessments such as the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. The validity of the OSCE as an evaluation tool in EM education has not been previously studied. The objective was to assess the validity of a novel management-focused OSCE as an evaluation instrument in EM education through demonstration of performance correlation with established assessment methods and case item analysis. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of fourth-year medical students enrolled in a required EM clerkship. Students enrolled in the clerkship completed a five-station EM OSCE. We used Pearson’s coefficient to correlate OSCE performance with performance in the ED based on completed faculty evaluations. Indices of difficulty and discrimination were computed for each scoring item. Results: We found a moderate and statistically-significant correlation between OSCE score and ED performance score [r(239 =0.40, p<0.001]. Of the 34 OSCE testing items the mean index of difficulty was 63.0 (SD =23.0 and the mean index of discrimination was 0.52 (SD =0.21. Conclusion: Student performance on the OSCE correlated with their observed performance in the ED, and indices of difficulty and differentiation demonstrated alignment with published best-practice testing standards. This evidence, along with other attributes of the OSCE, attest to its validity. Our OSCE can be further improved by modifying testing items that performed poorly and by examining and maximizing the inter-rater reliability of our evaluation instrument. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:121–126.

  6. The Addiction Recovery Clinic: A Novel, Primary-Care-Based Approach to Teaching Addiction Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Stephen R; Segar, Nora; Cavallo, Dana A; Tetrault, Jeanette M

    2017-05-01

    Substance use is highly prevalent in the United States, but little time in the curriculum is devoted to training internal medicine residents in addiction medicine. In 2014, the authors developed and launched the Addiction Recovery Clinic (ARC) to address this educational gap while also providing outpatient clinical services to patients with substance use disorders. The ARC is embedded within the residency primary care practice and is staffed by three to four internal medicine residents, two board-certified addiction medicine specialists, one chief resident, and one psychologist. Residents spend one half-day per week for four consecutive weeks at the ARC seeing new and returning patients. Services provided include pharmacological and behavioral treatments for opioid, alcohol, and other substance use disorders, with direct referral to local addiction treatment facilities as needed. Visit numbers, a patient satisfaction survey, and an end-of-rotation resident evaluation were used to assess the ARC. From 2014 to 2015, 611 patient encounters occurred, representing 97 new patients. Sixty-one (63%) patients were seen for opioid use disorder. According to patient satisfaction surveys, 29 (of 31; 94%) patients reported that the ARC probably or definitely helped them to cope with their substance use. Twenty-eight residents completed the end-of-rotation evaluation; all rated the rotation highly. The ARC offers a unique primary-care-based approach to exposing internal medicine residents to the knowledge and skills necessary to diagnose, treat, and prevent unhealthy substance use. Future research will examine other clinical and educational outcomes.

  7. [The purpose of clinical laboratory accreditation in transplantation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Nazor, Aida; Perkov, Sonja; Surina, Branka; Siftar, Zoran; Ozvald, Ivan; Vidas, Zeljko

    2011-09-01

    Although transplantation of solid organs has become a more standardized method of treatment, liver transplantation represents an exceptional multidisciplinary clinical procedure requiring understanding of specific pathophysiological changes that occur in the end stage of liver disease. Liver transplantation has been performed at Merkur University Hospital since 1998, with 360 transplantations performed to date. The most common indications are alcohol liver disease, cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B and C virus, hepatocellular carcinoma and cryptogenetic liver cirrhosis. Laboratory tests required for liver transplantation are performed at Department of Clinical Chemistry, Merkur University Hospital, accredited according to ISO 15189 in 2007 for the areas of clinical chemistry, laboratory hematology and coagulation, laboratory immunology-cell immunophenotyping, and molecular diagnosis. The complexity of liver transplant patients requires constant interaction between the anesthesiologist team and clinical laboratory, which has to ensure fast and efficient intraoperative monitoring of biochemical and liver profile: electrolytes and acid-base status, complete blood count, coagulation profile and monitoring of graft function according to the individual patient's health status. Dynamics of intraoperative changes is measured in whole arterial blood samples on a Nova Biomedical Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress mobile acid-base analyzer. Frequent monitoring of ionized calcium and magnesium levels is very important because of citrated blood transfusion and for appropriate therapeutic procedure. During anhepatic stage, there is a progressive increase in lactate level concentration. After reperfusion, a rapid increase in lactate clearance is an excellent indicator of stable graft initial function and its adequate size. During the transplantation procedure, there is usually a biphasic acid-base disturbance characterized by metabolic acidosis and then by metabolic alkalosis. The

  8. Clinical and forensic medicine issues in osteoporosis fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfetta, Luigi; Caldo, Davide

    2011-04-01

    Severe osteoporosis is characterized by a densitometry T-score lower than 2.5 associated with one or more fragility fractures. Fragility fractures represent a serious social and economic problem; the diagnosis of osteoporosis is an unachieved target by orthopaedic surgeons, despite the chance to detect it in many clinical assets and the availability of effective treatment tools. It is necessary to stick to scientific society guidelines, thus avoiding legal consequences related to the diagnosis, the therapy, the prescription coherence and the correct information due to patients.

  9. Therapeutic complement inhibition – from experimental to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Bjerre, Anna; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-20

    Internationally, the use of the C5-inhibiting monoclonal antibody eculizumab has in the course of just a few years become the first choice of treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and the most severe phenotypes of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. At present eculizumab is the only complement inhibitor in ordinary clinical use. This despite the fact that there only exists one randomised, placebo-controlled trial of eculizumab for paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and none for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and that the therapy is very costly. There is reason to believe that complement inhibition as therapy will increase in the future, and that other drugs will also prove to be effective.

  10. Clinical Holistic Health: Advanced Tools for Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called “gestalts”, are integrated in the present “now”. The advanced holistic physician’s expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of “stepping up” the therapy by using more and more “dramatic” methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a “therapeutic staircase” with ten steps: (1 establishing the relationship; (2 establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3 giving support and holding; (4 taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5 social healing of being in the family; (6 spiritual healing — returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7 healing the informational layer of the body; (8 healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, “controlled violence” and “acupressure through the vagina”; (9 mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10 techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient.We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the

  11. Noise pollution on an acute surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Emma; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to measure and analyse noise levels over a 24-h period on five general surgical wards. Noise levels were measured on three wards with four bays of six beds each (wards A, B and C), one ward of side-rooms only (ward D) and a surgical high dependency unit (ward E) of eight beds. Noise levels were measured for 15 min at 4-hourly intervals over a period of 24 h midweek. The maximum sound pressure level, baseline sound pressure level and the equivalent continuous level (LEq) were recorded. Peak levels and LEq were compared with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for community noise. Control measurements were taken elsewhere in the hospital and at a variety of public places for comparison. The highest peak noise level recorded was 95.6 dB on ward E, a level comparable to a heavy truck. This exceeded all control peak readings except that recorded at the bus stop. Peak readings frequently exceeded 80 dB during the day on all wards. Each ward had at least one measurement which exceeded the peak sound level of 82.5 dB recorded in the supermarket. The highest peak measurements on wards A, B, C and E also exceeded peak readings at the hospital main entrance (83.4 dB) and coffee shop (83.4 dB). Ward E had the highest mean peak reading during the day and at night - 83.45 dB and 81.0 dB, respectively. Ward D, the ward of side-rooms, had the lowest day-time mean LEq (55.9 dB). Analysis of the LEq results showed that readings on ward E were significantly higher than readings on wards A, B and C as a group (P = 0.001). LEq readings on ward E were also significantly higher than readings on ward D (P < 0.001). Day and night levels differ significantly, but least so on the high dependency unit. The WHO guidelines state that noise levels on wards should not exceed 30 dB LEq (day and night) and that peak noise levels at night should not exceed 40 dB. Our results exceed these guidelines at all times. It is likely that these findings will translate to

  12. Repeating tests: different roles in research studies and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Paul A

    2012-10-01

    Researchers often decide whether to average multiple results in order to produce more precise data, and clinicians often decide whether to repeat a laboratory test in order to confirm its validity or to follow a trend. Some of the major sources of variation in laboratory tests (analytical imprecision, within-subject biological variation and between-subject variation) and the effects of averaging multiple results from the same sample or from the same person over time are discussed quantitatively in this article. This analysis leads to the surprising conclusion that the strategy of averaging multiple results is only necessary and effective in a limited range of research studies. In clinical practice, it may be important to repeat a test in order to eliminate the possibility of a rare type of error that has nothing to do analytical imprecision or within-subject variation, and for this reason, paradoxically, it may be most important to repeat tests with the highest sensitivity and/or specificity (i.e., ones that are critical for clinical decision-making).

  13. The increasing impact of laboratory medicine on clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerico, Aldo

    2003-07-01

    The practice of cardiology continues to evolve along with a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and the development of new therapeutic procedures. Consequently, new demands are being made on the in vitro diagnostics industry to improve the performance of existing cardiac markers and to develop novel markers for new cardiac disease indications. Indeed, in the last 20 years there has been a progressive increase in new laboratory tests for markers of cardiac diseases. Several highly sensitive and/or specific assays for the detection of myocardial ischemic damage as well as some immunoassays for cardiac natriuretic hormones, now considered a reliable marker of myocardial function, have become commercially available. In parallel, a growing number of some novel risk factors, which can be assessed and monitored by laboratory methods, have been added to the classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Finally, the recent explosion of genetic analysis may soon place at the clinical cardiologist's disposal many laboratory tests for defining the diagnosis at the molecular level, assessing new risk factors, and better targeting the pharmaceutical approaches in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the present article, after a brief description of the analytical tests included in these four groups, each group's impact on clinical cardiology is discussed in detail.

  14. Rehabilitation Medicine in a Small Clinic: Effort of a private clinic with small inpatient facility in a province of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic is a small clinic located in Tochigi (Japan) with a capacity of 19 patients, serving as the core facility in providing borderless and seamless care in medicine, rehabilitation medicine, and long-term care; from inpatient rehabilitation for recovering patients to home-visit medical services and long-term care, including terminal care. In Japan, the managing physician of an authorized clinic with small inpatient facilities lives within the clinic's property or in the land adjacent to it and attends the inpatients while responding to local medical needs on a 24-hour basis, reflecting local climate, communities, and culture. Unlike a large-scale hospital, a clinic with a small-scale inpatient facilities specialized in rehabilitation with close links to local communities can still survive as a business and contribute to local society - Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic is a good example. Patients vary in their diseases, complications, age, family structure, living environment, financial status, sense of values, and the lives they lead. It is impossible to meet all such needs with one standard rehabilitation scheme - but, clinics with small inpatient facilities, such as Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic, can provide more treatment more flexibly, and fill in the gap.

  15. Targeting cancer epigenetics: Linking basic biology to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence that epigenetic dysregulation is involved in almost every step of tumor development and progression. Differences in tumor behavior, which ultimately reflects clinical outcome, can be explained by variations in gene expression patterns generated by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation. Therefore, epigenetic abnormalities are considered potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. DNA methylation is stable at certain specific loci in cancer cells and predominantly reflects the characteristic clinicopathological features. Thus, it is an ideal biomarker for cancer screening, classification and prognostic purposes. Epigenetic treatment for cancers is based on the pharmacologic targeting of various core transcriptional programs that sustains cancer cell identity. Therefore, targeting aberrant epigenetic modifiers may be effective for multiple processes compared with using a selective inhibitor of aberrant single signaling pathway. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic alterations in human cancers and discusses about novel therapeutic strategies targeting epigenetic alterations.

  16. Curcumin: from ancient medicine to current clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, H; Planalp, R; Cho, J; Torti, F M; Torti, S V

    2008-06-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa). Curcumin has a surprisingly wide range of beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. The pleiotropic activities of curcumin derive from its complex chemistry as well as its ability to influence multiple signaling pathways, including survival pathways such as those regulated by NF-kappaB, Akt, and growth factors; cytoprotective pathways dependent on Nrf2; and metastatic and angiogenic pathways. Curcumin is a free radical scavenger and hydrogen donor, and exhibits both pro- and antioxidant activity. It also binds metals, particularly iron and copper, and can function as an iron chelator. Curcumin is remarkably non-toxic and exhibits limited bioavailability. Curcumin exhibits great promise as a therapeutic agent, and is currently in human clinical trials for a variety of conditions, including multiple myeloma, pancreatic cancer, myelodysplastic syndromes, colon cancer, psoriasis and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  18. Nocebo phenomena in medicine: their relevance in everyday clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Hansen, Ernil; Enck, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Nocebo phenomena are common in clinical practice and have recently become a popular topic of research and discussion among basic scientists, clinicians, and ethicists. We selectively searched the PubMed database for articles published up to December 2011 that contained the key words "nocebo" or "nocebo effect." By definition, a nocebo effect is the induction of a symptom perceived as negative by sham treatment and/or by the suggestion of negative expectations. A nocebo response is a negative symptom induced by the patient's own negative expectations and/or by negative suggestions from clinical staff in the absence of any treatment. The underlying mechanisms include learning by Pavlovian conditioning and reaction to expectations induced by verbal information or suggestion. Nocebo responses may come about through unintentional negative suggestion on the part of physicians and nurses. Information about possible complications and negative expectations on the patient's part increases the likelihood of adverse effects. Adverse events under treatment with medications sometimes come about by a nocebo effect. Physicians face an ethical dilemma, as they are required not just to inform patients of the potential complications of treatment, but also to minimize the likelihood of these complications, i.e., to avoid inducing them through the potential nocebo effect of thorough patient information. Possible ways out of the dilemma include emphasizing the fact that the proposed treatment is usually well tolerated, or else getting the patient's permission to inform less than fully about its possible side effects. Communication training in medical school, residency training, and continuing medical education would be desirable so that physicians can better exploit the power of words to patients' benefit, rather than their detriment.

  19. The aquaporin family of water channel proteins in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D; King, L S; Agre, P

    1997-05-01

    The aquaporins are a family of membrane channel proteins that serve as selective pores through which water crosses the plasma membranes of many human tissues and cell types. The sites where aquaporins are expressed implicate these proteins in renal water reabsorption, cerebrospinal fluid secretion and reabsorption, generation of pulmonary secretions, aqueous humor secretion and reabsorption, lacrimation, and multiple other physiologic processes. Determination of the aquaporin gene sequences and their chromosomal locations has provided insight into the structure and pathophysiologic roles of these proteins, and primary and secondary involvement of aquaporins is becoming apparent in diverse clinical disorders. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in multiple tissues including red blood cells, and the Colton blood group antigens represent a polymorphism on the AQP1 protein. AQP2 is restricted to renal collecting ducts and has been linked to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans and to lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and fluid retention from congestive heart failure in rat models. Congenital cataracts result from mutations in the mouse gene encoding the lens homolog Aqp0 (Mip). The present understanding of aquaporin physiology is still incomplete; identification of additional members of the aquaporin family will affect future studies of multiple disorders of water distribution throughout the body. In some tissues, the aquaporins may participate in the transepithelial movement of fluid without being rate limiting, so aquaporins may be involved in clinical disorders without being causative. As outlined in this review, our challenge is to identify disease states in which aquaporins are involved, to define the aquaporins' roles mechanistically, and to search for ways to exploit this information therapeutically.

  20. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  1. Roadmap to a Comprehensive Clinical Data Warehouse for Precision Medicine Applications in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, David J; Chen, Wenjin; Chu, Huiqi; Sadimin, Evita; Loh, Doreen; Riedlinger, Gregory; Goodell, Lauri A; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirshfield, Kim; Rodriguez, Lorna; DiPaola, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Leading institutions throughout the country have established Precision Medicine programs to support personalized treatment of patients. A cornerstone for these programs is the establishment of enterprise-wide Clinical Data Warehouses. Working shoulder-to-shoulder, a team of physicians, systems biologists, engineers, and scientists at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have designed, developed, and implemented the Warehouse with information originating from data sources, including Electronic Medical Records, Clinical Trial Management Systems, Tumor Registries, Biospecimen Repositories, Radiology and Pathology archives, and Next Generation Sequencing services. Innovative solutions were implemented to detect and extract unstructured clinical information that was embedded in paper/text documents, including synoptic pathology reports. Supporting important precision medicine use cases, the growing Warehouse enables physicians to systematically mine and review the molecular, genomic, image-based, and correlated clinical information of patient tumors individually or as part of large cohorts to identify changes and patterns that may influence treatment decisions and potential outcomes.

  2. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    . The four key aspects are: ‘Light’, ‘Space’, ‘Users’ and ‘Time’. The ‘Light’ aspect describes, as shown in (Fig 0.6), the character of the light, light information and light effect i.e. function, aesthetics or symbolism. The ‘Space’ aspect looks into the dimension of the space, geographical orientation...... in Denmark are lastly an investigation on light zones at the hospital ward defined in order to optimize the illumination. The third cycle of iteration is an experimental study testing a lighting concept developed and grounded in the knowledge gained through the first and second cycle. The fourth cycle...

  3. Ward Identities for Hall Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We derive quantum field theory Ward identities based on linear area preserving and conformal transformations in 2+1 dimensions. The identities relate Hall viscosities, Hall conductivities and the angular momentum. They apply both for relativistic and non relativistic systems, at zero and at finite temperature. We consider systems with or without translation invariance, and introduce an external magnetic field and viscous drag terms. A special case of the identities yields the well known relation between the Hall conductivity and half the angular momentum density.

  4. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correale J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Correale,1 Erwin Chiquete,2 Alexey Boyko,3 Roy G Beran,4–6 Jorge Barahona Strauch,7,8 Snezana Milojevic,9 Nadina Frider101Department of Neurology, Raúl Carrea Institute for Neurological Research, Foundation for the Fight against Infant Neurological Illnesses (FLENI, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Clinical and Research Center “MS and Other Demyelinating Diseases” at the Neuroclinical Hospital, Department of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Genetics of the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia; 4South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, 5Department of Neurology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 6School of Medicine, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia; 7Department of Neurology, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, 8School of Medicine, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile; 9Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 10Novartis Latin America and Canada Region, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Both proprietary and nonproprietary medicines are expected to undergo rigorous preapproval testing and both should meet stringent health authority regulatory requirements related to quality to obtain approval. Nonproprietary (also known as copy, or generic medicines, which base their authorization and use on the proprietary documentation and label, are often viewed as a means to help lower the cost and, thus, increase patient access. If these medicines fail to meet quality standards, such as good manufacturing practice and bioequivalence (in humans, they are then defined as substandard copies and can pose serious risks to patients in terms of safety and efficacy. Potentially noncontrolled or different manufacturing process and excipients in nonproprietary medicines may result in poor batch-to-batch reproducibility (accurate and consistent quantity of

  5. Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology, Part 6: Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas L; Lee, Stella E; Lindsay, Robin; Locandro, Drew; Randolph, Gregory W; Shin, Jennifer J

    2017-09-01

    The assessment of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in the outpatient setting is gaining momentum in clinical and research venues. Implementing this data capture into one's practice, however, is not a one-size-fits-all venture, and it is critical to determine when, how, and where to include these patient-centered assessments. This installment of the "Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology" series provides insight into the implementation process and experiences with successful incorporation of PROMs into clinical practice. Specifically, 4 differing clinical scenarios and collection techniques are described, including data acquisition protocols, formats for clinician data usage, and applications of PROM results in clinical and research scenarios.

  6. Characteristics of Ascending, Descending, Floating and Sinking Theor y based on the Concept of Translational Medicine and its Clinical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohui; Zhai Huaqiang; Wang Wei; Wang Xiaoxia; Zhang Xiaojuan; Zhang Tian

    2013-01-01

    Ascending, descending, lfoating and sinking theory is the summarization for the effects of drugs on the body. Translational medicine establishes a bi-directional conversion channels between clinics and laboratories. This article mainly introduces the relationship between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) ascending, descending, lfoating and sinking theory and the concept of translational medicine, and how to study this theory based on the concept of translational medicine.

  7. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable

  8. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable instrumen

  9. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  10. Quality of registration for clinical trials published in emergency medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors established clinical trial registration as a requirement for articles submitted to member journals, with the goal of improving the transparency of clinical research. The objective of this study is to characterize the registration of clinical trials published in emergency medicine journals. Randomized trials involving human subjects and published between June 1, 2008, and May 31, 2011 in the 5 emergency medicine journals with the highest impact factors were included. We assessed the clarity of registered primary outcomes, timing of registration relative to patient enrollment, and consistency between registered and published outcomes. Of the 123 trials included, registry entries were identified for 57 (46%). Of the 57 registered studies, 45 (79%) were registered after the initiation of subject enrollment, 9 (16%) had registered outcomes that were unclear, and 26 (46%) had discrepancies between registered and published outcomes. Only 5 studies were registered before patient enrollment with a clear primary outcome that was consistent with the published primary outcome. Annals of Emergency Medicine was the only journal in which the majority of trials were registered. Current compliance with clinical trial registration guidelines is poor among trials published in emergency medicine journals. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  11. Exploring integrative medicine for back and neck pain - a pragmatic randomised clinical pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A model for integrative medicine (IM) adapted to Swedish primary care was previously developed. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of the IM model versus conventional primary care in the management of patients with non-specific back/neck pain. Specific objectives included the exploration of recruitment and retention rates, patient and care characteristics, clinical differences and e...

  12. New Toronto clinic for men may be sign of growing entrepreneurship within medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, F

    1995-07-15

    A Toronto physician has opened a new clinic for male patients, particularly highly stressed executives, who pay to have their physical, mental and nutritional health assessed. The Health Institute for Men, which opened in January, is located close to the Toronto Stock Exchange. It charges $450 for the initial visit, which includes a complete history, mental-assessment exam and thorough physical. The chair of the CMA Board of Directors considers the clinic a sign of growing entrepreneurship within Canadian medicine.

  13. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jonathan T; Muchir, Antoine; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells), cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  14. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  15. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Social Problems Disguised as Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the diseases seen in the clinic are actually symptoms of social problems. It is often easier for the physician to treat the symptoms than to be a coach and help the patient to assume responsibility in order to improve quality of life, social situation, and relations. If the physician ignores the signs of the disease as a symptom of social problems, and treats the patient with pharmaceuticals, he can give the patient the best justification in the world not to do anything about the situation. It is very important that the physician is not tricked by the games the socially troubled patient, more or less unconsciously, is playing. A firm and wise attitude that confronts the patient with his or her lack of responsibility for solving social problems seems to be a constructive way out. The physician can give holding and support, but the responsibility must remain with the patient. Often it is better for the patient that the physician abstains from giving drugs that can remedy the symptoms and takes the role of a coach instead. Suffering is not necessarily bad, suffering is actually highly motivating and often the most efficient source of learning. Coaching can help the patient canalize his motivation into highly constructive considerations and behavior. A holistic approach thus gives the patient learning and helps him rehabilitate his social reality. Concerning children with recurrent or chronic pain, we have observed an overuse of painkillers, where we believe part is of a psychosomatic nature due to poor thriving in the family. Here the physician has an important job helping the parents to develop as persons, teaching them the basic holding of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment and acceptance of their child. Most of the chronic pain and discomfort with children can be improved if the physician understands how to use the holistic medical toolbox.

  16. An observational study of hand hygiene compliance in paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Jacqueline; Firth, Joseph; Vaughan, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    To measure healthcare workers', children's and visitors' hand hygiene compliance in a paediatric oncology ward and a paediatric respiratory ward in an English hospital. Children are especially vulnerable to healthcare-associated infections, yet few studies have reported on hand hygiene compliance in paediatric clinical areas. This was an observational study. We measured hand hygiene compliance over an eight-hour period in two hospital wards using the 'five moments of hand hygiene' observation tool. We monitored a total of 407 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall opportunities for compliance were 74% for healthcare workers (n = 315) and children and visitors 23% (n = 92). Compliance was 84% for allied health professionals, 81% for doctors, 75% for nurses and 73% for ancillary and other staff. Hand hygiene compliance varied depending on which of the five moments of hygiene healthcare workers were undertaking (p hygiene compliance, and for visitors to the oncology ward, hand hygiene compliance was higher (p hygiene compliance; however, visitors' compliance was low. Among healthcare workers, levels of compliance were higher compared with previous reported estimates. Visitors had the lowest level of compliance yet owing to the nature of the clinical environments, nearly a quarter of care is delivered by them rather than healthcare workers, and so, this offers opportunities for specific future interventions aimed at families and carers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, mor...

  18. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  19. [Development and Quality Evaluation of Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yue-rong; Chen, Ke-ji

    2016-01-01

    More attentions have been paid to the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (ECPGs) of Chinese medicine (CM). International guideline evaluation instruments such as Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE I) has been gradually applied in ECPGs quality evaluation of CM. Nowadays, there are some certain methodological defects in partial ECPGs of Chinese medicine, with relatively low applicability and slowly update. It is suggested to establish technical specifications of CM-ECPGs in accordance with the characteristics of CM and international general specification, strengthen the quality evaluation of CM-ECPGs, attach great importance to the regularly update as well as popularization and application of CM-ECPGs.

  20. Ethical considerations in clinical research on herbal medicine for prevention of cardiovascular disease in the ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Karbwang, Juntra

    2016-10-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the ageing is a major public health problem worldwide. The nature of most CVD is subclinical with pathological processes that can span over years. Use of preventive measures could be an appropriate approach to prevailing over CVD in the ageing, and herbal medicine is one of the promising preventive approaches and is currently of interest among medical societies. In the evidence-based era, herbal medicine is, however, often underestimated and approached with skepticism, mainly due to the paucity of scientific evidence. Properly designed clinical trials on herbal medicine for prevention of CVD in a geriatric population are thus of importance and of clinical value. To review ethical issues and discuss considerations when such research is proposed. Four ethical issues, including the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent, are structured and extensively discussed in this article. Ethical core considerations of prevention research of CVD on herbal medicine involve particular attention on the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent. These issues and considerations are keys, although they must be adapted to an individual research setting in which a clinical study is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulatory considerations in production of a cell therapy medicinal product in Europe to clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Patricia Gálvez; Martinez, Adolfina Ruiz; Lara, Visitación Gallardo; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2014-02-01

    The development of new drugs using stem cells has become a clinic alternative for the treatment of different diseases such as Alzheimer's, diabetes and myocardial infarction. Similar to conventional medicines, stem cells as new medicinal products for cell therapy are subjected to current legislation concerning their manufacture process. Besides, their legality is determined by the Regulatory Agencies belonging to the Member State of the European Union in which they are being registered. With the evolution of therapy that uses cells as medicines, there is a need to develop the appropriate legislative and regulatory framework capable of ensuring their safety and effectiveness. However, few works have been published regarding the regulations that these products must comply through production and commercialization processes. The present work is focused on the description of key events during clinical development and cell production of stem cells as drugs. Such as the regulations, requirements and directives involved in the production of cell therapy medicinal products, from the clinical design stage to its commercialization in Europe.

  2. Vertical integration of biochemistry and clinical medicine using a near-peer learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallan, Alexander J; Offner, Gwynneth D; Symes, Karen

    2016-11-12

    Vertical integration has been extensively implemented across medical school curricula but has not been widely attempted in the field of biochemistry. We describe a novel curricular innovation in which a near-peer learning model was used to implement vertical integration in our medical school biochemistry course. Senior medical students developed and facilitated a case-based small group session for first year biochemistry students. Students were surveyed before and after the session on their attitudes about biochemistry, as well as the effectiveness of the session. Prior to the session, the students believed biochemistry was more important to understanding the basic science of medicine than it was to understanding clinical medicine or becoming a good physician. The session improved students' attitudes about the importance of biochemistry in clinical medicine, and after the session they now believe that understanding biochemistry is equally important to the basic sciences as clinical medicine. Students would like more sessions and believe the senior student facilitators were knowledgeable and effective teachers. The facilitators believe they improved their teaching skills. This novel combination of near-peer learning and vertical integration in biochemistry provided great benefit to both first year and senior medical students, and can serve as a model for other institutions. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):507-516, 2016.

  3. Development of emergency medicine as academic and distinct clinical discipline in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihefendic, Nizama; Zildzic, Muharem; Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Zoran; Vasic, Dusko

    2011-01-01

    Emergency medicine is a new academic discipline, as well as a recent independent clinical specialization with the specific principles of practice, education and research. It is also a very important segment of the overall health care and health system. Emergency medicine as a distinct specialty was introduced in the U.S. in 1970. Ten years later and relatively quickly emergency medicine was introduced in the health system in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a specialty with a special education program for specialist and a final exam. Compare the development of emergency medicine in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the trends of development of this discipline in the world as a specialization and an academic discipline. Identify specific problems and possible solutions and learn lessons from other countries. Reviewed are the literature data on the development of emergency medicine in the world, programs of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, the organizational scheme of emergency centers and residency. This is then compared with data of the current status of emergency medicine as an academic discipline and a recognized specialization, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are substantial differences in the development of emergency medicine in the United States, European Union and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although Bosnia and Herzegovina relatively early recognized specialty of emergency medicine in academia, it failed to mach the academic progress with the practical implementation. A&E departments in the Community Health Centers failed to meet the desired objectives even though they were led by specialists in emergency medicine. The main reason being the lack of space and equipment as well as staff needed to meet set standards of good clinical practice, education and research. Furthermore the Curriculum of undergraduate education and specialization does not match modern concept of educational programs that meet the principles set out in emergency medicine and learning through

  4. [Exercise is medicine: development and evidence-based practice in clinical exercise physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shi

    2014-08-01

    It has been well established that appropriate physical activity and exercise play an important role in promotion of health and fitness, prevention of disease and treatment and rehabilitation of health conditions. However, practice based on scientific evidence, in respect of the role and effectiveness of exercise interventions in prevention and treatment of diseases, has only been promoted and implemented in the fields of clinical exercise physiology, public health and medicine in recent years. This brief review provides an introduction of the concept of "Exercise is Medicine", the development and evidence-based practice in Clinical Exercise Physiology, and the role and training of Clinical Exercise Physiologist in the health care system of some other countries.

  5. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS.

  6. The Necessity of Data Mining in Clinical Emergency Medicine; A Narrative Review of the Current Literatrue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parva, Elahe; Boostani, Reza; Ghahramani, Zahra; Paydar, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    Clinical databases can be categorized as big data, include large quantities of information about patients and their medical conditions. Analyzing the quantitative and qualitative clinical data in addition with discovering relationships among huge number of samples using data mining techniques could unveil hidden medical knowledge in terms of correlation and association of apparently independent variables. The aim of this research is using predictive algorithm for prediction of trauma patients on admission to hospital to be able to predict the necessary treatment for patients and provided the necessary measures for the trauma patients who are before entering the critical situation. This study provides a review on data mining in clinical medicine. The relevant, recently-published studies of data mining on medical data with a focus on emergency medicine were investigated to tackle pros and cons of such approaches. The results of this study can be used in prediction of trauma patient’s status at six hours after admission to hospital. PMID:28507995

  7. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  8. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  9. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  10. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  11. Patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for pain: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Press Yan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care. The purpose of this study was to characterize patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for a pain complaint. Methods This is a cross-sectional study. The study took place at Clalit Health Services (CHS complementary clinic in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Patients visiting the complementary clinic, aged 18 years old and older, Hebrew speakers, with a main complaint of pain were included. Patients were recruited consecutively on random days of the month during a period of six months. Main outcome measures were: pain levels, location of pain, and interference with daily activities. Once informed consent was signed patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire by a qualified nurse. The questionnaire included socio-demographic data, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Results Three-hundred and ninety-five patients were seen at the complementary medicine clinic during the study period, 201 (50.8% of them met the inclusion criteria. Of them, 163 (81.1% agreed to participate in the study and were interviewed. Pain complaints included: 69 patients (46.6% with back pain, 65 (43.9% knee pain, and 28 (32.4% other limbs pain. Eighty-two patients (50.3% treated their pain with complementary medicine as a supplement for their conventional treatment, and 55 (33.7% felt disappointed from the conventional medicine experience. Eighty-three patients (50.9% claimed that complementary medicine can result in better physical strength, or better mental state 51 (31.3%. Thirty-seven patients (22.7% were hoping that complementary medicine will prevent invasive procedures. Conclusion Given the high proportion of patients with unsatisfactory pain relief using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, general practitioners should gain knowledge about CAM and CAM providers should gain training in pain topics to improve communication and counsel patients. More clinical

  12. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified.

  13. The Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: an organizational model for clinical research in a school of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Landis, J Richard; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    A new model for the conduct of clinical research was established at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine, through the development of the interdepartmental Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in 1993 and the basic science Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in 1994. The authors describe the development and evolution of these novel structures.Five key objectives were achieved with these structures' creation: (1) Clinical faculty have the opportunity to be identified as both clinicians and epidemiologists, (2) nonclinical faculty have an academic "home," (3) clinical trainees are now educated in population medicine, which promotes its incorporation into their clinical practice, (4) population medicine and clinical medicine have become fully integrated, and (5) better epidemiologic research is conducted, informed by clinical insights.Today's center is the primary home for epidemiology and biostatistics at Penn, linking epidemiology, biostatistics, clinical medicine, and the health sciences. The center's core faculty manage their own research programs, conduct primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, serve as members of collaborative research teams, manage cores and service centers that support research projects, and lead graduate training programs in epidemiology and biostatistics. The department provides an academic home and structure for faculty, provides primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, supports the center's mission, and provides training in biostatistics. This organizational approach has wide applicability across schools of medicine in the United States and abroad and has been a model for many.

  14. Why we should understand the patient experience: clinical empathy and medicines optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubraj, Barry; Barnett, Nina L; Grimes, Lesley; Varia, Sneha; Chater, Angel; Auyeung, Vivian

    2016-10-01

    To critically discuss the need for pharmacists to underpin their consultations with appropriate 'clinical empathy' as part of effective medicines optimisation. Use of literature around empathy, consultation and pharmacy practice to develop a case for greater clinical empathy in pharmacy consultations. Clinical empathy is defined from the literature and applied to pharmacy consultations, with a comparison to empathy in other clinical professions. Historical barriers to the embedding of clinical empathy into pharmacy consultations are also explored. We challenge the pharmacy profession to consider how clinical empathy should underpin consultations with a series of introspective questions and provide some sample questions to support pharmacy consultations. We also make the case for appropriate education and professional development of consultation skills at undergraduate and postgraduate level. We contend that patients' relationships with practitioners are critical, and a lack of empathy can impact the effectiveness of care. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. The enduring legacy of Alfred Gilman senior (1908-1984) to pharmacology and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Ronald P

    2016-09-28

    Alfred Gilman was best known for his co-authorship with Louis Goodman of the seminal textbook on pharmacology The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics in 1941. The book made the discipline of pharmacology relevant to clinical medicine by providing a link between the basic medical sciences and the practice of medicine. Gilman was also instrumental in establishing the use of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and made important contributions in areas related to renal function, acid-base balance, and diuretics. During the 1960s, he created a first rate department at the newly formed Albert Einstein College of Medicine. A superb lecturer, he commented incisively on issues related to pharmacology, therapeutics, and pathophysiology. Dr Gilman also provided a key link between academia and the pharmaceutical industry by serving as a consultant to several drug firms. The legacy of Alfred Gilman senior was continued by his son, Alfred Goodman Gilman, who became a Nobel Laureate. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Anticandidal activity of medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Limpon

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro anticandidal activity of some medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against Candida species. The antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of five medicinal plants, namely, Cinnamomum porrectum, Lippia nudiflora, Cestrum nocturnum, Trachyspermum ammi, and Sida carpinifolia were studied. The medicinal characteristics of these plants were compared with commercially used antibiotics. The antimicrobial assay was done by agar well diffusion and the broth dilution method. Among the plants used, T. ammi and C. nocturnum were found to be more potent than the others. Twenty P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from various clinical specimens. The total inhibitions obtained were found to be 47%, 38%, and 36% in blood agar, whereas in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) the inhibitions were 57%, 48%, and 37%, respectively.

  17. Characteristics of adult smokers presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luberto, Christina M; Chad-Friedman, Emma; Dossett, Michelle L; Perez, Giselle K; Park, Elyse R

    2016-09-29

    Mind-body interventions can improve vulnerabilities that underlie smoking behavior. The characteristics of smokers who use mind-body medicine have not been explored, preventing the development of targeted interventions. Patients (N = 593) presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic completed self-report measures. Patients were 67 percent never smokers, 27 percent former smokers, and 6 percent current smokers. Current smokers were younger; more likely to be single, unemployed, or on disability; and report greater depression symptoms, greater pain, and lower social support (ps mind-body medicine have unique psychosocial needs that should be targeted in mind-body smoking cessation interventions.

  18. Clinical Poems and Clinical Conversations: Some Thoughts on Working with Family Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Howard F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in which Family Medicine residents composed, read, and discussed their poems as a way of bringing to life their often complex relationships with patients. It argues that this approach mobilizes the physicians' own creativity in the service of reflective practice and improved doctor-patient relationships. This…

  19. Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Science, humanism, judgement, ethics: person-centered medicine as an emergent model of modern clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Medical University of Plovdiv (MUP) has as its motto 'Committed to humanity". But what does humanity in modern medicine mean? Is it possible to practise a form of medicine that is without humanity? In the current article, it is argued that modern medicine is increasingly being practised in a de-personalised fashion, where the patient is understood not as a unique human individual, a person, but rather as a subject or an object and more in the manner of a complex biological machine. Medicine has, it is contended, become distracted from its duty to care, comfort and console as well as to ameliorate, attenuate and cure and that the rapid development of medicine's scientific knowledge is, paradoxically, principally causative. Signal occurrences in the 'patient as a person' movement are reviewed, together with the emergence of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) and patient-centered care (PCC) movements. The characteristics of a model of medicine evolving in response to medicine's current deficiencies--person-centered healthcare (PCH)--are noted and described. In seeking to apply science with humanism, via clinical judgement, within an ethical framework, it is contended that PCH will prove to be far more responsive to the needs of the individual patient and his/her personal circumstances than current models of practice, so that neither a reductive anatomico-pathological, disease-centric model of illness (EBM), nor an aggressive patient-directed, consumerist form of care (PCC) is allowed continued dominance within modern healthcare systems. In conclusion, it is argued that PCH will enable affordable advances in biomedicine and technology to be delivered to patients within a humanistic framework of clinical practice that recognises the patient as a person and which takes full account of his/her stories, values, preferences, goals, aspirations, fears, worries, hopes, cultural context and which responds to his/her psychological, emotional, spiritual and social necessities

  1. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  2. Levels of Evidence in the Clinical Sports Medicine Literature: Are We Getting Better Over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Heather M; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Freedman, Kevin B

    2014-07-01

    There has been an increased emphasis on improving the level of evidence used as the basis for clinical treatment decisions. Several journals now require a statement of the level of evidence as a basic gauge of the study's strength. To review the levels of evidence in published articles in the clinical sports medicine literature and to determine if there has been an improvement in the levels of evidence published over the past 15 years. Systematic review. All articles from the years 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (AJSM), Arthroscopy, and sports medicine-related articles from The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-American (JBJS-A) were analyzed. Articles were categorized by type and ranked for level of evidence according to guidelines from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Excluded were animal, cadaveric, and basic science articles; editorials; surveys; special topics; letters to the editor; and correspondence. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square. A total of 1580 articles over the 4 periods met the inclusion criteria. The percentage of level 1 and 2 studies increased from 6.8% to 12.6%, 22.9%, and 23.5%, respectively (P sports medicine literature over the past 15 years, particularly in JBJS-A and AJSM. The largest increase was seen in diagnostic studies, while therapeutic and prognostic studies demonstrated modest improvement. The emphasis on increasing levels of evidence to guide treatment decisions for sports medicine patients may be taking effect. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofoss Dag

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1 that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2 that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006. Multilevel analysis by MLwiN version 1.10. Results Considerable parts of the score variations were at the ward and department levels. More organization level variation was seen at the ward level than at the department level. Conclusions Patient safety culture improvement efforts should not be limited to all-hospital interventions or interventions aimed at entire departments, but include involvement at the ward level, selectively aimed at low-scoring wards. Patient safety culture should be studied as closely to the patient as possible. There may be such a thing as "hospital safety culture" and the variance across hospital departments indicates the existence of department safety cultures. However, neglecting the study of patient safety culture at the ward level will mask important local variations. Safety culture research and improvement should not stop at the lowest formal level of the hospital (wards, out-patient clinics, ERs, but proceed to collect and analyze data on the micro-units within them.

  4. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... the requirements. What does it mean to create a 'home-like' and 'pleasant or appealing' light in this context? Does the composition of CRI and degree of Kelvin tell it all? Is it enough information to provide a proper illumination in which the patient can have a homely and pleasant experience? The 'Model of Light...... from the Danish interior design magazine BO BEDRE.The findings show that the placement of light atmosphere in Denmark are determined as three horizontal light zones: 'High Lighting Zone', 'Center Lighting Zone' and 'Low Lighting Zone' An experimental study evaluates the experience of the atmosphere...

  5. The expanding role of the clinical haematologist in the new world of advanced therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowdell, Mark W; Thomas, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) represent the current pinnacle of 'patient-specific medicines' and will change the nature of medicine in the near future. They fall into three categories; somatic cell-therapy products, gene therapy products and cells or tissues for regenerative medicine, which are termed 'tissue engineered' products. The term also incorporates 'combination products' where a human cell or tissue is combined with a medical device. Plainly, many of these new medicines share similarities with conventional haematological stem cell transplant products and donor lymphocyte infusions as well as solid organ grafts and yet ATMPs are regulated as medicines and their development has remained predominantly in academic settings and within specialist centres. However, with the advent of commercialisation of dendritic cell vaccines, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells and genetically modified autologous haematopoietic stem cells to cure single gene-defects in β-thalassaemia and haemophilia, the widespread availability of these therapies needs to be accommodated. Uniquely to ATMPs, the patient or an allogeneic donor is regularly part of the manufacturing process. All of the examples given above require procurement of blood, bone marrow or an apheresate from a patient as a starting material for manufacture. This can only occur in a clinical facility licensed for the procurement of human cells for therapeutic use and this is likely to fall to haematology departments, either as stem cell transplant programmes or as blood transfusion departments, to provide under a contract with the company that will manufacture and supply the final medicine. The resource implications associated with this can impact on all haematology departments, not just stem cell transplant units, and should not be under-estimated.

  6. [Evidence-based medicine. 1. The transfer of research results to clinical practice. The Italian Group for Evidence-Based Medicine-GIMBE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartabellotta, A

    1998-03-01

    Evidence-based Medicine, born officially in November 1992, during last five years is grown everywhere, showing its power to influence virtually all aspects of health care: clinical practice, medical education, patient information and health policy. Because of the raising interest also in Italy for the new paradigm of clinical practice, "Recently Progress in Medicina" launches a series of articles with the aim of giving to physicians tools and skills for searching, critically appraising and implementing in their own decisions the best results of clinical research. For a better explanation of practical aspects of Evidence-based Medicine, the first article discusses about several obstacles existing in transferring correctly and timely the results of research into clinical practice, and about the potential role of Evidence-based Medicine in the evolution of the medical art and the health systems of the third millennium.

  7. Clinical Utility of a Precision Medicine Test Evaluating Outpatients with Suspected Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Budoff, Matt; Sharp, David; Zapien, Michael; Huang, Lin; Maniet, Bruce; Herman, Lee; Monane, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Identifying patients with obstructive coronary artery disease can be challenging for primary care physicians. Advances in precision medicine may help augment clinical tools and redefine the paradigm for evaluating coronary artery disease in the outpatient setting. A blood-based age/sex/gene expression score (ASGES) incorporating key features of precision medicine has shown clinical validity with a 96% negative predictive value and 89% sensitivity in estimating a symptomatic patient's current likelihood of obstructive coronary artery disease. To better characterize the clinical utility of the ASGES and measure its impact on clinician decision-making, a community-based registry was established. The prospective PRESET Registry (NCT01677156) enrolled stable, nonacute adult patients presenting with typical or atypical symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease from 21 US primary care practices from August 2012 to August 2014. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and ASGES results (predefined as low [ASGES ≤15] or elevated [ASGES >15]) were collected, as were referrals to Cardiology or further functional/anatomic cardiac testing after ASGES testing. Patients were followed for 1 year post ASGES testing. Among the 566-patient cohort (median age 56 years), clinicians referred 26/252 (10%) of patients with low scores vs 137/314 (44%) of patients with elevated scores to Cardiology or advanced cardiac testing for further evaluation (unadjusted odds ratio 0.15, P medicine in the delivery of cardiovascular care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Education and training for medicines development, regulation and clinical research in emerging countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor - Kerpel-Fronius

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014 was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education teaching of medicines development, regulation and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC’s. It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues.

  9. Education and training for medicines development, regulation, and clinical research in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Allen, Elizabeth; Bass, Rolf; Mainard, Jacques D; Dodoo, Alex; Dubois, Dominique J; Hela, Mandisa; Kern, Steven; Massud, Joao; Silva, Honorio; Whitty, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014) was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education and teaching of medicines development, regulation, and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation, and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT) project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues.

  10. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  11. HIV in (and out of) the clinic: biomedicine, traditional medicine and spiritual healing in Harare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary lived experiences of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are shaped by clinical and cultural encounters with illness. In sub-Saharan countries such as Zimbabwe, HIV is treated in very different ways in various therapeutic contexts including by biomedical experts, traditional medicine and faith healers. The co-existence of such expertise raises important questions around the potencies and limits of medicalisation and alternative healing practices in promoting HIV recovery. First, in this study, drawing on in-depth qualitative interviews with 60 people from poor urban areas in Harare, we explore the experiences of people living with and affected by HIV. Specifically, we sought to document, interrogate and reflect on their perceptions and experiences of biomedicine in relation to traditional medicine and spiritual healing. Their accounts indicate that traditional medicine and spiritual beliefs continue to significantly influence the way in which HIV is understood, and the forms of help and care people seek. Second, we observe the dramatic and overwhelmingly beneficial impact of Antiretroviral Therapy and conclude through Zimbabwean's own stories that limitations around delivery and wider structural inequalities impede its potential. Lastly, we explore some practical implications of the biomedical clinic (and alternative healing practices) being understood as sites of ideological and expert contestation. This paper aimed to add to our knowledge of the relationships between traditional medicine and spiritual healing in connection with biomedicine and how this may influence HIV treatment and prevention.

  12. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  13. The proposed EU-regulation on clinical trials on medicinal products: an unethical proposal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringa, Jilles; Dute, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    The Commission has proposed a regulation 'on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use' to introduce one regulatory framework for clinical trials in the European Union. This regulation should replace the current clinical trials directive (2001/20/EC). In this article we describe and critically review the main provisions of the proposed regulation. We assess the consequences for a sound authorisation procedure of clinical trials and the level of protection for human subjects. We note that the proposed regulation is inconsistent with applicable international legal documents, such as the Biomedicine Convention and the Declaration of Helsinki. We conclude that the proposed regulation does not ensure a "high level of human health protection"--required by its legal basis in the TFEU--because it may force Member States concerned to accept a reporting Member States' approval of--in their estimation--an unethical clinical trial.

  14. [Combination analysis of new drug discovery with "Xiaohe Silian" method and traditional Chinese medicine clinical pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Xiang, Jia-Mei; Wang, Jing-Juan; Zhao, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Gang; Dong, Hong-Huan; Ouyang, Guo-Qing

    2014-07-01

    With the kernel of efficacy, "Xiaohe Silian" was a pattern and method for new drug discovery which was constituted with "metabolism-efficacy, toxicity-efficacy, quality-efficacy and structure-efficacy". Its connotation was in keeping with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical pharmacy. This paper systematically summarized the research method of new drug discovery practice process for TCM. To avoid western drug like in TCM new drug discovery, we carried out combination analysis with TCM clinical pharmacy. The correlation analysis between basic elements of "Xiaohe Silian(n) and TCM clinical pharmacy was studied to guarantee this method could integrate closely with TCM clinic from all angles. Hence, this method aimed to provide a new method for TCM new drug discovery on the basis of TCM clinical pharmacy with insisting on holistic view of multicomponent study, kinetic view of metabolic process when the curative effect occurred and molecular material view of quality control and structure-activity exposition.

  15. An Innovative Clinical Skills “Boot Camp” for Dental Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Castillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During a 1-year hospital-based residency, dental residents are required to rotate through many departments including surgery, medicine, and emergency medicine. It became apparent that there was a gap between clinical skills knowledge taught in dental school curriculum and skills required for hospital-based patient care. In response, a simulation-based intensive clinical skill “boot camp” was created. The boot camp provided an intensive, interactive 3-day session for the dental residents. During the 3 days, residents were introduced to medical knowledge and skills that were necessary for their inpatient hospital rotations but were lacking in traditional dental school curriculum. Effectiveness of the boot camp was assessed in terms of knowledge base and comfort through presession and postsession surveys. According to resident feedback, this intensive introduction for the dental residents improved their readiness for their inpatient hospital-based residency.

  16. Translating molecular medicine into clinical tools: doomed to fail by neglecting basic preanalytical principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannello Ferdinando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This commentary discusses a study on measurements of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 in serum of pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients recently published in Journal of Molecular Medicine. This study can be considered the typical "obstacle" to effective translational medicine as previously documented in JTM journal. Although serum has been frequently proven as inappropriate sample for determining numerous circulating MMPs, among them MMP-9, there are over and over again studies, as in this case, that measure MMP-9 in serum. Comparative measurements in serum and plasma samples demonstrated higher concentrations for MMP-9 in serum due to the additional release from leukocytes and platelets following the coagulation/fibrinolysis process. From this example it can be concluded that translating basic research discoveries into clinical tools needs a more intensive exchange between basic biomedical research and clinical scientists already in an early stage. Otherwise a lost of translation, as discussed in JTM journal, seems to be inevitable.

  17. Health Anxiety Levels in Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic for Several Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health anxiety (HA in patients consist of incorrect reference to normal bodily sensations as a signs of a serious disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the HA in patients admitted to internal medicine outpatient clinic for several times within one year. Material and Method: 60 patients who admitted more than one time to internal medicine outpatient clinic within one year and the control group consisted of 60 people were enrolled in this study. Short-form of health anxiety inventory (SAE-KF was given to these groups, The results were compared statistically. Results: SAE-KF scores were significantly higher in the patient group (11.17 ± 6.07 than the control group (10.71±4.44 (Z=-5.96, P

  18. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE AND THE CLINICAL STUDY ON ACUPUNCTURE AND MOXIBUSTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴滨; 李宁

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the authors hold that the evidence-based medicine(EBM) is a new medical action produced at the historic moment in clinical practice, which is promoting development of the medicine and even the whole life science in a fully new train of thought end method. Further the briefly introduced contents are the effect of EBM, the difficulty of utilizing in the acupuncture clinical practice and how to resolve them. It is highly recommended that the doctors of the acupuncture science field should study EBM and its effect and difficulties in practice as earlier as possible, insistently assimilate new knowledge and keep abreast of the times' progress to facilitate the further development of acupunctology.

  19. Scientific Principles and Rigorous Processes Should Be Followed in Developing Clinical Guidelines for Therapeutic Interventions of Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Shi-long; WU Da-rong; LAO Ying-rong

    2008-01-01

    @@ A clinical guideline for the therapeutic interventions of integrative medicine may be defined as a written document which states a series of recommendations on therapeutic interventions of integrative medicine for a special disease or condition. The guideline may provide assistance to medical professionals in making clinical decisions aimed at improving the clinical outcome of patients and reducing the costs of medical care(1-4).

  20. HIV in (and out of) the clinic: Biomedicine, traditional medicine and spiritual healing in Harare

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Contemporary lived experiences of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are shaped by clinical and cultural encounters with illness. In sub-Saharan countries such as Zimbabwe, HIV is treated in very different ways in various therapeutic contexts including by biomedical experts, traditional medicine and faith healers. The co-existence of such expertise raises important questions around the potencies and limits of medicalisation and alternative healing practices in promoting HIV recov...

  1. Implementing Genomic Clinical Decision Support for Drug‐Based Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, CM; Hoffman, JM; Matey, E; Peterson, JF; Boyce, RD

    2017-01-01

    The explosive growth of patient‐specific genomic information relevant to drug therapy will continue to be a defining characteristic of biomedical research. To implement drug‐based personalized medicine (PM) for patients, clinicians need actionable information incorporated into electronic health records (EHRs). New clinical decision support (CDS) methods and informatics infrastructure are required in order to comprehensively integrate, interpret, deliver, and apply the full range of genomic data for each patient.1 PMID:28109071

  2. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development.

  3. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex;

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine...... the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  4. Statistical issues and limitations in personalized medicine research with clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Daniel B; van der Laan, Mark J

    2012-07-20

    We discuss using clinical trial data to construct and evaluate rules that use baseline covariates to assign different treatments to different patients. Given such a candidate personalization rule, we first note that its performance can often be evaluated without actually applying the rule to subjects, and a class of estimators is characterized from a statistical efficiency standpoint. We also point out a recently noted reduction of the rule construction problem to a classification task and extend results in this direction. Together these facts suggest a natural form of cross-validation in which a personalized medicine rule can be constructed from clinical trial data using standard classification tools and then evaluated in a replicated trial. Because replication is often required by the FDA to provide evidence of safety and efficacy before pharmaceutical drugs can be marketed, there are abundant data with which to explore the potential benefits of more tailored therapy. We constructed and evaluated personalized medicine rules using simulations based on two active-controlled randomized clinical trials of antibacterial drugs for the treatment of skin and skin structure infections. Unfortunately we present negative results that did not suggest benefit from personalization. We discuss the implications of this finding and why statistical approaches to personalized medicine problems will often face difficult challenges.

  5. Regulatory requirements for clinical trial and marketing authorisation application for cell-based medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmikangas, P; Flory, E; Reinhardt, J; Hinz, T; Maciulaitis, R

    2010-01-01

    The new era of regenerative medicine has led to rapid development of new innovative therapies especially for diseases and tissue/organ defects for which traditional therapies and medicinal products have not provided satisfactory outcome. Although the clinical use and developments of cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs) could be witnessed already for a decade, robust scientific and regulatory provisions for these products have only recently been enacted. The new Regulation for Advanced Therapies (EC) 1394/2007 together with the revised Annex I, Part IV of Directive 2001/83/EC provides the new legal framework for CBMPs. The wide variety of cell-based products and the foreseen limitations (small sample sizes, short shelf life) vs. particular risks (microbiological purity, variability, immunogenicity, tumourigenicity) associated with CBMPs have called for a flexible, case-by-case regulatory approach for these products. Consequently, a risk-based approach has been developed to allow definition of the amount of scientific data needed for a Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) of each CBMP. The article provides further insight into the initial risk evaluation, as well as to the quality, non-clinical, and clinical requirements of CBMPs. Special somatic cell therapies designed for active immunotherapy are also addressed.

  6. History of foreign clinical forensic medicine%国外法医临床学发展史

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天潼; 姜竹青

    2016-01-01

    法医临床学是法医学的重要分支学科,正处于蓬勃发展阶段。研究法医临床学的发展史,对明确其定义和实践范畴,维护司法公正,具有重要意义。本文将从“简介、历史溯源、18世纪之后的法医临床学发展、现代法医临床学、世界法医临床学司法实践现状和结语”六个部分介绍法医临床学在国外,尤其是英国的发展历史,促进我国法医临床学的学科建设和发展。%Clinical forensic medicine is a branch of forensic medical practice. Clinical forensic medicine has evolved into a rapidly growing era. Launching a research on the history of clinical forensic medicine is signiifcant to define the discipline boundary of clinical forensic medicine. To demonstrate the historical development of the foreign clinical forensic medicine, this article mainly contains six parts, including“Introduction, Historical References, Clinical Forensic Medicine in Post-Eighteenth Century, Contemporary Clinical Forensic Medicine, Global Clinical Forensic Medicine, and Conclusion”. The history outlined in this article will assist the construction and development of clinical forensic medicine in China.

  7. Resident satisfaction with continuity clinic and career choice in general internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Tackett, Sean; Ward, Lawrence; Federman, Alex; Helenius, Ira; Christmas, Colleen; Thomas, David C

    2013-08-01

    The quality of the continuity clinic experience for internal medicine (IM) residents may influence their choice to enter general internal medicine (GIM), yet few data exist to support this hypothesis. To assess the relationship between IM residents' satisfaction with continuity clinic and interest in GIM careers. Cross-sectional survey assessing satisfaction with elements of continuity clinic and residents' likelihood of career choice in GIM. IM residents at three urban medical centers. Bivariate and multivariate associations between satisfaction with 32 elements of outpatient clinic in 6 domains (clinical preceptors, educational environment, ancillary staff, time management, administrative, personal experience) and likelihood of considering a GIM career. Of the 225 (90 %) residents who completed surveys, 48 % planned to enter GIM before beginning their continuity clinic, whereas only 38 % did as a result of continuity clinic. Comparing residents' likelihood to enter GIM as a result of clinic to likelihood to enter a career in GIM before clinic showed that 59 % of residents had no difference in likelihood, 28 % reported a lower likelihood as a result of clinic, and 11 % reported higher likelihood as a result of clinic. Most residents were very satisfied or satisfied with all clinic elements. Significantly more residents (p ≤ 0.002) were likely vs. unlikely to enter GIM if they were very satisfied with faculty mentorship (76 % vs. 53 %), time for appointments (28 % vs. 11 %), number of patients seen (33 % vs. 15 %), personal reward from work (51 % vs. 23 %), relationship with patients (64 % vs. 42 %), and continuity with patients (57 % vs. 33 %). In the multivariate analysis, being likely to enter GIM before clinic (OR 29.0, 95 % CI 24.0-34.8) and being very satisfied with the continuity of relationships with patients (OR 4.08, 95 % CI 2.50-6.64) were the strongest independent predictors of likelihood to enter GIM as a result of clinic. Resident satisfaction

  8. [Pharmaceutical analysis and clinical efficacy of Kampo medicine, maoto, extract suppository against pediatric febrile symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Nobuhiro; Doi, Norio; Uemura, Tomochika; Taketani, Takeshi; Hayashi, George; Kasai, Takeshi; Kanai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Iwamoto, Kikuo; Naora, Kohji

    2009-06-01

    A traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Kampo medicine, maoto, has been widely used in the treatment of febrile symptoms caused by viral infection. This herbal extract granule for oral use, however, is not well accepted by infants or young children due to its unpleasant taste and odor. Therefore, we prepared Kampo medicine, maoto, suppository and investigated the pharmaceutical and clinical efficacy of the suppository. Kampo medicine, maoto, granules were micro-pulverized and homogeneously dispersed into Hosco-H15 to prepare suppositories containing 0.25 to 1.0 g herbal extract by the conventional fusion method. Content of l-ephedrine, an index compound of Kampo medicine, maoto, in the extract granules and suppositories was determined by using a high performance liquid chromatographic method. Physicochemical experiments revealed that the suppository containing 0.5 g herbal extract had the most suitable melting point of 34 degrees C. Contents of l-ephedrine in the suppository were constant, 93-96% of those in the same amount of the extract granules in different three lots. Upper and lower portions of the suppository had the same content of l-ephedrine. The suppository maintained more than 95% of l-ephedrine content through 6 months at 4 degrees C, room temperature and 40 degrees C, although maldistribution of the extract constituent was observed after storage at 40 degrees C. The suppository was administered to 21 pediatric febrile patients at a dose of 1/3 to 2 full pieces depending on their body weight and physical status. Significant reduction (psuppository was found to satisfy the physicochemical quality and quantity standards as well as to be clinically applicable to neonates, infants and children with viral febrile symptoms without any adverse effects.

  9. Nuclear medicine in the acute clinical setting: indications, imaging findings, and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliel, Livnat; Mellnick, Vincent M; Menias, Christine O; Holz, Andrew L; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging provides valuable functional information that complements information obtained with anatomic imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with specific acute clinical manifestations. Nuclear medicine studies are most often used in conjunction with other imaging modalities and as a problem-solving tool. Under certain circumstances a nuclear medicine study may be indicated as the first-line imaging modality, as in the case of renal scintigraphy for transplant dysfunction in the early postoperative period. Nuclear imaging may be preferred when a conventional first-line study is contraindicated or when it is important to minimize radiation exposure. The portability of nuclear imaging offers particular advantages for the evaluation of critically ill patients whose clinical condition is unstable and who cannot be safely transported out of the intensive care unit. The ability to visualize physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over relatively long time periods without adding to the patient's radiation exposure contributes to the high diagnostic sensitivity of several types of nuclear medicine studies. Viewing the acquired images in the cine mode adds to the value of these studies for diagnosing and characterizing dynamic abnormalities such as intermittent internal bleeding and bile or urine leakage. In this pictorial review, the spectrum of nuclear medicine studies commonly performed in the acute care setting is reviewed according to body systems and organs, with detailed descriptions of the indications, technical considerations, findings, and potential pitfalls of each type of study. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125098/-/DC1.

  10. Emotional Intelligence in Internal Medicine Residents: Educational Implications for Clinical Performance and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Jason; Swenson, Sara; Rabow, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We measured emotional intelligence (EQ; the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions in the self and others) in a sample of 28 internal medicine residents at the beginning and end of an academic year. EQ scores increased significantly over the course of the year. Higher EQ scores at the end of the year were significantly related to higher ratings for overall clinical performance and medical interviewing. Higher EQ scores also correlated with lower levels of burnout. Results suggest that clinically significant changes in EQ can occur over the course of medical training. Further study should determine if and how educational interventions can affect EQ, EQ-related performance, and burnout.

  11. 老年患者医院获得性血流感染的临床回顾性研究%Hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in geriatric wards: a retrospective clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏淑禹; 张伟

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨老年病房医院感染血流感染病例的临床特点、病原学特征及其他相关因素,为临床诊疗提供科学依据.方法 对我院老年病房2010年6月至2015年10月医院获得性血流感染患者的相关因素及临床特征进行回顾性分析.结果 老年血流感染患者64例,基础疾病以恶性肿瘤(39.1%)及2型糖尿病(32.8%)为主;原发血流感染53例,占82.8%;继发性血流感染11例,占17.2%;原发感染病灶以呼吸道、泌尿道和肝胆系统为主.13例患者死亡,病死率高达20.3%.多因素条件Logistic逐步回归分析显示,中心静脉置管或输液港≥7 d(OR=49.51)、使用质子泵抑制剂药物≥3d(OR=13.63)是老年患者血流感染发生的独立危险因素;64例患者中,共检出66株病原菌.G+菌以凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌属最常见(18.2%);G-菌以埃希菌属(18.2%)和克雷伯菌属(15.2%)多见,二者产超广谱β-内酰胺酶株为54.5%.结论 血流感染严重影响老年患者的预后.减少侵袭性操作、积极防治肿瘤、改善内环境、保护重要脏器功能,是降低老年病房血流感染发生率的主要措施.%Objective To investigate the clinical and pathogenic features and other related factors of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections (HABSI) in geriatric wards,in order to provide the scientific basis for clinical diagnosis and therapy.Methods Clinical characteristics and other related factors of HABSI in patients admitted to the Department of Geriatrics of our hospital from June 2010 to October 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Of the 64 elderly patients with HABSI,malignant tumor (39.1%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (32.8%) were among the main disorders for their admission to the hospital.There were 53 cases of primary bloodstream infections and 11 cases of secondary bloodstream infections,accounting for 82.8% and 17.2%,respectively.Primary infections involved mostly the respiratory,urinary and

  12. Challenges in the clinical development requirements for the marketing authorization of new medicines in southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2009-03-01

    A rapid growth of investment into clinical research and new drug development has manifested itself by an exponential increase of new products coming onto the worldwide market. The emerging pharmaceutical and biotech markets in Southeast Asia are believed to be extremely promising from a commercial point of view in the next decade. The unique position of the Asian market and the diversity in clinical research initiatives are linked with diverse regulatory requirements for clinical development and registration of new medicines. Some of these differences have an impact on timelines for marketing authorizations in South Korea, China, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, and other countries. One of the approaches to streamlining regulatory strategy in different countries is the initiation of multicountry international clinical trials trying to address requirements and allowing registration in several regional countries simultaneously. Increasing cooperation between South Asian countries in relation to regulatory requirements and clinical development will facilitate the registration of innovative medicines in this rapidly developing region of the world and enable improved cohesiveness between countries in a drug safety framework.

  13. Emerging Utility of Virtual Reality as a Multidisciplinary Tool in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Davis, Steven; Lee, Danny; Barber, Scott; Sikka, Neal

    2017-07-31

    Among the more recent products borne of the evolution of digital technology, virtual reality (VR) is gaining a foothold in clinical medicine as an adjunct to traditional therapies. Early studies suggest a growing role for VR applications in pain management, clinical skills training, cognitive assessment and cognitive therapy, and physical rehabilitation. To complete a review of the literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE databases with the following search terms: "virtual reality," "procedural medicine," "oncology," "physical therapy," and "burn." We further limited our search to publications in the English language. Boolean operators were used to combine search terms. The included search terms yielded 97 potential articles, of which 45 were identified as meeting study criteria, and are included in this review. These articles provide data, which strongly support the hypothesis that VR simulations can enhance pain management (by reducing patient perception of pain and anxiety), can augment clinical training curricula and physical rehabilitation protocols (through immersive audiovisual environments), and can improve clinical assessment of cognitive function (through improved ecological validity). Through computer-generated, life-like digital landscapes, VR stands to change the current approach to pain management, medical training, neurocognitive diagnosis, and physical rehabilitation. Additional studies are needed to help define best practices in VR utilization, and to explore new therapeutic uses for VR in clinical practice.

  14. Teaching family medicine residents how to answer clinical questions using QUIPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Bishop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Questions in Practice” (QUIP rounds are used to encourage residents to quickly find, evaluate, and incorporate information into clinical practice. It is an opportunity for residents to identify a clinical question, research the answer, present the evidence, and discuss how to apply it to practice. The value of using this method to teach residents has not been evaluated. Methods: A sampling of all first and second-year family medicine residents enrolled in the Memorial University Family Medicine program were invited to participate in the survey. The survey gathered information about the residents’ current experiences with answering clinical questions, their experience during QUIP rounds, and the value of an interdisciplinary approach. Results: The response rate was 91% (42/46. Medical websites (45% and journal article indexes (34% were most often used. Through QUIPs, 50% of the students identified new methods to retrieve answers, 80% considered it a useful learning experience, 75% had improved confidence, and clinical knowledge improved in 97%. Conclusions: Residents are familiar with many general sources of medical information, and QUIPs helped improve confidence in their knowledge and ability to answer questions. QUIPs appear to be a useful tool for teaching information resources and how to interpret and apply evidence to clinical situations.

  15. The Importance of a Role-Specific, In-Hospital Ward Clerk Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Ward clerks are essential members of the healthcare team, providing administrative and organizational support to acute care units and clinics. This role influences such matters as nurses' direct patient-care time, timeliness of patient discharges, and patient safety. To support ward clerks in the varying responsibilities and complex scope of this role, a formal orientation and ongoing education program is imperative. Whereas corporate orientation informs new employees of overall organizational processes, a ward clerk-specific workplace education program prepares individuals for the demands of the position, ultimately supporting the healthcare team and patient safety.

  16. Developing knowledge resources to support precision medicine: principles from the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M; Dunnenberger, Henry M; Kevin Hicks, J; Caudle, Kelly E; Whirl Carrillo, Michelle; Freimuth, Robert R; Williams, Marc S; Klein, Teri E; Peterson, Josh F

    2016-07-01

    To move beyond a select few genes/drugs, the successful adoption of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical care requires a curated and machine-readable database of pharmacogenomic knowledge suitable for use in an electronic health record (EHR) with clinical decision support (CDS). Recognizing that EHR vendors do not yet provide a standard set of CDS functions for pharmacogenetics, the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Informatics Working Group is developing and systematically incorporating a set of EHR-agnostic implementation resources into all CPIC guidelines. These resources illustrate how to integrate pharmacogenomic test results in clinical information systems with CDS to facilitate the use of patient genomic data at the point of care. Based on our collective experience creating existing CPIC resources and implementing pharmacogenomics at our practice sites, we outline principles to define the key features of future knowledge bases and discuss the importance of these knowledge resources for pharmacogenomics and ultimately precision medicine.

  17. Clinical Distribution and Molecular Basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine ZHENG in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM clinical practice, ZHENG (also known as syndrome helps to guide design of individualized treatment strategies. In this study, we investigated the clinical use of ZHENG in TCM-treated cancer patients by systematically analyzing data from all relevant reports in the Chinese-language scientific literature. We aimed to determine the clinical ZHENG distributions in six common cancers (lung, liver, gastric, breast, colorectal, and pancreatic with the expectation of uncovering a theoretical basis for TCM ZHENG as a clinical cancer treatment. In addition, we also reviewed the molecular basis underlying Xue-Yu (blood stasis, Shi-Re (dampness-heat, Yin-Xu (Yin deficiency, and Pi-Xu (spleen deficiency ZHENG that are commonly found in cancer patients. The results from our summary study provide insights into the potential utility of TCM ZHENG and may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis of TCM ZHENG in cancer.

  18. A clinical study of integrating acupuncture and Western medicine in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pey; Chang, Ching-Mao; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Ta-Peng; Yang, Jen-Lin; Kung, Yen-Ying; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Complementary therapy with acupuncture for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied for quite a long time, but the effectiveness of the treatment still remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the integrated effects of acupuncture treatment in PD patients who received western medicine. In the short-term acupuncture treatment study, 20 patients received acupuncture therapy twice a week in acupoints DU 20, GB 20, LI 11, LI 10, LI 4, GB 31, ST 32, GB 34 and GB 38 along with western medicine for 18 weeks, and 20 controlled patients received western medicine only. In the long-term acupuncture treatment, 13 patients received acupuncture treatment twice a week for 36 weeks. The outcome parameters include Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory-Version 2 (BDI-II), and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL). In the short-term clinical trial, a higher percentage of patients in the acupuncture group had score improvement in UPDRS total scores (55% vs. 15%, p = 0.019), sub-score of mind, behavior and mood (85% vs. 25%, p acupuncture treatment, the mean UPDRS total scores and sub-score of mentation, behavior and mood, sub-score of complications of therapy and BDI-II score decreased significantly when compared to the pretreatment baseline. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment had integrated effects in reducing symptoms and signs of mind, behavior, mood, complications of therapy and depression in PD patients who received Western medicine.

  19. The Analysis of 139 Pieces of Medication Recommendation in Pediatric Nephropathy Ward Suggested by Clinical Pharmacy Specialist%139份儿童肾脏内科临床药师查房用药建议构成分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春; 张健

    2011-01-01

    目的:统计分析2010年3月至2010年12月本院临床药师参与儿童肾脏内科查房时提出的用药建议,探讨临床药师的专科工作内容及方法.方法:统计被医师接受的月度用药建议量,计算月度环比增长率;以不同系统药理作用分类,比较分析2010年3月至7月、2010年8月至12月两阶段的用药建议变化情况以及全阶段整体用药建议构成比.结果:随着临床药师查房时间的延长,被医师接受的月度建议量逐月递增,平均环比增长率为16.5%;抗胆碱受体、抗H1/H2受体类用药、凝血系统用药、糖皮质激素用药在第二阶段的数量及分布明显增加.儿童肾脏内科的用药建议主要包括抗感染药物(52%)、抗胆碱和抗H1/H2受体药物(11%)、凝血系统用药(9%)、糖皮质激素用药(6%).结论:临床药师用药建议内容广泛,并且随着查房的深入,逐渐体现出儿童肾脏内科专科用药建议特点.%Objective: To investigate the work methods and content of Clinical Pharmacy Specialist by analyzing the medication recommendation suggested by pharmacists when working in the pediatric nephropathy ward from March to December in 2010. Methods: Summarized the amounts of medication recommendation accepted by doctors of every month, analyzed the monthly loop arise ratio. All amounts of advices were classified according to the pharmacology, of which the diversification and component between two different periods were compared, which were respectively from March to July in 2010 and from August to December in 2010. Results; The medication recommendations accepted by doctors were rising monthly, the average loop rising ratio was 16.5% . The number of pieces of advice during the second stage was raised significantly mainly concentrating on cholinocepter blocking drugs, antihistamine receptor drugs, anticoagulants and glucocorticoids. The component ratio was anti-infectious drug (52%), antihistamine receptor and cholinocepter

  20. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with chronic diseases at outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Loon, William Cheah Wei

    2009-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with chronic diseases at outpatient clinics. Another aim was to identify demographic and socio-economic factors that are associated with CAM use. Face-to-face interviews of conveniently selected patients with chronic diseases were conducted in outpatient clinics of a general hospital. A validated data collection form was used to gather the information regarding pattern, perception, reasons, and perceived effect of CAM on the disease state. The other relevant information including demographics, diagnosis, indication, and treatment were collected from the patients' medical records. Out of 321 patients interviewed in this study, 205 patients were using some form of CAM, and thus the utilisation rate was 63.9%. A significant number of patients (35.5%) were using CAM for diabetes mellitus. Thirteen types of CAM were identified in the study with the most common being vitamins supplements (48.2%), herbal medicines (26.4%), ginseng (4.7%) and traditional Chinese medicine (4.0%). The patients with higher education level, higher income, and aged more than 50 years were independently associated with CAM use. Majority of the patients (77.6%) reported that their condition had improved by using CAM. The present study confirms the high frequency of CAM use among patients with chronic diseases in a Malaysian public hospital. The popularity of CAM indicated the patients' preference towards holistic approach to health care.

  1. Clinical Experiences of Korean Medicine Treatment against Urinary Bladder Cancer in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeyeol Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder cancer (UBC is one of the most common cancers, with 1 out of every 26 men and 1 out of every 80 women worldwide developing the disease during their lifetime. Moreover, it is a disease that predominantly affects the elderly and is becoming a major health problem as the elderly population continues to rapidly increase. In spite of the rapid development of medical science, the 5-year survival rate has remained around 75% since the 1990s, and the FDA has approved no new drugs for UBC over the last 10 years. In addition, most patients experience frequent recurrence and poor quality of life after diagnosis. Therefore, in order to solve unmet needs by alternative methods, we present our clinical cases of UBC where we observed outstanding results including regression and recurrence prevention exclusively through Traditional Korean Medicine such as (1 herbal therapy, (2 acupuncture, (3 pharmacopuncture and needle-embedding therapy, (4 moxibustion, and (5 cupping therapy. From our experience, it appears that multimodal strategies for synergistic efficiency are more effective than single Korean Medicine treatment. We hope this will encourage investigation of the efficacy of Korean Medicine treatment in clinical trials for UBC patients.

  2. Bryophyllum pinnatum and Related Species Used in Anthroposophic Medicine: Constituents, Pharmacological Activities, and Clinical Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürer, Karin; Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula; von Mandach, Ursula; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Bryophyllum pinnatum (syn. Kalanchoe pinnata) is a succulent perennial plant native to Madagascar that was introduced in anthroposophic medicine in the early 20th century. In recent years, we conducted a large collaborative project to provide reliable data on the chemical composition, pharmacological properties, and clinical efficacy of Bryophyllum. Here, we comprehensively review the phytochemistry, as well as the pharmacological and clinical data. As to the pharmacology, special emphasis is given to properties related to the use in anthroposophic medicine as a treatment for "hyperactivity diseases", such as preterm labor, restlessness, and sleep disorders. Studies suggesting that B. pinnatum may become a new treatment option for overactive bladder syndrome are also reviewed. Tolerability is addressed, and toxicological data are discussed in conjunction with the presence of potentially toxic bufadienolides in Bryophyllum species. The few data available on two related species with medicinal uses, Bryophyllum daigremontianum and Bryophyllum delagoense, have also been included. Taken together, current data support the use of B. pinnatum for the mentioned indications, but further studies are needed to fully understand the modes of action, and to identify the pharmacologically active constituents.

  3. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  4. [Acupuncture clinical studies and evidence-based medicine--an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Li-xing

    2008-02-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used in the West in recent years and demand has been growing for scientific evaluation of its clinical efficacy. The practice of evidence-based medicine has brought new challenges in the design of acupuncture research, and publication of randomized clinical trials on acupuncture has significantly increased. While systematic reviews of these trials have advanced our current knowledge, they have exposed deficiencies in research design and revealed that one design can not answer all research questions. Few clinical studies conducted in China have been published in the West, and most published in Chinese suffer from methodological design flaws that render the results unreliable and unconvincing. Such flaws include inadequate or no randomization, inadequate control, unsatisfactory outcome measurements, lack of proper concealment, insufficient follow-up, and improper statistical analysis. To foster high quality acupuncture clinical research in China, we must cultivate innovation and creativity in research design. It is unwise to simply follow or copy the research methodology of Western pharmaceutical studies. Acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) must be evaluated using rigorous scientific methods that preserve the essence of TCM concepts, so that acupuncture and TCM, these ancient healing arts, can continue to play an important role in the health care systems of modern societies.

  5. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  6. 50th anniversary of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine--a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Friedrich; Plebani, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Joachim Brugsch, one of the founders of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) (then Zeitschrift für Klinische Chemie), had the idea to found a journal in the upcoming field of clinical chemistry. He approached Ernst Schütte, who was associated with the De Gruyter publishing house through another journal, to participate, and Schütte thus became the second founder of this Journal. The aim was to create a vehicle allowing the experts to express their opinions and raise their voices more clearly than they could in a journal that publishes only original experimental papers, a laborious and difficult, but important endeavor, as the profession of clinical chemistry was still in the early stages of development at this time. The first issue of this Journal was published in early 1963, and today, we are proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of CCLM. This review describes the development of this Journal in light of the political situation of the time when it was founded, the situation of the publisher Walter De Gruyter after the erection of the Berlin Wall, and the development of clinical chemistry, and later on, laboratory medicine as a well-acknowledged discipline and profession.

  7. Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.

  8. Clinical complexity in medicine: A measurement model of task and patient complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R.; Weir, C.; Fiol, G. Del

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. Objective The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified to healthcare domain. Methods Three clinical Infectious Disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an Infectious Diseases expert, one Infectious Diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding process and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen’s kappa. Results The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. Conclusion The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare. PMID:26404626

  9. [Clinical trials and licensing of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cecilia Ferreira da; Silva, Miriam Ventura da; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the pathway of clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment involving Brazilian institutions from 2003 to 2012. Method This retrospective, descriptive study was based on review of two clinical trial registries, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Brazilian registry ReBEC. Phase II or III studies with participation from Brazilian institutions listed in at least one of the registries were included. Following selection of the trials, the pathway of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines was investigated from the research stage until licensing by the Brazilian Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (Anvisa), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Results Nine trials (eight phase III and one phase II) were selected. All had a randomized, controlled design. Two trials were double-blind and seven were open-label, and all recruited adults (≥ 18 years of age) of both sexes. The mean number of patients recruited per trial was 985.2. Seven trials had been completed and two had been terminated early. All trials were sponsored by non-Brazilian pharmaceutical companies and focused on renal, colorectal, gastric, and lung (non-small cell) cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and melanoma, and involved the use of cetuximab, figitumumab, ipilimumab, rituximab, bevacizumab and interferon alfa-2a. The FDA was the first agency to license the drugs, followed by EMA, except in the case of interferon alfa-2a, which was not approved by EMA. We were unable to determine the year of drug licensing by Anvisa in Brazil. Conclusions The participation of Brazil in clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medications for cancer treatment is insufficient. The quality of the available information on trials, history of licensing, and other relevant elements is a major weakness of the sources reviewed.

  10. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawati DK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services.Results: Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%, followed by transcription errors (15%, dispensing errors (14%, and prescribing errors (7%. Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant.Conclusion: Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors.Keywords: geriatric, medication errors, inpatients, medication delivery process

  11. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring......, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills...... and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations...

  12. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure-function relationships of cell-material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  13. Clinical Observation of Acupuncture plus Patent Chinese Medicine for Post-stroke Constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Xue-feng; Wu Ying; Zhang Zheng-xu; Zheng De-song

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture plus patent Chinese medicine in treating post-stroke constipation. Methods: Sixty eligible patients with post-stroke constipation were randomized into a treatment group and a control group, 30 in each group. The treatment group was intervened by acupuncture plusMa Zi Ren pill, while the control group was byMa Zi Ren pill alone. The symptoms of constipation were observed before and after intervention. Results: After 2-week treatment, the constipation condition was improved in both groups, and the improvement in the treatment group was statistically more significant than that in the control group (P Conclusion: Acupuncture at specific acupoints plus patent Chinese medicine can produce a content therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" was launched in Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    @@ On March 6th, the training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" (GPM ward) was launched in the conference hall of Westin Hotel, Wuhan.The conference was hosted by Clinics Medical Secretary, Ministry of Health, and undertaken by CSCO and Mundipharma (China) Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Three hundreds experts, doctors and nurses, from departments of oncology, pain, anesthesiology and pharmacy, in 6 provinces (including Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shanxi, Shanxi, Henan), attended the conference.

  15. [Histological view of ethics in medicine and handling of residual samples in clinical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-01

    One of the important ethical issues in clinical laboratory medicine is whether organs and/or specimens should belong to the examinees. Tracing back to ancient Greece, an episode of the death of Asklepios, killed by Zeus to revive the dead, and the great contribution of Hippocrates to medicine including the vow and ethics of medicine, have been described. In the relationship between doctors and patients, the former had been superior to the latter for more than 2400 years, however, the situation has been changing from that to the same position since 1960th, along with the development of bioethics from medical ethics. For the promotion of bioethics, world medical associations have contributed declarations and continuous discussion. The declarations are based on the avoidance of actions detrimental to the life, health, privacy or dignity of examinees. On the medical use of human organs and specimens in relation to human rights, the mind and the body, discussion has continued, however, a consensus on the details has not been reached. A view on the use of residual samples for methodological study, teaching and research in the clinical laboratory was proposed by the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine in 2002. Briefly, it included confidentiality of the laboratory staff, responsibility of the laboratory director, the absence of a necessity to obtain consent for the use of residual samples for methodological study when they are made anonymous or pooled, and the recommendation to obtain a judgement by an ethics committee for research use. The background and discussion for the proposal and the current situation on how to obtain consent from patients in Japan are mentioned.

  16. Prospective registration, bias risk and outcome-reporting bias in randomised clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Han, Mei; Li, Xin-Xue;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications.......Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications....

  17. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  18. MD-CTS: An integrated terminology reference of clinical and translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Will; Finamore, Joe; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Kadolph, Chris; Ye, Zhan; Bohne, Jacquie; Xu, Yin; Burish, Dan; Sondelski, Joshua; Easker, Melissa; Finnegan, Brian; Bartkowiak, Barbara; Smith, Catherine Arnott; Tachinardi, Umberto; Mendonca, Eneida A; Weichelt, Bryan; Lin, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    New vocabularies are rapidly evolving in the literature relative to the practice of clinical medicine and translational research. To provide integrated access to new terms, we developed a mobile and desktop online reference-Marshfield Dictionary of Clinical and Translational Science (MD-CTS). It is the first public resource that comprehensively integrates Wiktionary (word definition), BioPortal (ontology), Wiki (image reference), and Medline abstract (word usage) information. MD-CTS is accessible at http://spellchecker.mfldclin.edu/. The website provides a broadened capacity for the wider clinical and translational science community to keep pace with newly emerging scientific vocabulary. An initial evaluation using 63 randomly selected biomedical words suggests that online references generally provided better coverage (73%-95%) than paper-based dictionaries (57-71%).

  19. MD-CTS: An integrated terminology reference of clinical and translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New vocabularies are rapidly evolving in the literature relative to the practice of clinical medicine and translational research. To provide integrated access to new terms, we developed a mobile and desktop online reference—Marshfield Dictionary of Clinical and Translational Science (MD-CTS. It is the first public resource that comprehensively integrates Wiktionary (word definition, BioPortal (ontology, Wiki (image reference, and Medline abstract (word usage information. MD-CTS is accessible at http://spellchecker.mfldclin.edu/. The website provides a broadened capacity for the wider clinical and translational science community to keep pace with newly emerging scientific vocabulary. An initial evaluation using 63 randomly selected biomedical words suggests that online references generally provided better coverage (73%-95% than paper-based dictionaries (57–71%.

  20. On art and science: an epistemic framework for integrating social science and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jason Adam

    2014-06-01

    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate "social facts" in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking by which art and science proceed have not been addressed to this end. As such, the art of medical practice is conceptualized as an innate gift, and thus little is done to cultivate it. Yet doing so is more important than ever because uncertainty in diagnosing and treating chronic illnesses, the most significant contemporary mortality risks, suggests a re-expanding role for clinical judgment.

  1. Three point SUSY Ward identities without Ghosts

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M L

    2004-01-01

    We utilise a non-local gauge transform which renders the entire action of SUSY QED invariant and respects the SUSY algebra modulo the gauge-fixing condition, to derive two- and three-point ghost-free SUSY Ward identities in SUSY QED. We use the cluster decomposition principle to find the Green's function Ward identities and then takes linear combinations of the latter to derive identities for the proper functions.

  2. Can Emergency Medicine Residents Reliably Use the Internet to Answer Clinical Questions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Abbas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study objective was to determine the accuracy of answers to clinical questions by emergency medicine (EM residents conducting Internet searches by using Google. Emergency physicians commonly turn to outside resources to answer clinical questions that arise in the emergency department (ED. Internet access in the ED has supplanted textbooks for references because it is perceived as being more up to date. Although Google is the most widely used general Internet search engine, it is not medically oriented and merely provides links to other sources. Users must judge the reliability of the information obtained on the links. We frequently observed EM faculty and residents using Google rather than medicine-specific databases to seek answers to clinical questions. Methods: Two EM faculties developed a clinically oriented test for residents to take without the use of any outside aid. They were instructed to answer each question only if they were confident enough of their answer to implement it in a patient-care situation. Questions marked as unsure or answered incorrectly were used to construct a second test for each subject. On the second test, they were instructed to use Google as a resource to find links that contained answers. Results: Thirty-three residents participated. The means for the initial test were 32% correct, 28% incorrect, and 40% unsure. On the Google test, the mean for correct answers was 59%; 33% of answers were incorrect and 8% were unsure. Conclusion: EM residents’ ability to answer clinical questions correctly by using Web sites from Google searches was poor. More concerning was that unsure answers decreased, whereas incorrect answers increased. The Internet appears to have given the residents a false sense of security in their answers. Innovations, such as Internet access in the ED, should be studied carefully before being accepted as reliable tools for teaching clinical decision making. [West J Emerg Med. 2011

  3. Evaluation of pharmacy students’ clinical interventions on a general medicine practice experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones JD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As colleges of pharmacy prepare a new generation of practitioners, it is important that during practice experiences students learn the impact of clinical interventions. For over ten years, pharmacy students have been a vital part of the multidisciplinary team at the military treatment facility. The overall impact of the student interventions on patient care has not been evaluated. To evaluate the impact, the students began documenting their clinical interventions in Medkeeper RxInterventions™, an online database. The program is used to document faculty and fourth year pharmacy students’ pharmaceutical interventions.Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the interventions completed by fourth year pharmacy students during a general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at a military treatment facility.Methods: The students completing their general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at the military treatment facility are responsible for self reporting all interventions made during clinical rounds into the Medkeeper RxIntervention™ database. The researchers retrospectively collected and analyzed interventions made from June 2008 to June 2009.Results: The total number of interventions recorded by 8 fourth year pharmacy students was 114. Students averaged a number of 14.3 interventions during an eight week practice experience. Students spent an average of 5 minutes per intervention. Ninety- five percent of the interventions were accepted.Conclusion: Fourth year pharmacy students’ recommendations were accepted at a high rate by resident physicians. The high acceptance rate may have the ability to positively impact patient care.

  4. Assessing research impact in academic clinical medicine: a study using Research Excellence Framework pilot impact indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovseiko Pavel V

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Funders of medical research the world over are increasingly seeking, in research assessment, to complement traditional output measures of scientific publications with more outcome-based indicators of societal and economic impact. In the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE developed proposals for the Research Excellence Framework (REF to allocate public research funding to higher education institutions, inter alia, on the basis of the social and economic impact of their research. In 2010, it conducted a pilot exercise to test these proposals and refine impact indicators and criteria. Methods The impact indicators proposed in the 2010 REF impact pilot exercise are critically reviewed and appraised using insights from the relevant literature and empirical data collected for the University of Oxford’s REF pilot submission in clinical medicine. The empirical data were gathered from existing administrative sources and an online administrative survey carried out by the university’s Medical Sciences Division among 289 clinical medicine faculty members (48.1% response rate. Results The feasibility and scope of measuring research impact in clinical medicine in a given university are assessed. Twenty impact indicators from seven categories proposed by HEFCE are presented; their strengths and limitations are discussed using insights from the relevant biomedical and research policy literature. Conclusions While the 2010 pilot exercise has confirmed that the majority of the proposed indicators have some validity, there are significant challenges in operationalising and measuring these indicators reliably, as well as in comparing evidence of research impact across different cases in a standardised manner. It is suggested that the public funding agencies, medical research charities, universities, and the wider medical research community work together to develop more robust methodologies for capturing

  5. Clinical trials in nuclear medicine: Present and future; Les essais cliniques en medecine nucleaire: etat et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaumet-Riffaud, P. [Medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Kremlin-Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre, (France); Cachin, F. [EA 4231, medecine nucleaire, CRLCC Jean-Perrin, faculte de medecine, Clermont-Ferrand, (France); Couturier, O. [Inserm U646, departement de medecine nucleaire, CHU d Angers, Angers, (France); Desruet, M.D. [Pole d imagerie clinique de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, Paris, (France); Radiopharmacie, unite Inserm 877, hopital Michallon, CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Inserm UMR 601, CHU/CLCC Rene-Gauducheau, Nantes, (France); Talbot, J.N. [Medecine nucleaire, hopital Tenon, Paris, (France); Vuillez, J.P. [Radiopharmacie, unite Inserm 877, hopital Michallon, CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The particular status of radiopharmaceuticals, together with the positioning of nuclear medicine in multidisciplinary approach of oncology, lead to real difficulties for conception, validation and granting of clinical trials which are necessary for demonstrating clinical interest of new compounds, for diagnosis as well as for therapeutic use. This article is a presentation of some recent clinical trials conducted in nuclear medicine in France, showing its dynamism but also pointing out some encountered difficulties. These experiences could lead to reflexion in order to improve the clinical research performances, taking into account a scientific and regulatory context more and more constraining. (authors)

  6. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  7. Clinical research advances in traditional Chinese medicine in treatment of icteric hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Qiyu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of icteric hepatitis is that pathogenic dampness blocks the middle energizer or blood stasis blocks the bile duct, so that the bile is not excreted normally and moves to the skin surface, which makes the skin yellow. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has unique advantages in the prevention and treatment of icteric hepatitis. This article systematically introduces the etiology and pathogenesis of icteric hepatitis and the TCM syndrome differentiation therapy for icteric hepatitis, in order to provide a reference for the clinical treatment of icteric hepatitis and the improvement in its prognosis.

  8. [World level of competitiveness of national researches in the field of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubov, V I; Kuznetsov, S L; Kurakova, N G; Tsvetkova, L A; Aref'ev, P G

    2012-01-01

    There is proposed formalization of concepts ,world research levelb and "leading scientific technological directions" of global science used in program documents which define main trends of reformation of Russian science. Use of bibliographic index as an example of "normalized citation in related area" for analyzing various subject areas for Russian clinic medicine it was shown that there is a different correlation of some areas of some national subject areas to their world levels. It was noted that it's necessary to develop national methodology of Russian science audit considering its national aspect which is a real problem while application world-acclaimed methods.

  9. The Role of Clinical Records in Narrative Medicine: A Discourse of Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W; Choi, Jung Min; Cadeiras, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article is designed to unite theory and practice. The focus of attention is the impact of narrative medicine on clinical records. Specifically important is that records are created through dialogue, whereby patients are able to grow the record through their ability to offer critiques and alternative explanations. Merely allowing patients to peruse their records, through advances in technology, is not sufficient to facilitate this aim. Various theoretical and practical considerations are discussed that may facilitate patient involvement and the creation of more accurate and relevant patient records.

  10. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  11. The Practice of Korean Medicine: An Overview of Clinical Trials in Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Suk Kim

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture, one of the Oriental medical therapeutic techniques that can be traced back at least 2500 years, is growing in popularity all over the world. Korea has continued to develop its own unique tradition of medicine throughout its long history, and has formed different types of acupuncture methods. The purpose of this review is to summarize clinical case studies in acupuncture and related therapies, such as acupressure, electric acupuncture, auricular acupuncture and moxibustion in Korea. A survey of Korean journals revealed that a total of 124 studies were published from 1983 to 2001. Results obtained from the survey showed that most clinical studies using acupuncture, electric acupuncture, moxibustion and other traditional therapies could alleviate a relatively broad range of medical problems. However, it should be emphasized that almost all clinical case studies published in various local journals did not follow the ‘good clinical practice’ with respect to regulatory aspects. Since they were not conducted using the randomized double-blinded controls with a large sample size, all the results should be considered as therapeutic indications. This review is an attempt to show the scope of acupuncture in our country and the kind of diseases, after many years of clinical experience, that were deemed valid targets for clinical trials.

  12. [Study of clinical character and medicinal therapy of viral hepatitis in hospital based on real world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-ru; Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo-yue; Yi, Dan-hui; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Viral hepatitis was the most common infectious disease in china. But the diagnosis and treatment were varied because the viral hepatitis patients were hospitalized in different kinds of hospital such as infectious disease hospital, general hospital and Chinese medical hospital. It was necessary to know clinical characters and information of viral hepatitis patients in different hospitals. The general information, subtype distribution, prognosis, complication, medication and relations of onset with solar term from 41 180 viral hepatitis patients based on HIS data were analyzed. It was found that the age of patients between 18 to 59 years old was most; most patients were males. The national basic medical insurance was the most type of payment. The outcome of viral hepatitis in the youth and female were better than that in the old and male. Acute hepatitis was easer to restore than chronic hepatitis. Liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were the two most complications. The peak of onset was during summer solstice, slight heat and great heat. The most common Chinese medicine was Diammonium glycyrrhizinate and the most common western medicine was reduced glutathione. The combination of D. glycyrrhizinate with reduced glutathione, polyene phosphatidylcholine and thymosin was the main pattern. But It was not knew if the combination of western and Chinese medicine was the most effective therapy to protect liver function. It was necessary to take deeply research of the relationship between the combination therapy and their effectiveness.

  13. Saudi Internal Medicine Residents׳ Perceptions of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Alaidarous

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Commission for Health Specialties first implemented the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE as part of the final year Internal Medicine clerkship exam during the 2007–2008 academic year. This study evaluated Internal Medicine residents׳ overall perceptions of the OSCE as a formative assessment tool. It focused on residents׳ perceptions of the OSCE stations׳ attributes, determined the acceptability of the process, and provided feedback to enhance further development of the assessment tool. The main objective was to assess Internal Medicine resident test-takers׳ perceptions and acceptance of the OSCE, and to identify its strengths and weaknesses through their feedback. Sixty six residents were involved in the studied administered on November 8th 2012 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Overall, resident׳s evaluation of the OSCE was favorable and encouraging. To this end, we recommend that formative assessment opportunities using the OSCE for providing feedback to students should be included in the curriculum, and continuing refinement and localized adaptation of OSCEs in use should be pursued by course directors and assessment personnel.

  14. Clinical holistic medicine: classic art of healing or the therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2004-03-04

    Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT) is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  15. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Slomka, Thomas; Alawneh, Alia; Vedavalli, Abhishek; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-11-18

    Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. We developed the Guide-O-Game(c) in the format of a TV game show with questions based on recommendations of CPGs. The development of the Guide-O-Game(c) consisted of the creation of a multimedia interactive tool, the development of recommendation-based questions, and the definition of the game's rules. We evaluated its feasibility through pilot testing and its acceptability through a qualitative process. The multimedia interactive tool uses a Macromedia Flash web application and consists of a manager interface and a user interface. The user interface allows the choice of two game styles. We created so far 16 sets of questions relating to 9 CPGs. The pilot testing proved that the game was feasible. The qualitative evaluation showed that residents considered the game to be acceptable. We developed an educational game to teach CPGs to Internal Medicine residents that is both feasible and acceptable. Future work should evaluate its impact on educational outcomes.

  16. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Vivek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L. Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%, Escherichia coli (15.62%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%, Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%, Proteus mirabilis (3.6%, Proteus vulgaris (4.2% and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%, Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%. Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5% were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R

  17. Clinical preventive services in Guatemala: a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan E Corral

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guatemala is currently undergoing an epidemiologic transition. Preventive services are key to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, and smoking counseling and cessation are among the most cost-effective and wide-reaching strategies. Internal medicine physicians are fundamental to providing such services, and their knowledge is a cornerstone of non-communicable disease control. METHODS: A national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate knowledge of clinical preventive services for non-communicable diseases. Interns, residents, and attending physicians of the internal medicine departments of all teaching hospitals in Guatemala completed a self-administered questionnaire. Participants' responses were contrasted with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health (MoH prevention guidelines and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recommendations. Analysis compared knowledge of recommendations within and between hospitals. RESULTS: In response to simulated patient scenarios, all services were recommended by more than half of physicians regardless of MoH or USPSTF recommendations. Prioritization was adequate according to the MoH guidelines but not including other potentially effective services (e.g. colorectal cancer and lipid disorder screenings. With the exception of colorectal and prostate cancer screening, less frequently recommended by interns, there was no difference in recommendation rates by level. CONCLUSION: Guatemalan internal medicine physicians' knowledge on preventive services recommendations for non-communicable diseases is limited, and prioritization did not reflect cost-effectiveness. Based on these data we recommend that preventive medicine training be strengthened and development of evidence-based guidelines for low-middle income countries be a priority.

  18. Work Status and Development Strategy of Clinical Pharmaceutics of Chinese Medicine%中药临床药学工作开展现状与未来发展的策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅全喜

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the work status, existing problems and development strategy of clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine. Methods:The literatures on clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine in recent years were comprehensively analyzed to summarize the present situation, find out the existing problems and difficult points and put forward the development strategy. Results:At present, the main work performed in clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine was as follows:clinical pharmacist of Chinese med-icine made the rounds of the wards in clinics, wrote the medication records, studied the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medi-cine ( TCM) and monitored the therapeutic drugs, monitored and intervened the adverse reactions of TCM, carried out the prescription comment on TCM, studied the boiling, administration and processing methods of TCM, performed the clinical pharmaceutical service and pharmaceutical information service of TCM, and researched the pharmaceutical economics and evidence-based medicine of TCM. Conclusion:Significant achievement and development in clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine have been achieved. However, some problems and deficiency still exist, which should be improved and standardized. The paper puts forward some strategies and thoughts for the improvement of clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine for the purpose of providing reference for the comprehensive development of clinical pharmaceutics of Chinese medicine.%目的::探讨我国中药临床药学工作开展的现状、存在问题及发展策略。方法:对近年来发表的有关中药临床药学文章进行综合分析,总结现状,找出问题,提出发展策略。结果:目前中药临床药学开展的一些工作主要有:中药师深入临床查房、开展药历书写工作,中药药动学研究与中药的治疗药物监测,中药不良反应的监测与干预,开展中药处方点评工作,中药煎服方法与临方炮制

  19. Active learning on the ward: outcomes from a comparative trial with traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Prado, Hegla; Hannois Falbo, Gilliatt; Rodrigues Falbo, Ana; Natal Figueirôa, José

    2011-03-01

    Academic activity during internship is essentially practical and ward rounds are traditionally considered the cornerstone of clinical education. However, the efficacy and effectiveness of ward rounds for learning purposes have been under-investigated and it is necessary to assess alternative educational paradigms for this activity. This study aimed to compare the educational effectiveness of ward rounds conducted with two different learning methodologies. Student subjects were first tested on 30 true/false questions to assess their initial degree of knowledge on pneumonia and diarrhoea. Afterwards, they attended ward rounds conducted using an active and a traditional learning methodology. The participants were submitted to a second test 48hours later in order to assess knowledge acquisition and were asked to answer two questions about self-directed learning and their opinions on the two learning methodologies used. Seventy-two medical students taking part in a paediatric clinic rotation were enrolled. The active methodology proved to be more effective than the traditional methodology for the three outcomes considered: knowledge acquisition (33 students [45.8%] versus 21 students [29.2%]; p=0.03); self-directed learning (38 students [52.8%] versus 11 students [15.3%]; pactive methodology produced better results than the traditional methodology in a ward-based context. This study seems to be valuable in terms of the new evidence it demonstrates on learning methodologies in the context of the ward round. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music